National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for molecular dynamics md

  1. Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

    2006-11-01

    We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

  2. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of confined fluids...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) ... in a single simulation upon compression, whereas fluid molecules in the bulk ... for weak fluid -- wall interactions. ...

  3. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Methods

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Los Alamos Parallel Replica Dynamics Procedure Start clock and run thermostatted MD on ... Sum the trajectory times over all M processors. Advance simulation clock by this t sum Los ...

  4. A molecular dynamics investigation of the unusual concentration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    138, 228-234 (2011) DOI: 10.1016j.micromeso.2010.09.032 Full-size image (19 K) Abstract: Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to determine the self-diffusivitiy,...

  5. A molecular dynamics investigation of the diffusion characteristics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    137, 83-91 (2011) DOI: 10.1016j.micromeso.2010.08.026 Full-size image (36 K) Abstract: Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to investigate the diffusion characteristics...

  6. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Methods

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation on Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Methods was given at the DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials on May 18, 2006.

  7. Dynamics of a globular protein and its hydration water studied by neutron scattering and MD simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Sow-Hsin; Lagi, Marco; Chu, Xiang-qiang; Zhang, Yang; Kim, Chansoo; Faraone, Antonio; Fratini, Emiliano; Baglioni, Piero

    2010-01-01

    This review article describes our neutron scattering experiments made in the past four years for the understanding of the single-particle (hydrogen atom) dynamics of a protein and its hydration water and the strong coupling between them. We found that the key to this strong coupling is the existence of a fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover (FSC) phenomenon occurring at around T L = 225±5 K in the hydration water. On lowering of the temperature toward FSC, the structure of hydration water makes a transition from predominantly the high density form (HDL), a more fluid state, to predominantly the low density formmore » (LDL), a less fluid state, derived from the existence of a liquid–liquid critical point at an elevated pressure. We show experimentally that this sudden switch in the mobility of hydration water on Lysozyme, B-DNA and RNA triggers the dynamic transition, at a temperature T D = 220 K, for these biopolymers. In the glassy state, below T D , the biopolymers lose their vital conformational flexibility resulting in a substantial diminishing of their biological functions. We also performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on a realistic model of hydrated lysozyme powder, which confirms the existence of the FSC and the hydration level dependence of the FSC temperature. Furthermore, we show a striking feature in the short time relaxation ( β -relaxation) of protein dynamics, which is the logarithmic decay spanning 3 decades (from ps to ns). The long time α -relaxation shows instead a diffusive behavior, which supports the liquid-like motions of protein constituents. We then discuss our recent high-resolution X-ray inelastic scattering studies of globular proteins, Lysozyme and Bovine Serum Albumin. We were able to measure the dispersion relations of collective, intra-protein phonon-like excitations in these proteins for the first time. We found that the phonon energies show a marked softening and at the same time their population increases

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of microscale fluid transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, C.C.; Lopez, A.R.; Stevens, M.J.; Plimpton, S.J.

    1998-02-01

    Recent advances in micro-science and technology, like Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), have generated a group of unique liquid flow problems that involve characteristic length scales of a Micron. Also, in manufacturing processes such as coatings, current continuum models are unable to predict microscale physical phenomena that appear in these non-equilibrium systems. It is suspected that in these systems, molecular-level processes can control the interfacial energy and viscoelastic properties at the liquid/solid boundary. A massively parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code has been developed to better understand microscale transport mechanisms, fluid-structure interactions, and scale effects in micro-domains. Specifically, this MD code has been used to analyze liquid channel flow problems for a variety of channel widths, e.g. 0.005-0.05 microns. This report presents results from MD simulations of Poiseuille flow and Couette flow problems and addresses both scaling and modeling issues. For Poiseuille flow, the numerical predictions are compared with existing data to investigate the variation of the friction factor with channel width. For Couette flow, the numerical predictions are used to determine the degree of slip at the liquid/solid boundary. Finally, the results also indicate that shear direction with respect to the wall lattice orientation can be very important. Simulation results of microscale Couette flow and microscale Poiseuille flow for two different surface structures and two different shear directions will be presented.

  9. Comparison of binary collision approximation and molecular dynamics for displacement cascades in GaAs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foiles, Stephen Martin

    2011-10-01

    The predictions of binary collision approximation (BCA) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of displacement cascades in GaAs are compared. There are three issues addressed in this work. The first is the optimal choice of the effective displacement threshold to use in the BCA calculations to obtain the best agreement with MD results. Second, the spatial correlations of point defects are compared. This is related to the level of clustering that occurs for different types of radiation. Finally, the size and structure of amorphous zones seen in the MD simulations is summarized. BCA simulations are not able to predict the formation of amorphous material.

  10. A molecular dynamics study of polymer/graphene interfacial systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rissanou, Anastassia N.; Harmandaris, Vagelis

    2014-05-15

    Graphene based polymer nanocomposites are hybrid materials with a very broad range of technological applications. In this work, we study three hybrid polymer/graphene interfacial systems (polystyrene/graphene, poly(methyl methacrylate)/graphene and polyethylene/graphene) through detailed atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Density profiles, structural characteristics and mobility aspects are being examined at the molecular level for all model systems. In addition, we compare the properties of the hybrid systems to the properties of the corresponding bulk ones, as well as to theoretical predictions.

  11. Connecting the Molecular and the Continuum Scales

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    range of phenomena, from climate change to contaminant remediation. Accomplishments: Used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to determine molecular-scale diffusion coefficients of...

  12. Isomorphic phase transformation in shocked cerium using molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupont, Virginie; Germann, Timothy C; Chen, Shao - Ping

    2010-08-12

    Cerium (Ce) undergoes a significant ({approx}16%) volume collapse associated with an isomorphic fcc-fcc phase transformation when subject to compressive loading. We present here a new Embedded Atom Method (EAM) potential for Cerium that models two minima for the two fcc phases. We show results from its use in Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of Ce samples subjected to shocks with pressures ranging from 0.5 to 25 GPa. A split wave structure is observed, with an elastic precursor followed by a plastic wave. The plastic wave causes the expected fcc-fcc phase transformation. Comparisons to experiments and MD simulations on Cesium (Cs) indicate that three waves could be observed. The construction of the EAM potential may be the source of the difference.

  13. The Molecular Structure of a Phosphatidylserine Bilayer Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Jianjun [University of South Florida, Tampa (USF)] [University of South Florida, Tampa (USF); Cheng, Xiaolin [ORNL] [ORNL; Monticelli, Luca [Institut National de la Sant et de la Recherche Mdicale (INSERM) and INTS, France] [Institut National de la Sant et de la Recherche Mdicale (INSERM) and INTS, France; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kucerka, Norbert [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,; Tieleman, D. Peter [University of Calgary, ALberta, Canada] [University of Calgary, ALberta, Canada; Katsaras, John [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids play essential roles in biological processes, including enzyme activation and apoptosis. We report on the molecular structure and atomic scale interactions of a fluid bilayer composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS). A scattering density profile model, aided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was developed to jointly refine different contrast small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data, which yielded a lipid area of 62.7 A2 at 25 C. MD simulations with POPS lipid area constrained at different values were also performed using all-atom and aliphatic united-atom models. The optimal simulated bilayer was obtained using a model-free comparison approach. Examination of the simulated bilayer, which agrees best with the experimental scattering data, reveals a preferential interaction between Na+ ions and the terminal serine and phosphate moieties. Long-range inter-lipid interactions were identified, primarily between the positively charged ammonium, and the negatively charged carboxylic and phosphate oxygens. The area compressibility modulus KA of the POPS bilayer was derived by quantifying lipid area as a function of surface tension from area-constrained MD simulations. It was found that POPS bilayers possess a much larger KA than that of neutral phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. We propose that the unique molecular features of POPS bilayers may play an important role in certain physiological functions.

  14. Modeling ramp compression experiments using large-scale molecular dynamics simulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Grest, Gary Stephen; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Baskes, Michael I.; Winey, J. Michael; Gupta, Yogendra Mohan; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Ditmire, Todd; Quevedo, Hernan J.

    2011-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is an invaluable tool for studying problems sensitive to atomscale physics such as structural transitions, discontinuous interfaces, non-equilibrium dynamics, and elastic-plastic deformation. In order to apply this method to modeling of ramp-compression experiments, several challenges must be overcome: accuracy of interatomic potentials, length- and time-scales, and extraction of continuum quantities. We have completed a 3 year LDRD project with the goal of developing molecular dynamics simulation capabilities for modeling the response of materials to ramp compression. The techniques we have developed fall in to three categories (i) molecular dynamics methods (ii) interatomic potentials (iii) calculation of continuum variables. Highlights include the development of an accurate interatomic potential describing shock-melting of Beryllium, a scaling technique for modeling slow ramp compression experiments using fast ramp MD simulations, and a technique for extracting plastic strain from MD simulations. All of these methods have been implemented in Sandia's LAMMPS MD code, ensuring their widespread availability to dynamic materials research at Sandia and elsewhere.

  15. Two worlds collide: Image analysis methods for quantifying structural variation in cluster molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steenbergen, K. G.; Gaston, N.

    2014-02-14

    Inspired by methods of remote sensing image analysis, we analyze structural variation in cluster molecular dynamics (MD) simulations through a unique application of the principal component analysis (PCA) and Pearson Correlation Coefficient (PCC). The PCA analysis characterizes the geometric shape of the cluster structure at each time step, yielding a detailed and quantitative measure of structural stability and variation at finite temperature. Our PCC analysis captures bond structure variation in MD, which can be used to both supplement the PCA analysis as well as compare bond patterns between different cluster sizes. Relying only on atomic position data, without requirement for a priori structural input, PCA and PCC can be used to analyze both classical and ab initio MD simulations for any cluster composition or electronic configuration. Taken together, these statistical tools represent powerful new techniques for quantitative structural characterization and isomer identification in cluster MD.

  16. Nucleation Rate Analysis of Methane Hydrate from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yuhara, Daisuke; Barnes, Brian C.; Suh, Donguk; Knott, Brandon C.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Yasuoka, Kenji; Wu, David T.; Amadeu K. Sum

    2015-01-06

    Clathrate hydrates are solid crystalline structures most commonly formed from solutions that have nucleated to form a mixed solid composed of water and gas. Understanding the mechanism of clathrate hydrate nucleation is essential to grasp the fundamental chemistry of these complex structures and their applications. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is an ideal method to study nucleation at the molecular level because the size of the critical nucleus and formation rate occur on the nano scale. Moreover, various analysis methods for nucleation have been developed through MD to analyze nucleation. In particular, the mean first-passage time (MFPT) and survival probability (SP)more » methods have proven to be effective in procuring the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size for monatomic systems. This study assesses the MFPT and SP methods, previously used for monatomic systems, when applied to analyzing clathrate hydrate nucleation. Because clathrate hydrate nucleation is relatively difficult to observe in MD simulations (due to its high free energy barrier), these methods have yet to be applied to clathrate hydrate systems. In this study, we have analyzed the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size of methane hydrate using MFPT and SP methods from data generated by MD simulations at 255 K and 50 MPa. MFPT was modified for clathrate hydrate from the original version by adding the maximum likelihood estimate and growth effect term. The nucleation rates were calculated by MFPT and SP methods and are within 5%; the critical nucleus size estimated by the MFPT method was 50% higher, than values obtained through other more rigorous but computationally expensive estimates. These methods can also be extended to the analysis of other clathrate hydrates.« less

  17. Conformational dynamics of a crystalline protein from microsecond-scale molecular dynamics simulations and diffuse X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, Michael E.; Van Benschoten, Andrew H.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Adams, Paul D.; Fraser, James S.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2014-12-01

    X-ray diffraction from protein crystals includes both sharply peaked Bragg reflections and diffuse intensity between the peaks. The information in Bragg scattering is limited to what is available in the mean electron density. The diffuse scattering arises from correlations in the electron density variations and therefore contains information about collective motions in proteins. Previous studies using molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations to model diffuse scattering have been hindered by insufficient sampling of the conformational ensemble. To overcome this issue, we have performed a 1.1-?s MD simulation of crystalline staphylococcal nuclease, providing 100-fold more sampling than previous studies. This simulation enables reproducible calculations of the diffuse intensity and predicts functionally important motions, including transitions among at least eight metastable states with different active-site geometries. The total diffuse intensity calculated using the MD model is highly correlated with the experimental data. In particular, there is excellent agreement for the isotropic component of the diffuse intensity, and substantial but weaker agreement for the anisotropic component. The decomposition of the MD model into protein and solvent components indicates that proteinsolvent interactions contribute substantially to the overall diffuse intensity. In conclusion, diffuse scattering can be used to validate predictions from MD simulations and can provide information to improve MD models of protein motions.

  18. Conformational dynamics of a crystalline protein from microsecond-scale molecular dynamics simulations and diffuse X-ray scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wall, Michael E.; Van Benschoten, Andrew H.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Adams, Paul D.; Fraser, James S.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2014-12-01

    X-ray diffraction from protein crystals includes both sharply peaked Bragg reflections and diffuse intensity between the peaks. The information in Bragg scattering is limited to what is available in the mean electron density. The diffuse scattering arises from correlations in the electron density variations and therefore contains information about collective motions in proteins. Previous studies using molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations to model diffuse scattering have been hindered by insufficient sampling of the conformational ensemble. To overcome this issue, we have performed a 1.1-μs MD simulation of crystalline staphylococcal nuclease, providing 100-fold more sampling than previous studies. This simulation enables reproducible calculationsmore » of the diffuse intensity and predicts functionally important motions, including transitions among at least eight metastable states with different active-site geometries. The total diffuse intensity calculated using the MD model is highly correlated with the experimental data. In particular, there is excellent agreement for the isotropic component of the diffuse intensity, and substantial but weaker agreement for the anisotropic component. The decomposition of the MD model into protein and solvent components indicates that protein–solvent interactions contribute substantially to the overall diffuse intensity. In conclusion, diffuse scattering can be used to validate predictions from MD simulations and can provide information to improve MD models of protein motions.« less

  19. Modeling the Molecular Basis of Parkinson's Disease | Argonne Leadership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing Facility Alpha-synuclein pentamer constructed with 4ns molecular dynamics (MD) conformers after equilibration on the membrane with MD. Alpha-synuclein pentamer constructed with 4ns molecular dynamics (MD) conformers after equilibration on the membrane with MD. Modeling the Molecular Basis of Parkinson's Disease PI Name: Igor Tsigelny PI Email: itsigeln@ucsd.edu Institution: University of California-San Diego/SDSC Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 1.2 Million

  20. Combining molecular dynamics with mesoscopic Green’s function reaction dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vijaykumar, Adithya; Bolhuis, Peter G.; Rein ten Wolde, Pieter

    2015-12-07

    In many reaction-diffusion processes, ranging from biochemical networks, catalysis, to complex self-assembly, the spatial distribution of the reactants and the stochastic character of their interactions are crucial for the macroscopic behavior. The recently developed mesoscopic Green’s Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method enables efficient simulation at the particle level provided the microscopic dynamics can be integrated out. Yet, many processes exhibit non-trivial microscopic dynamics that can qualitatively change the macroscopic behavior, calling for an atomistic, microscopic description. We propose a novel approach that combines GFRD for simulating the system at the mesoscopic scale where particles are far apart, with a microscopic technique such as Langevin dynamics or Molecular Dynamics (MD), for simulating the system at the microscopic scale where reactants are in close proximity. This scheme defines the regions where the particles are close together and simulated with high microscopic resolution and those where they are far apart and simulated with lower mesoscopic resolution, adaptively on the fly. The new multi-scale scheme, called MD-GFRD, is generic and can be used to efficiently simulate reaction-diffusion systems at the particle level.

  1. Enhanced molecular dynamics for simulating porous interphase layers in batteries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Wong, Bryan Matthew; Jones, Reese E.; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Lee, Jonathan

    2009-10-01

    Understanding charge transport processes at a molecular level using computational techniques is currently hindered by a lack of appropriate models for incorporating anistropic electric fields in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. An important technological example is ion transport through solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layers that form in many common types of batteries. These layers regulate the rate at which electro-chemical reactions occur, affecting power, safety, and reliability. In this work, we develop a model for incorporating electric fields in MD using an atomistic-to-continuum framework. This framework provides the mathematical and algorithmic infrastructure to couple finite element (FE) representations of continuous data with atomic data. In this application, the electric potential is represented on a FE mesh and is calculated from a Poisson equation with source terms determined by the distribution of the atomic charges. Boundary conditions can be imposed naturally using the FE description of the potential, which then propagates to each atom through modified forces. The method is verified using simulations where analytical or theoretical solutions are known. Calculations of salt water solutions in complex domains are performed to understand how ions are attracted to charged surfaces in the presence of electric fields and interfering media.

  2. Communication: Quantum molecular dynamics simulation of liquid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Communication: Quantum molecular dynamics simulation of liquid para-hydrogen by nuclear and electron wave packet approach Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Communication:...

  3. Dynamics of Molecular Clouds: Observations, Simulations, and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Simulations, and NIF Experiments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dynamics of Molecular Clouds: Observations, Simulations, and NIF Experiments You are ...

  4. Molecular dynamics of membrane proteins.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woolf, Thomas B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Stevens, Mark Jackson

    2004-10-01

    Understanding the dynamics of the membrane protein rhodopsin will have broad implications for other membrane proteins and cellular signaling processes. Rhodopsin (Rho) is a light activated G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). When activated by ligands, GPCRs bind and activate G-proteins residing within the cell and begin a signaling cascade that results in the cell's response to external stimuli. More than 50% of all current drugs are targeted toward G-proteins. Rho is the prototypical member of the class A GPCR superfamily. Understanding the activation of Rho and its interaction with its Gprotein can therefore lead to a wider understanding of the mechanisms of GPCR activation and G-protein activation. Understanding the dark to light transition of Rho is fully analogous to the general ligand binding and activation problem for GPCRs. This transition is dependent on the lipid environment. The effect of lipids on membrane protein activity in general has had little attention, but evidence is beginning to show a significant role for lipids in membrane protein activity. Using the LAMMPS program and simulation methods benchmarked under the IBIG program, we perform a variety of allatom molecular dynamics simulations of membrane proteins.

  5. Accelerated molecular dynamics methods: introduction and recent developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Voter, Arthur F; Perez, Danny; Shim, Y; Amar, J G

    2009-01-01

    A long-standing limitation in the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is that it can only be applied directly to processes that take place on very short timescales: nanoseconds if empirical potentials are employed, or picoseconds if we rely on electronic structure methods. Many processes of interest in chemistry, biochemistry, and materials science require study over microseconds and beyond, due either to the natural timescale for the evolution or to the duration of the experiment of interest. Ignoring the case of liquids xxx, the dynamics on these time scales is typically characterized by infrequent-event transitions, from state to state, usually involving an energy barrier. There is a long and venerable tradition in chemistry of using transition state theory (TST) [10, 19, 23] to directly compute rate constants for these kinds of activated processes. If needed dynamical corrections to the TST rate, and even quantum corrections, can be computed to achieve an accuracy suitable for the problem at hand. These rate constants then allow them to understand the system behavior on longer time scales than we can directly reach with MD. For complex systems with many reaction paths, the TST rates can be fed into a stochastic simulation procedure such as kinetic Monte Carlo xxx, and a direct simulation of the advance of the system through its possible states can be obtained in a probabilistically exact way. A problem that has become more evident in recent years, however, is that for many systems of interest there is a complexity that makes it difficult, if not impossible, to determine all the relevant reaction paths to which TST should be applied. This is a serious issue, as omitted transition pathways can have uncontrollable consequences on the simulated long-time kinetics. Over the last decade or so, we have been developing a new class of methods for treating the long-time dynamics in these complex, infrequent-event systems. Rather than trying to guess in advance what

  6. Efficient preconditioning of the electronic structure problem in large scale ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiffmann, Florian; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-06-28

    We present an improved preconditioning scheme for electronic structure calculations based on the orbital transformation method. First, a preconditioner is developed which includes information from the full Kohn-Sham matrix but avoids computationally demanding diagonalisation steps in its construction. This reduces the computational cost of its construction, eliminating a bottleneck in large scale simulations, while maintaining rapid convergence. In addition, a modified form of Hotelling’s iterative inversion is introduced to replace the exact inversion of the preconditioner matrix. This method is highly effective during molecular dynamics (MD), as the solution obtained in earlier MD steps is a suitable initial guess. Filtering small elements during sparse matrix multiplication leads to linear scaling inversion, while retaining robustness, already for relatively small systems. For system sizes ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand atoms, which are typical for many practical applications, the improvements to the algorithm lead to a 2-5 fold speedup per MD step.

  7. Growth of bi- and tri-layered graphene on silicon carbide substrate via molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Min, Tjun Kit; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with simulated annealing method is used to study the growth process of bi- and tri-layered graphene on a 6H-SiC (0001) substrate via molecular dynamics simulation. Tersoff-Albe-Erhart (TEA) potential is used to describe the inter-atomic interactions among the atoms in the system. The formation temperature, averaged carbon-carbon bond length, pair correlation function, binding energy and the distance between the graphene formed and the SiC substrate are quantified. The growth mechanism, graphitization of graphene on the SiC substrate and characteristics of the surface morphology of the graphene sheet obtained in our MD simulation compare well to that observed in epitaxially grown graphene experiments and other simulation works.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Thermodynamic Properties in Uranium Dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xiangyu; Wu, Bin; Gao, Fei; Li, Xin; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Akinlalu, Ademola V.; Liu, L.

    2014-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated the thermodynamic properties of uranium dioxide (UO2) by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. As for solid UO2, the lattice parameter, density, and enthalpy obtained by MD simulations were in good agreement with existing experimental data and previous theoretical predictions. The calculated thermal conductivities matched the experiment results at the midtemperature range but were underestimated at very low and very high temperatures. The calculation results of mean square displacement represented the stability of uranium at all temperatures and the high mobility of oxygen toward 3000 K. By fitting the diffusivity constant of oxygen with the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman law, we noticed a secondary phase transition near 2006.4 K, which can be identified as a strong to fragile supercooled liquid or glass phase transition in UO2. By fitting the oxygen diffusion constant with the Arrhenius equation, activation energies of 2.0 and 2.7 eV that we obtained were fairly close to the recommended values of 2.3 to 2.6 eV. Xiangyu Wang, Bin Wu, Fei Gao, Xin Li, Xin Sun, Mohammed A. Khaleel, Ademola V. Akinlalu and Li Liu

  9. Predicting solute partitioning in lipid bilayers: Free energies and partition coefficients from molecular dynamics simulations and COSMOmic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakobtorweihen, S. Ingram, T.; Gerlach, T.; Smirnova, I.; Zuniga, A. Chaides; Keil, F. J.

    2014-07-28

    Quantitative predictions of biomembrane/water partition coefficients are important, as they are a key property in pharmaceutical applications and toxicological studies. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to calculate free energy profiles for different solutes in lipid bilayers. How to calculate partition coefficients from these profiles is discussed in detail and different definitions of partition coefficients are compared. Importantly, it is shown that the calculated coefficients are in quantitative agreement with experimental results. Furthermore, we compare free energy profiles from MD simulations to profiles obtained by the recent method COSMOmic, which is an extension of the conductor-like screening model for realistic solvation to micelles and biomembranes. The free energy profiles from these molecular methods are in good agreement. Additionally, solute orientations calculated with MD and COSMOmic are compared and again a good agreement is found. Four different solutes are investigated in detail: 4-ethylphenol, propanol, 5-phenylvaleric acid, and dibenz[a,h]anthracene, whereby the latter belongs to the class of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The convergence of the free energy profiles from biased MD simulations is discussed and the results are shown to be comparable to equilibrium MD simulations. For 5-phenylvaleric acid the influence of the carboxyl group dihedral angle on free energy profiles is analyzed with MD simulations.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of electrolytes andelectrolyte...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. es40smith.pdf (4 MB) More Documents & Publications Molecular Dynamics Simulation Studies of ...

  11. Reliable Viscosity Calculation from Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulations: A Time Decomposition Method - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research July 7, 2015, Research Highlights Reliable Viscosity Calculation from Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics Simulations: A Time Decomposition Method Schematic demonstration of the time decomposition method Scientific Achievement An equilibrium molecular dynamics-based computational method is developed and tested for the reliable calculation of viscosity. Significance and Impact Viscosity is one of the key properties

  12. Sandia Energy - Molecular Dynamics Simulations Predict Fate of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Dynamics Simulations Predict Fate of Uranium in Sediments Home Highlights - Energy Research Molecular Dynamics Simulations Predict Fate of Uranium in Sediments Previous...

  13. Parallel Molecular Dynamics Program for Molecules

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-03-07

    ParBond is a parallel classical molecular dynamics code that models bonded molecular systems, typically of an organic nature. It uses classical force fields for both non-bonded Coulombic and Van der Waals interactions and for 2-, 3-, and 4-body bonded (bond, angle, dihedral, and improper) interactions. It integrates Newton''s equation of motion for the molecular system and evaluates various thermodynamical properties of the system as it progresses.

  14. Molecular dynamics for 400 million particles with short-range interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Y.; McCoy, R.A.; Marr, R.B.

    1995-07-01

    We report the design and performance of a computational molecular dynamics (MD) code for 400 million particles interacting through the standard pairwise 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential on a 1024-node Intel Paragon, a distributed-memory MIMD parallel computer. The initially recorded {open_quotes}particle-step time{close_quotes} was .4 microseconds. A new inter-node communication strategy ensures high parallel efficiency for a large number of nodes. Besides the ability to tackle large problems, our implementation incorporates a novel method for dynamic load balancing. Our communication and load balancing enhancements provide increased efficiency and flexibility for our MD code. vet are general enough for use in other parallel algorithms.

  15. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics | Argonne Leadership Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility reactive molecular dynamics Authors: Chris KnighT, Gerrick E. Lindberg, Gregory A. Voth Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data

  16. Molecular dynamics study of two-dimensional sum frequency generation spectra at vapor/water interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Morita, Akihiro; Tahara, Tahei

    2015-06-07

    Two-dimensional heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation (2D HD-VSFG) spectra at vapor/water interface were studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with a classical flexible and nonpolarizable model. The present model well describes the spectral diffusion of 2D infrared spectrum of bulk water as well as 2D HD-VSFG at the interface. The effect of isotopic dilution on the 2D HD-VSFG was elucidated by comparing the normal (H{sub 2}O) water and HOD water. We further performed decomposition analysis of 2D HD-VSFG into the hydrogen-bonding and the dangling (or free) OH vibrations, and thereby disentangled the different spectral responses and spectral diffusion in the 2D HD-VSFG. The present MD simulation demonstrated the role of anharmonic coupling between these modes on the cross peak in the 2D HD-VSFG spectrum.

  17. Fast plane wave density functional theory molecular dynamics calculations on multi-GPU machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Weile; Fu, Jiyun; Cao, Zongyan; Wang, Long; Chi, Xuebin; Gao, Weiguo; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2013-10-15

    Plane wave pseudopotential (PWP) density functional theory (DFT) calculation is the most widely used method for material simulations, but its absolute speed stagnated due to the inability to use large scale CPU based computers. By a drastic redesign of the algorithm, and moving all the major computation parts into GPU, we have reached a speed of 12 s per molecular dynamics (MD) step for a 512 atom system using 256 GPU cards. This is about 20 times faster than the CPU version of the code regardless of the number of CPU cores used. Our tests and analysis on different GPU platforms and configurations shed lights on the optimal GPU deployments for PWP-DFT calculations. An 1800 step MD simulation is used to study the liquid phase properties of GaInP.

  18. Reaction dynamics in polyatomic molecular systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, W.H.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is the development of theoretical methods and models for describing the dynamics of chemical reactions, with specific interest for application to polyatomic molecular systems of special interest and relevance. There is interest in developing the most rigorous possible theoretical approaches and also in more approximate treatments that are more readily applicable to complex systems.

  19. Communication: Quantum molecular dynamics simulation of liquid para-hydrogen by nuclear and electron wave packet approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyeon-Deuk, Kim; Ando, Koji

    2014-05-07

    Liquid para-hydrogen (p-H{sub 2}) is a typical quantum liquid which exhibits strong nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) and thus anomalous static and dynamic properties. We propose a real-time simulation method of wave packet (WP) molecular dynamics (MD) based on non-empirical intra- and inter-molecular interactions of non-spherical hydrogen molecules, and apply it to condensed-phase p-H{sub 2}. The NQEs, such as WP delocalization and zero-point energy, are taken into account without perturbative expansion of prepared model potential functions but with explicit interactions between nuclear and electron WPs. The developed MD simulation for 100 ps with 1200 hydrogen molecules is realized at feasible computational cost, by which basic experimental properties of p-H{sub 2} liquid such as radial distribution functions, self-diffusion coefficients, and shear viscosities are all well reproduced.

  20. Molecular dynamics force-field refinement against quasi-elastic neutron scattering data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Borreguero Calvo, Jose M.; Lynch, Vickie E.

    2015-11-23

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) is one of the experimental techniques of choice for probing the dynamics at length and time scales that are also in the realm of full-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. This overlap enables extension of current fitting methods that use time-independent equilibrium measurements to new methods fitting against dynamics data. We present an algorithm that fits simulation-derived incoherent dynamical structure factors against QENS data probing the diffusive dynamics of the system. We showcase the difficulties inherent to this type of fitting problem, namely, the disparity between simulation and experiment environment, as well as limitations in the simulationmore » due to incomplete sampling of phase space. We discuss a methodology to overcome these difficulties and apply it to a set of full-atom MD simulations for the purpose of refining the force-field parameter governing the activation energy of methyl rotation in the octa-methyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane molecule. Our optimal simulated activation energy agrees with the experimentally derived value up to a 5% difference, well within experimental error. We believe the method will find applicability to other types of diffusive motions and other representation of the systems such as coarse-grain models where empirical fitting is essential. In addition, the refinement method can be extended to the coherent dynamic structure factor with no additional effort.« less

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of soliton-like structures in a dusty plasma medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiwari, Sanat Kumar Das, Amita; Sen, Abhijit; Kaw, Predhiman

    2015-03-15

    The existence and evolution of soliton-like structures in a dusty plasma medium are investigated in a first principles approach using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of particles interacting via a Yukawa potential. These localized structures are found to exist in both weakly and strongly coupled regimes with their structures becoming sharper as the correlation effects between the dust particles get stronger. A surprising result, compared to fluid simulations, is the existence of rarefactive soliton-like structures in our non-dissipative system, a feature that arises from the charge conjugation symmetry property of the Yukawa fluid. Our simulation findings closely resemble many diverse experimental results reported in the past.

  2. Computationally Efficient Multiconfigurational Reactive Molecular Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Computationally Efficient Multiconfigurational Reactive Molecular Dynamics Authors: Takefumi Yamashita, Yuxing Peng, Chris Knight, Gregory A. Voth It is a computationally demanding task to explicitly simulate the electronic degrees of freedom in a system to observe the chemical transformations of interest, while at the same time sampling the time and length scales required to converge statistical properties and thus reduce artifacts due to initial

  3. The 2011 Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nesbitt, David J.

    2011-07-11

    The Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference focuses on all aspects of molecular collisions--experimental & theoretical studies of elastic, inelastic, & reactive encounters involving atoms, molecules, ions, clusters, & surfaces--as well as half collisions--photodissociation, photo-induced reaction, & photodesorption. The scientific program for the meeting in 2011 included exciting advances in both the core & multidisciplinary forefronts of the study of molecular collision processes. Following the format of the 2009 meeting, we also invited sessions in special topics that involve interfacial dynamics, novel emerging spectroscopies, chemical dynamics in atmospheric, combustion & interstellar environments, as well as a session devoted to theoretical & experimental advances in ultracold molecular samples. Researchers working inside & outside the traditional core topics of the meeting are encouraged to join the conference. We invite contributions of work that seeks understanding of how inter & intra-molecular forces determine the dynamics of the phenomena under study. In addition to invited oral sessions & contributed poster sessions, the scientific program included a formal session consisting of five contributed talks selected from the submitted poster abstracts. The DMC has distinguished itself by having the Herschbach Medal Symposium as part of the meeting format. This tradition of the Herschbach Medal was first started in the 2007 meeting chaired by David Chandler, based on a generous donation of funds & artwork design by Professor Dudley Herschbach himself. There are two such awards made, one for experimental & one for theoretical contributions to the field of Molecular Collision Dynamics, broadly defined. The symposium is always held on the last night of the meeting & has the awardees are asked to deliver an invited lecture on their work. The 2011 Herschbach Medal was dedicated to the contributions of two long standing leaders in Chemical Physics, Professor

  4. Non-equilibrium dynamics in disordered materials: Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohmura, Satoshi; Nagaya, Kiyonobu; Yao, Makoto; Shimojo, Fuyuki

    2015-08-17

    The dynamic properties of liquid B{sub 2}O{sub 3} under pressure and highly-charged bromophenol molecule are studied by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based on density functional theory (DFT). Diffusion properties of covalent liquids under high pressure are very interesting in the sense that they show unexpected pressure dependence. It is found from our simulation that the magnitude relation of diffusion coefficients for boron and oxygen in liquid B{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows the anomalous pressure dependence. The simulation clarified the microscopic origin of the anomalous diffusion properties. Our simulation also reveals the dissociation mechanism in the coulomb explosion of the highly-charged bromophenol molecule. When the charge state n is 6, hydrogen atom in the hydroxyl group dissociates at times shorter than 20 fs while all hydrogen atoms dissociate when n is 8. After the hydrogen dissociation, the carbon ring breaks at about 100 fs. There is also a difference on the mechanism of the ring breaking depending on charge states, in which the ring breaks with expanding (n = 6) or shrink (n = 8)

  5. Application of optimal prediction to molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber IV, John Letherman

    2004-12-01

    Optimal prediction is a general system reduction technique for large sets of differential equations. In this method, which was devised by Chorin, Hald, Kast, Kupferman, and Levy, a projection operator formalism is used to construct a smaller system of equations governing the dynamics of a subset of the original degrees of freedom. This reduced system consists of an effective Hamiltonian dynamics, augmented by an integral memory term and a random noise term. Molecular dynamics is a method for simulating large systems of interacting fluid particles. In this thesis, I construct a formalism for applying optimal prediction to molecular dynamics, producing reduced systems from which the properties of the original system can be recovered. These reduced systems require significantly less computational time than the original system. I initially consider first-order optimal prediction, in which the memory and noise terms are neglected. I construct a pair approximation to the renormalized potential, and ignore three-particle and higher interactions. This produces a reduced system that correctly reproduces static properties of the original system, such as energy and pressure, at low-to-moderate densities. However, it fails to capture dynamical quantities, such as autocorrelation functions. I next derive a short-memory approximation, in which the memory term is represented as a linear frictional force with configuration-dependent coefficients. This allows the use of a Fokker-Planck equation to show that, in this regime, the noise is {delta}-correlated in time. This linear friction model reproduces not only the static properties of the original system, but also the autocorrelation functions of dynamical variables.

  6. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of pressure-induced phase transformation of BeO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, H. Y.; Duan, G.; Zu, X. T.; Weber, W. J.

    2011-05-05

    Ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) method has been used to study high pressure-induced phase transformation in BeO based on the local density approximation (LDA) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Both methods show that the wurtzite (WZ) and zinc blende (ZB) BeO transforms to the rocksalt (RS) structure smoothly at high pressure. The transition pressures obtained from the LDA method are about 40 GPa larger than the GGA result for both WZ ? RS and ZB ? RS phase transformations, and the phase transformation mechanisms revealed by the LDA and GGA methods are different. For WZ ? RS phase transformations both mechanisms obtained from the LDA and GGA methods are not comparable to the previous ab initio MD simulations of WZ BeO at 700 GPa based on the GGA method. It is suggested that the phase transformation mechanisms of BeO revealed by the ab initio MD simulations are affected remarkably by the exchangecorrelation functional employed and the way of applying pressure.

  7. Molecular dynamics study of saltsolution interface: Solubility and surface charge of salt in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Liang, Yunfeng E-mail: matsuoka@earth.kumst.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Matsuoka, Toshifumi E-mail: matsuoka@earth.kumst.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2014-04-14

    The NaCl saltsolution interface often serves as an example of an uncharged surface. However, recent laser-Doppler electrophoresis has shown some evidence that the NaCl crystal is positively charged in its saturated solution. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we have investigated the NaCl saltsolution interface system, and calculated the solubility of the salt using the direct method and free energy calculations, which are kinetic and thermodynamic approaches, respectively. The direct method calculation uses a saltsolution combined system. When the system is equilibrated, the concentration in the solution area is the solubility. In the free energy calculation, we separately calculate the chemical potential of NaCl in two systems, the solid and the solution, using thermodynamic integration with MD simulations. When the chemical potential of NaCl in the solution phase is equal to the chemical potential of the solid phase, the concentration of the solution system is the solubility. The advantage of using two different methods is that the computational methods can be mutually verified. We found that a relatively good estimate of the solubility of the system can be obtained through comparison of the two methods. Furthermore, we found using microsecond time-scale MD simulations that the positively charged NaCl surface was induced by a combination of a sodium-rich surface and the orientation of the interfacial water molecules.

  8. A molecular dynamics study of nuclear quantum effect on the diffusion of hydrogen in condensed phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagashima, Hiroki; Tokumasu, Takashi; Tsuda, Shin-ichi; Tsuboi, Nobuyuki; Koshi, Mitsuo; Hayashie, A. Koichi

    2014-10-06

    In this paper, the quantum effect of hydrogen molecule on its diffusivity is analyzed using Molecular Dynamics (MD) method. The path integral centroid MD (CMD) method is applied for the reproduction method of time evolution of the molecules. The diffusion coefficient of liquid hydrogen is calculated using the Green-Kubo method. The simulation is performed at wide temperature region and the temperature dependence of the quantum effect of hydrogen molecule is addressed. The calculation results are compared with those of classical MD results. As a result, it is confirmed that the diffusivity of hydrogen molecule is changed depending on temperature by the quantum effect. It is clarified that this result can be explained that the dominant factor by quantum effect on the diffusivity of hydrogen changes from the swollening the potential to the shallowing the potential well around 30 K. Moreover, it is found that this tendency is related to the temperature dependency of the ratio of the quantum kinetic energy and classical kinetic energy.

  9. Computation of shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions by SRD-MD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laganapan, A. M. K.; Videcoq, A. Bienia, M.; Ala-Nissila, T.; Bochicchio, D.; Ferrando, R.

    2015-04-14

    The behaviour of sheared colloidal suspensions with full hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) is numerically studied. To this end, we use the hybrid stochastic rotation dynamics-molecular dynamics (SRD-MD) method. The shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions is computed for different volume fractions, both for dilute and concentrated cases. We verify that HIs help in the collisions and the streaming of colloidal particles, thereby increasing the overall shear viscosity of the suspension. Our results show a good agreement with known experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies. This work demonstrates the ability of SRD-MD to successfully simulate transport coefficients that require correct modelling of HIs.

  10. Anharmonic lattice dynamics of Ag2O studied by inelastic neutron scattering and first-principles molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lan, Tian; Li, Chen; Niedziela, Jennifer L; Smith, Hillary; Abernathy, Douglas L; Rossman, George; Fultz, B.

    2014-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on silver oxide (Ag2O) with the cuprite structure were performed at temperatures from 40 to 400 K, and Fourier transform far-infrared spectra were measured from 100 to 300 K. The measured phonon densities of states and the infrared spectra showed unusually large energy shifts with temperature, and large linewidth broadenings. First principles molecular dynamics (MD) calculations were performed at various temperatures, successfully accounting for the negative thermal expansion (NTE) and local dynamics. Using the Fourier-transformed velocity autocorrelation method, the MD calculations reproduced the large anharmonic effects of Ag2O, and were in excellent agreement with the neutron scattering data. The quasiharmonic approximation (QHA) was less successful in accounting for much of the phonon behavior. The QHA could account for some of the NTE below 250 K, although not at higher temperatures. Strong anharmonic effects were found for both phonons and for the NTE. The lifetime broadenings of Ag2O were explained by anharmonic perturbation theory, which showed rich interactions between the Ag-dominated modes and the O-dominated modes in both up- and down-conversion processes.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Gas Selectivity in Amorphous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamics Simulations of Gas Selectivity in Amorphous Porous Molecular Solids Previous Next List Shan Jiang, Kim E. Jelfs, Daniel Holden, Tom Hasell, Samantha Y. Chong, Maciej...

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation and ab intio studies of electrolytes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications High Voltage Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries Molecular Dynamics Simulation Studies of Electrolytes and ElectrolyteElectrode Interfaces

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation and ab intio studies of electrolytes...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation es058smith2011o.pdf (854.25 KB) More Documents & Publications Molecular Dynamics Simulation ...

  14. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Y.T.

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  15. Molecular dynamics investigation of the substrate binding mechanism in carboxylesterase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Qi; Luan, Zheng-Jiao; Cheng, Xiaolin; Xu, Jian-he

    2015-01-01

    A recombinant carboxylesterase, cloned from Pseudomonas putida and designated as rPPE, is capable of catalyzing the bioresolution of racemic 2-acetoxy-2-(2 -chlorophenyl)acetate (rac-AcO-CPA) with excellent (S)-enantioselectivity. Semi-rational design of the enzyme showed that the W187H variant could increase the activity by ~100-fold compared to the wild type (WT) enzyme. In this study, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of both apo-rPPE and rPPE in complex with (S)-AcO-CPA to gain insights into the origin of the increased catalysis in the W187H mutant. Our results show differential binding of (S)-AcO-CPA in the WT and W187H enzymes, especially the interactions of the substrate with the two active site residues Ser159 and His286. The replacement of Trp187 by His leads to considerable structural rearrangement in the active site of W187H. Unlike in the WT rPPE, the cap domain in the W187 mutant shows an open conformation in the simulations of both apo and substrate-bound enzymes. This open conformation exposes the catalytic triad to the solvent through a water accessible channel, which may facilitate the entry of the substrate and/or the exit of the product. Binding free energy calculations confirmed that the substrate binds more strongly in W187H than in WT. Based on these computational results, we further predicted that the mutations W187Y and D287G might also be able to increase the substrate binding, thus improve the enzyme s catalytic efficiency. Experimental binding and kinetic assays on W187Y and D287G show improved catalytic efficiency over WT, but not W187H. Contrary to our prediction, W187Y shows slightly decreased substrate binding coupled with a 100 fold increase in turn-over rate, while in D287G the substrate binding is 8 times stronger but with a slightly reduced turn-over rate. Our work provides important molecular-level insights into the binding of the (S)-AcO-CPA substrate to carboxylesterase rPPEs, which will help guide

  16. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of the Substrate Binding Mechanism in Carboxylesterase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Qi; Luan, Zheng-Jiao; Cheng, Xiaolin; Xu, Jian-He

    2015-02-25

    A recombinant carboxylesterase, cloned from Pseudomonas putida and designated as rPPE, is capable of catalyzing the bioresolution of racemic 2-acetoxy-2-(2 -chlorophenyl)acetate (rac-AcO-CPA) with excellent (S)-enantioselectivity. Semi-rational design of the enzyme showed that the W187H variant could increase the activity by ~100-fold compared to the wild type (WT) enzyme. In this study, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of both apo-rPPE and rPPE in complex with (S)-AcO-CPA to gain insights into the origin of the increased catalysis in the W187H mutant. Moreover, our results show differential binding of (S)-AcO-CPA in the WT and W187H enzymes, especially the interactions of the substrate with the two active site residues Ser159 and His286. The replacement of Trp187 by His leads to considerable structural rearrangement in the active site of W187H. Unlike in the WT rPPE, the cap domain in the W187 mutant shows an open conformation in the simulations of both apo and substrate-bound enzymes. This open conformation exposes the catalytic triad to the solvent through a water accessible channel, which may facilitate the entry of the substrate and/or the exit of the product. Binding free energy calculations confirmed that the substrate binds more strongly in W187H than in WT. Based on these computational results, furthermore, we predicted that the mutations W187Y and D287G might also be able to increase the substrate binding, thus improve the enzyme s catalytic efficiency. Experimental binding and kinetic assays on W187Y and D287G show improved catalytic efficiency over WT, but not W187H. Contrary to our prediction, W187Y shows slightly decreased substrate binding coupled with a 100 fold increase in turn-over rate, while in D287G the substrate binding is 8 times stronger but with a slightly reduced turn-over rate. Finally, our work provides important molecular-level insights into the binding of the (S)-AcO-CPA substrate to carboxylesterase r

  17. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of the Substrate Binding Mechanism in Carboxylesterase

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Qi; Luan, Zheng-Jiao; Cheng, Xiaolin; Xu, Jian-He

    2015-02-25

    A recombinant carboxylesterase, cloned from Pseudomonas putida and designated as rPPE, is capable of catalyzing the bioresolution of racemic 2-acetoxy-2-(2 -chlorophenyl)acetate (rac-AcO-CPA) with excellent (S)-enantioselectivity. Semi-rational design of the enzyme showed that the W187H variant could increase the activity by ~100-fold compared to the wild type (WT) enzyme. In this study, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of both apo-rPPE and rPPE in complex with (S)-AcO-CPA to gain insights into the origin of the increased catalysis in the W187H mutant. Moreover, our results show differential binding of (S)-AcO-CPA in the WT and W187H enzymes, especially the interactions of themore » substrate with the two active site residues Ser159 and His286. The replacement of Trp187 by His leads to considerable structural rearrangement in the active site of W187H. Unlike in the WT rPPE, the cap domain in the W187 mutant shows an open conformation in the simulations of both apo and substrate-bound enzymes. This open conformation exposes the catalytic triad to the solvent through a water accessible channel, which may facilitate the entry of the substrate and/or the exit of the product. Binding free energy calculations confirmed that the substrate binds more strongly in W187H than in WT. Based on these computational results, furthermore, we predicted that the mutations W187Y and D287G might also be able to increase the substrate binding, thus improve the enzyme s catalytic efficiency. Experimental binding and kinetic assays on W187Y and D287G show improved catalytic efficiency over WT, but not W187H. Contrary to our prediction, W187Y shows slightly decreased substrate binding coupled with a 100 fold increase in turn-over rate, while in D287G the substrate binding is 8 times stronger but with a slightly reduced turn-over rate. Finally, our work provides important molecular-level insights into the binding of the (S)-AcO-CPA substrate to carboxylesterase r

  18. Hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics-Based Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Acid-Catalyzed Dehydration of Polyols in Liquid Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caratzoulas, Stavros; Courtney, Timothy; Vlachos, Dionisios G.

    2011-01-01

    We use the conversion of protonated glycerol to acrolein for a case study of the mechanism of acid-catalyzed dehydration of polyols in aqueous environments. We employ hybrid Quamtum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Molecular Dynamics (QM/MM MD) simulations with biased sampling and perform free energy calculations for the elementary steps of the reaction. We investigate the effects of solvent dynamics and in particular the role of quantum mechanical water in the dehydration mechanism. We present results supporting a mechanism that proceeds via water-mediated proton transfers and thus through an enol intermediate. We find that the first dehydration may take place by two, low-energy pathways requiring, respectively, 20.9 and 18.8 kcal/mol of activation free energy. The second dehydration requires 19.9 kcal/mol of activation free energy while for the overall reaction we compute a free energy change of -8 kcal/mol.

  19. Melting behaviour of gold-platinum nanoalloy clusters by molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, Yee Pin; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    The melting behavior of bimetallic gold-platinum nanoclusters is studied by applying Brownian-type isothermal molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, a program modified from the cubic coupling scheme (CCS). The process begins with the ground-state structures obtained from global minimum search algorithm and proceeds with the investigation of the effect of temperature on the thermal properties of gold-platinum nanoalloy clusters. N-body Gupta potential has been employed in order to account for the interactions between gold and platinum atoms. The ground states of the nanoalloy clusters, which are core-shell segregated, are heated until they become thermally segregated. The detailed melting mechanism of the nanoalloy clusters is studied via this approach to provide insight into the thermal stability of the nanoalloy clusters.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Studies of Electrolytes andElectrolyte...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon es058smith2010p.pdf More Documents & Publications Molecular dynamics simulation and ab intio ...

  1. First-principles molecular dynamics simulations of condensed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    phase V-type nerve agent reaction pathways and energy barriers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: First-principles molecular dynamics simulations of condensed phase V-type ...

  2. Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy from Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy from Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics and Static Normal Mode Analysis: The C-H Region of DMSO as a Case Study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  3. Atomic, molecular, and nuclear quantum dynamics and control in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomic, molecular, and nuclear quantum dynamics and control in (strong) visible to x-ray (laser) fields Wednesday, July 20, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A ...

  4. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics study of membrane fusion: Curvature effects on free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawamoto, Shuhei; Shinoda, Wataru; Klein, Michael L.

    2015-12-28

    The effects of membrane curvature on the free energy barrier for membrane fusion have been investigated using coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG-MD) simulations, assuming that fusion takes place through a stalk intermediate. Free energy barriers were estimated for stalk formation as well as for fusion pore formation using the guiding potential method. Specifically, the three different geometries of two apposed membranes were considered: vesicle–vesicle, vesicle–planar, and planar–planar membranes. The free energy barriers for the resulting fusion were found to depend importantly on the fusing membrane geometries; the lowest barrier was obtained for vesicular membranes. Further, lipid sorting was observed in fusion of the mixed membranes of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). Specifically, DOPE molecules were found to assemble around the stalk to support the highly negative curved membrane surface. A consistent result for lipid sorting was observed when a simple continuum model (CM) was used, where the Helfrich energy and mixing entropy of the lipids were taken into account. However, the CM predicts a much higher free energy barrier than found using CG-MD. This discrepancy originates from the conformational changes of lipids, which were not considered in the CM. The results of the CG-MD simulations reveal that a large conformational change in the lipid takes place around the stalk region, which results in a reduction of free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism of membrane fusion.

  5. Free Energy Perturbation Hamiltonian Replica-Exchange Molecular Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Absolute Ligand Binding | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Free Energy Perturbation Hamiltonian Replica-Exchange Molecular Dynamics for Absolute Ligand Binding Authors: Jiang, W., Roux, B. Free Energy Perturbation with Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics (FEP/REMD) offers a powerful strategy to improve the convergence of free energy computations. In particular, it has been shown previously that a FEP/REMD scheme allowing random moves within an extended replica ensemble of

  6. Entropy of Liquid Water from Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leadership Computing Facility Entropy of Liquid Water from Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Authors: Zhang, C., Spanu,L., Galli, G. We have computed the entropy of liquid water using a two-phase thermodynamic model and trajectories generated by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We present the results obtained with semilocal, hybrid, and van der Waals density functionals. We show that in all cases, at the experimental equilibrium density and at temperatures in the vicinity of 300 K, the

  7. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kellman, M.E.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  8. Deposition of cobalt atoms onto Alq 3 films: A molecular dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Deposition of cobalt atoms onto Alq 3 films: A molecular dynamics study Prev Next Title: Deposition of cobalt atoms onto Alq 3 films: A molecular dynamics study Authors: ...

  9. Using Molecular Dynamics to quantify the electrical double layer and examine the potential for its direct observation in the in-situ TEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, David A.; Mehdi, Beata L.; Hatchell, Hanna J.; Faller, Roland; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-03-25

    Understanding the fundamental processes taking place at the electrode-electrolyte interface in batteries will play a key role in the development of next generation energy storage technologies. One of the most fundamental aspects of the electrode-electrolyte interface is the electrical double layer (EDL). Given the recent development of high spatial resolution in-situ electrochemical cells for scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), there now exists the possibility that we can directly observe the formation and dynamics of the EDL. In this paper we predict electrolyte structure within the EDL using classical models and atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The MD simulations show that the classical models fail to accurately reproduce concentration profiles that exist within the electrolyte. It is thus suggested that MD must be used in order to accurately predict STEM images of the electrode-electrolyte interface. Using MD and image simulations together for a high contrast electrolyte (the high atomic number CsCl electrolyte), it is determined that, for a smooth interface, concentration profiles within the EDL should be visible experimentally. When normal experimental parameters such as rough interfaces and low-Z electrolytes (like those used in Li-ion batteries) are considered, observation of the EDL appears to be more difficult.

