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Sample records for molecular biology university

  1. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highlights Training Workshops & Summer Schools Summer Students Structural Molecular Biology Illuminating Biological Structures at the Atomic and Molecular Levels Your browser...

  2. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Our Mission Our Mission The SSRL Structural Molecular Biology program operates as a integrated resource and has three primary areas (or cores) of technological research and...

  3. Ringleader: Jay Nix, Beamline Director for the Molecular Biology Consortium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ringleader: Jay Nix, Beamline Director for the Molecular Biology Consortium Print Jay Nix started started the user program at Beamline 4.2.2 back in 2004, shortly after the Molecular Biology Consortium built the beamline. The macromolecular crystallography beamline is a little different than most at the ALS because it's privately managed by a consortium of 10 Midwest universities that pooled their money together to build the beamline, and now continue to do so to maintain it. Nix serves about 50

  4. Ringleader: Jay Nix, Beamline Director for the Molecular Biology Consortium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jay Nix, Beamline Director for the Molecular Biology Consortium Print Jay Nix started started the user program at Beamline 4.2.2 back in 2004, shortly after the Molecular Biology Consortium built the beamline. The macromolecular crystallography beamline is a little different than most at the ALS because it's privately managed by a consortium of 10 Midwest universities that pooled their money together to build the beamline, and now continue to do so to maintain it. Nix serves about 50 labs,

  5. Molecular biology of signal transduction in plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions of the 1991 Cold Springs Harbor Meeting entitled Molecular Biology of Signal Transduction in Plants.

  6. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, M.C.; Lippman, M.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  7. Genetics and Molecular Biology of Hydrogen Metabolism in Sulfate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Genetics and Molecular Biology of Hydrogen Metabolism in Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Genetics and Molecular Biology of Hydrogen Metabolism ...

  8. Frontiers of NMR in Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-08-25

    NMR spectroscopy is expanding the horizons of structural biology by determining the structures and describing the dynamics of blobular proteins in aqueous solution, as well as other classes of proteins including membrane proteins and the polypeptides that form the aggregates diagnostic of prion and amyloid diseases. Significant results are also emerging on DNA and RNA oligomers and their complexes with proteins. This meeting focused attention on key structural questions emanating from molecular biology and how NMR spectroscopy can be used to answer them.

  9. Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomes, R.

    1998-09-01

    Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

  10. 2011 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism, & Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keneth Stedman

    2011-08-05

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  11. 2009 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism & Molecular Biology GRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Julie Maupin- Furlow

    2009-07-26

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses; and industrial applications. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  12. 2010 Plant Molecular Biology Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Sussman

    2010-07-23

    The Plant Molecular Biology Conference has traditionally covered a breadth of exciting topics and the 2010 conference will continue in that tradition. Emerging concerns about food security have inspired a program with three main themes: (1) genomics, natural variation and breeding to understand adaptation and crop improvement, (2) hormonal cross talk, and (3) plant/microbe interactions. There are also sessions on epigenetics and proteomics/metabolomics. Thus this conference will bring together a range of disciplines, will foster the exchange of ideas and enable participants to learn of the latest developments and ideas in diverse areas of plant biology. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for individuals to discuss their research because additional speakers in each session will be selected from submitted abstracts. There will also be a poster session each day for a two-hour period prior to dinner. In particular, this conference plays a key role in enabling students and postdocs (the next generation of research leaders) to mingle with pioneers in multiple areas of plant science.

  13. Third international congress of plant molecular biology: Molecular biology of plant growth and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallick, R.B.

    1995-02-01

    The Congress was held October 6-11, 1991 in Tucson with approximately 3000 scientists attending and over 300 oral presentations and 1800 posters. Plant molecular biology is one of the most rapidly developing areas of the biological sciences. Recent advances in the ability to isolate genes, to study their expression, and to create transgenic plants have had a major impact on our understanding of the many fundamental plant processes. In addition, new approaches have been created to improve plants for agricultural purposes. This is a book of presentation and posters from the conference.

  14. Molecular biology of signal transduction in plants. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This volume contains abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions of the 1991 Cold Springs Harbor Meeting entitled Molecular Biology of Signal Transduction in Plants.

  15. Overview of selected molecular biological databases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayl, K.D.; Gaasterland, T.

    1994-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the purpose, content, and design of a subset of the currently available biological databases, with an emphasis on protein databases. Databases included in this summary are 3D-ALI, Berlin RNA databank, Blocks, DSSP, EMBL Nucleotide Database, EMP, ENZYME, FSSP, GDB, GenBank, HSSP, LiMB, PDB, PIR, PKCDD, ProSite, and SWISS-PROT. The goal is to provide a starting point for researchers who wish to take advantage of the myriad available databases. Rather than providing a complete explanation of each database, we present its content and form by explaining the details of typical entries. Pointers to more complete ``user guides`` are included, along with general information on where to search for a new database.

  16. Computational approaches to discovering semantics in molecular biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipton, R.J. ); Marr, T.G. . Theoretical Div.); Welsh, J.D. . Dept. of Biology)

    1989-07-01

    One of the central questions of molecular biology is the discovery of the semantics of DNA. This discovery relies in a critical way on a variety of expensive computations. In order to solve these computations, both parallel computers and special-purpose hardware play a major role.

  17. Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biology @WIPP Life Begins at 250,000,000 Years WIPP's underground isn't just suited for physics experiments aiming to unlock the mysteries of the Universe, it is also a perfect...

  18. Molecular biology of Homo sapiens: Abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Spring Harbor symposium on quantitative biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, J.D.; Siniscalco, M.

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Springs Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology. The topic for this meeting was the ''Molecular Biology of Homo sapiens.'' Sessions were entitled Human Gene Map, Human Cancer Genes, Genetic Diagnosis, Human Evolution, Drugs Made Off Human Genes, Receptors, and Gene Therapy. (DT)

  19. 2012 PLANT MOLECULAR BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JULY 15-20, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sussman, Michael

    2013-07-20

    The 2012 Gordon Conference on Plant Molecular Biology will present cutting-edge research on molecular aspects of plant growth and development, with particular emphasis on recent discoveries in molecular mechanisms involved with plant signaling systems. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics in plant molecular biology including hormone receptors and early events in hormone signaling, plant perception of and response to plant pathogen and symbionts, as well as technological and biological aspects of epigenomics particularly as it relates to signaling systems that regulate plant growth and development. Genomic approaches to plant signaling will be emphasized, including genomic profiling technologies for quantifying various biological subsystems, such as the epigenome, transcriptome, phosphorylome, and metabolome. The meeting will include an important session devoted to answering the question, "What are the biological and technological limits of plant breeding/genetics, and how can they be solved"?

  20. 2012 CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 17 - 22, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judith Berman

    2012-06-22

    The Gordon Research Conference on CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY was held at Holderness School, Holderness New Hampshire, June 17 - 22, 2012. The 2012 Gordon Conference on Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology (CMFB) will present the latest, cutting-edge research on the exciting and growing field of molecular and cellular aspects of fungal biology. Topics will range from yeast to filamentous fungi, from model systems to economically important organisms, and from saprophytes and commensals to pathogens of plants and animals. The CMFB conference will feature a wide range of topics including systems biology, cell biology and morphogenesis, organismal interactions, genome organisation and regulation, pathogenesis, energy metabolism, biomass production and population genomics. The Conference was well-attended with 136 participants. Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings.

  1. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Behzad Rad Rad Senior Scientific Engineering Associate, Biological Nanostructures BRad@lbl.gov 510.486.5795 Biography Education Postdoctoral Fellow Molecular Foundry Lawrence Berkeley National Labs Ph.D. in Biophysics University of California at Davis Dissertation Title: "The Unwinding Mechanism of the E. coli RecQ helicase" Dissertation Advisor: Dr. Stephen C. Kowalczykowski Bachelor's in Molecular and Cellular Biology University of California at Berkeley Expertise Behzad's interests

  2. Workshop in computational molecular biology, April 15, 1991--April 14, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tavare, S.

    1995-04-12

    Funds from this award were used to the Workshop in Computational Molecular Biology, `91 Symposium entitled Interface: Computing Science and Statistics, Seattle, Washington, April 21, 1991; the Workshop in Statistical Issues in Molecular Biology held at Stanford, California, August 8, 1993; and the Session on Population Genetics a part of the 56th Annual Meeting, Institute of Mathematical Statistics, San Francisco, California, August 9, 1993.

  3. Frontiers of Plant Cell Biology: Signals and Pathways, System-Based Approaches 22nd Symposium in Plant Biology (University of California-Riverside)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minorsky, Peter V.

    2003-06-01

    The symposium ''Frontiers of Plant Cell Biology: Signals and Pathways, Systems-Based Approaches'' was held January 15-18, 2003 at the Riverside Convention Center in Riverside, California. The host organization for the symposium was the Center for Plant Cell Biology (CEPCEB) at the University of California, Riverside (UCR). The meeting, focusing on systems-based approaches to plant cell biology research, was the first of this kind in the field of plant biology. The speakers and nearly 100 posters placed emphasis on recent developments in plant cellular biology and molecular genetics, particularly those employing emerging genomic tools, thereby sharing the most current knowledge in the field and stimulating future advances. In attendance were many well-established scientists and young investigators who approach plant cell biology from different but complementary conceptual and technical perspectives. Indeed, many disciplines are converging in the field of cell biology, producing synergies that will enable plant scientists to determine the function of gene products in the context of living cells in whole organisms. New, cross-disciplinary collaborations, as well as the involvement of computer scientists and chemists in plant biology research, are likely additional outcomes of the symposium. The program included 39 invited session speakers and workshop/panel speakers. Sessions were convened on the following themes: Cell-Cell Communication; Protein Trafficking; Cell Surface, Extracellular Matrix and Cell Wall; Signal Transduction; Signal Transduction and Proteosome; and Systems-Based Approaches to Plant Cell Biology. Workshops on Chemical Genetics and Visual Microscopy were also presented. Abstracts from each of the speaker presentations, as well as the posters presented at the meeting were published in a program booklet given to the 239 faculty members, researchers, postdoctoral scientists and graduate students in attendance. The booklet thus serves as a reference for symposium attendees to locate additional information about a topic of their particular interest and to contact other investigators. In addition, an article reviewing the symposium by science writer Peter V. Minorsky appeared in the June 2003 issue of Plant Physiology, a special issue devoted to systems-based approaches in the study of the model plant Arabidopsis (article submitted as part of this Final Technical Report).

  4. Recent advances in yeast molecular biology: recombinant DNA. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 25 papers presented at a workshop focusing on chromosomal structure, gene regulation, recombination, DNA repair, and cell type control, that have been obtained by experimental approaches incorporating the new technologies of yeast DNA transformation, molecular cloning, and DNA sequence analysis. (KRM)

  5. Inhibition Of Molecular And Biological Processes Using Modified Oligonucleotides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kozyavkin, Sergei A.; Malykh, Andrei G.; Polouchine, Nikolai N.; Slesarev, Alexei I.

    2003-04-15

    A method of inhibiting at least one molecular process in a sample, comprising administering to the sample an oligonucleotide or polynucleotide containing at least one monomeric unit having formula (I): wherein A is an organic moiety, n is at least 1, and each X is independently selected from the group consisting of --NRCOCONu, --NHCOCR.sub.2 CR.sub.2 CONu, --NHCOCR.dbd.CRCONu, and --NHCOSSCONu, wherein each R independently represents H or a substituted or unsubstituted alkyl group, and Nu represents a nucleophile, or a salt of the compound.

  6. Facilities for exploring molecular biology databases on the Web: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markowitz, V.M.; Chen, I.M.A.; Kosky, A.S.; Szeto, E.

    1996-12-31

    We discuss criteria for evaluating and comparing the main facilities provided by molecular biology databases (MBDs) for exploring (that is, retrieving and interpreting data) on the Web. We use these criteria for examining the facilities supported by typical MBDs such as Genbank, AtDB, GSDB, GDB, and MGD (as of September 5, 1996). 19 refs.

  7. Molecular biology in marine science: Scientific questions, technological approaches, and practical implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    This report describes molecular techniques that could be invaluable in addressing process-oriented problems in the ocean sciences that have perplexed oceanographers for decades, such as understanding the basis for biogeochemical processes, recruitment processes, upper-ocean dynamics, biological impacts of global warming, and ecological impacts of human activities. The coupling of highly sophisticated methods, such as satellite remote sensing, which permits synoptic monitoring of chemical, physical, and biological parameters over large areas, with the power of modern molecular tools for ``ground truthing`` at small scales could allow scientists to address questions about marine organisms and the ocean in which they live that could not be answered previously. Clearly, the marine sciences are on the threshold of an exciting new frontier of scientific discovery and economic opportunity.

  8. Molecular Biology for the Environment: an EC-US hands-on Course in Environmental Biotechnology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Victor de Lorenzo; Juan Luis Ramos; Jerome Kukor; Gerben J. Zylstra

    2004-02-15

    One of the central goals of this activity is to bring together young scientists (at the late Ph.D. or early postdoctoral stages of their careers) in a forum that should result in future collaborations. The course is designed to give scientists hands-on experience in modern, up-to-date biotechnological methods at the interface between molecular biology and environmental biotechnology for the analysis of microorganisms and their activities with regard to the remediation of pollutants in the environment.

  9. Plant Molecular Biology 2008 Gordon Research Conference - July 13-18, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard M. Amasino

    2009-08-28

    The Plant Molecular Biology Conference has traditionally covered a breadth of exciting topics and the 2008 conference will continue in that tradition. There will be sessions on metabolism; new methods to study genomes, proteomes and metabolomes; plant-microbe interactions; plant hormones; epigenetics. A new topic for the conference this year will be bioenergy. Thus this conference will bring together a range of disciplines to foster the exchange ideas and to permit the participants to learn of the latest developments and ideas in diverse areas of plant biology. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for individuals to discuss their research because additional speakers in each session will be selected from submitted abstracts. There will also be a poster session each day for a two-hour period prior to dinner.

  10. FINAL REPORT: DOE CONTRACT NUMBER FG0205ER64026 Biological Neutron Scattering: A Collaboration with the Oak Ridge Center for Structural Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jill Trewhella

    2011-01-12

    The overarching goal of this project was to promote applications of small-angle scattering in structural molecular biology by providing model examples of cutting edge applications that demonstrate the unique capabilities and potential of the DOE national user facilities at Oak Ridge, especially the newly commissioned BioSANS. The approach taken was three-fold: (1) to engage in high impact collaborative research projects that would benefit from small-angle neutron scattering to both demonstrate the power of the technique while expanding the potential user community; (2) to provide access to scattering facilities established at the University of Utah to as broad a set of researchers as possible to increase the expertise in small-angle scattering generally; and (3) to develop new methods and tools for small-angle scattering. To these ends, three major research collaborations were pursued that resulted in a significant body of published work where neutron scattering and contrast variation played a major role. These major collaborations involved studies of protein complexes involved in (1) bacterial transcription regulation and adaptive response (a DOE/BER priority area); (2) regulation of cardiac muscle; and (3) neuronal disorders. In addition, to broaden the impact of the project, smaller collaborative efforts were supported that used either small-angle X-ray or neutron scattering. Finally, the DOE supported facilities at the University of Utah were made available to researchers on a service basis and a number of independent groups took advantage of this opportunity. In all of this work, there was an emphasis on the training of students and post docs in scattering techniques, and a set of publications (a book chapter, a review, and an encyclopedia article) were produced to guide the non-specialist potential user of scattering techniques in successful applications of the techniques. We also developed a suite of user friendly web-based computational tools currently being accessed world-wide by researchers as an aid in neutron scattering data interpretation. In all, these collaborative projects and resulted in 29 original refereed journal articles published between 2005 and 2010 and engaged groups from at least 14 Universities (10 US, 4 international) and 3 National Laboratories (2 US, 1 international). An important final initiative from this project was to begin a process for international community agreement on a set of standards for the publication of biomolecular small-angle scattering data. This initiative is being championed with the International Union of Crystallography and has engaged a number of Journal Editors and is a very important step in the maturing of this now burgeoning field.

  11. 2010 CELL AND MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 13-18, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelle Momany

    2010-06-18

    The Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology Conference provides a forum for presentation of the latest advances in fungal research with an emphasis on filamentous fungi. This open-registration scientific meeting brings together the leading scientists from academia, government and industry to discuss current research results and future directions at Holderness School, an outstanding venue for scientific interaction. A key objective of the conference is to foster interaction among scientists working on model fungi such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Neurospora crassa and Aspergillus nidulans and scientists working on a variety of filamentous fungi whose laboratory tractability is often inversely proportional to their medical, industrial or ecological importance. Sessions will be devoted to Systems Biology, Fungi and Cellulosic Biomass, Small RNAs, Population Genomics, Symbioses, Pathogenesis, Membrane Trafficking and Polarity, and Cytoskeleton and Motors. A session will also be devoted to hot topics picked from abstracts. The CMFB conference provides a unique opportunity to examine the breadth of fungal biology in a small meeting format that encourages in-depth discussion among the attendees.

  12. WHOLE CELL TOMOGRAPHY/MOLECULAR BIOLOGY/STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY: Affordable x-ray microscopy with nanoscale resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, James E.; Blackborow, Paul; Horne, Stephen J.; Gelb, Jeff

    2013-03-01

    Biological research spans 10 orders of magnitude from angstroms to meters. While electron microscopy can reveal structural details at most of these spatial length scales, transmission electron tomography only reliably reconstructs three-dimensional (3-D) volumes of cellular material with a spatial resolution between 1-5 nm from samples less than 500 nm thick1. Most biological cells are 2-30 times thicker than this threshold, which means that a cell must be cut into consecutive slices with each slice reconstructed individually in order to approximate the contextual information of the entire cell. Fortunately, due to a larger penetration depth2, X-ray computed tomography bypasses the need to physically section a cell and enables imaging of intact cells and tissues on the micrometer or larger scale with tens to hundreds of nanometer spatial resolution. While the technique of soft x-ray microscopy has been extensively developed in synchrotron facilities, advancements in laboratory x-ray source designs now increase its accessibility by supporting commercial systems suitable for a standard laboratory. In this paper, we highlight a new commercial compact cryogenic soft x-ray microscope designed for a standard laboratory setting and explore its capabilities for mesoscopic investigations of intact prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

  13. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Caroline M. Ajo-Franklin Ajo-Franklin Staff Scientist, Biological Nanostructures cajo-franklin@lbl.gov 510.486.4299 personal website Biography Dr. Ajo-Franklin has been a Staff Scientist at the Molecular Foundry since 2007. Before that, she received her Ph.D. in Chemistry from Stanford University with Prof. Steve Boxer and was a post-doctoral fellow with Prof. Pam Silver in the Department of Systems Biology at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Ajo-Franklin is fascinated by the incredible, diverse

  14. Molecular Dynameomics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynameomics Molecular Dynameomics DaggettHiResWhitebg.png Key Challenges: Perform molecular dynamics simulations to characterize both native (i.e. biologically active) and...

  15. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Crystallography 2014 (IYCr2014) commemorates not only the centennial of X-ray diffraction, which allowed the detailed study of crystalline material, but also the 400th...

  16. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cellular sacs full of digestive enzymes that break down bacteria, viruses and worn-out cell parts for recycling. When this recycling process goes awry, it can cause rare metabolic...

  17. University Partners Panel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Matt Tirrell, Pritzker Director and Professor, Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago Thomas Glasmacher, Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Project Manager, Michigan State University

  18. Theoretical Biology and Biophysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Theoretical Biology and Biophysics Modeling biological systems and analysis and informatics of molecular and cellular biological data Mathematical Biology/Immunology Fundamental science and modeling enabling host-pathogen science Computational Structural Biology Understanding biomolecule function by determining their 3-D macromolecular structure Bioinformatics and Epidemiology Sequence analysis using advanced algorithms, software, computational hardware Contacts Group Leader Nick Hengartner

  19. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bruce Cohen Cohen Staff Scientist, Biological Nanostructures becohen@lbl.gov 510.486.6640 personal website Biography Dr. Cohen was a postdoctoral fellow with Lily Y. Jan at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Physiology at the University of California San Francisco. He received his Ph.D. from the Department of Chemistry at the University of California Berkeley and his A.B. from Princeton University's Department of Chemistry, where he graduated cum laude. Research Interests

  20. PULSE at Stanford University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photon Science @ SLAC - LCLS - LUSI - SSRL - PULSE - Stanford University Go Search Home Publications Atomic & Molecular Physics Condensed Matter Physics Single Molecule Imaging...

  1. Automated insertion of sequences into a ribosomal RNA alignment: An application of computational linguistics in molecular biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, R.C.

    1991-11-01

    This thesis involved the construction of (1) a grammar that incorporates knowledge on base invariancy and secondary structure in a molecule and (2) a parser engine that uses the grammar to position bases into the structural subunits of the molecule. These concepts were combined with a novel pinning technique to form a tool that semi-automates insertion of a new species into the alignment for the 16S rRNA molecule (a component of the ribosome) maintained by Dr. Carl Woese's group at the University of Illinois at Urbana. The tool was tested on species extracted from the alignment and on a group of entirely new species. The results were very encouraging, and the tool should be substantial aid to the curators of the 16S alignment. The construction of the grammar was itself automated, allowing application of the tool to alignments for other molecules. The logic programming language Prolog was used to construct all programs involved. The computational linguistics approach used here was found to be a useful way to attach the problem of insertion into an alignment.

  2. Automated insertion of sequences into a ribosomal RNA alignment: An application of computational linguistics in molecular biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, R.C.

    1991-11-01

    This thesis involved the construction of (1) a grammar that incorporates knowledge on base invariancy and secondary structure in a molecule and (2) a parser engine that uses the grammar to position bases into the structural subunits of the molecule. These concepts were combined with a novel pinning technique to form a tool that semi-automates insertion of a new species into the alignment for the 16S rRNA molecule (a component of the ribosome) maintained by Dr. Carl Woese`s group at the University of Illinois at Urbana. The tool was tested on species extracted from the alignment and on a group of entirely new species. The results were very encouraging, and the tool should be substantial aid to the curators of the 16S alignment. The construction of the grammar was itself automated, allowing application of the tool to alignments for other molecules. The logic programming language Prolog was used to construct all programs involved. The computational linguistics approach used here was found to be a useful way to attach the problem of insertion into an alignment.

  3. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rita Garcia Brand Principal Research Associate, Biological Nanostructures Facility RLGarcia@lbl.gov 510.486.4125 Biography Education B.A. Molecular Biology, Scripps College, Claremont, CA, 2005 Previous Professional Positions Principal Research Associate, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, CA, May 2009 - present Office Manager, Microsoft, San Francisco, CA, August 2008 - December 2008 Office Manager, Powerset, Inc., San Francisco, CA, January 2007 - July 2008 Post-Baccalaureate Intramural

  4. Report on the research conducted under the funding of the Sloan foundation postdoctoral fellowship in Computational Molecular Biology [Systematic study of protein-protein complexes] Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheinerman, Felix

    2001-06-01

    A central question in molecular biology is what structural features are common at protein-protein interfaces and what energetic factors define the affinity and specificity of protein-protein association. Analysis of structural and mutational data on protein-protein interfaces revealed that protein-protein interfaces of different functional classes contain many more energetically important charged and polar residues than was previously thought. Since, in the context of protein folding studies, polar interactions are believed to destabilize the folded proteins, this observation raised the question as to the forces that determine the stability of protein complexes. To investigate this issue in detail, the authors developed a number of partitioning schemes that allowed them to investigate the role of selected residues, ion pairs, and networks of polar interactions in protein-protein association. The methods developed were applied to the analysis of four different protein-protein interfaces: the ribonuclease barnase and its inhibitor barstar, the human growth hormone and its receptor, subtype N9 influenze virus neuraminidase and NC41 antibody, and the Ras Binding Domain of kinase cRaf and a Ras homologue Rap1A. The calculations revealed a surprising variability in how polar interactions affect the stability of different complexes. The finding that positions of charged and polar residues on protein-protein interfaces are optimized with respect to electrostatic interactions suggests that this property can be employed for the discrimination between native conformations and trial complexes generated by a docking algorithm. Analysis indicated the presence of SH2 domains in Janus family of non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases.