  10. Using Molecular Dynamics to quantify the electrical double layer and examine the potential for its direct observation in the in-situ TEM

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Welch, David A.; Mehdi, Beata L.; Hatchell, Hanna J.; Faller, Roland; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-03-25

    Understanding the fundamental processes taking place at the electrode-electrolyte interface in batteries will play a key role in the development of next generation energy storage technologies. One of the most fundamental aspects of the electrode-electrolyte interface is the electrical double layer (EDL). Given the recent development of high spatial resolution in-situ electrochemical cells for scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), there now exists the possibility that we can directly observe the formation and dynamics of the EDL. In this paper we predict electrolyte structure within the EDL using classical models and atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The MD simulations show thatmore » the classical models fail to accurately reproduce concentration profiles that exist within the electrolyte. It is thus suggested that MD must be used in order to accurately predict STEM images of the electrode-electrolyte interface. Using MD and image simulations together for a high contrast electrolyte (the high atomic number CsCl electrolyte), it is determined that, for a smooth interface, concentration profiles within the EDL should be visible experimentally. When normal experimental parameters such as rough interfaces and low-Z electrolytes (like those used in Li-ion batteries) are considered, observation of the EDL appears to be more difficult.« less

  11. An Efficient Molecular Dynamics Scheme for Predicting Dopant Implant Profiles in Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beardmore, K.M.; Gronbech-Jensen, N.

    1998-09-15

    The authors present a highly efficient molecular dynamics scheme for calculating the concentration profile of dopants implanted in group-IV alloy, and III-V zinc blende structure materials. The program incorporates methods for reducing computational overhead, plus a rare event algorithm to give statistical accuracy over several orders of magnitude change in the dopant concentration. The code uses a molecular dynamics (MD) model, instead of the binary collision approximation (BCA) used in implant simulators such as TRIM and Marlowe, to describe ion-target interactions. Atomic interactions are described by a combination of 'many-body' and screened Coulomb potentials. Inelastic energy loss is accounted for using a Firsov model, and electronic stopping is described by a Brandt-Kitagawa model which contains the single adjustable parameter for the entire scheme. Thus, the program is easily extensible to new ion-target combinations with the minimum of tuning, and is predictive over a wide range of implant energies and angles. The scheme is especially suited for calculating profiles due to low energy, large angle implants, and for situations where a predictive capability is required with the minimum of experimental validation. They give examples of using their code to calculate concentration profiles and 2D 'point response' profiles of dopants in crystalline silicon, silicon-germanium blends, and gallium-arsenide. They can predict the experimental profiles over five orders of magnitude for <100> and <110> channeling and for non-channeling implants at energies up to hundreds of keV.

  12. Predicting Low Energy Dopant Implant Profiles in Semiconductors using Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beardmore, K.M.; Gronbech-Jensen, N.

    1999-05-02

    The authors present a highly efficient molecular dynamics scheme for calculating dopant density profiles in group-IV alloy, and III-V zinc blende structure materials. Their scheme incorporates several necessary methods for reducing computational overhead, plus a rare event algorithm to give statistical accuracy over several orders of magnitude change in the dopant concentration. The code uses a molecular dynamics (MD) model to describe ion-target interactions. Atomic interactions are described by a combination of 'many-body' and pair specific screened Coulomb potentials. Accumulative damage is accounted for using a Kinchin-Pease type model, inelastic energy loss is represented by a Firsov expression, and electronic stopping is described by a modified Brandt-Kitagawa model which contains a single adjustable ion-target dependent parameter. Thus, the program is easily extensible beyond a given validation range, and is therefore truly predictive over a wide range of implant energies and angles. The scheme is especially suited for calculating profiles due to low energy and to situations where a predictive capability is required with the minimum of experimental validation. They give examples of using the code to calculate concentration profiles and 2D 'point response' profiles of dopants in crystalline silicon and gallium-arsenide. Here they can predict the experimental profile over five orders of magnitude for <100> and <110> channeling and for non-channeling implants at energies up to hundreds of keV.

  13. A Molecular Dynamics Study of Chemical Reactions of Solid Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate at Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C J; Manaa, M R; Fried, L E

    2006-05-30

    We have carried out density functional based tight binding (DFTB) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to study energetic reactions of solid Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN) at conditions approximating the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) detonation state. We found that the initial decomposition of PETN molecular solid is characterized by uni-molecular dissociation of the NO{sub 2}groups. Interestingly, energy release from this powerful high explosive was found to proceed in several stages. The large portion of early stage energy release was found to be associated with the formation of H{sub 2}O molecules within a few picoseconds of reaction. It took nearly four times as long for majority of CO{sub 2} products to form, accompanied by a slow oscillatory conversion between CO and CO{sub 2}. The production of N{sub 2} starts after NO{sub 2} loses its oxygen atoms to hydrogen or carbon atoms to form H{sub 2}O or CO. We identified many intermediate species that emerge and contribute to reaction kinetics, and compared our simulation with a thermo-chemical equilibrium calculation. In addition, a detailed chemical kinetics of formation of H{sub 2}O, CO, and CO{sub 2} were developed. Rate constants of formations of H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} were reported.

  14. Structure of rigid polymers confined to nanoparticles: Molecular dynamics simulations insight

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maskey, Sabina; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2016-02-04

    Nanoparticles (NPs) grafted with organic layers form hybrids able to retain their unique properties through integration into the mesoscopic scale. The organic layer structure and response often determine the functionality of the hybrids on the mesoscopic length scale. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we probe the conformation of luminescent rigid polymers, dialkyl poly(p-phenylene ethynylene)s (PPE), end-grafted onto a silica nanoparticle in different solvents as the molecular weights and polymer coverages are varied. We find that, in contrast to NP-grafted flexible polymers, the chains are fully extended independent of the solvent. In toluene and decane, which are good solvents, the graftedmore » PPEs chains assume a similar conformation to that observed in dilute solutions. In water, which is a poor solvent for the PPEs, the polymer chains form one large cluster but remain extended. The radial distribution of the chains around the core of the nanoparticle is homogeneous in good solvents, whereas in poor solvents clusters are formed independent of molecular weights and coverages. As a result, the clustering is distinctively different from the response of grafted flexible and semiflexible polymers.« less

  15. High-rate Plastic Deformation of Nanocrystalline Tantalum to Large Strains: Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, R E

    2009-02-05

    Recent advances in the ability to generate extremes of pressure and temperature in dynamic experiments and to probe the response of materials has motivated the need for special materials optimized for those conditions as well as a need for a much deeper understanding of the behavior of materials subjected to high pressure and/or temperature. Of particular importance is the understanding of rate effects at the extremely high rates encountered in those experiments, especially with the next generation of laser drives such as at the National Ignition Facility. Here we use large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the high-rate deformation of nanocrystalline tantalum to investigate the processes associated with plastic deformation for strains up to 100%. We use initial atomic configurations that were produced through simulations of solidification in the work of Streitz et al [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, (2006) 225701]. These 3D polycrystalline systems have typical grain sizes of 10-20 nm. We also study a rapidly quenched liquid (amorphous solid) tantalum. We apply a constant volume (isochoric), constant temperature (isothermal) shear deformation over a range of strain rates, and compute the resulting stress-strain curves to large strains for both uniaxial and biaxial compression. We study the rate dependence and identify plastic deformation mechanisms. The identification of the mechanisms is facilitated through a novel technique that computes the local grain orientation, returning it as a quaternion for each atom. This analysis technique is robust and fast, and has been used to compute the orientations on the fly during our parallel MD simulations on supercomputers. We find both dislocation and twinning processes are important, and they interact in the weak strain hardening in these extremely fine-grained microstructures.

  16. First principles molecular dynamics without self-consistent field optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souvatzis, Petros; Niklasson, Anders M. N.

    2014-01-28

    We present a first principles molecular dynamics approach that is based on time-reversible extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization. The optimization-free dynamics keeps the computational cost to a minimum and typically provides molecular trajectories that closely follow the exact Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface. Only one single diagonalization and Hamiltonian (or Fockian) construction are required in each integration time step. The proposed dynamics is derived for a general free-energy potential surface valid at finite electronic temperatures within hybrid density functional theory. Even in the event of irregular functional behavior that may cause a dynamical instability, the optimization-free limit represents a natural starting guess for force calculations that may require a more elaborate iterative electronic ground state optimization. Our optimization-free dynamics thus represents a flexible theoretical framework for a broad and general class of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

  17. VUV studies of molecular photofragmentation dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, M.G.

    1993-12-01

    State-resolved, photoion and photoelectron methods are used to study the neutral fragmentation and ionization dynamics of small molecules relevant to atmospheric and combustion chemistry. Photodissociation and ionization are initiated by coherent VUV radiation and the fragmentation dynamics are extracted from measurements of product rovibronic state distributions, kinetic energies and angular distributions. The general aim of these studies is to investigate the multichannel interactions between the electronic and nuclear motions which determine the evolution of the photoexcited {open_quotes}complex{close_quotes} into the observed asymptotic channels.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of diffusion coefficients and structural properties of some alkylbenzenes in supercritical carbon dioxide at infinite dilution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jinyang; Zhong, Haimin; Qiu, Wenda; Chen, Liuping; Feng, Huajie

    2014-03-14

    The binary infinite dilute diffusion coefficients, D{sub 12}{sup ?}, of some alkylbenzenes (Ph-C{sub n}, from Ph-H to Ph-C{sub 12}) from 313 K to 333 K at 15 MPa in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}) have been studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The MD values agree well with the experimental ones, which indicate MD simulation technique is a powerful way to predict and obtain diffusion coefficients of solutes in supercritical fluids. Besides, the local structures of Ph-C{sub n}/CO{sub 2} fluids are further investigated by calculating radial distribution functions and coordination numbers. It qualitatively convinces that the first solvation shell of Ph-C{sub n} in scCO{sub 2} is significantly influenced by the structure of Ph-C{sub n} solute. Meanwhile, the mean end-to-end distance, the mean radius of gyration and dihedral angle distribution are calculated to gain an insight into the structural properties of Ph-C{sub n} in scCO{sub 2}. The abnormal trends of radial distribution functions and coordination numbers can be reasonably explained in term of molecular flexibility. Moreover, the computed results of dihedral angle clarify that flexibility of long-chain Ph-C{sub n} is the result of internal rotation of C-C single bond (?{sub c-c}) in alkyl chain. It is interesting that compared with n-alkane, because of the existence of benzene ring, the flexibility of alkyl chain in Ph-C{sub n} with same carbon atom number is significantly reduced, as a result, the carbon chain dependence of diffusion behaviors for long-chain n-alkane (n ? 5) and long-chain Ph-C{sub n} (n ? 4) in scCO{sub 2} are different.

  19. State-to-state dynamics of molecular energy transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentry, W.R.; Giese, C.F.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this research program is to elucidate the elementary dynamical mechanisms of vibrational and rotational energy transfer between molecules, at a quantum-state resolved level of detail. Molecular beam techniques are used to isolate individual molecular collisions, and to control the kinetic energy of collision. Lasers are used both to prepare specific quantum states prior to collision by stimulated-emission pumping (SEP), and to measure the distribution of quantum states in the collision products by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The results are interpreted in terms of dynamical models, which may be cast in a classical, semiclassical or quantum mechanical framework, as appropriate.

  20. Soft-spring wall based non-periodic boundary conditions for non-equilibrium molecular dynamics of dense fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghatage, Dhairyashil; Tomar, Gaurav Shukla, Ratnesh K.

    2015-03-28

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations require imposition of non-periodic boundary conditions (NPBCs) that seamlessly account for the effect of the truncated bulk region on the simulated MD region. Standard implementation of specular boundary conditions in such simulations results in spurious density and force fluctuations near the domain boundary and is therefore inappropriate for coupled atomistic-continuum calculations. In this work, we present a novel NPBC model that relies on boundary atoms attached to a simple cubic lattice with soft springs to account for interactions from particles which would have been present in an untruncated full domain treatment. We show that the proposed model suppresses the unphysical fluctuations in the density to less than 1% of the mean while simultaneously eliminating spurious oscillations in both mean and boundary forces. The model allows for an effective coupling of atomistic and continuum solvers as demonstrated through multiscale simulation of boundary driven singular flow in a cavity. The geometric flexibility of the model enables straightforward extension to nonplanar complex domains without any adverse effects on dynamic properties such as the diffusion coefficient.

  1. Input File Creation for the Molecular Dynamics Program LAMMPS.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-05-30

    The program creates an input data file for the molecular dynamics program LAMMPS. The input file created is a liquid mixture between two walls explicitly composed of particles. The liquid molecules are modeled as a bead-spring molecule. The input data file specifies the position and topology of the starting state. The data structure of input allows for dynamic bond creation (cross-linking) within the LAMMPS code.

  2. On the correlation between the photoexcitation pathways and the critical energies required for ablation of poly(methyl methacrylate): A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conforti, Patrick F.; Prasad, Manish; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2008-05-15

    The energetics initiating ablation in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) are studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The critical energy to initiate ablation in PMMA following the absorption of photons is investigated for two penetration depths along a range of fluences using a coarse-grained, hybrid Monte Carlo-MD scheme. Both heating and direct bond scission are simulated separately after photon absorption with additional transformation of material occurring via chemical reactions following the photochemical bond cleavage. For a given type of absorption and reaction channel, a critical energy can well describe the amount of energy required to initiate ablation. The simulations show a decrease in the critical energy when a greater amount of photochemistry is introduced in the system. The simulations complement experimental studies and elucidate how enhanced photochemistry lowers ablation thresholds in polymer substrates.

  3. Direct comparisons of X-ray scattering and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations for precise acid copolymers and ionomers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buitrago, C. Francisco; Bolintineanu, Dan; Seitz, Michelle E.; Opper, Kathleen L.; Wagener, Kenneth B.; Stevens, Mark J.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Winey, Karen I.

    2015-02-09

    Designing acid- and ion-containing polymers for optimal proton, ion, or water transport would benefit profoundly from predictive models or theories that relate polymer structures with ionomer morphologies. Recently, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to study the morphologies of precise poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid) copolymer and ionomer melts. Here, we present the first direct comparisons between scattering profiles, I(q), calculated from these atomistic MD simulations and experimental X-ray data for 11 materials. This set of precise polymers has spacers of exactly 9, 15, or 21 carbons between acid groups and has been partially neutralized with Li, Na, Cs, or Zn. Inmore » these polymers, the simulations at 120 °C reveal ionic aggregates with a range of morphologies, from compact, isolated aggregates (type 1) to branched, stringy aggregates (type 2) to branched, stringy aggregates that percolate through the simulation box (type 3). Excellent agreement is found between the simulated and experimental scattering peak positions across all polymer types and aggregate morphologies. The shape of the amorphous halo in the simulated I(q) profile is in excellent agreement with experimental I(q). We found that the modified hard-sphere scattering model fits both the simulation and experimental I(q) data for type 1 aggregate morphologies, and the aggregate sizes and separations are in agreement. Given the stringy structure in types 2 and 3, we develop a scattering model based on cylindrical aggregates. Both the spherical and cylindrical scattering models fit I(q) data from the polymers with type 2 and 3 aggregates equally well, and the extracted aggregate radii and inter- and intra-aggregate spacings are in agreement between simulation and experiment. Furthermore, these dimensions are consistent with real-space analyses of the atomistic MD simulations. By combining simulations and experiments, the ionomer scattering peak can be associated with the

  4. Optimizing legacy molecular dynamics software with directive-based offload

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Brown, W.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Gavhane, Nitin; Thakkar, Foram M.; Plimpton, Steven J.

    2015-05-14

    The directive-based programming models are one solution for exploiting many-core coprocessors to increase simulation rates in molecular dynamics. They offer the potential to reduce code complexity with offload models that can selectively target computations to run on the CPU, the coprocessor, or both. In our paper, we describe modifications to the LAMMPS molecular dynamics code to enable concurrent calculations on a CPU and coprocessor. We also demonstrate that standard molecular dynamics algorithms can run efficiently on both the CPU and an x86-based coprocessor using the same subroutines. As a consequence, we demonstrate that code optimizations for the coprocessor also result in speedups on the CPU; in extreme cases up to 4.7X. We provide results for LAMMAS benchmarks and for production molecular dynamics simulations using the Stampede hybrid supercomputer with both Intel (R) Xeon Phi (TM) coprocessors and NVIDIA GPUs: The optimizations presented have increased simulation rates by over 2X for organic molecules and over 7X for liquid crystals on Stampede. The optimizations are available as part of the "Intel package" supplied with LAMMPS. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Optimizing legacy molecular dynamics software with directive-based offload

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Michael Brown, W.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Gavhane, Nitin; Thakkar, Foram M.; Plimpton, Steven J.

    2015-05-14

    The directive-based programming models are one solution for exploiting many-core coprocessors to increase simulation rates in molecular dynamics. They offer the potential to reduce code complexity with offload models that can selectively target computations to run on the CPU, the coprocessor, or both. In our paper, we describe modifications to the LAMMPS molecular dynamics code to enable concurrent calculations on a CPU and coprocessor. We also demonstrate that standard molecular dynamics algorithms can run efficiently on both the CPU and an x86-based coprocessor using the same subroutines. As a consequence, we demonstrate that code optimizations for the coprocessor also resultmore » in speedups on the CPU; in extreme cases up to 4.7X. We provide results for LAMMAS benchmarks and for production molecular dynamics simulations using the Stampede hybrid supercomputer with both Intel (R) Xeon Phi (TM) coprocessors and NVIDIA GPUs: The optimizations presented have increased simulation rates by over 2X for organic molecules and over 7X for liquid crystals on Stampede. The optimizations are available as part of the "Intel package" supplied with LAMMPS. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.« less

  6. Prediction of Thermal Conductivity for Irradiated SiC/SiC Composites by Informing Continuum Models with Molecular Dynamics Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Gao, Fei; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2014-05-01

    This article proposes a new method to estimate the thermal conductivity of SiC/SiC composites subjected to neutron irradiation. The modeling method bridges different scales from the atomic scale to the scale of a 2D SiC/SiC composite. First, it studies the irradiation-induced point defects in perfect crystalline SiC using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to compute the defect thermal resistance as a function of vacancy concentration and irradiation dose. The concept of defect thermal resistance is explored explicitly in the MD data using vacancy concentrations and thermal conductivity decrements due to phonon scattering. Point defect-induced swelling for chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC as a function of irradiation dose is approximated by scaling the corresponding MD results for perfect crystal ?-SiC to experimental data for CVD-SiC at various temperatures. The computed thermal defect resistance, thermal conductivity as a function of grain size, and definition of defect thermal resistance are used to compute the thermal conductivities of CVD-SiC, isothermal chemical vapor infiltrated (ICVI) SiC and nearly-stoichiometric SiC fibers. The computed fiber and ICVI-SiC matrix thermal conductivities are then used as input for an Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka approach to compute the thermal conductivities of 2D SiC/SiC composites subjected to neutron irradiation within the same irradiation doses. Predicted thermal conductivities for an irradiated Tyranno-SA/ICVI-SiC composite are found to be comparable to available experimental data for a similar composite ICVI-processed with these fibers.

  7. Effect of point defects on the thermal conductivity of UO2: molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiang-Yang; Stanek, Christopher Richard; Andersson, Anders David Ragnar

    2015-07-21

    The thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel is an important materials property that affects fuel performance since it is a key parameter determining the temperature distribution in the fuel, thus governing, e.g., dimensional changes due to thermal expansion, fission gas release rates, etc. [1] The thermal conductivity of UO2 nuclear fuel is also affected by fission gas, fission products, defects, and microstructural features such as grain boundaries. Here, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out to determine quantitatively, the effect of irradiation induced point defects on the thermal conductivity of UO2, as a function of defect concentrations, for a range of temperatures, 300 – 1500 K. The results will be used to develop enhanced continuum thermal conductivity models for MARMOT and BISON by INL. These models express the thermal conductivity as a function of microstructure state-variables, thus enabling thermal conductivity models with closer connection to the physical state of the fuel [2].

  8. 369 TFlop/s molecular dynamics simulations on the Roadrunner general-purpose heterogeneous supercomputer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swaminarayan, Sriram; Germann, Timothy C; Kadau, Kai; Fossum, Gordon C

    2008-01-01

    The authors present timing and performance numbers for a short-range parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code, SPaSM, that has been rewritten for the heterogeneous Roadrunner supercomputer. Each Roadrunner compute node consists of two AMD Opteron dual-core microprocessors and four PowerXCell 8i enhanced Cell microprocessors, so that there are four MPI ranks per node, each with one Opteron and one Cell. The interatomic forces are computed on the Cells (each with one PPU and eight SPU cores), while the Opterons are used to direct inter-rank communication and perform I/O-heavy periodic analysis, visualization, and checkpointing tasks. The performance measured for our initial implementation of a standard Lennard-Jones pair potential benchmark reached a peak of 369 Tflop/s double-precision floating-point performance on the full Roadrunner system (27.7% of peak), corresponding to 124 MFlop/Watt/s at a price of approximately 3.69 MFlops/dollar. They demonstrate an initial target application, the jetting and ejection of material from a shocked surface.

  9. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-03-14

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  10. First Principals and Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Solvated Benzene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allesch, M; Lightstone, F; Schwegler, E; Galli, G

    2007-09-11

    We have performed extensive ab initio and classical MD simulations of benzene in water in order to examine the unique solvation structures that are formed. Qualitative differences between classical and ab initio MD simulations are found and the importance of various technical simulation parameters is examined. Our comparison indicates that non-polarizable classical models are not capable of describing the solute-water interface correctly if local interactions become energetically comparable to water hydrogen bonds. In addition, a comparison is made between a rigid water model and fully flexible water within ab initio MD simulations which shows that both models agree qualitatively for this challenging system.

  11. Coupled molecular dynamics-Monte Carlo model to study the role of chemical processes during laser ablation of polymeric materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, Manish; Conforti, Patrick F.; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2007-08-28

    The coarse grained chemical reaction model is enhanced to build a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation framework with an embedded Monte Carlo (MC) based reaction scheme. The MC scheme utilizes predetermined reaction chemistry, energetics, and rate kinetics of materials to incorporate chemical reactions occurring in a substrate into the MD simulation. The kinetics information is utilized to set the probabilities for the types of reactions to perform based on radical survival times and reaction rates. Implementing a reaction involves changing the reactants species types which alters their interaction potentials and thus produces the required energy change. We discuss the application of this method to study the initiation of ultraviolet laser ablation in poly(methyl methacrylate). The use of this scheme enables the modeling of all possible photoexcitation pathways in the polymer. It also permits a direct study of the role of thermal, mechanical, and chemical processes that can set off ablation. We demonstrate that the role of laser induced heating, thermomechanical stresses, pressure wave formation and relaxation, and thermochemical decomposition of the polymer substrate can be investigated directly by suitably choosing the potential energy and chemical reaction energy landscape. The results highlight the usefulness of such a modeling approach by showing that various processes in polymer ablation are intricately linked leading to the transformation of the substrate and its ejection. The method, in principle, can be utilized to study systems where chemical reactions are expected to play a dominant role or interact strongly with other physical processes.

  12. A wrench in the works of human acetylcholinesterase: Soman induced conformational changes revealed by molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennion, Brian J.; Essiz, Sebnem G.; Lau, Edmond Y.; Fattebert, Jean -Luc; Emigh, Aiyana; Lightstone, Felice C.; Salsbury , Jr, Freddie

    2015-04-13

    Irreversible inactivation of human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) by organophosphorous pesticides (OPs) and chemical weapon agents (CWA) has severe morbidity and mortality consequences. We present data from quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) and 80 classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the apo and soman-adducted forms of hAChE to investigate the effects on the dynamics and protein structure when the catalytic Serine 203 is phosphonylated. We find that the soman phosphonylation of the active site Ser203 follows a water assisted addition-elimination mechanism with the elimination of the fluoride ion being the highest energy barrier at 6.5 kcal/mole. We observe soman-dependent changes in backbone and sidechain motions compared to the apo form of the protein. These alterations restrict the soman-adducted hAChE to a structural state that is primed for the soman adduct to be cleaved and removed from the active site. The altered motions and resulting structures provide alternative pathways into and out of the hAChE active site. In the soman-adducted protein both side and back door pathways are viable for soman adduct access. Correlation analysis of the apo and soman adducted MD trajectories shows that the correlation of gorge entrance and back door motion is disrupted when hAChE is adducted. This supports the hypothesis that substrate and product can use two different pathways as entry and exit sites in the apo form of the protein. These alternative pathways have important implications for the rational design of medical countermeasures.

  13. A wrench in the works of human acetylcholinesterase: Soman induced conformational changes revealed by molecular dynamics simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bennion, Brian J.; Essiz, Sebnem G.; Lau, Edmond Y.; Fattebert, Jean -Luc; Emigh, Aiyana; Lightstone, Felice C.; Salsbury , Jr, Freddie

    2015-04-13

    Irreversible inactivation of human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) by organophosphorous pesticides (OPs) and chemical weapon agents (CWA) has severe morbidity and mortality consequences. We present data from quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) and 80 classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the apo and soman-adducted forms of hAChE to investigate the effects on the dynamics and protein structure when the catalytic Serine 203 is phosphonylated. We find that the soman phosphonylation of the active site Ser203 follows a water assisted addition-elimination mechanism with the elimination of the fluoride ion being the highest energy barrier at 6.5 kcal/mole. We observe soman-dependent changes in backbone andmore » sidechain motions compared to the apo form of the protein. These alterations restrict the soman-adducted hAChE to a structural state that is primed for the soman adduct to be cleaved and removed from the active site. The altered motions and resulting structures provide alternative pathways into and out of the hAChE active site. In the soman-adducted protein both side and back door pathways are viable for soman adduct access. Correlation analysis of the apo and soman adducted MD trajectories shows that the correlation of gorge entrance and back door motion is disrupted when hAChE is adducted. This supports the hypothesis that substrate and product can use two different pathways as entry and exit sites in the apo form of the protein. These alternative pathways have important implications for the rational design of medical countermeasures.« less

  14. Multi million-to-Billion Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cavitation-Induced Damage on a Silica Slab | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Multi million-to-Billion Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Cavitation-Induced Damage on a Silica Slab Authors: Shekhar, A., Nomura, K., Rajiv, K., Nakano, A., Vashishta, P Cavitation bubble collapse causes severe damage to materials. For example, cavitation erosion is a major threat to the safety of nuclear power plants. The cavitation bubbles may also be utilized for preventing stress corrosion cracking

  15. Atomistic Molecular Dynamics of Ion-Containing Polymers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomistic Molecular Dynamics of Ion-Containing Polymers - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste

  16. Molecular Topology and Local Dynamics Govern the Viscosity of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research October 27, 2015, Research Highlights Molecular Topology and Local Dynamics Govern the Viscosity of Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids Ionic liquids (ILs) with branched alkyl chains were found to have higher viscosities than those with linear alkyl chains when the carbon numbers are the same. In addition, the branched chain IL with four carbons in the chain was found to have abnormally high viscosity. Our computational

  17. Atomic, molecular, and nuclear quantum dynamics and control in (strong)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    visible to x-ray (laser) fields | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Atomic, molecular, and nuclear quantum dynamics and control in (strong) visible to x-ray (laser) fields Wednesday, July 20, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Thomas Pfeifer, MPIK Heidelberg Program Description Electrons bound in atoms and small molecules represent some of the most fundamental quantum systems. These systems are so well known and reliable that they serve as optical

  18. Shapiro like steps reveals molecular nanomagnets’ spin dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdollahipour, Babak; Abouie, Jahanfar Ebrahimi, Navid

    2015-09-15

    We present an accurate way to detect spin dynamics of a nutating molecular nanomagnet by inserting it in a tunnel Josephson junction and studying the current voltage (I-V) characteristic. The spin nutation of the molecular nanomagnet is generated by applying two circularly polarized magnetic fields. We demonstrate that modulation of the Josephson current by the nutation of the molecular nanomagnet’s spin appears as a stepwise structure like Shapiro steps in the I-V characteristic of the junction. Width and heights of these Shapiro-like steps are determined by two parameters of the spin nutation, frequency and amplitude of the nutation, which are simply tuned by the applied magnetic fields.

  19. Molecular Dynamics and Energy Minimization Based on Embedded Atom Method

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    This program performs atomic scale computer simulations of the structure and dynamics of metallic system using energetices based on the Embedded Atom Method. The program performs two types of calculations. First, it performs local energy minimization of all atomic positions to determine ground state and saddle point energies and structures. Second, it performs molecular dynamics simulations to determine thermodynamics or miscroscopic dynamics of the system. In both cases, various constraints can be applied to themore » system. The volume of the system can be varied automatically to achieve any desired external pressure. The temperature in molecular dynamics simulations can be controlled by a variety of methods. Further, the temperature control can be applied either to the entire system or just a subset of the atoms that would act as a thermal source/sink. The motion of one or more of the atoms can be constrained to either simulate the effects of bulk boundary conditions or to facilitate the determination of saddle point configurations. The simulations are performed with periodic boundary conditions.« less

  20. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics by accelerated semiclassical Monte Carlo

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    White, Alexander J.; Gorshkov, Vyacheslav N.; Tretiak, Sergei; Mozyrsky, Dmitry

    2015-07-07

    Non-adiabatic dynamics, where systems non-radiatively transition between electronic states, plays a crucial role in many photo-physical processes, such as fluorescence, phosphorescence, and photoisomerization. Methods for the simulation of non-adiabatic dynamics are typically either numerically impractical, highly complex, or based on approximations which can result in failure for even simple systems. Recently, the Semiclassical Monte Carlo (SCMC) approach was developed in an attempt to combine the accuracy of rigorous semiclassical methods with the efficiency and simplicity of widely used surface hopping methods. However, while SCMC was found to be more efficient than other semiclassical methods, it is not yet as efficientmore » as is needed to be used for large molecular systems. Here, we have developed two new methods: the accelerated-SCMC and the accelerated-SCMC with re-Gaussianization, which reduce the cost of the SCMC algorithm up to two orders of magnitude for certain systems. In many cases shown here, the new procedures are nearly as efficient as the commonly used surface hopping schemes, with little to no loss of accuracy. This implies that these modified SCMC algorithms will be of practical numerical solutions for simulating non-adiabatic dynamics in realistic molecular systems.« less

  1. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics by accelerated semiclassical Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Alexander J.; Gorshkov, Vyacheslav N.; Tretiak, Sergei; Mozyrsky, Dmitry

    2015-07-07

    Non-adiabatic dynamics, where systems non-radiatively transition between electronic states, plays a crucial role in many photo-physical processes, such as fluorescence, phosphorescence, and photoisomerization. Methods for the simulation of non-adiabatic dynamics are typically either numerically impractical, highly complex, or based on approximations which can result in failure for even simple systems. Recently, the Semiclassical Monte Carlo (SCMC) approach was developed in an attempt to combine the accuracy of rigorous semiclassical methods with the efficiency and simplicity of widely used surface hopping methods. However, while SCMC was found to be more efficient than other semiclassical methods, it is not yet as efficient as is needed to be used for large molecular systems. Here, we have developed two new methods: the accelerated-SCMC and the accelerated-SCMC with re-Gaussianization, which reduce the cost of the SCMC algorithm up to two orders of magnitude for certain systems. In many cases shown here, the new procedures are nearly as efficient as the commonly used surface hopping schemes, with little to no loss of accuracy. This implies that these modified SCMC algorithms will be of practical numerical solutions for simulating non-adiabatic dynamics in realistic molecular systems.

  2. Molecular nonlinear dynamics and protein thermal uncertainty quantification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Kelin [Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, Michigan 48824 (United States)] [Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, Michigan 48824 (United States); Wei, Guo-Wei, E-mail: wei@math.msu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, Michigan 48824 (United States) [Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    This work introduces molecular nonlinear dynamics (MND) as a new approach for describing protein folding and aggregation. By using a mode system, we show that the MND of disordered proteins is chaotic while that of folded proteins exhibits intrinsically low dimensional manifolds (ILDMs). The stability of ILDMs is found to strongly correlate with protein energies. We propose a novel method for protein thermal uncertainty quantification based on persistently invariant ILDMs. Extensive comparison with experimental data and the state-of-the-art methods in the field validate the proposed new method for protein B-factor prediction.

  3. Generalized extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niklasson, Anders M. N. Cawkwell, Marc J.

    2014-10-28

    Extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics based on Kohn-Sham density functional theory is generalized in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization prior to the force evaluations. The equations of motion are derived directly from the extended Lagrangian under the condition of an adiabatic separation between the nuclear and the electronic degrees of freedom. We show how this separation is automatically fulfilled and system independent. The generalized equations of motion require only one diagonalization per time step and are applicable to a broader range of materials with improved accuracy and stability compared to previous formulations.

  4. Extracting the diffusion tensor from molecular dynamics simulation with Milestoning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mugnai, Mauro L.; Elber, Ron

    2015-01-07

    We propose an algorithm to extract the diffusion tensor from Molecular Dynamics simulations with Milestoning. A Kramers-Moyal expansion of a discrete master equation, which is the Markovian limit of the Milestoning theory, determines the diffusion tensor. To test the algorithm, we analyze overdamped Langevin trajectories and recover a multidimensional Fokker-Planck equation. The recovery process determines the flux through a mesh and estimates local kinetic parameters. Rate coefficients are converted to the derivatives of the potential of mean force and to coordinate dependent diffusion tensor. We illustrate the computation on simple models and on an atomically detailed system—the diffusion along the backbone torsions of a solvated alanine dipeptide.

  5. Clustering effects in ionic polymers: Molecular dynamics simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agrawal, Anupriya; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-08-18

    Ionic clusters control the structure, dynamics, and transport in soft matter. Incorporating a small fraction of ionizable groups in polymers substantially reduces the mobility of the macromolecules in melts. Furthermore, these ionic groups often associate into random clusters in melts, where the distribution and morphology of the clusters impact the transport in these materials. Here, using molecular dynamic simulations we demonstrate a clear correlation between cluster size and morphology with the polymer mobility in melts of sulfonated polystyrene. We show that in low dielectric media ladderlike clusters that are lower in energy compared with spherical assemblies are formed. Reducing themore » electrostatic interactions by enhancing the dielectric constant leads to morphological transformation from ladderlike clusters to globular assemblies. Finally, decrease in electrostatic interaction significantly enhances the mobility of the polymer.« less

  6. Clustering effects in ionic polymers: Molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, Anupriya; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-08-18

    Ionic clusters control the structure, dynamics, and transport in soft matter. Incorporating a small fraction of ionizable groups in polymers substantially reduces the mobility of the macromolecules in melts. Furthermore, these ionic groups often associate into random clusters in melts, where the distribution and morphology of the clusters impact the transport in these materials. Here, using molecular dynamic simulations we demonstrate a clear correlation between cluster size and morphology with the polymer mobility in melts of sulfonated polystyrene. We show that in low dielectric media ladderlike clusters that are lower in energy compared with spherical assemblies are formed. Reducing the electrostatic interactions by enhancing the dielectric constant leads to morphological transformation from ladderlike clusters to globular assemblies. Finally, decrease in electrostatic interaction significantly enhances the mobility of the polymer.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of radiation damage cascades in diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchan, J. T.; Robinson, M.; Christie, H. J.; Roach, D. L.; Ross, D. K.; Marks, N. A.

    2015-06-28

    Radiation damage cascades in diamond are studied by molecular dynamics simulations employing the Environment Dependent Interaction Potential for carbon. Primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies up to 2.5 keV are considered and a uniformly distributed set of 25 initial PKA directions provide robust statistics. The simulations reveal the atomistic origins of radiation-resistance in diamond and provide a comprehensive computational analysis of cascade evolution and dynamics. As for the case of graphite, the atomic trajectories are found to have a fractal-like character, thermal spikes are absent and only isolated point defects are generated. Quantitative analysis shows that the instantaneous maximum kinetic energy decays exponentially with time, and that the timescale of the ballistic phase has a power-law dependence on PKA energy. Defect recombination is efficient and independent of PKA energy, with only 50% of displacements resulting in defects, superior to graphite where the same quantity is nearly 75%.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Binary Fluid in a Nanochannel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullick, Shanta; Ahluwalia, P. K. [Department of Physics, Himachal Pradesh University, SummerHill, Shimla - 171005 (India); Pathania, Y. [Chitkara University, Atal Shiksha Kunj, Atal Nagar, Barotiwala, Dist Solan, Himachal Pradesh - 174103 (India)

    2011-12-12

    This paper presents the results from a molecular dynamics simulation of binary fluid (mixture of argon and krypton) in the nanochannel flow. The computational software LAMMPS is used for carrying out the molecular dynamics simulations. Binary fluids of argon and krypton with varying concentration of atom species were taken for two densities 0.65 and 0.45. The fluid flow takes place between two parallel plates and is bounded by horizontal walls in one direction and periodic boundary conditions are imposed in the other two directions. To drive the flow, a constant force is applied in one direction. Each fluid atom interacts with other fluid atoms and wall atoms through Week-Chandler-Anderson (WCA) potential. The velocity profile has been looked at for three nanochannel widths i.e for 12{sigma}, 14{sigma} and 16{sigma} and also for the different concentration of two species. The velocity profile of the binary fluid predicted by the simulations agrees with the quadratic shape of the analytical solution of a Poiseuille flow in continuum theory.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen diffusion in aluminum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, X. W.; El Gabaly, F.; Stavila, V.; Allendorf, M. D.

    2016-03-23

    In this study, hydrogen diffusion impacts the performance of solid-state hydrogen storage materials and contributes to the embrittlement of structural materials under hydrogen-containing environments. In atomistic simulations, the diffusion energy barriers are usually calculated using molecular statics simulations where a nudged elastic band method is used to constrain a path connecting the two end points of an atomic jump. This approach requires prior knowledge of the “end points”. For alloy and defective systems, the number of possible atomic jumps with respect to local atomic configurations is tremendous. Even when these jumps can be exhaustively studied, it is still unclear howmore » they can be combined to give an overall diffusion behavior seen in experiments. Here we describe the use of molecular dynamics simulations to determine the overall diffusion energy barrier from the Arrhenius equation. This method does not require information about atomic jumps, and it has additional advantages, such as the ability to incorporate finite temperature effects and to determine the pre-exponential factor. As a test case for a generic method, we focus on hydrogen diffusion in bulk aluminum. We find that the challenge of this method is the statistical variation of the results. However, highly converged energy barriers can be achieved by an appropriate set of temperatures, output time intervals (for tracking hydrogen positions), and a long total simulation time. Our results help elucidate the inconsistencies of the experimental diffusion data published in the literature. The robust approach developed here may also open up future molecular dynamics simulations to rapidly study diffusion properties of complex material systems in multidimensional spaces involving composition and defects.« less

  10. Can the ring polymer molecular dynamics method be interpreted as real time quantum dynamics?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jang, Seogjoo; Sinitskiy, Anton V.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2014-04-21

    The ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method has gained popularity in recent years as a simple approximation for calculating real time quantum correlation functions in condensed media. However, the extent to which RPMD captures real dynamical quantum effects and why it fails under certain situations have not been clearly understood. Addressing this issue has been difficult in the absence of a genuine justification for the RPMD algorithm starting from the quantum Liouville equation. To this end, a new and exact path integral formalism for the calculation of real time quantum correlation functions is presented in this work, which can serve as a rigorous foundation for the analysis of the RPMD method as well as providing an alternative derivation of the well established centroid molecular dynamics method. The new formalism utilizes the cyclic symmetry of the imaginary time path integral in the most general sense and enables the expression of Kubo-transformed quantum time correlation functions as that of physical observables pre-averaged over the imaginary time path. Upon filtering with a centroid constraint function, the formulation results in the centroid dynamics formalism. Upon filtering with the position representation of the imaginary time path integral, we obtain an exact quantum dynamics formalism involving the same variables as the RPMD method. The analysis of the RPMD approximation based on this approach clarifies that an explicit quantum dynamical justification does not exist for the use of the ring polymer harmonic potential term (imaginary time kinetic energy) as implemented in the RPMD method. It is analyzed why this can cause substantial errors in nonlinear correlation functions of harmonic oscillators. Such errors can be significant for general correlation functions of anharmonic systems. We also demonstrate that the short time accuracy of the exact path integral limit of RPMD is of lower order than those for finite discretization of path. The

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulations from SNL's Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Plimpton, Steve; Thompson, Aidan; Crozier, Paul

    LAMMPS (http://lammps.sandia.gov/index.html) stands for Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator and is a code that can be used to model atoms or, as the LAMMPS website says, as a parallel particle simulator at the atomic, meso, or continuum scale. This Sandia-based website provides a long list of animations from large simulations. These were created using different visualization packages to read LAMMPS output, and each one provides the name of the PI and a brief description of the work done or visualization package used. See also the static images produced from simulations at http://lammps.sandia.gov/pictures.html The foundation paper for LAMMPS is: S. Plimpton, Fast Parallel Algorithms for Short-Range Molecular Dynamics, J Comp Phys, 117, 1-19 (1995), but the website also lists other papers describing contributions to LAMMPS over the years.

  12. Dynamic load balancing algorithm for molecular dynamics based on Voronoi cells domain decompositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fattebert, J.-L.; Richards, D.F.; Glosli, J.N.

    2012-12-01

    We present a new algorithm for automatic parallel load balancing in classical molecular dynamics. It assumes a spatial domain decomposition of particles into Voronoi cells. It is a gradient method which attempts to minimize a cost function by displacing Voronoi sites associated with each processor/sub-domain along steepest descent directions. Excellent load balance has been obtained for quasi-2D and 3D practical applications, with up to 440106 particles on 65,536 MPI tasks.

  13. Molecular dynamics of a dilute solution of hydrogen in palladium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, L. R.; Eckert, J.

    1989-06-15

    Molecular-dynamics results on a dilute solution of H in Pd are presentedand compared with available incoherent inelastic neutron-scattering results.The embedded-atom model adopted here does a good job of describing the H-Pdatomic forces probed by incoherent inelastic neutron scattering. The timecorrelation functions associated with the computed spectra are strongly dampedand indicative of the anharmonicity that has been suggested as the principalcontribution to the anomalous isotope dependence of the superconductingtransition temperature in PdH. These results highlight the fact that the H-atomvibrations in Pd-H solutions are low-frequency, large-amplitude vibrationsrelative to vibrations of H atoms in usual covalent interactions. The rmsdisplacement of the H atom from its mean position in the center of the Pdoctahedron compares favorably with the available neutron-diffraction results.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of annealed ZnO surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Min, Tjun Kit; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    The effect of thermally annealing a slab of wurtzite ZnO, terminated by two surfaces, (0001) (which is oxygen-terminated) and (0001{sup ¯}) (which is Zn-terminated), is investigated via molecular dynamics simulation by using reactive force field (ReaxFF). We found that upon heating beyond a threshold temperature of ∼700 K, surface oxygen atoms begin to sublimate from the (0001) surface. The ratio of oxygen leaving the surface at a given temperature increases as the heating temperature increases. A range of phenomena occurring at the atomic level on the (0001) surface has also been explored, such as formation of oxygen dimers on the surface and evolution of partial charge distribution in the slab during the annealing process. It was found that the partial charge distribution as a function of the depth from the surface undergoes a qualitative change when the annealing temperature is above the threshold temperature.

  15. Mechanical unfolding of a beta-hairpin using molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryant, Zev; Pande, Vijay S.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    1999-10-16

    Single molecule mechanical unfolding experiments have the potential to provide insights into the details of protein folding pathways. To investigate the relationship between force-extension unfolding curves and microscopic events, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the mechanical unfolding of the C-terminal hairpin of protein G. We have studied the dependence of the unfolding pathway on pulling speed, cantilever stiffness, and attachment points. Under conditions which generate low forces, the unfolding trajectory mimics the untethered, thermally accessible pathway previously proposed based on high temperature studies. In this stepwise pathway, complete breakdown of backbone hydrogen bonds precedes dissociation of the hydrophobic cluster. Under more extreme conditions, the cluster and hydrogen bonds break simultaneously. Transitions between folding intermediates can be identified in our simulations as features of the calculated force-extension curves.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of methane hydrate using polarizable force fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, H.N.; Jordan, K.D.; Taylor, C.E.

    2007-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of methane hydrate have been carried out using the AMOEBA and COS/G2 polarizable force fields. Properties examined include the temperature dependence of the lattice constant, the OC and OO radial distribution functions and the vibrational spectra. Both the AMOEBA and COS/G2 models are found to successfully account for the available experimental data, with overall slightly better agreement with experiment being found for the AMOEBA model. Several properties calculated using the AMOEBA and COS/G2 models differ appreciable from the corresponding results obtained previously using the polarizable TIP4P-FQ model. This appears to be due to the inadequacy of the treatment of polarization, especially, the restriction of polarization to in-plane only, in the TIP4P-FQ model.

  17. Exploring the free energy surface using ab initio molecular dynamics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Samanta, Amit; Morales, Miguel A.; Schwegler, Eric

    2016-04-22

    Efficient exploration of the configuration space and identification of metastable structures are challenging from both computational as well as algorithmic perspectives. Here, we extend the recently proposed orderparameter aided temperature accelerated sampling schemes to efficiently and systematically explore free energy surfaces, and search for metastable states and reaction pathways within the framework of density functional theory based molecular dynamics. The sampling method is applied to explore the relevant parts of the configuration space in prototypical materials SiO2 and Ti to identify the different metastable structures corresponding to different phases in these materials. In addition, we use the string method inmore » collective variables to study the melting pathways in the high pressure cotunnite phase of SiO2 and the hcp to fcc phase transition in Ti.« less

  18. Relationship between nanocrystalline and amorphous microstructures by molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keblinski, P.; Phillpot, S.R.; Wolf, D.; Gleiter, H.

    1996-08-01

    A recent molecular dynamics simulation method for growth of fully dense nanocrystalline materials crystallized from melt was used with the Stillinger-Weber three-body potential to synthesize nanocrystalline Si with a grain size up to 75{Angstrom}. Structures of the highly constrained grain boundaries (GBs), triple lines, and point grain junctions were found to be highly disordered and similar to the structure of amorphous Si. These and earlier results for fcc metals suggest that a nanocrystalline microstructure may be viewed as a two-phase system, namely an ordered crystalline phase in the grain interiors connected by an amorphous, intergranular, glue-like phase. Analysis of the structures of bicrystalline GBs in the same materials reveals the presence of an amorphous intergranular equilibrium phase only in the high-energy but not the low-energy GBs, suggesting that only high-energy boundaries are present in nanocrystalline microstructures.

  19. Effect of Cu2+ Activation on Interfacial Water Structure at the Sphalerite Surface as Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.; Wick, Collin D.

    2015-12-10

    In the first part of this paper, an experimental contact angle study of the fresh and Cu2+ activated sphalerite-ZnS surface as well as the covellite-CuS (001) surface is reported describing the increased hydrophobic character of the surface during Cu2+ activation. In addition to these experimental results, the fresh sphalerite-ZnS (110), copper-zinc sulfide-CuZnS2 (110), villamaninite- CuS2 (100), and covellite-CuS (001) surfaces were examined using Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS). Our MDS results on the behavior of interfacial water at the fresh sphalerite-ZnS (110), copper-zinc sulfide-CuZnS2 (110), villamaninite-CuS2 (100), and covellite-CuS (001) surfaces include simulated contact angles, water number density distribution, water dipole orientation, water residence time, and hydrogen-bonding considerations. The copper content at the Cu2+ activated sphalerite surface seems to account for the increased hydrophobicity as revealed by both experimental and MD simulated contact angle measurements. The relatively greater hydrophobic character developed at the Cu2+ activated sphalerite surface and at the copper-zinc sulfide surface has been described by MDS, based on the structure of interfacial water and its dynamic properties. L.X.D. acknowledges funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of Si etching in Cl- and Br-based...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular dynamics simulations of Si etching in ... thickness, surface stoichiometry, and depth profile of surface products simulated for ...

  1. Qbox First-principles Molecular Dynamics (Qball branch, svn release 081

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-03-05

    Qball is a modified version of the open source Qbox first-principles molecular dynamics code which was originally developed at LLNL by Francois Gygi.

  2. Equation of state of dense plasmas: Orbital-free molecular dynamics as the limit of quantum molecular dynamics for high-Z elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danel, J.-F.; Blottiau, P.; Kazandjian, L.; Piron, R.; Torrent, M.

    2014-10-15

    The applicability of quantum molecular dynamics to the calculation of the equation of state of a dense plasma is limited at high temperature by computational cost. Orbital-free molecular dynamics, based on a semiclassical approximation and possibly on a gradient correction, is a simulation method available at high temperature. For a high-Z element such as lutetium, we examine how orbital-free molecular dynamics applied to the equation of state of a dense plasma can be regarded as the limit of quantum molecular dynamics at high temperature. For the normal mass density and twice the normal mass density, we show that the pressures calculated with the quantum approach converge monotonically towards those calculated with the orbital-free approach; we observe a faster convergence when the orbital-free approach includes the gradient correction. We propose a method to obtain an equation of state reproducing quantum molecular dynamics results up to high temperatures where this approach cannot be directly implemented. With the results already obtained for low-Z plasmas, the present study opens the way for reproducing the quantum molecular dynamics pressure for all elements up to high temperatures.

  3. CoMD Implementation Suite in Emerging Programming Models

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-09-23

    CoMD-Em is a software implementation suite of the CoMD [4] proxy app using different emerging programming models. It is intended to analyze the features and capabilities of novel programming models that could help ensure code and performance portability and scalability across heterogeneous platforms while improving programmer productivity. Another goal is to provide the authors and venders with some meaningful feedback regarding the capabilities and limitations of their models. The actual application is a classical molecularmore » dynamics (MD) simulation using either the Lennard-Jones method (LJ) or the embedded atom method (EAM) for primary particle interaction. The code can be extended to support alternate interaction models. The code is expected ro run on a wide class of heterogeneous hardware configurations like shard/distributed/hybrid memory, GPU's and any other platform supported by the underlying programming model.« less

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of D{sub 2}O ice photodesorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arasa, C.; Andersson, S.; Cuppen, H. M.; Dishoeck, E. F. van; Kroes, G. J.

    2011-04-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations have been performed to study the ultraviolet (UV) photodissociation of D{sub 2}O in an amorphous D{sub 2}O ice surface at 10, 20, 60, and 90 K, in order to investigate the influence of isotope effects on the photodesorption processes. As for H{sub 2}O, the main processes after UV photodissociation are trapping and desorption of either fragments or D{sub 2}O molecules. Trapping mainly takes place in the deeper monolayers of the ice, whereas desorption occurs in the uppermost layers. There are three desorption processes: D atom, OD radical, and D{sub 2}O molecule photodesorption. D{sub 2}O desorption takes places either by direct desorption of a recombined D{sub 2}O molecule, or when an energetic D atom produced by photodissociation kicks a surrounding D{sub 2}O molecule out of the surface by transferring part of its momentum. Desorption probabilities are calculated for photoexcitation of D{sub 2}O in the top four monolayers and are compared quantitatively with those for H{sub 2}O obtained from previous MD simulations of UV photodissociation of amorphous water ice at different ice temperatures [Arasa et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 184510 (2010)]. The main conclusions are the same, but the average D atom photodesorption probability is smaller than that of the H atom (by about a factor of 0.9) because D has lower kinetic energy than H, whereas the average OD radical photodesorption probability is larger than that of OH (by about a factor of 2.5-2.9 depending on ice temperature) because OD has higher translational energy than OH for every ice temperature studied. The average D{sub 2}O photodesorption probability is larger than that of H{sub 2}O (by about a factor of 1.4-2.3 depending on ice temperature), and this is entirely due to a larger contribution of the D{sub 2}O kick-out mechanism. This is an isotope effect: the kick-out mechanism is more efficient for D{sub 2}O ice, because the D atom formed after D{sub 2}O photodissociation

  5. Does fluoride disrupt hydrogen bond network in cationic lipid bilayer? Time-dependent fluorescence shift of Laurdan and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokorna, Sarka; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Hof, Martin; Vazdar, Mario; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-12-14

    Time-dependent fluorescence shift (TDFS) of Laurdan embedded in phospholipid bilayers reports on hydration and mobility of the phospholipid acylgroups. Exchange of H{sub 2}O with D{sub 2}O prolongs the lifetime of lipid-water and lipid-water-lipid interactions, which is reflected in a significantly slower TDFS kinetics. Combining TDFS measurements in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O hydrated bilayers with atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provides a unique tool for characterization of the hydrogen bonding at the acylgroup level of lipid bilayers. In this work, we use this approach to study the influence of fluoride anions on the properties of cationic bilayers composed of trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP). The results obtained for DOTAP are confronted with those for neutral phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers. Both in DOTAP and DOPC H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O exchange prolongs hydrogen-bonding lifetime and does not disturb bilayer structure. These results are confirmed by MD simulations. TDFS experiments show, however, that for DOTAP this effect is cancelled in the presence of fluoride ions. We interpret these results as evidence that strongly hydrated fluoride is able to steal water molecules that bridge lipid carbonyls. Consequently, when attracted to DOTAP bilayer, fluoride disrupts the local hydrogen-bonding network, and the differences in TDFS kinetics between H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O hydrated bilayers are no longer observed. A distinct behavior of fluoride is also evidenced by MD simulations, which show different lipid-ion binding for Cl{sup −} and F{sup −}.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of self-rotation effects on ultra-precision polishing of single-crystal copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yihan; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhang, Lin; Shao, Mingkun; Liu, Hongda; Huang, Hu

    2013-10-15

    Understanding the behaviors of the material removal mechanism of ultra-precision polishing process has been a critical issue of generating well-formed surface. In order to make clear the abrasive self-rotation effects on material removal at the atomic level, a three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) model is conducted to study the mechanics of ultra-precision polishing on single-crystal copper with a diamond abrasive and the effects of abrasive self-rotation velocity and direction. Morse potential energy function and EAM potential energy function are applied to model the copper/diamond and copper/copper interactions, respectively. The simulation results show that the deformation mechanism of single-crystal copper is due to the formation and movement of dislocations in the specimen. In addition, with the increasing of abrasive self-rotation velocity, the deformation mechanism falls from cutting to plowing regimes. The abrasive self-rotation velocity and direction have effects on the morphology and quality of the specimen surface, distribution and evolution of defects under the surface of the specimen. Also, the interatomic force between abrasive and specimen is studied to account for the effects of different polishing conditions.