  5. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    David Prendergast David Prendergast Director, Theory of Nanostructured Materials dgprendergast@lbl.gov 510.486.4948 personal website Biography Education 2002 Ph.D., Physics, University College Cork, Ireland 1999 B.Sc., Physics and Mathematics, University College Cork, Ireland Research Interests My research focuses on employing and developing first-principles electronic structure theory and molecular dynamics simulations on high-performance computing infrastructure to reveal energy relevant

  6. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracy Mattox TMMattox Senior Scientific Engineering Associate, Inorganic Nanostructures TMMattox@lbl.gov 510.495.2649 Biography Education M.S. in Chemistry, Miami University, 2006 B.S. in Chemistry, University of Portland, 2003 Tracy Mattox has been a member of the Inorganic Facility at the Molecular Foundry as a Scientific Engineering Associate since 2007. Expertise Tracy's main focus is assisting users with their research projects (helping design reactions and analyze results). She is well

  7. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liana Klivansky Klivansky Principal Scientific Engineering Associate, Organic and Macromolecular Synthesis LMKlivansky@lbl.gov 510.486.4199 Biography Education B.Sc.(HONS) Chemistry, Monash University, Victoria, Australia, 1990 Previous Professional Positions Principal Scientific Engineering Associate, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 2006 - present Research Associate, Chiron Corp. Emeryville, CA, 1998 - 2006 Research Associate, Chiron Mimotopes, Victoria, Australia,

  8. Molecular and biological characterization of the 5 human-bovine rotavirus (WC3)-based reassortant strains of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, RotaTeq (registered)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; Joelsson, Daniel B.; Warakomski, Donald J.; Zhou, Tingyi; Mathis, Pamela K.; Maanen, Marc-Henri van; Ranheim, Todd S.; Ciarlet, Max

    2010-08-01

    RotaTeq (registered) is a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine that contains five human-bovine reassortant strains (designated G1, G2, G3, G4, and P1) on the backbone of the naturally attenuated tissue culture-adapted parental bovine rotavirus (BRV) strain WC3. The viral genomes of each of the reassortant strains were completely sequenced and compared pairwise and phylogenetically among each other and to human rotavirus (HRV) and BRV reference strains. Reassortants G1, G2, G3, and G4 contained the VP7 gene from their corresponding HRV parent strains, while reassortants G1 and G2 also contained the VP3 gene (genotype M1) from the HRV parent strain. The P1 reassortant contained the VP4 gene from the HRV parent strain and all the other gene segments from the BRV WC3 strain. The human VP7s had a high level of overall amino acid identity (G1: 95-99%, G2: 94-99% G3: 96-100%, G4: 93-99%) when compared to those of representative rotavirus strains of their corresponding G serotypes. The VP4 of the P1 reassortant had a high identity (92-97%) with those of serotype P1A[8] HRV reference strains, while the BRV VP7 showed identities ranging from 91% to 94% to those of serotype G6 HRV strains. Sequence analyses of the BRV or HRV genes confirmed that the fundamental structure of the proteins in the vaccine was similar to those of the HRV and BRV references strains. Sequences analyses showed that RotaTeq (registered) exhibited a high degree of genetic stability as no mutations were identified in the material of each reassortant, which undergoes two rounds of replication cycles in cell culture during the manufacturing process, when compared to the final material used to fill the dosing tubes. The infectivity of each of the reassortant strains of RotaTeq (registered) , like HRV strains, did not require the presence of sialic acid residues on the cell surface. The molecular and biologic characterization of RotaTeq (registered) adds to the significant body of clinical data supporting the consistent efficacy, immunogenicity, and safety of RotaTeq (registered) .

  9. William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    to unravel the interactions of physical, chemical and biological processes that underpin ... and simulate atomic- and molecular-level biological, chemical and physical processes. ...

  10. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emory Chan Brand Staff Scientist, Inorganic Nanostructures EMChan@lbl.gov 510.486.7874 personal website Biography Education Postdoctoral fellow, Molecular Foundry with Dr. Delia Milliron Ph. D., Chemistry, UC Berkeley with Prof. Paul Alivisatos and Prof. Richard Mathies, B. S., Chemistry, Stanford University with Prof. Hongjie Dai Expertise Dr. Chan's expertise lies in the combinatorial and high-throughput synthesis of colloidal inorganic nanoparticles. As part of the Foundry's Combinatorial

  11. California: Breakthrough in Algae Biology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Breakthrough in Algae Biology California: Breakthrough in Algae Biology January 31, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis Researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at University of ...

  12. Biological Science | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... When Wellington Muchero got a part-time job in a plant molecular biology lab as a college student, there was no turning back. Learn how this quantitative geneticist advances ...

  13. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SEMINARS ARCHIVE The Molecular Foundry regularly offers seminars and events that feature compelling research and information for those who investigate at the nanoscale. Seminars occur on Tuesdays at 11:00 am, in Building 67, Room 3111 unless otherwise noted. < seminars and events Tuesday, May 10, 2016 at 11am On the Optical and Magnetic Properties of Ln3+ Based Nanoparticles for Bio-Imaging Frank van Veggel, University of Victoria [MORE] Tuesday, May 3, 2016 at 11am On the Nature of

  14. Biological Applications of Synchrotron Radiation:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Welcome to the Biological and Environmental Research Abstracts Database The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) conducts research in the areas of Climate and Environmental Sciences and Biological Systems Science. This database contains abstracts of research projects supported by the program. Work was performed at DOE Laboratories as well as at nearly 300 universities and other research institutions. This is a historical database that includes the

  15. Biological Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE's Biological Safety Program provides a forum for the exchange of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of biological safety. This content is supported by the Biosurety Executive Team. The Biosurety Executive Team is a DOE-chartered group. The DOE Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy provides administrative support for this group. The group identifies biological safety-related issues of concern to the DOE and pursues solutions to issues identified.

  16. University Partnerships

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy Universities Provide Pipeline of Talent, Ideas, and Innovation Universities Provide Pipeline of Talent, Ideas, and Innovation February 17, 2016 - 11:07am Addthis Hyliion from Carnegie Mellon University won the 2015 top student DOE cleantech entrepreneur prize. Who will win in 2016? Hyliion from Carnegie Mellon University won the 2015 top student DOE cleantech entrepreneur prize. Who will win in 2016? Tomorrow marks the beginning of a very exciting collegiate season. No we aren't

  17. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  18. Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria Presentation by Charles Dismukes, Rutgers University, at the Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop held September 24-25, 2013, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. PDF icon bio_h2_workshop_dismukes.pdf More Documents & Publications 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report Renewable Hydrogen

  19. Local Universities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Universities Local Universities Los Alamos Lab recruits the best minds on the planet and offers job search information and assistance to our dual career spouses or partners. Contact Us dualcareers@lanl.gov The listing of schools, colleges and universities in New Mexico is organized by region. Northern New Mexico Area Espanola Public Schools District (K-12) Los Alamos Public Schools McCurdy Charter School New Mexico School for the Deaf Northern New Mexico Community College Pojoaque Valley Schools

  20. National Laboratory] Basic Biological Sciences(59) Biological...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Achievements of structural genomics Terwilliger, Thomas C. Los Alamos National Laboratory Basic Biological Sciences(59) Biological Science Biological Science Abstract Not...

  1. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Nanostructures This facility studies the synthesis, analysis and mimicry of biological nanostructures. Expertise and capabilities are available to develop new materials...

  2. Biological preconcentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Huber, Dale L.

    2008-09-09

    A biological preconcentrator comprises a stimulus-responsive active film on a stimulus-producing microfabricated platform. The active film can comprise a thermally switchable polymer film that can be used to selectively absorb and desorb proteins from a protein mixture. The biological microfabricated platform can comprise a thin membrane suspended on a substrate with an integral resistive heater and/or thermoelectric cooler for thermal switching of the active polymer film disposed on the membrane. The active polymer film can comprise hydrogel-like polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) or poly(n-isopropylacrylamide), that are tethered to the membrane. The biological preconcentrator can be fabricated with semiconductor materials and technologies.

  3. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Biology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Biological, and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University Williams, John M. (John M. Williams) - Petroleum Engineering program, Petroleum Institute (Abu Dhabi) Go ...

  4. Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol stress...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    However, the molecular mechanisms of ethanol stress response have not been elucidated fully. In this study, ethanol stress responses were investigated using systems biology tools. ...

  5. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Revealing the Fluctuations of Flexible DNA in 3D First-of-their-kind images by Molecular ... Electronic Landscapes of Molecular Nanostructures: Mapping States for Charge Transfer with ...

  6. Energy Department Announces Regional Winners of University Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Stanford University - Stanford Nitrogen Group: Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a biological wastewater treatment process that removes and recovers energy from waste nitrogen and ...

  7. Howard University Researchers Represented in the E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ww.biology.howard.edu FacultyFacultyBiosEckberg.htm Hindman, Neil - Department of Mathematics, Howard University http:mysite.verizon.netnhindman Sitaraman, Sankar -...

  8. Ninth International Workshop on Plant Membrane Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This report is a compilation of abstracts from papers which were discussed at a workshop on plant membrane biology. Topics include: plasma membrane ATP-ases; plant-environment interactions, membrane receptors; signal transduction; ion channel physiology; biophysics and molecular biology; vaculor H+ pumps; sugar carriers; membrane transport; and cellular structure and function.

  9. Biological & Environmental Research Abstracts Database

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Welcome to the Biological and Environmental Research Abstracts Database The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) conducts research in the areas of Climate and Environmental Sciences and Biological Systems Science. This database contains abstracts of research projects supported by the program. Work was performed at DOE Laboratories as well as at nearly 300 universities and other research institutions. This is a historical database that includes the

  10. Final report for Conference Support Grant "From Computational Biophysics to Systems Biology - CBSB12"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansmann, Ulrich H.E.

    2012-07-02

    This report summarizes the outcome of the international workshop “From Computational Biophysics to Systems Biology (CBSB12)” which was held June 3-5, 2012, at the University of Tennessee Conference Center in Knoxville, TN, and supported by DOE through the Conference Support Grant 120174. The purpose of CBSB12 was to provide a forum for the interaction between a data-mining interested systems biology community and a simulation and first-principle oriented computational biophysics/biochemistry community. CBSB12 was the sixth in a series of workshops of the same name organized in recent years, and the second that has been held in the USA. As in previous years, it gave researchers from physics, biology, and computer science an opportunity to acquaint each other with current trends in computational biophysics and systems biology, to explore venues of cooperation, and to establish together a detailed understanding of cells at a molecular level. The conference grant of $10,000 was used to cover registration fees and provide travel fellowships to selected students and postdoctoral scientists. By educating graduate students and providing a forum for young scientists to perform research into the working of cells at a molecular level, the workshop adds to DOE's mission of paving the way to exploit the abilities of living systems to capture, store and utilize energy.

  11. Systems biology approach to bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, Romy; Wu, Cindy H.; Hazen, Terry C.

    2012-06-01

    Bioremediation has historically been approached as a ‘black box’ in terms of our fundamental understanding. Thus it succeeds and fails, seldom without a complete understanding of why. Systems biology is an integrated research approach to study complex biological systems, by investigating interactions and networks at the molecular, cellular, community, and ecosystem level. The knowledge of these interactions within individual components is fundamental to understanding the dynamics of the ecosystem under investigation. Finally, understanding and modeling functional microbial community structure and stress responses in environments at all levels have tremendous implications for our fundamental understanding of hydrobiogeochemical processes and the potential for making bioremediation breakthroughs and illuminating the ‘black box’.

  12. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University Distinguished Teaching Award. Research Interests Organic, Bioorganic, and Materials Chemistry - Self-assembling networks of inorganic nanocrystals from modified...

  13. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mike Brady ed_barnard Joint Molecular Foundry/ALS Project Scientist mabrady@lbl.gov 510.486.6548

  14. Molecular Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Science NETL's Molecular Science competency provides technology-enabling computational and experimental insight into the atomic-level processes occurring in condensed matter and gas phase systems or at the heterogeneous surface-gas interfaces used for energy applications. Research includes molecular optimization as well as both classical and high-throughput material design, specifically: Molecular Optimization Development and application of new computational approaches in the general

  15. Open University

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Michel Pentz est née en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et président de l'associaion du personnel. Il est également fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genève et a participé à la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pédagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la méthode peut s'appliquer.

  16. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alex Weber-Bargioni Weber-Bargioni Staff Scientist, Imaging and Manipulation of Nanostructures afweber-bargioni@lbl.gov 510.486.4026 personal website Biography Education University of Konstanz, Germany Physics B.S., 2001 Portland State University Physics M.S., 2003 University of British Columbia Physics Ph.D., 2007 Lawrence Berkeley Nat. Lab Material Science PostDoc 2008-2010 Research Interests Dr. Weber-Bargioni's research revolves around understanding fundamental opto electronic processes at

  17. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P. James Schuck Schuck Facility Director, Imaging and Manipulation of Nanostructures PJSchuck@lbl.gov 510.486.4822 personal website Biography Education Stanford University, Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Chemistry, Advisor: W. E. Moerner, 2003-2006 Yale University, Ph.D., Department of Applied Physics, Advisor: R. D. Grober, Dissertation titled "Three-Dimensional Imaging Spectroscopy of the III-Nitride Material System", 2003 Yale University, M.S., Department of Applied Physics,

  18. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tevye Kuykendall Klivansky Principal Scientific Engineering Associate, Organic and Macromolecular Synthesis TRKuykendall@lbl.gov 510.495.2649 Biography Education Postdoctoral Fellow, University of California, Berkeley, 2008 Ph.D. in Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, 2007 B.S. in Chemistry, University of California, Santa Cruz, 2000 Expertise Tevye Kuykendall is an expert in the field of III-V nanowire growth and characterization. His work concentrates on the synthesis and

  19. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EVENTS ARCHIVE The Molecular Foundry regularly offers seminars and events that feature compelling research and information for those who investigate at the nanoscale. Seminars occur on Tuesdays at 11:00 am, in Building 67, Room 3111 unless otherwise noted. < seminars and events Molecular Foundry 10th Anniversary Symposium and Dinner On March 24, 2016, the Molecular Foundry will be celebrating the 10th anniversary of the dedication of its iconic building with a full day scientific symposium

  20. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bachelor's of Science degree in Chemistry from California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, CA. After a short stint teaching high school chemistry, she joined the...

  1. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flatter and Faster: Transition Metal Dichalcogendies at the Molecular Foundry (Part II) Brain Imaging and Optical Manipulation Active Nanointerfaces for Electrochemistry SAXS-WAXS...

  2. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The abundance of interfaces allows the directing of transport for efficient energy storage and conversion. Electron donors and acceptors at interfaces Molecular level design and ...

  3. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... "'Thinking,' 'Exchanging,' and 'Making' necessary links in creating ground-breaking science inspired SmithGroup's design for the Molecular Foundry in Berkeley, California. The ...

  4. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The insight gained guides the design and optimization of new nanostructured materials for molecular-scale electronics, solar harvesting, water-splitting, carbon capture and ...

  5. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    31, 2016 Instrument Scheduler Nanofabrication Instrument Scheduler User Program The Molecular Foundry user program gives researchers access to expertise and equipment for...

  6. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications Advanced Materials Special Issue The Molecular Foundry publication database lists peer-reviewed work that has resulted from internal and user research. New...

  7. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dmitry Soustin dmitry User Program Administrator dsoustin@lbl.gov 510.486.7687 Biography Dmitry Soustin is the Molecular Foundry's User Program Administrator. In this role, Dmitry...

  8. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theory of Nanostructured Materials jbneaton@lbl.gov 510.486.4527 personal website Biography Jeffrey B. Neaton is Director of the Molecular Foundry, a Department of Energy...

  9. Modern concepts in molecular modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bajorath, J.; Klein, T.E.

    1996-12-31

    This session focused on the application of computer models and the development and application of various energy functions to study the structure, energetics and dynamics of proteins and their interactions with ligands. These studies provide an exciting view of current developments in computer-aided molecular modeling and theoretical analysis of biological molecules.

  10. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ralph J. Greenspan, Director, Center for Brain Activity Mapping; Professor of BiologyNeurobiology Section and of Cognitive Science, UC San Diego; Co-Director, Cal-BRAIN. Roger ...

  11. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agenda March 24, 2016 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory AGENDA Registration 8:30 am - 9:00 am The Molecular Foundry's History and Impact 9:00 am - 10:30 am Jeff Neaton, Molecular Foundry Welcome Paul Alivisatos, Berkeley Lab/UC Berkeley The Creation of the Molecular Foundry Michael Witherell, Berkeley Lab Berkeley Lab Impact Brian Schowengerdt, Magic Leap Industry Impact Representative Mike Honda (D-CA) National Impact Break 10:30 am - 11:00 am Session 1: Functional Nanointerfaces 11:00 am -

  12. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cells, viruses), plant or soil samples (USDA quarantines), recombinant DNA, or blood-borne pathogen. Biological Use Authorization The great majority of biological work at...

  13. Micro/nanofabricated environments for synthetic biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collier, Pat [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    A better understanding of how confinement, crowding and reduced dimensionality modulate reactivity and reaction dynamics will aid in the rational and systematic discovery of functionality in complex biological systems. Artificial micro- and nanofabricated structures have helped elucidate the effects of nanoscale spatial confinement and segregation on biological behavior, particularly when integrated with microfluidics, through precise control in both space and time of diffusible signals and binding interactions. Examples of nanostructured interfaces for synthetic biology include the development of cell-like compartments for encapsulating biochemical reactions, nanostructured environments for fundamental studies of diffusion, molecular transport and biochemical reaction kinetics, and regulation of biomolecular interactions as functions of micro- and nanofabricated topological constraints.

  14. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    19, 2016 at 11am Sustaining Life with Genes and Proteins Designed De Novo Michael Hecht, Princeton University MORE Tuesday, January 26, 2016 at 11am Active Dielectric and...

  15. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in 1983 to maintain a forefront research center for electron microscopy with state-of-the-art instrumentation and expertise. Merged with the Molecular Foundry in 2014 to take...

  16. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Meg Holm Meg Senior Administrator mcholm@lbl.gov 510.486.5135 Biography Meg is the Molecular Foundry's Senior Administrator. In this role, she supervises the Foundry budget...

  17. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alison Hatt allison User Program Director ajhatt@lbl.gov 510.486.7154 Biography Alison Hatt is the Director of the User Program at the Molecular Foundry and a former Foundry...

  18. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gil Torres Gil Torres gjtorres@lbl.gov 510.486.4395 Biography Gil is the Building Manager for MSD in buildings 62, 66, 2, 30, JCAP and the Molecular Foundry. Gil supports Foundry...

  19. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deirdre Olynick Olynick Staff Scientist, Nanofabrication dlolynick@lbl.gov 510.495.2893 Biography Education B. S. Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N. C. Ph.D. Department of Materials Science and Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Advisor: J. Murray Gibson. Fannie and John Hertz Fellowship Thesis: "In situ Studies of Copper Nano-particles Using a Novel Tandem Ultra-High Vacuum Particle Production Chamber Transmission Electron Microscope" Past

  20. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gang (Gary) Ren Ren Staff Scientist, Imaging and Manipulation of Nanostructures gren@lbl.gov 510.495.2375 personal website Biography Education B.A., Theoretical Physics, Lanzhou University, China, 1986-1990 M.S., Theoretical Physics (General relativity and gauge theory), Lanzhou University, China, 1990-1993, Advisor: Prof. Yi-shi Duan. Thesis: "Theory and Application of 2+1 Dimensional Topological Current" Ph.D. Material Physics (Electron microscopy), Univ. of Science and Technology

  1. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shaul Aloni Svec Staff Engineer, Inorganic Nanostructures/Imaging and Manipulation of Nanostructures saloni@lbl.gov 510.486.7452 Biography Education 2001 Weizmann Institute of Science, Rechovot, Israel Ph.D. in Chemical Physics, Awarded Finberg prize for outstanding graduate research 1995 Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel M. Sc. in Materials Science and Engineering, Summa Cum Laude 1992 Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel B. Sc. in Materials Science and

  2. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See the Foundry's full equipment list Organic and Macromolecular Synthesis Capabilities & Tools Instrument Scheduler Major Instruments and Capabilities AB SCIEX TF4800 MALDI TOF-TOF Mass Spectrometer This instrument is the tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer systems, providing the excellent level of molecular mass coverage in the range of molecular masses 500 and 150,000 Da, high throughput, and confidence in both qualitative and quantitative analyses. The analyzer combines all of the

  3. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Foundry Advanced Materials Special Issue Advanced Materials Cover Art The multidisciplinary science that is central to the Molecular Foundry's mission is well represented throughout the October 14, 2015 special issue of Advanced Materials. In three Review articles, we highlight recent areas of particular innovation and promise at the Foundry: the development of advanced electron tomography for both hard and soft materials with near-atomic resolution, the creation of designer biomimetic

  4. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Media and Resources MEDIA Molecular Foundry Youtube Channel Berkeley Lab Youtube Channel Berkeley Lab Photo Archive Webcam The Molecular Foundry and its users benefit from its location at Berkeley Lab within the Bay Area's vibrant scientific ecosystem. The expansive views serve to fuel the imagination and build connections among the Foundry's diverse research community. Baycam Click here for a full screen view from our webcam. RESOURCES Style Guide PDF 308 KB Logos Signature Preferred 41 KB ZIP

  5. PNNL: Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis - Research Team

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Team Morris Bullock Morris Bullock Director Aaron Appel Aaron Appel Deputy Director Dan DuBois Dan DuBois Scientific Advisor Monte L. Helm Monte L. Helm Mike Mock Mike Mock Molly O'Hagan Molly O'Hagan Simone Raugei Simone Raugei Eric Wiedner Eric Wiedner Collaborators Sharon Hammes-Schiffer Sharon Hammes-Schiffer University of Illinois Jim Mayer Jim Mayer Yale University Shannon Stahl Shannon Stahl University of Wisconsin - Madison Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis Home Scientific

  6. John Marohn > ProfessorChemistry and Chemical Biology > Faculty...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marohn Professor Chemistry and Chemical Biology Research Group Webpage jam99@cornell.edu John Marohn earned a B.S. in Chemistry and a B.A. in Physics from the University of...

  7. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Biology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Keller, Christopher (Christopher Keller) - Department of Biology, Minot State University Go back to Individual Researchers Collections: A B C D E F G ...

  8. [Studies of biologic activation associated with molecular receptor increase and tumor response in ChL6/L6 protocol patients; Studies in phantoms; Quantitative SPECT; Preclinical studies; and Clinical studies]. DOE annual report, 1994--95

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeNardo, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The authors describe results which have not yet been published from their associated studies listed in the title. For the first, they discuss Lym-1 single chain genetically engineered molecules, analysis of molecular genetic coded messages to enhance tumor response, and human dosimetry and therapeutic human use radiopharmaceuticals. Studies in phantoms includes a discussion of planar image quantitation, counts coincidence correction, organ studies, tumor studies, and {sup 90}Y quantitation with Bremsstrahlung imaging. The study on SPECT discusses attenuation correction and scatter correction. Preclinical studies investigated uptake of {sup 90}Y-BrE-3 in mice using autoradiography. Clinical studies discuss image quantitation verses counts from biopsy samples, S factors for radiation dose calculation, {sup 67}Cu imaging studies for lymphoma cancer, and {sup 111}In MoAb imaging studies for breast cancer to predict {sup 90}Y MoAb therapy.

  9. Biological conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, C.D.

    A system for bioconversion of organic material comprises a primary bioreactor column wherein a biological active agent (zymomonas mobilis) converts the organic material (sugar) to a product (alcohol), a rejuvenator column wherein the biological activity of said biological active agent is enhanced, and means for circulating said biological active agent between said primary bioreactor column and said rejuvenator column.

  10. Molecular fountain.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-09-01

    A molecular fountain directs slowly moving molecules against gravity to further slow them to translational energies that they can be trapped and studied. If the molecules are initially slow enough they will return some time later to the position from which they were launched. Because this round trip time can be on the order of a second a single molecule can be observed for times sufficient to perform Hz level spectroscopy. The goal of this LDRD proposal was to construct a novel Molecular Fountain apparatus capable of producing dilute samples of molecules at near zero temperatures in well-defined user-selectable, quantum states. The slowly moving molecules used in this research are produced by the previously developed Kinematic Cooling technique, which uses a crossed atomic and molecular beam apparatus to generate single rotational level molecular samples moving slowly in the laboratory reference frame. The Kinematic Cooling technique produces cold molecules from a supersonic molecular beam via single collisions with a supersonic atomic beam. A single collision of an atom with a molecule occurring at the correct energy and relative velocity can cause a small fraction of the molecules to move very slowly vertically against gravity in the laboratory. These slowly moving molecules are captured by an electrostatic hexapole guiding field that both orients and focuses the molecules. The molecules are focused into the ionization region of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and are ionized by laser radiation. The new molecular fountain apparatus was built utilizing a new design for molecular beam apparatus that has allowed us to miniaturize the apparatus. This new design minimizes the volumes and surface area of the machine allowing smaller pumps to maintain the necessary background pressures needed for these experiments.

  11. Physics Meets Biology (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chu, Steve [Director, LBNL

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: If scientists could take advantage of the awesomely complex and beautiful functioning of biologys natural molecular machines, their potential for application in many disciplines would be incalculable. Nobel Laureate and Director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Steve Chu explores Possible solutions to global warming and its consequences.

  12. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Andrew Minor Facility Director, NCEM aminor@lbl.gov 510.495.2749 personal website Biography Andrew Minor is the Acting Director of NCEM and an Associate Professor of Materials Science & Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. He received a B.A. in Mechanical Engineering and Economics from Yale University, and a M.S. and Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from UC Berkeley. Research Interests Dr. Minor's research group focuses on the development of new techniques and

  13. Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities User Facilities Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ARM) Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) Community Resources Contact Information Biological and

  14. Final Report for Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2013-08-28

    In collaboration with researchers at Vanderbilt University, North Carolina State University, Princeton and Oakridge National Laboratory we developed multiscale modeling and simulation methods capable of modeling the synthesis, assembly, and operation of molecular electronics devices. Our role in this project included the development of coarse-grained molecular and mesoscale models and simulation methods capable of simulating the assembly of millions of organic conducting molecules and other molecular components into nanowires, crossbars, and other organized patterns.

  15. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See the Foundry's full equipment list Biological Nanostructures Capabilities & Tools Instrument Scheduler Major Capabilities: Instruments and Labs AAPPTec Apex 396 Peptide Synthesizer The Aapptec is a robotic multiple peptide synthesizer, capable of synthesizing up to 40 peptides and or peptoids in parallel via solid-phase synthesis. Jobin Yvon Fluoromax Fluorometer The fluorometer is a quality spectrophotometer used to characterize the fluorescent properties of

  16. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marissa Libbee Scientific Engineering Associate, NCEM mlibbee@lbl.gov 510.495.2308 Biography Marissa Libbee transitioned from the liberal arts world in 2005 and spent the next two years at the Center for Mathematics and Applied Sciences at San Joaquin Delta College where she completed her studies on electron microscopy with an emphasis on crystalline materials and biological ultra-structure. Before joining NCEM, Marissa worked for IBM Almaden on multi-layer magnetic thin films, for SanDisk with

  17. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ron Zuckermann Ron Zuckermann Facility Director, Biological Nanostructures User Program Senior Advisor rnzuckermann@lbl.gov 510.486.7091 personal website Biography Education Ph.D. Chemistry, UC Berkeley, 1989. Advisor: Prof. Peter Schultz B.S. Chemistry, Harvey Mudd College, 1984 Past professional positions 2003 - 2005 Research Fellow, Chiron Corp. 1996 - 2003 Director of Bioorganic Chemistry, Chiron Corp. 1993 - 1996 Associate Director, Bioorganic Chemistry, Chiron Corp. 1991 - 1993 Sr.

  18. University of Tennessee | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    University of Tennessee

  19. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dinner March 24, 2016 Hotel Shattuck Plaza AGENDA Reception 6:30 pm - 7:15 pm Dinner 7:15 pm Special Presentation 7:30 pm Representative Barbara Lee (D-CA) Panel Discussion 7:45 pm Moderated by Jeff Neaton Paul Alivisatos, Berkeley Lab/UC Berkeley Vikram Bajaj, Google[x] Life Sciences Ambika Bumb, Bikanta Steve Chu, Stanford University MEDIA Group Anniversary Highlights Video [VIDEO] Group Dinner

  20. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chengyu Song Senior Scientific Engineering Associate, NCEM csong@lbl.gov 510.486.6751 Biography Education B.S. in Materials Science, Zhejiang University, China M.S. in high Tc superconductor structure and property, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences Expertise Technical support for TEAM microscopes, Tecnai, CM300, and CM200. Secondary support for Titan-X, 3010, FIB, and specimen preparation. High resolution TEM and STEM, mono-chromated EELS, image and probe aberration

  1. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Christian Kisielowski Staff Scientist, NCEM cfkisielowski@lbl.gov 510.486.4716 Biography Christian Kisielowski was awarded his PhD in natural sciences and his habilitation in physics performing spectroscopic studies on defects in semiconductors at the University of Cologne, Germany in 1985 and 1990, respectively. Thereafter, he joined AT&T Bell Laboratories (1991 - 1994) where he established a new quantitative method for image analyses in high resolution electron microscopy (QUANTITEM). From

  2. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Colin Ophus Project Scientist, NCEM clophus@lbl.gov 510.486.5663 Biography Colin Ophus received his PhD in Materials Engineering from the University of Alberta in Canada. There he studied the growth of polycrystalline and amorphous metal thin films with deposition experiments and simulations. He has used microfabrication techniques including physical and chemical vapor deposition, chemical etching, and optical and electron beam lithography. He is also proficient in analysis techniques including

  3. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D. Frank Ogletree Ogletree Staff Engineer, Imaging and Manipulation of Nanostructures dfogletree@lbl.gov 510.486.4862 Biography Education Postdoctoral Research Fellow with Miquel Salmeron developing ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy in the Materials and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1987 - 1988. Ph.D. in Experimental Solid State Physics, 1986, University of California, Berkeley, California. Thesis title: "Extending the Range of Low Energy Electron

  4. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jim Ciston Staff Scientist, NCEM jciston@lbl.gov 510.495.8072 Biography Jim Ciston obtained his Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from Northwestern University in 2009 for his work on the structural determination of hydrogen atom positions and bonding charge density at crystal surfaces through the use of advanced electron diffraction and high resolution imaging techniques. From 2009-2011, he was a Postdoctoral Research Associate at Brookhaven National Laboratory where he also served as

  5. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Karen Bustillo Senior Scientific Engineering Associate, NCEM kbustillo@lbl.gov 510.486.4324 Biography Karen Bustillo obtained her Ph.D in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Her doctoral work focused on the optical properties of semiconductor nanoparticles. Her M.S. degree research involved using solid state NMR to study bonding configurations in amorphous carbon. Karen has expertise in Raman, photoluminescence, FTIR, and UV-Vis spectroscopies, as well

  6. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Peter Ercius Staff Scientist, NCEM percius@lbl.gov 510.486.4634 Biography Peter Ercius graduated from Cornell University with a B.S. in applied and engineering physics in 2003. He remained at Cornell and completed a Ph.D. in applied and engineering physics with Professor David Muller in 2009. His dissertation project involved three-dimensional imaging of semiconductor devices using STEM. He then joined NCEM as a collaborative postdoctoral researcher for 2 years to implement electron tomography

  7. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stefano Cabrini Stefano Cabrini Facility Director, Nanofabrication scabrini@lbl.gov 510.486.7339 Biography Education Ph.D. in PHYSICS (Laurea degree), University of Rome "La Sapienza", Thesis entitled: "Theoretical - numerical analysis of Free Electron Laser systems operating in saturation regime." Advisors: Prof. F. De Martini - Univ of Rome; Dr G. Dattoli, Dr E. Sabia - C.R.E. ENEA Frascati (Rome) Past Professional Positions 2003 - 2006. Senior Scientist (Primo ricercatore)

  8. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stephen Whitelam Whitelam Staff Scientist, Theory of Nanostructured Materials swhitelam@lbl.gov 510.495.2769 personal website Biography Steve Whitelam got his Ph.D. in theoretical physics in 2004 from Oxford University, where he used statistical mechanics to study the dynamics of model glass-forming liquids. He was supervised by Juan P. Garrahan and David Sherrington. From 2004 - 2007 he did a postdoc with Phillip Geissler at UC Berkeley, using theory and simulation to study protein complex

  9. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yi Liu Liu Facility Director (acting), Organic and Macromolecular Synthesis YLiu@lbl.gov 510.486.6287 personal website Biography Yi Liu is the Director (acting) of the Organic and Macromolecular Synthesis Facility. He obtained a Ph.D. in Chemistry in 2004 from the University of California, Los Angeles under the direction of Sir. J. Fraser Stoddart. After his postdoctoral research with Professor K. Barry Sharpless at the Scripps Research Institute, San Diego, he joined the Foundry in 2006 as an

  10. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See the Foundry's full equipment list Nanofabrication Capabilities & Tools Instrument Scheduler Major Capabilities: Instruments and Labs Zeiss Crossbeam 1540 EsB The Molecular Foundry Zeiss Cross-beam is one of the most versatile lithographic and inspection tools allowing fabrication of complex prototypes for nanoelectronics, nano-optical antenna, modifying scanning probe tips, rapid electrical contacting and many other applications. The 1500XB Cross Beam combines the Gemini field emission

  11. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Branden Brough Branden Director of Strategy and External Relations bbrough@lbl.gov 510.486.4206 Biography Branden Brough is the Molecular Foundry's Director of Strategy and External Relations. In this role, Dr. Brough is responsible for the organization's strategic planning and management. He also facilitates internal and external communications to promote the Foundry's mission and showcase its accomplishments to the DOE, the nanoscience research community and the public. Before joining the

  12. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Guide Download the complete Users' Guide (PDF) Submit a Proposal Learn about the Molecular Foundry and its user program Explore Foundry capabilities and plan your proposal Prepare responses to proposal questions Create and submit your proposal through the online proposal portal After your proposal is approved* Complete secondary safety screening Become a badged LBNL "affiliate" Contact your assigned Foundry scientist When you arrive* Go to your appointment with the Affiliate

  13. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Foundry User Policies and Definitions Download the complete User Policies and Definitions (PDF) Guiding principles Safety Costs 50/50 staff time model User proposal types Proposal questions and evaluation criteria Proposal Review Board (PRB) and review process User agreements with Berkeley Lab Access to other user facilities at LBNL Final project report Publications and acknowledgement User feedback and end-of-project survey Users' Executive Committee (UEC) Scientific Advisory Board

  14. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Dinner On March 24, 2016, the Molecular Foundry celebrated the 10th anniversary of the dedication of its iconic building with a full day scientific symposium and dinner event. This celebration recognized the Foundry's major scientific and operational milestones and looked forward to the promising future of nanoscience. Leaders from Congress, DOE, academia, industry, and Berkeley Lab joined prominent Foundry users and staff, both past and present, to participate in this celebration.

  15. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Nanostructures Staff Ron Zuckerman Ron Zuckermann Facility Director rnzuckermann@lbl.gov 510.486.7091 Caroline Ajo-Franklin Caroline Ajo-Franklin Staff Scientist cajo-franklin@lbl.gov 510.486.4299 Bruce Cohen Bruce Cohen Staff Scientist becohen@lbl.gov 510.486.6640 Connolly Michael Connolly Principal Scientific Engineering Associate mdconnolly@lbl.gov 510.486.6388 Rad Behzad Rad Senior Scientific Engineering Associate brad@lbl.gov 510.486.5795 Rita Rita Garcia Principal Research

  16. Biology and Medicine Division: Annual report 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The Biology and Medicine Division continues to make important contributions in scientific areas in which it has a long-established leadership role. For 50 years the Division has pioneered in the application of radioisotopes and charged particles to biology and medicine. There is a growing emphasis on cellular and molecular applications in the work of all the Division's research groups. The powerful tools of genetic engineering, the use of recombinant products, the analytical application of DNA probes, and the use of restriction fragment length polymorphic DNA are described and proposed for increasing use in the future.

  17. LABORATORY OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND RADIATION BIOLOGY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MEDICINE AND RADIATION BIOLOGY 900 VETERAN AVENUE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90024 AND DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGICAL SCIENCES UCLA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90024 This manuscript is a contribution to the monograph edited by Daniel S. Berman and Dean Mason, entitled "Clinical Nuclear Cardiology". These studies were supported by Contract #DE-AM03-76-SF00012 between the U.S. Department of Energy and the University of California Prepared for the U.S.

  18. DockingShop: A Tool for Interactive Molecular Docking Ting-Cheng...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... determining molecular interactions using visual feedbacks to steer the docking process in ... Our work also advances state-of-the-art computational biology and scientific visualization ...

  19. Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    i FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Project Title: Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens DOE Award Number: DE-EE0000526 Project Period: 12/01/2009 to 6/22/2012 Principal Investigator: Brett K. Sandercock, Professor of Wildlife Biology, Division of Biology, 116 Ackert Hall, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506, bsanderc@k- state.edu, 785-532-0120 Recipient Organization: Kansas State University (92-977-3554) Administrative Contact of

  20. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Project Title: Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Project Title: Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens DOE Award Number: DE-EE0000526 Project Period: 12/01/2009 to 6/22/2012 Principal Investigator: Brett K. Sandercock, Professor of Wildlife Biology, Division of Biology, 116 Ackert Hall, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506, bsanderc@k- state.edu, 785-532-0120 Recipient Organization: Kansas State University (92-977-3554) Administrative Contact of

  1. Biological tracer method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1998-09-15

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. 2 figs.

  2. Biological tracer method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strong-Gunderson, Janet M. (Ten Mile, TN); Palumbo, Anthony V. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer.

  3. Biological detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2013-02-26

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  4. Biological detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M.; McDowell, Andrew F.

    2015-11-24

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  5. Biological detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2014-04-15

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  6. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology Genomics and Systems Biology Los Alamos scientists perform research in functional genomics and structural genomics, and applications for such work cover diverse fields such as energy, agriculture, and environmental cleanup. Contact Us Babetta Marrone Biofuels Program Manager Email Cheryl Kuske DOE BER Biological System Science Division Program Manager Email Kirsten McCabe Emerging Threats Program Manager Email Rebecca McDonald Bioscience Communications Email "We

  7. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology LANL leads the world in computational finishing of microbial genomes Read caption + In 2013, Los Alamos scientist Richard Sayre and his team genetically modified the organisms to harvest light more efficiently for maximum production. Overview of Research and Highlights Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory are using their renowned expertise in genomics, computation, and experimental biology as the foundation of a dynamic systems biology capability. Systems

  8. Yuan T. Lee and Molecular Beam Studies

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Yuan T. Lee and Molecular Beam Studies Resources with Additional Information * Awards Yuan T. Lee Courtesy of the Michigan State University Chemistry Department Yuan Tseh Lee 'received the 1986 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, ... for elucidating the collision dynamics of elementary chemical reactions. During a postdoctoral appointment at Harvard with [Dudley R.] Herschbach, Lee designed and built a technologically advanced "universal" machine with electron bombardment ionizer and mass

  9. Dudley Herschbach: Chemical Reactions and Molecular Beams

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dudley Herschbach: Chemical Reactions and Molecular Beams Resources with Additional Information Dudley Herschbach Courtesy of Texas A&M University As a co-recipient of the 1986 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 'Dudley Herschbach was cited for "providing a much more detailed understanding of how chemical reactions take place". Using molecular beams, he studied elementary reactions such as K + CH3I and K + Br2, where it became possible to correlate reaction dynamics with the electronic

  10. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are collaborating with this center under the leadership of the University of New Mexico's Cancer Center and Department of Pathology and in collaboration with Sandia National...

  11. The Intersection of Physics and Biology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Liphardt, Jan [University of California, Berkeley, California, United States

    2010-09-01

    In April 1953, Watson and Crick largely defined the program of 20th century biology: obtaining the blueprint of life encoded in the DNA. Fifty years later, in 2003, the sequencing of the human genome was completed. Like any major scientific breakthrough, the sequencing of the human genome raised many more questions than it answered. I'll brief you on some of the big open problems in cell and developmental biology, and I'll explain why approaches, tools, and ideas from the physical sciences are currently reshaping biological research. Super-resolution light microscopies are revealing the intricate spatial organization of cells, single-molecule methods show how molecular machines function, and new probes are clarifying the role of mechanical forces in cell and tissue function. At the same time, Physics stands to gain beautiful new problems in soft condensed matter, quantum mechanics, and non-equilibrium thermodynamics.

  12. University of Nebraska-Lincoln and University of Florida (Building...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nebraska-Lincoln and University of Florida (Building Energy Efficient Homes for America) Jump to: navigation, search Name: University of Nebraska-Lincoln and University of Florida...

  13. Integrated Biological Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, A.R.

    2002-09-01

    Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects; and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (apriori) or in response to existing contamination spread (aposteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and apriori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, aposteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

  14. Integrated Biological Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, A.R.

    2003-10-09

    Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects, and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (a priori) or in response to existing contamination spread (a posteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and a priori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, a posteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

  15. Biological sample collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, Gloria A.

    2010-09-07

    A biological sample collector is adapted to a collect several biological samples in a plurality of filter wells. A biological sample collector may comprise a manifold plate for mounting a filter plate thereon, the filter plate having a plurality of filter wells therein; a hollow slider for engaging and positioning a tube that slides therethrough; and a slide case within which the hollow slider travels to allow the tube to be aligned with a selected filter well of the plurality of filter wells, wherein when the tube is aligned with the selected filter well, the tube is pushed through the hollow slider and into the selected filter well to sealingly engage the selected filter well and to allow the tube to deposit a biological sample onto a filter in the bottom of the selected filter well. The biological sample collector may be portable.

  16. Lancaster University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    University Jump to: navigation, search Name: Lancaster University Address: Engineering Department Lancaster University Place: Lancaster Zip: LA1 4YR Region: United Kingdom Sector:...

  17. Napier University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    University Jump to: navigation, search Name: Napier University Place: Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom Zip: EH14 1DJ Product: A university located in Edinburgh, Scotland that...

  18. Hamdard University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hamdard University Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hamdard University Place: Karachi, Pakistan Zip: 74600 Sector: Solar Product: University setting up Pakistan's first solar lab....

  19. Purdue University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Purdue University Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Purdue University Name: Purdue University Address: West Lafayette, IN Zip: 47907 Phone Number: (765) 494-4600 Website:...

  20. Institute for Molecular Medicine Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, Michael E

    2012-12-14

    The objectives of the project are the development of new Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging instrumentation, chemistry technology platforms and new molecular imaging probes to examine the transformations from normal cellular and biological processes to those of disease in pre-clinical animal models. These technology platforms and imaging probes provide the means to: 1. Study the biology of disease using pre-clinical mouse models and cells. 2. Develop molecular imaging probes for imaging assays of proteins in pre-clinical models. 3. Develop imaging assays in pre-clinical models to provide to other scientists the means to guide and improve the processes for discovering new drugs. 4. Develop imaging assays in pre-clinical models for others to use in judging the impact of drugs on the biology of disease.

  1. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal process or may be completed as an independent document. In the ESS, identify each material (including all biological materials) with which you will be working. The regulatory oversight for biological work is very complicated and we need to understand the risk levels involved with the material you plan to use at the ALS,

  2. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal process or may be completed as an independent document. In the ESS, identify each material (including all biological materials) with which you will be working. The regulatory oversight for biological work is very complicated and we need to understand the risk levels involved with the material you plan to use at the ALS,

  3. Duke University and Duke University Medical Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Duke University and Duke University Medical Center Date Revised: 3/5/97; 4/25/01 PERSONNEL DOSIMETER REQUEST AND RADIATION EXPOSURE HISTORY 1. Name (Please print - Last name, First name, MI) 2. Duke Unique ID 3. Date of Birth 4. Age (in full years) 5. Gender (circle one) Male Female 6. WORK Telephone No. 7. Name of Department AND Authorized User X-rays Specify type of equipment: 8. Type of radiation to be monitored Radioactive Materials Specify radioisotopes: Other Specify: 9. Have you been

  4. Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Greater Prairie-Chickens | Department of Energy Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens This report summarizes the results of a seven-year, DOE-funded research project, conducted by researchers from Kansas State University and the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative, to assess the effects of wind energy development in Kansas on the

  5. Excitonic Quantum Random Walk in Biological Phycocyanin Nanowires |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Quantum Random Walk in Biological Phycocyanin Nanowires October 6, 2015 at 4:30pm/ 36-428 Yossi Paltiel Department of Applied Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem yossi-3a The importance of quantum processes in biology is starting to be recognized. Quantum processes are being discussed in the context of enzyme function, olfaction, magnetic sensing and most prominently in photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes. These findings suggest that a key to

  6. New Microbiome Center to combine UChicago, Marine Biological Laboratory and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne expertise | Argonne National Laboratory Filamentous cyanobacteria from a tidal pond at Little Sippewissett salt marsh, Falmouth, Mass. Microbial communities - bacteria, viruses and fungi - affect every ecosystem on earth, including human bodies, oceans, our homes and the land around us, and are the focus of a new Microbiome Center jointly headed by Argonne, the Marine Biological Laboratory and the University of Chicago. (Image: S. Emil Ruff, Marine Biological Laboratory) Filamentous

  7. Computational Biology: A Recipe for Ligand-Binding Proteins

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Biology: A Recipe for Ligand-Binding Proteins Authors: Ghirlanda, G. Title: Computational Biology: A Recipe for Ligand-Binding Proteins Source: Nature Year: 2013 Volume: 501 Pages: 177-178 ABSTRACT: Cellular cross-talk, enzymatic catalysis and regulation of gene expression all depend on molecular recognition. A method that allows the design of proteins with desired recognition sites could thus be revolutionary Date of online publication: Thu, 2013-09-12 Link online:

  8. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal...

  9. Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) held a Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on September 24–25, 2013, in Golden, Colorado. The workshop...

  10. University Coal Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Universities frequently win Fossil Energy research competitions or join with private companies to submit successful research proposals. Today approximately 16 percent of the Office of Fossil Energy...

  11. university of california

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Led by University of California, Berkeley Awarded 25M NNSA Grant for Nuclear Science and Security Research http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleases...

  12. Nuclear Energy University Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    * Awards that are experimental - 30 * Awards in materials and waste - 30 * Awards to Nuclear Engineering Faculty - 18 * Number of universities receiving awards - 26 * Number of...

  13. University Research Summaries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Idaho National Laboratory published the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Office 2001 University Research Summaries. 

  14. Biological and Environmental Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological and Environmental Research Biological and Environmental Research Understanding how genomic information is translated to functional capabilities, and the roles of Earth's biogeochemical systems so we can predict climate decades or centuries into the future. Get Expertise Cheryl Kuske (505) 665-4800 Email James Bossert (505) 667-3644 Email Manvendra Dubey (505) 665-3128 Email Kim Nitschke (505) 667-1186 Email Phil Jones (505) 667-6387 Email Cathy Wilson (505) 667-0202 Email Conducting

  15. CHRONOLOGY OF EVENTS IN DIVISION OF BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE PROGRAMS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CHRONOLOGY OF EVENTS IN DIVISION OF BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE PROGRAMS 1927 1936 December 1944 1946 August 1947 Discovery of the specific mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation by Muller. First cyclotron-produced radioisotope, phosphorus 32, administered to a patient suffering from leukemia at University of California, Berkeley. Initiation of first large scale mammalian genetics study (in mice) at the University of Rochester. First shipment of reactor-produced radioisotope, carbon 14, to independent

  16. PNNL: Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis - Energy Frontier Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center - Related Links Related Links Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis Members Pacific Northwest National Laboratory University of Illinois Yale University U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Basic Energy Sciences Energy Frontier Research Centers

  17. Green Biologics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biologics Jump to: navigation, search Name: Green Biologics Place: Oxfordshire, United Kingdom Sector: Biomass, Renewable Energy Product: Oxfordshire-based industrial biotech...

  18. Report of the Structural Biology Subcommittee of the Biological...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... David Kingsbury (absent from meeting) Chiron Corporation Emeryville, California Dr. Anthony Kossiakoff University of Chicago Chicago, Illinois Dr. Janet Smith Purdue University ...

  19. Final Report - Montana State University - Microbial Activity and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Precipitation at Solution-Solution Mixing Zones in Porous Media (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Final Report - Montana State University - Microbial Activity and Precipitation at Solution-Solution Mixing Zones in Porous Media Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Final Report - Montana State University - Microbial Activity and Precipitation at Solution-Solution Mixing Zones in Porous Media Background. The use of biological and chemical processes that degrade or immobilize

  20. CMI Education Partner: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Materials Institute Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey Rutgers, the state university of New Jersey, offers courses in several areas: Materials Science and Engineering, undergraduate level MSE Energy Conversion and Storage Chemical and Biological Engineering Geology-related courses in School of Science and Art Materials Science and Engineering curriculum Online list can be found at http://mse.rutgers.edu/undergraduate-courses

  1. University of Delaware | CCEI Partners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Its Partner Institutions The Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation (CCEI) is a partnership between the University of Delaware, 8 academic institutions and 1 national laboratory. The University of Delaware is the lead institution and home to the center's administrative headquarters. Brookhaven National Laboratory California Institute of Technology Columbia University Georgia Institute of Technology Lehigh University Rutgers University University of Delaware (lead institution) University of

  2. 7th Annual Systems Biology Symposium: Systems Biology and Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitski, Timothy P.