  7. Charged nanoparticle attraction in multivalent salt solution: A classical-fluids density functional theory and molecular dynamics study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Salerno, K. Michael; Frischknecht, Amalie L.; Stevens, Mark J.

    2016-04-08

    Here, negatively charged nanoparticles (NPs) in 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3 electrolyte solutions are studied in a primitive ion model using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and classical density functional theory (DFT). We determine the conditions for attractive interactions between the like-charged NPs. Ion density profiles and NP–NP interaction free energies are compared between the two methods and are found to be in qualitative agreement. The NP interaction free energy is purely repulsive for monovalent counterions, but can be attractive for divalent and trivalent counterions. Using DFT, the NP interaction free energy for different NP diameters and charges is calculated. The depthmore » and location of the minimum in the interaction depend strongly on the NPs’ charge. For certain parameters, the depth of the attractive well can reach 8–10 kBT, indicating that kinetic arrest and aggregation of the NPs due to electrostatic interactions is possible. Rich behavior arises from the geometric constraints of counterion packing at the NP surface. Layering of counterions around the NPs is observed and, as secondary counterion layers form the minimum of the NP–NP interaction free energy shifts to larger separation, and the depth of the free energy minimum varies dramatically. We find that attractive interactions occur with and without NP overcharging.« less

  8. Solution-state structure and affinities of cyclodextrin: Fentanyl complexes by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mayer, Brian P.; Kennedy, Daniel J.; Lau, Edmond Y.; Valdez, Carlos A.

    2016-02-04

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are investigated for their ability to form inclusion complexes with the analgesic fentanyl and three similar molecules: acetylfentanyl, thiofentanyl, and acetylthiofentanyl. Stoichiometry, binding strength, and complex structure are revealed through nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques and discussed in terms of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. It was found that β-cyclodextrin is generally capable of forming the strongest complexes with the fentanyl panel. Two-dimensional NMR data and computational chemical calculations are used to derive solution-state structures of the complexes. Binding of the fentanyls to the CDs occurs at the amide phenyl ring, leaving the majority of the molecule solvated bymore » water, an observation common to all four fentanyls. This finding suggests a universal binding behavior, as the vast majority of previously synthesized fentanyl analogues contain this structural moiety. Furthermore, this baseline study serves as the most complete work on CD:fentanyl complexes to date and provides the insights into strategies for producing future generations of designer cyclodextrins capable of stronger and more selective complexation of fentanyl and its analogues.« less

  9. miniMD v. 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-06-12

    Simple parallel MD code that serves as a microapplication in the Mantevo suite. Study of computer system design and implementation, benchmarking of new and existing computer systems.

  10. Insight into the molecular switch mechanism of human Rab5a from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jing-Fang; Shanghai Center for Bioinformation Technology, 100 Qinzhou Road, Shanghai 200235; Gordon Life Science Institute, 13784 Torrey Del Mar Drive, San Diego, CA 92130 ; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2009-12-18

    Rab5a is currently a most interesting target because it is responsible for regulating the early endosome fusion in endocytosis and possibly the budding process. We utilized longtime-scale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the internal motion of the wild-type Rab5a and its A30P mutant. It was observed that, after binding with GTP, the global flexibility of the two proteins is increasing, while the local flexibility in their sensitive sites (P-loop, switch I and II regions) is decreasing. Also, the mutation of Ala30 to Pro30 can cause notable flexibility variations in the sensitive sites. However, this kind of variations is dramatically reduced after binding with GTP. Such a remarkable feature is mainly caused by the water network rearrangements in the sensitive sites. These findings might be of use for revealing the profound mechanism of the displacements of Rab5a switch regions, as well as the mechanism of the GDP dissociation and GTP association.

  11. Dynamics of micelle-nanoparticle systems undergoing shear: a coarse-grained molecular dynamics approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolfe, Bryan A.; Chun, Jaehun; Joo, Yong L.

    2013-09-05

    Recent experimental work has shown that polymeric micelles can template nanoparticles via interstitial sites in shear-ordered micelle solutions. In the current study, we report simulation results based on a coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) model of a solvent/polymer/nanoparticle system. Our results demonstrate the importance of polymer concentration and the micelle corona length in 2D shear-ordering of neat block copolymer solutions. Although our results do not show strong 3D ordering during shear, we find that cessation of shear allows the system to relax into a 3D configuration of greater order than without shear. It is further shown that this post-shear relaxation is strongly dependent on the length of the micelle corona. For the first time, we demonstrate the presence and importance of a flow disturbance surrounding micelles in simple shear flow at moderate Pclet numbers. This disturbance is similar to what is observed around simulated star polymers and ellipsoids. The extent of the flow disturbance increases as expected with a longer micelle corona length. It is further suggested that without proper consideration of these dynamics, a stable nanoparticle configuration would be difficult to obtain.

  12. Theoretical study of molecular vibrations in electron momentum spectroscopy experiments on furan: An analytical versus a molecular dynamical approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morini, Filippo; Deleuze, Michael S.; Watanabe, Noboru; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-03-07

    The influence of thermally induced nuclear dynamics (molecular vibrations) in the initial electronic ground state on the valence orbital momentum profiles of furan has been theoretically investigated using two different approaches. The first of these approaches employs the principles of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, whereas the so-called harmonic analytical quantum mechanical approach resorts to an analytical decomposition of contributions arising from quantized harmonic vibrational eigenstates. In spite of their intrinsic differences, the two approaches enable consistent insights into the electron momentum distributions inferred from new measurements employing electron momentum spectroscopy and an electron impact energy of 1.2 keV. Both approaches point out in particular an appreciable influence of a few specific molecular vibrations of A{sub 1} symmetry on the 9a{sub 1} momentum profile, which can be unravelled from considerations on the symmetry characteristics of orbitals and their energy spacing.

  13. High-performance First-principles Molecular Dynamics for Predictive Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Modeling Eric Schwegler is Prinicipal Investigator for High-performance First-principles Molecular Dynamics for Predictive Theory and Modeling. High-performance First-principles Molecular Dynamics for Predictive Theory and Modeling Research The focus of this project is on the development of a high-performance software infrastructure that combines large-scale FPMD with advanced spectroscopy and sampling algorithms.

  14. Crossed Molecular Beam Studies and Dynamics of Decomposition of Chemically Activated Radicals

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Lee, Y. T.

    1973-09-01

    The power of the crossed molecular beams method in the investigation of the dynamics of chemical reactions lies mainly in the direct observation of the consequences of single collisions of well controlled reactant molecules. The primary experimental observations which provide information on reaction dynamics are the measurements of angular and velocity distributions of reaction products.

  15. Extended Lagrangian Density Functional Tight-Binding Molecular Dynamics for Molecules and Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aradi, Bálint; Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2015-06-26

    A computationally fast quantum mechanical molecular dynamics scheme using an extended Lagrangian density functional tight-binding formulation has been developed and implemented in the DFTB+ electronic structure program package for simulations of solids and molecular systems. The scheme combines the computational speed of self-consistent density functional tight-binding theory with the efficiency and long-term accuracy of extended Lagrangian Born–Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Furthermore, for systems without self-consistent charge instabilities, only a single diagonalization or construction of the single-particle density matrix is required in each time step. The molecular dynamics simulation scheme can also be applied to a broad range of problems in materials science, chemistry, and biology.

  16. Extended Lagrangian Density Functional Tight-Binding Molecular Dynamics for Molecules and Solids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aradi, Bálint; Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2015-06-26

    A computationally fast quantum mechanical molecular dynamics scheme using an extended Lagrangian density functional tight-binding formulation has been developed and implemented in the DFTB+ electronic structure program package for simulations of solids and molecular systems. The scheme combines the computational speed of self-consistent density functional tight-binding theory with the efficiency and long-term accuracy of extended Lagrangian Born–Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Furthermore, for systems without self-consistent charge instabilities, only a single diagonalization or construction of the single-particle density matrix is required in each time step. The molecular dynamics simulation scheme can also be applied to a broad range of problems in materialsmore » science, chemistry, and biology.« less

  17. A new shared-memory programming paradigm for molecular dynamics simulations on the Intel Paragon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D`Azevedo, E.F.; Romine, C.H.

    1994-12-01

    This report describes the use of shared memory emulation with DOLIB (Distributed Object Library) to simplify parallel programming on the Intel Paragon. A molecular dynamics application is used as an example to illustrate the use of the DOLIB shared memory library. SOTON-PAR, a parallel molecular dynamics code with explicit message-passing using a Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential, is rewritten using DOLIB primitives. The resulting code has no explicit message primitives and resembles a serial code. The new code can perform dynamic load balancing and achieves better performance than the original parallel code with explicit message-passing.

  18. Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulation: An approach based on quantum measurement picture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Wei; Xu, Luting; Li, Xin-Qi; Fang, Weihai; Yan, YiJing

    2014-07-15

    Mixed-quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulation implies an effective quantum measurement on the electronic states by the classical motion of atoms. Based on this insight, we propose a quantum trajectory mean-field approach for nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations. The new protocol provides a natural interface between the separate quantum and classical treatments, without invoking artificial surface hopping algorithm. Moreover, it also bridges two widely adopted nonadiabatic dynamics methods, the Ehrenfest mean-field theory and the trajectory surface-hopping method. Excellent agreement with the exact results is illustrated with representative model systems, including the challenging ones for traditional methods.

  19. Insights into photodissociation dynamics of acetaldehyde from ab initio calculations and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Shilu; Fang Weihai

    2009-08-07

    In the present paper we report a theoretical study on mechanistic photodissociation of acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO). Stationary structures for H{sub 2} and CO eliminations in the ground state (S{sub 0}) have been optimized with density functional theory method, which is followed by the intrinsic reaction coordinate and ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to confirm the elimination mechanism. Equilibrium geometries, transition states, and intersection structures for the C-C and C-H dissociations in excited states were determined by the complete-active-space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method. Based on the CASSCF optimized structures, the potential energy profiles for the dissociations were refined by performing the single-point calculations using the multireference configuration interaction method. Upon the low-energy irradiation of CH{sub 3}CHO (265 nm<{lambda}<318 nm), the T{sub 1} C-C bond fission following intersystem crossing from the S{sub 1} state is the predominant channel and the minor channel, the ground-state elimination to CH{sub 4}+CO after internal conversion (IC) from S{sub 1} to S{sub 0}, could not be excluded. With the photon energy increasing, another pathway of IC, achieved via an S{sub 1}/S{sub 0} intersection point resulting from the S{sub 1} C-C bond fission, becomes accessible and increases the yield of CH{sub 4}+CO.

  20. Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations resolve apparent diffusion rate differences for proteins confined in nanochannels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tringe, J. W.; Ileri, N.; Levie, H. W.; Stroeve, P.; Ustach, V.; Faller, R.; Renaud, P.

    2015-08-01

    We use Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to examine molecular transport phenomena in nanochannels, explaining four orders of magnitude difference in wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) protein diffusion rates observed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and by direct imaging of fluorescently-labeled proteins. We first use the ESPResSo Molecular Dynamics code to estimate the surface transport distance for neutral and charged proteins. We then employ a Monte Carlo model to calculate the paths of protein molecules on surfaces and in the bulk liquid transport medium. Our results show that the transport characteristics depend strongly on the degree of molecular surface coverage. Atomic force microscope characterization of surfaces exposed to WGA proteins for 1000 s show large protein aggregates consistent with the predicted coverage. These calculations and experiments provide useful insight into the details of molecular motion in confined geometries.

  1. Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations resolve apparent diffusion rate differences for proteins confined in nanochannels

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tringe, J. W.; Ileri, N.; Levie, H. W.; Stroeve, P.; Ustach, V.; Faller, R.; Renaud, P.

    2015-08-01

    We use Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to examine molecular transport phenomena in nanochannels, explaining four orders of magnitude difference in wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) protein diffusion rates observed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and by direct imaging of fluorescently-labeled proteins. We first use the ESPResSo Molecular Dynamics code to estimate the surface transport distance for neutral and charged proteins. We then employ a Monte Carlo model to calculate the paths of protein molecules on surfaces and in the bulk liquid transport medium. Our results show that the transport characteristics depend strongly on the degree of molecular surface coverage.more » Atomic force microscope characterization of surfaces exposed to WGA proteins for 1000 s show large protein aggregates consistent with the predicted coverage. These calculations and experiments provide useful insight into the details of molecular motion in confined geometries.« less

  2. Dynamical dipole gamma radiation in heavy-ion collisions on the basis of a quantum molecular dynamics model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, H. L.; Tian, W. D.; Ma, Y. G.; Cai, X. Z.; Chen, J. G.; Fang, D. Q.; Guo, W.; Wang, H. W.

    2010-04-15

    Dynamical dipole gamma-ray emission in heavy-ion collisions is explored in the framework of the quantum molecular dynamics model. The studies are focused on systems of {sup 40}Ca bombarding {sup 48}Ca and its isotopes at different incident energies and impact parameters. Yields of gamma rays are calculated and the centroid energy and dynamical dipole emission width of the gamma spectra are extracted to investigate the properties of gamma emission. In addition, sensitivities of dynamical dipole gamma-ray emission to the isospin and the symmetry energy coefficient of the equation of state are studied. The results show that detailed study of dynamical dipole gamma radiation can provide information on the equation of state and the symmetry energy around the normal nuclear density.

  3. Theoretical aspects of gas-phase molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muckerman, J.T.

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program is focused on the development and application of time-dependent quantum mechanical and semiclassical methods for treating inelastic and reactive molecular collisions, and the photochemistry and photophysics of atoms and molecules in laser fields. Particular emphasis is placed on the development and application of grid methods based on discrete variable representations, on time-propagation methods, and, in systems with more that a few degrees of freedom, on the combined use of quantal wavepackets and classical trajectories.

  4. Electron Transfer Dynamics in Efficient Molecular Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Gerald John

    2014-10-01

    This research provided new mechanistic insights into surface mediated photochemical processes relevant to solar energy conversion. In this past three years our research has focused on oxidation photo-redox chemistry and on the role surface electric fields play on basic spectroscopic properties of molecular-semiconductor interfaces. Although this research as purely fundamental science, the results and their interpretation have relevance to applications in dye sensitized and photogalvanic solar cells as well as in the storage of solar energy in the form of chemical bonds.

  5. Graphics processing units accelerated semiclassical initial value representation molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tamascelli, Dario; Dambrosio, Francesco Saverio; Conte, Riccardo; Ceotto, Michele

    2014-05-07

    This paper presents a Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) implementation of the Semiclassical Initial Value Representation (SC-IVR) propagator for vibrational molecular spectroscopy calculations. The time-averaging formulation of the SC-IVR for power spectrum calculations is employed. Details about the GPU implementation of the semiclassical code are provided. Four molecules with an increasing number of atoms are considered and the GPU-calculated vibrational frequencies perfectly match the benchmark values. The computational time scaling of two GPUs (NVIDIA Tesla C2075 and Kepler K20), respectively, versus two CPUs (Intel Core i5 and Intel Xeon E5-2687W) and the critical issues related to the GPU implementation are discussed. The resulting reduction in computational time and power consumption is significant and semiclassical GPU calculations are shown to be environment friendly.

  6. Quantum correlation dynamics in photosynthetic processes assisted by molecular vibrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giorgi, G.L.; Roncaglia, M.; Raffa, F.A.; Genovese, M.

    2015-10-15

    During the long course of evolution, nature has learnt how to exploit quantum effects. In fact, recent experiments reveal the existence of quantum processes whose coherence extends over unexpectedly long time and space ranges. In particular, photosynthetic processes in light-harvesting complexes display a typical oscillatory dynamics ascribed to quantum coherence. Here, we consider the simple model where a dimer made of two chromophores is strongly coupled with a quasi-resonant vibrational mode. We observe the occurrence of wide oscillations of genuine quantum correlations, between electronic excitations and the environment, represented by vibrational bosonic modes. Such a quantum dynamics has been unveiled through the calculation of the negativity of entanglement and the discord, indicators widely used in quantum information for quantifying the resources needed to realize quantum technologies. We also discuss the possibility of approximating additional weakly-coupled off-resonant vibrational modes, simulating the disturbances induced by the rest of the environment, by a single vibrational mode. Within this approximation, one can show that the off-resonant bath behaves like a classical source of noise.

  7. Simulation and dynamics of entropy-driven, molecular self-assembly processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, B.; Kohler, G.,; Rasmussen, S.,

    1997-04-01

    Molecular self-assembly is frequently found to generate higher-order functional structures in biochemical systems. One such example is the self-assembly of lipids in aqueous solution forming membranes, micelles, and vesicles; another is the dynamic formation and rearrangement of the cytoskeleton. These processes are often driven by local, short-range forces and therefore the dynamics is solely based on local interactions. In this paper, we introduce a cellular automata based simulation, the lattice molecular automaton, in which data structures, representing different molecular entities such as water and hydrophilic and hydrophobic monomers, share locally propagated force information on a hexagonal, two-dimensional lattice. The purpose of this level of description is the simulation of entropic and enthalpic flows in a microcanonical, molecular ensemble to gain insight about entropy-driven processes in molecular many-particle systems. Three applications are shown, i.e., modeling structural features of a polar solvent, cluster formation of hydrophobic monomers in a polar environment, and the self-assembly of polymers. Processes leading to phase separation on a molecular level are discussed. A thorough discussion of the computational details, advantages, and limitations of the lattice molecular automaton approach is given elsewhere [B. Mayer and S. Rasmussen (unpublished)]. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Johns Hopkins University - MD 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Johns Hopkins University - MD 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY (MD.02 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Baltimore , Maryland MD.02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MD.02-2 Site Operations: Conducted spectroscopic studies under contract number AT(49-1)-309. MD.02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on limited quantities of material used in a controlled

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Maryland Disposal Site - MD 05

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Maryland Disposal Site - MD 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MARYLAND DISPOSAL SITE (MD.05 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Baltimore - Vicinity , Maryland MD.05-1 Evaluation Year: 1989 MD.05-1 Site Operations: Proposed disposal site - never developed. MD.05-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Radiological Survey(s): None

  10. Nonadiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics of photoisomerization in bridged azobenzene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao Aihua; Li Bin; Zhang Peiyu; Han Keli

    2012-11-28

    The photoisomerization mechanisms of bridged azobenzene are investigated by means of surface hopping dynamics simulations based on the Zhu-Nakamura theory. In the geometry optimizations and potential energy surface calculations, four minimum-energy conical intersections between the ground state and the lowest excited state are found to play important roles in the trans-cis and cis-trans isomerization processes. The trans-cis photoisomerization proceeds through two minimum-energy conical intersections. Ultrafast pedal motion of the N atoms and twisting of phenyl rings around their N-C bonds allows the molecule to move to a minimum-energy conical intersection, after which surface hopping from S{sub 1} to S{sub 0} occurs. In the S{sub 0} state, further rotation occurs around the N=N bond and two N-C bonds until the azo moiety and phenyl rings complete their isomerization. Finally, the cis form is achieved by subsequent adjustment of the ethylene bridge. In the cis-trans photodynamics, there is one rotational pathway, in the middle of which two CIs are responsible for the surface hopping to the S{sub 0} state. After the nonadiabatic transition, the molecule reaches the trans form through a barrierless pathway and the two phenyl rings and the additional bridge complete their reorientation almost at the same time.

  11. The thermal conductivity of mixed fuel UxPu1-xO2: molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiang-Yang; Cooper, Michael William Donald; Stanek, Christopher Richard; Andersson, Anders David Ragnar

    2015-10-16

    Mixed oxides (MOX), in the context of nuclear fuels, are a mixture of the oxides of heavy actinide elements such as uranium, plutonium and thorium. The interest in the UO2-PuO2 system arises from the fact that these oxides are used both in fast breeder reactors (FBRs) as well as in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The thermal conductivity of UO2 fuel is an important material property that affects fuel performance since it is the key parameter determining the temperature distribution in the fuel, thus governing, e.g., dimensional changes due to thermal expansion, fission gas release rates, etc. For this reason it is important to understand the thermal conductivity of MOX fuel and how it differs from UO2. Here, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out to determine quantitatively, the effect of mixing on the thermal conductivity of UxPu1-xO2, as a function of PuO2 concentrations, for a range of temperatures, 300 – 1500 K. The results will be used to develop enhanced continuum thermal conductivity models for MARMOT and BISON by INL. These models express the thermal conductivity as a function of microstructure state-variables, thus enabling thermal conductivity models with closer connection to the physical state of the fuel.

  12. Dielectric relaxation of ethylene carbonate and propylene carbonate from molecular dynamics simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chaudhari, Mangesh I.; You, Xinli; Pratt, Lawrence R.; Rempe, Susan B.

    2015-11-24

    Ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) are widely used solvents in lithium (Li)-ion batteries and supercapacitors. Ion dissolution and diffusion in those media are correlated with solvent dielectric responses. Here, we use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the pure solvents to calculate dielectric constants and relaxation times, and molecular mobilities. The computed results are compared with limited available experiments to assist more exhaustive studies of these important characteristics. As a result, the observed agreement is encouraging and provides guidance for further validation of force-field simulation models for EC and PC solvents.

  13. Wetting kinetics of water nano-droplet containing non-surfactant nanoparticles: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Gui; Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 ; Hu, Han; Sun, Ying E-mail: ysun@coe.drexel.edu; Duan, Yuanyuan E-mail: ysun@coe.drexel.edu

    2013-12-16

    In this Letter, dynamic wetting of water nano-droplets containing non-surfactant gold nanoparticles on a gold substrate is examined via molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the addition of non-surfactant nanoparticles hinders the nano-second droplet wetting process, attributed to the increases in both surface tension of the nanofluid and friction between nanofluid and substrate. The droplet wetting kinetics decreases with increasing nanoparticle loading and water-particle interaction energy. The observed wetting suppression and the absence of nanoparticle ordering near the contact line of nano-sized droplets differ from the wetting behaviors reported from nanofluid droplets of micron size or larger.

  14. Phonon-magnon interactions in body centered cubic iron: A combined molecular and spin dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perera, Dilina Landau, David P.; Nicholson, Don M.; Malcolm Stocks, G.; Eisenbach, Markus; Yin, Junqi; Brown, Gregory

    2014-05-07

    Combining an atomistic many-body potential with a classical spin Hamiltonian parameterized by first principles calculations, molecular-spin dynamics computer simulations were performed to investigate phonon-magnon interactions in body centered cubic iron. Results obtained for spin-spin and density-density dynamic structure factors show that noticeable softening and damping of magnon modes occur due to the presence of lattice vibrations. Furthermore, as a result of the phonon-magnon coupling, additional longitudinal spin wave excitations are observed, with the same frequencies as the longitudinal phonon modes.

  15. Parallel implementation of three-dimensional molecular dynamic simulation for laser-cluster interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holkundkar, Amol R.

    2013-11-15

    The objective of this article is to report the parallel implementation of the 3D molecular dynamic simulation code for laser-cluster interactions. The benchmarking of the code has been done by comparing the simulation results with some of the experiments reported in the literature. Scaling laws for the computational time is established by varying the number of processor cores and number of macroparticles used. The capabilities of the code are highlighted by implementing various diagnostic tools. To study the dynamics of the laser-cluster interactions, the executable version of the code is available from the author.

  16. Vibrational dynamics of zero-field-splitting hamiltonian in gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents from ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasoroski, Aurélie; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Pollet, Rodolphe

    2014-07-07

    The electronic relaxation of gadolinium complexes used as MRI contrast agents was studied theoretically by following the short time evolution of zero-field-splitting parameters. The statistical analysis of ab initio molecular dynamics trajectories provided a clear separation between static and transient contributions to the zero-field-splitting. For the latter, the correlation time was estimated at approximately 0.1 ps. The influence of the ligand was also probed by replacing one pendant arm of our reference macrocyclic complex by a bulkier phosphonate arm. In contrast to the transient contribution, the static zero-field-splitting was significantly influenced by this substitution.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of H{sub 2} adsorption in tetramethyl ammonium lithium phthalocyanine crystalline structures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamonte, K.; Gomez Gualdron, D.; Scanlon, L. G.; Sandi, G.; Feld, W.; Balbuena, P. B.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Texas A&M Univ.; Wright-Patterson Air Force Base; Wright State Univ.

    2008-11-01

    Tetramethyl ammonium lithium phthalocyanine is explored as a potential material for storage of molecular hydrogen. Density functional theory calculations are used to investigate the molecular structure and the dimer conformation. Additional scans performed to determine the interactions of a H{sub 2} molecule located at various distances from the molecular sites are used to generate a simple force field including dipole-induced-dipole interactions. This force field is employed in molecular dynamics simulations to calculate adsorption isotherms at various pressures. The regions of strongest adsorption are quantified as functions of temperature, pressure, and separation between molecules in the adsorbent phase, and compared to the regions of strongest binding energy as given by the proposed force field. It is found that the total adsorption could not be predicted only from the spatial distribution of the strongest binding energies; the available volume is the other contributing factor even if the volume includes regions of much lower binding energy. The results suggest that the complex anion is primarily involved in the adsorption process with molecular hydrogen, whereas the cation serves to provide access for hydrogen adsorption in both sides of the anion molecular plane, and spacing between the planes.

  18. Interplay between the structure and dynamics in liquid and undercooled boron: An ab initio molecular dynamics simulation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakse, N.; Pasturel, A.

    2014-12-21

    In the present work, the structural and dynamic properties of liquid and undercooled boron are investigated by means of ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. Our results show that both liquid and undercooled states present a well pronounced short-range order (SRO) mainly due to the formation of inverted umbrella structural units. Moreover, we observe the development of a medium-range order (MRO) in the undercooling regime related to the increase of inverted umbrella structural units and of their interconnection as the temperature decreases. We also evidence that this MRO leads to a partial crystallization in the β-rhombohedral crystal below T = 1900 K. Finally, we discuss the role played by the SRO and MRO in the nearly Arrhenius evolution of the diffusion and the non-Arrhenius temperature dependence of the shear viscosity, in agreement with the experiment.

  19. Self-consistent field theory based molecular dynamics with linear system-size scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richters, Dorothee; Khne, Thomas D.

    2014-04-07

    We present an improved field-theoretic approach to the grand-canonical potential suitable for linear scaling molecular dynamics simulations using forces from self-consistent electronic structure calculations. It is based on an exact decomposition of the grand canonical potential for independent fermions and does neither rely on the ability to localize the orbitals nor that the Hamilton operator is well-conditioned. Hence, this scheme enables highly accurate all-electron linear scaling calculations even for metallic systems. The inherent energy drift of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, arising from an incomplete convergence of the self-consistent field cycle, is circumvented by means of a properly modified Langevin equation. The predictive power of the present approach is illustrated using the example of liquid methane under extreme conditions.

  20. Accelerated molecular dynamics and equation-free methods for simulating diffusion in solids.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Jie; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Brown, William Michael; Plimpton, Steven James; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Wagner, Gregory John; Erickson, Lindsay Crowl

    2011-09-01

    Many of the most important and hardest-to-solve problems related to the synthesis, performance, and aging of materials involve diffusion through the material or along surfaces and interfaces. These diffusion processes are driven by motions at the atomic scale, but traditional atomistic simulation methods such as molecular dynamics are limited to very short timescales on the order of the atomic vibration period (less than a picosecond), while macroscale diffusion takes place over timescales many orders of magnitude larger. We have completed an LDRD project with the goal of developing and implementing new simulation tools to overcome this timescale problem. In particular, we have focused on two main classes of methods: accelerated molecular dynamics methods that seek to extend the timescale attainable in atomistic simulations, and so-called 'equation-free' methods that combine a fine scale atomistic description of a system with a slower, coarse scale description in order to project the system forward over long times.

  1. Large-Scale First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Electrostatic Embedding: Application to Acetylcholinesterase Catalysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fattebert, Jean-Luc; Lau, Edmond Y.; Bennion, Brian J.; Huang, Patrick; Lightstone, Felice C.

    2015-10-22

    Enzymes are complicated solvated systems that typically require many atoms to simulate their function with any degree of accuracy. We have recently developed numerical techniques for large scale First-Principles molecular dynamics simulations and applied them to study the enzymatic reaction catalyzed by acetylcholinesterase. We carried out Density functional theory calculations for a quantum mechanical (QM) sub- system consisting of 612 atoms with an O(N) complexity finite-difference approach. The QM sub-system is embedded inside an external potential field representing the electrostatic effect due to the environment. We obtained finite temperature sampling by First-Principles molecular dynamics for the acylation reaction of acetylcholinemore » catalyzed by acetylcholinesterase. Our calculations shows two energies barriers along the reaction coordinate for the enzyme catalyzed acylation of acetylcholine. In conclusion, the second barrier (8.5 kcal/mole) is rate-limiting for the acylation reaction and in good agreement with experiment.« less

  2. Large-Scale First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Electrostatic Embedding: Application to Acetylcholinesterase Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fattebert, Jean-Luc; Lau, Edmond Y.; Bennion, Brian J.; Huang, Patrick; Lightstone, Felice C.

    2015-10-22

    Enzymes are complicated solvated systems that typically require many atoms to simulate their function with any degree of accuracy. We have recently developed numerical techniques for large scale First-Principles molecular dynamics simulations and applied them to study the enzymatic reaction catalyzed by acetylcholinesterase. We carried out Density functional theory calculations for a quantum mechanical (QM) sub- system consisting of 612 atoms with an O(N) complexity finite-difference approach. The QM sub-system is embedded inside an external potential field representing the electrostatic effect due to the environment. We obtained finite temperature sampling by First-Principles molecular dynamics for the acylation reaction of acetylcholine catalyzed by acetylcholinesterase. Our calculations shows two energies barriers along the reaction coordinate for the enzyme catalyzed acylation of acetylcholine. In conclusion, the second barrier (8.5 kcal/mole) is rate-limiting for the acylation reaction and in good agreement with experiment.

  3. A Linked-Cell Domain Decomposition Method for Molecular Dynamics Simulation on a Scalable Multiprocessor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, L. H.; Brooks III, E. D.; Belak, J.

    1992-01-01

    A molecular dynamics algorithm for performing large-scale simulations using the Parallel C Preprocessor (PCP) programming paradigm on the BBN TC2000, a massively parallel computer, is discussed. The algorithm uses a linked-cell data structure to obtain the near neighbors of each atom as time evoles. Each processor is assigned to a geometric domain containing many subcells and the storage for that domain is private to the processor. Within this scheme, the interdomain (i.e., interprocessor) communication is minimized.

  4. Carbon atom, dimer and trimer chemistry on diamond surfaces from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valone, S.M.

    1995-07-01

    Spectroscopic studies of various atmospheres appearing in diamond film synthesis suggest evidence for carbon atoms, dimers, or trimers. Molecular dynamics simulations with the Brenner hydrocarbon potential are being used to investigate the elementary reactions of these species on a hydrogen-terminated diamond (111) surface. In principle these types of simulations can be extended to simulations of growth morphologies, in the 1-2 monolayer regime presently.

  5. Dispersion curves from short-time molecular dynamics simulation. 1. Diatomic chain results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noid, D.W.; Broocks, B.T.; Gray, S.K.; Marple, S.L.

    1988-06-16

    The multiple signal classification method (MUSIC) for frequency estimation is used to compute the frequency dispersion curves of a diatomic chain from the time-dependent structure factor. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that MUSIC can accurately determine the frequencies from very short time trajectories. MUSIC is also used to show how the frequencies can vary in time, i.e., along a trajectory. The method is ideally suited for analyzing molecular dynamics simulations of large systems.

  6. Mass transport properties of Pu/DT mixtures from orbital free molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kress, Joel David; Ticknor, Christopher; Collins, Lee A.

    2015-09-16

    Mass transport properties (shear viscosity and diffusion coefficients) for Pu/DT mixtures were calculated with Orbital Free Molecular Dynamics (OFMD). The results were fitted to simple functions of mass density (for ρ=10.4 to 62.4 g/cm3) and temperature (for T=100 up to 3,000 eV) for Pu/DT mixtures consisting of 100/0, 25/75, 50/50, and 75/25 by number.

  7. Opposite photo-induced deformations in azobenzene-containing polymers with different molecular architecture: Molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilnytskyi, Jaroslav M.; Neher, Dieter; Saphiannikova, Marina

    2011-07-28

    Photo-induced deformations in azobenzene-containing polymers (azo-polymers) are central to a number of applications, such as optical storage and fabrication of diffractive elements. The microscopic nature of the underlying opto-mechanical coupling is yet not clear. In this study, we address the experimental finding that the scenario of the effects depends on molecular architecture of the used azo-polymer. Typically, opposite deformations in respect to the direction of light polarization are observed for liquid crystalline and amorphous azo-polymers. In this study, we undertake molecular dynamics simulations of two different models that mimic these two types of azo-polymers. We employ hybrid force field modeling and consider only trans-isomers of azobenzene, represented as Gay-Berne sites. The effect of illumination on the orientation of the chromophores is considered on the level of orientational hole burning and emphasis is given to the resulting deformation of the polymer matrix. We reproduce deformations of opposite sign for the two models being considered here and discuss the relevant microscopic mechanisms in both cases.

  8. Reactive MD Simulation of Shock-Induced Cavitation Damage | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leadership Computing Facility Billion atom reactive molecular dynamics simulation of nanobubble collapse in wa Billion atom reactive molecular dynamics simulation of nanobubble collapse in water near a ceramic surface under shock compression. A 2km/sec shock wave compresses the nanobubble and creates high compressive stress and novel chemical reactions (production of hydronium ions) not found under normal conditions. The simulations reveal that high pressure in the shock wave deforms the

  9. Reactive MD Simulations of Electrochemical Oxide Interfaces at Mesoscale |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility molecular dynamics demonstrating the sintering mechanism under the influence of e-field Large-scale reactive molecular dynamics demonstrating the sintering mechanism under the influence of e-field. Tailoring the properties of nanoscale oxide-based technologies such as chemical activity, efficiency, durability, and reliability requires a better understanding of the nanoscale oxide growth kinetics under various oxidation conditions, the resulting film

  10. Ensemble Sampling vs. Time Sampling in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Thermal Conductivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gordiz, Kiarash; Singh, David J.; Henry, Asegun

    2015-01-29

    In this report we compare time sampling and ensemble averaging as two different methods available for phase space sampling. For the comparison, we calculate thermal conductivities of solid argon and silicon structures, using equilibrium molecular dynamics. We introduce two different schemes for the ensemble averaging approach, and show that both can reduce the total simulation time as compared to time averaging. It is also found that velocity rescaling is an efficient mechanism for phase space exploration. Although our methodology is tested using classical molecular dynamics, the ensemble generation approaches may find their greatest utility in computationally expensive simulations such asmore » first principles molecular dynamics. For such simulations, where each time step is costly, time sampling can require long simulation times because each time step must be evaluated sequentially and therefore phase space averaging is achieved through sequential operations. On the other hand, with ensemble averaging, phase space sampling can be achieved through parallel operations, since each ensemble is independent. For this reason, particularly when using massively parallel architectures, ensemble sampling can result in much shorter simulation times and exhibits similar overall computational effort.« less

  11. Analysis of nanoscale two-phase flow of argon using molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verma, Abhishek Kumar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-12-09

    Two phase flows through micro and nanochannels have attracted a lot of attention because of their immense applicability to many advanced fields such as MEMS/NEMS, electronic cooling, bioengineering etc. In this work, a molecular dynamics simulation method is employed to study the condensation process of superheated argon vapor force driven flow through a nanochannel combining fluid flow and heat transfer. A simple and effective particle insertion method is proposed to model phase change of argon based on non-periodic boundary conditions in the simulation domain. Starting from a crystalline solid wall of channel, the condensation process evolves from a transient unsteady state where we study the influence of different wall temperatures and fluid wall interactions on interfacial and heat transport properties of two phase flows. Subsequently, we analyzed transient temperature, density and velocity fields across the channel and their dependency on varying wall temperature and fluid wall interaction, after a dynamic equilibrium is achieved in phase transition. Quasi-steady nonequilibrium temperature profile, heat flux and interfacial thermal resistance were analyzed. The results demonstrate that the molecular dynamics method, with the proposed particle insertion method, effectively solves unsteady nonequilibrium two phase flows at nanoscale resolutions whose interphase between liquid and vapor phase is typically of the order of a few molecular diameters.

  12. Accurate static and dynamic properties of liquid-electrolytes for Li-ion batteries from ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Jiang, Deen; Kent, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries have the potential to revolutionize the transportation industry, as they did for wireless communication. A judicious choice of the liquid electrolytes used in these systems is required to achieve a good balance among high-energy storage, long cycle life and stability, and fast charging. Ethylene-carbonate (EC) and propylene-carbonate (PC) are popular electrolytes. However, to date, almost all molecular-dynamics simulations of these fluids rely on classical force fields, while a complete description of the functionality of Li-ion batteries will eventually require quantum mechanics. We perform accurate ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations of ethylene- and propylene-carbonate with LiPF6 at experimental concentrations to build solvation models which explain available neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results and to compute Li-ion solvation energies and diffusion constants. Our results suggest some similarities between the two liquids as well as some important differences. Simulations also provide useful insights into formation of solid-electrolyte interphases in the presence of electrodes in conventional Li-ion batteries.

  13. Accurate static and dynamic properties of liquid electrolytes for Li-ion batteries from ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganesh, P.; Jiang, D.; Kent, P.R.C.

    2011-03-31

    Lithium-ion batteries have the potential to revolutionize the transportation industry, as they did for wireless communication. A judicious choice of the liquid electrolytes used in these systems is required to achieve a good balance among high-energy storage, long cycle life and stability, and fast charging. Ethylene-carbonate (EC) and propylene-carbonate (PC) are popular electrolytes. However, to date, almost all molecular-dynamics simulations of these fluids rely on classical force fields, while a complete description of the functionality of Li-ion batteries will eventually require quantum mechanics. We perform accurate ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations of ethylene- and propylene-carbonate with LiPF6 at experimental concentrations to build solvation models which explain available neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results and to compute Li-ion solvation energies and diffusion constants. Our results suggest some similarities between the two liquids as well as some important differences. Simulations also provide useful insights into formation of solid-electrolyte interphases in the presence of electrodes in conventional Li-ion batteries.

  14. Structure, dynamics and stability of water/scCO2/mineral interfaces from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Mal Soon; McGrail, B. Peter; Rousseau, Roger J.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra

    2015-10-12

    The interface between a solid and a complex multi-component liquid forms a unique reaction environment whose structure and composition can significantly deviate from either bulk or liquid phase and is poorly understood due the innate difficulty to obtain molecular level information. Feldspar minerals, as typified by the Ca-end member Anorthite, serve as prototypical model systems to assess the reactivity and ion mobility at solid/water-bearing supercritical fluid (WBSF) interfaces due to recent X-ray based measurements that provide information on water-film formation, and cation vacancies at these surfaces. Using density functional theory based molecular dynamics, which allows the evaluation of reactivity and condensed phase dynamics on equal footing, we report on the structure and dynamics of water nucleation and surface aggregation, carbonation and Ca mobilization under geologic carbon sequestration scenarios (T=323 K and P=90 bar). We find that water has a strong enthalpic preference for aggregation on a Ca-rich, O-terminated anorthite (001) surface, but entropy strongly hinders the film formation at very low water concentrations. Carbonation reactions readily occur at electron-rich terminal Oxygen sites adjacent to cation vacancies, when in contact with supercritical CO2. Cation vacancies of this type can form readily in the presence of a water layer that allows for facile and enthalpicly favorable Ca2+ extraction and solvation. Apart from providing unprecedented molecular level detail of a complex three component (mineral, water and scCO2) system), this work highlights the ability of modern capabilities of AIMD methods to begin to qualitatively and quantitatively address structure and reactivity at solid-liquid interfaces of high chemical complexity. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy (M.-S. L., B. P. M. and V.-A. G.) and the Office of Basic Energy Science, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences

  15. Water around fullerene shape amphiphiles: A molecular dynamics simulation study of hydrophobic hydration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varanasi, S. R. E-mail: guskova@ipfdd.de; John, A.; Guskova, O. A. E-mail: guskova@ipfdd.de; Sommer, J.-U.

    2015-06-14

    Fullerene C{sub 60} sub-colloidal particle with diameter ?1 nm represents a boundary case between small and large hydrophobic solutes on the length scale of hydrophobic hydration. In the present paper, a molecular dynamics simulation is performed to investigate this complex phenomenon for bare C{sub 60} fullerene and its amphiphilic/charged derivatives, so called shape amphiphiles. Since most of the unique properties of water originate from the pattern of hydrogen bond network and its dynamics, spatial, and orientational aspects of water in solvation shells around the solute surface having hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions are analyzed. Dynamical properties such as translational-rotational mobility, reorientational correlation and occupation time correlation functions of water molecules, and diffusion coefficients are also calculated. Slower dynamics of solvent moleculeswater retardationin the vicinity of the solutes is observed. Both the topological properties of hydrogen bond pattern and the dangling OH groups that represent surface defects in water network are monitored. The fraction of such defect structures is increased near the hydrophobic cap of fullerenes. Some dry regions of C{sub 60} are observed which can be considered as signatures of surface dewetting. In an effort to provide molecular level insight into the thermodynamics of hydration, the free energy of solvation is determined for a family of fullerene particles using thermodynamic integration technique.

  16. The interplay between inter- and intra-molecular dynamics in a series of alkylcitrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kipnusu, Wycliffe Kiprop; Kossack, Wilhelm; Iacob, Ciprian; Zeigermann, Philipp; Jasiurkowska, Malgorzata; Sangoro, Joshua R; Valiullin, Rustem; Kremer, Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    The inter- and intra-molecular dynamics in a series of glass-forming alkylcitrates is studied by a combination of Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy (BDS), Pulsed Field Gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (PFG NMR), Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Analyzing the temperature dependencies of specific IR absorption bands in terms of their spectral position and the corresponding oscillator strengths enables one to unravel the intramolecular dynamics of specific molecular moieties and to compare them with the (primarily dielectrically) determined intermolecular dynamics. With decreasing temperature, the IR band positions of carbonyls (part of the core units) and H-bonded moieties of citrates show a red shift with a kink at the calorimetric glass transition temperature (Tg) while other moieties, whose dynamics are decoupled from those of the core units, exhibit a blue shift with nominal changes at Tg. The oscillator strength of all units in citrates depicts stronger temperature dependencies above Tg and in some, the ester linkage and H-bonded units show a change of slope at a temperature where structural and faster secondary relaxations merge. By that, a wealth of novel information is obtained proving the fundamental importance of intramolecular mobility in the process of glass formation, beyond coarse-grained descriptions.

  17. Tungsten polyoxometalate molecules as active nodes for dynamic carrier exchange in hybrid molecular/semiconductor capacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balliou, A.; Douvas, A. M.; Normand, P.; Argitis, P.; Glezos, N.; Tsikritzis, D.; Kennou, S.

    2014-10-14

    In this work we study the utilization of molecular transition metal oxides known as polyoxometalates (POMs), in particular the Keggin structure anions of the formula PW₁₂O₄₀³⁻, as active nodes for potential switching and/or fast writing memory applications. The active molecules are being integrated in hybrid Metal-Insulator/POM molecules-Semiconductor capacitors, which serve as prototypes allowing investigation of critical performance characteristics towards the design of more sophisticated devices. The charging ability as well as the electronic structure of the molecular layer is probed by means of electrical characterization, namely, capacitance-voltage and current-voltage measurements, as well as transient capacitance measurements, C (t), under step voltage polarization. It is argued that the transient current peaks observed are manifestations of dynamic carrier exchange between the gate electrode and specific molecular levels, while the transient C (t) curves under conditions of molecular charging can supply information for the rate of change of the charge that is being trapped and de-trapped within the molecular layer. Structural characterization via surface and cross sectional scanning electron microscopy as well as atomic force microscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, UV and Fourier-transform IR spectroscopies, UPS, and XPS contribute to the extraction of accurate electronic structure characteristics and open the path for the design of new devices with on-demand tuning of their interfacial properties via the controlled preparation of the POM layer.

  18. A model of lipid-free Apolipoprotein A-I revealed by iterative molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xing; Lei, Dongsheng; Zhang, Lei; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Shengli

    2015-03-20

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I), the major protein component of high-density lipoprotein, has been proven inversely correlated to cardiovascular risk in past decades. The lipid-free state of apo A-I is the initial stage which binds to lipids forming high-density lipoprotein. Molecular models of lipid-free apo A-I have been reported by methods like X-ray crystallography and chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry (CCL/MS). Through structural analysis we found that those current models had limited consistency with other experimental results, such as those from hydrogen exchange with mass spectrometry. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we also found those models could not reach a stable equilibrium state. Therefore, by integrating various experimental results, we proposed a new structural model for lipidfree apo A-I, which contains a bundled four-helix N-terminal domain (1–192) that forms a variable hydrophobic groove and a mobile short hairpin C-terminal domain (193–243). This model exhibits an equilibrium state through molecular dynamics simulation and is consistent with most of the experimental results known from CCL/MS on lysine pairs, fluorescence resonance energy transfer and hydrogen exchange. This solution-state lipid-free apo A-I model may elucidate the possible conformational transitions of apo A-I binding with lipids in high-density lipoprotein formation.

  19. A model of lipid-free Apolipoprotein A-I revealed by iterative molecular dynamics simulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Xing; Lei, Dongsheng; Zhang, Lei; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Shengli

    2015-03-20

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I), the major protein component of high-density lipoprotein, has been proven inversely correlated to cardiovascular risk in past decades. The lipid-free state of apo A-I is the initial stage which binds to lipids forming high-density lipoprotein. Molecular models of lipid-free apo A-I have been reported by methods like X-ray crystallography and chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry (CCL/MS). Through structural analysis we found that those current models had limited consistency with other experimental results, such as those from hydrogen exchange with mass spectrometry. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we also found those models could not reach a stable equilibrium state. Therefore,more » by integrating various experimental results, we proposed a new structural model for lipidfree apo A-I, which contains a bundled four-helix N-terminal domain (1–192) that forms a variable hydrophobic groove and a mobile short hairpin C-terminal domain (193–243). This model exhibits an equilibrium state through molecular dynamics simulation and is consistent with most of the experimental results known from CCL/MS on lysine pairs, fluorescence resonance energy transfer and hydrogen exchange. This solution-state lipid-free apo A-I model may elucidate the possible conformational transitions of apo A-I binding with lipids in high-density lipoprotein formation.« less

  20. Alfred L. Frechette, M.D. COYYISIIONE~

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Alfred L. Frechette, M.D. - COYYISIIONE~ , 5i7 StrcOm 02X/ Room 770 Tel: (6171 727-2660 October 15. 1979 \+ * Dr. William Mot? DOE Environmental Control Division ' Mail Stop E2Gl Washington, D.C. 20545 Re: Uranium in the Woburn Dump Dear Dr. Mott: The Massachusetts Department of Public Health has been informed that uranium ore was disposed of in a dump site in Woburn, Massachusetts sometime in 1960. x. -.. ' The National Lead Company, was under contract with a federal agency to assay uranium ore

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Tri-n-butyl-phosphate/n-Dodecane Mixture: Thermophysical Properties and Molecular Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Almeida, Valmor F; Cui, Shengting; Khomami, Bamin

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of tri-n-butyl-phosphate (TBP)/n-dodecane mixture in the liquid phase have been carried out using two recently developed TBP force field models (J. Phys. Chem. B 2012, 116, 305) in combination with the all-atom optimized potentials for liquid simulations (OPLS-AA) force field model for n-dodecane. Specifically, the electric dipole moment of TBP, mass density of the mixture, and the excess volume of mixing were computed with TBP mole fraction ranging from 0 to 1. It is found that the aforementioned force field models accurately predict the mass density of the mixture in the entire mole fraction range. Commensurate with experimental measurements, the electric dipole moment of the TBP was found to slightly increase with the mole fraction of TBP in the mixture. Also, in accord with experimental data, the excess volume of mixing is positive in the entire mole fraction range, peaking at TBP mole fraction range 0.3 0.5. Finally, a close examination of the spatial pair correlation functions between TBP molecules, and between TBP and n-dodecane molecules, revealed formation of TBP dimers through self-association at close distance, a phenomenon with ample experimental evidence.

  2. Dissociative chemisorption of methane on metal surfaces: Tests of dynamical assumptions using quantum models and ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Bret; Nattino, Francesco; Kroes, Geert-Jan

    2014-08-07

    The dissociative chemisorption of methane on metal surfaces is of great practical and fundamental importance. Not only is it the rate-limiting step in the steam reforming of natural gas, the reaction exhibits interesting mode-selective behavior and a strong dependence on the temperature of the metal. We present a quantum model for this reaction on Ni(100) and Ni(111) surfaces based on the reaction path Hamiltonian. The dissociative sticking probabilities computed using this model agree well with available experimental data with regard to variation with incident energy, substrate temperature, and the vibrational state of the incident molecule. We significantly expand the vibrational basis set relative to earlier studies, which allows reaction probabilities to be calculated for doubly excited initial vibrational states, though it does not lead to appreciable changes in the reaction probabilities for singly excited initial states. Sudden models used to treat the center of mass motion parallel to the surface are compared with results from ab initio molecular dynamics and found to be reasonable. Similar comparisons for molecular rotation suggest that our rotationally adiabatic model is incorrect, and that sudden behavior is closer to reality. Such a model is proposed and tested. A model for predicting mode-selective behavior is tested, with mixed results, though we find it is consistent with experimental studies of normal vs. total (kinetic) energy scaling. Models for energy transfer into lattice vibrations are also examined.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of organic SIMS with Cu{sub n} (n=1-3) clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townes, J. A.; White, A. K.; Krantzman, K. D.; Garrison, B. J.

    1999-06-10

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study the effect of cluster size on the emission yield and damage cross section in organic SIMS. A model system composed of a monolayer of biphenyl molecules on a Cu(001) substrate was bombarded with Cu{sub n} (n=1-3) projectiles at kinetic energies of 0.100 keV per atom. The yield increases with cluster size, but a nonlinear enhancement in yield is not observed. The yield-to-damage ratio, on the other hand, increases with the use of clusters, indicating that clusters have the potential to improve the sensitivity of SIMS.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Displacement Cascades in Single and Polycrystalline Zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du Jincheng

    2009-03-10

    Displacement cascades in zirconia have been studied using classical molecular dynamics simulations. Polycrystalline zirconia with nano-meter grains were created using Voronoi polyhedra construction and studied in comparison with single crystalline zirconia. The results show that displacement cascades with similar kinetic energy generated larger number of displaced atoms in polycrystalline than in the single crystal structure. The fraction of atoms with coordination number change was also higher in polycrystalline zirconia that was explained to be due to the diffusion of oxygen and relaxation at grain boundaries.