    2008-04-01

    Systems biology recognizes the complex multi-scale organization of biological systems, from molecules to ecosystems. The International Symposium on Systems Biology has been hosted by the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle, Washington, since 2002. The annual two-day event gathers the most influential researchers transforming biology into an integrative discipline investingating complex systems. Engineering and application of new technology is a central element of systems biology. Genome-scale, or very small-scale, biological questions drive the enigneering of new technologies, which enable new modes of experimentation and computational analysis, leading to new biological insights and questions. Concepts and analytical methods in engineering are now finding direct applications in biology. Therefore, the 2008 Symposium, funded in partnership with the Department of Energy, featured global leaders in "Systems Biology and Engineering."

  3. Bagley University Classroom Building

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Duluth, MN, MN LEED PLATINUM CERTIFIED AND PASSIVHAUS ( certification pending) CLASSROOM BUILDING The Nature Preserve where this building is located is a contiguous natural area, 55 acres in size, deeded to the University in the 1950's for educational and recreational use. The site has hiking trails through old growth hard woods frequented by the university students as well as the public. We were charged with designing a facility to serve eight different departments for the nature portions of their teaching and study at a regional University.

  4. LBL-15480 Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5480 Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Materials & Molecular Research Division Presented at the International Conference on Photochemistry and Photobiology, Alexandria, Egypt, January 5-10, 1983 MOLECULAR BEAM STUDIES OF PRIMARY PHOTOCHEMICAL PROCESSES Yuan T. Lee December 1982 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC03-76SF00098 DISTRIBUTION OF THIS DOCUMENT 16 miMVrf} LEGAL NOTICE This book was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency

  5. NEUP Approved Universities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. universities and colleges must apply to the U.S. Department of Energy to administer NEUP scholarships and fellowships.  That is done through a separate solicitation operated by the Department...

  6. Program in Functional Genomics of Autoimmunity and Immunology of yhe University of Kentucky and the University of Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan M Kaplan

    2012-10-12

    This grant will be used to augment the equipment infrastructure and core support at the University of Kentucky and the University of Alabama particularly in the areas of genomics/informatics, molecular analysis and cell separation. In addition, we will promote collaborative research interactions through scientific workshops and exchange of scientists, as well as joint exploration of the role of immune receptors as targets in autoimmunity and host defense, innate and adaptive immune responses, and mucosal immunity in host defense.

  7. College / University Programs - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    header-college College/University Programs Colleges and universities in the SRSCRO region offer a variety of educational opportunities that prepare students for careers in the nuclear industry. Programs are designed for students choosing to start a career for the first time and those seeking to enhance or change careers. Aiken Technical College Certificate and associate degree opportunities are available for students interested in pursuing a career in the nuclear industry, including nuclear

  8. MISSOURI UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MISSOURI UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (MS&T) RPSEA SUBCONTRACT# 11123-14 DR. BAOJUN BAI PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR STUDY AND PILOT TEST OF PREFORMED PARTICLE GEL CONFORMANCE CONTROL COMBINED WITH SURFACTANT TREATMENT Final Report Covering the period from November 2012 to August 2015 Prime Contractor's Technical Point of Contact: Baojun Bai Phone: 573-341-4016; Email: baib@mst.edu Missouri University of Science and Technology August 2015 Study and Pilot Test of Preformed Particle Gel

  9. Fermilab Today | University Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University Profiles Archive Subscribe | Contact Fermilab Today | Archive | Classifieds Search GO More than 2,000 scientists worldwide work with Fermilab. In the United States, about 1,300 scientists from institutions in 36 states rely on Fermilab for their research, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. These profiles, published in Fermilab Today, spotlight the critical role of universities in particle physics research. We'd love to profile your

  10. Oak Ridge Associated Universities

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Facility and Site Decommissioning U.S. Department of Energy ORAU 89lA-42 VERIFICATION OF REMEDIAL ACTION ON VENTILATION SYSTEMS JONES CHEMICAL LABORATORY UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO CHICAGO, ILLINOIS M. R. LANDIS Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division FINAL REPORT JANUARY 1989 ORAU 89IA-42 3 VERIFICATION OF REMEDIAL ACTION ON VENTILATION SYSTEMS JONES CHEMICAL LABORATORY UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO CHICAGO, ILLINOIS Prepared by M.R. Landis Radiological Site

  11. Healthcare Energy: State University of New York Upstate Medical University

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    East Wing | Department of Energy State University of New York Upstate Medical University East Wing Healthcare Energy: State University of New York Upstate Medical University East Wing The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project in partnership with two hospitals. This page contains highlights from monitoring at the East Wing, a hospital building addition at the State University of New York Upstate Medical University. In the figure above, click on

  12. University contracts summary book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-08-01

    The principal objectives of the Fossil Energy Program are to seek new ideas, new data, fundamental knowledge that will support the ongoing programs, and new processes to better utilize the nation's fossil energy resources with greater efficiency and environmental acceptability. Toward this end, the Department of Energy supports research projects conducted by universities and colleges to: Ensure a foundation for innovative technology through the use of the capabilities and talents in our academic institutions; provide an effective, two-way channel of communication between the Department of Energy and the academic community; and ensure that trained technical manpower is developed to carry out basic and applied research in support of DOE's mission. Fossil Energy's university activities emphasize the type of research that universities can do best - research to explore the potential of novel process concepts, develop innovative methods and materials for improving existing processes, and obtain fundamental information on the structure of coal and mechanisms of reactions of coal, shale oil, and other fossil energy sources. University programs are managed by different Fossil Energy technical groups; the individual projects are described in greater detail in this book. It is clear that a number of research areas related to the DOE Fossil Energy Program have been appropriate for university involvement, and that, with support from DOE, university scientific and technical expertise can be expected to continue to play a significant role in the advancement of fossil energy technology in the years to come.

  13. University) [Johns Hopkins University] 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Zlatko (Johns Hopkins University) Johns Hopkins University 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY;...

  14. Murdoch University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    offers a university education of the highest quality and has been ranked the best teaching campus of all Australia's public universities in an independent national survey of...

  15. CASL - North Carolina State University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC NC State University has a proven record of working with industry and government to advance research in support of solving nuclear...

  16. Universally oriented renewable liquid mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryutov, Dmitri D.; Toor, Arthur

    2004-07-20

    A universally oriented liquid mirror. A liquid and a penetrable unit are operatively connected to provide a mirror that can be universally oriented.

  17. Fermilab Today | Kansas State University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kansas State University Feb. 27, 2013 NAME: Kansas State University HOME TOWN: Manhattan, Kan. MASCOT: Willie the Wildcat COLORS: Royal purple COLLABORATING AT FERMILAB SINCE: 1993...

  18. Fermilab Today | Purdue University Calumet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University Calumet Jan. 9, 2013 NAME: Purdue University Calumet HOME TOWN: Hammond, Ind. MASCOT: Peregrine COLORS: Black and gold COLLABORATING AT FERMILAB SINCE: 2005 WORLDWIDE...

  19. Sichuan University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sichuan University Place: Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China Zip: 610065 Product: A comprehensive university in south-west China. Coordinates: 30.67, 104.071022 Show Map Loading...

  20. Uppsala University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    University Jump to: navigation, search Name: Uppsala University Address: Box 534 Place: Uppsala Zip: 75121 Region: Sweden Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number:...

  1. Universal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Universal Energy Place: Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China Sector: Solar Product: Universal Energy is a PV module and solar hot water systems...

  2. Fermilab Today | Brown University Profile

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brown University April 29, 2010 NAME: Brown University HOME TOWN: Providence, Rhode Island MASCOT: Bruno the Bear SCHOOL COLORS: Seal brown and cardinal red PARTICLE PHYSICS...

  3. Split University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Split University Place: Zagreb, Croatia Sector: Hydro, Solar Product: Croatia-based electrical engineering faculty of Split University. Involved in developing small hydro and...

  4. Fermilab Today | Wayne State University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wayne State University May 29, 2013 NAME: Wayne State University HOME TOWN: Detroit, Mich. COLORS: Green and gold COLLABORATING AT FERMILAB SINCE: 1995 WORLDWIDE PARTICLE PHYSICS...

  5. Biological particle identification apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzman, Gary C.; Gregg, Charles T.; Grace, W. Kevin; Hiebert, Richard D.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method for making multiparameter light scattering measurements from suspensions of biological particles is described. Fourteen of the sixteen Mueller matrix elements describing the particles under investigation can be substantially individually determined as a function of scattering angle and probing radiations wavelength, eight elements simultaneously for each of two apparatus configurations using an apparatus which incluees, in its simplest form, two polarization modulators each operating at a chosen frequency, one polarizer, a source of monochromatic electromagnetic radiation, a detector sensitive to the wavelength of radiation employed, eight phase-sensitive detectors, and appropriate electronics. A database of known biological particle suspensions can be assembled, and unknown samples can be quickly identified once measurements are performed on it according to the teachings of the subject invention, and a comparison is made with the database.

  6. BIOLOGICAL IRRADIATION FACILITY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCorkle, W.H.; Cern, H.S.

    1962-04-24

    A facility for irradiating biological specimens with neutrons is described. It includes a reactor wherein the core is off center in a reflector. A high-exposure room is located outside the reactor on the side nearest the core while a low-exposure room is located on the opposite side. Means for converting thermal neutrons to fast neutrons are movably disposed between the reactor core and the high and low-exposure rooms. (AEC)

  7. Report of The Structural Biology Subcommittee of The Biological and

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Environmental Research Advisory Committee | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Report of The Structural Biology Subcommittee of The Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Current BERAC Charges Archive of BERAC Reports Charter .pdf file (135KB) BER Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees BER Home Charges/Reports Report of The Structural Biology Subcommittee of

  8. Music of the Universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-01

    Scientists are quite familiar with what a supernova looks like when these stars are destroyed in the most massive explosions in the universe, they leave their mark as one of the brightest objects in space, at least for several weeks. While the supernova can be seen, it cant be heard, as sound waves cannot travel through space. But what if the light waves emitted by the exploding star and other cosmological phenomena could be translated into sound? Thats the idea behind a Rhythms of the Universe, a musical project to sonify the universe by Grateful Dead percussionist and Grammy award-winning artist Mickey Hart that caught the attention of Nobel Prize-winning astrophysicist George Smoot of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Sounds courtesy of Keith Jackson. Images courtesy of NASA

  9. Arms Control: US and International efforts to ban biological weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons Convention, the treaty that bans the development, production, and stockpiling and acquisition of biological weapons was opened for signature in 1972 and came into force in 1975 after being ratified by 22 governments, including the depository nations of the USA, the United Kingdom, and the former Soviet Union. In support of the Convention, the USA later established export controls on items used to make biological weapons. Further, in accordance with the 1990 President`s Enhanced Proliferation Control Initiative, actions were taken to redefine and expand US export controls, as well as to encourage multilateral controls through the Australia Group. Thus far, the Convention has not been effective in stopping the development of biological weapons. The principal findings as to the reasons of the failures of the Convention are found to be: the Convention lacks universality, compliance measures are effective, advantage of verification may outweigh disadvantages. Recommendations for mitigating these failures are outlined in this report.

  10. Molecular Science Research Center 1992 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knotek, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    The Molecular Science Research Center is a designated national user facility, available to scientists from universities, industry, and other national laboratories. After an opening section, which includes conferences hosted, appointments, and projects, this document presents progress in the following fields: chemical structure and dynamics; environmental dynamics and simulation; macromolecular structure and dynamics; materials and interfaces; theory, modeling, and simulation; and computing and information sciences. Appendices are included: MSRC staff and associates, 1992 publications and presentations, activities, and acronyms and abbreviations.

  11. Oregon State University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    University Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon State University Name: Oregon State University Address: Oregon State University Corvallis, OR Zip: 97331-4501 Year Founded: 1868...

  12. Pennsylvania State University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    University Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Pennsylvania State University Name: Pennsylvania State University Address: 201 Shields Building University Park, PA 16802 Zip: 16802...

  13. Abengoa Mojave Final Biological Opinion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biological Opinion on Mojave Solar, LLC's Mojave Solar Project, San Bernardino County, California (8-8-11-F-3)

  14. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory : 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TUNL personnel and collaborators from the University of Notre Dame pose after photoneutron studies at HIGS

  15. Cleantech University Prize

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Cleantech University Prize (CUP) aims to inspire the next generation of clean energy entrepreneurs and innovators by providing them with competitive funding for business development and commercialization training and other educational opportunities.

  16. Universal nonlinear entanglement witnesses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotowski, Marcin; Kotowski, Michal [College of Inter-Faculty Individual Studies in Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Warsaw University, PL-Warszawa (Poland); Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Aleja Lotnikow 32/44, PL-02-668 Warszawa (Poland); Kus, Marek [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Aleja Lotnikow 32/44, PL-02-668 Warszawa (Poland)

    2010-06-15

    We give a universal recipe for constructing nonlinear entanglement witnesses able to detect nonclassical correlations in arbitrary systems of distinguishable and/or identical particles for an arbitrary number of constituents. The constructed witnesses are expressed in terms of expectation values of observables. As such, they are, at least in principle, measurable in experiments.

  17. Method and apparatus for the gas phase decontamination of chemical and biological agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Hugh J.; Brubaker, Kenneth L.

    2003-10-07

    An apparatus and method for decontaminating chemical and biological agents using the reactive properties of both the single atomic oxygen and the hydroxyl radical for the decontamination of chemical and biological agents. The apparatus is self contained and portable and allows for the application of gas reactants directly at the required decontamination point. The system provides for the use of ultraviolet light of a specific spectral range to photolytically break down ozone into molecular oxygen and hydroxyl radicals where some of the molecular oxygen is in the first excited state. The excited molecular oxygen will combine with water vapor to produce two hydroxyl radicals.

  18. Elements in biological AMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogel, J.S.; McAninch, J.; Freeman, S.

    1996-08-01

    AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) provides high detection sensitivity for isotopes whose half-lives are between 10 years and 100 million years. {sup 14}C is the most developed of such isotopes and is used in tracing natural and anthropogenic organic compounds in the Earth`s biosphere. Thirty-three elements in the main periodic table and 17 lanthanides or actinides have long lived isotopes, providing potential tracers for research in elemental biochemistry. Overlap of biologically interesting heavy elements and possible AMS tracers is discussed.

  19. Oak Ridge Associated Universities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information, USDOE Open Archives Initiative (OAI) Records for Information Bridge Available Harvest OAI-PMH records (XML format) for U.S. Department of Energy research and development reports. OSTI has established an OAI server (see OAI Repository Manual) to allow harvesting of metadata for full-text DOE R&D reports contained in the Information Bridge. Included are reports in physics, chemistry, materials, biology, environmental sciences, energy technologies, engineering, computer and

  20. COLLOQUIUM: Plasma Mediated Effects on Biological Cells | Princeton Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Lab October 8, 2014, 4:00pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Plasma Mediated Effects on Biological Cells Professor Mounir Laroussi Old Dominion University Low temperature plasma (LTP) in air-containing gas mixtures produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as O, O2-, and OH and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as NO and NO2 which exhibit strong oxidative properties and/or trigger signaling pathways in biological cells. For example oxidation of the lipids and

  1. Harnessing Spin, Delocalisation and Coherence in Molecular Semiconductors |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Harnessing Spin, Delocalisation and Coherence in Molecular Semiconductors November 4, 2014 at 4:30pm / 6-120 Akshay Rao Optoelectronics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge a_rao_01 Abstract: For more than three decades the electronic properties of molecular semiconductors have been described as 'limited by disorder'. Thus, attempts to improve their performance have mainly focused on materials properties such as improving crystallinity and

  2. Madalina Furis: University of Vermont

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    State University (Tallahassee) and the other at the University of Florida (Gainesville). ... and unique Florida Helix Magnet at the Tallahassee site of the MagLab, In addition to ...

  3. Fermilab Today | University of Arizona

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A&M University Dec. 12, 2012 NAME: Texas A&M University HOME TOWN: College Station, Texas MASCOT: Reveille COLORS: Maroon and white COLLABORATING AT FERMILAB SINCE: Early 1980s....

  4. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory : 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hill KamLAND: Hugon Karwowski and Ryan Rohm, UNC at Chapel Hill; Christopher Gould and Albert Young, NC State University; Diane Markoff, NC Central University; and Werner Tornow,...

  5. In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation within a Highly Contaminated Aquifer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation within a Highly Contaminated Aquifer Matthew Ginder-Vogel1, Wei-Min Wu1, Jack Carley2, Phillip Jardine2, Scott Fendorf1 and Craig Criddle1 1Stanford University, Stanford, CA 2Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN Microbial Respiration Figure 1. Uranium(VI) reduction is driven by microbial respiration resulting in the precipitation of uraninite. Uranium contamination of ground and surface waters has been detected at numerous sites throughout the

  6. The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure Print Phosphatases, enzymes that remove a phosphate group from amino-acid substrates, can be subdivided according to their substrate specificity. Myriad evidence has demonstrated that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a family of serine/threonine-specific (Ser/Thr) phosphatases, regulates many, if not most, aspects of cellular activities and is a critical tumor suppressor. A team at the University of Washington recently determined the first

  7. The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure Print Phosphatases, enzymes that remove a phosphate group from amino-acid substrates, can be subdivided according to their substrate specificity. Myriad evidence has demonstrated that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a family of serine/threonine-specific (Ser/Thr) phosphatases, regulates many, if not most, aspects of cellular activities and is a critical tumor suppressor. A team at the University of Washington recently determined the first

  8. The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure Print Phosphatases, enzymes that remove a phosphate group from amino-acid substrates, can be subdivided according to their substrate specificity. Myriad evidence has demonstrated that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a family of serine/threonine-specific (Ser/Thr) phosphatases, regulates many, if not most, aspects of cellular activities and is a critical tumor suppressor. A team at the University of Washington recently determined the first

  9. Electronic Structure and Excited State Dynamics in Biological and Nanoscale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Electronic Structure and Excited State Dynamics in Biological and Nanoscale Systems February 25, 2009 at 3pm/36-428 Gregory D. Scholes Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto scholes2 abstract: After photoexcitation, energy absorbed by a molecule can be transferred efficiently over a distance of up to several tens of Ångstrom to another molecule by the process of resonance energy transfer, RET (also commonly known as electronic energy

  10. The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure Print Phosphatases, enzymes that remove a phosphate group from amino-acid substrates, can be subdivided according to their substrate specificity. Myriad evidence has demonstrated that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a family of serine/threonine-specific (Ser/Thr) phosphatases, regulates many, if not most, aspects of cellular activities and is a critical tumor suppressor. A team at the University of Washington recently determined the first

  11. Biological Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological Select Agents Inspection Report: IG-0681, Concerns Regarding a Non-Viable (Dead) "Anthrax Sport" Research Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Inspection ...

  12. psu-molecular-basket | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CO2 Capture from Flue Gas Using Solid Molecular Basket Sorbents Project No.: FE0000458 Pennsylvania State University (PSU) is developing a new generation of solid polymer-based sorbents for more efficient capture and separation of carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gas of coal-fired power plants. The project is based on the concept of a "molecular basket" sorbent which was invented and developed at PSU. The idea of a molecular basket sorbent development is to load CO2-philic polymers

  13. Drexel University Temperature Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; B. M. Chase

    2014-09-01

    This document summarizes background information and presents results related to temperature measurements in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) Drexel University Project 31091 irradiation. The objective of this test was to assess the radiation performance of new ceramic materials for advanced reactor applications. Accordingly, irradiations of transition metal carbides and nitrides were performed using the Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) in the B-7 position and in static capsules inserted into the A-3 and East Flux Trap Position 5 locations of the ATR.

  14. THE UNIVERSITY' OF CHICAGO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .G: THE UNIVERSITY' OF CHICAGO DATE December 28, 194s I_ TO C. F. Hiskey DLP*Rr"LNT MUCtf=t+-3I ~ DEPARTMENT This document ConhtS Of...2, IN RE: Bloaaningtcn' Experiments pages and ._____._ L? ____ ~--~-~----7 Nos~f&COplES, Merle &aft Chicago on Sunday, Deccrmber 12, for Bloomington, Indian where I was to work in oonjuncticn with Dr. Mitohell. Carried along approxi- mately 1200 grams of D20. On Monday, Deomber 13, 8aue ne0eesW-y equi&.anent arrived from Chicago. was unpaoked,

  15. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jean-Luc Vay With inputs from J. Amundson, J. Cary, W. Mori, C.-K. Ng, R. Ryne, J. Qiang Exascale Requirements Reviews: High Energy Physics June 10-12, 2015 Traditional HPC needs: particle accelerators 2 2 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Office of Science Advanced s imula.ons p lay a n i ncreasingly i mportant r ole in the design, o pera.on and t uning o f a ccelerators. CERN ( HL---)LHC FNAL P IP(---II/III) "Conven.onal a ccelerators" accelerate b eams i n R F c avi.es "Advanced c

  16. University of Neuchatel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Neuchatel Jump to: navigation, search Name: University of Neuchatel Place: Switzerland Product: The University of Neuchatel, Switzerland References: University of Neuchatel1 This...

  17. Fermilab Today | Johns Hopkins University Profile

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hopkins University September 9, 2010 NAME: The Johns Hopkins University HOME TOWN: Baltimore, Maryland MASCOT: Blue jay SCHOOL COLORS: The university's official colors are gold...

  18. University of Cape Town | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: University of Cape Town Place: South Africa Product: Teaching and research university. References: University of Cape Town1 This article is a...

  19. Robert Gordon University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gordon University Jump to: navigation, search Name: Robert Gordon University Address: Centre for Research in Energy and the Environment The Robert Gordon University Schoolhill...

  20. North Carolina State University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    University Jump to: navigation, search Name: North Carolina State University Place: Raleigh, North Carolina Zip: 27695 Sector: Biofuels, Biomass, Solar Product: Public university...

  1. Michigan State University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    State University Jump to: navigation, search Name: Michigan State University Place: East Lansing, MI Website: www.michiganstateuniversity.co References: Michigan State University...

  2. Washington State University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    University Jump to: navigation, search Name: Washington State University Place: Spokane, WA Website: www.washingtonstateuniversity. References: Washington State University1...

  3. Kansas State University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    University Jump to: navigation, search Name Kansas State University Facility Kansas State University Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  4. University of Delaware Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name University of Delaware Wind Facility University of Delaware Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner University of...

  5. Case Western University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    University Jump to: navigation, search Name Case Western University Facility Case Western University Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  6. Polytechnic University of Madrid | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Polytechnic University of Madrid Jump to: navigation, search Name: Polytechnic University of Madrid Place: Madrid, Spain Sector: Solar Product: University piloting a 2.7MW solar...

  7. Inflating an inhomogeneous universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Easther, Richard; Price, Layne C.; Rasero, Javier E-mail: lpri691@aucklanduni.ac.nz

    2014-08-01

    While cosmological inflation can erase primordial inhomogeneities, it is possible that inflation may not begin in a significantly inhomogeneous universe. This issue is particularly pressing in multifield scenarios, where even the homogeneous dynamics may depend sensitively on the initial configuration. This paper presents an initial survey of the onset of inflation in multifield models, via qualitative lattice-based simulations that do not include local gravitational backreaction. Using hybrid inflation as a test model, our results suggest that small subhorizon inhomogeneities do play a key role in determining whether inflation begins in multifield scenarios. Interestingly, some configurations which do not inflate in the homogeneous limit ''succeed'' after inhomogeneity is included, while other initial configurations which inflate in the homogeneous limit ''fail'' when inhomogeneity is added.

  8. University Engagement at INL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrell, Sean Robert; Rynes, Amanda Renee

    2014-07-01

    There are currently over 900 facilities in over 170 countries which fall under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. As additional nations look to purse civilian nuclear programs or to expand infrastructure already in place, the number of reactors and accompanying facilities as well as the quantity of material has greatly increased. Due to the breadth of the threat and the burden placed on the IAEA as nuclear applications expand, it has become increasingly important that safeguards professionals have a strong understanding of both the technical and political aspects of nonproliferation starting early in their career. To begin overcoming this challenge, Idaho National Laboratory, has partnered with local universities to deliver a graduate level nuclear engineering course that covers both aspects of the field with a focus on safeguards applications. To date over 60 students across multiple disciplines have participated in this course with many deciding to transition into a nonproliferation area of focus in both their academic and professional careers.

  9. Oak Ridge Associ Universities

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ir.\ "'t-"' , i 'Prepared by Oak Ridge Associ Universities Prepared for Division of Remedial Action Proiects 'U.S. Department of Energy 5 : ! l :;"i\ r l!! ,iri$, t . r ' i , , . 1 . E".:r- i{$, i. 'ii idi 1, . :{. I i:li C O M P R E H E N S I V E R A D I O L O G I C A L S U R V E Y O F F - S I T E P R O P E R T Y W N I A G A R A F A L L S S T O R A G E S I T E LEWlsToN, NEW YORK J . D . B E R G E R Radiol-oglcal Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and

  10. Oak Ridge Universities

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Oak Ridge Universities Prepared for Division of Remedial Action Projects U.S. Department of Energy C O M P R E H E N S I V E R A D I O L O G I C A L S U R V E Y O F F - S I T E P R O P E R T Y X N I A G A R A F A L L S S T O R A G E S I T E L E W l s T o N , N E W Y O R K J . D . B E R G E R R a d i o l o g i c a l M a n p o w e r E d u c a t i o n ' Site Assessment Program Research, and Training Division FINA], May REPORT 1 9 8 4 COMPREHENSIVE MDIOLOGICAI SURVEY OFF-SITE PROPERTY X NIAGARA

  11. Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory 2004 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Julia C.

    2005-04-17

    This 2004 Annual Report describes the research and accomplishments of staff and users of the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), located in Richland, Washington. EMSL is a multidisciplinary, national scientific user facility and research organization, operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The resources and opportunities within the facility are an outgrowth of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to fundamental research for understanding and resolving environmental and other critical scientific issues.

  12. THE DARK MOLECULAR GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfire, Mark G.; Hollenbach, David; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: dhollenbach@seti.or

    2010-06-20

    The mass of molecular gas in an interstellar cloud is often measured using line emission from low rotational levels of CO, which are sensitive to the CO mass, and then scaling to the assumed molecular hydrogen H{sub 2} mass. However, a significant H{sub 2} mass may lie outside the CO region, in the outer regions of the molecular cloud where the gas-phase carbon resides in C or C{sup +}. Here, H{sub 2} self-shields or is shielded by dust from UV photodissociation, whereas CO is photodissociated. This H{sub 2} gas is 'dark' in molecular transitions because of the absence of CO and other trace molecules, and because H{sub 2} emits so weakly at temperatures 10 K molecular component. This component has been indirectly observed through other tracers of mass such as gamma rays produced in cosmic-ray collisions with the gas and far-infrared/submillimeter wavelength dust continuum radiation. In this paper, we theoretically model this dark mass and find that the fraction of the molecular mass in this dark component is remarkably constant ({approx}0.3 for average visual extinction through the cloud A-bar{sub V{approx_equal}}8) and insensitive to the incident ultraviolet radiation field strength, the internal density distribution, and the mass of the molecular cloud as long as A-bar{sub V}, or equivalently, the product of the average hydrogen nucleus column and the metallicity through the cloud, is constant. We also find that the dark mass fraction increases with decreasing A-bar{sub V}, since relatively more molecular H{sub 2} material lies outside the CO region in this case.

  13. Forty years of molecular electronics: Non-equilibrium heat and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Volume: 250; Related Information: CBES partners with Northwestern University (lead); Harvard University; New York University; Pennsylvania State University; University of...

  14. ionic liquids biological-ly derived from lignin and hemicellulose

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biological-ly derived from lignin and hemicellulose - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste

  15. Optical Modulation of Molecular Conductance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transient absorption spectra of these molecular layers are consistent with formation of a long-lived charge separated state, a finding with implications for the design of molecular ...

  16. UCRL-10377 UNIVERSITY OF CALI FORNIA Lawrence Radiation Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    377 UNIVERSITY OF CALI FORNIA Lawrence Radiation Laboratory Berkeley, California Contract No. W-7105-eng--48 THE DETERMINATION OF MOLECULAR STRUCTURE FROM ROTATIONAL SPECTRA Victor W. Laurie and Dudley R. Herschbach July 1962 LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of Government sponsored work. Neither the United States, nor the Commission, nor any person acting on behalf of the Commission: A. Makes any warranty or repreeentation, expressed or implied, with respect to the accu- racy,

  17. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory : 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics| NC-State Physics| UNC-Chapel Hill Physics| Graduate Education at TUNL - Students from Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill perform collaborative research on a wide variety of topics. There are approximately 40 graduate students conducting research projects on a wide variety of topics that include nuclear astrophysics, fundamental symmetries, neutrino physics, weak interactions, few-nucleon, sub-nucleon, and many-body

  18. University of Delaware | Contact CCEI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Information: The administrative offices of CCEI are located inside the Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Laboratory (ISE Lab) at the University of Delaware. Address Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation University of Delaware 221 Academy Street Newark, DE 19716 Phone Number (302) 831-1628 Email efrc-info@udel.edu Visitors A downloadable PDF of the campus parking map is available. For hotel accommodations, please visit the University's visitor page.

  19. BioSAXS: Ways and Means to Study Structural Flexibility of Biological

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Macromolecules | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource BioSAXS: Ways and Means to Study Structural Flexibility of Biological Macromolecules Thursday, November 17, 2011 - 10:30am SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Dr. Alexander V. Shkumatov, Biological Small Angle Scattering Group, EMBL Hamburg Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is universal low-resolution method to study native particles in solution and analyze structural changes in response to variations of external conditions. SAXS is

  20. Cornell University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    first colleges devoted to hotel administration, industrial and labor relations, and veterinary medicine. It is both a private university and the land-grant institution of New York...

  1. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory : 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Members of the HIGS PAC are listed below: Gerald T. Garvey, Chair Los Alamos National Laboratory Elizabeth J. Beise University of Maryland T. William Donnelly Massachusetts...

  2. Bucknell University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    University Address Civil & Mechanical Engineering Departments, Hydraulic Flume, 701 Moore Avenue, Dana Engineering Building Place Lewisburg, PA Zip 17837 Sector Hydro Phone...

  3. Pennsylvania State University: Executive Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Executive Summary The Pennsylvania State University's team, Remote Wind Power Systems Unit (PSU), is focused on developing a sustainable, portable wind turbine that can provide ...

  4. Fermilab Today | Texas Tech University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and to increasing public awareness of physics research. FUNDING AGENCIES: DOE, NSF Texas Tech University High-Energy Physics Group: (Left) From left: Kittikul Kovitanggoon, Nural...

  5. Auburn University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alabama Zip: 36849 Product: Largest university in Alabama, enrolling approximately 23,000 students in 230 undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. References:...

  6. University Turbine Systems Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitner, Robert; Wenglarz, Richard

    2010-12-31

    The primary areas of university research were combustion, aerodynamics/heat transfer, and materials, with a few projects in the area of instrumentation, sensors and life (ISL).

  7. Texas A&M University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from women, minorities, individuals with disabilities, and veterans. In addition, Texas A&M University strives to be responsive to the particular needs of dual career...

  8. Shanghai University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Shanghai Municipality, China Zip: 200072 Product: Key institution of higher learning in Shanghai. References: Shanghai University1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  9. Denver University - International Institute for Environment and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - International Institute for Environment and Enterprise Name: Denver University - International Institute for Environment and Enterprise Address: 2199 S. University Blvd....

  10. Funding Opportunity Webinar - Buildings University Innovators...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings University Innovators and Leaders Development (BUILD) Funding Opportunity Webinar - Buildings University Innovators and Leaders Development (BUILD) View the Funding ...

  11. Oak Ridge Associated Universities Procurement Questionnaire Applicatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Associated Universities Procurement Questionnaire Application System Supplier Profile PIA, Oak ridge Operations Office Oak Ridge Associated Universities Procurement Questionnaire ...

  12. Pennsylvania State University Hydrodynamics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    State University Hydrodynamics Jump to: navigation, search Hydro | Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Name Pennsylvania State University Address Applied Research Laboratory, Garfield...

  13. Florida International University Science and Technology Workforce...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About Us Jobs & Internships Florida International University Science and Technology Workforce Development Program Florida International University Science and Technology ...

  14. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of California...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California, Santa Barbara Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of California, Santa Barbara Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of California, Santa ...

  15. Toronto University Innovation Foundation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Toronto University Innovation Foundation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Toronto University Innovation Foundation Place: Canada Sector: Services Product: General Financial &...

  16. Synthetic biology and crop engineering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2-A: Synthetic Biology and the Promise of Biofuels Jonathan Burbaum, Program Director, Department of Energy, Office of Science, ARPA–E

  17. Universal ripper miner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrell, Roger J.; Larson, David A.

    1991-01-01

    A universal ripper miner used to cut, collect and transfer material from an underground mine working face includes a cutter head that is vertically movable in an arcuate cutting cycle by means of drive members, such as hydraulically actuated pistons. The cutter head may support a circular cutter bit having a circular cutting edge that may be indexed to incrementally expose a fresh cutting edge. An automatic indexing system is disclosed wherein indexing occurs by means of a worm gear and indexing lever mechanism. The invention also contemplates a bi-directional bit holder enabling cutting to occur in both the upstroke and the downstroke cutting cycle. Another feature of the invention discloses multiple bits arranged in an in-line, radially staggered pattern, or a side-by-side pattern to increase the mining capacity in each cutting cycle. An on-board resharpening system is also disclosed for resharpening the cutting edge at the end of cutting stroke position. The aforementioned improvement features may be used either singly, or in any proposed combination with each other.

  18. Molecular Science Research Center annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knotek, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics group is studying chemical kinetics and reactions dynamics of terrestrial and atmospheric processes as well as the chemistry of complex waste forms and waste storage media. Staff are using new laser systems and surface-mapping techniques in combination with molecular clusters that mimic adsorbate/surface interactions. The Macromolecular Structure and Dynamics group is determining biomolecular structure/function relationships for processes the control the biological transformation of contaminants and the health effects of toxic substances. The Materials and Interfaces program is generating information needed to design and synthesize advanced materials for the analysis and separation of mixed chemical waste, the long-term storage of concentrated hazardous materials, and the development of chemical sensors for environmental monitoring of various organic and inorganic species. The Theory, Modeling, and Simulation group is developing detailed molecular-level descriptions of the chemical, physical, and biological processes in natural and contaminated systems. Researchers are using the full spectrum of computational techniques. The Computer and Information Sciences group is developing new approaches to handle vast amounts of data and to perform calculations for complex natural systems. The EMSL will contain a high-performance computing facility, ancillary computing laboratories, and high-speed data acquisition systems for all major research instruments.

  19. Universal: Order (2013-SE-26004)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Universal Lighting Technologies, Inc. to pay a $7,264 civil penalty after finding Universal had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. 454 units of model B140R277HP, a noncompliant fluorescent lamp ballast.

  20. Experimental Data from the Proteomics Research Center for Integrative Biology

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Smith, Richard D.

    The possible roles and importance of proteomics are rapidly growing across essentially all areas of biological research. The precise and comprehensive measurement of levels of expressed proteins and their modified forms can provide new insights into the molecular nature of cell-signaling pathways and networks, the cell cycle, cellular differentiation, and other processes relevant to understanding human health and the progression of various disease states. The ability to characterize protein complexes complements this capability, allowing hypotheses to be tested and the biological system operation to be defined. The Proteomics Research Center for Integrative Biology is a national user facility established and funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences component of the National Institutes of Health. This Center has been established to serve the biomedical research community by developing and integrating new proteomic technologies for collaborative and service studies, disseminating the new technologies, and training scientists in their use. The Center is housed in DOEs William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  1. Experimental Data from the Proteomics Research Center for Integrative Biology

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Smith, Richard D.

    The possible roles and importance of proteomics are rapidly growing across essentially all areas of biological research. The precise and comprehensive measurement of levels of expressed proteins and their modified forms can provide new insights into the molecular nature of cell-signaling pathways and networks, the cell cycle, cellular differentiation, and other processes relevant to understanding human health and the progression of various disease states. The ability to characterize protein complexes complements this capability, allowing hypotheses to be tested and the biological system operation to be defined. The Proteomics Research Center for Integrative Biology is a national user facility established and funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences component of the National Institutes of Health. This Center has been established to serve the biomedical research community by developing and integrating new proteomic technologies for collaborative and service studies, disseminating the new technologies, and training scientists in their use. The Center is housed in DOE’s William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  2. Renewable Hydrogen Production from Biological Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hydrogen Production from Biological Systems Matthew Posewitz Colorado School of Mines DOE Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop September 24 th , 2013 H 2 production PSIIPSI...

  3. Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon bioh2workshopdismukes.pdf More Documents & Publications 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report Renewable Hydrogen Production from Biological ...

  4. Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

    2006-11-01

    We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

  5. Cleantech University Prize | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Home » Cleantech University Prize Cleantech University Prize Hyliion from Carnegie Mellon University won the 2015 Cleantech University Prize. | Photo by Matt Dozier, Energy Department. Hyliion from Carnegie Mellon University won the 2015 Cleantech University Prize. | Photo by Matt Dozier, Energy Department. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Cleantech University Prize (CUP) aims to inspire the next generation of clean energy entrepreneurs and innovators by providing them with competitive

  6. Molecular Foundry Bay Cam

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Baycam The Molecular Foundry is a Department of Energy-funded nanoscience research facility at Berkeley Lab that provides users from around the world with access to cutting-edge expertise and instrumentation in a collaborative, multidisciplinary environment. twitter instagram facebook

  7. Statistical Inference for Big Data Problems in Molecular Biophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Savol, Andrej; Burger, Virginia; Quinn, Shannon; Agarwal, Pratul K; Chennubhotla, Chakra

    2012-01-01

    We highlight the role of statistical inference techniques in providing biological insights from analyzing long time-scale molecular simulation data. Technologi- cal and algorithmic improvements in computation have brought molecular simu- lations to the forefront of techniques applied to investigating the basis of living systems. While these longer simulations, increasingly complex reaching petabyte scales presently, promise a detailed view into microscopic behavior, teasing out the important information has now become a true challenge on its own. Mining this data for important patterns is critical to automating therapeutic intervention discovery, improving protein design, and fundamentally understanding the mech- anistic basis of cellular homeostasis.

  8. ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John R. Gallagher

    2001-07-31

    During the production of oil and gas, large amounts of water are brought to the surface and must be disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner. This is an especially difficult problem in offshore production facilities where space is a major constraint. The chief regulatory criterion for produced water is oil and grease. Most facilities have little trouble meeting this criterion using conventional oil-water separation technologies. However, some operations have significant amounts of naphthenic acids in the water that behave as oil and grease but are not well removed by conventional technologies. Aerobic biological treatment of naphthenic acids in simulated-produced water has been demonstrated by others; however, the system was easily overloaded by the large amounts of low-molecular-weight organic acids often found in produced waters. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of an anaerobic biological system to treat these organic acids in a simulated produced water and to examine the potential for biodegradation of the naphthenic acids in the anaerobic environment. A small fixed-film anaerobic biological reactor was constructed and adapted to treat a simulated produced water. The bioreactor was tubular, with a low-density porous glass packing material. The inocula to the reactor was sediment from a produced-water holding pond from a municipal anaerobic digester and two salt-loving methanogenic bacteria. During start-up, the feed to the reactor contained glucose as well as typical produced-water components. When glucose was used, rapid gas production was observed. However, when glucose was eliminated and the major organic component was acetate, little gas was generated. Methane production from acetate may have been inhibited by the high salt concentrations, by sulfide, or because of the lack, despite seeding, of microbes capable of converting acetate to methane. Toluene, a minor component of the produced water (0.1 g/L) was removed in the reactor. Batch tests were conducted to examine naphthenic acid biodegradability under several conditions. The conditions used were seed from the anaerobic reactor, wetland sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and a sterile control. The naphthenic acid was from a commercial source isolated from Gulf Coast petroleum as was dosed at 2 mg/mL. The incubations were for 30 days at 30 C. The results showed that the naphthenic acids were not biodegraded under anaerobic conditions, but were degraded under aerobic conditions. Despite poor performance of the anaerobic reactor, it remains likely that anaerobic treatment of acetate, toluene, and, potentially, other produced-water components is feasible.

  9. Genetic Regulation of Grass Biomass Accumulation and Biological Conversion Quality (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, Sam [University of Massachusetts

    2013-03-01

    Sam Hazen of the University of Massachusetts on "Genetic Regulation of Grass Biomass Accumulation and Biological Conversion Quality" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  10. Biological responses to engineered nanomaterials: Needs for the next decade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Catherine J.; Vartanian, Ariane M.; Geiger, Franz M.; Hamers, Robert J.; Pedersen, Joel A.; Cui, Qiang; Haynes, Christy L.; Carlson, Erin E.; Hernandez, Rigoberto; Klaper, Rebecca D.; Orr, Galya; Rosenzweig, Ze'ev

    2015-06-09

    In this study, the interaction of nanomaterials with biomolecules, cells, and organisms is an enormously vital area of current research, with applications in nanoenabled diagnostics, imaging agents, therapeutics, and contaminant removal technologies. Yet the potential for adverse biological and environmental impacts of nanomaterial exposure is considerable and needs to be addressed to ensure sustainable development of nanomaterials. In this Outlook four research needs for the next decade are outlined: (i) measurement of the chemical nature of nanomaterials in dynamic, complex aqueous environments; (ii) real-time measurements of nanomaterial-biological interactions with chemical specificity; (iii) delineation of molecular modes of action for nanomaterial effects on living systems as functions of nanomaterial properties; and (iv) an integrated systems approach that includes computation and simulation across orders of magnitude in time and space.

  11. Biological responses to engineered nanomaterials: Needs for the next decade

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Murphy, Catherine J.; Vartanian, Ariane M.; Geiger, Franz M.; Hamers, Robert J.; Pedersen, Joel A.; Cui, Qiang; Haynes, Christy L.; Carlson, Erin E.; Hernandez, Rigoberto; Klaper, Rebecca D.; et al

    2015-06-09

    In this study, the interaction of nanomaterials with biomolecules, cells, and organisms is an enormously vital area of current research, with applications in nanoenabled diagnostics, imaging agents, therapeutics, and contaminant removal technologies. Yet the potential for adverse biological and environmental impacts of nanomaterial exposure is considerable and needs to be addressed to ensure sustainable development of nanomaterials. In this Outlook four research needs for the next decade are outlined: (i) measurement of the chemical nature of nanomaterials in dynamic, complex aqueous environments; (ii) real-time measurements of nanomaterial-biological interactions with chemical specificity; (iii) delineation of molecular modes of action for nanomaterialmore » effects on living systems as functions of nanomaterial properties; and (iv) an integrated systems approach that includes computation and simulation across orders of magnitude in time and space.« less

  12. Towards a Semantic Lexicon for Biological Language Processing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Verspoor, Karin

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the use of the resources in the National Library of Medicine's Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) for the construction of a lexicon useful for processing texts in the field of molecular biology. A lexicon is constructed from overlapping terms in the UMLS SPECIALIST lexicon and the UMLS Metathesaurus to obtain both morphosyntactic and semantic information for terms, and the coverage of a domain corpus is assessed. Over 77% of tokens in the domain corpus are found in the constructed lexicon, validating the lexicon's coverage of the most frequent terms in the domain and indicating that the constructedmore » lexicon is potentially an important resource for biological text processing.« less

  13. California Valley Solar Ranch Biological Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biological Assessment for the California Valley Solar Ranch Project San Luis Obispo County, California

  14. SC e-journals, Biology/Genetics

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Biology/Genetics ACM Transactions on Applied Perception (TAP) ACS Chemical Biology ACS Synthetic Biology Acta Biotheoretica Acta Neuropathologica Advances in Bioinformatics - OAJ Advances in Health Sciences Education Agriculture and Human Values Agroforestry Systems American Journal of Agricultural and Biological Science - OAJ American Journal of Medical Genetics Amino Acids Analyst Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry Analytical Biochemistry Anatomical Record, The Anatomy and Embryology

  15. Fermilab Today | Oklahoma State University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University group is involved in top quark studies, searches for a non-Standard Model Higgs boson, heavy flavor tagging and upgrade of the pixel detector in the ATLAS...

  16. EERE Days at Stanford University

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy hosts the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Days at Stanford University to engage students and faculty on key energy issues aligned with EERE’s...

  17. Harvard University Video (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To encourage the use of electric vehicles, Parking Services has installed a number of electric vehicle charging stations across the university. These stations allow drivers who obtain a special...

  18. LABORATORY OF NUCLEAR MEDICIhF ARD RADIATION BIOLOGY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MEDICIhF ARD RADIATION BIOLOGY . - UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORMA 90024 Ah" DEPARTXENT OF RADIOLOGY UCLA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90024 This work was p a r t i a l l y supported by ERDA Contract gEY-76-C-03-0012 and N I H g r a n t 7-R01-GM-24839-01. Prepared for U.S. Energy Research and Development Administrat ion under C o n t r a c t gEY-76-C-03-0012 ECAT: A New Computerized Tomographic Imaging System for Positron-Emitting Michael E. Phelps, Edward J

  19. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory : 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This symposium celebrates the contributions of Edward G. Bilpuch to nuclear physic and to the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL), which is a U.S. Department of Energy Center of Excellence in Nuclear Physics. Dr. Bilpuch was a Henry W. Newson Professor of Physics at Duke University, a member of the first generation of nuclear physicists who founded TUNL and the longest-term director of TUNL.

  20. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory : 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Postdoctoral Position in Fundamental Symmetries Postdoctoral Position in Fundamental Symmetries - North Carolina State University, Department of Physics The Experimental Nuclear Physics group at North Carolina State University solicits applications for a postdoctoral research associate to work with us on the SNS-based neutron electric dipole moment experiment. Applicants must have a Ph.D. in physics, astronomy, or a related field. Candidates having low temperature (<4 K) experience are

  1. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory : 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consortium Universities Research Hadron Structure Nuclei: Structure to Stars Fundamental Symmetries Neutrinos and Dark Matter Applications of Nucl. Phys. Facilities HIGS LENA Tandem Laboratory Resources HIGS / Tandem Schedules TUNL Seminars Conferences/Schools/Events Rooms/Docs/Technical TUNL Management Employment Opportunities Duke NCSU UNC The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Center of Excellence that focuses on low-energy nuclear physics

  2. Clocking the Early Universe's Expansion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clocking the Early Universe Clocking the Early Universe's Expansion Calculations Performed at NERSC Help Scientists Close in on the Nature of Dark Energy April 17, 2014 Margie Wylie, mwylie@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 7421 NERSC PI: David Schlegel Lead Institution: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Project Title: Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey NERSC Resources Used: Hopper DOE Program Office: High Energy Physics Astronomers have made the most accurate calculation yet of the expansion rate of

  3. Alumni: Claire White, Princeton University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Claire White, Princeton University Alumni Link: Opportunities, News and Resources for Former Employees Latest Issue:September 2015 all issues All Issues » submit Alumni: Claire White, Princeton University Reducing air emissions with new ways to make concrete May 1, 2015 The site offers a variety of Los Alamos-developed biosurveillance tools that can be used for decision support in disease surveillance. The site offers a variety of Los Alamos-developed biosurveillance tools that can be used for

  4. Method and apparatus to image biological interactions in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weisenberger, Andrew; Bonito, Gregory M.; Reid, Chantal D.; Smith, Mark Frederick

    2015-12-22

    A method to dynamically image the actual translocation of molecular compounds of interest in a plant root, root system, and rhizosphere without disturbing the root or the soil. The technique makes use of radioactive isotopes as tracers to label molecules of interest and to image their distribution in the plant and/or soil. The method allows for the study and imaging of various biological and biochemical interactions in the rhizosphere of a plant, including, but not limited to, mycorrhizal associations in such regions.

  5. Molecular-beam scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vernon, M.F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N/sub 2/ from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HCl ..-->.. NaCl + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included.

  6. Fermilab | Science | Questions for the Universe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Universe To discover what the universe is made of and how it works is the challenge of particle physics. The landmark Quantum Universe report defines the quest of particle...

  7. Universal Display Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Universal Display Corp. Place: New Jersey Product: OLED (Organic Light Emitting Device) Developer References: Universal Display Corp.1 This...

  8. Seoul National University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 151-742 Product: SNU was the first ever national university established in modern Korean history and is still perceived as the leading university in Korea. Coordinates:...

  9. university of california | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    university of california | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter ... Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home university of california ...

  10. Oak Rigde Associated Universities (ORAU) Radiation Emergency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Rigde Associated Universities (ORAU) Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS), ORAU Director Oak Rigde Associated Universities (ORAU) Radiation Emergency...

  11. Montage Builders Northern Forest, Ryerson University Selected...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    University, and Onondaga Community College - Best single family detached design Ryerson University's Urban Harvest team - Best single family attached design Best Design Solution ...

  12. University of Michigan Hydrodynamics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Michigan Hydrodynamics Jump to: navigation, search Hydro | Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Name University of Michigan Address 1085 South University Avenue Place Ann Arbor,...

  13. Building America Program Evaluation, Harvard University, Volume...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Program Evaluation, Harvard University, Volume 2, 2004 Building America ... (ETIP), Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Vicki Norberg-Bohm, Principal ...