  5. Nonlinear Raman Techniques in Femtosecond Time Resolved Spectroscopy for the Analysis and Control of Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Materny, Arnulf; Konradi, Jakow; Namboodiri, Vinu; Namboodiri, Mahesh; Scaria, Abraham

    2008-11-14

    The use of four-wave mixing techniques in femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy has considerable advantages. Due to the many degrees of freedom offered e.g. by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), the dynamics even of complex systems can be analyzed in detail. Using pulse shaping techniques in combination with a self-learning loop approach, molecular mode excitation can be controlled very efficiently in a multi-photon excitation process. Results obtained from the optimal control of CARS on {beta}-carotene are discussed.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of grain boundaries in thin nanocrystalline silicon films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, G.P.; Doolen, G.D.; Mainieri, R.; Campbell, D.K.; Luchnikov, V.A. |

    1997-10-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, the grain boundaries in thin polycrystalline silicon films (considered as promising material for future nanoelectronic devices) are investigated. It is shown that in polysilicon film with randomly oriented grains the majority of grain boundaries are disordered. However, some grains with small mutual orientation differences can form extended crystalline patterns. The structure of the grain boundaries satisfies the thermodynamical criterion. The majority of atoms in the grain boundaries are tetrahedrally coordinated with the nearest neighbors, even though the grain boundaries are disordered. The grain boundary matter is characterized as an amorphous phase with a characteristic tetragonality value.

  7. Simulations of fluorescence solvatochromism in substituted PPV oligomers from excited state molecular dynamics with implicit solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorgaard, J. A.; Nelson, T.; Kalinin, K.; Kuzmenko, V.; Velizhanin, K. A.; Tretiak, S.

    2015-04-28

    In this study, an efficient method of treating solvent effects in excited state molecular dynamics (ESMD) is implemented and tested by exploring the solvatochromic effects in substituted p-phenylene vinylene oligomers. A continuum solvent model is used which has very little computational overhead. This allows simulations of ESMD with solvent effects on the scale of hundreds of picoseconds for systems of up to hundreds of atoms. At these time scales, solvatochromic shifts in fluoresence spectra can be described. Solvatochromic shifts in absorption and fluorescence spectra from ESMD are compared with time-dependent density functional theory calculations and experiments.

  8. Evaporative cooling of microscopic water droplets in vacuo: Molecular dynamics simulations and kinetic gas theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schlesinger, Daniel; Sellberg, Jonas A.; Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G. M.

    2016-03-22

    In the present study, we investigate the process of evaporative cooling of nanometer-sized droplets in vacuum using molecular dynamics simulations with the TIP4P/2005 water model. The results are compared to the temperature evolution calculated from the Knudsen theory of evaporation which is derived from kinetic gas theory. The calculated and simulation results are found to be in very good agreement for an evaporation coefficient equal to unity. Lastly, our results are of interest to experiments utilizing droplet dispensers as well as to cloud micro-physics.

  9. Linear scaling first-principles molecular dynamics with plane waves accuracy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fattebert, J; Gygi, F

    2005-10-07

    We propose a real-space finite differences approach for accurate and unbiased O(N) Density Functional Theory molecular dynamics simulations based on a localized orbitals representation of the electronic structure. The discretization error can be reduced systematically by adapting the mesh spacing, while the orbitals truncation error decreases exponentially with the radius of the localization regions. For regions large enough, energy conservation in microcanonical simulations is demonstrated for liquid water. We propose an explanation for the energy drift observed for smaller regions.

  10. Molecular dynamic studies on anisotropic explosion of laser irradiated Xe cluster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Gaurav; Gupta, N. K.

    2012-09-15

    A three dimensional molecular dynamic model is used to investigate the dynamics of Xe clusters of various radii irradiated by laser of moderate intensities ({approx}10{sup 14}-10{sup 16}W/cm{sup 2}). The FWHM pulse duration of the laser is varied from few laser cycles to hundreds of femtosecond. For cluster of radius 50 A irradiated by a laser of 170 fs pulse duration, it is observed that ion yield is more along the direction of laser polarization than perpendicular to it. This trend reverses (more ions are emitted along the direction perpendicular to laser polarization than parallel to it) when laser pulses of few cycles are used. This reversal of anisotropy is explained on the basis of spatial shielding of ions due to the oscillating inner electron cloud along direction of laser electric field. The nature of anisotropy remains same with variations in laser intensity and cluster size.

  11. Dynamical consequences of a constraint on the Langevin thermostat in molecular cluster simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stinson, Jake L.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Ford, Ian J.

    2014-11-17

    We investigate some unusual behaviour observed while performing molecular dynamics simulations with the DL_POLY_4.03 code. Under the standard Langevin thermostat, atoms appear to be thermalised to different temperatures, depending on their mass and on the total number of particles in the system. We find that an imposed constraint whereby no thermal noise acts on the centre of mass of the system is the cause of the unexpected behaviour. This is demonstrated by solving the stochastic dynamics for the constrained thermostat and comparing the results with simulation data. The effect of the constraint can be considerable for small systems with disparate masses. By removing the constraint the Langevin thermostat may be restored to its intended behaviour and this has been implemented as an option in DL_POLY_4.05. SMK was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences.

  12. On the dynamic and static manifestation of molecular absorption in thin films probed by a microcantilever

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finot, Eric; Fabre, Arnaud; Passian, Ali; Thundat, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical resonators shaped like microcantilevers have been demonstrated as a platform for very sensitive detection of chemical and biological analytes. However, its use as an analytical tool will require fundamental understanding of the molecular absorption-induced effects in the static and dynamic sensor response. The effect of absorption-induced surface stress on the microcantilever response is here investigated using palladium hydride formation. It is shown that the resonance and deformation states of the cantilever monitored simultaneously exhibit excellent correlation with the phase of the hydride formation. However, the associated frequency shifts and quasistatic bending are observed to be independent during solid solution phase. Importantly, absorption-induced changes in the elastic parameters of the palladium film are found to play a dominant role in the static and dynamic response. The presented results help in discerning the parameters that control the cantilever response as well as the relationships between these parameters.

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- W R Grace Co - Curtis Bay - MD 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Co - Curtis Bay - MD 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites W.R. Grace Co., MD Alternate Name(s): W.R. Grace Rare Earths, Inc. Davison Chemical Division Curtis Bay Plant MD.01-2 MD.01-3 Location: Curtis Bay, Baltimore, Maryland MD.01-2 Historical Operations: Conducted developmental research and thorium extraction from monazite ore for AEC. MD.01-6 Eligibility Determination: Eligible MD.01-2 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys MD.01-3 MD.01-4 MD.01-5 MD.01-6 Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S.

  14. Exploring the vibrational fingerprint of the electronic excitation energy via molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deyne, Andy Van Yperen-De; Pauwels, Ewald; Ghysels, An; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Hemelsoet, Karen; De Meyer, Thierry; Department of Textiles, Ghent University, Technologiepark 907, 9052 Zwijnaarde ; De Clerck, Karen

    2014-04-07

    A Fourier-based method is presented to relate changes of the molecular structure during a molecular dynamics simulation with fluctuations in the electronic excitation energy. The method implies sampling of the ground state potential energy surface. Subsequently, the power spectrum of the velocities is compared with the power spectrum of the excitation energy computed using time-dependent density functional theory. Peaks in both spectra are compared, and motions exhibiting a linear or quadratic behavior can be distinguished. The quadratically active motions are mainly responsible for the changes in the excitation energy and hence cause shifts between the dynamic and static values of the spectral property. Moreover, information about the potential energy surface of various excited states can be obtained. The procedure is illustrated with three case studies. The first electronic excitation is explored in detail and dominant vibrational motions responsible for changes in the excitation energy are identified for ethylene, biphenyl, and hexamethylbenzene. The proposed method is also extended to other low-energy excitations. Finally, the vibrational fingerprint of the excitation energy of a more complex molecule, in particular the azo dye ethyl orange in a water environment, is analyzed.

  15. Study on the thermal resistance in secondary particles chain of silica aerogel by molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, M. [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing100190 (China); Department of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Qiu, L., E-mail: qiulin111@sina.com, E-mail: jzzhengxinghua@163.com; Zheng, X. H., E-mail: qiulin111@sina.com, E-mail: jzzhengxinghua@163.com; Zhu, J.; Tang, D. W. [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing100190 (China)

    2014-09-07

    In this article, molecular dynamics simulation was performed to study the heat transport in secondary particles chain of silica aerogel. The two adjacent particles as the basic heat transport unit were modelled to characterize the heat transfer through the calculation of thermal resistance and vibrational density of states (VDOS). The total thermal resistance of two contact particles was predicted by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (NEMD). The defects were formed by deleting atoms in the system randomly first and performing heating and quenching process afterwards to achieve the DLCA (diffusive limited cluster-cluster aggregation) process. This kind of treatment showed a very reasonable prediction of thermal conductivity for the silica aerogels compared with the experimental values. The heat transport was great suppressed as the contact length increased or defect concentration increased. The constrain effect of heat transport was much significant when contact length fraction was in the small range (<0.5) or the defect concentration is in the high range (>0.5). Also, as the contact length increased, the role of joint thermal resistance played in the constraint of heat transport was increasing. However, the defect concentration did not affect the share of joint thermal resistance as the contact length did. VDOS of the system was calculated by numerical method to characterize the heat transport from atomic vibration view. The smaller contact length and greater defect concentration primarily affected the longitudinal acoustic modes, which ultimately influenced the heat transport between the adjacent particles.

  16. Molecular Dynameomics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynameomics Molecular Dynameomics DaggettHiResWhitebg.png Key Challenges: Perform molecular dynamics simulations to characterize both native (i.e. biologically active) and...

  17. Inelastic neutron scattering and molecular simulation of the dynamics of interlayer water in smectite clay minerals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cygan, Randall T.; Daemen, Luke L.; Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Krumhansl, James L.; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2015-11-16

    The study of mineral–water interfaces is of great importance to a variety of applications including oil and gas extraction, gas subsurface storage, environmental contaminant treatment, and nuclear waste repositories. Understanding the fundamentals of that interface is key to the success of those applications. Confinement of water in the interlayer of smectite clay minerals provides a unique environment to examine the interactions among water molecules, interlayer cations, and clay mineral surfaces. Smectite minerals are characterized by a relatively low layer charge that allows the clay to swell with increasing water content. Montmorillonite and beidellite varieties of smectite were investigated to comparemore » the impact of the location of layer charge on the interlayer structure and dynamics. Inelastic neutron scattering of hydrated and dehydrated cation-exchanged smectites was used to probe the dynamics of the interlayer water (200–900 cm–1 spectral region) and identify the shift in the librational edge as a function of the interlayer cation. Molecular dynamics simulations of equivalent phases and power spectra, derived from the resulting molecular trajectories, indicate a general shift in the librational behavior with interlayer cation that is generally consistent with the neutron scattering results for the monolayer hydrates. Both neutron scattering and power spectra exhibit librational structures affected by the location of layer charge and by the charge of the interlayer cation. Furthermore, divalent cations (Ba2+ and Mg2+) characterized by large hydration enthalpies typically exhibit multiple broad librational peaks compared to monovalent cations (Cs+ and Na+), which have relatively small hydration enthalpies.« less

  18. Inelastic neutron scattering and molecular simulation of the dynamics of interlayer water in smectite clay minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cygan, Randall T.; Daemen, Luke L.; Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Krumhansl, James L.; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2015-11-16

    The study of mineral–water interfaces is of great importance to a variety of applications including oil and gas extraction, gas subsurface storage, environmental contaminant treatment, and nuclear waste repositories. Understanding the fundamentals of that interface is key to the success of those applications. Confinement of water in the interlayer of smectite clay minerals provides a unique environment to examine the interactions among water molecules, interlayer cations, and clay mineral surfaces. Smectite minerals are characterized by a relatively low layer charge that allows the clay to swell with increasing water content. Montmorillonite and beidellite varieties of smectite were investigated to compare the impact of the location of layer charge on the interlayer structure and dynamics. Inelastic neutron scattering of hydrated and dehydrated cation-exchanged smectites was used to probe the dynamics of the interlayer water (200–900 cm–1 spectral region) and identify the shift in the librational edge as a function of the interlayer cation. Molecular dynamics simulations of equivalent phases and power spectra, derived from the resulting molecular trajectories, indicate a general shift in the librational behavior with interlayer cation that is generally consistent with the neutron scattering results for the monolayer hydrates. Both neutron scattering and power spectra exhibit librational structures affected by the location of layer charge and by the charge of the interlayer cation. Furthermore, divalent cations (Ba2+ and Mg2+) characterized by large hydration enthalpies typically exhibit multiple broad librational peaks compared to monovalent cations (Cs+ and Na+), which have relatively small hydration enthalpies.

  19. Final Report. The 2015 Conference on the Dynamics of Molecular Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suits, Arthur G.

    2015-08-31

    The 25th The Conference on the Dynamics of Molecular Collisions (DMC) was held from July 12-17, 2015. The Conference provides a unique platform and focal point for the gathering of experimentalists and theoreticians in the field of chemical dynamics. Since its inauguration in 1965, it has played an irreplaceable role in the development of this field and of many distinguished careers. This 25th meeting was highly successful. We held ten oral sessions and four poster sessions. Nobel Laureate Yuan T. Lee presented the keynote lecture. At this meeting, celebrating 50 years of chemical reaction dynamics, one hundred thirty-seven attendees participated, forty-two talks were presented as well as fifty-nine posters.Many attendees remarked that it was the “best meeting of the year.” Results from the meeting and other contributions were collected in a special issue of the Journal of Physical Chemistry A, published December 17, 2015. With this proposal we sought support for students, post-doctoral researchers and junior scientists who needed financial support. The Department of Energy has a large program in gas phase chemistry and many of the speakers and session chairs at the meeting are presently supported by DOE, including Professor Millard Alexander and Carl Lineberger, the recipents of the 2015 Herschbach Prizes that were awarded at the meeting. Funds were used to supplement registration fees for students and post-docs and to cover registration fees for the six selected “hot topic” presentations.

  20. Inter-cage dynamics in structure I, II, and H fluoromethane hydrates as studied by NMR and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trueba, Alondra Torres; Kroon, Maaike C.; Peters, Cor J.; Moudrakovski, Igor L.; Ratcliffe, Christopher I.; Ripmeester, John A.; Alavi, Saman

    2014-06-07

    Prospective industrial applications of clathrate hydrates as materials for gas separation require further knowledge of cavity distortion, cavity selectivity, and defects induction by guest-host interactions. The results presented in this contribution show that under certain temperature conditions the guest combination of CH{sub 3}F and a large polar molecule induces defects on the clathrate hydrate framework that allow intercage guest dynamics. {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts of a CH{sub 3}F/CH{sub 4}/TBME sH hydrate and a temperature analysis of the {sup 2}H NMR powder lineshapes of a CD{sub 3}F/THF sII and CD{sub 3}F/TBME sH hydrate, displayed evidence that the populations of CH{sub 4} and CH{sub 3}F in the D and D{sup ?} cages were in a state of rapid exchange. A hydrogen bonding analysis using molecular dynamics simulations on the TBME/CH{sub 3}F and TBME/CH{sub 4} sH hydrates showed that the presence of CH{sub 3}F enhances the hydrogen bonding probability of the TBME molecule with the water molecules of the cavity. Similar results were obtained for THF/CH{sub 3}F and THF/CH{sub 4} sII hydrates. The enhanced hydrogen bond formation leads to the formation of defects in the water hydrogen bonding lattice and this can enhance the migration of CH{sub 3}F molecules between adjacent small cages.

  1. Impact of deformation on the atomic structures and dynamics of a Cu-Zr metallic glass: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.; Mendelev, M. I.; Wang, C. Z.; Ott, R.; Zhang, F.; Besser, M. F.; Ho, K. M.; Kramer, M. J.

    2014-11-03

    Despite numerous studies on the atomic structures of Cu-Zr metallic glasses (MGs), their inherent structural ordering, e.g., medium-range order (MRO), remains difficult to describe. Specifically lacking is an understanding of how the MRO responds to deformation and the associated changes in atomic mobility. In this paper, we focus on the impact of deformation on MRO and associated effect on diffusion in a well-relaxed Cu64.5Zr35.5 MG by molecular dynamics simulations. The Cu-Zr MG exhibits a larger elastic limit of 0.035 and a yield stress of 3.5 GPa. The cluster alignment method was employed to characterize the icosahedral short-range order (ISRO) and Bergman-type medium-range order (BMRO) in the models upon loading and unloading. From this analysis, we find the disruption of both ISRO and BMRO occurs as the strain reaches about 0.02, well below the elastic limit. Within the elastic limit, the total fractions of ISRO or BMRO can be fully recovered upon unloading. The diffusivity increases six to eight times in regions undergoing plastic deformation, which is due to the dramatic disruption of the ISRO and BMRO. As a result, by mapping the spatial distributions of the mobile atoms, we demonstrate the increase in atomic mobility is due to the extended regions of disrupted ISRO and more importantly BMRO.

  2. Impact of deformation on the atomic structures and dynamics of a Cu-Zr metallic glass: A molecular dynamics study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Y.; Mendelev, M. I.; Wang, C. Z.; Ott, R.; Zhang, F.; Besser, M. F.; Ho, K. M.; Kramer, M. J.

    2014-11-03

    Despite numerous studies on the atomic structures of Cu-Zr metallic glasses (MGs), their inherent structural ordering, e.g., medium-range order (MRO), remains difficult to describe. Specifically lacking is an understanding of how the MRO responds to deformation and the associated changes in atomic mobility. In this paper, we focus on the impact of deformation on MRO and associated effect on diffusion in a well-relaxed Cu64.5Zr35.5 MG by molecular dynamics simulations. The Cu-Zr MG exhibits a larger elastic limit of 0.035 and a yield stress of 3.5 GPa. The cluster alignment method was employed to characterize the icosahedral short-range order (ISRO) andmore » Bergman-type medium-range order (BMRO) in the models upon loading and unloading. From this analysis, we find the disruption of both ISRO and BMRO occurs as the strain reaches about 0.02, well below the elastic limit. Within the elastic limit, the total fractions of ISRO or BMRO can be fully recovered upon unloading. The diffusivity increases six to eight times in regions undergoing plastic deformation, which is due to the dramatic disruption of the ISRO and BMRO. As a result, by mapping the spatial distributions of the mobile atoms, we demonstrate the increase in atomic mobility is due to the extended regions of disrupted ISRO and more importantly BMRO.« less

  3. Stochastic dynamics of small ensembles of non-processive molecular motors: The parallel cluster model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Albert, Philipp J.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2013-11-07

    Non-processive molecular motors have to work together in ensembles in order to generate appreciable levels of force or movement. In skeletal muscle, for example, hundreds of myosin II molecules cooperate in thick filaments. In non-muscle cells, by contrast, small groups with few tens of non-muscle myosin II motors contribute to essential cellular processes such as transport, shape changes, or mechanosensing. Here we introduce a detailed and analytically tractable model for this important situation. Using a three-state crossbridge model for the myosin II motor cycle and exploiting the assumptions of fast power stroke kinetics and equal load sharing between motors in equivalent states, we reduce the stochastic reaction network to a one-step master equation for the binding and unbinding dynamics (parallel cluster model) and derive the rules for ensemble movement. We find that for constant external load, ensemble dynamics is strongly shaped by the catch bond character of myosin II, which leads to an increase of the fraction of bound motors under load and thus to firm attachment even for small ensembles. This adaptation to load results in a concave force-velocity relation described by a Hill relation. For external load provided by a linear spring, myosin II ensembles dynamically adjust themselves towards an isometric state with constant average position and load. The dynamics of the ensembles is now determined mainly by the distribution of motors over the different kinds of bound states. For increasing stiffness of the external spring, there is a sharp transition beyond which myosin II can no longer perform the power stroke. Slow unbinding from the pre-power-stroke state protects the ensembles against detachment.

  4. Translational diffusion of water inside hydrophobic carbon micropores studied by neutron spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Diallo, S. O.; Vlcek, L.; Mamontov, E.; Keum, J. K.; Chen, Jihua; Hayes, J. S.; Chialvo, A. A.

    2015-02-17

    When water molecules are confined to nanoscale spacings, such as in the nanometer-size pores of activated carbon fiber (ACF), their freezing point gets suppressed down to very low temperatures (~150 K), leading to a metastable liquid state with remarkable physical properties. Here we have investigated the ambient pressure diffusive dynamics of water in microporous Kynol ACF-10 (average pore size ~11.6 Å, with primarily slit-like pores) from temperature T = 280 K in its stable liquid state down to T = 230 K into the metastable supercooled phase. The observed characteristic relaxation times and diffusion coefficients are found to be, respectively, higher and lower than those in bulk water, indicating a slowing down of the water mobility with decreasing temperature. The observed temperature-dependent average relaxation time (more » $${{\\tau}}$$) when compared to previous findings indicate that it is the width of the slit pores-not their curvature-that primarily affects the dynamics of water for pore sizes larger than 10 Å. The experimental observations are compared to complementary molecular dynamics simulations of a model system, in which we studied the diffusion of water within the 11.6 Å gap of two parallel graphene sheets. We find generally a reasonable agreement between the observed and calculated relaxation times at the low momentum transfer Q (Q ≤ 0.9 Å-1). At high Q, however, where localized dynamics becomes relevant, this ideal system does not satisfactorily reproduce the measurements. Consequently, the simulations are compared to the experiments at low Q, where the two can be best reconciled. The best agreement is obtained for the diffusion parameter D associated with the hydrogen-site when a representative stretched exponential function, rather than the standard bimodal exponential model, is used to parametrize the self-correlation function I (Q,t).« less

  5. A divide-conquer-recombine algorithmic paradigm for large spatiotemporal quantum molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimojo, Fuyuki; Hattori, Shinnosuke; Department of Physics, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 ; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Mou, Weiwei; Nakano, Aiichiro; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Rajak, Pankaj; Vashishta, Priya; Kunaseth, Manaschai; National Nanotechnology Center, Pathumthani 12120 ; Ohmura, Satoshi; Department of Physics, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555; Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 ; Shimamura, Kohei; Department of Physics, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555; Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395

    2014-05-14

    We introduce an extension of the divide-and-conquer (DC) algorithmic paradigm called divide-conquer-recombine (DCR) to perform large quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations on massively parallel supercomputers, in which interatomic forces are computed quantum mechanically in the framework of density functional theory (DFT). In DCR, the DC phase constructs globally informed, overlapping local-domain solutions, which in the recombine phase are synthesized into a global solution encompassing large spatiotemporal scales. For the DC phase, we design a lean divide-and-conquer (LDC) DFT algorithm, which significantly reduces the prefactor of the O(N) computational cost for N electrons by applying a density-adaptive boundary condition at the peripheries of the DC domains. Our globally scalable and locally efficient solver is based on a hybrid real-reciprocal space approach that combines: (1) a highly scalable real-space multigrid to represent the global charge density; and (2) a numerically efficient plane-wave basis for local electronic wave functions and charge density within each domain. Hybrid space-band decomposition is used to implement the LDC-DFT algorithm on parallel computers. A benchmark test on an IBM Blue Gene/Q computer exhibits an isogranular parallel efficiency of 0.984 on 786 432 cores for a 50.3 × 10{sup 6}-atom SiC system. As a test of production runs, LDC-DFT-based QMD simulation involving 16 661 atoms is performed on the Blue Gene/Q to study on-demand production of hydrogen gas from water using LiAl alloy particles. As an example of the recombine phase, LDC-DFT electronic structures are used as a basis set to describe global photoexcitation dynamics with nonadiabatic QMD (NAQMD) and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) methods. The NAQMD simulations are based on the linear response time-dependent density functional theory to describe electronic excited states and a surface-hopping approach to describe transitions between the excited states. A series of

  6. Molecular-dynamics study of amorphous SiO{sub 2} relaxation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fadhilah, Irfan Muhammad; Rosandi, Yudi

    2015-09-30

    Using Molecular-Dynamics simulation we observed the generation of amorphous SiO{sub 2} target from a randomly distributed Si and O atoms. We applied a sequence of annealing of the target with various temperature and quenching to room temperature. The relaxation time required by the system to form SiO{sub 4} tetrahedral mesh after a relatively long simulation time, is studied. The final amorphous target was analyzed using the radial distribution function method, which can be compared with the available theoretical and experimental data. We found that up to 70% of the target atoms form the tetrahedral SiO{sub 4} molecules. The number of formed tetrahedral increases following the growth function and the rate of SiO{sub 4} formation follows Arrhenius law, depends on the annealing temperature. The local structure of amorphous SiO{sub 2} after this treatment agrees well with those reported in some literatures.

  7. Fast and accurate quantum molecular dynamics of dense plasmas across temperature regimes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sjostrom, Travis; Daligault, Jerome

    2014-10-10

    Here, we develop and implement a new quantum molecular dynamics approximation that allows fast and accurate simulations of dense plasmas from cold to hot conditions. The method is based on a carefully designed orbital-free implementation of density functional theory. The results for hydrogen and aluminum are in very good agreement with Kohn-Sham (orbital-based) density functional theory and path integral Monte Carlo calculations for microscopic features such as the electron density as well as the equation of state. The present approach does not scale with temperature and hence extends to higher temperatures than is accessible in the Kohn-Sham method and lowermore » temperatures than is accessible by path integral Monte Carlo calculations, while being significantly less computationally expensive than either of those two methods.« less

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of 30 and 2 keV Ga in Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giannuzzi, Lucille A.; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2007-09-15

    Focused Ga{sup +} ion beams are routinely used at high incident angles for specimen preparation. Molecular dynamics simulations of 2 and 30 keV Ga bombardment of Si(011) at a grazing angle of 88 deg. were conducted to assess sputtering characteristics and damage depth. The bombardment of atomically flat surfaces and surfaces with vacancies shows little energy transfer yielding ion reflection. The bombardment of surfaces with adatoms allows for the coupling of the energy of motion parallel to the surface into the substrate resulting in sputtering. The adatom and one other Si atom eject, and motion in the substrate occurs down to a depth of 13 A. Experimental evidence shows that sputtering is a reality, suggesting that an atomically flat surface is never achieved.

  9. Electronic excitation induced amorphization in titanate pyrochlores: an ab initio molecular dynamics study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiao, Haiyan Y.; Weber, William J.; Zhang, Yanwen; Zu, X. T.; Li, Sean

    2015-02-09

    In this study, the response of titanate pyrochlores (A2Ti2O7, A = Y, Gd and Sm) to electronic excitation is investigated utilizing an ab initio molecular dynamics method. All the titanate pyrochlores are found to undergo a crystalline-to-amorphous structural transition under a low concentration of electronic excitations. The transition temperature at which structural amorphization starts to occur depends on the concentration of electronic excitations. During the structural transition, O2-like molecules are formed, and this anion disorder further drives cation disorder that leads to an amorphous state. This study provides new insights into the mechanisms of amorphization in titanate pyrochlores under laser,more » electron and ion irradiations.« less

  10. Mean ionic activity coefficients in aqueous NaCl solutions from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mester, Zoltan; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2015-01-28

    The mean ionic activity coefficients of aqueous NaCl solutions of varying concentrations at 298.15 K and 1 bar have been obtained from molecular dynamics simulations by gradually turning on the interactions of an ion pair inserted into the solution. Several common non-polarizable water and ion models have been used in the simulations. Gibbs-Duhem equation calculations of the thermodynamic activity of water are used to confirm the thermodynamic consistency of the mean ionic activity coefficients. While the majority of model combinations predict the correct trends in mean ionic activity coefficients, they overestimate their values at high salt concentrations. The solubility predictions also suffer from inaccuracies, with all models underpredicting the experimental values, some by large factors. These results point to the need for further ion and water model development.

  11. Integrated atomistic chemical imaging and reactive force field molecular dynamic simulations on silicon oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dumpala, Santoshrupa; Broderick, Scott R.; Rajan, Krishna; Khalilov, Umedjon; Neyts, Erik C.; Duin, Adri C. T. van; Provine, J; Howe, Roger T.

    2015-01-05

    In this paper, we quantitatively investigate with atom probe tomography, the effect of temperature on the interfacial transition layer suboxide species due to the thermal oxidation of silicon. The chemistry at the interface was measured with atomic scale resolution, and the changes in chemistry and intermixing at the interface were identified on a nanometer scale. We find an increase of suboxide (SiOx) concentration relative to SiO{sub 2} and increased oxygen ingress with elevated temperatures. Our experimental findings are in agreement with reactive force field molecular dynamics simulations. This work demonstrates the direct comparison between atom probe derived chemical profiles and atomistic-scale simulations for transitional interfacial layer of suboxides as a function of temperature.

  12. Solvent Electrostriction-Driven Peptide Folding Revealed by Quasi Gaussian Entropy Theory and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noe, F [University of Heidelberg; Daidone, Isabella [University of Heidelberg; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; DiNola, Alfredo [University of Rome; Amadei, Andrea [University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Rome, Italy

    2008-08-01

    A quantitative understanding of the complex relationship between microscopic structure and the thermodynamics driving peptide and protein folding is a major goal of biophysical chemistry. Here, we present a methodology comprising the use of an extended quasi-Gaussian entropy theory parametrized using molecular dynamics simulation that provides a complete description of the thermodynamics of peptide conformational states. The strategy is applied to analyze the conformational thermodynamics of MR121-GSGSW, a peptide well characterized in experimental studies. The results demonstrate that the extended state of the peptide possesses the lowest partial molar entropy. The origin of this entropy decrease is found to be in the increase of the density and orientational order of the hydration water molecules around the peptide, induced by the 'unfolding'. While such a reduction of the configurational entropy is usually associated with the hydrophobic effect, it is here found to be mainly due to the interaction of the solute charges with the solvent, that is, electrostriction.

  13. Solvent Electrostriction Driven Peptide Folding revealed by Quasi-Gaussian Entropy Theory and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noe, F [University of Heidelberg; Daidone, Isabella [University of Heidelberg; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; DiNola, Alfredo [University of Rome; Amadei, Andrea [University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Rome, Italy

    2008-06-01

    A quantitative understanding of the complex relationship between microscopic structure and the thermodynamics driving peptide and protein folding is a major goal of biophysical chemistry. Here, we present a methodology comprising the use of an extended quasi-Gaussian entropy theory parametrized using molecular dynamics simulation that provides a complete description of the thermodynamics of peptide conformational states. The strategy is applied to analyze the conformational thermodynamics of MR121-GSGSW, a peptide well characterized in experimental studies. The results demonstrate that the extended state of the peptide possesses the lowest partial molar entropy. The origin of this entropy decrease is found to be in the increase of the density and orientational order of the hydration water molecules around the peptide, induced by the 'unfolding'. While such a reduction of the configurational entropy is usually associated with the hydrophobic effect, it is here found to be mainly due to the interaction of the solute charges with the solvent, that is, electrostriction.

  14. Full-direct method for imaging pharmacokinetic parameters in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Guanglei; Pu, Huangsheng; Liu, Fei; Bai, Jing; He, Wei; Luo, Jianwen

    2015-02-23

    Images of pharmacokinetic parameters (also known as parametric images) in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) can provide three-dimensional metabolic information for biological studies and drug development. However, the ill-posed nature of FMT and the high temporal variation of fluorophore concentration together make it difficult to obtain accurate parametric images in small animals in vivo. In this letter, we present a method to directly reconstruct the parametric images from the boundary measurements based on hybrid FMT/X-ray computed tomography (XCT) system. This method can not only utilize structural priors obtained from the XCT system to mitigate the ill-posedness of FMT but also make full use of the temporal correlations of boundary measurements to model the high temporal variation of fluorophore concentration. The results of numerical simulation and mouse experiment demonstrate that the proposed method leads to significant improvements in the reconstruction quality of parametric images.

  15. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water by quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zen, Andrea; Luo, Ye Mazzola, Guglielmo Sorella, Sandro; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2015-04-14

    Although liquid water is ubiquitous in chemical reactions at roots of life and climate on the earth, the prediction of its properties by high-level ab initio molecular dynamics simulations still represents a formidable task for quantum chemistry. In this article, we present a room temperature simulation of liquid water based on the potential energy surface obtained by a many-body wave function through quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. The simulated properties are in good agreement with recent neutron scattering and X-ray experiments, particularly concerning the position of the oxygen-oxygen peak in the radial distribution function, at variance of previous density functional theory attempts. Given the excellent performances of QMC on large scale supercomputers, this work opens new perspectives for predictive and reliable ab initio simulations of complex chemical systems.

  16. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; Johns, Douglas G.; Charles, M. Arthur; Ren, Gang

    2015-03-04

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobic environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.

  17. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; et al

    2015-03-04

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobicmore » environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.« less

  18. xMDFF: molecular dynamics flexible fitting of low-resolution X-ray structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGreevy, Ryan; Singharoy, Abhishek; Li, Qufei; Zhang, Jingfen; Xu, Dong; Perozo, Eduardo; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    A new real-space refinement method for low-resolution X-ray crystallography is presented. The method is based on the molecular dynamics flexible fitting protocol targeted at addressing large-scale deformations of the search model to achieve refinement with minimal manual intervention. An explanation of the method is provided, augmented by results from the refinement of both synthetic and experimental low-resolution data, including an independent electrophysiological verification of the xMDFF-refined crystal structure of a voltage-sensor protein. X-ray crystallography remains the most dominant method for solving atomic structures. However, for relatively large systems, the availability of only medium-to-low-resolution diffraction data often limits the determination of all-atom details. A new molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF)-based approach, xMDFF, for determining structures from such low-resolution crystallographic data is reported. xMDFF employs a real-space refinement scheme that flexibly fits atomic models into an iteratively updating electron-density map. It addresses significant large-scale deformations of the initial model to fit the low-resolution density, as tested with synthetic low-resolution maps of d-ribose-binding protein. xMDFF has been successfully applied to re-refine six low-resolution protein structures of varying sizes that had already been submitted to the Protein Data Bank. Finally, via systematic refinement of a series of data from 3.6 to 7 resolution, xMDFF refinements together with electrophysiology experiments were used to validate the first all-atom structure of the voltage-sensing protein Ci-VSP.

  19. Molecular dynamics of wetting layer formation and forced water invasion in angular nanopores with mixed wettability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sedghi, Mohammad Piri, Mohammad; Goual, Lamia

    2014-11-21

    The depletion of conventional hydrocarbon reservoirs has prompted the oil and gas industry to search for unconventional resources such as shale gas/oil reservoirs. In shale rocks, considerable amounts of hydrocarbon reside in nanoscale pore spaces. As a result, understanding the multiphase flow of wetting and non-wetting phases in nanopores is important to improve oil and gas recovery from these formations. This study was designed to investigate the threshold capillary pressure of oil and water displacements in a capillary dominated regime inside nanoscale pores using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. The pores have the same cross-sectional area and volume but different cross-sectional shapes. Oil and water particles were represented with a coarse grained model and the NEMD simulations were conducted by assigning external pressure on an impermeable piston. Threshold capillary pressures were determined for the drainage process (water replaced by oil) in different pores. The molecular dynamics results are in close agreements with calculations using the Mayer-Stowe-Princen (MS-P) method which has been developed on the premise of energy balance in thermodynamic equilibrium. After the drainage simulations, a change in wall particles’ wettability from water-wet to oil-wet was implemented based on the final configuration of oil and water inside the pore. Waterflooding simulations were then carried out at the threshold capillary pressure. The results show that the oil layer formed between water in the corner and in the center of the pore is not stable and collapses as the simulation continues. This is in line with the predictions from the MS-P method.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of diffusion and electrical conductivity in montmorillonite interlayers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Cygan, Randall T.; Fredrich, Joanne T.; Jerauld, Gary R.

    2016-01-20

    In this study, the diffusion of water and ions in the interlayer region of smectite clay minerals represents a direct probe of the type and strength of clay–fluid interactions. Interlayer diffusion also represents an important link between molecular simulation and macroscopic experiments. Here we use molecular dynamics simulation to investigate trends in cation and water diffusion in montmorillonite interlayers, looking specifically at the effects of layer charge, interlayer cation and cation charge (sodium or calcium), water content, and temperature. For Na-montmorillonite, the largest increase in ion and water diffusion coefficients occurs between the one-layer and two-layer hydrates, corresponding to themore » transition from inner-sphere to outer-sphere surface complexes. Calculated activation energies for ion and water diffusion in Na-montmorillonite are similar to each other and to the water hydrogen bond energy, suggesting the breaking of water–water and water–clay hydrogen bonds as a likely mechanism for interlayer diffusion. A comparison of interlayer diffusion with that of bulk electrolyte solutions reveals a clear trend of decreasing diffusion coefficient with increasing electrolyte concentration, and in most cases the interlayer diffusion results are nearly coincident with the corresponding bulk solutions. Trends in electrical conductivities computed from the ion diffusion coefficients are also compared.« less

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of mechanical deformation of ultra-thin metal and ceramic films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belak, J.; Glosli, J.N.; Boercker, D.B.; Stowers, I.F.

    1995-04-01

    We present an overview of the molecular dynamics computer simulation method as employed in the study of the mechanical properties of surfaces at the manometer scale. The embedded atom method is used to model a clean metal surface and the bond-order model is used to model ceramic surfaces. The computer experiment consists of the indentation and scraping of a hard diamond-like tool into and across the surface. Results are presented for the (111) surface of copper and silver and for the (100) surface of silicon. We explicitly demonstrate in our point indentation simulations that nanoscale plasticity in metals takes place by nondislocation mechanisms, a result suggested by recent nanoindentation experiments. We also observe the surface to accommodate nearly the entire volume of the tip and the annealing out of plastic work as the tip is removed. In our orthogonal cutting simulation, we observe an interesting phenomenon: the system dynamically reorients the gain in front of the tool tip to minimize the work performed on the shear plane (i.e. the shear plane becomes an easy slip plane). Silicon transforms into an amorphous state which then flows plastically.

  2. Properties of gravitationally equilibrated Yukawa systemsA molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charan, Harish; Ganesh, Rajaraman Joy, Ashwin

    2014-04-15

    Using 2D Molecular Dynamics simulation, the equilibrium and dynamical properties of a gravitationally equilibrated Yukawa liquid are investigated. We observe that due to asymmetry introduced in one direction by gravity, several interesting features arise. For example, for a given value of coupling parameter ?, screening parameter ?, and according to a chosen value of gravitational force g (say in y-direction), the system is seen to exhibit super-, sub- or normal diffusion. Interestingly, x-averaged density profiles, unlike a barotropic fluid, acquires sharp, free surface with scale free linear y-dependence. As can be expected for a system with macroscopic gradients, self-diffusion calculated from Green-Kubos formalism does not agree with that obtained from Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion. A 2D angular-radial pair correlation function g(r, ?) clearly indicates asymmetric features induced by gravity. We observe that due to compression in y-direction, though in liquid state for all values of gravity considered, the transverse mode is found to predominant as compared to the longitudinal mode, leading to a novel Anisotropic Solid-like Yukawa liquid.

  3. Molecular dynamics study of interfacial confinement effects of aqueous NaCl brines in nanoporous carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wander, M. C. F.; Shuford, K. L.

    2010-12-09

    In this paper, studies of aqueous electrolyte solutions in contact with a family of porous carbon geometries using classical molecular dynamics simulations are presented. These simulations provide an atomic scale depiction of ion transport dynamics in different environments to elucidate power of aqueous electrolyte supercapacitors. The electrolyte contains alkali metal and halide ions, which allow for the examination of size trends within specific geometries as well as trends in concentration. The electrode pores are modeled as planar graphite sheets and carbon nanotubes with interstices ranging from one to four nanometers. Ordered layers form parallel to the carbon surface, which facilitates focused ion motion under slightly confining conditions. As a result, the ions diffusivities are enhanced in the direction of the slit or pore. Further confining the system leads to decreased ion diffusivities. The ions are fully hydrated in all but the smallest slits and pores with those sizes showing increased ion pairing. There is strong evidence of charge separation perpendicular to the surface at all size scales, concentrations, and ion types, providing a useful baseline for examining differential capacitance behavior and future studies on energy storage. These systems show promise as high-power electrical energy storage devices.

  4. Theoretical studies of zirconium and carbon clusters with molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, B.

    1993-08-01

    In this dissertation, we will present a systematic study of structures of fullerenes ranging from C{sub 20} to C{sub 100} by introducing a novel scheme. Using our new scheme, we not only reproduce all known fullerene structures but also successfully predicted several other fullerene structures which were confirmed by experiments. By utilizing the tight-binding molecular-dynamic (TBMD) simulation, we also studied the dynamical behavior of fullerenes: Vibrations, thermal disintegration of individual clusters as well as collisions between fullerenes. If the beauty of carbon fullerene is not enough, people found that carbon can also form tubules and even speculated that they can form three-dimensional graphite-like networks. By extending our fullerene structure searching scheme, we performed a search for the ground-state structure of three dimensional carbon network. We found the most stable structure people ever proposed for simple cubic based networks. From the difference of this new form of carbon and graphite in the electronic and vibrational properties, we propose an experimental probe to identify these novel three-dimensional carbon networks.

  5. High temperature spin dynamics in linear magnetic chains, molecular rings, and segments by nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adelnia, Fatemeh; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Mariani, Manuel; Ammannato, Luca; Caneschi, Andrea; Rovai, Donella; Winpenny, Richard; Timco, Grigore; Corti, Maurizio Borsa, Ferdinando

    2015-05-07

    We present the room temperature proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (NSLR) results in two 1D spin chains: the Heisenberg antiferromagnetic (AFM) Eu(hfac){sub 3}NITEt and the magnetically frustrated Gd(hfac){sub 3}NITEt. The NSLR as a function of external magnetic field can be interpreted very well in terms of high temperature spin dynamics dominated by a long time persistence of the decay of the two-spin correlation function due to the conservation of the total spin value for isotropic Heisenberg chains. The high temperature spin dynamics are also investigated in Heisenberg AFM molecular rings. In both Cr{sub 8} closed ring and in Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 8}Zn open rings, i.e., model systems for a finite spin segment, an enhancement of the low frequency spectral density is found consistent with spin diffusion but the high cut-off frequency due to intermolecular anisotropic interactions prevents a detailed analysis of the spin diffusion regime.

  6. Quantify Water Extraction by TBP/Dodecane via Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khomami, Bamin; Cui, Shengting; de Almeida, Valmor F.; Felker, Kevin

    2013-05-16

    The purpose of this project is to quantify the interfacial transport of water into the most prevalent nuclear reprocessing solvent extractant mixture, namely tri-butyl- phosphate (TBP) and dodecane, via massively parallel molecular dynamics simulations on the most powerful machines available for open research. Specifically, we will accomplish this objective by evolving the water/TBP/dodecane system up to 1 ms elapsed time, and validate the simulation results by direct comparison with experimentally measured water solubility in the organic phase. The significance of this effort is to demonstrate for the first time that the combination of emerging simulation tools and state-of-the-art supercomputers can provide quantitative information on par to experimental measurements for solvent extraction systems of relevance to the nuclear fuel cycle. Results: Initially, the isolated single component, and single phase systems were studied followed by the two-phase, multicomponent counterpart. Specifically, the systems we studied were: pure TBP; pure n-dodecane; TBP/n-dodecane mixture; and the complete extraction system: water-TBP/n-dodecane two phase system to gain deep insight into the water extraction process. We have completely achieved our goal of simulating the molecular extraction of water molecules into the TBP/n-dodecane mixture up to the saturation point, and obtained favorable comparison with experimental data. Many insights into fundamental molecular level processes and physics were obtained from the process. Most importantly, we found that the dipole moment of the extracting agent is crucially important in affecting the interface roughness and the extraction rate of water molecules into the organic phase. In addition, we have identified shortcomings in the existing OPLS-AA force field potential for long-chain alkanes. The significance of this force field is that it is supposed to be optimized for molecular liquid simulations. We found that it failed for dodecane and

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Max Zuckerman and Sons Inc - MD 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Inc - MD 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MAX ZUCKERMAN & SONS, INC. (MD.04 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Maryland Alloys Corporation MD.04-1 Location: 5245 Fairlawn Avenue , Baltimore , Maryland MD.04-2 Evaluation Year: 1994 MD.04-1 MD.04-3 Site Operations: Scrap metals broker that arranged purchases of materials for third party buyers. MD.04-2 MD.04-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote MD.04-3

  8. The Aqueous Ca2+ System, in Comparison with Zn2+, Fe3+, and Al3+: An Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogatko, Stuart A.; Cauet, Emilie L.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Fulton, John L.; Weare, John H.

    2013-02-21

    Results of Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics (AIMD) simulations of a Ca2+ ion in an aqueous environment (64 waters, 38ps=5ps equilibration + 33ps data collection, 300K) are reported. The 1st hydration shell contains 6-7 waters with d(OH) = 0.97Å (identical to our bulk water estimate) and average tilt angle, I = 32º. The 1st maximum in the radial distribution function occurs at GCaO(r) = 2.45Å. Our results compare well with published experimental structural data from X-Ray Absorption (XAFS) and Neutron Diffraction. We also generate simulated XAFS spectra using a 1st principles MD-XAFS procedure and show quantitative agreement with experimental XAFS data from a 0.2m Ca(ClO4)2 aqueous solution. The Ca2+ 1st shell water dipole moment of 3.1D is identical to our bulk water estimate (3.1D). The structured 2nd hydration shell, composed of ~16.5 waters, has a maximum at GCaO(r) =4.6Å. The average 2nd shell dipole moment = 2.9D, is suppressed relative to bulk water values. Detailed H-bond analysis demonstrates the waters in this shell predominately coordinate 1st shell waters with a trigonally structured H-bond network. Two exchanges between the 1st hydration shell and the bulk were observed. These were consistent with a dissociative and dissociative interchange Eigen-Wilkins ligand exchange mechanism. Many transfers between the 2nd shell and bulk are detected for Ca2+ allowing an estimation of the 2nd shell mean residence time (MRT) of 4.6ps. Comparison of the Ca2+ hydration shell structure and dynamics with those of the recently reported Zn2+, Fe3+ and Al3+ cation species show that the 1st and 2nd hydration shell parameters, d(M-OI) distance, CNII, H-bond d(OI-OII) distance and %Tetrahedral structure are correlated with cation charge density, the ratio of cation charge (Z) and size (Rion). However, important exceptions are d(M-OII) and the 2nd shell Mean Residence Time (MRT). These differences are explained in terms of the 1st shell structure parameters (d(M-OI) distance

  9. Chirped-pulse manipulated carrier dynamics in low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Chao-Kuei; Lin, Yuan-Yao; Lin, Sung-Hui; Lin, Gong-Ru; Pan, Ci-Ling

    2014-04-28

    Chirped pulse controlled carrier dynamics in low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaAs are investigated by degenerate pump-probe technique. Varying the chirped condition of excited pulse from negative to positive increases the carrier relaxation time so as to modify the dispersion and reshape current pulse in time domain. The spectral dependence of carrier dynamics is analytically derived and explained by Shockley-Read Hall model. This observation enables the new feasibility of controlling carrier dynamics in ultrafast optical devices via the chirped pulse excitations.

  10. American Physical Society March Meeting (Baltimore, MD) - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    American Physical Society March Meeting (Baltimore, MD) American Physical Society March Meeting (Baltimore, MD) Mon, Mar 14, 2016 8:00am 08:00 Fri, Mar 18, 2016 9:00am 09:00 Baltimore Convention Center 1 W Pratt St Baltimore, MD 21201 United States Bryan Beckingham and Daniel Miller, "Quantitative Monitoring of Membrane Permeation via In-Situ ATR FT-IR Spectroscopy" Abstract: Ion conducting membranes are of interest for various energy applications including fuel cells and artificial

  11. Developing a Dynamic Pharmacophore Model for HIV-1 Integrase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Heather A.; Masukawa, Keven M.; Rubins, Kathleen; Bushman, Frederic; Jorgensen, William L.; Lins, Roberto; Briggs, James; Mccammon, Andy

    2000-05-11

    We present the first receptor-based pharmacophore model for HIV-1 integrase. The development of ''dynamic'' pharmacophore models is a new method that accounts for the inherent flexibility of the active site and aims to reduce the entropic penalties associated with binding a ligand. Furthermore, this new drug discovery method overcomes the limitation of an incomplete crystal structure of the target protein. A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation describes the flexibility of the uncomplexed protein. Many conformational models of the protein are saved from the MD simulations and used in a series of multi-unit search for interacting conformers (MUSIC) simulations. MUSIC is a multiple-copy minimization method, available in the BOSS program; it is used to determine binding regions for probe molecules containing functional groups that complement the active site. All protein conformations from the MD are overlaid, and conserved binding regions for the probe molecules are identified. Those conserved binding regions define the dynamic pharmacophore model. Here, the dynamic model is compared to known inhibitors of the integrase as well as a three-point, ligand-based pharmacophore model from the literature. Also, a ''static'' pharmacophore model was determined in the standard fashion, using a single crystal structure. Inhibitors thought to bind in the active site of HIV-1 integrase fit the dynamic model but not the static model. Finally, we have identified a set of compounds from the Available Chemicals Directory that fit the dynamic pharmacophore model, and experimental testing of the compounds has confirmed several new inhibitors.

  12. Magnetic Materials at finite Temperatures: thermodynamics and combined spin and molecular dynamics derived from first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenbach, Markus; Perera, Meewanage Dilina N; Landau, David P; Nicholson, Don M; Yin, Junqi; Brown, Greg

    2015-01-01

    We present a unified approach to describe the combined behavior of the atomic and magnetic degrees of freedom in magnetic materials. Using Monte Carlo simulations directly combined with first principles the Curie temperature can be obtained ab initio in good agreement with experimental values. The large scale constrained first principles calculations have been used to construct effective potentials for both the atomic and magnetic degrees of freedom that allow the unified study of influence of phonon-magnon coupling on the thermodynamics and dynamics of magnetic systems. The MC calculations predict the specific heat of iron in near perfect agreement with experimental results from 300K to above Tc and allow the identification of the importance of the magnon-phonon interaction at the phase-transition. Further Molecular Dynamics and Spin Dynamics calculations elucidate the dynamics of this coupling and open the potential for quantitative and predictive descriptions of dynamic structure factors in magnetic materials using first principles derived simulations.

  13. Molecular-dynamics analysis of mobile helium cluster reactions near surfaces of plasma-exposed tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Lin; Maroudas, Dimitrios; Hammond, Karl D.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-10-28

    We report the results of a systematic atomic-scale analysis of the reactions of small mobile helium clusters (He{sub n}, 4 ≤ n ≤ 7) near low-Miller-index tungsten (W) surfaces, aiming at a fundamental understanding of the near-surface dynamics of helium-carrying species in plasma-exposed tungsten. These small mobile helium clusters are attracted to the surface and migrate to the surface by Fickian diffusion and drift due to the thermodynamic driving force for surface segregation. As the clusters migrate toward the surface, trap mutation (TM) and cluster dissociation reactions are activated at rates higher than in the bulk. TM produces W adatoms and immobile complexes of helium clusters surrounding W vacancies located within the lattice planes at a short distance from the surface. These reactions are identified and characterized in detail based on the analysis of a large number of molecular-dynamics trajectories for each such mobile cluster near W(100), W(110), and W(111) surfaces. TM is found to be the dominant cluster reaction for all cluster and surface combinations, except for the He{sub 4} and He{sub 5} clusters near W(100) where cluster partial dissociation following TM dominates. We find that there exists a critical cluster size, n = 4 near W(100) and W(111) and n = 5 near W(110), beyond which the formation of multiple W adatoms and vacancies in the TM reactions is observed. The identified cluster reactions are responsible for important structural, morphological, and compositional features in the plasma-exposed tungsten, including surface adatom populations, near-surface immobile helium-vacancy complexes, and retained helium content, which are expected to influence the amount of hydrogen re-cycling and tritium retention in fusion tokamaks.