  14. Building America Program Evaluation, Harvard University, Volume...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Program Evaluation, Harvard University, Volume 1, 2004 Building America ... (ETIP), Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Vicki Norberg-Bohm, Principal ...

  15. Property:CSC-University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pages using the property "CSC-University" Showing 5 pages using this property. L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area + University of North Dakota + M Magic Reservoir...

  16. Huazhong Science Technology University Yongtai Science Technology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Huazhong Science Technology University Yongtai Science Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Huazhong Science & Technology University Yongtai Science & Technology Co...

  17. Next generation safeguards initiative university outreach: the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Next generation safeguards initiative university outreach: the unique Los Alamos and the ... Title: Next generation safeguards initiative university outreach: the unique Los Alamos ...

  18. The University of Wisconsin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name: The University of Wisconsin Place: Madison, WI Website: www.wisc.edu References: The University of Wisconsin 1 Information About Partnership with NREL...

  19. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional VaryMatrix.png Collaboration with mathematicians and computational...

  20. California State University CSU | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    University CSU Jump to: navigation, search Name: California State University (CSU) Place: Los Angeles, California Zip: 90802-4210 Sector: Solar Product: One of the largest higher...

  1. Ferris State University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ferris State University Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ferris State University Place: Big Rapids, MI Website: www.ferrisstateuniversity.com References: Ferris State...

  2. Arizona State University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    University Jump to: navigation, search Name: Arizona State University Place: Tempe, Arizona Zip: 85287 Website: asu.edu Coordinates: 33.4183159, -111.9311939 Show Map Loading...

  3. University of Tennessee | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Testing Facilities Name University of Tennessee Address University of Tennessee Space Center, 411 B.H. Goethert Parkway Place Tullahoma, Tennessee Zip 37388 Sector Hydro...

  4. Nuclear Energy University Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy University Program Nuclear Energy University Program NEUP Award Recipients FY2009 ... Drag and zoom map to see more recipients. Investing in the next generation of nuclear ...

  5. University of Maine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: University of Maine Place: United States Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Academic Research foundation ) References: University of...

  6. Australian National University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name: Australian National University Place: Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia Zip: 200 Product: One of the top five Australian Universities....

  7. The University of Wyoming | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search Name: The University of Wyoming Abbreviation: UW Address: 1000 East University Avenue Place: Laramie, Wyoming Zip: 82071 Phone Number:...

  8. University of Michigan | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Michigan Jump to: navigation, search Name: University of Michigan Place: Ann Arbor, Michigan Zip: 48109 Product: Offers research across all disciplines. References: University of...

  9. University of Washington | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington Jump to: navigation, search Name: University of Washington Place: Seattle, Washington Product: Public research university with campuses in Seattle, Tacoma, and Bothell....

  10. University of Toledo | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Toledo Jump to: navigation, search Name: University of Toledo Place: Toledo, Ohio Zip: 43606-3390 Product: A student-centered public metropolitan research university. Coordinates:...

  11. University of Colorado | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Colorado Jump to: navigation, search Name: University of Colorado Place: Boulder, Colorado Zip: 80309 Product: A public university in Colorado. Coordinates: 42.74962,...

  12. University of Maryland | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maryland Jump to: navigation, search Logo: University of Maryland Name: University of Maryland Address: College Park, MD Zip: 20742 Website: www.umd.edu Coordinates: 38.980666,...

  13. The George Washington University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington University Jump to: navigation, search Name: The George Washington University Place: Washington, District of Columbia Zip: 20052 Website: www.gwu.edu Coordinates:...

  14. Baylor University - Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    University - Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center Jump to: navigation, search Name: Baylor University - Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center Address: One Bear Place...

  15. University of South Florida | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    South Florida Jump to: navigation, search Name: University of South Florida Place: St. Petersburg, Florida Zip: FL 33701 Product: Educational and research university. References:...

  16. University Park “STEP-UP” Proposal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    University Park “STEP-UP” Proposal: DE-FOA-0000148, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  17. University Park Data Dashboard | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    data dashboard for University Park, Maryland, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. Office spreadsheet icon University Park Data Dashboard More Documents & ...

  18. Universal Entech LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Entech LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Universal Entech, LLC Place: Phoenix, Arizona Zip: 85041 Product: Project developer focused on waste-to-energy References: Universal...

  19. Carborundum Universal Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carborundum Universal Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Carborundum Universal Ltd Place: Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India Zip: 600001 Product: Chennai-based abrasives manufacturer....

  20. Universal Lighting Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lighting Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: Universal Lighting Technologies Place: Nashville, Tennessee Zip: 37214-3683 Product: Universal Lighting Technologies...

  1. Universal Carbon Credits Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Universal Carbon Credits Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name: Universal Carbon Credits Limited Place: London, England, United Kingdom Zip: EC3A6DF Sector: Carbon Product:...

  2. University of Johannesburg | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: University of Johannesburg Place: Auckland Park, South Africa Zip: 2006 Sector: Solar Product: University with solar research activities....

  3. University of Kansas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kansas Jump to: navigation, search Name: University of Kansas Place: Lawrence, Kansas Zip: 66045 Product: A public university in the state of Kansas. Coordinates: 44.40581,...

  4. Northern Arizona University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    University Jump to: navigation, search Name: Northern Arizona University Place: Flagstaff, AZ Zip: 86011 Phone Number: 928-523-0715 Website: nau.edu Coordinates: 35.1905403,...

  5. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    C. Harrison) - Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard University Hawthorne, M. Frederick (M. Frederick Hawthorne) - Department of Chemistry ...

  6. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay Surfaces in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Deep Saline Aquifers. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Surfaces in Deep Saline Aquifers. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay Surfaces in Deep Saline Aquifers. Authors: Tenney, Craig M. Publication Date: 2013-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1063603 Report Number(s): SAND2013-0408C DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Proposed for presentation at the CFSES Seminar, University of

  7. New York Nano-Bio Molecular Information Technology (NYNBIT) Incubator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Digendra K

    2008-12-19

    This project presents the outcome of an effort made by a consortium of six universities in the State of New York to develop a Center for Advanced technology (CAT) in the emerging field of Nano-Bio-Molecular Information Technology. The effort consists of activities such as organization of the NYNBIT incubator, collaborative research projects, development of courses, an educational program for high schools, and commercial start-up programs.

  8. Structure of Molecular Thin Films for Organic Electronics | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Structure of Molecular Thin Films for Organic Electronics Friday, April 6, 2012 - 1:00pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Bert Nickel, Physics Faculty and CeNS, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, München Thin films made out of conjugated small molecules and polymers exhibit very interesting semiconducting properties. While some applications such as light emitting diodes (OLED) are already on the market, other application such as solar cells, integrated circuits,

  9. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory : 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Main Office June Tirpak, Grants and Contracts Administrator Room 414, TUNL Phone : (919) 660 - 2600 Fax : (919) 660 - 2634 Email : june.tirpak@tunl.duke.edu Courier Deliveries Duke University 116 Science Drive TUNL Building, Room 414 Durham, NC 27708 USA Post Office Mail Duke University Physics Department/TUNL P. O. Box 90308 Durham, NC 27708-0308 USA HIGS/New Visitor Matthew Paul, Staff Assistant Room 125, DFELL Phone : (919) 660 - 2681 Email : mpaul@tunl.duke.edu Director's Office Calvin

  10. The Creation of the Universe

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Gravity and quantum theory cause the Universe to be spontaneously created out of nothing. Most of these universes are quite unlike our own but we select out a subset that are compatible with what we observe. Please note that Professor Hawking's talk will be broadcasted in the following rooms : TH auditorium (4-3-006) TE auditorium (30-7-018) 40-S2-A01 40-S2-C01 BE Meyrin (6-2-024) BE Prévessin (864-1-D02)

  11. The Creation of the Universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-09-09

    Gravity and quantum theory cause the Universe to be spontaneously created out of nothing. Most of these universes are quite unlike our own but we select out a subset that are compatible with what we observe. Please note that Professor Hawking's talk will be broadcasted in the following rooms : TH auditorium (4-3-006) TE auditorium (30-7-018) 40-S2-A01 40-S2-C01 BE Meyrin (6-2-024) BE Prévessin (864-1-D02)

  12. Universal equation for Efimov states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braaten, Eric; Hammer, H.-W.; Kusunoki, M.

    2003-02-01

    Efimov states are a sequence of shallow three-body bound states that arise when the two-body scattering length is large. Efimov showed that the binding energies of these states can be calculated in terms of the scattering length and a three-body parameter by solving a transcendental equation involving a universal function of one variable. We calculate this universal function using effective field theory and use it to describe the three-body system of {sup 4}He atoms. We also extend Efimov's theory to include the effects of deep two-body bound states, which give widths to the Efimov states.

  13. Alumni: Duane Hatch, Belmont University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Duane Hatch, Belmont University Alumni Link: Opportunities, News and Resources for Former Employees Latest Issue:September 2015 all issues All Issues » submit Alumni: Duane Hatch, Belmont University Hatch and two students spend the summer at the Lab September 1, 2015 Duane Hatch (m) and two students; Ambrose Rice (l) and Ryan Agh (r) worked at the Lab this summer. Duane Hatch (m) and two students; Ambrose Rice (l) and Ryan Agh (r) worked at the Lab this summer. Contact Linda Anderman Email

  14. MOLECULAR VACUUM PUMP

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eckberg, E.E.

    1960-09-27

    A multiple molecular vacuum pump capable of producing a vacuum of the order of 10/sup -9/ mm Hg is described. The pump comprises a casing of an aggregate of paired and matched cylindrical plates, a recessed portion on one face of each plate concentrically positioned formed by a radially extending wall and matching the similarly recessed portion of its twin plate of that pair of plates and for all paired and matched plates; a plurality of grooves formed in the radially extending walls of each and all recesses progressing in a spiral manner from their respective starting points out at the periphery of the recess inwardly to the central area; a plurality of rotors rotatably mounted to closely occupy the spaces as presented by the paired and matched recesses between all paired plates; a hollowed drive-shaft perforated at points adjacent to the termini of all spiral grooves; inlet ports at the starting points of all grooves and through all plates at common points to each respectively; and a common outlet passage presented by the hollow portion of the perforated hollowed drive-shaft of the molecular pump. (AEC)

  15. A Systems Biology Approach to Infectious Disease Research: Innovating the Pathogen-Host Research Paradigm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aderem, Alan; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles; Galagan, James; Kaiser, Shari; Korth, Marcus J.; Law, G. L.; McDermott, Jason E.; Proll, Sean; Rosenberger, Carrie; Schoolnik, Gary; Katze, Michael G.

    2011-02-01

    The 20th century was marked by extraordinary advances in our understanding of microbes and infectious disease, but pandemics remain, food and water borne illnesses are frequent, multi-drug resistant microbes are on the rise, and the needed drugs and vaccines have not been developed. The scientific approaches of the pastincluding the intense focus on individual genes and proteins typical of molecular biologyhave not been sufficient to address these challenges. The first decade of the 21st century has seen remarkable innovations in technology and computational methods. These new tools provide nearly comprehensive views of complex biological systems and can provide a correspondingly deeper understanding of pathogen-host interactions. To take full advantage of these innovations, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases recently initiated the Systems Biology Program for Infectious Disease Research. As participants of the Systems Biology Program we think that the time is at hand to redefine the pathogen-host research paradigm.

  16. Particle infectivity of HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones in a subtype C heterosexual transmission pair following high fidelity amplification and unbiased cloning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deymier, Martin J.; Claiborne, Daniel T.; Ende, Zachary; Ratner, Hannah K.; Kilembe, William; Hunter, Eric

    2014-11-15

    The high genetic diversity of HIV-1 impedes high throughput, large-scale sequencing and full-length genome cloning by common restriction enzyme based methods. Applying novel methods that employ a high-fidelity polymerase for amplification and an unbiased fusion-based cloning strategy, we have generated several HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones from an epidemiologically linked transmission pair. These clones represent the transmitted/founder virus and phylogenetically diverse non-transmitted variants from the chronically infected individual's diverse quasispecies near the time of transmission. We demonstrate that, using this approach, PCR-induced mutations in full-length clones derived from their cognate single genome amplicons are rare. Furthermore, all eight non-transmitted genomes tested produced functional virus with a range of infectivities, belying the previous assumption that a majority of circulating viruses in chronic HIV-1 infection are defective. Thus, these methods provide important tools to update protocols in molecular biology that can be universally applied to the study of human viral pathogens. - Highlights: • Our novel methodology demonstrates accurate amplification and cloning of full-length HIV-1 genomes. • A majority of plasma derived HIV variants from a chronically infected individual are infectious. • The transmitted/founder was more infectious than the majority of the variants from the chronically infected donor.

  17. Artificial photosynthesis combines biology with technology for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Artificial photosynthesis combines biology with technology for sustainable energy ... photosynthetic net primary production (NPP) to support our GDP and nutrition. ...

  18. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory : 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education| REU| Nuclear Data Evaluation| Publications| Directory| WebMail| Consortium Universities Research Hadron Structure Nuclei: Structure to Stars Fundamental Symmetries Neutrinos and Dark Matter Applications of Nucl. Phys. Facilities HIGS LENA Tandem Laboratory Resources HIGS / Tandem Schedules TUNL Seminars Technical Support Rooms and Documents Conferences/Schools/Events TUNL Management Employment Opportunities Useful Links Duke NCSU UNC Research scientist Alex Crowell and graduate

  19. PROJECT PROFILE: George Washington University

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The GW Solar Institute at the George Washington University is developing multimedia solar energy training materials that can be used to train a spectrum of diverse audiences. The resulting solar knowledge library serves as an invaluable resource for other STEP awardees who are directly engaging and training communities as diverse as real estate agents, financiers, and state regulators and policymakers.

  20. The Molecular Structure of a Phosphatidylserine Bilayer Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Jianjun [University of South Florida, Tampa (USF)] [University of South Florida, Tampa (USF); Cheng, Xiaolin [ORNL] [ORNL; Monticelli, Luca [Institut National de la Sant et de la Recherche Mdicale (INSERM) and INTS, France] [Institut National de la Sant et de la Recherche Mdicale (INSERM) and INTS, France; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kucerka, Norbert [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,; Tieleman, D. Peter [University of Calgary, ALberta, Canada] [University of Calgary, ALberta, Canada; Katsaras, John [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids play essential roles in biological processes, including enzyme activation and apoptosis. We report on the molecular structure and atomic scale interactions of a fluid bilayer composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS). A scattering density profile model, aided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was developed to jointly refine different contrast small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data, which yielded a lipid area of 62.7 A2 at 25 C. MD simulations with POPS lipid area constrained at different values were also performed using all-atom and aliphatic united-atom models. The optimal simulated bilayer was obtained using a model-free comparison approach. Examination of the simulated bilayer, which agrees best with the experimental scattering data, reveals a preferential interaction between Na+ ions and the terminal serine and phosphate moieties. Long-range inter-lipid interactions were identified, primarily between the positively charged ammonium, and the negatively charged carboxylic and phosphate oxygens. The area compressibility modulus KA of the POPS bilayer was derived by quantifying lipid area as a function of surface tension from area-constrained MD simulations. It was found that POPS bilayers possess a much larger KA than that of neutral phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. We propose that the unique molecular features of POPS bilayers may play an important role in certain physiological functions.

  1. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Eastern Washington University |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Washington University Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Eastern Washington University Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Eastern Washington University Joined the Challenge: August 2015 Headquarters: Cheney, WA Charging Locations: N/A Domestic Employees: 1,989 In 2007 Eastern Washington University accepted the challenge to reduce campus emissions by becoming signatory to the American Colleges and University President's Climate Commitment (ACUPCC). Installing

  2. Spotlighting Howard University | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Spotlighting Howard University Spotlighting Howard University February 27, 2012 - 2:45pm Addthis Students at Howard University are helping to solve one of the biggest challenges facing renewable energy. | Photo by Jim Pleasant. Students at Howard University are helping to solve one of the biggest challenges facing renewable energy. | Photo by Jim Pleasant. Kate Bannan Communications and Outreach Specialist Students at Washington, D.C.'s Howard University are helping to solve one of the biggest

  3. Structure of the Specificity Domain of Bacterial RNase P

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Andrey S. Krasilnikov*, Xiaojing Yang*, Tao Pan, and Alfonso Mondragn* *Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Cell Biology, Northwestern University, Evanston,...

  4. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: --...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Gaudet, Rachelle (Rachelle Gaudet) - Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard ... of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University Giri, Ranjit K. (Ranjit K. ...

  5. Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Biological Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-06-28

    Conventional organic fluorophores suffer from poor photo stability, narrow absorption spectra and broad emission feature. Semiconductor nanocrystals, on the other hand, are highly photo-stable with broad absorption spectra and narrow size-tunable emission spectra. Recent advances in the synthesis of these materials have resulted in bright, sensitive, extremely photo-stable and biocompatible semiconductor fluorophores. Commercial availability facilitates their application in a variety of unprecedented biological experiments, including multiplexed cellular imaging, long-term in vitro and in vivo labeling, deep tissue structure mapping and single particle investigation of dynamic cellular processes. Semiconductor nanocrystals are one of the first examples of nanotechnology enabling a new class of biomedical applications.

  6. Assessment of Molecular Modeling & Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2002-01-03

    This report reviews the development and applications of molecular and materials modeling in Europe and Japan in comparison to those in the United States. Topics covered include computational quantum chemistry, molecular simulations by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, mesoscale modeling of material domains, molecular-structure/macroscale property correlations like QSARs and QSPRs, and related information technologies like informatics and special-purpose molecular-modeling computers. The panel's findings include the following: The United States leads this field in many scientific areas. However, Canada has particular strengths in DFT methods and homogeneous catalysis; Europe in heterogeneous catalysis, mesoscale, and materials modeling; and Japan in materials modeling and special-purpose computing. Major government-industry initiatives are underway in Europe and Japan, notably in multi-scale materials modeling and in development of chemistry-capable ab-initio molecular dynamics codes.

  7. The 2011 Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nesbitt, David J.

    2011-07-11

    The Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference focuses on all aspects of molecular collisions--experimental & theoretical studies of elastic, inelastic, & reactive encounters involving atoms, molecules, ions, clusters, & surfaces--as well as half collisions--photodissociation, photo-induced reaction, & photodesorption. The scientific program for the meeting in 2011 included exciting advances in both the core & multidisciplinary forefronts of the study of molecular collision processes. Following the format of the 2009 meeting, we also invited sessions in special topics that involve interfacial dynamics, novel emerging spectroscopies, chemical dynamics in atmospheric, combustion & interstellar environments, as well as a session devoted to theoretical & experimental advances in ultracold molecular samples. Researchers working inside & outside the traditional core topics of the meeting are encouraged to join the conference. We invite contributions of work that seeks understanding of how inter & intra-molecular forces determine the dynamics of the phenomena under study. In addition to invited oral sessions & contributed poster sessions, the scientific program included a formal session consisting of five contributed talks selected from the submitted poster abstracts. The DMC has distinguished itself by having the Herschbach Medal Symposium as part of the meeting format. This tradition of the Herschbach Medal was first started in the 2007 meeting chaired by David Chandler, based on a generous donation of funds & artwork design by Professor Dudley Herschbach himself. There are two such awards made, one for experimental & one for theoretical contributions to the field of Molecular Collision Dynamics, broadly defined. The symposium is always held on the last night of the meeting & has the awardees are asked to deliver an invited lecture on their work. The 2011 Herschbach Medal was dedicated to the contributions of two long standing leaders in Chemical Physics, Professor Yuan T. Lee & Professor George Schatz. Professor Lees research has been based on the development & use of advanced chemical kinetics & molecular beams to investigate & manipulate the behavior of fundamental chemical reactions. Lees work has been recognized by many awards, including the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1986, as well as Sloan Fellow, Dreyfus Scholar, Fellowship in the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, Fellowship in the American Physical Society, Guggenheim Fellow, Member National Academy of Sciences, Member Academia Sinica, E.O. Lawrence Award, Miller Professor, Berkeley, Fairchild Distinguished Scholar, Harrison Howe Award, Peter Debye Award, & the National Medal of Science. Lee also has served as the President of the Academia Sinica in Taiwan (ROC). Professor Schatzs research group is interested in using theory & computation to describe physical phenomena in a broad range of applications relevant to chemistry, physics, biology & engineering. Among the types of applications that we interested are: optical properties of nanoparticles & nanoparticle assemblies; using theory to model polymer properties; DNA structure, thermodynamics & dynamics; modeling self assembly & nanopatterning; & gas phase reaction dynamics. Among his many awards & distinctions have been appointment as an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow, Camille & Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar, the Fresenius Award, Fellow of the American Physical Society, the Max Planck Research Award, Fellowship in the American Association for the Advancement of Science, & election to the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Sciences & the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. Dr Schatz is also lauded for his highly successful work as Editor for the Journal of Physical Chemistry. We requested $10,000 from DOE in support of this meeting. The money was distributed widely among the student & post doctoral fellows & some used to attract the very best scientists in the field. The organizers were committed to encouraging women & minorities as well as encourage the field of Chemical Physics in scientific

  8. Mysteries of 'molecular machines' revealed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mysteries of 'molecular machines' revealed Mysteries of 'molecular machines' revealed Scientists are making it easier for pharmaceutical companies and researchers to see the detailed inner workings of molecular machines. December 22, 2014 A picture of a membrane protein called cysZ determined with Phenix software using data that could not previously be analyzed. A picture of a membrane protein called cysZ determined with Phenix software using data that could not previously be analyzed. Contact

  9. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print Wednesday, 27 April 2005 00:00 In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can

  10. Lubricant characterization by molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, J.D.; Cui, S.T.; Cummings, P.T.; Cochran, H.D.

    1997-12-01

    The authors have reported the calculation of the kinematic viscosity index of squalane from nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. This represents the first accurate quantitative prediction of this measure of lubricant performance by molecular simulation. Using the same general alkane potential model, this computational approach offers the possibility of predicting the performance of potential lubricants prior to synthesis. Consequently, molecular simulation is poised to become an important tool for future lubricant development.

  11. Interface-assisted molecular spintronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raman, Karthik V.

    2014-09-15

    Molecular spintronics, a field that utilizes the spin state of organic molecules to develop magneto-electronic devices, has shown an enormous scientific activity for more than a decade. But, in the last couple of years, new insights in understanding the fundamental phenomena of molecular interaction on magnetic surfaces, forming a hybrid interface, are presenting a new pathway for developing the subfield of interface-assisted molecular spintronics. The recent exploration of such hybrid interfaces involving carbon based aromatic molecules shows a significant excitement and promise over the previously studied single molecular magnets. In the above new scenario, hybridization of the molecular orbitals with the spin-polarized bands of the surface creates new interface states with unique electronic and magnetic character. This study opens up a molecular-genome initiative in designing new handles to functionalize the spin dependent electronic properties of the hybrid interface to construct spin-functional tailor-made devices. Through this article, we review this subject by presenting a fundamental understanding of the interface spin-chemistry and spin-physics by taking support of advanced computational and spectroscopy tools to investigate molecular spin responses with demonstration of new interface phenomena. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling spectroscopy is favorably considered to be an important tool to investigate these hybrid interfaces with intra-molecular spatial resolution. Finally, by addressing some of the recent findings, we propose novel device schemes towards building interface tailored molecular spintronic devices for applications in sensor, memory, and quantum computing.

  12. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally...

  13. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Barrett, Karen B.; Key, Diane E.

    2006-01-24

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens to the surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  14. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Barrett, Karen B.; Key, Diane E.

    2013-10-15

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do not form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to a subject's identity.

  15. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Barrett, Karen B.; Key, Diane E.

    2010-03-23

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens of the surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do not form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to a subject's identity.

  16. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Barrett, Karen B.; Key, Diane E.

    2010-03-23

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do not form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to a subject's identity.

  17. DOE EPSCoR Initiative in Structural and computational Biology/Bioinformatics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, Susan S.

    2008-02-21

    The overall goal of the DOE EPSCoR Initiative in Structural and Computational Biology was to enhance the competiveness of Vermont research in these scientific areas. To develop self-sustaining infrastructure, we increased the critical mass of faculty, developed shared resources that made junior researchers more competitive for federal research grants, implemented programs to train graduate and undergraduate students who participated in these research areas and provided seed money for research projects. During the time period funded by this DOE initiative: (1) four new faculty were recruited to the University of Vermont using DOE resources, three in Computational Biology and one in Structural Biology; (2) technical support was provided for the Computational and Structural Biology facilities; (3) twenty-two graduate students were directly funded by fellowships; (4) fifteen undergraduate students were supported during the summer; and (5) twenty-eight pilot projects were supported. Taken together these dollars resulted in a plethora of published papers, many in high profile journals in the fields and directly impacted competitive extramural funding based on structural or computational biology resulting in 49 million dollars awarded in grants (Appendix I), a 600% return on investment by DOE, the State and University.