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Analysis of Interfacial Water at Selected Sulfide Mineral Surfaces under Anaerobic Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.

    2014-04-10

    In this paper, we report on a molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) study of the behavior of interfacial water at selected sulfide mineral surfaces under anaerobic conditions. The study revealed the interfacial water structure and wetting characteristics of the pyrite (100) surface, galena (100) surface, chalcopyrite (012) surface, sphalerite (110) surface, and molybdenite surfaces (i.e., the face, armchair-edge, and zigzag-edge surfaces), including simulated contact angles, relative number density profiles, water dipole orientations, hydrogen-bonding, and residence times. For force fields of the metal and sulfur atoms in selected sulfide minerals used in the MDS, we used the universal force field (UFF) and another set of force fields optimized by quantum chemical calculations for interactions with interfacial water molecules at selected sulfide mineral surfaces. Simulation results for the structural and dynamic properties of interfacial water molecules indicate the natural hydrophobic character for the selected sulfide mineral surfaces under anaerobic conditions as well as the relatively weak hydrophobicity for the sphalerite (110) surface and two molybdenite edge surfaces. Part of the financial support for this study was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Basic Science Grant No. DE-FG-03-93ER14315. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the DOE, funded work performed by Liem X. Dang. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES. The authors are grateful to Professor Tsun-Mei Chang for valuable discussions.

  15. Reactive MD Simulations of Electrochemical Oxide Interfaces at Mesoscale |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Large-scale reactive molecular dynamics demonstrating the sintering mechanism under the influence of e-field. Tailoring the properties of nanoscale oxide-based technologies such as chemical activity, efficiency, durability, and reliability requires a better understanding of the nanoscale oxide growth kinetics under various oxidation conditions, the resulting film morphology, as well as their functional properties. Subramanian Sankaranarayanan, Argonne

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation for arrangement of nickel atoms filled in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Liu Zhenyu, Zhao; Lirui, Liu

    2014-08-28

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) filled with metals can be used in capacitors, sensors, rechargeable batteries, and so on. Atomic arrangement of the metals has an important role in the function of the composites. The tips of CNTs were opened, and then nickel was filled by means of hydrothermal oxidation/ultrasonic vibration method. The tests of TEM, HREM, and EDX (energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy) analysis showed that Ni was filled in CNTs successfully. The atomic arrangement of nickel filled into single wall carbon nanotubes was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The radial distribution function and bond orientation order were established to analyze the atomic arrangement of nickel filled in carbon nanotubes during the cooling process. The results show that nickel atoms became in order gradually and preferably crystallized on the inner wall of carbon nanotubes when the temperature decreased from 1600?K. After it cooled to 100?K, the arrangement of nickel atoms in outermost circle was regular and dense, but there were many defects far from the wall of CNTs. According to the calculation of bond orientation order parameters Q{sub 6} and its visualization, the structure of nickel is Face-centered cube (f.c.c). (1,1,1){sub Ni} was close on the inner surface of carbon nanotubes. Radial direction of CNTs was [1,1,1] crystal orientation. Axial direction of CNTs, namely, filling direction, was [1{sup }, 1{sup },2] crystal orientation.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of uranyl adsorption and structure on the basal surface of muscovite

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie L.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Cygan, Randall T.

    2014-02-05

    Anthropogenic activities have led to an increased concentration of uranium on the Earth’s surface and potentially in the subsurface with the development of nuclear waste repositories. Uranium is soluble in groundwater, and its mobility is strongly affected by the presence of clay minerals in soils and in subsurface sediments. We use molecular dynamics simulations to probe the adsorption of aqueous uranyl (UO22+) ions onto the basal surface of muscovite, a suitable proxy for typically ultrafine-grained clay phases. Model systems include the competitive adsorption between potassium counterions and aqueous ions (0.1 M and 1.0 M UO2Cl2 , 0.1 M NaCl). Wemore » find that for systems with potassium and uranyl ions present, potassium ions dominate the adsorption phenomenon. Potassium ions adsorb entirely as inner-sphere complexes associated with the ditrigonal cavity of the basal surface. Uranyl ions adsorb in two configurations when it is the only ion species present, and in a single configuration in the presence of potassium. Finally, the majority of adsorbed uranyl ions are tilted less than 45° relative to the muscovite surface, and are associated with the Si4Al2 rings near aluminum substitution sites.« less

  18. Dopant profile modeling by rare event enhanced domain-following molecular dynamics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beardmore, Keith M.; Jensen, Niels G.

    2002-01-01

    A computer-implemented molecular dynamics-based process simulates a distribution of ions implanted in a semiconductor substrate. The properties of the semiconductor substrate and ion dose to be simulated are first initialized, including an initial set of splitting depths that contain an equal number of virtual ions implanted in each substrate volume determined by the splitting depths. A first ion with selected velocity is input onto an impact position of the substrate that defines a first domain for the first ion during a first timestep, where the first domain includes only those atoms of the substrate that exert a force on the ion. A first position and velocity of the first ion is determined after the first timestep and a second domain of the first ion is formed at the first position. The first ion is split into first and second virtual ions if the first ion has passed through a splitting interval. The process then follows each virtual ion until all of the virtual ions have come to rest. A new ion is input to the surface and the process repeats until all of the ion dose has been input. The resulting ion rest positions form the simulated implant distribution.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of shock waves in hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene melts: Mechanical and structural responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frhlich, Markus G. E-mail: ThompsonDon@missouri.edu; Sewell, Thomas D. Thompson, Donald L. E-mail: ThompsonDon@missouri.edu

    2014-01-14

    The mechanical and structural responses of hydroxyl-terminated cis-1,4-polybutadiene melts to shock waves were investigated by means of all-atom non-reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations were performed using the OPLS-AA force field but with the standard 12-6 Lennard-Jones potential replaced by the Buckingham exponential-6 potential to better represent the interactions at high compression. Monodisperse systems containing 64, 128, and 256 backbone carbon atoms were studied. Supported shock waves were generated by impacting the samples onto stationary pistons at impact velocities of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 km s{sup ?1}, yielding shock pressures between approximately 2.8 GPa and 12.5 GPa. Single-molecule structural properties (squared radii of gyration, asphericity parameters, and orientational order parameters) and mechanical properties (density, shock pressure, shock temperature, and shear stress) were analyzed using a geometric binning scheme to obtain spatio-temporal resolution in the reference frame centered on the shock front. Our results indicate that while shear stress behind the shock front is relieved on a ?0.5 ps time scale, a shock-induced transition to a glass-like state occurs with a concomitant increase of structural relaxation times by several orders of magnitude.

  20. Accelerating ab initio path integral molecular dynamics with multilevel sampling of potential surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng, Hua Y.

    2015-02-15

    A multilevel approach to sample the potential energy surface in a path integral formalism is proposed. The purpose is to reduce the required number of ab initio evaluations of energy and forces in ab initio path integral molecular dynamics (AI-PIMD) simulation, without compromising the overall accuracy. To validate the method, the internal energy and free energy of an Einstein crystal are calculated and compared with the analytical solutions. As a preliminary application, we assess the performance of the method in a realistic model—the FCC phase of dense atomic hydrogen, in which the calculated result shows that the acceleration rate is about 3 to 4-fold for a two-level implementation, and can be increased up to 10 times if extrapolation is used. With only 16 beads used for the ab initio potential sampling, this method gives a well converged internal energy. The residual error in pressure is just about 3 GPa, whereas it is about 20 GPa for a plain AI-PIMD calculation with the same number of beads. The vibrational free energy of the FCC phase of dense hydrogen at 300 K is also calculated with an AI-PIMD thermodynamic integration method, which gives a result of about 0.51 eV/proton at a density of r{sub s}=0.912.

  1. Traction–separation relationships for hydrogen induced grain boundary embrittlement in nickel via molecular dynamics simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barrows, Wesley; Dingreville, Rémi; Spearot, Douglas

    2015-10-19

    A statistical approach combined with molecular dynamics simulations is used to study the influence of hydrogen on intergranular decohesion. This methodology is applied to a Ni Σ3(112)[11¯0] symmetric tilt grain boundary. Hydrogenated grain boundaries with different H concentrations are constructed using an energy minimization technique with initial H atom positions guided by Monte Carlo simulation results. Decohesion behavior is assessed through extraction of a traction–separation relationship during steady-state crack propagation in a statistically meaningful approach, building upon prior work employing atomistic cohesive zone volume elements (CZVEs). A sensitivity analysis is performed on the numerical approach used to extract the traction–separationmore » relationships, clarifying the role of CZVE size, threshold parameters necessary to differentiate elastic and decohesion responses, and the numerical averaging technique. Results show that increasing H coverage at the Ni Σ3(112)[11¯0] grain boundary asymmetrically influences the crack tip velocity during propagation, leads to a general decrease in the work of separation required for crack propagation, and provides a reduction in the peak stress in the extracted traction–separation relationship. Furthermore the present framework offers a meaningful vehicle to pass atomistically derived interfacial behavior to higher length scale formulations for intergranular fracture.« less

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of the melting curve of NiAl alloy under pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wenjin; Peng, Yufeng; Liu, Zhongli

    2014-05-15

    The melting curve of B2-NiAl alloy under pressure has been investigated using molecular dynamics technique and the embedded atom method (EAM) potential. The melting temperatures were determined with two approaches, the one-phase and the two-phase methods. The first one simulates a homogeneous melting, while the second one involves a heterogeneous melting of materials. Both approaches reduce the superheating effectively and their results are close to each other at the applied pressures. By fitting the well-known Simon equation to our melting data, we yielded the melting curves for NiAl: 1783(1 + P/9.801){sup 0.298} (one-phase approach), 1850(1 + P/12.806){sup 0.357} (two-phase approach). The good agreement of the resulting equation of states and the zero-pressure melting point (calc., 1850 25 K, exp., 1911 K) with experiment proved the correctness of these results. These melting data complemented the absence of experimental high-pressure melting of NiAl. To check the transferability of this EAM potential, we have also predicted the melting curves of pure nickel and pure aluminum. Results show the calculated melting point of Nickel agrees well with experiment at zero pressure, while the melting point of aluminum is slightly higher than experiment.

  3. Testing thermal gradient driving force for grain boundary migration using molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Xian-Ming; Zhang, Yongfeng; Tonks, Michael R.

    2015-02-01

    Strong thermal gradients in low-thermal-conductivity ceramics may drive extended defects, such as grain boundaries and voids, to migrate in preferential directions. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to study thermal gradient driven grain boundary migration and to verify a previously proposed thermal gradient driving force equation, using uranium dioxide as a model system. It is found that a thermal gradient drives grain boundaries to migrate up the gradient and the migration velocity increases under a constant gradient owing to the increase in mobility with temperature. Different grain boundaries migrate at very different rates due to their different intrinsic mobilities. The extracted mobilities from the thermal gradient driven simulations are compared with those calculated from two other well-established methods and good agreement between the three different methods is found, demonstrating that the theoretical equation of the thermal gradient driving force is valid, although a correction of one input parameter should be made. The discrepancy in the grain boundary mobilities between modeling and experiments is also discussed.

  4. Tractionseparation relationships for hydrogen induced grain boundary embrittlement in nickel via molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrows, Wesley; Dingreville, Rmi; Spearot, Douglas

    2015-10-19

    A statistical approach combined with molecular dynamics simulations is used to study the influence of hydrogen on intergranular decohesion. This methodology is applied to a Ni ?3(112)[110] symmetric tilt grain boundary. Hydrogenated grain boundaries with different H concentrations are constructed using an energy minimization technique with initial H atom positions guided by Monte Carlo simulation results. Decohesion behavior is assessed through extraction of a tractionseparation relationship during steady-state crack propagation in a statistically meaningful approach, building upon prior work employing atomistic cohesive zone volume elements (CZVEs). A sensitivity analysis is performed on the numerical approach used to extract the tractionseparation relationships, clarifying the role of CZVE size, threshold parameters necessary to differentiate elastic and decohesion responses, and the numerical averaging technique. Results show that increasing H coverage at the Ni ?3(112)[110] grain boundary asymmetrically influences the crack tip velocity during propagation, leads to a general decrease in the work of separation required for crack propagation, and provides a reduction in the peak stress in the extracted tractionseparation relationship. Furthermore the present framework offers a meaningful vehicle to pass atomistically derived interfacial behavior to higher length scale formulations for intergranular fracture.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of uranyl adsorption and structure on the basal surface of muscovite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie L.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Cygan, Randall T.

    2014-02-05

    Anthropogenic activities have led to an increased concentration of uranium on the Earth’s surface and potentially in the subsurface with the development of nuclear waste repositories. Uranium is soluble in groundwater, and its mobility is strongly affected by the presence of clay minerals in soils and in subsurface sediments. We use molecular dynamics simulations to probe the adsorption of aqueous uranyl (UO22+) ions onto the basal surface of muscovite, a suitable proxy for typically ultrafine-grained clay phases. Model systems include the competitive adsorption between potassium counterions and aqueous ions (0.1 M and 1.0 M UO2Cl2 , 0.1 M NaCl). We find that for systems with potassium and uranyl ions present, potassium ions dominate the adsorption phenomenon. Potassium ions adsorb entirely as inner-sphere complexes associated with the ditrigonal cavity of the basal surface. Uranyl ions adsorb in two configurations when it is the only ion species present, and in a single configuration in the presence of potassium. Finally, the majority of adsorbed uranyl ions are tilted less than 45° relative to the muscovite surface, and are associated with the Si4Al2 rings near aluminum substitution sites.

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Armco-Rustless Iron and Steel - MD 03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Armco-Rustless Iron and Steel - MD 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Armco-Rustless Iron & Steel (MD.03 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: ARMCO Baltimore Works MD.03-1 Location: Baltimore , Maryland MD.03-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 MD.03-1 Site Operations: Test rolling of uranium billets. MD.03-2 MD.03-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote due to limited quantity of material and duration of test MD.03-1

  7. MD simulations of phase stability of PuGa alloys: Effects of primary radiation defects and helium bubbles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dremov, V. V.; Sapozhnikov, F. A.; Ionov, G. V.; Karavaev, A. V.; Vorobyova, M. A.; Chung, B. W.

    2013-05-14

    We present classical molecular dynamics (MD) with Modified Embedded Atom Model (MEAM) simulations to investigate the role of primary radiation defects and radiogenic helium as factors affecting the phase stability of PuGa alloys in cooling–heating cycles at ambient pressure. The models of PuGa alloys equilibrated at ambient conditions were subjected to cooling–heating cycles in which they were initially cooled down to 100 K and then heated up to 500 K at ambient pressure. The rate of temperature change in the cycles was 10 K/ns. The simulations showed that the initial FCC phase of PuGa alloys undergo polymorphous transition in coolingmore » to a lower symmetry α'-phase. All the alloys undergo direct and reverse polymorphous transitions in the cooling–heating cycles. The alloys containing vacancies shift in both transitions to lower temperatures relative to the defect-free alloys. The radiogenic helium has much less effect on the phase stability compared to that of primary radiation defects (in spite of the fact that helium concentration is twice of that for the primary radiation defects). Lastly, this computational result agrees with experimental data on unconventional stabilization mechanism of PuGa alloys.« less

  8. Final technical report [ACCELERATED MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS OF REACTIVE HYDROCARBON SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, Steven J.

    2014-02-25

    The research activities in this project consisted of four different sub-projects. Three different accelerated dynamics techniques (parallel replica dynamics, hyperdynamics, and temperature-accelerated dynamics) were applied to the modeling of pyrolysis of hydrocarbons. In addition, parallel replica dynamics was applied to modeling of polymerization.

  9. Structural, dynamic, electronic, and vibrational properties of flexible, intermediate, and stressed rigid As-Se glasses and liquids from first principles molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauchy, M.; Kachmar, A.; Micoulaut, M.

    2014-11-21

    The structural, vibrational, electronic, and dynamic properties of amorphous and liquid As{sub x}Se{sub 1-x} (0.10 Molecular Dynamics. Within the above range of compositions, thresholds, and anomalies are found in the behavior of reciprocal and real space properties that can be correlated to the experimental location of the Boolchand intermediate phase in these glassy networks, observed at 0.27 dynamical atomic-scale fingerprints for the onset of rigidity within the network, while also providing a much more complex picture than the one derived from mean-field approaches of stiffness transitions.

  10. Development of EEM based siliconwater and silicawater wall potentials for non-reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Junghan; Iype, Eldhose; Frijns, Arjan J.H.; Nedea, Silvia V.; Steenhoven, Anton A. van

    2014-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of heat transfer in gases are computationally expensive when the wall molecules are explicitly modeled. To save computational time, an implicit boundary function is often used. Steele's potential has been used in studies of fluidsolid interface for a long time. In this work, the conceptual idea of Steele's potential was extended in order to simulate watersilicon and watersilica interfaces. A new wall potential model is developed by using the electronegativity-equalization method (EEM), a ReaxFF empirical force field and a non-reactive molecular dynamics package PumMa. Contact angle simulations were performed in order to validate the wall potential model. Contact angle simulations with the resulting tabulated wall potentials gave a siliconwater contact angle of 129, a quartzwater contact angle of 0, and a cristobalitewater contact angle of 40, which are in reasonable agreement with experimental values.

  11. A density-functional and molecular-dynamics study on the physical properties of yttrium-doped tantalum oxynitride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, H.; Schilling, H.; Lerch, M.; Dronskowski, R. . E-mail: drons@HAL9000.ac.rwth-aachen.de

    2006-08-15

    Fluorite-type phases in the system Y-Ta-O-N have been studied using both first-principle electronic-structure calculations and molecular-dynamic simulations to validate the structural data and to explain unusual asymmetric reflection profiles observed in the experimental X-ray diffraction patterns. We provide evidence that the compounds may be macroscopically described as to represent cubic fluorite-type defect structures despite the fact that DFT calculations clearly show that all crystallographic unit cells appear as triclinically distorted. Additionally, we find that there is a minute (but hardly significant) tendency for anionic ordering at absolute zero temperature but none under reaction conditions. - Graphical abstract: Structural result of a room-temperature molecular-dynamic simulation of a supercell of Y{sub 0.125}Ta{sub 0.875}O{sub 0.875}N{open_square}{sub 0.125}.

  12. Structural aspects of the solvation shell of lysine and acetylated lysine: A Car-Parrinello and classical molecular dynamics investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carnevale, V.; Raugei, S.

    2009-12-14

    Lysine acetylation is a post-translational modification, which modulates the affinity of protein-protein and/or protein-DNA complexes. Its crucial role as a switch in signaling pathways highlights the relevance of charged chemical groups in determining the interactions between water and biomolecules. A great effort has been recently devoted to assess the reliability of classical molecular dynamics simulations in describing the solvation properties of charged moieties. In the spirit of these investigations, we performed classical and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations on lysine and acetylated-lysine in aqueous solution. A comparative analysis between the two computational schemes is presented with a focus on the first solvation shell of the charged groups. An accurate structural analysis unveils subtle, yet statistically significant, differences which are discussed in connection to the significant electronic density charge transfer occurring between the solute and the surrounding water molecules.

  13. Non-adiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics of supersonic beam epitaxy of silicon carbide at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taioli, Simone; Garberoglio, Giovanni; Simonucci, Stefano; Beccara, Silvio a; Aversa, Lucrezia; Nardi, Marco; Verucchi, Roberto; Iannotta, Salvatore; Dapor, Maurizio; and others

    2013-01-28

    In this work, we investigate the processes leading to the room-temperature growth of silicon carbide thin films by supersonic molecular beam epitaxy technique. We present experimental data showing that the collision of fullerene on a silicon surface induces strong chemical-physical perturbations and, for sufficient velocity, disruption of molecular bonds, and cage breaking with formation of nanostructures with different stoichiometric character. We show that in these out-of-equilibrium conditions, it is necessary to go beyond the standard implementations of density functional theory, as ab initio methods based on the Born-Oppenheimer approximation fail to capture the excited-state dynamics. In particular, we analyse the Si-C{sub 60} collision within the non-adiabatic nuclear dynamics framework, where stochastic hops occur between adiabatic surfaces calculated with time-dependent density functional theory. This theoretical description of the C{sub 60} impact on the Si surface is in good agreement with our experimental findings.

  14. Cummins MD & HD Accessory Hybridization CRADA -Annual Report FY15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deter, Dean D.

    2015-10-01

    There are many areas of MD and HD vehicles that can be improved by new technologies and optimized control strategies. Component optimization and idle reduction need to be addressed, this is best done by a two part approach that includes selecting the best component technology, and/or architecture, and optimized controls that are vehicle focused. While this is a common focus in the light duty industry it has been gaining momentum in the MD and HD market as the market gets more competitive and the regulations become more stringent. When looking into systems optimization and idle reduction technologies, affected vehicle systems must first be considered, and if possible included in the new architecture to get the most benefit out of these new capabilities. Typically, when looking into idle reduction or component optimization for MD/HD, the vehicle s accessories become a prime candidate for electrification or hybridization. While this has already been studied on light duty vehicles (especially on hybrids and electric vehicles) it has not made any head way or market penetration in most MD and HD applications. If hybrids and electric MD and HD vehicles begin to break into the market this would be a necessary step into the ability to make those vehicles successful by allowing for independent, optimized operation separate from the engine.

  15. Temperature dependence of creep compliance of highly cross-linked epoxy: A molecular simulation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khabaz, Fardin Khare, Ketan S. Khare, Rajesh

    2014-05-15

    We have used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the effect of temperature on the creep compliance of neat cross-linked epoxy. Experimental studies of mechanical behavior of cross-linked epoxy in literature commonly report creep compliance values, whereas molecular simulations of these systems have primarily focused on the Youngs modulus. In this work, in order to obtain a more direct comparison between experiments and simulations, atomistically detailed models of the cross-linked epoxy are used to study their creep compliance as a function of temperature using MD simulations. The creep tests are performed by applying a constant tensile stress and monitoring the resulting strain in the system. Our results show that simulated values of creep compliance increase with an increase in both time and temperature. We believe that such calculations of the creep compliance, along with the use of time temperature superposition, hold great promise in connecting the molecular insight obtained from molecular simulation at small length- and time-scales with the experimental behavior of such materials. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first reported effort that investigates the creep compliance behavior of cross-linked epoxy using MD simulations.

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Ordnance Laboratory - MD 0-03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Laboratory - MD 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVAL ORDNANCE LABORATORY (MD.0-03 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Naval Ordnance Laboratory - White Oak Location: White Oak Area , Silver Spring , Maryland MD.0-03-1 MD.0-03-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 MD.0-03-2 Site Operations: Research and development - may have involved radioactive materials because the site was identified on a 1955 Accountability Station

  17. Electric Double-Layer Structure in Primitive Model Electrolytes. Comparing Molecular Dynamics with Local-Density Approximations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Giera, Brian; Lawrence Livermore National Lab.; Henson, Neil; Kober, Edward M.; Shell, M. Scott; Squires, Todd M.

    2015-02-27

    We evaluate the accuracy of local-density approximations (LDAs) using explicit molecular dynamics simulations of binary electrolytes comprised of equisized ions in an implicit solvent. The Bikerman LDA, which considers ions to occupy a lattice, poorly captures excluded volume interactions between primitive model ions. Instead, LDAs based on the Carnahan–Starling (CS) hard-sphere equation of state capture simulated values of ideal and excess chemical potential profiles extremely well, as is the relationship between surface charge density and electrostatic potential. Excellent agreement between the EDL capacitances predicted by CS-LDAs and computed in molecular simulations is found even in systems where ion correlations drivemore » strong density and free charge oscillations within the EDL, despite the inability of LDAs to capture the oscillations in the detailed EDL profiles.« less

  18. The liquid surface of chiral ionic liquids as seen from molecular dynamics simulations combined with intrinsic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lísal, Martin

    2013-12-07

    We present molecular-level insight into the liquid/gas interface of two chiral room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) derived from 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([bmim][Br]); namely, (R)-1-butyl-3-(3-hydroxy-2-methylpropyl)imidazolium bromide (hydroxypropyl) and 1-butyl-3-[(1R)-nopyl]imidazolium bromide (nopyl). We use our currently developed force field which was validated against the experimental bulk density, heat of vaporization, and surface tension of [bmim][Br]. The force field for the RTILs adopts the Chemistry at Harvard Molecular Mechanics (CHARMM) parameters for the intramolecular and repulsion-dispersion interactions along with the reduced partial atomic charges based on ab initio calculations. The net charges of the ions are around ±0.8e, which mimic the anion to cation charge transfer and many-body effects. Molecular dynamics simulations in the slab geometry combined with the intrinsic interface analysis are employed to provide a detailed description of the RTIL/gas interface in terms of the structural and dynamic properties of the interfacial, sub-interfacial, and central layers at a temperature of 300 K. The focus is on the comparison of the liquid/gas interface for the chiral RTILs with the interface for parent [bmim][Br]. The structure of the interface is elucidated by evaluating the surface roughness, intrinsic atomic density profiles, and orientation ordering of the cations. The dynamics of the ions at the interfacial region is characterized by computing the survival probability, and normal and lateral self-diffusion coefficients in the layers.

  19. An efficient parallelization scheme for molecular dynamics simulations with many-body, flexible, polarizable empirical potentials: Application to water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fanourgakis, Georgios S.; Tipparaju, Vinod; Nieplocha, Jarek; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2007-01-01

    An efficient parallelization scheme for classical Molecular Dynamics simulations with flexible polarizable empirical potentials is presented. It is based on the standard Ewald summation technique to handle the long-range electrostatic and induction interactions. The algorithm for this parallelization scheme is designed for systems containing several thousands of polarizable sites in the simulation box. Its performance is evaluated during Molecular Dynamics simulations under periodic boundary conditions with unit cell sizes ranging from 128-512 water molecules employing two exible, polarizable water models [POL1(F) and TTM2-F] containing 1 and 3 polarizable sites respectively. The efficiency of the algorithm, is evaluated against a flexible, pairwise-additive water model (TIP4F). The benchmarks were performed on both shared and distributed memory platforms. As a result of the efficient calculations of the induced dipole moments, a superlinear scaling as a function of the number of the processors is observed in several cases. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt for a parallel implementation of a polarizable potential under periodic boundary conditions. Guidelines for adapting the algorithm for larger systems are also discussed. This research was performed in part using the Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energys Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.

  20. Radiation damage in cubic ZrO2 and yttria-stabilized zirconia from molecular dynamics simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2014-11-20

    Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulation on cubic ZrO2 and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to elucidate defect cluster formation resulting from radiation damage, and evaluate the impact of Y-dopants. Interstitial clusters composed of split-interstitial building blocks, i.e., Zr-Zr or Y-Zr are formed. Moreover, oxygen vacancies control cation defect migration; in their presence, Zr interstitials aggregate to form split-interstitials whereas in their absence Zr interstitials remain immobile, as isolated single-interstitials. Y-doping prevents interstitial cluster formation due to sequestration of oxygen vacancies.

  1. Radiation damage in cubic-ZrO2 and yttria-stabilized zirconia from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J

    2015-01-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulation on cubic ZrO2 and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to elucidate defect cluster formation resulting from radiation damage, and evaluate the impact of Y-dopants. Interstitial clusters composed of split-interstitial building blocks, i.e., Zr-Zr or Y-Zr are formed. Oxygen vacancies control cation defect migration; in their presence, Zr interstitials aggregate to form split-interstitials whereas in their absence Zr interstitials remain immobile, as isolated single-interstitials. Y-doping prevents interstitial cluster formation due to sequestration of oxygen vacancies.

  2. Three-dimensional ordering of cold ion beams in a storage ring: A molecular-dynamics simulation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuri, Yosuke

    2015-06-29

    Three-dimensional (3D) ordering of a charged-particle beams circulating in a storage ring is systematically studied with a molecular-dynamics simulation code. An ion beam can exhibit a 3D ordered configuration at ultralow temperature as a result of powerful 3D laser cooling. Various unique characteristics of the ordered beams, different from those of crystalline beams, are revealed in detail, such as the single-particle motion in the transverse and longitudinal directions, and the dependence of the tune depression and the Coulomb coupling constant on the operating points.

  3. Lenard-Balescu calculations and classical molecular dynamics simulations of electrical and thermal conductivities of hydrogen plasmas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Whitley, Heather D.; Scullard, Christian R.; Benedict, Lorin X.; Castor, John I.; Randles, Amanda; Glosli, James N.; Richards, David F.; Desjarlais, Michael P.; Graziani, Frank R.

    2015-12-04

    Here, we present a discussion of kinetic theory treatments of linear electrical and thermal transport in hydrogen plasmas, for a regime of interest to inertial confinement fusion applications. In order to assess the accuracy of one of the more involved of these approaches, classical Lenard-Balescu theory, we perform classical molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen plasmas using 2-body quantum statistical potentials and compute both electrical and thermal conductivity from out particle trajectories using the Kubo approach. Our classical Lenard-Balescu results employing the identical statistical potentials agree well with the simulations.

  4. Isobaric molecular dynamics version of the generalized replica exchange method (gREM): Liquid–vapor equilibrium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Secor, Maxim; Keyes, Tom

    2015-09-23

    A prescription for sampling isobaric generalized ensembles with molecular dynamics is presented and applied to the generalized replica exchange method (gREM), which was designed for simulating first-order phase transitions. The properties of the isobaric gREM ensemble are discussed and a study is presented of the liquid-vapor equilibrium of the guest molecules given for gas hydrate formation with the mW water model. As a result, phase diagrams, critical parameters, and a law of corresponding states are obtained.

  5. Molecular dynamics of gases and vapors in nanoporous solids. Final LDRD project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pohl, P.I.

    1996-08-01

    This report provides a study of gases in microporous solids using molecular modeling. The theory of gas transport in porous materials as well as the molecular modeling literature is briefly reviewed. Work complete is described and analyzed with retard to the prevailing theory. The work covers two simple subjects, construction of porous solid models and diffusion of He, H{sub 2}, Ar and CH{sub 4} down a pressure gradient across the material models as in typical membrane permeation experiments. The broader objective is to enhance our capability to efficiently and accurately develop, produce and apply microporous materials.

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bendix Corp Frieze Division - MD 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Corp Frieze Division - MD 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: BENDIX CORP., FRIEZE DIVISION (MD.0-01 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Baltimore , Maryland MD.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MD.0-01-3 Site Operations: Produced "classified units" believed to be electronics components - no radioactive materials involved. MD.0-01-1 MD.0-01-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No radioactive materials handled at this

  7. Experimental and Theoretical Study of Molecular Response of Amine Bases in Organic Solvents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathmann, Shawn M.; Cho, Herman M.; Chang, Tsun-Mei; Schenter, Gregory K.; Parab, Kshitij K.; Autrey, Thomas

    2014-05-08

    Reorientational correlation times of various amine bases (viz., pyridine, 2,6-lutidene, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine) and organic solvents (dichloromethane, toluene) were determined by solution-state NMR relaxation time measurements and compared with predictions from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The bases and solvents are reagents in complex reactions involving Frustrated Lewis Pairs (FLP), which display remarkable catalytic activity in metal-free H2 scission. The comparison of measured and simulated correlation times is a key test of the ability of recent MD and quantum electronic structure calculations to elucidate the mechanism of FLP activity. Correla- tion times were found to be in the range 1.4-3.4 ps (NMR) and 1.23-5.28 ps (MD) for the amines, and 0.9-2.3 ps (NMR) and 0.2-1.7 ps (MD) for the solvent molecules. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacic Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  8. Function and dynamics of aptamers: A case study on the malachite green aptamer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Tianjiao

    2008-12-01

    Aptamers are short single-stranded nucleic acids that can bind to their targets with high specificity and high affinity. To study aptamer function and dynamics, the malachite green aptamer was chosen as a model. Malachite green (MG) bleaching, in which an OH- attacks the central carbon (C1) of MG, was inhibited in the presence of the malachite green aptamer (MGA). The inhibition of MG bleaching by MGA could be reversed by an antisense oligonucleotide (AS) complementary to the MGA binding pocket. Computational cavity analysis of the NMR structure of the MGA-MG complex predicted that the OH{sup -} is sterically excluded from the C1 of MG. The prediction was confirmed experimentally using variants of the MGA with changes in the MG binding pocket. This work shows that molecular reactivity can be reversibly regulated by an aptamer-AS pair based on steric hindrance. In addition to demonstrate that aptamers could control molecular reactivity, aptamer dynamics was studied with a strategy combining molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and experimental verification. MD simulation predicted that the MG binding pocket of the MGA is largely pre-organized and that binding of MG involves reorganization of the pocket and a simultaneous twisting of the MGA terminal stems around the pocket. MD simulation also provided a 3D-structure model of unoccupied MGA that has not yet been obtained by biophysical measurements. These predictions were consistent with biochemical and biophysical measurements of the MGA-MG interaction including RNase I footprinting, melting curves, thermodynamic and kinetic constants measurement. This work shows that MD simulation can be used to extend our understanding of the dynamics of aptamer-target interaction which is not evident from static 3D-structures. To conclude, I have developed a novel concept to control molecular reactivity by an aptamer based on steric protection and a strategy to study the dynamics of aptamer-target interaction by combining MD

  9. A Scalable O(N) Algorithm for Large-Scale Parallel First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osei-Kuffuor, Daniel; Fattebert, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Traditional algorithms for first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) simulations only gain a modest capability increase from current petascale computers, due to their O(N3) complexity and their heavy use of global communications. To address this issue, we are developing a truly scalable O(N) complexity FPMD algorithm, based on density functional theory (DFT), which avoids global communications. The computational model uses a general nonorthogonal orbital formulation for the DFT energy functional, which requires knowledge of selected elements of the inverse of the associated overlap matrix. We present a scalable algorithm for approximately computing selected entries of the inverse of the overlap matrix, based on an approximate inverse technique, by inverting local blocks corresponding to principal submatrices of the global overlap matrix. The new FPMD algorithm exploits sparsity and uses nearest neighbor communication to provide a computational scheme capable of extreme scalability. Accuracy is controlled by the mesh spacing of the finite difference discretization, the size of the localization regions in which the electronic orbitals are confined, and a cutoff beyond which the entries of the overlap matrix can be omitted when computing selected entries of its inverse. We demonstrate the algorithm's excellent parallel scaling for up to O(100K) atoms on O(100K) processors, with a wall-clock time of O(1) minute per molecular dynamics time step.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of the effects of salts on the aggregation properties of benzene in water.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, P. E.

    2003-07-16

    The specific aims of the project were: to provide an atomic level description of the interactions between benzene, water and ions in solutions. To determine the degree of association between two benzene molecules in aqueous and salt solutions. To investigate the structure and dynamics of the interface between benzene and water or salt solution.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of n-hexane at 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisal, Martin; Izak, Pavel

    2013-07-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations of n-hexane adsorbed onto the interface of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([bmim][Tf{sub 2}N]) are performed at three n-hexane surface densities, ranged from 0.7 to 2.3 {mu}mol/m{sup 2} at 300 K. For [bmim][Tf{sub 2}N] room-temperature ionic liquid, we use a non-polarizable all-atom force field with the partial atomic charges based on ab initio calculations for the isolated ion pair. The net charges of the ions are {+-}0.89e, which mimics the anion to cation charge transfer and polarization effects. The OPLS-AA force field is employed for modeling of n-hexane. The surface tension is computed using the mechanical route and its value decreases with increase of the n-hexane surface density. The [bmim][Tf{sub 2}N]/n-hexane interface is analyzed using the intrinsic method, and the structural and dynamic properties of the interfacial, sub-interfacial, and central layers are computed. We determine the surface roughness, global and intrinsic density profiles, and orientation ordering of the molecules to describe the structure of the interface. We further compute the survival probability, normal and lateral self-diffusion coefficients, and re-orientation correlation functions to elucidate the effects of n-hexane on dynamics of the cations and anions in the layers.

  12. Theoretical study of quantum molecular reaction dynamics and of the effects of intense laser radiation on a diatomic molecule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dardi, P.S.

    1984-11-01

    Within the very broad field of molecular dynamics, we have concentrated on two simple yet important systems. The systems are simple enough so that they are adequately described with a single Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface and that the dynamics can be calculated accurately. They are important because they give insight into solving more complicated systems. First we discuss H + H/sub 2/ reactive scattering. We present an exact formalism for atom-diatom reactive scattering which avoids the problem of finding a coordinate system appropriate for both reactants and products. We present computational results for collinear H + H/sub 2/ reactive scattering which agree very well with previous calculations. We also present a coupled channel distorted wave Born approximation for atom-diatom reactive scattering which we show is a first order approximation to our exact formalism. We present coupled channel DWBA results for three dimensional H + H/sub 2/ reactive scattering. The second system is an isolated HF molecule in an intense laser field. Using classical trajectories and quantum dynamics, we look at energy absorbed and transition probabilities as a function of the laser pulse time and also averaged over the pulse time. Calculations are performed for both rotating and nonrotating HF. We examine one and two photon absorption about the fundamental frequency, multiphoton absorption, and overtone absorption. 127 references, 31 figures, 12 tables.

  13. Slow dynamics in an azopolymer molecular layer studied by x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orsi, D.; Fluerasu, A.; Cristofolini, L.; Fontana, M.P.; Pontecorvo, E.; Caronna, C.; Zontone, F.; Madsen, A.

    2010-09-23

    We report the results of x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) experiments on multilayers of a photosensitive azo-polymer which can be softened by photoisomerization. Time correlation functions have been measured at different temperatures and momentum transfers (q) and under different illumination conditions (dark, UV or visible). The correlation functions are well described by the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) form with relaxation times that are proportional to q{sup -1}. The characteristic relaxation times follow the same Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law describing the bulk viscosity of this polymer. The out-of-equilibrium relaxation dynamics following a UV photoperturbation are accelerated, which is in agreement with a fluidification effect previously measured by rheology. The transient dynamics are characterized by two times correlation function, and dynamical heterogeneity is evidenced by calculating the variance {chi} of the degree of correlation as a function of ageing time. A clear peak in {chi} appears at a well defined time {tau}{sub C} which scales with q{sup -1} and with the ageing time, in a similar fashion as previously reported in colloidal suspensions [O. Dauchot et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 95 265701 (2005)]. From an accurate analysis of the correlation functions we could demonstrate a temperature and light dependent cross-over from compressed KWW to simple exponential behavior.

  14. Characterization of amorphous In{sub 2}O{sub 3}: An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliano, Antonio; Catellani, Alessandra; Cicero, Giancarlo

    2011-11-21

    In this work, we report on the structural and electronic properties of amorphous In{sub 2}O{sub 3} obtained with ab initio molecular dynamics. Our results show crystal-like short range InO{sub 6} polyhedra having average In-O distance consistent with x-ray spectroscopy data. Structural disorder yields band tailing and localized states, which are responsible of a strong reduction of the electronic gap. Most importantly, the appearance of a peculiar O-O bond imparts n-type character to the amorphous compound and provides contribution for interpreting spectroscopic measurements on indium based oxidized systems. Our findings portray characteristic features to attribute transparent semiconductive properties to amorphous In{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  15. Ab initio molecular dynamics of Al irradiation-induced processes during Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Music, Denis; Nahif, Farwah; Friederichsen, Niklas; Schneider, Jochen M.; Sarakinos, Kostas

    2011-03-14

    Al bombardment induced structural changes in {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (R-3c) and {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Fd-3m) were studied using ab initio molecular dynamics. Diffusion and irradiation damage occur for both polymorphs in the kinetic energy range from 3.5 to 40 eV. However, for {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(001) subplantation of impinging Al causes significantly larger irradiation damage and hence larger mobility as compared to {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Consequently, fast diffusion along {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(001) gives rise to preferential {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) growth, which is consistent with published structure evolution experiments.

  16. Theoretical design of a novel copper doped gold cluster supported on graphene utilizing ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koizumi, Kenichi; Nobusada, Katsuyuki; Boero, Mauro

    2015-12-31

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations have been used to inspect the adsorption of O{sub 2} to a small gold-copper alloy cluster supported on graphene. The exposed Cu atom in this cluster acts as a crucial attractive site for the approaching of O{sub 2} and consequently widens the reaction channel for the adsorption process. Conversely, a pure Au cluster on the same graphene support is inactive for the O{sub 2} adsorption because the corresponding reaction channel for the adsorption is very narrow. These results clearly indicate that doping a different metal to the Au cluster is a way to enhance the oxygen adsorption and to promote catalytic reactions.

  17. Effects of boron-nitride substrates on Stone-Wales defect formation in graphene: An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, K.; Xiao, H. Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Zhang, Y. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Weber, W. J., E-mail: wjweber@utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2014-05-19

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the effects of a boron nitride (BN) substrate on Stone-Wales (SW) defect formation and recovery in graphene. It is found that SW defects can be created by an off-plane recoil atom that interacts with the BN substrate. A mechanism with complete bond breakage for formation of SW defects in suspended graphene is also revealed for recoils at large displacement angles. In addition, further irradiation can result in recovery of the SW defects through a bond rotation mechanism in both graphene and graphene/BN, and the substrate has little effect on the recovery process. This study indicates that the BN substrate enhances the irradiation resistance of graphene.

  18. Electronic excitation induced amorphization in titanate pyrochlores: an ab initio molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Haiyan Y.; Weber, William J.; Zhang, Yanwen; Zu, X. T.; Li, Sean

    2015-02-09

    In this study, the response of titanate pyrochlores (A2Ti2O7, A = Y, Gd and Sm) to electronic excitation is investigated utilizing an ab initio molecular dynamics method. All the titanate pyrochlores are found to undergo a crystalline-to-amorphous structural transition under a low concentration of electronic excitations. The transition temperature at which structural amorphization starts to occur depends on the concentration of electronic excitations. During the structural transition, O2-like molecules are formed, and this anion disorder further drives cation disorder that leads to an amorphous state. This study provides new insights into the mechanisms of amorphization in titanate pyrochlores under laser, electron and ion irradiations.

  19. Low temperature spin dynamics in Cr{sub 7}Ni-Cu-Cr{sub 7}Ni coupled molecular rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bordonali, L.; Furukawa, Y.; Mariani, M.; Sabareesh, K. P. V.; Garlatti, E.; Borsa, F.

    2014-05-07

    Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation measurements have been performed down to very low temperature (50 mK) to determine the effect of coupling two Cr{sub 7}Ni molecular rings via a Cu{sup 2+} ion. No difference in the spin dynamics was found from nuclear spin lattice relaxation down to 1.5 K. At lower temperature, the {sup 1}H-NMR line broadens dramatically indicating spin freezing. From the plot of the line width vs. magnetization, it is found that the freezing temperature is higher (260 mK) in the coupled ring with respect to the single Cr{sub 7}Ni ring (140 mK)

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of Coulomb explosion, melting and shock wave creation in silicon after an ionization pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhongyu; Shao, Lin; Chen, Di; Wang, Jing

    2014-04-14

    Strong electronic stopping power of swift ions in a semiconducting or insulating substrate can lead to localized electron stripping. The subsequent repulsive interactions among charged target atoms can cause Coulomb explosion. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we simulate Coulomb explosion in silicon by introducing an ionization pulse lasting for different periods, and at different substrate temperatures. We find that the longer the pulse period, the larger the melting radius. The observation can be explained by a critical energy density model assuming that melting required thermal energy density is a constant value and the total thermal energy gained from Coulomb explosion is linearly proportional to the ionization period. Our studies also show that melting radius is larger at higher substrate temperatures. The temperature effect is explained due to a longer structural relaxation above the melting temperature at original ionization boundary due to lower heat dissipation rates. Furthermore, simulations show the formation of shock waves, created due to the compression from the melting core.

  1. Thermal transport in UO2 with defects and fission products by molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiang-Yang; Cooper, Michael William Donald; Mcclellan, Kenneth James; Lashley, Jason Charles; Byler, Darrin David; Stanek, Christopher Richard; Andersson, Anders David Ragnar

    2015-10-14

    The importance of the thermal transport in nuclear fuel has motivated a wide range of experimental and modelling studies. In this report, the reduction of thermal transport in UO2 due to defects and fission products has been investigated using non-equilibrium MD simulations, with two sets of empirical potentials for studying the degregation of UO2 thermal conductivity including a Buckingham type interatomic potential and a recently developed EAM type interatomic potential. Additional parameters for U5+ and Zr4+ in UO2 have been developed for the EAM potential. The thermal conductivity results from MD simulations are then corrected for the spin-phonon scattering through Callaway model formulations. To validate the modelling results, comparison was made with experimental measurements on single crystal hyper-stoichiometric UO2+x samples.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations and thermochemistry of reactive ion etching of silicon by chlorine, chlorine dimer, bromine, and bromine dimer cations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valone, S.M.; Hanson, D.E.; Kress, J.D.

    1998-05-08

    Simulations of Cl plasma etch of Si surfaces with MD techniques agree reasonably well with the available experimental information on yields and surface morphologies. This information has been supplied to a Monte Carlo etch profile resulting in substantial agreement with comparable inputs provided through controlled experiments. To the extent that more recent measurements of etch rates are more reliable than older ones, preliminary MD simulations using bond-order corrections to the atomic interactions between neighboring Si atoms on the surface improves agreement with experiment through an increase in etch rate and improved agreement with XPS measurements of surface stoichiometry. Thermochemical and geometric analysis of small Si-Br molecules is consistent with the current notions of the effects of including brominated species in etchant gases.

  3. Microcutting characteristics on the single crystal diamond tool with edge radius using molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jeong-Du; Moon, Chan-Hong

    1995-12-31

    Ultraprecision metal cutting (UPMC) technology which makes possible submicrometer form accuracy and manometer roughness is developed to reach the 1nm nominal (undeformed) thickness of cut. At this thickness level, a few of atom`s layers should be considered. In this paper using the Molecuar Dynamics simulation, the phenomena of microcutting with a subnanometer chip thickness, the cutting mechanism for tool edge configuration to consider the sharp edge and round edge tool, the cut material and cutting speed are evaluated. Cutting mechanism of subnanometer depth of cut is evaluated.

  4. Homogeneous hydride formation path in α-Zr: Molecular dynamics simulations with the charge-optimized many-body potential

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Bai, Xian-Ming; Yu, Jianguo; Tonks, Michael R.; Noordhoek, Mark J.; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2016-06-01

    A formation path for homogeneous γ hydride formation in hcp α-Zr, from solid solution to the ζ and then the γ hydride, was demonstrated using molecular static calculations and molecular dynamic simulations with the charge-optimized many-body (COMB) potential. Hydrogen has limited solubility in α-Zr. Once the solubility limit is exceeded, the stability of solid solution gives way to that of coherent hydride phases such as the ζ hydride by planar precipitation of hydrogen. At finite temperatures, the ζ hydride goes through a partial hcp-fcc transformation via 1/3 <1¯100> slip on the basal plane, and transforms into a mixture of γmore » hydride and α-Zr. In the ζ hydride, slip on the basal plane is favored thermodynamically with negligible barrier, and is therefore feasible at finite temperatures without mechanical loading. The transformation process involves slips of three equivalent shear partials, in contrast to that proposed in the literature where only a single shear partial was involved. The adoption of multiple slip partials minimizes the macroscopic shape change of embedded hydride clusters and the shear strain accumulation in the matrix, and thus reduces the overall barrier needed for homogeneous γ hydride formation. In conclusion, this formation path requires finite temperatures for hydrogen diffusion without mechanical loading. Therefore, it should be effective at the cladding operating conditions.« less

  5. Neutron Scattering of Residual Hydrogen in 1,4-Dioxane-D8 Liquid. Understanding Measurements with Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Almeida, Valmor F.; Liu, Hongjun; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Kidder, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    understand measurements or calibrate/validate molecular dynamics models.

  6. Charged particle dynamics and molecular kinetics in the hydrogen postdischarge plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diomede, P.; Longo, S.; Capitelli, M.

    2006-11-15

    The afterglow of a parallel plate radio frequency discharge in hydrogen is studied by numerical modelling to compare ion dynamics and chemical effects on the behavior of negative ions. While the ion dynamics requires a kinetic description of space dependent plasma relaxation (at least 1D), chemical effects require a vibrational kinetics of hydrogen molecules. Since previous models did not include both features it has not been possible until now to realize both effects in a single simulation. We apply an updated version of the 1D Bari model which includes a 1.5D (1Dr2Dv) Particle in Cell/Monte Carlo (PIC/MC) multispecies module coupled to the space and time dependent master equation for H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +},v=0,...,14) vibrational level population. Negative ion fronts are described in hydrogen for the first time and their impact on the plasma limiting surfaces produces a negative ion current evolution compatible with experimental findings. In the same conditions, the attachment rate overshoot is found to contribute about 7% to the average ion density in the plasma.

  7. Hybrid DFT Functional-Based Static and Molecular Dynamics Studies of Excess Electron in Liquid Ethylene Carbonate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, J. M.; Balbuena, P. B.; Budzien, J. L.; Leung, Kevin

    2011-02-22

    We applied static and dynamic hybrid functional density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the interactions of one and two excess electrons with ethylene carbonate (EC) liquid and clusters. Optimal structures of (EC)n and (EC)n- clusters devoid of Li+ ions, n = 16, were obtained. The excess electron was found to be localized on a single EC in all cases, and the EC dimeric radical anion exhibits a reduced barrier associated with the breaking of the ethylene carbonoxygen covalent bond compared to EC-. In ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations of EC- solvated in liquid EC, large fluctuations in the carbonyl carbonoxygen bond lengths were observed. AIMD simulations of a two-electron attack on EC in EC liquid and on Li metal surfaces yielded products similar to those predicted using nonhybrid DFT functionals, except that CO release did not occur for all attempted initial configurations in the liquid state.

  8. Role of direct electron-phonon coupling across metal-semiconductor interfaces in thermal transport via molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Keng-Hua; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-07-21

    Motivated by significant interest in metal-semiconductor and metal-insulator interfaces and superlattices for energy conversion applications, we developed a molecular dynamics-based model that captures the thermal transport role of conduction electrons in metals and heat transport across these types of interface. Key features of our model, denoted eleDID (electronic version of dynamics with implicit degrees of freedom), are the natural description of interfaces and free surfaces and the ability to control the spatial extent of electron-phonon (e-ph) coupling. Non-local e-ph coupling enables the energy of conduction electrons to be transferred directly to the semiconductor/insulator phonons (as opposed to having to first couple to the phonons in the metal). We characterize the effect of the spatial e-ph coupling range on interface resistance by simulating heat transport through a metal-semiconductor interface to mimic the conditions of ultrafast laser heating experiments. Direct energy transfer from the conduction electrons to the semiconductor phonons not only decreases interfacial resistance but also increases the ballistic transport behavior in the semiconductor layer. These results provide new insight for experiments designed to characterize e-ph coupling and thermal transport at the metal-semiconductor/insulator interfaces.

  9. A unified electrostatic and cavitation model for first-principles molecular dynamics in solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scherlis, D A; Fattebert, J; Gygi, F; Cococcioni, M; Marzari, N

    2005-11-14

    The electrostatic continuum solvent model developed by Fattebert and Gygi is combined with a first-principles formulation of the cavitation energy based on a natural quantum-mechanical definition for the surface of a solute. Despite its simplicity, the cavitation contribution calculated by this approach is found to be in remarkable agreement with that obtained by more complex algorithms relying on a large set of parameters. The model allows for very efficient Car-Parrinello simulations of finite or extended systems in solution, and demonstrates a level of accuracy as good as that of established quantum-chemistry continuum solvent methods. They apply this approach to the study of tetracyanoethylene dimers in dichloromethane, providing valuable structural and dynamical insights on the dimerization phenomenon.

  10. Adapting SAFT-? perturbation theory to site-based molecular dynamics simulation. I. Homogeneous fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Elliott, J. Richard

    2013-12-21

    In this work, we aim to develop a version of the Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (SAFT)-? equation of state (EOS) that is compatible with united-atom force fields, rather than experimental data. We rely on the accuracy of the force fields to provide the relation to experimental data. Although, our objective is a transferable theory of interfacial properties for soft and fused heteronuclear chains, we first clarify the details of the SAFT-? approach in terms of site-based simulations for homogeneous fluids. We show that a direct comparison of Helmholtz free energy to molecular simulation, in the framework of a third order Weeks-Chandler-Andersen perturbation theory, leads to an EOS that takes force field parameters as input and reproduces simulation results for Vapor-Liquid Equilibria (VLE) calculations. For example, saturated liquid density and vapor pressure of n-alkanes ranging from methane to dodecane deviate from those of the Transferable Potential for Phase Equilibria (TraPPE) force field by about 0.8% and 4%, respectively. Similar agreement between simulation and theory is obtained for critical properties and second virial coefficient. The EOS also reproduces simulation data of mixtures with about 5% deviation in bubble point pressure. Extension to inhomogeneous systems and united-atom site types beyond those used in description of n-alkanes will be addressed in succeeding papers.

  11. Infrared Chemical Nano-Imaging: Accessing Structure, Coupling, and Dynamics on Molecular Length Scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, Eric A.; Pollard, Benjamin; Raschke, Markus Bernd

    2015-04-02

    This Perspective highlights recent advances in infrared vibrational chemical nano-imaging. In its implementations of scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) and photothermal-induced resonance (PTIR), IR nanospectroscopy provides few-nanometer spatial resolution for the investigation of polymer, biomaterial, and related soft-matter surfaces and nanostructures. Broad-band IR s-SNOM with coherent laser and synchrotron sources allows for chemical recognition with small-ensemble sensitivity and the potential for sensitivity reaching the single-molecule limit. Probing selected vibrational marker resonances, it gives access to nanoscale chemical imaging of composition, domain morphologies, order/disorder, molecular orientation, or crystallographic phases. Local intra- and intermolecular coupling can be measured through frequency shifts of a vibrational marker in heterogeneous environments and associated inhomogeneities in vibrational dephasing. In combination with ultrafast spectroscopy, the vibrational coherent evolution of homogeneous sub-ensembles coupled to their environment can be observed. Outstanding challenges are discussed in terms of extensions to coherent and multidimensional spectroscopies, implementation in liquid and in situ environments, general sample limitations, and engineering s-SNOM scanning probes to better control the nano-localized optical excitation and to increase sensitivity.

  12. Dynamics of laser-induced molecular alignment in the impulsive and adiabatic regimes: A direct comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres, R.; Marangos, J.P.; Nalda, R. de

    2005-08-15

    Quantum-mechanical calculations are performed of the dynamic alignment of linear molecules induced by a strong nonresonant laser field. Within this framework we have treated in a unified fashion the alignment with laser pulses of varying duration from the short pulse impulsive limit ({tau}{sub pulse}<T{sub rot}). The temporal behavior of the alignment in both these limits, and in the intermediate pulse duration regime, have been analyzed. For the impulsive limit the dependence of the degree of maximum alignment upon the laser pulse duration was examined and the intensity-dependent optimum pulse duration explained. A comparison between the degree of alignment under the same conditions of pulse intensity and rotational temperature was performed between the impulsive and adiabatic cases. The adiabatic case was found to always provide a better degree of alignment for a given intensity which we show is due to the zero relative phasing between the component states of the superposition that form the pendular states. We have explicitly calculated the angular distribution of an ensemble of linear molecules as it evolves through a rotational revival; a rich structure is found that may be useful in guiding future experiments that utilize the field free alignment in a revival.

  13. Role of nuclear dynamics in the Asymmetric molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions for C 1s photoejection from CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyabe, Shungo; Haxton, Dan; Rescigno, Tom; McCurdy, Bill

    2010-11-30

    We report the results of semiclassical calculations of the asymmetric molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions for C 1s ionization of CO{sub 2} measured with respect to the CO{sup +} and O{sup +} ions produced by subsequent Auger decay, and show how the decay event can be used to probe ultrafast molecular dynamics of the transient cation. The fixed-nuclei photoionization amplitudes were constructed using variationally obtained electron-molecular ion scattering wave functions. The amplitudes are then used in a semiclassical manner to investigate their dependence on the nuclear dynamics of the cation. The method introduced here can be used to study other core-level ionization events.

  14. Dynamics of polydots: Soft luminescent polymeric nanoparticles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maskey, Sabina; Osti, Naresh C.; Grest, Gary S.; Perahia, Dvora

    2016-03-04

    The conformation and dynamics of luminescent polymers collapsed into nanoparticles or polydots were studied using fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, providing a first insight into their internal dynamics. Controlling the conformation and dynamics of confined polymers is essential for realization of the full potential of polydots in nanomedicine and biotechnology. Specifically, the shape and internal dynamics of polydots that consist of highly rigid dialkyl p-phenylene ethynylene (PPE) are probed as a function of temperature. At room temperature, the polydots are spherical without any correlations between the aromatic rings on the PPE backbone. With increasing temperature, they expand and becomemore » slightly aspherical; however, the polymers remain confined. The coherent dynamic structure factor reveals that the internal motion of the polymer backbone is arrested, and the side chains dominate the internal dynamics of the polydots. Lastly, these new soft nanoparticles retain their overall shape and dynamics over an extended temperature range, and their conformation is tunable via their degree of expansion.« less

  15. Neutron scattering of residual hydrogen in 1,4-dioxane d8 liquid: Understanding measurements with molecular dynamics simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Hongjun; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Kidder, Michelle K.; de Almeida, Valmor F.

    2016-06-08

    performed to either understand measurements or calibrate/validate molecular dynamics models.« less

  16. Dynamics of Water Associated with Lithium Ions Distributed in Polyethylene Oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhe; Ohl, Michael; Diallo, Souleymane O.; Jalarvo, Niina H.; Hong, Kunlun; Han, Youngkyu; Smith, Gregory S.; Do, Changwoo

    2015-11-03

    We studied the dynamics of water in polyethylene oxide (PEO)/LiCl solution with quasielastic neutron scattering experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Two different time scales of water diffusion representing interfacial water and bulk water dynamics have been identified. Furthermore, the measured diffusion coefficient of interfacial water remained 5–10 times smaller than that of bulk water, but both were slowed by approximately 50% in the presence of Li+. Detailed analysis of MD trajectories suggests that Li+ is favorably found at the surface of the hydration layer, and the probability to find the caged Li+ configuration formed by the PEO is lower than for the noncaged Li+-PEO configuration. In both configurations, however, the slowing down of water molecules is driven by reorienting water molecules and creating water-Li+ hydration complexes. Moreover, performing the MD simulation with different ions (Na+ and K+) revealed that smaller ionic radius of the ions is a key factor in disrupting the formation of PEO cages by allowing spaces for water molecules to come in between the ion and PEO.

  17. Dynamics of Water Associated with Lithium Ions Distributed in Polyethylene Oxide

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Zhe; Ohl, Michael; Diallo, Souleymane O.; Jalarvo, Niina H.; Hong, Kunlun; Han, Youngkyu; Smith, Gregory S.; Do, Changwoo

    2015-11-03

    We studied the dynamics of water in polyethylene oxide (PEO)/LiCl solution with quasielastic neutron scattering experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Two different time scales of water diffusion representing interfacial water and bulk water dynamics have been identified. Furthermore, the measured diffusion coefficient of interfacial water remained 5–10 times smaller than that of bulk water, but both were slowed by approximately 50% in the presence of Li+. Detailed analysis of MD trajectories suggests that Li+ is favorably found at the surface of the hydration layer, and the probability to find the caged Li+ configuration formed by the PEO is lowermore » than for the noncaged Li+-PEO configuration. In both configurations, however, the slowing down of water molecules is driven by reorienting water molecules and creating water-Li+ hydration complexes. Moreover, performing the MD simulation with different ions (Na+ and K+) revealed that smaller ionic radius of the ions is a key factor in disrupting the formation of PEO cages by allowing spaces for water molecules to come in between the ion and PEO.« less

  18. RADIATION PRESSURE DETECTION AND DENSITY ESTIMATE FOR 2011 MD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Micheli, Marco; Tholen, David J.; Elliott, Garrett T. E-mail: tholen@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2014-06-10

    We present our astrometric observations of the small near-Earth object 2011 MD (H ? 28.0), obtained after its very close fly-by to Earth in 2011 June. Our set of observations extends the observational arc to 73days, and, together with the published astrometry obtained around the Earth fly-by, allows a direct detection of the effect of radiation pressure on the object, with a confidence of 5?. The detection can be used to put constraints on the density of the object, pointing to either an unexpectedly low value of ?=(640330)kg m{sup ?3} (68% confidence interval) if we assume a typical probability distribution for the unknown albedo, or to an unusually high reflectivity of its surface. This result may have important implications both in terms of impact hazard from small objects and in light of a possible retrieval of this target.

  19. BERAC Meeting February 18 - 19, 2009 North Bethesda, MD | U.S. DOE Office

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    of Science (SC) 18 - 19, 2009 North Bethesda, MD Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings BERAC Minutes BERAC Minutes Archive Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (135KB) BER Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees BER Home Meetings BERAC Meeting February 18 - 19, 2009 North Bethesda, MD Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee Meeting February 18-19, 2009 North Bethesda, MD

  20. BERAC Meeting February 23-24, 2010 Gaithersburg, MD | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) 23-24, 2010 Gaithersburg, MD Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings BERAC Minutes BERAC Minutes Archive Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (135KB) BER Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees BER Home Meetings BERAC Meeting February 23-24, 2010 Gaithersburg, MD Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page BERAC Meeting February 23-24,2010 Gaithersburg MD Agenda .pdf file (8KB) Presentations Patricia Dehmer .ppt file

  1. BERAC Meeting October 16, 2006 North Bethesda, MD | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) October 16, 2006 North Bethesda, MD Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings BERAC Minutes BERAC Minutes Archive Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (135KB) BER Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees BER Home Meetings BERAC Meeting October 16, 2006 North Bethesda, MD Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page BERAC Meeting October 16, 2006 North Bethesda, MD Agenda .pdf file (8KB) Presentations Jerry Elwood .ppt file

  2. BERAC Meeting September 1-2, 2009 Gaithersburg, MD | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) 1-2, 2009 Gaithersburg, MD Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings BERAC Minutes BERAC Minutes Archive Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (135KB) BER Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees BER Home Meetings BERAC Meeting September 1-2, 2009 Gaithersburg, MD Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page BERAC Meeting September 1-2, 2009 Gaithersburg, MD Agenda .pdf file (8KB) Presentations Patricia Dehmer .ppt file

  3. BERAC Meeting September 16-17, 2010 Gaithersburg, MD | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) September 16-17, 2010 Gaithersburg, MD Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings BERAC Minutes BERAC Minutes Archive Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (135KB) BER Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees BER Home Meetings BERAC Meeting September 16-17, 2010 Gaithersburg, MD Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page BERAC Meeting September 16-17, 2010 Gaithersburg, MD Agenda .pdf file (8KB) Presentations Anna Palmisano

  4. BERAC Meeting, June 6-7, 2012 Gaithersburg, MD| U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) June 6-7, 2012 Gaithersburg, MD Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings BERAC Minutes BERAC Minutes Archive Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (135KB) BER Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees BER Home Meetings BERAC Meeting, June 6-7, 2012 Gaithersburg, MD Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page BERAC Meeting June 6-7, 2012 Gaithersburg, MD Agenda .pdf file (424KB) Presentations Sharlene Weatherwax, BER Associate

  5. BERAC Meeting, October 6-7, 2011, Rockville, MD| U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) Meeting, October 6-7, 2011, Rockville, MD Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings BERAC Minutes BERAC Minutes Archive Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (135KB) BER Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees BER Home Meetings BERAC Meeting, October 6-7, 2011, Rockville, MD Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page BERAC Meeting October 6-7, 2011 Rockville, MD Agenda .docx file (13KB) Presentations Sharlene Weatherwax, State of

  6. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Nexus EnergyHomes, Frederick, MD,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production | Department of Energy Study, Nexus EnergyHomes, Frederick, MD, Production DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Nexus EnergyHomes, Frederick, MD, Production This urban infill community features a package of SIP walls, geothermal heat pumps, solar PV, and a proprietary energy management system. Nexus EnergyHomes - Frederick, MD (1.56 MB) More Documents & Publications Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Nexus EnergyHomes - Frederick, Maryland DOE Zero Energy

  7. Molecular dynamical simulation of the behavior of early precipitated stage in aging process in dilute Cu-Cr alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, J.; Liu, L.; Chen, J.; Du, Y.; Zhou, R.; Xiao, B.

    2010-06-15

    The aging behaviors of Cu-Cr alloys in the early stage at different temperatures are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. First principles potentials are used for the interactions between Cu and Cr atoms. The initial behavior of precipitation is characterized by transmission electron microscope and electron energy disperse spectroscopy. The results showed that Cu-Cr supersaturated solid solution is thermodynamically unstable. The mean-square displacements of the atoms are used to describe the diffusivity. At room temperature, the atoms only show harmonic vibrations near the equilibrium positions. The mutual diffusion at 873 K is different from the unidirectional diffusion in low temperatures. The calculation shows that aging process is accelerated with increasing temperature, which is not only due to the lower diffusion activation energy of Cr at higher temperature, but also because Cu atoms are also participated in the aging process. When ''aging'' at 1073 K, the precipitation of Cr element is dissolved again into Cu matrix, which is an ''over-aging'' state of Cu-Cr alloy at high temperature.

  8. Anisotropy of the solid–liquid interface properties of the Ni–Zr B33 phase from molecular dynamics simulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wilson, S. R.; Mendelev, M. I.

    2015-01-08

    Solid–liquid interface (SLI) properties of the Ni–Zr B33 phase were determined from molecular dynamics simulations. In order to perform these measurements, a new semi-empirical potential for Ni–Zr alloy was developed that well reproduces the material properties required to model SLIs in the Ni50.0Zr50.0 alloy. In particular, the developed potential is shown to provide that the solid phase emerging from the liquid Ni50.0Zr50.0alloy is B33 (apart from a small fraction of point defects), in agreement with the experimental phase diagram. The SLI properties obtained using the developed potential exhibit an extraordinary degree of anisotropy. It is observed that anisotropies in bothmore » the interfacial free energy and mobility are an order of magnitude larger than those measured to date in any other metallic compound. Moreover, the [0 1 0] interface is shown to play a significant role in the observed anisotropy. Our data suggest that the [0 1 0] interface simultaneously corresponds to the lowest mobility, the lowest free energy and the highest stiffness of all inclinations in B33 Ni–Zr. This finding can be understood by taking into account a rather complicated crystal structure in this crystallographic direction.« less

  9. Molecular dynamics modeling of atomic displacement cascades in 3C-SiC: Comparison of interatomic potentials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Samolyuk, German D.; Osetskiy, Yury N.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-06-03

    We used molecular dynamics modeling of atomic displacement cascades to characterize the nature of primary radiation damage in 3C-SiC. We demonstrated that the most commonly used interatomic potentials are inconsistent with ab initio calculations of defect energetics. Both the Tersoff potential used in this work and a modified embedded-atom method potential reveal a barrier to recombination of the carbon interstitial and carbon vacancy which is much higher than the density functional theory (DFT) results. The barrier obtained with a newer potential by Gao and Weber is closer to the DFT result. This difference results in significant differences in the cascademore » production of point defects. We have completed both 10 keV and 50 keV cascade simulations in 3C-SiC at a range of temperatures. In contrast to the Tersoff potential, the Gao-Weber potential produces almost twice as many C vacancies and interstitials at the time of maximum disorder (~0.2 ps) but only about 25% more stable defects at the end of the simulation. Only about 20% of the carbon defects produced with the Tersoff potential recombine during the in-cascade annealing phase, while about 60% recombine with the Gao-Weber potential.« less

  10. Molecular dynamics modeling of atomic displacement cascades in 3C-SiC: Comparison of interatomic potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samolyuk, German D.; Osetskiy, Yury N.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-06-03

    We used molecular dynamics modeling of atomic displacement cascades to characterize the nature of primary radiation damage in 3C-SiC. We demonstrated that the most commonly used interatomic potentials are inconsistent with ab initio calculations of defect energetics. Both the Tersoff potential used in this work and a modified embedded-atom method potential reveal a barrier to recombination of the carbon interstitial and carbon vacancy which is much higher than the density functional theory (DFT) results. The barrier obtained with a newer potential by Gao and Weber is closer to the DFT result. This difference results in significant differences in the cascade production of point defects. We have completed both 10 keV and 50 keV cascade simulations in 3C-SiC at a range of temperatures. In contrast to the Tersoff potential, the Gao-Weber potential produces almost twice as many C vacancies and interstitials at the time of maximum disorder (~0.2 ps) but only about 25% more stable defects at the end of the simulation. Only about 20% of the carbon defects produced with the Tersoff potential recombine during the in-cascade annealing phase, while about 60% recombine with the Gao-Weber potential.

  11. The glass transition in cured epoxy thermosets: A comparative molecular dynamics study in coarse-grained and atomistic resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langeloth, Michael; Böhm, Michael C.; Müller-Plathe, Florian; Sugii, Taisuke

    2015-12-28

    We investigate the volumetric glass transition temperature T{sub g} in epoxy thermosets by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The epoxy thermosets consist of the resin bisphenol A diglycidyl ether and the hardener diethylenetriamine. A structure based coarse-grained (CG) force field has been derived using iterative Boltzmann inversion in order to facilitate simulations of larger length scales. We observe that T{sub g} increases clearly with the degree of cross-linking for all-atomistic (AA) and CG simulations. The transition T{sub g} in CG simulations of uncured mixtures is much lower than in AA-simulations due to the soft nature of the CG potentials, but increases all the more with the formation of rigid cross-links. Additional simulations of the CG mixtures in contact with a surface show the existence of an interphase region of about 3 nm thickness in which the network properties deviate significantly from the bulk. In accordance to experimental studies, we observe that T{sub g} is reduced in this interphase region and gradually increases to its bulk value with distance from the surface. The present study shows that the glass transition is a local phenomenon that depends on the network structure in the immediate environment.

  12. Ab initio molecular dynamics investigations of low-energy recoil events in Ni and NiCo

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Bin; Yuan, Fenglin; Jin, Ke; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-10-06

    Low-energy recoil events in pure Ni and the equiatomic NiCo alloy are studied using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We found that the threshold displacement energies are strongly dependent on orientation and weakly dependent on composition. The minimum threshold displacement energies are along the [1 1 0] direction in both pure Ni and the NiCo alloy. Compared to pure Ni, the threshold displacement energies increase slightly in the NiCo alloy due to stronger bonds in the alloy, irrespective of the element type of the PKA. A single Ni interstitial occupying the center of a tetrahedron formed by four Ni atomsmore » and a <1 0 0> split interstitial is produced in pure Ni by the recoils, while only the <1 0 0> split interstitial is formed in the NiCo alloy. Compared to the replacement sequences in pure Ni, anti-site defect sequences are observed in the alloy, which have high efficiency for both producing defects and transporting energy outside of the cascade core. These results provide insights into energy transfer processes occurring in equiatomic alloys under irradiation.« less

  13. Effect of bound state of water on hydronium ion mobility in hydrated Nafion using molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mabuchi, Takuya; Tokumasu, Takashi

    2014-09-14

    We have performed a detailed analysis of the structural properties of the sulfonate groups in terms of isolated and overlapped solvation shells in the nanostructure of hydrated Nafion membrane using classical molecular dynamics simulations. Our simulations have demonstrated the correlation between the two different areas in bound water region, i.e., the first solvation shell, and the vehicular transport of hydronium ions at different water contents. We have employed a model of the Nafion membrane using the improved force field, which is newly modified and validated by comparing the density and water diffusivity with those obtained experimentally. The first solvation shells were classified into the two types, the isolated area and the overlapped area. The mean residence times of solvent molecules explicitly showed the different behaviors in each of those areas in terms of the vehicular transport of protons: the diffusivity of classical hydronium ions in the overlapped area dominates their total diffusion at lower water contents while that in the isolated area dominates for their diffusion at higher water contents. The results provided insights into the importance role of those areas in the solvation shells for the diffusivity of vehicular transport of hydronium ions in hydrated Nafion membrane.

  14. Preparation, temperature dependent structural, molecular dynamics simulations studies and electrochemical properties of LiFePO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, R. Prasada; Reddy, M.V.; Adams, S.; Chowdari, B.V.R.

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • LiFePO{sub 4} compound was prepared by carbothermal reduction method. • In-situ XRD studies were carried out on LiFePO{sub 4} at various temperatures. • Dedicated imperial potentials used to explain the variation of lattice constants. • It exhibited reversible capacity of 140 (±5) mAh g{sup −1}, stable up to 400 cycles. - Abstract: LiFePO{sub 4} was prepared using carbothermal reduction method. In-situ temperature dependent structural studies were carried using X-ray diffraction. Molecular dynamics simulations were conducted for the LiFePO{sub 4} using empirical potentials developed using bond valence approach to investigate the structural variations. Electrochemical behaviour of LiFePO{sub 4} was evaluated using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic cycling studies at room temperature. Charge–discharge cycling studies showed a reversible capacities 140 (±5) mAh g{sup −1} at the end of 50th cycle and these capacity values were stable up to 400 cycles and almost nil capacity fade between 50 and 400 cycles, showing excellent capacity retention, low capacity fading. The cyclic voltammetry studies showed a main cathodic and anodic redox peaks at 3.34 and 3.5 V vs. Li, respectively.

  15. Transport and Self-Assembly in Molecular Nanosystems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transport and Self-Assembly in Molecular Nanosystems Key Challenges: Use classical molecular dynamics and coarse grain molecular dynamics to enable "bottom-up" material...

  16. Ab initio molecular orbital-configuration interaction based quantum master equation (MOQME) approach to the dynamic first hyperpolarizabilities of asymmetric π-conjugated systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishi, Ryohei; Fujii, Hiroaki; Minami, Takuya; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Nakano, Masayoshi

    2015-01-22

    In this study, we apply the ab initio molecular orbital - configuration interaction based quantum master equation (MOQME) approach to the calculation and analysis of the dynamic first hyperpolarizabilities (β) of asymmetric π-conjugated molecules. In this approach, we construct the excited state models by the ab initio configuration interaction singles method. Then, time evolutions of system reduced density matrix ρ(t) and system polarization p(t) are calculated by the QME approach. Dynamic β in the second harmonic generation is calculated based on the nonperturbative definition of nonlinear optical susceptibility, using the frequency domain system polarization p(ω). Spatial contributions of electrons to β are analyzed based on the dynamic hyperpolarizability density map, which visualizes the second-order response of charge density oscillating with a frequency of 2ω. We apply the present method to the calculation of the dynamic β of a series of donor/acceptor substituted polyene oligomers, and then discuss the applicability of the MOQME method to the calculation and analysis of dynamic NLO properties of molecular systems.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of framework flexibility effects on noble gas diffusion in HKUST-1 and ZIF-8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkes, Marie V.; Demir, Hakan; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie L.; Sholl, David S.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Allendorf, Mark D.

    2014-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate trends in noble gas (Ar, Kr, Xe) diffusion in the metal-organic frameworks HKUST-1 and ZIF-8. Diffusion occurs primarily through inter-cage jump events, with much greater diffusion of guest atoms in HKUST-1 compared to ZIF-8 due to the larger cage and window sizes in the former. We compare diffusion coefficients calculated for both rigid and flexible frameworks. For rigid framework simulations, in which the framework atoms were held at their crystallographic or geometry optimized coordinates, sometimes dramatic differences in guest diffusion were seen depending on the initial framework structure or the choice of framework force field parameters. When framework flexibility effects were included, argon and krypton diffusion increased significantly compared to rigid-framework simulations using general force field parameters. Additionally, for argon and krypton in ZIF-8, guest diffusion increased with loading, demonstrating that guest-guest interactions between cages enhance inter-cage diffusion. No inter-cage jump events were seen for xenon atoms in ZIF-8 regardless of force field or initial structure, and the loading dependence of xenon diffusion in HKUST-1 is different for rigid and flexible frameworks. Diffusion of krypton and xenon in HKUST-1 depends on two competing effects: the steric effect that decreases diffusion as loading increases, and the “small cage effect” that increases diffusion as loading increases. Finally, a detailed analysis of the window size in ZIF-8 reveals that the window increases beyond its normal size to permit passage of a (nominally) larger krypton atom.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of framework flexibility effects on noble gas diffusion in HKUST-1 and ZIF-8

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Parkes, Marie V.; Demir, Hakan; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie L.; Sholl, David S.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Allendorf, Mark D.

    2014-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate trends in noble gas (Ar, Kr, Xe) diffusion in the metal-organic frameworks HKUST-1 and ZIF-8. Diffusion occurs primarily through inter-cage jump events, with much greater diffusion of guest atoms in HKUST-1 compared to ZIF-8 due to the larger cage and window sizes in the former. We compare diffusion coefficients calculated for both rigid and flexible frameworks. For rigid framework simulations, in which the framework atoms were held at their crystallographic or geometry optimized coordinates, sometimes dramatic differences in guest diffusion were seen depending on the initial framework structure or the choice of frameworkmore » force field parameters. When framework flexibility effects were included, argon and krypton diffusion increased significantly compared to rigid-framework simulations using general force field parameters. Additionally, for argon and krypton in ZIF-8, guest diffusion increased with loading, demonstrating that guest-guest interactions between cages enhance inter-cage diffusion. No inter-cage jump events were seen for xenon atoms in ZIF-8 regardless of force field or initial structure, and the loading dependence of xenon diffusion in HKUST-1 is different for rigid and flexible frameworks. Diffusion of krypton and xenon in HKUST-1 depends on two competing effects: the steric effect that decreases diffusion as loading increases, and the “small cage effect” that increases diffusion as loading increases. Finally, a detailed analysis of the window size in ZIF-8 reveals that the window increases beyond its normal size to permit passage of a (nominally) larger krypton atom.« less

  19. Interactions of aqueous amino acids and proteins with the (110) surface of ZnS in molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nawrocki, Grzegorz; Cieplak, Marek

    2014-03-07

    The growing usage of nanoparticles of zinc sulfide as quantum dots and biosensors calls for a theoretical assessment of interactions of ZnS with biomolecules. We employ the molecular-dynamics-based umbrella sampling method to determine potentials of mean force for 20 single amino acids near the ZnS (110) surface in aqueous solutions. We find that five amino acids do not bind at all and the binding energy of the remaining amino acids does not exceed 4.3 kJ/mol. Such energies are comparable to those found for ZnO (and to hydrogen bonds in proteins) but the nature of the specificity is different. Cysteine can bind with ZnS in a covalent way, e.g., by forming the disulfide bond with S in the solid. If this effect is included within a model incorporating the Morse potential, then the potential well becomes much deeperthe binding energy is close to 98 kJ/mol. We then consider tryptophan cage, a protein of 20 residues, and characterize its events of adsorption to ZnS. We demonstrate the relevance of interactions between the amino acids in the selection of optimal adsorbed conformations and recognize the key role of cysteine in generation of lasting adsorption. We show that ZnS is more hydrophobic than ZnO and that the density profile of water is quite different than that forming near ZnOit has only a minor articulation into layers. Furthermore, the first layer of water is disordered and mobile.

  20. Effect of Surface Oxidation on Interfacial Water Structure at a Pyrite (100) Surface as Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.; Wick, Collin D.

    2015-06-01

    In the first part of this paper, a Scanning Electron Microscopy and contact angle study of a pyrite surface (100) is reported describing the relationship between surface oxidation and the hydrophilic surface state. In addition to these experimental results, the following simulated surface states were examined using Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS): fresh unoxidized (100) surface; polysulfide at the (100) surface; elemental sulfur at the (100) surface. Crystal structures for the polysulfide and elemental sulfur at the (100) surface were simulated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) quantum chemical calculations. The well known oxidation mechanism which involves formation of a metal deficient layer was also described with DFT. Our MDS results of the behavior of interfacial water at the fresh and oxidized pyrite (100) surfaces without/with the presence of ferric hydroxide include simulated contact angles, number density distribution for water, water dipole orientation, water residence time, and hydrogen-bonding considerations. The significance of the formation of ferric hydroxide islands in accounting for the corresponding hydrophilic surface state is revealed not only from experimental contact angle measurements but also from simulated contact angle measurements using MDS. The hydrophilic surface state developed at oxidized pyrite surfaces has been described by MDS, on which basis the surface state is explained based on interfacial water structure. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the DOE funded work performed by Liem X. Dang. Battelle operates the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES.

  1. Dynamic

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Dynamic , and Static , Res.ponse of the Government Oil Shale Mine at ' , . , Rifle, ... AND STATIC RESPONSE 'OF THE GOVERNMENT OIL SHALE MINE A T RIFLE, COLORADO, T O THE, ...

  2. Effect of native oxide layers on copper thin-film tensile properties: A reactive molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skarlinski, Michael D.; Quesnel, David J.

    2015-12-21

    Metal-oxide layers are likely to be present on metallic nano-structures due to either environmental exposure during use, or high temperature processing techniques such as annealing. It is well known that nano-structured metals have vastly different mechanical properties from bulk metals; however, difficulties in modeling the transition between metallic and ionic bonding have prevented the computational investigation of the effects of oxide surface layers. Newly developed charge-optimized many body [Liang et al., Mater. Sci. Eng., R 74, 255 (2013)] potentials are used to perform fully reactive molecular dynamics simulations which elucidate the effects that metal-oxide layers have on the mechanical properties of a copper thin-film. Simulated tensile tests are performed on thin-films while using different strain-rates, temperatures, and oxide thicknesses to evaluate changes in yield stress, modulus, and failure mechanisms. Findings indicate that copper-thin film mechanical properties are strongly affected by native oxide layers. The formed oxide layers have an amorphous structure with lower Cu-O bond-densities than bulk CuO, and a mixture of Cu{sub 2}O and CuO charge character. It is found that oxidation will cause modifications to the strain response of the elastic modulii, producing a stiffened modulii at low temperatures (<75 K) and low strain values (<5%), and a softened modulii at higher temperatures. While under strain, structural reorganization within the oxide layers facilitates brittle yielding through nucleation of defects across the oxide/metal interface. The oxide-free copper thin-film yielding mechanism is found to be a tensile-axis reorientation and grain creation. The oxide layers change the observed yielding mechanism, allowing for the inner copper thin-film to sustain an FCC-to-BCC transition during yielding. The mechanical properties are fit to a thermodynamic model based on classical nucleation theory. The fit implies that the oxidation of the

  3. Effect of surface free energies on the heterogeneous nucleation of water droplet: A molecular dynamics simulation approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, W.; Lan, Z.; Peng, B. L.; Wen, R. F.; Ma, X. H.

    2015-02-07

    Heterogeneous nucleation of water droplet on surfaces with different solid-liquid interaction intensities is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The interaction potentials between surface atoms and vapor molecules are adjusted to obtain various surface free energies, and the nucleation process and wetting state of nuclei on surfaces are investigated. The results indicate that near-constant contact angles are already established for nano-scale nuclei on various surfaces, with the contact angle decreasing with solid-liquid interaction intensities linearly. Meanwhile, noticeable fluctuation of vapor-liquid interfaces can be observed for the nuclei that deposited on surfaces, which is caused by the asymmetric forces from vapor molecules. The formation and growth rate of nuclei are increasing with the solid-liquid interaction intensities. For low energy surface, the attraction of surface atoms to water molecules is comparably weak, and the pre-existing clusters can depart from the surface and enter into the bulk vapor phase. The distribution of clusters within the bulk vapor phase becomes competitive as compared with that absorbed on surface. For moderate energy surfaces, heterogeneous nucleation predominates and the formation of clusters within bulk vapor phase is suppressed. The effect of high energy particles that embedded in low energy surface is also discussed under the same simulation system. The nucleation preferably initiates on the high energy particles, and the clusters that formed on the heterogeneous particles are trapped around their original positions instead of migrating around as that observed on smooth surfaces. This feature makes it possible for the heterogeneous particles to act as fixed nucleation sites, and simulation results also suggest that the number of nuclei increases monotonously with the number of high energy particles. The growth of nuclei on high energy particles can be divided into three sub-stages, beginning with the formation

  4. BERAC Meeting May 14-15, 2007 North Bethesda, MD | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) 4-15, 2007 North Bethesda, MD Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings BERAC Minutes BERAC Minutes Archive Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (135KB) BER Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees BER Home Meetings BERAC Meeting May 14-15, 2007 North Bethesda, MD Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page BERAC Meeting May 14-15, 2007 North Bethesda, MD Agenda .pdf file (10KB) Presentations Joyce Penner .ppt file (74KB),

  5. BERAC Meeting May 19-20, 2008 Hilton Hotel Gaithersburg, MD | U.S. DOE

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Office of Science (SC) 9-20, 2008 Hilton Hotel Gaithersburg, MD Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings BERAC Minutes BERAC Minutes Archive Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (135KB) BER Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees BER Home Meetings BERAC Meeting May 19-20, 2008 Hilton Hotel Gaithersburg, MD Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page BERAC Meeting May 19-20, 2008 Hilton Hotel Gaithersburg, MD Agenda .pdf file (17KB)

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Cummins MD & HD Accessory Hybridization CRADA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Cummins MD &...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cummins MD & HD Accessory Hybridization CRADA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Cummins MD &...

  8. The structural organization of N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone + water mixtures: A densitometry, x-ray diffraction, and molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usula, M.; Marincola, F. Cesare; Porcedda, S.; Mocci, F.; Gontrani, L.; Caminiti, R.

    2014-03-28

    A combined approach of molecular dynamics simulations, wide angle X-ray scattering experiments, and density measurements was employed to study the structural properties of N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) + water mixtures over the whole concentration range. Remarkably, a very good agreement between computed and experimental densities and diffraction patterns was achieved, especially if the effect of the mixture composition on NMP charges is taken into account. Analysis of the intermolecular organization, as revealed by the radial and spatial distribution functions of relevant solvent atoms, nicely explained the density maximum observed experimentally.

  9. BERAC Meeting September 5 2008 Gaithersburg MD | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) 5 2008 Gaithersburg MD Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings BERAC Minutes BERAC Minutes Archive Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (135KB) BER Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees BER Home Meetings BERAC Meeting September 5 2008 Gaithersburg MD Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page BER September 5, 2008 Arlington, VA Agenda Presentations Peg Riley .ppt file (357KB), Life and Medical Sciences Division Committee of

  10. A coarse-graining approach for molecular simulation that retains the dynamics of the all-atom reference system by implementing hydrodynamic interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markutsya, Sergiy; Lamm, Monica H.

    2014-11-07

    We report on a new approach for deriving coarse-grained intermolecular forces that retains the frictional contribution that is often discarded by conventional coarse-graining methods. The approach is tested for water and an aqueous glucose solution, and the results from the new implementation for coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation show remarkable agreement with the dynamics obtained from reference all-atom simulations. The agreement between the structural properties observed in the coarse-grained and all-atom simulations is also preserved. We discuss how this approach may be applied broadly to any existing coarse-graining method where the coarse-grained models are rigorously derived from all-atom reference systems.

  11. LDRD Final Report (08-ERD-037): Important Modes to Drive Protein MD Simulations to the Next Conformational Level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadigh, B

    2011-04-07

    Every action in biology is performed by dynamic proteins that convert between multiple states in order to engage their functions. Often binding to various ligands is essential for the rates of desired transitions to be enhanced. The goal of computational biology is to study these transitions and discover the different states to fully understand the protein's normal and diseased function, design drugs to target/bias specific states, and understand all of the interactions in between. We have developed a new methodology that is capable of calculating the absolute free energy of proteins while taking into account all the interactions with the solvent molecules. The efficiency of the new scheme is an order of magnitude greater than any existing technique. This method is now implemented in the massively parallel popular MD program package NAMD. This now makes it possible to calculate the relative stability of different conformational states of biological macromolecules as well as their binding free energies to various ligands.

  12. Influence of surface oxidation on ion dynamics and capacitance in porous and nonporous carbon electrodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dyatkin, Boris; Zhang, Yu; Mamontov, Eugene; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Cheng, Yongqiang; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Cummings, Peter T.; Gogotsi, Yury G.

    2016-04-07

    Here, we investigate the influence of surface chemistry and ion confinement on capacitance and electrosorption dynamics of room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) in supercapacitors. Using air oxidation and vacuum annealing, we produced defunctionalized and oxygen-rich surfaces of carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) and graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs). While oxidized surfaces of porous CDCs improve capacitance and rate handling abilities of ions, defunctionalized nonporous GNPs improve charge storage densities on planar electrodes. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) probed the structure, dynamics, and orientation of RTIL ions confined in divergently functionalized pores. Oxidized, ionophilic surfaces draw ions closer to pore surfaces andmore » enhance potential-driven ion transport during electrosorption. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations corroborated experimental data and demonstrated the significance of surface functional groups on ion orientations, accumulation densities, and capacitance.« less

  13. Simulations of the quart (101-bar1)/water interface: A comparison of classical force fields, ab initi molecular dynamics, and x-ray reflectivity experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skelton, Adam; Fenter, Paul; Kubicki, James D.; Wesolowski, David J; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations of the (1011) surface of quartz interacting with bulk liquid water are performed using three different classical force fields, Lopes et al., ClayFF, and CHARMM water contact angle (CWCA), and compared to ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and X-ray reflectivity (XR) results. The axial densities of the water and surface atoms normal to the surface are calculated and compared to previous XR experiments. Favorable agreement is shown for all the force fields with respect to the position of the water atoms. Analyses such as the radial distribution functions between water and hydroxyl atoms and the average cosine of the angle between the water dipole vector and the normal of the surface are also calculated for each force field. Significant differences are found between the different force fields from such analyses, indicating differing descriptions of the structured water in the near vicinity of the surface. AIMD simulations are also performed to obtain the water and hydroxyl structure for comparison among the predictions of the three classical force fields to better understand which force field is most accurate. It is shown that ClayFF exhibits the best agreement with the AIMD simulations for water hydroxyl radial distribution functions, suggesting that ClayFF treats the hydrogen bonding more accurately.

  14. Multiyear simulation study provides breakthrough in membrane...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The team exploits state-of-the-art developments in molecular dynamics (MD) and protein modeling. The MD simulation approach, frequently used in computational physics and chemistry, ...

  15. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): Time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-01-21

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2}) and urea (NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2} + (1 − f)NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ∼120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (∼207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (∼70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (α{sub 2}) and new non-Gaussian (γ) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems.

  16. A molecular dynamics study of intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in solutions based upon mixed quantum-classical approximation. I. Proton transfer reaction in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamada, Atsushi; Kojima, Hidekazu; Okazaki, Susumu

    2014-08-28

    In order to investigate proton transfer reaction in solution, mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics calculations have been carried out based on our previously proposed quantum equation of motion for the reacting system [A. Yamada and S. Okazaki, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 044507 (2008)]. Surface hopping method was applied to describe forces acting on the solvent classical degrees of freedom. In a series of our studies, quantum and solvent effects on the reaction dynamics in solutions have been analysed in detail. Here, we report our mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics calculations for intramolecular proton transfer of malonaldehyde in water. Thermally activated proton transfer process, i.e., vibrational excitation in the reactant state followed by transition to the product state and vibrational relaxation in the product state, as well as tunneling reaction can be described by solving the equation of motion. Zero point energy is, of course, included, too. The quantum simulation in water has been compared with the fully classical one and the wave packet calculation in vacuum. The calculated quantum reaction rate in water was 0.70 ps{sup ?1}, which is about 2.5 times faster than that in vacuum, 0.27 ps{sup ?1}. This indicates that the solvent water accelerates the reaction. Further, the quantum calculation resulted in the reaction rate about 2 times faster than the fully classical calculation, which indicates that quantum effect enhances the reaction rate, too. Contribution from three reaction mechanisms, i.e., tunneling, thermal activation, and barrier vanishing reactions, is 33:46:21 in the mixed quantum-classical calculations. This clearly shows that the tunneling effect is important in the reaction.

  17. Adapting SAFT-? perturbation theory to site-based molecular dynamics simulation. II. Confined fluids and vapor-liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Elliott, J. Richard

    2014-07-14

    In this work, a new classical density functional theory is developed for group-contribution equations of state (EOS). Details of implementation are demonstrated for the recently-developed SAFT-? WCA EOS and selective applications are studied for confined fluids and vapor-liquid interfaces. The acronym WCA (Weeks-Chandler-Andersen) refers to the characterization of the reference part of the third-order thermodynamic perturbation theory applied in formulating the EOS. SAFT-? refers to the particular form of statistical associating fluid theory that is applied to the fused-sphere, heteronuclear, united-atom molecular models of interest. For the monomer term, the modified fundamental measure theory is extended to WCA-spheres. A new chain functional is also introduced for fused and soft heteronuclear chains. The attractive interactions are taken into account by considering the structure of the fluid, thus elevating the theory beyond the mean field approximation. The fluctuations of energy are also included via a non-local third-order perturbation theory. The theory includes resolution of the density profiles of individual groups such as CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} and satisfies stoichiometric constraints for the density profiles. New molecular simulations are conducted to demonstrate the accuracy of each Helmholtz free energy contribution in reproducing the microstructure of inhomogeneous systems at the united-atom level of coarse graining. At each stage, comparisons are made to assess where the present theory stands relative to the current state of the art for studying inhomogeneous fluids. Overall, it is shown that the characteristic features of real molecular fluids are captured both qualitatively and quantitatively. For example, the average pore density deviates ?2% from simulation data for attractive pentadecane in a 2-nm slit pore. Another example is the surface tension of ethane/heptane mixture, which deviates ?1% from simulation data while the theory reproduces

  18. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theory of Nanostructured Materials The Theory of Nanostructured Materials Facility at the Molecular Foundry is focused on expanding our understanding of materials at the nanoscale. Our research connects the structural and dynamical properties of materials to their functions, such as electrical conductivity and storage, light-harvesting for electricity and fuel, or gas separation and sequestration. We develop and employ a broad range of tools, including advanced electronic-structure theory,

  19. Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Nigeria

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet) Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,362 2013 2,590 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Cove Point, MD LNG Imports from

  20. Spectral shapes of Ar-broadened HCl lines in the fundamental band by classical molecular dynamics simulations and comparison with experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tran, H.; Domenech, J.-L.

    2014-08-14

    Spectral shapes of isolated lines of HCl perturbed by Ar are investigated for the first time using classical molecular dynamics simulations (CMDS). Using reliable intermolecular potentials taken from the literature, these CMDS provide the time evolution of the auto-correlation function of the dipole moment, whose Fourier-Laplace transform leads to the absorption spectrum. In order to test these calculations, room temperature spectra of various lines in the fundamental band of HCl diluted in Ar are measured, in a large pressure range, with a difference-frequency laser spectrometer. Comparisons between measured and calculated spectra show that the CMDS are able to predict the large Dicke narrowing effect on the shape of HCl lines and to satisfactorily reproduce the shapes of HCl spectra at different pressures and for various rotational quantum numbers.

  1. A comment on the thermal conductivity of (U,Pu)O2 and (U,Th)O2 by molecular dynamics with adjustment for phonon-spin scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cooper, Michael William D.; Liu, Xiang -Yang; Stanek, Christopher Richard; Andersson, David Anders

    2016-07-15

    In this study, a new approach for adjusting molecular dynamics results on UO2 thermal conductivity to include phonon-spin scattering has been used to improve calculations on Ux Pu1–x O2 and UxTh1xO2. We demonstrate that by including spin scattering a strong asymmetry as a function of uranium actinide fraction, x, is obtained. Greater degradation is shown for UxTh1–xO2 than UxPu1-xO2. Minimum thermal conductivities are predicted at U0.97Pu0.03O2 and U0.58Th0.42O2, although the degradation in UxPu1–xO2 is negligible relative to pure UO2.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of radiation damage in CaCd{sub 6} quasicrystal cubic approximant up to 10 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, P. H.; Avchachov, K.; Nordlund, K.; Pussi, K.

    2013-06-21

    Due to the peculiar nature of the atomic order in quasicrystals, examining phase transitions in this class of materials is of particular interest. Energetic particle irradiation can provide a way to modify the structure locally in a quasicrystal. To examine irradiation-induced phase transitions in quasicrystals on the atomic scale, we have carried out molecular dynamics simulations of collision cascades in CaCd{sub 6} quasicrystal cubic approximant with energies up to 10 keV at 0 and 300 K. The results show that the threshold energies depend surprisingly strongly on the local coordination environments. The energy dependence of stable defect formation exhibits a power-law dependence on cascade energy, and surviving defects are dominated by Cd interstitials and vacancies. Only a modest effect of temperature is observed on defect survival, while irradiation temperature increases lead to a slight increase in the average size of both vacancy clusters and interstitial clusters.

  3. CO{sub 2} isolated line shapes by classical molecular dynamics simulations: Influence of the intermolecular potential and comparison with new measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larcher, G.; Tran, H. Schwell, M.; Chelin, P.; Landsheere, X.; Hartmann, J.-M.; Hu, S.-M.

    2014-02-28

    Room temperature absorption spectra of various transitions of pure CO{sub 2} have been measured in a broad pressure range using a tunable diode-laser and a cavity ring-down spectrometer, respectively, in the 1.6 μm and 0.8 μm regions. Their spectral shapes have been calculated by requantized classical molecular dynamics simulations. From the time-dependent auto-correlation function of the molecular dipole, including Doppler and collisional effects, spectral shapes are directly computed without the use of any adjusted parameter. Analysis of the spectra calculated using three different anisotropic intermolecular potentials shows that the shapes of pure CO{sub 2} lines, in terms of both the Lorentz widths and non-Voigt effects, slightly depend on the used potential. Comparisons between these ab initio calculations and the measured spectra show satisfactory agreement for all considered transitions (from J = 6 to J = 46). They also show that non-Voigt effects on the shape of CO{sub 2} transitions are almost independent of the rotational quantum number of the considered lines.

  4. Nanoparticle generation and transport resulting from femtosecond laser ablation of ultrathin metal films: Time-resolved measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rouleau, C. M. Puretzky, A. A.; Geohegan, D. B.; Shih, C.-Y.; Wu, C.; Zhigilei, L. V.

    2014-05-12

    The synthesis of metal nanoparticles by ultrafast laser ablation of nanometers-thick metal films has been studied experimentally and computationally. Near-threshold backside laser ablation of 2–20 nm-thick Pt films deposited on fused silica substrates was found to produce nanoparticles with size distributions that were bimodal for the thicker films, but collapsed into a single mode distribution for the thinnest film. Time-resolved imaging of blackbody emission from the Pt nanoparticles was used to reveal the nanoparticle propagation dynamics and estimate their temperatures. The observed nanoparticle plume was compact and highly forward-directed with a well-defined collective velocity that permitted multiple rebounds with substrates to be revealed. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations were used to understand the evolution of compressive and tensile stresses in the thicker melted liquid films that lead to their breakup and ejection of two groups of nanoparticles with different velocity and size distributions. Ultrafast laser irradiation of ultrathin (few nm) metal films avoids the splitting of the film and appears to be a method well-suited to cleanly synthesize and deposit nanoparticles from semitransparent thin film targets in highly directed beams.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of cholesterol-rich membranes using a coarse-grained force field for cyclic alkanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDermaid, Christopher M. Klein, Michael L.; Fiorin, Giacomo; Kashyap, Hemant K.; DeVane, Russell H.; Shinoda, Wataru; Klauda, Jeffery B.

    2015-12-28

    The architecture of a biological membrane hinges upon the fundamental fact that its properties are determined by more than the sum of its individual components. Studies on model membranes have shown the need to characterize in molecular detail how properties such as thickness, fluidity, and macroscopic bending rigidity are regulated by the interactions between individual molecules in a non-trivial fashion. Simulation-based approaches are invaluable to this purpose but are typically limited to short sampling times and model systems that are often smaller than the required properties. To alleviate both limitations, the use of coarse-grained (CG) models is nowadays an established computational strategy. We here present a new CG force field for cholesterol, which was developed by using measured properties of small molecules, and can be used in combination with our previously developed force field for phospholipids. The new model performs with precision comparable to atomistic force fields in predicting the properties of cholesterol-rich phospholipid bilayers, including area per lipid, bilayer thickness, tail order parameter, increase in bending rigidity, and propensity to form liquid-ordered domains in ternary mixtures. We suggest the use of this model to quantify the impact of cholesterol on macroscopic properties and on microscopic phenomena involving localization and trafficking of lipids and proteins on cellular membranes.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Study of Fe(II) Adsorption, Electron Exchange, and Mobility at Goethite (alpha-FeOOH) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2015-02-12

    We present classical molecular simulations of the adsorption free energy profiles for the aqueous Fe(II) ion approaching key low index crystal faces of goethite at neutral surface charge conditions. Calculated profiles show minima corresponding to stable outer- and inner-sphere adsorbed structures. We analyzed the energetics and kinetics of most possible interfacial electron transfer reactions, as well as analyzing the same for subsurface migration pathways of injected electrons through calculating the Marcus free energy surfaces. We conclude that inner-sphere Fe(II)-complex formation is required for the interfacial electron transfer to occur, but the energetic cost of moving from the outer-sphere to inner-sphere geometry may prevent electron injection at some faces. We also show that some surfaces, especially (101), (100) and (001), are more energetically prone toward reduction than others. We demonstrate that subsurface charge migration in directions parallel to the surface, which run along the iron chains, is more energetically plausible than conduction through the resistive crystal bulk phase. Collectively this leads to the conclusion that Fe(II)-catalyzed recrystallization of goethite most likely proceeds by short path length electron migration through specific goethite surfaces along specific directions, until capture at Fe sites structurally susceptible to reduction and release.

  7. A study of dynamical processes in the Orion KL region using ALMA—probing molecular outflow and inflow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yuefang; Liu, Tie; Qin, Sheng-Li

    2014-08-20

    This work reports high spatial resolution observations toward the Orion KL region with high critical density lines of CH{sub 3}CN (12{sub 4}-11{sub 4}) and CH{sub 3}OH (8{sub –1,8}-7{sub 0,7}), as well as a continuum at ∼1.3 mm band. The observations were made using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array with a spatial resolution of ∼1.''5 and sensitivity of about 0.07 K and ∼0.18 K for continuum and line, respectively. The observational results showed that the gas in the Orion KL region consists of jet-propelled cores at the ridge and dense cores east and south of the region that are shaped like a wedge ring. The outflow has multiple lobes, which may originate from an explosive ejection, and is not driven by young stellar objects. Four infrared bubbles were found in the Spitzer/IRAC emissions. These bubbles, the distributions of the previously found H{sub 2} jets, the young stellar objects, and molecular gas suggest that BN is the explosive center. The burst time was estimated to be ≤1300 yr. At the same time, signatures of gravitational collapse toward Source I and the hot core were detected with material infall velocities of 1.5 km s{sup –1} and ∼0.6 km s{sup –1}, corresponding to mass accretion rates of 1.2 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉}/yr and 8.0 × 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉}/yr, respectively. These observations may support the belief that high-mass stars form via the accretion model, similar to their low-mass counterparts.

  8. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation & dynamics; and surfaces.

  9. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation dynamics; and surfaces.

  10. Atomistic and molecular effects in electric double layers at high surface charges

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Lee, Jonathan; Mani, Ali

    2015-06-16

    Here, the Poisson–Boltzmann theory for electrolytes near a charged surface is known to be invalid due to unaccounted physics associated with high ion concentration regimes. In order to investigate this regime, fluids density functional theory (f-DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to determine electric surface potential as a function of surface charge. Based on these detailed computations, for electrolytes with nonpolar solvent, the surface potential is shown to depend quadratically on the surface charge in the high charge limit. We demonstrate that modified Poisson–Boltzmann theories can model this limit if they are augmented with atomic packing densities providedmore » by MD. However, when the solvent is a highly polar molecule water an intermediate regime is identified in which a constant capacitance is realized. Simulation results demonstrate the mechanism underlying this regime, and for the salt water system studied here, it persists throughout the range of physically realistic surface charge densities so the potential’s quadratic surface charge dependence is not obtained.« less

  11. DYNAMICAL STRUCTURE OF THE MOLECULAR INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM IN AN EXTREMELY BRIGHT, MULTIPLY LENSED z {approx_equal} 3 SUBMILLIMETER GALAXY DISCOVERED WITH HERSCHEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riechers, Dominik A.; Cooray, A.; Carpenter, J. M.; Bock, J.; Omont, A.; Neri, R.; Cox, P.; Harris, A. I.; Baker, A. J.; Frayer, D. T.; Auld, R.; Aussel, H.; Chanial, P.; Blundell, R.; Brisbin, D.; Burgarella, D.; Chapman, S. C.; Clements, D. L.