  18. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, K.W.; Vogel, J.S.; Felton, J.S.; Gledhill, B.L.: Davis, J.C.; Stanker, L.H.

    1993-05-11

    A method is disclosed of quantifying molecules in biological substances, comprising: selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere; preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie; administering the chemical specie to the biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system; allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of the chemical specie with the host throughout the biological system of the host; isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from the host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of the substance from extraneous sources; converting the fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation; and measuring the radioisotope concentration in the material by means of direct isotopic counting.

  19. Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June 2006 Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June 2006 Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic...

  20. The age of the universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1996-10-01

    An overview of the current controversy on the age of the universe is presented. It is shown that the age of the oldest star, globular clusters, yields an age estimate of approximately 14 {+-} 2 {+-} 2 Gyr (where the first {+-} is statistical and the second systematic, and the two should {ital not} be added in quadrature), with a firm lower bound of {ge} 10 Gyr. It is shown how radioactive dating, nucleocosmochronology, also yields a firm lower bound of {approx_gt} 10 Gyr. The currently favored values for the Hubble constant, when converted to ages using a cosmological model with zero cosmological constant, are shown {ital not} to be in conflict with statistical and systematic uncertainties at the present time when one takes both into account, even for critical density universes. 25 refs. , 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. A map of the universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gott III, J. Richard; Juric, Mario; Schlegel, David; Hoyle, Fiona; Vogeley, Michael; Tegmark, Max; Bahcall, Neta; Brinkmann, Jon

    2003-10-20

    We have produced a new conformal map of the universe illustrating recent discoveries, ranging from Kuiper belt objects in the Solar system, to the galaxies and quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This map projection, based on the logarithm map of the complex plane, preserves shapes locally, and yet is able to display the entire range of astronomical scales from the Earth s neighborhood to the cosmic microwave background. The conformal nature of the projection, preserving shapes locally, may be of particular use for analyzing large scale structure. Prominent in the map is a Sloan Great Wall of galaxies 1.37 billion light years long, 80 percent longer than the Great Wall discovered by Geller and Huchra and therefore the largest observed structure in the universe.

  2. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory : 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Parking Directions and Map The Duke University campus map shows the Duke Physics Building on Science Drive behind Duke Chapel. The former 4 MeV Van de Graaff accelerator laboratory in its basement is now the location of TUNL's Laboratory for Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics (LENA). Graduates since 1965 will recall the tandem accelerator laboratory is located behind the Physics Building, but those who graduated before 1990 may not recognize a newer larger building behind the tandem lab which

  3. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory : 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Past Projects 2015| REU flickr| Schedule of Activities| 2016 TUNL/Duke REU Program Undergraduate Research in Nuclear and Particle Physics at TUNL/Duke University The 2016 TUNL REU program dates are Tuesday, May 31, 2016 to August 6, 2016. This year's application deadline was February 5, 2016. The online application process is now closed. We will accept recommendation letters through Wednesday, Feb. 10. The Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) programs provide opportunities for students

  4. University of Delaware Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Michael T

    2012-09-30

    The main goal of this project funded through this DOE grant is to help in the establishment of the University of Delaware Energy Institute (UDEI) which is designed to be a long-term, on-going project. The broad mission of UDEI is to develop collaborative programs encouraging research activities in the new and emerging energy technologies and to partner with industry and government in meeting the challenges posed by the nationâ??s pressing energy needs.

  5. ESnet LHCONE Service for Universities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LHCONE Service for Universities Version January 28 2015 Date Edited By Change 13-Jan-2015 J Metzger Created 15-Jan-2015 J Metzger Minor updates 16-Jan-2015 P Giuntoli, J Metzger Improved Clarity & Focus, added Appendix 2. 22-Jan-2015 Dorn Readability improvements; consistency of terms (especially ESnet LHCONE Service and global LHCONE VRF network) 28-Jan-2015 J Metzger Entered Experiment Site Coordinator Names. Overview Service Description Service Design Demarcation Point Service Policies

  6. Susanne Crewell, University of Cologne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extending operational satellite cloud remote sensing into the submillimeter range: The challenge of supercooled liquid water absorption Susanne Crewell, University of Cologne How will the future observational system develop? a journey from ground to space Global Observing System (GOS) co-ordinated by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) From simple clouds to Seamless Prediction of the Earth System: From minutes to months" WMO, G Brunet, S Jones, PM Ruti Eds., WMO-No. 1156, (ISBN

  7. University of Delaware | About CCEI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation About CCEI The Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation (CCEI) is a multi-institutional research center at the University of Delaware. It was established in 2009 by a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. It is one of 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) and one of very few externally funded centers on heterogeneous catalysis. The center builds upon the long tradition of novel catalytic research

  8. University of Delaware | CCEI News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News [January 2016] Wei Fan, professor of chemical engineering at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, is among scientists highlighted in the U.S. Department of Energy's online feature article titled "Driving to Great: Science and the Journey to Waste-Free Biodiesel." The article, which discusses how scientists are overcoming obstacles in order to turn fuel waste into valued chemicals, discusses Fan's discovery of a one-pot reaction that turns glycerol into large quantities of

  9. transims-studies-at-the-university

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Studies at the University at Buffalo, the State University of New York Adel W. Sadek, Ph.D. Associate Professor University at Buffalo, The State University of New York 233 Ketter Hall Buffalo, NY 14260 Phone: (716) 645-4367 FAX: (716) 645-3733 E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. List of Authors ================ Adel W. Sadek, Ph.D. Shan Huang Liya Guo Yan Yang Irene Casas, Ph.D. University at Buffalo, The State University of New

  10. Cerenkov emission induced by external beam radiation stimulates molecular fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Axelsson, Johan; Davis, Scott C.; Gladstone, David J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Cerenkov emission is induced when a charged particle moves faster than the speed of light in a given medium. Both x-ray photons and electrons produce optical Cerenkov photons in everyday radiation therapy of tissue; yet, this phenomenon has never been fully documented. This study quantifies the emissions and also demonstrates that the Cerenkov emission can excite a fluorophore, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), embedded in biological phantoms. Methods: In this study, Cerenkov emission induced by radiation from a clinical linear accelerator is investigated. Biological mimicking phantoms were irradiated with x-ray photons, with energies of 6 or 18 MV, or electrons at energies 6, 9, 12, 15, or 18 MeV. The Cerenkov emission and the induced molecular fluorescence were detected by a camera or a spectrometer equipped with a fiber optic cable. Results: It is shown that both x-ray photons and electrons, at MeV energies, produce optical Cerenkov photons in tissue mimicking media. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Cerenkov emission can excite a fluorophore, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), embedded in biological phantoms. Conclusions: The results here indicate that molecular fluorescence monitoring during external beam radiotherapy is possible.

  11. OTEC environmental biological oceanographic program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartwig, E.O.

    1981-07-01

    One of the major goals of the OTEC biological field measurement program is to assess the effect of OTEC operations on the environment. Prior understanding of the natural variability of the tropical oceanic plankton community is the most important method for determining changes due to operation of an OTEC plant. The spatial and temporal patterns of the plankton community in terms of absolute number, biomass and species composition have been investigated at potential OTEC sites. Considerable data exist which document the changes with depth of all three measurements. Diel fluctuations in number and species composition have been studied at one site. While horizontal and seasonal patterns of variability likely exist at all sites, they are subtle and remain somewhat unclear. Attempts are now being made to determine the overall trophic structure of the plankton community at these sites using these data, gut content analysis, and information already in the literature.

  12. DOE Announces $375,000 Grant to Lincoln University and the University...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Reynolds, intern, Mercer University; Guannian Zeng, intern, City College of New York; Anna Knox, SRNL scientist; Daniel Berry, intern, University of South Carolina-Aiken; Thomas ...

  13. Tel Aviv University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aviv University Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tel Aviv University Place: Tel Aviv, Israel Zip: 69978 Sector: Solar Product: R&D of solar energy, fuel cells and new materials...

  14. National Laboratories Recruiting Day" at Howard University |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Laboratories Recruiting Day" at Howard University February 4, 2016 11:00AM to 6:00PM EST Howard University, School of Engineering, Architecture and Computer Sciences....

  15. Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine Print Wednesday, 30 January 2013 00:00 Worldwide, influenza causes substantial deaths and yearly ...

  16. Colorado State University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    University Jump to: navigation, search Name: Colorado State University Place: Colorado Phone Number: (970) 491-1101 or 907-491-6444 Website: www.colostate.edu Outage Hotline:...

  17. Illinois State University | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Illinois State University Home Dloomis's picture Submitted by Dloomis(21) Member 28 June, 2012 - 15:41 User Manuals Illinois State University We have a beta version of two user...

  18. University of Alberta | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alberta Jump to: navigation, search Logo: University of Alberta Name: University of Alberta Address: 116 St. and 85 Ave., Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2R3 Place: Edmonton, Alberta...

  19. University of Waterloo UW | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: University of Waterloo (UW) Place: Waterloo, Ontario, Canada Zip: N2L 3G1 Product: Research-intensive university that has received grants to pursue...

  20. Probing Interactions in Complex Molecular Systems through Ordered Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Yoreo, J J; Bartelt, M C; Orme, C A; Villacampa, A; Weeks, B L; Miller, A E

    2002-01-31

    Emerging from the machinery of epitaxial science and chemical synthesis, is a growing emphasis on development of self-organized systems of complex molecular species. The nature of self-organization in these systems spans the continuum from simple crystallization of large molecules such as dendrimers and proteins, to assembly into large organized networks of nanometer-scale structures such as quantum dots or nanoparticles. In truth, self-organization in complex molecular systems has always been a central feature of many scientific disciplines including fields as diverse as structural biology, polymer science and geochemistry. But over the past decade, changes in those fields have often been marked by the degree to which researchers are using molecular-scale approaches to understand the hierarchy of structures and processes driven by this ordered assembly. At the same time, physical scientists have begun to use their knowledge of simple atomic and molecular systems to fabricate synthetic self-organized systems. This increasing activity in the field of self-organization is testament to the success of the physical and chemical sciences in building a detailed understanding of crystallization and epitaxy in simple atomic and molecular systems, one that is soundly rooted in thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. One of the fundamental challenges of chemistry and materials science in the coming decades is to develop a similarly well-founded physical understanding of assembly processes in complex molecular systems. Over the past five years, we have successfully used in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the physical controls on single crystal epitaxy from solutions for a wide range of molecular species. More recently, we have combined this method with grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and kinetic Monte Carlo modeling in order to relate morphology to surface atomic structure and processes. The purpose of this proposal was to extend this approach to assemblies of three classes of ''super molecular'' nanostructured materials. These included (1) dendrimers, (2) DNA bonded nano-particles, and (3) colloids, all of which form solution-based self-organizing systems. To this end, our goals were, first, to learn how to modify models of epitaxy in small molecule systems so that they are useful, efficient, and applicable to assembly of super-molecular species; and, second, to learn how systematic variations in the structure and bonding of the building blocks affect the surface kinetics and energetics that control the assembly process and the subsequent dynamic behavior of the assembled structures. AFM imaging provided experimental data on morphology and kinetics, while kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations related these data to molecular-scale processes and features.

  1. Electrostatic thin film chemical and biological sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prelas, Mark A.; Ghosh, Tushar K.; Tompson, Jr., Robert V.; Viswanath, Dabir; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.

    2010-01-19

    A chemical and biological agent sensor includes an electrostatic thin film supported by a substrate. The film includes an electrostatic charged surface to attract predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A charge collector associated with said electrostatic thin film collects charge associated with surface defects in the electrostatic film induced by the predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A preferred sensing system includes a charge based deep level transient spectroscopy system to read out charges from the film and match responses to data sets regarding the agents of interest. A method for sensing biological and chemical agents includes providing a thin sensing film having a predetermined electrostatic charge. The film is exposed to an environment suspected of containing the biological and chemical agents. Quantum surface effects on the film are measured. Biological and/or chemical agents can be detected, identified and quantified based on the measured quantum surface effects.

  2. Buildings University Innovators and Leaders Development (BUILD...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Institutional requirements Lead institution must be an Institution of Higher Education: Universities, 2-year community colleges, predominately undergraduate ...

  3. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Colorado State University |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Colorado State University Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Colorado State University Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Colorado State University Joined the Challenge: July 2015 Headquarters: Fort Collins, CO Charging Location: Fort Collins, CO Domestic Employees: 6,985 Colorado State University (CSU) has received the first Platinum rating and the highest score ever submitted in STARS, the American Association of Sustainability in Higher Education's

  4. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Louisiana State University |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Louisiana State University Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Louisiana State University Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Louisiana State University Joined the Challenge: October 2015 Headquarters: Baton Rouge, LA Charging Location: Baton Rouge, LA Domestic Employees: 36,757 Louisiana State University (LSU) has 3 charging stations on campus, and 12 plug-in electric vehicles routinely used the stations in 2015. LSU Campus Sustainability aims to promote energy

  5. PROJECT PROFILE: Boston University | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boston University PROJECT PROFILE: Boston University Funding Opportunity: CSP: APOLLO SunShot Subprogram: CSP Location: Boston, MA Amount Awarded: $1,150,000 Awardee Cost Share: $390,864 Boston University Logo.png The Boston University project under CSP: Apollo will use laboratory-scale electrodynamic-screen self-cleaning solar technology with heliostat mirrors and parabolic troughs in large scale solar plants. The objective is to reduce both the need to clean mirrors with water and the

  6. University Partnerships | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Multidisciplinary Simulation Center for High Efficiency Electric Power Generation with Carbon Capture," an MSC University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign,...

  7. University Partnerships | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    University Partnerships Historically, universities have had a close relationship with NNSA National Laboratories. In fact, Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore have been operated for NNSA by the University of California for many years. The mission of the Defense Programs laboratories is focused on Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship, and ASC and the universities share a common and critical interest in making that vision a reality. The success of ASC depends on the ability to demonstrate that

  8. PNNL: Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis - Advisory Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advisory Committee Kathy Ayers Kathy Ayers (Proton Energy Systems) R. Tom Baker R. Tom Baker (University of Ottawa) Charles Casey Charles Casey (University of Wisconsin) Michael Hall Michael Hall (Texas A&M University) Carl Koval Carl Koval (University of Colorado at Boulder) Thomas B. Rauchfuss Thomas B. Rauchfuss (University of Illinois

  9. HIV Molecular Immunology 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette Tina Marie; Barouch, Dan; Koup, Richard; de Boer, Rob; Moore, John P.; Brander, Christian; Haynes, Barton F.; Walker, Bruce D.

    2015-02-03

    HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2014 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as crossreactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins are provided.

  10. University Park Data Dashboard | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Data Dashboard University Park Data Dashboard The data dashboard for University Park, Maryland, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. Office spreadsheet icon University Park Data Dashboard More Documents & Publications Massachusetts -- SEP Data Dashboard Maryland Data Dashboard Bainbridge Island Data Dashboard

  11. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of Connecticut |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Connecticut Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of Connecticut Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of Connecticut Joined the Challenge: February 2015 Headquarters: Storrs, CT Charging Location: Storrs, CT Domestic Employees: 4,816 The University of Connecticut is committed to leadership in campus sustainability, including objective measurement and clear, concise communications about its progress. Joining the Workplace Charging Challenge commits

  12. Oak Ridge Associated Universities Procurement Questionnaire Application

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System Supplier Profile PIA, Oak ridge Operations Office | Department of Energy Associated Universities Procurement Questionnaire Application System Supplier Profile PIA, Oak ridge Operations Office Oak Ridge Associated Universities Procurement Questionnaire Application System Supplier Profile PIA, Oak ridge Operations Office Oak Ridge Associated Universities Procurement Questionnaire Application System Supplier Profile PIA, Oak ridge Operations Office PDF icon Oak Ridge Associated

  13. Molecular biological enhancement of coal biodesulfurization. Technical report, March 1, 1994--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilbane, J.J. II

    1994-09-01

    IGT has developed a microbial culture of Rhodococcus rhodochrous, designated as IGTS8, that is capable of specifically cleaving carbon-sulfur bonds in a range of organosulfur model compounds and is capable of removing organic sulfur from coal and petroleum without significantly sacrificing the calorific value of the fuel. Although IGTS8 possesses the ability to specifically remove organic sulfur from coal, a major research need is to develop improved strains of microorganisms that possess higher levels of desulfurization activity and therefore will permit more favorable biodesulfurization process conditions: faster rates, more complete removal, and smaller reactor size. Strain improvement is the single most important aspect to the development of a practical coal biodesulfurization process and accordingly is the focus of research in this project. During this quarter the DNA sequences and transcriptional initiation sites of several promoters derived from the chromosome of Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8 were determined. Several strong promoters have been used to replace the promoter of the desulfurization genes with the intent of obtaining cultures with enhanced levels of desulfurization activity. The evaluation of the ability of improved cultures to desulfurize coal will be evaluated during the final quarter of this project.

  14. International symposium on cellular and molecular biology of phosphate and phosphorylated compounds in microorganisms: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-12-31

    This report contains the abstracts of papers presented at the conference. Attention is focused on the following topics: regulation of phosphate metabolism in bacteria; structure-function of alkaline phosphatase; regulation of phosphate metabolism in yeast; transport of phosphate and phosphorylated compounds; and phosphate regulation in pathogenesis and secondary metabolism.

  15. Method for photo-altering a biological system to improve biological effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, Richard A. (Irvine, CA); Doiron, Daniel R. (Santa Ynez, CA); Crean, David H. (Santa Barbara, CA)

    2000-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a new adjunctive therapy for filtration surgery that does not use chemotherapy agents or radiation, but uses pharmacologically-active sensitizing compounds to produce a titratable, localized, transient, post operative avascular conjunctiva. A photosensitizing agent in a biological system is selectively activated by delivering the photosensitive agent to the biological system and laser activating only a spatially selected portion of the delivered photosensitive agent. The activated portion of the photosensitive agent reacts with the biological system to obtain a predetermined biological effect. As a result, an improved spatial disposition and effectuation of the biological effect by the photosensitive agent in the biological system is achieved.

  16. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory : 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Subscribe to TUNL Seminars| Duke Colloquia| UNC Colloquia| NC-State Colloquia| TNT Seminars| All talks are on Thursday at 2:00 pm in Room 298 of the Physics Building, unless otherwise noted. There is a reception prior to the talk at 1:45 pm in the TUNL lobby. If you have questions about the seminars, you can email the TUNL secretary or call (919)-660-2600. Chairman: John Kelley. Thomas Langford Yale University Thursday, 02/04/2016, 02:00:PM, Physics 298 TBA Read the Abstract Steve Wender LANL

  17. Universality of Charged Multiplicity Distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulianos, K.; /Rockefeller U.

    1981-12-01

    The charged multiplicity distributions of the diffractive and non-diffractive components of hadronic interactions, as well as those of hadronic states produced in other reactions, are described well by a universal Gaussian function that depends only on the available mass for pionization, has a maximum at n{sub o} {approx_equal} 2M{sup 1/2}, where M is the available mass in GeV, and a peak to width ratio n{sub o}/D {approx_equal} 2.

  18. Bisfuel links - Arizona State University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arizona State University http://chemistry.asu.edu/" target="_blank">ASU Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry http://sustainability.asu.edu/index.php" target="_blank">ASU Global Institute of Sustainability http://asulightworks.com/" target="_blank">ASU Lightworks http://sols.asu.edu/" target="_blank">ASU School of Life Sciences http://www.biodesign.asu.edu/" target="_blank">Biodesign Institute

  19. University of Illinois Temperature Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; B. M. Chase

    2014-09-01

    This document summarizes background information and presents results related to temperature measurements in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) University of Illinois Project 29609 irradiation. The objective of this test was to assess the radiation performance of ferritic alloys for advanced reactor applications. The FeCr-based alloy system is considered the lead alloy system for a variety of advanced reactor components and applications. Irradiations of FeCr alloy samples were performed using the Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) in the B-7 position and in a static capsule in the A-11 position of the ATR.

  20. RHIC - Exploring the Universe Within

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    BNL

    2009-09-01

    A guided tour of Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) conducted by past Laboratory Director John Marburger. RHIC is a world-class scientific research facility that began operation in 2000, following 10 years of development and construction. Hundreds of physicists from around the world use RHIC to study what the universe may have looked like in the first few moments after its creation. RHIC drives two intersecting beams of gold ions head-on, in a subatomic collision. What physicists learn from these collisions may help us understand more about why the physical world works the way it does, from the smallest subatomic particles, to the largest stars.

  1. Portland State University Shattuck Hall

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Portland, OR Portland State's Shattuck hall was originally constructed as an elementary school in 1915. In 2007 the university undertook extensive renovations of the building to bring it up to current seismic requirements. In addition to structural improvements, the design team was able to upgraded the building's aging mechanical and electrical systems, upgrade plumbing, and restore the large light wells that bring daylight into the U-shaped building. The resulting building houses Portland State's Architecture department, where students are able to learn from the exposed building systems.

  2. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA BERKELEY UCR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    n 1 1 J} > 0 > , H 0 z r > DD 0 7} 0 7} < n * * UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA BERKELEY UCR ^ r DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process

  3. A brief history of the Biology Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex Most of the "Biology" buildings were constructed in early 1945 and were built as expansion capability for the uranium preparation operations being conducted across the...

  4. Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Sharlene Weatherwax .pdf file (768KB) Office of Biological and Environmental Research Update Gary Geernaert .pdf file (5.8MB) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division Update ...

  5. Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines The U.S. Department of Energy's ... which environmen- tal attributes, such as entrainment survival for fish, are emphasized. ...

  6. Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This factsheet explains studies conducted in a highly reproducible manner to examine the biological effects to fish exposed to a shear environment in the laboratory.

  7. 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    November 2013 summary report for the 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop. PDF icon bioh2workshopfinalreport.pdf More Documents & Publications The Hydrogen Program at ...

  8. Repurposing the translation apparatus for synthetic biology ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Name: Current Opinion in Chemical Biology Additional Journal Information: Journal ... Publisher: Elsevier Sponsoring Org: USDOE Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy ...

  9. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-03-14

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  10. Research universities for the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gover, J.; Huray, P.G.

    1998-05-01

    The `public outcomes` from research universities are educated students and research that extends the frontiers of knowledge. Measures of these `public outcomes` are inadequate to permit either research or education consumers to select research universities based on quantitative performance data. Research universities annually spend over $20 billion on research; 60% of these funds are provided by Federal sources. Federal funding for university research has recently grown at an annual rate near 6% during a time period when other performers of Federal research have experienced real funding cuts. Ten universities receive about 25% of the Federal funds spent on university research. Numerous studies of US research universities are reporting storm clouds. Concerns include balancing research and teaching, the narrow focus of engineering education, college costs, continuing education, and public funding of foreign student education. The absence of research on the `public outcomes` from university research results in opinion, politics, and mythology forming the basis of too many decisions. Therefore, the authors recommend studies of other nations` research universities, studies of various economic models of university research, analysis of the peer review process and how well it identifies the most capable research practitioners and at what cost, and studies of research university ownership of intellectual property that can lead to increased `public outcomes` from publicly-funded research performed by research universities. They advocate two practices that could increase the `public outcomes` from university research. These are the development of science roadmaps that link science research to `public outcomes` and `public outcome` metrics. Changes in the university research culture and expanded use of the Internet could also lead to increased `public outcomes`. They recommend the use of tax incentives to encourage companies to develop research partnerships with research universities.

  11. From systems biology to photosynthesis and whole-plant modeling: a conceptual model for integrating multi-scale networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weston, David; Hanson, Paul J; Norby, Richard J; Tuskan, Gerald A; Wullschleger, Stan D

    2012-01-01

    Network analysis is now a common statistical tool for molecular biologists. Network algorithms are readily used to model gene, protein and metabolic correlations providing insight into pathways driving biological phenomenon. One output from such an analysis is a candidate gene list that can be responsible, in part, for the biological process of interest. The question remains, however, as to whether molecular network analysis can be used to inform process models at higher levels of biological organization. In our previous work, transcriptional networks derived from three plant species were constructed, interrogated for orthology and then correlated to photosynthetic inhibition at elevated temperature. One unique aspect of that study was the link from co-expression networks to net photosynthesis. In this addendum, we propose a conceptual model where traditional network analysis can be linked to whole-plant models thereby informing predictions on key processes such as photosynthesis, nutrient uptake and assimilation, and C partitioning.

  12. Division of Biological and Medical Research research summary 1984-1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, S.H.