    2011-05-20

    We report the detection of CO(J = 5 {yields} 4), CO(J = 3 {yields} 2), and CO(J = 1 {yields} 0) emission in the strongly lensed, Herschel/SPIRE-selected submillimeter galaxy (SMG) HERMES J105751.1+573027 at z = 2.9574 {+-} 0.0001, using the Plateau de Bure Interferometer, the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy, and the Green Bank Telescope. The observations spatially resolve the molecular gas into four lensed images with a maximum separation of {approx}9'' and reveal the internal gas dynamics in this system. We derive lensing-corrected CO line luminosities of L'{sub CO(1-0)} = (4.17 {+-} 0.41), L'{sub CO(3-2)} = (3.96 {+-} 0.20), and L'{sub CO(5-4)} = (3.45 {+-} 0.20) x 10{sup 10} ({mu}{sub L}/10.9){sup -1} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}, corresponding to luminosity ratios of r{sub 31} = 0.95 {+-} 0.10, r{sub 53} = 0.87 {+-} 0.06, and r{sub 51} = 0.83 {+-} 0.09. This suggests a total molecular gas mass of M{sub gas} = 3.3x10{sup 10} ({alpha}{sub CO}/0.8) ({mu}{sub L}/10.9){sup -1} M{sub sun}. The gas mass, gas mass fraction, gas depletion timescale, star formation efficiency, and specific star formation rate are typical for an SMG. The velocity structure of the gas reservoir suggests that the brightest two lensed images are dynamically resolved projections of the same dust-obscured region in the galaxy that are kinematically offset from the unresolved fainter images. The resolved kinematics appear consistent with the complex velocity structure observed in major, 'wet' (i.e., gas-rich) mergers. Major mergers are commonly observed in SMGs and are likely to be responsible for fueling their intense starbursts at high gas consumption rates. This study demonstrates the level of detail to which galaxies in the early universe can be studied by utilizing the increase in effective spatial resolution and sensitivity provided by gravitational lensing.

  12. X-ray scattering measurements of dissociation-induced metallization of dynamically compressed deuterium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Davis, P.; Döppner, T.; Rygg, J. R.; Fortmann, C.; Divol, L.; Pak, A.; Fletcher, L.; Becker, A.; Holst, B.; Sperling, P.; et al

    2016-04-18

    Hydrogen, the simplest element in the universe, has a surprisingly complex phase diagram. Because of applications to planetary science, inertial confinement fusion and fundamental physics, its high-pressure properties have been the subject of intense study over the past two decades. While sophisticated static experiments have probed hydrogen’s structure at ever higher pressures, studies examining the higher-temperature regime using dynamic compression have mostly been limited to optical measurement techniques. Here we present spectrally resolved x-ray scattering measurements from plasmons in dynamically compressed deuterium. Combined with Compton scattering, and velocity interferometry to determine shock pressure and mass density, this allows us tomore » extract ionization state as a function of compression. Finally, the onset of ionization occurs close in pressure to where density functional theory-molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations show molecular dissociation, suggesting hydrogen transitions from a molecular and insulating fluid to a conducting state without passing through an intermediate atomic phase.« less

  13. Quantitative in-situ scanning electron microscope pull-out experiments and molecular dynamics simulations of carbon nanotubes embedded in palladium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartmann, S., E-mail: steffen.hartmann@etit.tu-chemnitz.de; Blaudeck, T.; Hermann, S.; Wunderle, B. [Technische Universitt Chemnitz, Reichenhainer Str. 70, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Hlck, O. [Technische Universitt Chemnitz, Reichenhainer Str. 70, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Fraunhofer IZM Berlin, Gustav-Meyer-Allee 25, 13355 Berlin (Germany); Schulz, S. E.; Gessner, T. [Technische Universitt Chemnitz, Reichenhainer Str. 70, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Fraunhofer ENAS Chemnitz, Technologie-Campus 3, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2014-04-14

    In this paper, we present our results of experimental and numerical pull-out tests on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded in palladium. We prepared simple specimens by employing standard silicon wafers, physical vapor deposition of palladium and deposition of CNTs with a simple drop coating technique. An AFM cantilever with known stiffness connected to a nanomanipulation system was utilized inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) as a force sensor to determine forces acting on a CNT during the pull-out process. SEM-images of the cantilever attached to a CNT have been evaluated for subsequent displacement steps with greyscale correlation to determine the cantilever deflection. We compare the experimentally obtained pull-out forces with values of numerical investigations by means of molecular dynamics and give interpretations for deviations according to material impurities or defects and their influence on the pull-out data. We find a very good agreement of force data from simulation and experiment, which is 17 nN and in the range of 1061 nN, respectively. Our findings contribute to the ongoing research of the mechanical characterization of CNT-metal interfaces. This is of significant interest for the design of future mechanical sensors utilizing the intrinsic piezoresistive effect of CNTs or other future devices incorporating CNT-metal interfaces.

  14. Application of computational fluid dynamics for the simulation of cryogenic molecular sieve bed absorber of hydrogen isotopes recovery system for Indian LLCB-TBM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gayathri Devi, V.; Sircar, A.; Sarkar, B.

    2015-03-15

    One of the most challenging tasks in the design of the fuel cycle system lies in the effective design of Tritium Extraction System (TES) which involves proper extraction and purification of tritium in the fuel cycle of the fusion reactor. Indian Lead Lithium cooled Ceramic Breeder Test Blanket Module (LLCB-TBM) would extract hydrogen isotopes through Cryogenic Molecular Sieve Bed (CMSB) adsorber system. A prototype Hydrogen Isotopes Recovery System (HIRS) is being developed to validate the concepts for tritium extraction by adsorption mass transfer mechanism. In this study, a design model has been developed and analyzed to simulate the adsorption mass transfer kinetics in a fixed bed adsorption column. The simulation leads primarily to effective design of HIRS, which is a state-of-the-art technology. The paper describes the process simulation approach and the results of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis. The effects of different operating conditions are studied to investigate their influence on the hydrogen isotopes adsorption capacity. The results of the present simulation study would be used to understand the best optimized transport phenomenon before realizing the TES as a system for LLCB-TBM. (authors)

  15. Effects of local structure on helium bubble growth in bulk and at grain boundaries of bcc iron: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Li; Gao, Fei; Kurtz, Richard J.; Zu, Xiaotao; Peng, S. M.; Long, X. G.; Zhou, X. S.

    2015-07-15

    The nucleation and growth of helium (He) bubbles in the bulk and at Σ3 <110> {112} and Σ73b <110> {661} grain boundaries (GBs) in bcc iron have been investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that a 1/2 <111> {111} dislocation loop is formed with the sequential collection of <111> interstitial crowdions at the periphery of the He cluster and is eventually emitted from the He cluster. Insertion of 45 He atoms into a He cluster leads to the formation of a 1/2 <111> dislocation loop in Σ3 GB. It is of interest to notice that the transition of a dislocation segment through the GB leads to the formation of a step at the GB plane following the loop formation, accounting for the formation of a residual GB defect. A 1/2 <111> loop, with a {110} habit plane, is emitted with further increase of the He bubble size in the Σ3 GB. In contrast, the sequential insertion of He atoms in Σ73b GB continuously emits self-interstitial atoms (SIAs), but these SIAs rearrange at the core of the inherent GB dislocation, instead of forming a dislocation loop, which leads the GB dislocation to propagate along the [1¯1¯ 1 2] direction. In the bulk and Σ3 GB, the He bubble exhibits three-dimensionally spherical shape, but it forms longitudinal shape along the dislocation line in the Σ73 GB, a shape commonly observed at GBs in experiments.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of the electrical double layer on smectite surfaces contacting concentrated mixed electrolyte (NaCl-CaCl?) solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourg, Ian C.; Sposito, Garrison

    2011-01-01

    We report new molecular dynamics results elucidating the structure of the electrical double layer (EDL) on smectite surfaces contacting mixed NaClCaCl2 electrolyte solutions in the range of concentrations relevant to pore waters in geologic repositories for CO2 or high-level radioactive waste (0.341.83 molc dm-3). Our results confirm the existence of three distinct ion adsorption planes (0-, ?-, and d-planes), often assumed in EDL models, but with two important qualifications: (1) the location of the ?- and d-planes are independent of ionic strength or ion type and (2) indifferent electrolyte ions can occupy all three planes. Charge inversion occurred in the diffuse ion swarm because of the affinity of the clay surface for CaCl+ ion pairs. Therefore, at concentrations {>=0.34 molc dm-3}, properties arising from long-range electrostatics at interfaces (electrophoresis, electro-osmosis, co-ion exclusion, colloidal aggregation) will not be correctly predicted by most EDL models. Co-ion exclusion, typically neglected by surface speciation models, balanced a large part of the clay mineral structural charge in the more concentrated solutions. Water molecules and ions diffused relatively rapidly even in the first statistical water monolayer, contradicting reports of rigid ice-like structures for water on clay mineral surfaces.

  17. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of short-range order in Zr50Cu45Al5 and Cu50Zr45Al5 metallic glasses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Yuxiang; Huang, Li; Wang, C. Z.; Kramer, M. J.; Ho, K. M.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, comparative analysis between Zr-rich Zr50Cu45Al5 and Cu-rich Cu50Zr45Al5 metallic glasses (MGs) is extensively performed to locate the key structural motifs accounting for their difference of glass forming ability. Here we adopt ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the local atomic structures of Zr50Cu45Al5 and Cu50Zr45Al5 MGs. A high content of icosahedral-related (full and distorted) orders was found in both samples, while in the Zr-rich MG full icosahedrons <0,0,12,0> is dominant, and in the Cu-rich one the distorted icosahedral orders, especially <0,2,8,2> and <0,2,8,1>, are prominent. And the <0,2,8,2> polyhedra in Cu50Zr45Al5 MG mainly originate from Al-centeredmore » clusters, while the <0,0,12,0> in Zr50Cu45Al5 derives from both Cu-centered clusters and Al-centered clusters. These difference may be ascribed to the atomic size difference and chemical property between Cu and Zr atoms. The relatively large size of Zr and large negative heat of mixing between Zr and Al atoms, enhancing the packing density and stability of metallic glass system, may be responsible for the higher glass forming ability of Zr50Cu45Al5.« less

  18. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of short-range order in Zr50Cu45Al5 and Cu50Zr45Al5 metallic glasses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Yuxiang; Huang, Li; Wang, C. Z.; Kramer, M. J.; Ho, K. M.

    2016-02-01

    Comparative analysis between Zr-rich Zr50Cu45Al5 and Cu-rich Cu50Zr45Al5 metallic glasses (MGs) is extensively performed to locate the key structural motifs accounting for their difference of glass forming ability. Here we adopt ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the local atomic structures of Zr50Cu45Al5 and Cu50Zr45Al5 MGs. A high content of icosahedral-related (full and distorted) orders was found in both samples, while in the Zr-rich MG full icosahedrons < 0,0,12,0 > is dominant, and in the Cu-rich one the distorted icosahedral orders, especially < 0,2,8,2 > and < 0,2,8,1 >, are prominent. And the < 0,2,8,2 > polyhedra in Cu50Zr45Al5more » MG mainly originate from Al-centered clusters, while the < 0,0,12,0 > in Zr50Cu45Al5 derives from both Cu-centered clusters and Al-centered clusters. These difference may be ascribed to the atomic size difference and chemical property between Cu and Zr atoms. Lastly, the relatively large size of Zr and large negative heat of mixing between Zr and Al atoms, enhancing the packing density and stability of metallic glass system, may be responsible for the higher glass forming ability of Zr50Cu45Al5.« less

  19. Solute–solute correlations responsible for the prepeak in structure factors of undercooled Al-rich liquids: A molecular dynamics study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Feng; Sun, Yang; Ye, Zhuo; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Mendelev, Mikhail I.; Ott, Ryan T.; Kramer, Matthew J.; Ding, Ze -Jun; Ho, Kai -Ming

    2015-05-06

    In this study, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations on a typical Al-based alloy Al90Sm10. The short-range and medium-range correlations of the system are reliably produced by ab initio calculations, whereas the long-range correlations are obtained with the assistance of a semi-empirical potential well-fitted to ab initio data. Our calculations show that a prepeak in the structure factor of this system emerges well above the melting temperature, and the intensity of the prepeak increases with increasing undercooling of the liquid. These results are in agreement with x-ray diffraction experiments. The interplay between the short-range order of the system originating frommore » the large affinity between Al and Sm atoms, and the intrinsic repulsion between Sm atoms gives rise to a stronger correlation in the second peak than the first peak in the Sm–Sm partial pair correlation function (PPCF), which in turn produces the prepeak in the structure factor.« less

  20. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: Nexus EnergyHomes, Frederick, MD

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nexus EnergyHomes Frederick, MD BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed in to give you

  1. Extending molecular simulation time scales: Parallel in time integrations for high-level quantum chemistry and complex force representations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bylaska, Eric J.; Weare, Jonathan Q.; Weare, John H.

    2013-08-21

    Parallel in time simulation algorithms are presented and applied to conventional molecular dynamics (MD) and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) models of realistic complexity. Assuming that a forward time integrator, f (e.g., Verlet algorithm), is available to propagate the system from time t{sub i} (trajectory positions and velocities x{sub i} = (r{sub i}, v{sub i})) to time t{sub i+1} (x{sub i+1}) by x{sub i+1} = f{sub i}(x{sub i}), the dynamics problem spanning an interval from t{sub 0}t{sub M} can be transformed into a root finding problem, F(X) = [x{sub i} ? f(x{sub (i?1})]{sub i} {sub =1,M} = 0, for the trajectory variables. The root finding problem is solved using a variety of root finding techniques, including quasi-Newton and preconditioned quasi-Newton schemes that are all unconditionally convergent. The algorithms are parallelized by assigning a processor to each time-step entry in the columns of F(X). The relation of this approach to other recently proposed parallel in time methods is discussed, and the effectiveness of various approaches to solving the root finding problem is tested. We demonstrate that more efficient dynamical models based on simplified interactions or coarsening time-steps provide preconditioners for the root finding problem. However, for MD and AIMD simulations, such preconditioners are not required to obtain reasonable convergence and their cost must be considered in the performance of the algorithm. The parallel in time algorithms developed are tested by applying them to MD and AIMD simulations of size and complexity similar to those encountered in present day applications. These include a 1000 Si atom MD simulation using Stillinger-Weber potentials, and a HCl + 4H{sub 2}O AIMD simulation at the MP2 level. The maximum speedup ((serial execution time)/(parallel execution time) ) obtained by parallelizing the Stillinger-Weber MD simulation was nearly 3.0. For the AIMD MP2 simulations, the algorithms achieved speedups of up to 14

  2. Extending molecular simulation time scales: Parallel in time integrations for high-level quantum chemistry and complex force representations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bylaska, Eric J.; Weare, Jonathan Q.; Weare, John H.

    2013-08-21

    Parallel in time simulation algorithms are presented and applied to conventional molecular dynamics (MD) and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) models of realistic complexity. Assuming that a forward time integrator, f , (e.g. Verlet algorithm) is available to propagate the system from time ti (trajectory positions and velocities xi = (ri; vi)) to time ti+1 (xi+1) by xi+1 = fi(xi), the dynamics problem spanning an interval from t0 : : : tM can be transformed into a root finding problem, F(X) = [xi - f (x(i-1)]i=1;M = 0, for the trajectory variables. The root finding problem is solved using a variety of optimization techniques, including quasi-Newton and preconditioned quasi-Newton optimization schemes that are all unconditionally convergent. The algorithms are parallelized by assigning a processor to each time-step entry in the columns of F(X). The relation of this approach to other recently proposed parallel in time methods is discussed and the effectiveness of various approaches to solving the root finding problem are tested. We demonstrate that more efficient dynamical models based on simplified interactions or coarsening time-steps provide preconditioners for the root finding problem. However, for MD and AIMD simulations such preconditioners are not required to obtain reasonable convergence and their cost must be considered in the performance of the algorithm. The parallel in time algorithms developed are tested by applying them to MD and AIMD simulations of size and complexity similar to those encountered in present day applications. These include a 1000 Si atom MD simulation using Stillinger-Weber potentials, and a HCl+4H2O AIMD simulation at the MP2 level. The maximum speedup obtained by parallelizing the Stillinger-Weber MD simulation was nearly 3.0. For the AIMD MP2 simulations the algorithms achieved speedups of up to 14.3. The parallel in time algorithms can be implemented in a distributed computing environment using very slow TCP/IP networks. Scripts

  3. Molecular dynamics study of the effect of alkyl chain length on melting points of [CnMIM][PF6] ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y; Maginn, EJ

    2014-01-01

    Based on molecular dynamics simulations, the melting points T-m of a series of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ionic liquids [CnMIM][PF6] with n = 2, 4, 10, 12, and 14 were studied using the free energy-based pseudosupercritical path (PSCP) method. The experimental trend that the Tm decreases with increasing alkyl chain length for ILs with short alkyl chains and increases for the ones with long alkyl chains was correctly captured. Further analysis revealed that the different trends are the results of the balance between fusion enthalpy and fusion entropy. For the ILs with short alkyl chains (ethyl and butyl groups), fusion entropy plays the dominant role so that [C4MIM][PF6], which has a larger fusion entropy due to its higher liquid phase entropy has the lower melting temperature. As for the ILs with long alkyl chains, due to the enhanced van der Waals interactions brought about by the long non-polar alkyl chains, enthalpy becomes the deciding factor and the melting points increase when the alkyl chain goes from C10 to C14. While the melting points for [C2MIM][PF6] and [C4MIM][PF6] were quantitatively predicted and the trends for the long chain ILs were captured correctly, the absolute melting points for [C10MIM][PF6], [C12MIM][PF6] and [C14MIM][PF6] were systematically overestimated in the simulations. Three possible reasons for the overestimation were studied but all ruled out. Further simulation or experimental studies are needed to explain the difference.

  4. The photoexcitation of crystalline ice and amorphous solid water: A molecular dynamics study of outcomes at 11 K and 125 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crouse, J.; Loock, H.-P. Cann, N. M.

    2015-07-21

    Photoexcitation of crystalline ice Ih and amorphous solid water at 7-9 eV is examined using molecular dynamics simulations and a fully flexible water model. The probabilities of photofragment desorption, trapping, and recombination are examined for crystalline ice at 11 K and at 125 K and for amorphous solid water at 11 K. For 11 K crystalline ice, a fully rigid water model is also employed for comparison. The kinetic energy of desorbed H atoms and the distance travelled by trapped fragments are correlated to the location and the local environment of the photoexcited water molecule. In all cases, H atom desorption is found to be the most likely outcome in the top bilayer while trapping of all photofragments is most probable deeper in the solid where the likelihood for recombination of the fragments into H{sub 2}O molecules also rises. Trajectory analysis indicates that the local hydrogen bonding network in amorphous solid water is more easily distorted by a photodissociation event compared to crystalline ice. Also, simulations indicate that desorption of OH radicals and H{sub 2}O molecules are more probable in amorphous solid water. The kinetic energy distributions for desorbed H atoms show a peak at high energy in crystalline ice, arising from photoexcited water molecules in the top monolayer. This peak is less pronounced in amorphous solid water. H atoms that are trapped may be displaced by up to ∼10 water cages, but migrate on average 3 water cages. Trapped OH fragments tend to stay near the original solvent cage.

  5. Dynamics of dendritic polymers in the bulk and under confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrissopoulou, K.; Fotiadou, S.; Androulaki, K.; Anastasiadis, S. H.; Tanis, I.; Karatasos, K.; Prevosto, D.; Labardi, M.; Frick, B.

    2014-05-15

    The structure and dynamics of a hyperbranched polyesteramide (Hybrane S 1200) polymer and its nanocomposites with natural montmorillonite (Na{sup +}-MMT) are investigated by XRD, DSC, QENS, DS and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation. In bulk, the energy-resolved elastically scattered intensity from the polymer exhibits two relaxation steps, one attributed to sub-T{sub g} motions and one observed at temperatures above the glass transition, T{sub g}. The QENS spectra measured over the complete temperature range are consistent with the elastic measurements and can be correlated to the results emerging from the detailed description afforded by the atomistic simulations, which predict the existence of three relaxation processes. Moreover, dielectric spectroscopy shows the sub- T{sub g} beta process as well as the segmental relaxation. For the nanocomposites, XRD reveals an intercalated structure for all hybrids with distinct interlayer distances due to polymer chains residing within the galleries of the Na{sup +}-MMT. The polymer chains confined within the galleries show similarities in the behavior with that of the polymer in the bulk for temperatures below the bulk polymer T{sub g}, whereas they exhibit frozen dynamics under confinement at temperatures higher than that.

  6. NATIONAL HARBOR, Md.,May 21, 2013-Los Alamos National Laboratory Director

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    director echoes cyber concerns May 21, 2013 Securing the grid will be key for energy security going forward NATIONAL HARBOR, Md.,May 21, 2013-Los Alamos National Laboratory Director Charlie McMillan told a gathering of energy executives today that securing the electrical grid is a major concern now and it's only becoming more serious. "If you look back at the last year, there were several hundred attacks on critical infrastructure," McMillan said, addressing attendees at the Deloitte

  7. Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Norway

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Norway (Million Cubic Feet) Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Norway (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,909 5,810 2,900 2014 2,621 2,995 2015 3,097 3,105 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of

  8. Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2012 2,790 2013 2,776 2014 2,984 2,986 2015 2,844 3,045 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied

  9. Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Total Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2014 2,984 2,621 5,981 2015 2,844 3,045 3,097 3,105 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Cove Point,

  10. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AN~~.N~dtAN, MD. Y.P.H.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ,' ,...- -., -.- . . we#lnty..: - DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AN~~.N~dtAN, MD. Y.P.H. April 30, 1979 . _-- _' . U.S.E.P.A. Radiation Branch 26 Federal Plaz;a, Boom 9079 New York, N. Y. 10007 Attention: Miss Feldman:, Gentlemen: In accordance with your request to Calvin E. Weber, P.E., Assistant Commissioner of Health for Environmental Quality, I am forwarding a copy of a report prepared by him concerning a radiation survey conducted in the vicinity of the former Canadian Radium and Uranium Corpora+on

  11. Price of Cove Point, MD Natural Gas LNG Imports from Algeria (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Algeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Cove Point, MD Natural Gas LNG Imports from Algeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's NA 2000's NA NA NA 4.79 6.32 8.38 8.48 7.50 -- -- 2010's -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring

  12. Price of Cove Point, MD Natural Gas LNG Imports from Egypt (Nominal Dollars

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Egypt (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Cove Point, MD Natural Gas LNG Imports from Egypt (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- 11.66 7.83 7.22 7.46 4.20 2010's 5.49 -- -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016

  13. Cell multipole method for molecular simulations in bulk and confined systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Jie; Balasundaram, Ramkumar; Gehrke, Stevin H.; Heffelfinger, Grant S.; Goddard, William A. III; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2002-08-01

    One of the bottlenecks in molecular simulations is to treat large systems involving electrostatic interactions. Computational time in conventional molecular simulation methods scales with O(N{sup 2}), where N is the number of atoms. With the emergence of the cell multipole method (CMM) and massively parallel supercomputers, simulations of 10 million atoms have been performed. In this work, the optimal hierarchy cell level and the algorithm for Taylor expansion were recommended for fast and accurate molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of three-dimensional (3D) systems. CMM was then extended to treat quasi-two-dimensional (2D) systems, which is very important for condensed matter physics problems. In addition, CMM was applied to grand canonical ensemble Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations for both 3D and 2D systems. Under the optimal conditions, the results show that computational time is approximately linear with N for large systems, average error in total potential energy is less than {approx}1%, and RMS force is about 0.015 for 3D and 2D systems when compared with the Ewald summation.

  14. Model of fracture of metal melts and the strength of melts under dynamic conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, P. N. Mayer, A. E.

    2015-07-15

    The development of a continuum model of deformation and fracture of melts is needed for the description of the behavior of metals in extreme states, in particular, under high-current electron and ultrashort laser irradiation. The model proposed includes the equations of mechanics of a two-phase continuum and the equations of the kinetics of phase transitions. The change (exchange) of the volumes of dispersed and carrier phases and of the number of dispersed particles is described, and the energy and mass exchange between the phases due to phase transitions is taken into account. Molecular dynamic (MD) calculations are carried out with the use of the LAMMPS program. The continuum model is verified by MD, computational, and experimental data. The strength of aluminum, copper, and nickel is determined at various temperatures and strain rates. It is shown that an increase in the strain rate leads to an increase in the strength of a liquid metal, while an increase in temperature leads to a decrease in its strength.

  15. Dynamics of micelle-nanoparticle systems undergoing shear: a...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dynamics of micelle-nanoparticle systems undergoing shear: a coarse-grained molecular dynamics approach Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dynamics of micelle-nanoparticle ...

  16. Structure, solvation, and dynamics of Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, and Ba{sup 2+} complexes with 3-hydroxyflavone and perchlorate anion in acetonitrile medium: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agieienko, Vira N.; Kolesnik, Yaroslav V.; Kalugin, Oleg N.

    2014-05-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations of complexes of Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, and Ba{sup 2+} with 3-hydroxyflavone (flavonol, 3HF) and ClO {sub 4}{sup ?} in acetonitrile were performed. The united atoms force field model was proposed for the 3HF molecule using the results of DFT quantum chemical calculations. 3HF was interpreted as a rigid molecule with two internal degrees of freedom, i.e., rotation of the phenyl ring and of the OH group with respect to the chromone moiety. The interatomic radial distribution functions showed that interaction of the cations with flavonol occurs via the carbonyl group of 3HF and it is accompanied with substitution of one of the acetonitrile molecules in the cations first solvation shells. Formation of the cation3HF complexes does not have significant impact on the rotation of the phenyl ring with respect to the chromone moiety. However, the orientation of the flavonol's OH-group is more sensitive to the interaction with doubly charged cations. When complex with Mg{sup 2+} is formed, the OH-group turns out of the plane of the chromone moiety that leads to rupture of intramolecular H-bond in the ligand molecule. Complexation of Ca{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, and BaClO {sub 4}{sup +} with 3HF produces two structures with different OH-positions, as in the free flavonol with the intramolecular H-bond and as in the complex with Mg{sup 2+} with disrupted H-bonding. It was shown that additional stabilization of the [MgClO{sub 4}(3HF)]{sup +} and [BaClO{sub 4}(3HF)]{sup +} complexes is determined by strong affinity of perchlorate anion to interact with flavonol via intracomplex hydrogen bond between an oxygen atom of the anion and the hydrogen atom of the 3-hydroxyl group. Noticeable difference in the values of the self-diffusion coefficients for Kt{sup 2+} from one side and ClO {sub 4}{sup ?}, 3HF, and AN in the cations coordination shell from another side implies quite weak interaction between cation, anion, and ligands in the

  17. α-tocopherol is well designed to protect polyunsaturated phospholipids: MD simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leng, Xiaoling; Kinnun, Jacob A.; Marquardt, Drew; Ghefli, Mikel; Kucerka, Norbert; Katsaras, John; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Harroun, Thad A.; Feller, Scott E.; Wassall, Stephen

    2015-10-20

    Here, the presumptive function for alpha-tocopherol (αtoc) in membranes is to protect polyunsaturated lipids against oxidation. Although the chemistry of the process is well established, the role played by molecular structure that we address here with atomistic molecular-dynamics simulations remains controversial. The simulations were run in the constant particle NPT ensemble on hydrated lipid bilayers composed of SDPC (1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoylphosphatidylcholine, 18:0-22:6PC) and SOPC (1-stearoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine, 18:0-18:1PC) in the presence of 20 mol % αtoc at 37°C. SDPC with SA (stearic acid) for the sn-1 chain and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) for the sn-2 chain is representative of polyunsaturated phospholipids, while SOPC with OA (oleic acid) substituted for the sn-2 chain serves as a monounsaturated control. Solid-state 2H nuclear magnetic resonance and neutron diffraction experiments provide validation. The simulations demonstrate that high disorder enhances the probability that DHA chains at the sn-2 position in SDPC rise up to the bilayer surface, whereby they encounter the chromanol group on αtoc molecules. This behavior is reflected in the van der Waals energy of interaction between αtoc and acyl chains, and illustrated by density maps of distribution for acyl chains around αtoc molecules that were constructed. An ability to more easily penetrate deep into the bilayer is another attribute conferred upon the chromanol group in αtoc by the high disorder possessed by DHA. By examining the trajectory of single molecules, we found that αtoc flip-flops across the SDPC bilayer on a submicrosecond timescale that is an order-of-magnitude greater than in SOPC. Our results reveal mechanisms by which the sacrificial hydroxyl group on the chromanol group can trap lipid peroxyl radicals within the interior and near the surface of a polyunsaturated membrane. At the same time, water-soluble reducing agents that regenerate αtoc can access the

  18. α-tocopherol is well designed to protect polyunsaturated phospholipids: MD simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Leng, Xiaoling; Kinnun, Jacob A.; Marquardt, Drew; Ghefli, Mikel; Kucerka, Norbert; Katsaras, John; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Harroun, Thad A.; Feller, Scott E.; Wassall, Stephen

    2015-10-20

    Here, the presumptive function for alpha-tocopherol (αtoc) in membranes is to protect polyunsaturated lipids against oxidation. Although the chemistry of the process is well established, the role played by molecular structure that we address here with atomistic molecular-dynamics simulations remains controversial. The simulations were run in the constant particle NPT ensemble on hydrated lipid bilayers composed of SDPC (1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoylphosphatidylcholine, 18:0-22:6PC) and SOPC (1-stearoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine, 18:0-18:1PC) in the presence of 20 mol % αtoc at 37°C. SDPC with SA (stearic acid) for the sn-1 chain and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) for the sn-2 chain is representative of polyunsaturated phospholipids, while SOPC with OAmore » (oleic acid) substituted for the sn-2 chain serves as a monounsaturated control. Solid-state 2H nuclear magnetic resonance and neutron diffraction experiments provide validation. The simulations demonstrate that high disorder enhances the probability that DHA chains at the sn-2 position in SDPC rise up to the bilayer surface, whereby they encounter the chromanol group on αtoc molecules. This behavior is reflected in the van der Waals energy of interaction between αtoc and acyl chains, and illustrated by density maps of distribution for acyl chains around αtoc molecules that were constructed. An ability to more easily penetrate deep into the bilayer is another attribute conferred upon the chromanol group in αtoc by the high disorder possessed by DHA. By examining the trajectory of single molecules, we found that αtoc flip-flops across the SDPC bilayer on a submicrosecond timescale that is an order-of-magnitude greater than in SOPC. Our results reveal mechanisms by which the sacrificial hydroxyl group on the chromanol group can trap lipid peroxyl radicals within the interior and near the surface of a polyunsaturated membrane. At the same time, water-soluble reducing agents that regenerate αtoc can access

  19. Protein Dynamics and Biocatalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protein Dynamics and Biocatalysis Protein Dynamics and Biocatalysis 1998 Annual Report Grand Challenge Projects biocatalysis.gif A model of the Michaelis complex for the TEM-1/penicillin system from molecular dynamics simulations. Investigators: P. A. Bash, Northwestern University Medical School and M. Karplus, Harvard University Research Objectives A guiding principle of molecular biology is that the structure of a biomolecule defines its function. This principle is especially true in the case

  20. An NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) Investigation of the Chemical Association and Molecular Dynamics in Asphalt Ridge Tar Sand Ore and Bitumen

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Netzel, D. A.; Coover, P. T.

    1987-09-01

    Preliminary studies on tar sand bitumen given in this report have shown that the reassociation of tar sand bitumen to its original molecular configuration after thermal stressing is a first-order process requiring nearly a week to establish equilibrium. Studies were also conducted on the dissolution of tar sand bitumen in solvents of varying polarity. At a high-weight fraction of solute to solvent the apparent molecular weight of the bitumen molecules was greater than that of the original bitumen when dissolved in chloroform-d{sub 1} and benzene-d{sub 6}. This increase in the apparent molecular weight may be due to micellar formation or a weak solute-solvent molecular complex. Upon further dilution with any of the solvents studied, the apparent molecular weight of the tar sand bitumen decreased because of reduced van der Waals forces of interaction and/or hydrogen bonding. To define the exact nature of the interactions, it will be necessary to have viscosity measurements of the solutions.

  1. Intramolecular and nonlinear dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.J.

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program focuses on three interconnected areas. The first involves the study of intramolecular dynamics, particularly of highly excited systems. The second area involves the use of nonlinear dynamics as a tool for the study of molecular dynamics and complex kinetics. The third area is the study of the classical/quantum correspondence for highly excited systems, particularly systems exhibiting classical chaos.

  2. A molecular dynamics study of intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in solution based upon a mixed quantumclassical approximation. II. Proton transfer reaction in non-polar solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kojima, H.; Yamada, A.; Okazaki, S.

    2015-05-07

    The intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in neon solvent has been investigated by mixed quantumclassical molecular dynamics (QCMD) calculations and fully classical molecular dynamics (FCMD) calculations. Comparing these calculated results with those for malonaldehyde in water reported in Part I [A. Yamada, H. Kojima, and S. Okazaki, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 084509 (2014)], the solvent dependence of the reaction rate, the reaction mechanism involved, and the quantum effect therein have been investigated. With FCMD, the reaction rate in weakly interacting neon is lower than that in strongly interacting water. However, with QCMD, the order of the reaction rates is reversed. To investigate the mechanisms in detail, the reactions were categorized into three mechanisms: tunneling, thermal activation, and barrier vanishing. Then, the quantum and solvent effects were analyzed from the viewpoint of the reaction mechanism focusing on the shape of potential energy curve and its fluctuations. The higher reaction rate that was found for neon in QCMD compared with that found for water solvent arises from the tunneling reactions because of the nearly symmetric double-well shape of the potential curve in neon. The thermal activation and barrier vanishing reactions were also accelerated by the zero-point energy. The number of reactions based on these two mechanisms in water was greater than that in neon in both QCMD and FCMD because these reactions are dominated by the strength of solutesolvent interactions.

  3. Assessment of Molecular Modeling & Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2002-01-03

    This report reviews the development and applications of molecular and materials modeling in Europe and Japan in comparison to those in the United States. Topics covered include computational quantum chemistry, molecular simulations by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, mesoscale modeling of material domains, molecular-structure/macroscale property correlations like QSARs and QSPRs, and related information technologies like informatics and special-purpose molecular-modeling computers. The panel's findings include the following: The United States leads this field in many scientific areas. However, Canada has particular strengths in DFT methods and homogeneous catalysis; Europe in heterogeneous catalysis, mesoscale, and materials modeling; and Japan in materials modeling and special-purpose computing. Major government-industry initiatives are underway in Europe and Japan, notably in multi-scale materials modeling and in development of chemistry-capable ab-initio molecular dynamics codes.

  4. Lubricant characterization by molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, J.D.; Cui, S.T.; Cummings, P.T.; Cochran, H.D.

    1997-12-01

    The authors have reported the calculation of the kinematic viscosity index of squalane from nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. This represents the first accurate quantitative prediction of this measure of lubricant performance by molecular simulation. Using the same general alkane potential model, this computational approach offers the possibility of predicting the performance of potential lubricants prior to synthesis. Consequently, molecular simulation is poised to become an important tool for future lubricant development.

  5. Molecular eigenstate spectroscopy: Application to the intramolecular dynamics of some polyatomic molecules in the 3000 to 7000 cm{sup {minus}1} region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, D.S.

    1993-12-01

    Intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) appears to be a universal property of polyatomic molecules in energy regions where the vibrational density of states is greater than about 5 to 30 states per cm{sup {minus}1}. Interest in IVR stems from its central importance to the spectroscopy, photochemistry, and reaction kinetics of these molecules. A bright state, {var_phi}{sub s}, which may be a C-H stretching vibration, carries the oscillator strength from the ground state. This bright state may mix with bath rotational-vibrational levels to form a clump of molecular eigenstates, each of which carries a portion of the oscillator strength from the ground state. In this work the authors explicitly resolve transitions to each of these molecular eigenstates. Detailed information about the nature of IVR is contained in the frequencies and intensities of the observed discrete transitions. The primary goal of this research is to probe the coupling mechanisms by which IVR takes place. The most fundamental distinction to be made is between anharmonic coupling which is independent of molecular rotation and rotationally-mediated coupling. The authors are also interested in the rate at which IVR takes place. Measurements are strictly in the frequency domain but information is obtained about the decay of the zero order state, {var_phi}{sub s}, which could be prepared in a hypothetical experiment as a coherent excitation of the clump of molecular eigenstates. As the coherent superposition dephases, the energy would flow from the initially prepared mode into nearby overtones and combinations of lower frequency vibrational modes. The decay of the initially prepared mode is related to a pure sequence infrared absorption spectrum by a Fourier transform.

  6. Molecular Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Science NETL's Molecular Science competency provides technology-enabling computational and experimental insight into the atomic-level processes occurring in condensed matter and gas phase systems or at the heterogeneous surface-gas interfaces used for energy applications. Research includes molecular optimization as well as both classical and high-throughput material design, specifically: Molecular Optimization Development and application of new computational approaches in the general

  7. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mike Brady ed_barnard Joint Molecular Foundry/ALS Project Scientist mabrady@lbl.gov 510.486.6548

  8. Communication: Rate coefficients of the H + CH{sub 4} → H{sub 2} + CH{sub 3} reaction from ring polymer molecular dynamics on a highly accurate potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Qingyong Chen, Jun Zhang, Dong H.

    2015-09-14

    The ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) calculations are performed to calculate rate constants for the title reaction on the recently constructed potential energy surface based on permutation invariant polynomial (PIP) neural-network (NN) fitting [J. Li et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 204302 (2015)]. By inspecting convergence, 16 beads are used in computing free-energy barriers at 300 K ≤ T ≤ 1000 K, while different numbers of beads are used for transmission coefficients. The present RPMD rates are in excellent agreement with quantum rates computed on the same potential energy surface, as well as with the experimental measurements, demonstrating further that the RPMD is capable of producing accurate rates for polyatomic chemical reactions even at rather low temperatures.

  9. Origin State>> CA ID ID ID IL KY MD NM NM NY NY OH SC TN TN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MD NM NM NY NY OH SC TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN TN TN TX Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Batelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Aberdeen Proving Ground Los Alamos National Laboratory Sandia National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory West Valley Environmental Services Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Savannah River Site Duratek/Energy Solutions Babcox

  10. Kinetic energy deficit in the symmetric fission of /sup 259/Md. [Light particle emission in /sup 256/Fm fission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulet, E.K.; Wild, J.F.; Lougheed, R.W.; Baisden, P.A.; Dougan, R.J.; Mustafa, M.G.

    1980-10-01

    The fragment energies of about 725 coincidence events have now been observed in the spontaneous fission (SF) decay of 105-min /sup 259/Md since its discovery in 1977. The fission of /sup 259/Md is characterized by a symmetric mass distribution, similar to those of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, but with a broad total kinetic energy (anti TKE) distribution which peaks at about 195 MeV, in contrast to those of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, for which the anti TKE is about 240 MeV. This kinetic energy deficit, approx. 40 MeV, has been postulated to be due to the emission of hydrogen-like particles by /sup 259/Md at the scission point in a large fraction of the fissions, leaving the residual fissioning nucleus with 100 protons. The residual nucleus would then be able to divide into two ultrastable tin-like fission fragments, but with less kinetic energy than that observed in the SF of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, because of binding-energy losses and a reduction in the Coulomb repulsion of the major fragments. To test this hypothesis, counter-telescope experiments aimed at detecting and identifying these light particles were performed. In 439 SF events 3 + 3 protons of the appropriate energy were observed, too few to account for the kinetic energy deficit in the fission of /sup 259/Md. There seems to be no explanation for this problem within the framework of current fission theory. These results are discussed along with preliminary measurements of light-particle emission in the SF of /sup 256/Fm. 5 figures.

  11. Hai Wang, Z. Hua, W. Lua, M.D. Thouless - Department of Mechanical Engineering, and Department of Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hai Wang, Z. Hua, W. Lua, M.D. Thouless - Department of Mechanical Engineering, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan One of the fundamental challenges of multi-scale modeling is the integration of atomistic-scale effects to continuum scale calculations. For example, the analysis of creep deformation requires continuum-level finite-element calculations to compute local stresses and temperatures which are then used in atomistic models to determine local atom

  12. Investigation of Interfacial and Bulk Dissociation of HBr, HCl, and HNO3 Using Density Functional Theory-Based Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, Marcel; Tobias, Douglas J.; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2014-12-18

    In this study we investigate the free energy barrier associated with the dissociation of strong acids, XH (HBr, HCl and HNO3) deprotonation, and subsequent formation of ionpairs, X___H3O+ in the vicinity of the air-water interface. We will show that the free energy for acid dissociation for HCl and HNO3 show significant differences at the air-water than under bulk solvation conditions producing a picture where at the interface associated molecular species can be stable. For the strongest acid we consider, HBr the more traditional picture of acids is preserved in the vicinity of the air-water interface. Our results have implications for our understanding of acids, and their surface tensions at the air-water interface.

  13. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NEWS Subatomic Microscopy Key to Building New Classes of Materials Molecular Foundry users from Penn State University and Cornell University have worked with staff to describe the first atomic scale evidence for strain-induced ferroelectricity in a layered oxide. [MORE] Molecular Foundry User Featured in MIT's Technology Review Cyclotron Road's Kendra Kuhl Featured in '35 Innovators Under 35' for 2016. [MORE] Foundry Fall Seminar Series Begins September 13 The next Molecular Foundry seminar

  14. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility RLGarcia@lbl.gov 510.486.4125 Biography Education B.A. Molecular Biology, Scripps College, Claremont, CA, 2005 Previous Professional Positions Principal...

  15. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Branden Brough Branden Director of Strategy and External Relations bbrough@lbl.gov 510.486.4206 Biography Branden Brough is the Molecular Foundry's Director of Strategy and...

  16. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the Molecular Foundry as a Scientific Engineering Associate since 2007. Expertise Tracy's main focus is assisting users with their research projects (helping design reactions ...

  17. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liu's research aims to achieve coherent control of functionality and properties across different scales through molecular level design and synthesis. With the developed materials ...

  18. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jeff Urban of the Molecular. Both of these positions involved the application of his laser physics and chemistry knowledge to implement various spectroscopic imaging techniques. ...

  19. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sources, as well as lasers that can be used in total internal reflectance mode (TIRF). ... to aid in work with biomolecules, microbes, molecular biology techniques and cell culture. ...

  20. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Guide Download the complete Users' Guide (PDF) Submit a Proposal Learn about the Molecular Foundry and its user program Explore Foundry capabilities and plan your proposal...

  1. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dmitry Soustin dmitry User Program Administrator dsoustin@lbl.gov 510.486.7687 Biography Dmitry Soustin is the Molecular Foundry's User Program Administrator. In this role, Dmitry...

  2. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theory of Nanostructured Materials jbneaton@lbl.gov 510.486.4527 personal website Biography Jeffrey B. Neaton is Director of the Molecular Foundry, a Department of Energy...

  3. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flatter and Faster: Transition Metal Dichalcogendies at the Molecular Foundry (Part II) Brain Imaging and Optical Manipulation Active Nanointerfaces for Electrochemistry SAXS-WAXS...

  4. Interaction and Coalescence of Nanovoids and Dynamic Fracture...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Nanovoids and Dynamic Fracture in Silica Glass: Multimiilion-to-Billion Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interaction and...

  5. Methods and Tools to allow molecular flow simulations to be coupled to higher level continuum descriptions of flows in porous/fractured media and aerosol/dust dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loyalka, Sudarshan

    2015-04-09

    The purpose of this project was to develop methods and tools that will aid in safety evaluation of nuclear fuels and licensing of nuclear reactors relating to accidents.The objectives were to develop more detailed and faster computations of fission product transport and aerosol evolution as they generally relate to nuclear fuel and/or nuclear reactor accidents. The two tasks in the project related to molecular transport in nuclear fuel and aerosol transport in reactor vessel and containment. For both the tasks, explorations of coupling of Direct Simulation Monte Carlo with Navier-Stokes solvers or the Sectional method were not successful. However, Mesh free methods for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method were successfully explored.These explorations permit applications to porous and fractured media, and arbitrary geometries.The computations were carried out in Mathematica and are fully parallelized. The project has resulted in new computational tools (algorithms and programs) that will improve the fidelity of computations to actual physics, chemistry and transport of fission products in the nuclear fuel and aerosol in reactor primary and secondary containments.

  6. NMR study of the molecular dynamics of ethanol and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol liquids confined to nanopores of porous silica glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballard, L.; Jonas, J.

    1996-05-29

    A dynamic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of the polar fluids ethanol (EtOH) and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) confined to porous silica sol-gel glasses is reported. The {sup 13}C NMR spin-lattice relaxation times, T{sub 1}, were measured in glasses with pore radii ranging from 18.9 to 54.8 A, over a temperature range from -13.6 to 30.5{degree}C. The data were analyzed in terms of the two-state, fast exchange model, and surface layer relaxation times, T{sub 1s}, were calculated. On the basis of surface enhancement factors, T{sub 1b}/T{sub 1s}, where T{sub 1b} is the relaxation time of the bulk liquid, it was concluded that the more acidic TFE has a weaker hydrogen bond interaction with silica, due to the fact that the alcohols serve as hydrogen bond acceptors. The experiment shows that EtOH and TFE have nearly identical surface layer viscosities, originating from the differences in hydrogen bonding with the silica surface. Confinement was found to have little effect on the internal rotation of terminal CF{sub 3} or CH{sub 3} groups. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. The structures and dynamics of atomic and molecular adsorbates on metal surfaces by scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Hyungsuk Alexander

    1996-12-01

    Studies of surface structure and dynamics of atoms and molecules on metal surfaces are presented. My research has focused on understanding the nature of adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-substrate interactions through surface studies of coverage dependency and coadsorption using both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). The effect of adsorbate coverage on the surface structures of sulfur on Pt(111) and Rh(111) was examined. On Pt(111), sulfur forms p(2x2) at 0.25 ML of sulfur, which transforms into a more compressed ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30{degrees} at 0.33 ML. On both structures, it was found that sulfur adsorbs only in fcc sites. When the coverage of sulfur exceeds 0.33 ML, it formed more complex c({radical}3x7)rect structure with 3 sulfur atoms per unit cell. In this structure, two different adsorption sites for sulfur atoms were observed - two on fcc sites and one on hcp site within the unit cell.

  8. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agenda March 24, 2016 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory AGENDA Registration 8:30 am - 9:00 am The Molecular Foundry's History and Impact 9:00 am - 10:30 am Jeff Neaton, Molecular Foundry Welcome Paul Alivisatos, Berkeley Lab/UC Berkeley The Creation of the Molecular Foundry Michael Witherell, Berkeley Lab Berkeley Lab Impact Brian Schowengerdt, Magic Leap Industry Impact Representative Mike Honda (D-CA) National Impact Break 10:30 am - 11:00 am Session 1: Functional Nanointerfaces 11:00 am -

  9. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the study of surface and thin film magnetic microstructures and their dynamic behavior. In-situ investigations of growth and structure of thin films, effect of...

  10. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Basic understanding of this nature is required to achieve the mission of the Molecular Foundry, the atomic-level design, creation and control of energy-relevant materials. My group ...

  11. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Meg Holm Meg Senior Administrator mcholm@lbl.gov 510.486.5135 Biography Meg is the Molecular Foundry's Senior Administrator. In this role, she supervises the Foundry budget...

  12. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alison Hatt allison User Program Director ajhatt@lbl.gov 510.486.7154 Biography Alison Hatt is the Director of the User Program at the Molecular Foundry and a former Foundry...

  13. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gil Torres Gil Torres gjtorres@lbl.gov 510.486.4395 Biography Gil is the Building Manager for MSD in buildings 62, 66, 2, 30, JCAP and the Molecular Foundry. Gil supports Foundry...

  14. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Seminars occur on Tuesdays at 11:00 am, in Building 67, Room 3111 unless otherwise noted. To be added to the Molecular Foundry's seminar mailing list, please email Jason Sweet. ...

  15. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Media and Resources MEDIA Molecular Foundry Youtube Channel Berkeley Lab Youtube Channel Berkeley Lab Photo Archive Webcam The Molecular Foundry and its users benefit from its location at Berkeley Lab within the Bay Area's vibrant scientific ecosystem. The expansive views serve to fuel the imagination and build connections among the Foundry's diverse research community. Baycam Click here for a full screen view from our webcam. RESOURCES Style Guide PDF 308 KB Logos Signature Preferred 41 KB ZIP

  16. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications Advanced Materials Special Issue » The Molecular Foundry publication database lists peer-reviewed work that has resulted from internal and user research. New publications can be added to the database here. All published work resulting from the use of this facility must acknowledge the Molecular Foundry, regardless of whether Foundry staff are included as authors. Proper acknowledgement text can be found here. Citation Year Facility User Loading data from server

  17. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foundry Molecular Foundry HOME REGISTRATION AGENDA SYMPOSIA POSTERS EXHIBITOR INFO TRAVEL & LODGING Molecular Foundry User Meeting: August 11-12, 2016 This conference focuses on frontier research topics in nanoscale science, providing a forum for discussion and development of new results and ideas. Whether you are a returning user, a prospective user, or someone who is curious about the Foundry, you are encouraged to attend the User Meeting. Participants are invited to submit abstracts for

  18. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See the Foundry's full equipment list Organic and Macromolecular Synthesis Capabilities & Tools Instrument Scheduler Major Instruments and Capabilities AB SCIEX TF4800 MALDI TOF-TOF Mass Spectrometer This instrument is the tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer systems, providing the excellent level of molecular mass coverage in the range of molecular masses 500 and 150,000 Da, high throughput, and confidence in both qualitative and quantitative analyses. The analyzer combines all of the

  19. Local spin dynamics at low temperature in the slowly relaxing molecular chain [Dy(hfac)3(NIT(C6H4OPh))]: A μ{sup +} spin relaxation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arosio, Paolo Orsini, Francesco; Corti, Maurizio; Mariani, Manuel; Bogani, Lapo; Caneschi, Andrea; Lago, Jorge; Lascialfari, Alessandro

    2015-05-07

    The spin dynamics of the molecular magnetic chain [Dy(hfac){sub 3}(NIT(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}OPh))] were investigated by means of the Muon Spin Relaxation (μ{sup +}SR) technique. This system consists of a magnetic lattice of alternating Dy(III) ions and radical spins, and exhibits single-chain-magnet behavior. The magnetic properties of [Dy(hfac){sub 3}(NIT(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}OPh))] have been studied by measuring the magnetization vs. temperature at different applied magnetic fields (H = 5, 3500, and 16500 Oe) and by performing μ{sup +}SR experiments vs. temperature in zero field and in a longitudinal applied magnetic field H = 3500 Oe. The muon asymmetry P(t) was fitted by the sum of three components, two stretched-exponential decays with fast and intermediate relaxation times, and a third slow exponential decay. The temperature dependence of the spin dynamics has been determined by analyzing the muon longitudinal relaxation rate λ{sub interm}(T), associated with the intermediate relaxing component. The experimental λ{sub interm}(T) data were fitted with a corrected phenomenological Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound law by using a distribution of thermally activated correlation times, which average to τ = τ{sub 0} exp(Δ/k{sub B}T), corresponding to a distribution of energy barriers Δ. The correlation times can be associated with the spin freezing that occurs when the system condenses in the ground state.

  20. Molecular fountain.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-09-01

    A molecular fountain directs slowly moving molecules against gravity to further slow them to translational energies that they can be trapped and studied. If the molecules are initially slow enough they will return some time later to the position from which they were launched. Because this round trip time can be on the order of a second a single molecule can be observed for times sufficient to perform Hz level spectroscopy. The goal of this LDRD proposal was to construct a novel Molecular Fountain apparatus capable of producing dilute samples of molecules at near zero temperatures in well-defined user-selectable, quantum states. The slowly moving molecules used in this research are produced by the previously developed Kinematic Cooling technique, which uses a crossed atomic and molecular beam apparatus to generate single rotational level molecular samples moving slowly in the laboratory reference frame. The Kinematic Cooling technique produces cold molecules from a supersonic molecular beam via single collisions with a supersonic atomic beam. A single collision of an atom with a molecule occurring at the correct energy and relative velocity can cause a small fraction of the molecules to move very slowly vertically against gravity in the laboratory. These slowly moving molecules are captured by an electrostatic hexapole guiding field that both orients and focuses the molecules. The molecules are focused into the ionization region of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and are ionized by laser radiation. The new molecular fountain apparatus was built utilizing a new design for molecular beam apparatus that has allowed us to miniaturize the apparatus. This new design minimizes the volumes and surface area of the machine allowing smaller pumps to maintain the necessary background pressures needed for these experiments.

  1. Structure of the glass-forming metallic liquids by ab-initio and classical molecular dynamics, a case study: Quenching the Cu{sub 60}Ti{sub 20}Zr{sub 20} alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amokrane, S.; Ayadim, A.; Levrel, L.

    2015-11-21

    We consider the question of the amorphization of metallic alloys by melt quenching, as predicted by molecular dynamics simulations with semi-empirical potentials. The parametrization of the potentials is discussed on the example of the ternary Cu-Ti-Zr transition metals alloy, using the ab-initio simulation as a reference. The pair structure in the amorphous state is computed from a potential of the Stillinger-Weber form. The transferability of the parameters during the quench is investigated using two parametrizations: from solid state data, as usual and from a new parametrization on the liquid structure. When the adjustment is made on the pair structure of the liquid, a satisfactory transferability is found between the pure components and their alloys. The liquid structure predicted in this way agrees well with experiment, in contrast with the one obtained using the adjustment on the solid. The final structure, after quenches down to the amorphous state, determined with the new set of parameters is shown to be very close to the ab-initio one, the latter being in excellent agreement with recent X-rays diffraction experiments. The corresponding critical temperature of the glass transition is estimated from the behavior of the heat capacity. Discussion on the consistency between the structures predicted using semi-empirical potentials and ab-initio simulation, and comparison of different experimental data underlines the question of the dependence of the final structure on the thermodynamic path followed to reach the amorphous state.

  2. The high pressure structure and equation of state of 2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (LLM-105) up to 20 GPa: X-ray diffraction measurements and first principles molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stavou, Elissaios; Manaa, M. Riad; Zaug, Joseph M.; Kuo, I-Feng W.; Pagoria, Philip F.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Armstrong, Michael R.; Kalkan, Bora

    2015-10-14

    Recent theoretical studies of 2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (C4H4N6O5 Lawrence Livermore Molecule No. 105, LLM-105) report unreacted high pressure equations of state that include several structural phase transitions, between 8 and 50 GPa, while one published experimental study reports equation of state (EOS) data up to a pressure of 6 GPa with no observed transition. Here we report the results of a synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction study and also ambient temperature isobaric-isothermal atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of LLM-105 up to 20 GPa. We find that the ambient pressure phase remains stable up to 20 GPa; there is no indication of a pressure induced phase transition. We do find a prominent decrease in b-axis compressibility starting at approximately 13 GPa and attribute the stiffening to a critical length where inter-sheet distance becomes similar to the intermolecular distance within individual sheets. The ambient temperature isothermal equation of state was determined through refinements of measured X-ray diffraction patterns. The pressure-volume data were fit using various EOS models to yield bulk moduli with corresponding pressure derivatives. As a result, we find very good agreement between the experimental and theoretically derived EOS.

  3. Nano-crystallization and magnetic mechanisms of Fe{sub 85}Si{sub 2}B{sub 8}P{sub 4}Cu{sub 1} amorphous alloy by ab initio molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yaocen; Takeuchi, Akira; Makino, Akihiro; Liang, Yunye; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2014-05-07

    Iron-based amorphous and nano-crystalline alloys have attracted a growing interest due to their potential in the application of magnetic coil production. However, fundamental understanding of the nano-crystallization mechanisms and magnetic features in the amorphous structure are still lack of knowledge. In the present work, we performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulation to clarify the ionic and electronic structure in atomic scale, and to derive the origin of the good magnetic property of Fe{sub 85}Si{sub 2}B{sub 8}P{sub 4}Cu{sub 1} amorphous alloy. The simulation gave a direct evidence of the Cu-P bonding preference in the amorphous alloy, which may promote nucleation in nano-crystallization process. On the other hand, the electron transfer and the band/orbital features in the amorphous alloy suggests that alloying elements with large electronegativity and the potential to expand Fe disordered matrix are preferred for enhancing the magnetization.

  4. The high pressure structure and equation of state of 2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (LLM-105) up to 20 GPa: X-ray diffraction measurements and first principles molecular dynamics simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stavou, Elissaios; Manaa, M. Riad; Zaug, Joseph M.; Kuo, I-Feng W.; Pagoria, Philip F.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Armstrong, Michael R.; Kalkan, Bora

    2015-10-14

    Recent theoretical studies of 2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (C4H4N6O5 Lawrence Livermore Molecule No. 105, LLM-105) report unreacted high pressure equations of state that include several structural phase transitions, between 8 and 50 GPa, while one published experimental study reports equation of state (EOS) data up to a pressure of 6 GPa with no observed transition. Here we report the results of a synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction study and also ambient temperature isobaric-isothermal atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of LLM-105 up to 20 GPa. We find that the ambient pressure phase remains stable up to 20 GPa; there is no indication of a pressure induced phasemore » transition. We do find a prominent decrease in b-axis compressibility starting at approximately 13 GPa and attribute the stiffening to a critical length where inter-sheet distance becomes similar to the intermolecular distance within individual sheets. The ambient temperature isothermal equation of state was determined through refinements of measured X-ray diffraction patterns. The pressure-volume data were fit using various EOS models to yield bulk moduli with corresponding pressure derivatives. As a result, we find very good agreement between the experimental and theoretically derived EOS.« less

  5. Achieving atomistic understanding of solvation dynamics from...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mechanics and Quantum Mechanical Molecular Mechanics calculations, we have been ... Achieving atomistic understanding of solvation dynamics from X-ray free-electron laser ...

  6. Extrapolating dynamic leidenfrost principles to metallic nanodroplets...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    here we have used classical molecular dynamics simulations to investigate whether Cu ... Publisher: Nature Publishing Group Research Org: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak ...

  7. Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    molecular scientists with a valuable window through which to probe the electronic structure and dynamics of molecules. But the answer to one fundamental quantum...

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - Ahn_2014_CNMSStaffScienceHighlight_ACSMacroLett...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exclusion chromatography (SEC), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), and coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG-MD) simulations. Multiple aliquots were collected at various...

  9. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See the Foundry's full equipment list Research Themes Discovering the Future, Atom by Atom The six-story, 94,000 square-foot Molecular Foundry building at LBNL overlooks the UC Berkeley campus and, from a distance, the San Francisco Bay. Directly adjacent to the Foundry is the NCEM complex that was established in 1983 to maintain a forefront research center for electron microscopy with state-of-the-art instrumentation and expertise. Merged with the Molecular Foundry in 2014 to take advantage of

  10. Modern concepts in molecular modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bajorath, J.; Klein, T.E.

    1996-12-31

    This session focused on the application of computer models and the development and application of various energy functions to study the structure, energetics and dynamics of proteins and their interactions with ligands. These studies provide an exciting view of current developments in computer-aided molecular modeling and theoretical analysis of biological molecules.

  11. Dynamics of Molecular Clouds: Observations, Simulations, and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: DE-AC52-07NA27344 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Presented at: SPIE Photonics West LASE 2015, San Francisco, CA, United States, Feb ...

  12. Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Rheology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... usage N*100 bytes <10GB >10GB Current LAMMPS, GROMACS, NAMD, DLPOLY,.... VASP, Qbox, Pwscf VASP, PEtot Future Library... requiring 1000 to 10000 energy evaluations Typical ...

  13. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Dinner On March 24, 2016, the Molecular Foundry celebrated the 10th anniversary of the dedication of its iconic building with a full day scientific symposium and dinner event. This celebration recognized the Foundry's major scientific and operational milestones and looked forward to the promising future of nanoscience. Leaders from Congress, DOE, academia, industry, and Berkeley Lab joined prominent Foundry users and staff, both past and present, to participate in this celebration.

  14. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    One of the World's Premier Nanoscience Research Institutions Supported by the Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) through their Nanoscale Science Research Center (NSRC) program, the Molecular Foundry is a national User Facility for nanoscale science serving hundreds of academic, industrial and government scientists around the world each year. Users come to the Foundry to perform multidisciplinary research beyond the scope of an individual's own laboratory. By taking

  15. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    POLICIES AND DEFINITIONS PROPOSAL GUIDE USER GUIDE USER PROGRAM SUBMIT A PROPOSAL » Reviewer Login » Proposal Deadline September 30, 2016 Instrument Scheduler Nanofabrication Instrument Scheduler User Program The Molecular Foundry user program gives researchers access to expertise and equipment for cutting-edge nanoscience in a collaborative, multidisciplinary environment. The program is open to scientists from academia, industry, and research institutes worldwide. These users join a vibrant

  16. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SEMINARS ARCHIVE The Molecular Foundry regularly offers seminars and events that feature compelling research and information for those who investigate at the nanoscale. Seminars occur on Tuesdays at 11:00 am, in Building 67, Room 3111 unless otherwise noted. < seminars and events Tuesday, June 28, 2016 at 11am Revealing the Mechanisms of Deformation in Structural Materials Using Advanced Characterization Techniques Mike Mills, The Ohio State University [MORE] Tuesday, June 14, 2016 at 11am

  17. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emory Chan Brand Staff Scientist, Inorganic Nanostructures EMChan@lbl.gov 510.486.7874 personal website Biography Education Postdoctoral fellow, Molecular Foundry with Dr. Delia Milliron Ph. D., Chemistry, UC Berkeley with Prof. Paul Alivisatos and Prof. Richard Mathies, B. S., Chemistry, Stanford University with Prof. Hongjie Dai Expertise Dr. Chan's expertise lies in the combinatorial and high-throughput synthesis of colloidal inorganic nanoparticles. As part of the Foundry's Combinatorial

  18. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Foundry User Policies and Definitions Download the complete User Policies and Definitions (PDF) Guiding principles Safety Costs 50/50 staff time model User proposal types Proposal questions and evaluation criteria Proposal Review Board (PRB) and review process User agreements with Berkeley Lab Access to other user facilities at LBNL Final project report Publications and acknowledgement User feedback and end-of-project survey Users' Executive Committee (UEC) Scientific Advisory Board

  19. Molecular Science Research Center 1992 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knotek, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    The Molecular Science Research Center is a designated national user facility, available to scientists from universities, industry, and other national laboratories. After an opening section, which includes conferences hosted, appointments, and projects, this document presents progress in the following fields: chemical structure and dynamics; environmental dynamics and simulation; macromolecular structure and dynamics; materials and interfaces; theory, modeling, and simulation; and computing and information sciences. Appendices are included: MSRC staff and associates, 1992 publications and presentations, activities, and acronyms and abbreviations.

  20. Gas Diffusion in a Porous Organic Cage: Analysis of Dynamic Pore...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diffusion in a Porous Organic Cage: Analysis of Dynamic Pore Connectivity Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations Previous Next List Daniel Holden, Kim E. Jelfs, Abbie Trewin, David...

  1. The structure and IR signatures of the arginine-glutamate salt bridge. Insights from the classical MD simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vener, M. V.; Odinokov, A. V.; Wehmeyer, C.; Sebastiani, D.

    2015-06-07

    Salt bridges and ionic interactions play an important role in protein stability, protein-protein interactions, and protein folding. Here, we provide the classical MD simulations of the structure and IR signatures of the arginine (Arg)glutamate (Glu) salt bridge. The Arg-Glu model is based on the infinite polyalanine antiparallel two-stranded ?-sheet structure. The 1 ?s NPT simulations show that it preferably exists as a salt bridge (a contact ion pair). Bidentate (the end-on and side-on structures) and monodentate (the backside structure) configurations are localized [Donald et al., Proteins 79, 898915 (2011)]. These structures are stabilized by the short {sup +}NH?O{sup ?} bonds. Their relative stability depends on a force field used in the MD simulations. The side-on structure is the most stable in terms of the OPLS-AA force field. If AMBER ff99SB-ILDN is used, the backside structure is the most stable. Compared with experimental data, simulations using the OPLS all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field describe the stability of the salt bridge structures quite realistically. It decreases in the following order: side-on > end-on > backside. The most stable side-on structure lives several nanoseconds. The less stable backside structure exists a few tenth of a nanosecond. Several short-living species (solvent shared, completely separately solvated ionic groups ion pairs, etc.) are also localized. Their lifetime is a few tens of picoseconds or less. Conformational flexibility of amino acids forming the salt bridge is investigated. The spectral signature of the Arg-Glu salt bridge is the IR-intensive band around 2200 cm{sup ?1}. It is caused by the asymmetric stretching vibrations of the {sup +}NH?O{sup ?} fragment. Result of the present paper suggests that infrared spectroscopy in the 20002800 frequency region may be a rapid and quantitative method for the study of salt bridges in peptides and ionic interactions between proteins. This region is usually not considered in

  2. Large-Scale Condensed Matter and Fluid Dynamics Simulations in Three

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diverse Areas: Part II: Molecular Dynamics Study of Clay-Polymer Nanocomposites | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Snapshot from a molecular dynamics simulation of a system containing 16 isolated clay sheets immersed in a polymer melt. , Snapshot from a molecular dynamics simulation of an isolated clay platelet (consisting of two sheets) immersed in water. Top image: Snapshot from a molecular dynamics simulation of a system containing 16 isolated clay sheets immersed in a polymer melt.

  3. Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print Wednesday, 25 February 2009 00:00 The behavior of the core hole created in molecular x-ray photoemission experiments has provided molecular scientists with a valuable window through which to probe the electronic structure and dynamics of molecules. But the answer to one fundamental quantum question-whether the core hole is localized or delocalized-has remained elusive for diatomic

  4. Training Session: Frederick, MD

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 3.5-hour training provides builders with a comprehensive review of zero net-energy-ready home construction including the business case, detailed specifications, and opportunities to be...

  5. The effects of side-chain-induced disorder on the emission spectra and quantum yields of oligothiophene nano-aggregates. A combined experimental and MD-TDDFT study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Jiyun; Jeon, SuKyung; Kim, Janice J.; Devi, Diane; Chacon-Madrid, Kelly; Lee, Wynee; Koo, Seung Moh; Wildeman, Jurjen; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Peteanu, Linda A.; Wen, Jin; Ma, Jing

    2014-07-24

    Oligomeric thiophenes are commonly-used components in organic electronics and solar cells. These molecules stack and/or aggregate readily under the processing conditions used to form thin films for these applications, significantly altering their optical and charge-transport properties. To determine how these effects depend on the substitution pattern of the thiophene main chains, nano-aggregates of three sexi-thiophene (6T) oligomers having different alkyl substitution patterns were formed using solvent poisoning techniques and studied using steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy. The results indicate the substantial role played by the side-chain substituents in determining the emissive properties of these species. Both the measured spectral changes and their dependence on substitution are well modeled by combined quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations connect the side-chain-induced disorder, which determines the favorable chain packing configurations within the aggregates, with their measured electronic spectra.

  6. The effects of side-chain-induced disorder on the emission spectra and quantum yields of oligothiophene nano-aggregates: A combined experimental and MD-TDDFT study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Jiyun; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Jeon, SuKyung; Kim, Janice J.; Devi, Diane; Chacon-Madrid, Kelly; Lee, Wynee; Koo, Seung Moh; Wildeman, Jurjen; Peteanu, Linda A.; Wen, Jin; Ma, Jing

    2014-11-13

    Oligomeric thiophenes are commonly-used components in organic electronics and solar cells. These molecules stack and/or aggregate readily under the processing conditions used to form thin films for these applications, significantly altering their optical and charge-transport properties. To determine how these effects depend on the substitution pattern of the thiophene main chains, nano-aggregates of three sexi-thiophene (6T) oligomers having different alkyl substitution patterns were formed using solvent poisoning techniques and studied using steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy. The results indicate the substantial role played by the side-chain substituents in determining the emissive properties of these species. Both the measured spectral changes and their dependence on substitution are well modeled by combined quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations connect the side-chain-induced disorder, which determines the favorable chain packing configurations within the aggregates, with their measured electronic spectra.

  7. Reduction of VOC emissions from metal dip coating applications -- Canam Steel Corporation Point of Rocks, MD case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monfet, J.P.

    1997-12-31

    The reduction of VOC emissions from metal dip coating applications is not an environmental constraint, it is an economic opportunity. This case study shows how the industry can reap economic benefits from VOC reductions while improving air quality. The Canam Steel Corporation plant located in Point of Rocks, MD operates dip tanks for primer application on fabricated steel joists and joist girders. This process is presently subject to a regulation that limits the paint VOC content to 3.5 pounds per gallon of coating less water. As a result of the high paint viscosity associated with that regulation, the paint thickness of the dipped steel is thicker than the customers` specifications. Most of the VOC emissions can therefore be associated with the excess of paint applied to the products rather than to the required thickness of the coating. The higher paint usage rate has more than environmental consequences, it increases the cost of the applied coating. The project is to reduce the paint usage by controlling the viscosity of the coating in the tank. Experimental results as well as actual mass balance calculations show that using a higher VOC content paint would reduce the overall VOC emissions. The author explained the project to the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) Air and Radiation Management Administration. First, the MDE agreed to develop a new RACT determination for fabricated steel dipping operations. The new regulation would limit the amount of VOC than can be emitted to dip coat a ton of fabricated steel. Second, the MDE agreed to allow experimentation of the higher VOC content paint as a pilot project for the new regulation. This paper demonstrates the need for a RACT determination specific to fabricated steel dipping operations.

  8. Atomic-scale dynamics of a model glass-forming metallic liquid: Dynamical crossover, dynamical decoupling, and dynamical clustering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    The phase behavior of multi-component metallic liquids is exceedingly complex because of the convoluted many-body and many-elemental interactions. Herein, we present systematic studies of the dynamic aspects of such a model ternary metallic liquid Cu40Zr51Al9 using molecular dynamics simulation with embedded atom method. We observed a dynamical crossover from Arrhenius to super-Arrhenius behavior in the transport properties (diffusion coefficient, relaxation times, and shear viscosity) bordered at Tx ~1300K. Unlike in many molecular and macromolecular liquids, this crossover phenomenon occurs in the equilibrium liquid state well above the melting temperature of the system (Tm ~ 900K), and the crossover temperature ismore » roughly twice of the glass-transition temperature (Tg). Below Tx, we found the elemental dynamics decoupled and the Stokes-Einstein relation broke down, indicating the onset of heterogeneous spatially correlated dynamics in the system mediated by dynamic communications among local configurational excitations. To directly characterize and visualize the correlated dynamics, we employed a non-parametric, unsupervised machine learning technique and identified dynamical clusters of atoms with similar atomic mobility. The revealed average dynamical cluster size shows an accelerated increase below Tx and mimics the trend observed in other ensemble averaged quantities that are commonly used to quantify the spatially heterogeneous dynamics such as the non-Gaussian parameter and the four-point correlation function.« less

  9. Structure And Dynamics of the Hydrated Palladium(II) Ion in Aqueous Solution a QMCF MD Simulation And EXAFS Spectroscopic Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofer, T.S.; Randolf, B.R.; Shah, S.Adnan Ali; Rode, B.M.; Persson, I.

    2009-06-01

    The pharmacologically and industrially important palladium(II) ion is usually characterised as square-planar structure in aqueous solution, similar to the platinum(II) ion. Our investigations by means of the most modern experimental and theoretical methods give clear indications, however, that the hydrated palladium(II) ion is hexa-coordinated, with four ligands arranged in a plane at 2.0 {angstrom} plus two additional ligands in axial positions showing an elongated bond distance of 2.7-2.8 A. The second shell consists in average of 8.0 ligands at a mean distance of 4.4 {angstrom}. This structure provides a new basis for the interpretation of the kinetic properties of palladium(II) complexes.

  10. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with pump-probe measurements. Using a combination of isotope substitution experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, researchers from Sweden, Germany, and the U.S. have shown...

  11. Sandia Energy - Simulations Reveal Ion Dynamics in Polymer Electrolyte

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and their effects on material properties is important for improved design. Recent molecular-dynamics simulations have revealed new details of ion motion in model ionomers....

  12. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Waters If you look deeply enough at even the stillest of waters, as deep as the molecular level, you will find a surprisingly turbulent, dynamic universe. The water...

  13. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    isotope substitution experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, researchers from Sweden, Germany, and the U.S. have shown that the ultrafast (0- to 10-fs) dissociation...

  14. Hierarchical analysis of molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    A novel representation of molecular spectra in terms of hierarchical trees has proven to be an important aid for the study of many significant problems in gas-phase chemical dynamics. Trees are generated from molecular spectra by monitoring the changes that occur in a spectrum as resolution is changed in a continuous manner. A tree defines a genealogy among all lines of a spectrum. This allows for a detailed understanding of the assignment of features of a spectrum that may be difficult to obtain any other way as well as an understanding of intramolecular energy transfer time scales, mechanisms, and pathways. The methodology has been applied to several problems: transition state spectroscopy, intramolecular energy transfer in highly excited molecules, high-resolution overtone spectroscopy, and the nature of the classical-quantum correspondence when there is classical chaos (``quantum chaos``).

  15. Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print The behavior of the core hole created in molecular x-ray photoemission experiments has provided molecular scientists with a valuable window through which to probe the electronic structure and dynamics of molecules. But the answer to one fundamental quantum question-whether the core hole is localized or delocalized-has remained elusive for diatomic molecules in which both atoms are the same element. An international team of scientists

  16. Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print The behavior of the core hole created in molecular x-ray photoemission experiments has provided molecular scientists with a valuable window through which to probe the electronic structure and dynamics of molecules. But the answer to one fundamental quantum question-whether the core hole is localized or delocalized-has remained elusive for diatomic molecules in which both atoms are the same element. An international team of scientists

  17. Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print The behavior of the core hole created in molecular x-ray photoemission experiments has provided molecular scientists with a valuable window through which to probe the electronic structure and dynamics of molecules. But the answer to one fundamental quantum question-whether the core hole is localized or delocalized-has remained elusive for diatomic molecules in which both atoms are the same element. An international team of scientists

  18. Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print The behavior of the core hole created in molecular x-ray photoemission experiments has provided molecular scientists with a valuable window through which to probe the electronic structure and dynamics of molecules. But the answer to one fundamental quantum question-whether the core hole is localized or delocalized-has remained elusive for diatomic molecules in which both atoms are the same element. An international team of scientists

  19. Production of Ultracold Trapped Molecular Hydrogen Ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blythe, P.; Roth, B.; Froehlich, U.; Wenz, H.; Schiller, S.

    2005-10-28

    We have cooled ensembles of the molecular hydrogen ions H{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 3}{sup +}, and all their deuterated variants to temperatures of a few mK in a radio frequency trap, by sympathetic cooling with laser-cooled beryllium ions. The molecular ions are embedded in the central regions of Coulomb crystals. Mass spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations were used to accurately characterize the properties of the ultracold multispecies crystals. We demonstrate species-selective purification of multispecies ensembles. These molecules are of fundamental importance as the simplest of all molecules, and have the potential to be used for precision tests of molecular structure theory, tests of Lorentz invariance, and measurements of electron to nuclear mass ratios and their time variation.

  20. The effects of side-chain-induced disorder on the emission spectra and quantum yields of oligothiophene nano-aggregates. A combined experimental and MD-TDDFT study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hong, Jiyun; Jeon, SuKyung; Kim, Janice J.; Devi, Diane; Chacon-Madrid, Kelly; Lee, Wynee; Koo, Seung Moh; Wildeman, Jurjen; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Peteanu, Linda A.; et al

    2014-07-24

    Oligomeric thiophenes are commonly-used components in organic electronics and solar cells. These molecules stack and/or aggregate readily under the processing conditions used to form thin films for these applications, significantly altering their optical and charge-transport properties. To determine how these effects depend on the substitution pattern of the thiophene main chains, nano-aggregates of three sexi-thiophene (6T) oligomers having different alkyl substitution patterns were formed using solvent poisoning techniques and studied using steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy. The results indicate the substantial role played by the side-chain substituents in determining the emissive properties of these species. Both the measured spectral changesmore » and their dependence on substitution are well modeled by combined quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations connect the side-chain-induced disorder, which determines the favorable chain packing configurations within the aggregates, with their measured electronic spectra.« less

  1. Molecular photoionization studies of nucleobases and correlated systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poliakoff, Erwin D.

    2015-03-11

    We proposed molecular photoionization studies in order to probe correlated events in fundamental scattering phenomena. In particular, we suggested that joint theoretical-experimental studies would provide a window into the microscopic aspects that are of central importance in AMO and chemical physics generally, and would generate useful data for wide array of important DOE topics, such as ultrafast dynamics, high harmonic generation, and probes of nonadiabatic processes. The unifying theme is that correlations between electron scattering dynamics and molecular geometry highlight inherently molecular aspects of the photoelectron behavior.

  2. Hydration Shell Structure and Dynamics of Curium(III) in Aqueous Solution: First Principles and Empirical Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atta-Fynn, Raymond; Bylaska, Eric J.; Schenter, Gregory K.; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2011-05-12

    Results of ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD), quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) and classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations of Cm3+ in liquid water at a temperature of 300 K are reported. The AIMD simulation was based on the Car-Parrinello MD scheme and GGA-PBE formulation of density functional theory. Two QM/MM simulations were performed by treating Cm3+ and the water molecules in the first shell quantum mechanically using the PBE (QM/MM-PBE) and the hybrid PBE0 density functionals (QM/MM-PBE0). Two CMD simulations were carried out using ab initio derived pair plus three-body potentials (CMD-3B) and empirical Lennard-Jones pair potential (CMD-LJ). The AIMD and QM/MM-PBE simulations predict average first shell hydration numbers of 8, both of which disagree with recent experimental EXAFS and TRLFS value of 9. On the other hand, the average first shell hydration numbers obtained in the QM/MM-PBE0 and CMD simulations was 9, which agrees with experiment. All the simulations predicted a average first shell and second shell Cm-O bond distances of 2.49-2.53 Å and 4.67-4.75 Å respectively, both of which are in fair agreement with corresponding experimental values of 2.45-2.48 Å and 4.65 Å. The average geometric arrangement of the eight-fold and nine-fold coordinated first shell structures corresponded to the square anti-prism and tricapped trigonal prisms respectively. The second shell hydration number for AIMD QM/MM-PBE, QM/MM-PBE0, CMD-3B, and CMD-LJ, were 15.8, 17.2, 17.7, 17.4, and 16.4 respectively, which indicates second hydration shell over-coordination compared to recent EXAFS experimental value of 13. Save the EXAFS spectra CMD-LJ simulation, all the computed EXAFS spectra agree fairly well with experiment and a clear distinction could not be made between configurations with 8-fold and 9-fold coordinated first shells. The mechanisms responsible for the first shell associative and dissociative ligand exchange in the classical simulations

  3. Atomic-scale dynamics of a model glass-forming metallic liquid: Dynamical crossover, dynamical decoupling, and dynamical clustering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    The phase behavior of multi-component metallic liquids is exceedingly complex because of the convoluted many-body and many-elemental interactions. Herein, we present systematic studies of the dynamic aspects of such a model ternary metallic liquid Cu40Zr51Al9 using molecular dynamics simulation with embedded atom method. We observed a dynamical crossover from Arrhenius to super-Arrhenius behavior in the transport properties (diffusion coefficient, relaxation times, and shear viscosity) bordered at Tx ~1300K. Unlike in many molecular and macromolecular liquids, this crossover phenomenon occurs in the equilibrium liquid state well above the melting temperature of the system (Tm ~ 900K), and the crossover temperature is roughly twice of the glass-transition temperature (Tg). Below Tx, we found the elemental dynamics decoupled and the Stokes-Einstein relation broke down, indicating the onset of heterogeneous spatially correlated dynamics in the system mediated by dynamic communications among local configurational excitations. To directly characterize and visualize the correlated dynamics, we employed a non-parametric, unsupervised machine learning technique and identified dynamical clusters of atoms with similar atomic mobility. The revealed average dynamical cluster size shows an accelerated increase below Tx and mimics the trend observed in other ensemble averaged quantities that are commonly used to quantify the spatially heterogeneous dynamics such as the non-Gaussian parameter and the four-point correlation function.

  4. Photoionization dynamics of excited molecular states. Photoelectron angular distributions and rotational and vibrational branching ratios for H2 C ¹Πu, v=0–4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Stephen T.; Dehmer, Patricia M.; Dehmer, Joseph L.

    1986-01-01

    Photoelectron angular distributions following three photonresonant, four photon (3+1) ionization of H2 via the C ¹Πu, v'=0-4←X ¹Σg⁺, v''= 0 Q(1) transitions are reported. The observed angular distributions are generally more isotropic for v⁺≠v' than for v⁺=v'. Photoelectron spectra obtained along the polarization axis of the laser following (3+1)= ionization via the C ¹Πu, v'= 4←X ¹Σg⁺, v"= 0 R(0) and R(1) transitions are also reported. These spectra are rotationally resolved and exhibit strongly v⁺-dependent rotational branching ratios. The comparison of the angular distribution data with available theoretical calculations indicates good agreement for some transitions and poor agreement for others, suggesting the need for substantial progress in understanding the photoionizationdynamics of even the simplest excited molecular states.

  5. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workshops & Summer Schools Summer Students Structural Molecular Biology Illuminating ... major experimental driver for structural biology research, serving the needs of a large ...

  6. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Our Mission Our Mission The SSRL Structural Molecular Biology program operates as a integrated resource and has three primary areas (or cores) of technological research and ...

  7. Yuan T. Lee and Molecular Beam Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yuan T. Lee and Molecular Beam Studies Resources with Additional Information * Awards Yuan T. Lee Courtesy of the Michigan State University Chemistry Department Yuan Tseh Lee 'received the 1986 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, ... for elucidating the collision dynamics of elementary chemical reactions. During a postdoctoral appointment at Harvard with [Dudley R.] Herschbach, Lee designed and built a technologically advanced "universal" machine with electron bombardment ionizer and mass

  8. Frontiers of NMR in Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-08-25

    NMR spectroscopy is expanding the horizons of structural biology by determining the structures and describing the dynamics of blobular proteins in aqueous solution, as well as other classes of proteins including membrane proteins and the polypeptides that form the aggregates diagnostic of prion and amyloid diseases. Significant results are also emerging on DNA and RNA oligomers and their complexes with proteins. This meeting focused attention on key structural questions emanating from molecular biology and how NMR spectroscopy can be used to answer them.

  9. Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomes, R.

    1998-09-01

    Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

  10. 2010 Atomic & Molecular Interactions Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd Martinez

    2010-07-23

    The Atomic and Molecular Interactions Gordon Conferences is justifiably recognized for its broad scope, touching on areas ranging from fundamental gas phase and gas-condensed matter collision dynamics, to laser-molecule interactions, photophysics, and unimolecular decay processes. The meeting has traditionally involved scientists engaged in fundamental research in gas and condensed phases and those who apply these concepts to systems of practical chemical and physical interest. A key tradition in this meeting is the strong mixing of theory and experiment throughout. The program for 2010 conference continues these traditions. At the 2010 AMI GRC, there will be talks in 5 broadly defined and partially overlapping areas of intermolecular interactions and chemical dynamics: (1) Photoionization and Photoelectron Dynamics; (2) Quantum Control and Molecules in Strong Fields; (3) Photochemical Dynamics; (4) Complex Molecules and Condensed Phases; and (5) Clusters and Reaction Dynamics. These areas encompass many of the most productive and exciting areas of chemical physics, including both reactive and nonreactive processes, intermolecular and intramolecular energy transfer, and photodissociation and unimolecular processes. Gas phase dynamics, van der Waals and cluster studies, laser-matter interactions and multiple potential energy surface phenomena will all be discussed.

  11. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Biology Group hosted a 3-day comprehensive workshop on the use of non-crystalline small-angle x-ray scattering and diffraction techniques in structural biology research. ...

  12. THE DARK MOLECULAR GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfire, Mark G.; Hollenbach, David; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: dhollenbach@seti.or

    2010-06-20

    The mass of molecular gas in an interstellar cloud is often measured using line emission from low rotational levels of CO, which are sensitive to the CO mass, and then scaling to the assumed molecular hydrogen H{sub 2} mass. However, a significant H{sub 2} mass may lie outside the CO region, in the outer regions of the molecular cloud where the gas-phase carbon resides in C or C{sup +}. Here, H{sub 2} self-shields or is shielded by dust from UV photodissociation, whereas CO is photodissociated. This H{sub 2} gas is 'dark' in molecular transitions because of the absence of CO and other trace molecules, and because H{sub 2} emits so weakly at temperatures 10 K molecular component. This component has been indirectly observed through other tracers of mass such as gamma rays produced in cosmic-ray collisions with the gas and far-infrared/submillimeter wavelength dust continuum radiation. In this paper, we theoretically model this dark mass and find that the fraction of the molecular mass in this dark component is remarkably constant ({approx}0.3 for average visual extinction through the cloud A-bar{sub V{approx_equal}}8) and insensitive to the incident ultraviolet radiation field strength, the internal density distribution, and the mass of the molecular cloud as long as A-bar{sub V}, or equivalently, the product of the average hydrogen nucleus column and the metallicity through the cloud, is constant. We also find that the dark mass fraction increases with decreasing A-bar{sub V}, since relatively more molecular H{sub 2} material lies outside the CO region in this case.

  13. Predictive Dynamic Security Assessment through Advanced Computing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: IEEE PES General Meeting, Conference & Exposition, July 27-31, 2014, National Harbor, MD, 1-5 Publisher: IEEE, Piscataway, ...

  14. Optical Modulation of Molecular Conductance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transient absorption spectra of these molecular layers are consistent with formation of a long-lived charge separated state, a finding with implications for the design of molecular ...

  15. Investigating the validity of the Bosanquet formula for estimation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sci., 69, 684-688 (2012) DOI: 10.1016j.ces.2011.11.026 Full-size image (21 K) Abstract: Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to determine the self-diffusivity,...

  16. Influence of adsorption on the diffusion selectivity for mixture...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Baten, J. Membr. Sci., 369, 545-549 (2011) DOI: 10.1016j.memsci.2010.12.042 Abstract: Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to determine the self-diffusivities,...

  17. [CII] dynamics in the S140 region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dedes, C.; Rllig, M.; Okada, Y.; Ossenkopf, V.; Mookerjea, B.; Collaboration: WADI Team

    2015-01-22

    We report the observation of [C II] emission in a cut through the S140 region together with single pointing observations of several molecular tracers, including hydrides, in key regions of the photon-dominated region (PDR) and molecular cloud [1]. At a distance of 910 pc, a BOV star ionizes the edge of the molecular cloud L1204, creating S140. In addition, the dense molecular cloud hosts a cluster of embedded massive young stellar objects only 75' from the H II region [e.g. 2, 3]. We used HIFI on Herschel to observe [CII] in a strip following the direction of the impinging radiation across the ionisation front and through the cluster of embedded YSOs. With [C II], we can trace the ionising radiation and, together with the molecular tracers such as CO isotopologues and HCO{sup +}, study the dynamical processes in the region. Combining HIFIs high spectral resolution data with ground based molecular data allows us to study the dynamics and excitation conditions both in the ionization front and the dense molecular star forming region and model their physical conditions [4].

  18. Photodissociation Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photodissociation Dynamics - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  19. Dynamics of Block Copolymer Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mochrie, Simon G. J.

    2014-09-09

    A detailed study of the dynamics of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles suspended in polystyrene homopolymer matrices was carried out using X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy for temperatures between 120 and 180 C. For low molecular weight polystyrene homopolymers, the observed dynamics show a crossover from diffusive to hyper-diffusive behavior with decreasing temperatures. For higher molecular weight polystyrene, the nanoparticle dynamics appear hyper-diffusive at all temperatures studied. The relaxation time and characteristic velocity determined from the measured hyper-diffusive dynamics reveal that the activation energy and underlying forces determined are on the order of 2.14 10?19 J and 87 pN, respectively. We also carried out a detailed X-ray scattering study of the static and dynamic behavior of a styrene isoprene diblock copolymer melt with a styrene volume fraction of 0.3468. At 115 and 120 C, we observe splitting of the principal Bragg peak, which we attribute to phase coexistence of hexagonal cylindrical and cubic double- gyroid structure. In the disordered phase, above 130 C, we have characterized the dynamics of composition fluctuations via X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Near the peak of the static structure factor, these fluctuations show stretched-exponential relaxations, characterized by a stretching exponent of about 0.36 for a range of temperatures immediately above the MST. The corresponding characteristic relaxation times vary exponentially with temperature, changing by a factor of 2 for each 2 C change in temperature. At low wavevectors, the measured relaxations are diffusive with relaxation times that change by a factor of 2 for each 8 C change in temperature.

  20. Molecular Science Research Center annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knotek, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics group is studying chemical kinetics and reactions dynamics of terrestrial and atmospheric processes as well as the chemistry of complex waste forms and waste storage media. Staff are using new laser systems and surface-mapping techniques in combination with molecular clusters that mimic adsorbate/surface interactions. The Macromolecular Structure and Dynamics group is determining biomolecular structure/function relationships for processes the control the biological transformation of contaminants and the health effects of toxic substances. The Materials and Interfaces program is generating information needed to design and synthesize advanced materials for the analysis and separation of mixed chemical waste, the long-term storage of concentrated hazardous materials, and the development of chemical sensors for environmental monitoring of various organic and inorganic species. The Theory, Modeling, and Simulation group is developing detailed molecular-level descriptions of the chemical, physical, and biological processes in natural and contaminated systems. Researchers are using the full spectrum of computational techniques. The Computer and Information Sciences group is developing new approaches to handle vast amounts of data and to perform calculations for complex natural systems. The EMSL will contain a high-performance computing facility, ancillary computing laboratories, and high-speed data acquisition systems for all major research instruments.

  1. Exciton Dynamics and Structural Investigations of Singlet Fission in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Solids | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Exciton Dynamics and Structural Investigations of Singlet Fission in Molecular Solids October 11, 2012 at 3pm/36-428 Michael R. Wasielewski Director, Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center, Northwestern University Wasielewski-002 Abstract: We are examining new dye molecules, which undergo singlet fission (SF), using guidance from electronic structure calculations to assure the requisite relationships between molecular

  2. Scattering Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scattering Dynamics - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  3. Geochemical Reaction Mechanism Discovery from Molecular Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stack, Andrew G.; Kent, Paul R. C.

    2014-11-10

    Methods to explore reactions using computer simulation are becoming increasingly quantitative, versatile, and robust. In this review, a rationale for how molecular simulation can help build better geochemical kinetics models is first given. We summarize some common methods that geochemists use to simulate reaction mechanisms, specifically classical molecular dynamics and quantum chemical methods and discuss their strengths and weaknesses. Useful tools such as umbrella sampling and metadynamics that enable one to explore reactions are discussed. Several case studies wherein geochemists have used these tools to understand reaction mechanisms are presented, including water exchange and sorption on aqueous species and mineral surfaces, surface charging, crystal growth and dissolution, and electron transfer. The impact that molecular simulation has had on our understanding of geochemical reactivity are highlighted in each case. In the future, it is anticipated that molecular simulation of geochemical reaction mechanisms will become more commonplace as a tool to validate and interpret experimental data, and provide a check on the plausibility of geochemical kinetic models.

  4. Geochemical Reaction Mechanism Discovery from Molecular Simulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stack, Andrew G.; Kent, Paul R. C.

    2014-11-10

    Methods to explore reactions using computer simulation are becoming increasingly quantitative, versatile, and robust. In this review, a rationale for how molecular simulation can help build better geochemical kinetics models is first given. We summarize some common methods that geochemists use to simulate reaction mechanisms, specifically classical molecular dynamics and quantum chemical methods and discuss their strengths and weaknesses. Useful tools such as umbrella sampling and metadynamics that enable one to explore reactions are discussed. Several case studies wherein geochemists have used these tools to understand reaction mechanisms are presented, including water exchange and sorption on aqueous species and mineralmore » surfaces, surface charging, crystal growth and dissolution, and electron transfer. The impact that molecular simulation has had on our understanding of geochemical reactivity are highlighted in each case. In the future, it is anticipated that molecular simulation of geochemical reaction mechanisms will become more commonplace as a tool to validate and interpret experimental data, and provide a check on the plausibility of geochemical kinetic models.« less

  5. First-principles molecular dynamics simulations of condensed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: DE-AC52-07NA27344 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical Chemistry Chemical Pysics, vol. 14, no. 10, January 5, 2012, pp. ...

  6. Large-Scale First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulations on...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurements of performance by means of hardware counters show that 37% of the peak FPU performance can be attained. Authors: Gygi, F ; Draeger, E W ; de Supinski, B R ; Yates, R K ...

  7. Molecular dynamics modeling of atomic displacement cascades in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Samolyuk, German D. 1 ; Osetskiy, Yury N. 1 ; Stoller, Roger E. 1 + Show Author Affiliations Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States) ...

  8. Large-Scale First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulations on...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for large-scale parallel platforms such as BlueGeneL. Strong scaling tests for a Materials Science application show an 86% scaling efficiency between 1024 and 32,768 CPUs. ...

  9. On Eliminating Synchronous Communication in Molecular Simulations to Improve Scalability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Straatsma, TP; Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation, as a complementary tool to experimentation, has become an important methodology for the understanding and design of molecular systems as it provides access to properties that are difficult, impossible or prohibitively expensive to obtain experimentally. Many of the available software packages have been parallelized to take advantage of modern massively concurrent processing resources. The challenge in achieving parallel efficiency is commonly attributed to the fact that molecular dynamics algorithms are communication intensive. This paper illustrates how an appropriately chosen data distribution and asynchronous one-sided communication approach can be used to effectively deal with the data movement within the Global Arrays/ARMCI programming model framework. A new put_notify capability is presented here, allowing the implementation of the molecular dynamics algorithm without any explicit global or local synchronization or global data reduction operations. In addition, this push-data model is shown to very effectively allow hiding data communication behind computation. Rather than data movement or explicit global reductions, the implicit synchronization of the algorithm becomes the primary challenge for scalability. Without any explicit synchronous operations, the scalability of molecular simulations is shown to depend only on the ability to evenly balance computational load.

  10. Molecular Foundry Bay Cam

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Baycam The Molecular Foundry is a Department of Energy-funded nanoscience research facility at Berkeley Lab that provides users from around the world with access to cutting-edge expertise and instrumentation in a collaborative, multidisciplinary environment. twitter instagram facebook

  11. Dissipative Particle Dynamics and Other Particle Methods for Multiphase Fluid Flow in Fractured and Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Meakin; Zhijie Xu

    2009-08-01

    Particle methods are less computationally efficient than grid based numerical solution of the Navier Stokes equation. However, they have important advantages including rigorous mass conservation, momentum conservation and isotropy. In addition, there is no need for explicit interface tracking/capturing and code development effort is relatively low. We describe applications of three particle methods: molecular dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics and smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The mesoscale (between the molecular and continuum scales) dissipative particle dynamics method can be used to simulate systems that are too large to simulate using molecular dynamics but small enough for thermal fluctuations to play an important role.

  12. Water dynamics clue to key residues in protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Meng [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhu, Huaiqiu, E-mail: hqzhu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yao, Xin-Qiu [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Biophysics, Kyoto University, Sakyo Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); She, Zhen-Su, E-mail: she@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2010-01-29

    A computational method independent of experimental protein structure information is proposed to recognize key residues in protein folding, from the study of hydration water dynamics. Based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, two key residues are recognized with distinct water dynamical behavior in a folding process of the Trp-cage protein. The identified key residues are shown to play an essential role in both 3D structure and hydrophobic-induced collapse. With observations on hydration water dynamics around key residues, a dynamical pathway of folding can be interpreted.

  13. Structural dynamics in complex liquids studied with multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2013-08-31

    The development of new sustainable energy sources is linked to our understanding of the molecular properties of water and aqueous solutions. Energy conversion, storage, and transduction processes, particularly those that occur in biology, fuel cells, and batteries, make use of water for the purpose of moving energy in the form of charges and mediating the redox chemistry that allows this energy to be stored as and released from chemical bonds. To build our fundamental knowledge in this area, this project supports work in the Tokmakoff group to investigate the molecular dynamics of water’s hydrogen bond network, and how these dynamics influence its solutes and the mechanism of proton transport in water. To reach the goals of this grant, we developed experiments to observe molecular dynamics in water as directly as possible, using ultrafast multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy. We excite and probe broad vibrational resonances of water, molecular solutes, and protons in water. By correlating how molecules evolve from an initial excitation frequency to a final frequency, we can describe the underlying molecular dynamics. Theoretical modeling of the data with the help of computational spectroscopy coupled with molecular dynamics simulations provided the atomistic insight in these studies.

  14. Molecular-beam scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vernon, M.F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N/sub 2/ from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HCl ..-->.. NaCl + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included.

  15. Simple Dynamic Gasifier Model That Runs in Aspen Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, P.J.; Luyben, W.L.

    2008-10-15

    Gasification (or partial oxidation) is a vital component of 'clean coal' technology. Sulfur and nitrogen emissions can be reduced, overall energy efficiency is increased, and carbon dioxide recovery and sequestration are facilitated. Gasification units in an electric power generation plant produce a fuel for driving combustion turbines. Gasification units in a chemical plant generate gas, which can be used to produce a wide spectrum of chemical products. Future plants are predicted to be hybrid power/chemical plants with gasification as the key unit operation. The widely used process simulator Aspen Plus provides a library of models that can be used to develop an overall gasifier model that handles solids. So steady-state design and optimization studies of processes with gasifiers can be undertaken. This paper presents a simple approximate method for achieving the objective of having a gasifier model that can be exported into Aspen Dynamics. The basic idea is to use a high molecular weight hydrocarbon that is present in the Aspen library as a pseudofuel. This component should have the same 1:1 hydrogen-to-carbon ratio that is found in coal and biomass. For many plantwide dynamic studies, a rigorous high-fidelity dynamic model of the gasifier is not needed because its dynamics are very fast and the gasifier gas volume is a relatively small fraction of the total volume of the entire plant. The proposed approximate model captures the essential macroscale thermal, flow, composition, and pressure dynamics. This paper does not attempt to optimize the design or control of gasifiers but merely presents an idea of how to dynamically simulate coal gasification in an approximate way.

  16. Wetting properties of molecularly rough surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svoboda, Martin; Lísal, Martin; Malijevský, Alexandr

    2015-09-14

    We employ molecular dynamics simulations to study the wettability of nanoscale rough surfaces in systems governed by Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions. We consider both smooth and molecularly rough planar surfaces. Solid substrates are modeled as a static collection of LJ particles arranged in a face-centered cubic lattice with the (100) surface exposed to the LJ fluid. Molecularly rough solid surfaces are prepared by removing several strips of LJ atoms from the external layers of the substrate, i.e., forming parallel nanogrooves on the surface. We vary the solid-fluid interactions to investigate strongly and weakly wettable surfaces. We determine the wetting properties by measuring the equilibrium droplet profiles that are in turn used to evaluate the contact angles. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to Wenzel’s law, suggest that surface roughness always amplifies the wetting properties of a lyophilic surface. However, our results indicate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., surface roughness deteriorates the substrate wettability. Adding the roughness to a strongly wettable surface shrinks the surface area wet with the liquid, and it either increases or only marginally affects the contact angle, depending on the degree of liquid adsorption into the nanogrooves. For a weakly wettable surface, the roughness changes the surface character from lyophilic to lyophobic due to a weakening of the solid-fluid interactions by the presence of the nanogrooves and the weaker adsorption of the liquid into the nanogrooves.

  17. Drama in Dynamics: Boom, Splash, and Speed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heather Marie Netzloff

    2004-12-19

    The full nature of chemistry and physics cannot be captured by static calculations alone. Dynamics calculations allow the simulation of time-dependent phenomena. This facilitates both comparisons with experimental data and the prediction and interpretation of details not easily obtainable from experiments. Simulations thus provide a direct link between theory and experiment, between microscopic details of a system and macroscopic observed properties. Many types of dynamics calculations exist. The most important distinction between the methods and the decision of which method to use can be described in terms of the size and type of molecule/reaction under consideration and the type and level of accuracy required in the final properties of interest. These considerations must be balanced with available computational codes and resources as simulations to mimic ''real-life'' may require many time steps. As indicated in the title, the theme of this thesis is dynamics. The goal is to utilize the best type of dynamics for the system under study while trying to perform dynamics in the most accurate way possible. As a quantum chemist, this involves some level of first principles calculations by default. Very accurate calculations of small molecules and molecular systems are now possible with relatively high-level ab initio quantum chemistry. For example, a quantum chemical potential energy surface (PES) can be developed ''on-the-fly'' with dynamic reaction path (DRP) methods. In this way a classical trajectory is developed without prior knowledge of the PES. In order to treat solvation processes and the condensed phase, large numbers of molecules are required, especially in predicting bulk behavior. The Effective Fragment Potential (EFP) method for solvation decreases the cost of a fully quantum mechanical calculation by dividing a chemical system into an ab initio region that contains the solute and an ''effective fragment'' region that contains the remaining solvent

  18. TURBULENCE DECAY AND CLOUD CORE RELAXATION IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yang; Law, Chung K.; Xu, Haitao

    2015-02-01

    The turbulent motion within molecular clouds is a key factor controlling star formation. Turbulence supports molecular cloud cores from evolving to gravitational collapse and hence sets a lower bound on the size of molecular cloud cores in which star formation can occur. On the other hand, without a continuous external energy source maintaining the turbulence, such as in molecular clouds, the turbulence decays with an energy dissipation time comparable to the dynamic timescale of clouds, which could change the size limits obtained from Jean's criterion by assuming constant turbulence intensities. Here we adopt scaling relations of physical variables in decaying turbulence to analyze its specific effects on the formation of stars. We find that the decay of turbulence provides an additional approach for Jeans' criterion to be achieved, after which gravitational infall governs the motion of the cloud core. This epoch of turbulence decay is defined as cloud core relaxation. The existence of cloud core relaxation provides a more complete understanding of the effect of the competition between turbulence and gravity on the dynamics of molecular cloud cores and star formation.

  19. Nonlinear effects in defect production by atomic and molecular ion implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David, C. Dholakia, Manan; Chandra, Sharat; Nair, K. G. M.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Amirthapandian, S.; Amarendra, G.; Varghese Anto, C.; Santhana Raman, P.; Kennedy, John

    2015-01-07

    This report deals with studies concerning vacancy related defects created in silicon due to implantation of 200 keV per atom aluminium and its molecular ions up to a plurality of 4. The depth profiles of vacancy defects in samples in their as implanted condition are carried out by Doppler broadening spectroscopy using low energy positron beams. In contrast to studies in the literature reporting a progressive increase in damage with plurality, implantation of aluminium atomic and molecular ions up to Al{sub 3}, resulted in production of similar concentration of vacancy defects. However, a drastic increase in vacancy defects is observed due to Al{sub 4} implantation. The observed behavioural trend with respect to plurality has even translated to the number of vacancies locked in vacancy clusters, as determined through gold labelling experiments. The impact of aluminium atomic and molecular ions simulated using MD showed a monotonic increase in production of vacancy defects for cluster sizes up to 4. The trend in damage production with plurality has been explained on the basis of a defect evolution scheme in which for medium defect concentrations, there is a saturation of the as-implanted damage and an increase for higher defect concentrations.

  20. Ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense mixtures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gill, N. M.; Heinonen, R. A.; Starrett, C. E.; Saumon, D.

    2015-06-25

    In this study, the ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense matter is determined using the recently developed pseudoatom molecular dynamics method [Starrett et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 013104 (2015)]. The method uses density functional theory to determine ion-ion pair interaction potentials that have no free parameters. These potentials are used in classical molecular dynamics simulations. This constitutes a computationally efficient and realistic model of dense plasmas. Comparison with recently published simulations of the ion-ion dynamic structure factor and sound speed of warm dense aluminum finds good to reasonable agreement. Using this method, we make predictions of the ion-ionmore » dynamical structure factor and sound speed of a warm dense mixture—equimolar carbon-hydrogen. This material is commonly used as an ablator in inertial confinement fusion capsules, and our results are amenable to direct experimental measurement.« less