    1985-08-01

    The Division of Biological and Medical Research at Argonne National Laboratory conducts multidisciplinary research aimed at defining the biological and medical hazards to man from energy technologies and new energy options. These technically oriented studies have a strong base in fundamental research in a variety of scientific disciplines, including molecular and cellular biology, biophysics, genetics, radiobiology, pharmacology, biochemistry, chemistry, environmental toxicology, and epidemiology. This research summary is organized into six parts. The first five parts reflect the Divisional structure and contain the scientific program chapters, which summarize the activities of the individual groups during the calendar year 1984 and the first half of 1985. To provide better continuity and perspective, previous work is sometimes briefly described. Although the summaries are short, efforts have been made to indicate the range of research activities for each group.

  13. Apparatus for molecular weight separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA); Liu, Chuanliang (Haverhill, MA)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to an apparatus and method for separating high molecular weight molecules from low molecular weight molecules. More specifically, the invention relates to the use of microdialysis for removal of the salt (low molecular weight molecules) from a nucleotide sample (high molecular weight molecules) for ESI-MS analysis. The dialysis or separation performance of the present invention is improved by (1) increasing dialysis temperature thereby increasing desalting efficiency and improving spectrum quality; (2) adding piperidine and imidazole to the dialysis buffer solution and reducing charge states and further increasing detection sensitivity for DNA; (3) using low concentrations (0-2.5 mM NH4OAc) of dialysis buffer and shifting the DNA negative ions to higher charge states, producing a nearly 10-fold increase in detection sensitivity and a slightly decreased desalting efficiency, (4) conducting a two-stage separation or (5) any combination of (1), (2), (3) and (4).

  14. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can become temporarily trapped by the molecule before ultimately escaping,

  15. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can become temporarily trapped by the molecule before ultimately escaping,

  16. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can become temporarily trapped by the molecule before ultimately escaping,

  17. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can become temporarily trapped by the molecule before ultimately escaping,

  18. Synchrotrons Explore Water's Molecular Mysteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotrons Explore Water's Molecular Mysteries Synchrotrons Explore Water's Molecular Mysteries Print Friday, 01 February 2013 00:00 In experiments at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source, scientists observed a surprisingly dense form of water that remained liquid well beyond its typical freezing point. Researchers applied a superthin coating of water-no deeper than a few molecules-to the surface of a barium fluoride crystal.

  19. Sharpening Our Tools: Algal Biology Toolbox Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) will host the Algal Biology Toolbox Workshop on May 24-25, 2016, in San Diego, California. Because biological productivity is a key driver for the economic viability of algae-based biofuels, improving on the performance of native strains is a critical element of the research efforts funded by the Advanced Algal Systems program at BETO.

  20. Protein Structure Suggests Role as Molecular Adapter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protein Structure Suggests Role as Molecular Adapter Print To split and copy DNA during replication, all cellular organisms use a multicomponent molecular machine known as the...

  1. Institute for Molecular Engineering | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Molecular Engineering explores innovative technologies that address fundamental societal problems through advances in nanoscale manipulation and design at a molecular scale. ...

  2. PIA - Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) User...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) User System (ESU) PDF icon PIA - Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) User System (ESU) More Documents & Publications PIA - WEB ...

  3. Protein Structure Suggests Role as Molecular Adapter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure Suggests Role as Molecular Adapter Print To split and copy DNA during replication, all cellular organisms use a multicomponent molecular machine known as the...

  4. Connecting the Molecular and the Continuum Scales

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    range of phenomena, from climate change to contaminant remediation. Accomplishments: Used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to determine molecular-scale diffusion coefficients of...

  5. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saibil, Helen R.; Grnewald, Kay; Stuart, David I.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides a brief update on the use of cryo-electron microscopy for integrated structural biology, along with an overview of the plans for the UK national facility for electron microscopy being built at the Diamond synchrotron. Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback.

  6. 2014 Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Ryerson University...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ryerson University's Urban Harvest Team Submission 2014 Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Ryerson University's Urban Harvest Team Submission Ryerson University's Urban ...

  7. 2014 Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Penn State University...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Penn State University Profile 2014 Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Penn State University Profile 2014 Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Penn State University ...

  8. Four Minority Universities Selected for Fossil Energy Research...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Students and faculty from the chosen universities - the University of Texas, El Paso; ... University of Texas, El Paso (El Paso, Texas) -- The design, optimization and control of ...

  9. Northern Arizona University Wind Projects | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Northern Arizona University Wind Projects (Redirected from Northern Arizona University Wind Project) Jump to: navigation, search Northern Arizona University ARD Wind Project...

  10. Advanced Cellular and Biomolecular Imaging at Lehigh University, (PA) Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassimeris, Lynne, U.

    2010-09-10

    Lehigh University is establishing an interdisciplinary program in high resolution cellular and subcellular biological imaging for a range of applications including improved cancer detection. The completed DOE project added to Lehigh?s bio-imaging infrastructure through acquisition of a new confocal microscope system as well as upgrades to two pieces of existing equipment. Bio-imaging related research at Lehigh was also supported through two seed grants for initiation of new projects.

  11. Nuclear physics detector technology applied to plant biology research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Kross, Brian J.; Lee, Seung Joo; McKisson, John E.; Xi, Wenze; Zorn, Carl J.; Howell, Calvin; Crowell, A.S.; Reid, C.D.; Smith, Mark

    2013-08-01

    The ability to detect the emissions of radioactive isotopes through radioactive decay (e.g. beta particles, x-rays and gamma-rays) has been used for over 80 years as a tracer method for studying natural phenomena. More recently a positron emitting radioisotope of carbon: {sup 11}C has been utilized as a {sup 11}CO{sub 2} tracer for plant ecophysiology research. Because of its ease of incorporation into the plant via photosynthesis, the {sup 11}CO{sub 2} radiotracer is a powerful tool for use in plant biology research. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to study carbon transport in live plants using {sup 11}CO{sub 2}. Presently there are several groups developing and using new PET instrumentation for plant based studies. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in collaboration with the Duke University Phytotron and the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) is involved in PET detector development for plant imaging utilizing technologies developed for nuclear physics research. The latest developments of the use of a LYSO scintillator based PET detector system for {sup 11}CO{sub 2} tracer studies in plants will be briefly outlined.

  12. Matrix Effects in Biological Mass Spectrometry Imaging: Identification and Compensation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Stevens, Susan; Stenzel-Poore, Mary; Laskin, Julia

    2014-07-21

    Matrix effects in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) may affect the observed molecular distribution in chemical and biological systems. In this study, we introduce an experimental approach that efficiently compensates for matrix effects in nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) MSI without introducing any complexity into the experimental protocol. We demonstrate compensation for matrix effects in nano-DESI MSI of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in normal and ischemic mouse brain tissue by doping the nano-DESI solvent with PC standards. Specifically, we use mouse brain tissue of a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke model with an ischemic region localized to one hemisphere of the brain. Due to similar suppression in ionization of endogenous PC molecules extracted from the tissue and PC standards added to the solvent, matrix effects are eliminated by normalizing the intensity of the sodium and potassium adducts of endogenous PC to the intensity of the corresponding adduct of the PC standard. This approach efficiently compensates for signal variations resulting from differences in the local concentrations of sodium and potassium in tissue sections and from the complexity of the extracted analyte mixture derived from local variations in molecular composition.

  13. University Prosperity Game. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyack, K.W.; Berman, M.

    1996-03-01

    Prosperity Games are an outgrowth and adaptation of move/countermove and seminar War Games. Prosperity Games are simulations that explore complex issues in a variety of areas including economics, politics, sociology, environment, education and research. These issues can be examined from a variety of perspectives ranging from a global, macroeconomic and geopolitical viewpoint down to the details of customer/supplier/market interactions in specific industries. All Prosperity Games are unique in that both the game format and the player contributions vary from game to game. This report documents the University Prosperity Game conducted under the sponsorship of the Anderson Schools of Management at the University of New Mexico. This Prosperity Game was initially designed for the roadmap making effort of the National Electronics Manufacturing Initiative (NEMI) of the Electronics Subcommittee of the Civilian Industrial Technology Committee under the aegis of the National Science and Technology Council. The game was modified to support course material in MGT 508, Ethical, Political, and Social Environment of Business. Thirty-five students participated as role players. In this educational context the game`s main objectives were to: (1) introduce and teach global competitiveness and business cultures in an experiential classroom setting; (2) explore ethical, political, and social issues and address them in the context of global markets and competition; and (3) obtain non-government views regarding the technical and non-technical (i.e., policy) issues developed in the NEMI roadmap-making endeavor. The negotiations and agreements made during the game, along with the student journals detailing the players feelings and reactions to the gaming experience, provide valuable insight into the benefits of simulation as an advanced learning tool in higher education.

  14. Final Report - Montana State University - Microbial Activity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and chemical processes that degrade or immobilize contaminants in subsurface environments is a cornerstone of remediation technology. The enhancement of biological and chemical ...

  15. NREL: MIDC/Elizabeth City State University (36.28 N, 76.22 W, 26 m, GMT-5)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Elizabeth City State University

  16. Universal nucleic acids sample preparation method for cells, spores and their mixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bavykin, Sergei

    2011-01-18

    The present invention relates to a method for extracting nucleic acids from biological samples. More specifically the invention relates to a universal method for extracting nucleic acids from unidentified biological samples. An advantage of the presently invented method is its ability to effectively and efficiently extract nucleic acids from a variety of different cell types including but not limited to prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells and/or recalcitrant organisms (i.e. spores). Unlike prior art methods which are focused on extracting nucleic acids from vegetative cell or spores, the present invention effectively extracts nucleic acids from spores, multiple cell types or mixtures thereof using a single method. Important that the invented method has demonstrated an ability to extract nucleic acids from spores and vegetative bacterial cells with similar levels effectiveness. The invented method employs a multi-step protocol which erodes the cell structure of the biological sample, isolates, labels, fragments nucleic acids and purifies labeled samples from the excess of dye.

  17. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, K.W.; Vogel, J.S.; Felton, J.S.; Gledhill, B.L.; Davis, J.C.

    1994-12-27

    Disclosed is a method of quantifying molecules in biological substances comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering the chemical specie to the biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of the chemical specie with the host throughout the biological system of the host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from the host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of the substance from extraneous sources, f. converting the fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in the material by means of direct isotopic counting. 5 figures.

  18. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Vogel, John S.; Felton, James S.; Gledhill, Barton L.; Davis, Jay C.; Stanker, Larry H.

    1993-05-11

    Disclosed is a method of quantifying molecules in biological substances, comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering said chemical specie to said biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system thereof, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of said chemical specie with said host throughout said biological system of said host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from said host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of said substance from extraneous sources, f. converting said fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in said material by means of direct isotopic counting.

  19. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Vogel, John S.; Felton, James S.; Gledhill, Barton L.; Davis, Jay C.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of quantifying molecules in biological substances comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering said chemical specie to said biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system thereof, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of said chemical specie with said host throughout said biological system of said host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from said host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of said substance from extraneous sources, f. converting said fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in said material by means of direct isotopic counting.

  20. University of Washington, Nuclear Physics Laboratory annual report, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    The Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington supports a broad program of experimental physics research. The current program includes in-house research using the local tandem Van de Graff and superconducting linac accelerators and non-accelerator research in double beta decay and gravitation as well as user-mode research at large accelerator and reactor facilities around the world. This book is divided into the following areas: nuclear astrophysics; neutrino physics; nucleus-nucleus reactions; fundamental symmetries and weak interactions; accelerator mass spectrometry; atomic and molecular clusters; ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions; external users; electronics, computing, and detector infrastructure; Van de Graff, superconducting booster and ion sources; nuclear physics laboratory personnel; degrees granted for 1994--1995; and list of publications from 1994--1995.

  1. Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Washington annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    The Nuclear Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington in Seattle pursues a broad program of nuclear physics. These activities are conducted locally and at remote sites. The current programs include in-house research using the local tandem Van de Graaff and superconducting linac accelerators and non-accelerator research in solar neutrino physics at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory in Canada and at SAGE in Russia, and gravitation as well as user-mode research at large accelerators and reactor facilities around the world. Summaries of the individual research projects are included. Areas of research covered are: fundamental symmetries, weak interactions and nuclear astrophysics; neutrino physics; nucleus-nucleus reactions; ultra-relativistic heavy ions; and atomic and molecular clusters.

  2. University of Utah | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    University of Utah University of Utah FORGE logos 010416-06.jpg The Milford, Utah FORGE team, led by the University of Utah - Energy & Geoscience Institute (EGI), has identified a location where they propose to establish a geothermal laboratory. The proposed area has an established history of geothermal research and development, with a vast set of data from exploration wells and seismic stations that will help the Milford, Utah FORGE team characterize their potential site. The Milford, Utah

  3. Colleges and Universities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Education & Professional Development » Colleges and Universities Colleges and Universities STATE All College All SEARCH Reset Map Here you'll find resources on higher education learning opportunities in energy, particularly those concerning energy efficiency and renewable energy. This list is a work in progress and is not intended to be all-inclusive or to assure individual program quality. You can also search for university programs in your state at the Interstate Renewable Energy

  4. James Madison University | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    James Madison University James Madison University Back row: Kyle Kingsborough, Ryan Hoag, James Merrick, Kyle Byrd, Jackson Snarr, Corey Allison, Scott Beatty, Mick Blackwell, Blake Chapman, Nolan Morris. Middle row: Jonathan Romero, Philip Sturm, David Hryvniak, William Romov, Jonathan Nichols, Michael Daddio, Erwin James Will. Front row: Jesse Mlcoch, Natasha Babiarz, Ashleigh Cotting, Ashlynn Buttram, Genevieve D'Antonio. Photo from James Madison University. Back row: Kyle Kingsborough, Ryan

  5. University of Alaska Fairbanks | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Alaska Fairbanks University of Alaska Fairbanks From left to right: Shannan Hoyos, Ed Greene, Matthew Staley, Patrick Wade, Nick Janssen, Chic O'Dell, Pryce Brown, Bruce Lee, Wyatt Rehder, Dominic Dionne. Photo from the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. From left to right: Shannan Hoyos, Ed Greene, Matthew Staley, Patrick Wade, Nick Janssen, Chic O'Dell, Pryce Brown, Bruce Lee, Wyatt Rehder, Dominic Dionne. Photo from the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. Project Description For the inaugural U.S.

  6. Dark matter in a bouncing universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, Yeuk-Kwan E.; Kang, Jin U; Li, Changhong E-mail: jin.u.kang2@gmail.com

    2014-11-01

    We investigate a new scenario of dark matter production in a bouncing universe, in which dark matter was produced completely out of equilibrium in the contracting as well as expanding phase. We explore possibilities of using dark matter as a probe of the bouncing universe, focusing on the relationship between a critical temperature of the bouncing universe and the present relic abundance of dark matter.

  7. Exploring the Repeat-Protein Universe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exploring the Repeat-Protein Universe Exploring the Repeat-Protein Universe Print Wednesday, 13 April 2016 00:00 Naturally occurring proteins-chains of amino acids that fold into functional, three-dimensional shapes-are believed to represent just a small fraction of the universe of all possible permutations of amino-acid sequences and folds. How can we begin to systematically sift through those permutations to find and engineer from scratch (de novo) proteins with the characteristics desired for

  8. Kansas State University | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kansas State University Kansas State University From left to right: Aaron Thomsen, Stuart Disberger, Bret Gross, Cody Yost, Joe Kuhn, Lane Yoder, Hussam Alghamdi, Will Duren, Martin Mixon, Ying Huang, Alex Wurtz, Tanzila Ahmed, Armando Marquez. Not pictured: Jordan Robl, Brandon Young, Shae Pelkowski. Photo from Kansas State University. From left to right: Aaron Thomsen, Stuart Disberger, Bret Gross, Cody Yost, Joe Kuhn, Lane Yoder, Hussam Alghamdi, Will Duren, Martin Mixon, Ying Huang, Alex

  9. Workplace Charging: Charging Up University Campuses

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Workplace Charging: Charging Up University Campuses Carrie Giles, ICF International Carrie Ryder, ICF International Stephen Lommele, National Renewable Energy Laboratory March 2016 DRAFT REPORT Workplace 2 Workplace Charging: Charging Up University Campuses As leading regional employers, colleges and universities are on the front line of local- and national-level technology trends. To remain competitive, many schools are offering plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging to their faculty, staff,

  10. University of Alaska Fairbanks: Business Plan

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Advisory Committee | Department of Energy University Research Reactor Task Force to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee University Research Reactor Task Force to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee In mid-February, 2001 The University Research Reactor (URR) Task Force (TF), a sub-group of the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC), was asked to: * Analyze information collected by DOE, the NERAC "Blue Ribbon Panel,"

  11. Boise State University | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boise State University Boise State University Top left: Mike Sansorm, Calvin Brown, Cody McConkey, Luke Weaver. Top right: Cameron Allen, Scott Roskens, Mitchell Petronek, Davis Gumbo. Bottom Left: Jerad Deitrick, Brandon Lee, Nael Naser, Luke Ganschow. Bottom middle: Grant Stephens, Michael Shoaee, Brian Cardwell, Rory O'Leary. Bottom right: Brian Dambi, Stephan Stuats, Adrian Reyes, Haitian Xu, Firaj Almasyabi. Photo from Boise State University. Top left: Mike Sansorm, Calvin Brown, Cody

  12. Alumni: Sarah Nurre, University of Arkansas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sarah Nurre, University of Arkansas Alumni Link: Opportunities, News and Resources for Former Employees Latest Issue:September 2015 all issues All Issues » submit Alumni: Sarah Nurre, University of Arkansas Optimizing complex systems July 1, 2015 Sarah Nurre Sarah Nurre Contact Linda Anderman Email Sarah Nurre Sarah Nurre moving to the University of Arkansas Even though Sarah Nurre only spent two months at the Lab, in what is now Defense Systems and Analysis, she says it was a great experience,

  13. Extended Lagrangian Density Functional Tight-Binding Molecular Dynamics for Molecules and Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aradi, Bálint; Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2015-06-26

    A computationally fast quantum mechanical molecular dynamics scheme using an extended Lagrangian density functional tight-binding formulation has been developed and implemented in the DFTB+ electronic structure program package for simulations of solids and molecular systems. The scheme combines the computational speed of self-consistent density functional tight-binding theory with the efficiency and long-term accuracy of extended Lagrangian Born–Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Furthermore, for systems without self-consistent charge instabilities, only a single diagonalization or construction of the single-particle density matrix is required in each time step. The molecular dynamics simulation scheme can also be applied to a broad range of problems in materials science, chemistry, and biology.

  14. Extended Lagrangian Density Functional Tight-Binding Molecular Dynamics for Molecules and Solids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aradi, Bálint; Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2015-06-26

    A computationally fast quantum mechanical molecular dynamics scheme using an extended Lagrangian density functional tight-binding formulation has been developed and implemented in the DFTB+ electronic structure program package for simulations of solids and molecular systems. The scheme combines the computational speed of self-consistent density functional tight-binding theory with the efficiency and long-term accuracy of extended Lagrangian Born–Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Furthermore, for systems without self-consistent charge instabilities, only a single diagonalization or construction of the single-particle density matrix is required in each time step. The molecular dynamics simulation scheme can also be applied to a broad range of problems in materialsmore » science, chemistry, and biology.« less

  15. New observatory studies universe's most energetic phenomena

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    computer keyboard were a detector array? To envision how the detectors work, Jordan Goodman, professor of physics at the University of Maryland and principal investigator for...

  16. Oregon State University Hydrodynamics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Hydro | Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Name Oregon State University Address O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory, 220 Owen Hall Place Corvallis, Oregon Zip 97331...

  17. University of Maine Hydrodynamics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Hydro | Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Name University of Maine Address 208 Boardman Hall Place Orono, Maine Zip 04469 Sector Hydro Phone number (207) 581-2129 Website...

  18. Fermilab Today | University of Wisconsin Profile

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of Wisconsin experimental particle physics group focuses on searches for the Higgs boson within and beyond the Standard Model. The group also focuses on new exotic...

  19. University Partnerships / Academic Alliances | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Consequently, the Office of Research, Development, Test and Evaluation supports university partnerships in areas of fundamental science and technology relevant to Stockpile ...

  20. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Stanford University | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stanford University employs best practices to minimize the environmental impact of its operations, including its award-winning Transportation Demand Management program. As part of ...

  1. University of Minnesota Hydrodynamics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydrodynamics Jump to: navigation, search Hydro | Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Name University of Minnesota Address St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE Place...

  2. NREL, Universities Hail Renewable Energy 'Collaboratory' Bill...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL, Universities Hail Renewable Energy 'Collaboratory' Bill June 8, 2006 Denver, Colo. - Leaders of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), ...

  3. University of New Orleans | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Testing Facilities Name University of New Orleans Address School of Naval Architecture, Engineering Bldg UNO Lakefront Campus, 2000 Lakeshore Drive Place New Orleans,...

  4. NETL: University Turbine Systems Research Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UTSR also offers a Gas Turbine Industrial Fellowship program to recruit qualified university research students. This fellowship brings highly trained student researchers from the ...

  5. University of Alaska Fairbanks | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Matt Weisbrod, Mechanical Engineering Kansas State University Team roster: David Chang, Business AdministrationInternational Business and Logistics; Nathan Griffin, Business ...

  6. Fermilab Today | University of Texas at Austin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Austin March 13, 2013 NAME: University of Texas at Austin HOME TOWN: Austin, Texas MASCOT: Bevo the Longhorn COLORS: Burnt orange COLLABORATING AT FERMILAB SINCE: Mid-1990s...

  7. University of North Carolina | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carolina Jump to: navigation, search Name: University of North Carolina Place: Chapel Hill, North Carolina Zip: 27514 Sector: Solar, Wind energy Product: Chapel Hill-based public...

  8. University of Delaware | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Newark, Delaware Sector: Solar Product: University with a research department leading a solar cell development consortium. Coordinates: 44.690435, -71.951685 Show Map Loading...

  9. 2015 University Turbine Systems Research Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University Turbine Systems Research Workshop November 3-5, 2015 Accommodations Georgian Terrace Hotel 659 Peachtree Street, NE Atlanta, GA 30308 The Georgian Terrace Hotel will be...

  10. Northwestern University Team Wins Energy Department's National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Department's National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Northwestern University ... NuMat Technologies won based on its commercialization idea, go-to market strategy, team ...

  11. University of California, Berkeley | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Berkeley Jump to: navigation, search Hydro | Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Name University of California, Berkeley Address 1301 S 46th Street Place Richmond, California Zip 94804...

  12. University Program in Advanced Technology | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ASC at the Labs Supercomputers University Partnerships Predictive Science Academic ... ASC Program Elements Facility Operations and User Support Computational Systems & Software ...

  13. University of California Davis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    65714,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map References: University of California, Davis1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  14. Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Toward Design of a Universal Flu Vaccine Print Worldwide, influenza causes substantial deaths and yearly economic burdens, but the highly changeable nature of the flu virus ...

  15. University of Rhode Island | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Testing Facilities Name University of Rhode Island Address Department of Ocean Engineering, Sheets Building, Bay Campus Place Narragansett, Rhode Island Zip 02882 Sector...

  16. Our Universe from the cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrau, Aurlien; Linsefors, Linda E-mail: linda.linsefors@lpsc.in2p3.fr

    2014-12-01

    The issue of the origin of the Universe and of its contents is addressed in the framework of bouncing cosmologies, as described for example by loop quantum gravity. If the current acceleration is due to a true cosmological constant, this constant is naturally conserved through the bounce and the Universe should also be in a (contracting) de Sitter phase in the remote past. We investigate here the possibility that the de Sitter temperature in the contracting branch fills the Universe with radiation that causes the bounce and the subsequent inflation and reheating. We also consider the possibility that this gives rise to a cyclic model of the Universe and suggest some possible tests.

  17. Fermilab Today | University of Washington Profile

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington August 27, 2009 NAME: University of Washington HOME TOWN: Seattle, Washington MASCOT: Husky SCHOOL COLORS: Purple and gold PARTICLE PHYSICS COLLABORATIONS: DZero and...

  18. Colorado State University Hydrodynamics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Hydro | Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Name Colorado State University Address Daryl B. Simons Building, Engineering Research Center, 1320 Campus...

  19. Oregon State University OSU | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OSU Jump to: navigation, search Name: Oregon State University OSU Address: 1148 Kelley Engineering Center Place: Corvallis Zip: 97331 Region: United States Sector: Marine and...

  20. Susan Murabana - Astronomer, Global Hands On Universe

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Murabana, Susan

    2013-05-29

    Susan Murabana is working to bring astronomy education to Africa through Global Hands-On Universe, a program founded by Berkeley Lab astronomer Carl Pennypacker.