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Sample records for molecular biology csmb

  1. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workshops & Summer Schools Summer Students Structural Molecular Biology Illuminating ... major experimental driver for structural biology research, serving the needs of a large ...

  2. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Biology Group hosted a 3-day comprehensive workshop on the use of non-crystalline small-angle x-ray scattering and diffraction techniques in structural biology research. ...

  3. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Our Mission Our Mission The SSRL Structural Molecular Biology program operates as a integrated resource and has three primary areas (or cores) of technological research and ...

  4. Molecular biology of signal transduction in plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions of the 1991 Cold Springs Harbor Meeting entitled Molecular Biology of Signal Transduction in Plants.

  5. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, M.C.; Lippman, M.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  6. Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomes, R.

    1998-09-01

    Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

  7. Frontiers of NMR in Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-08-25

    NMR spectroscopy is expanding the horizons of structural biology by determining the structures and describing the dynamics of blobular proteins in aqueous solution, as well as other classes of proteins including membrane proteins and the polypeptides that form the aggregates diagnostic of prion and amyloid diseases. Significant results are also emerging on DNA and RNA oligomers and their complexes with proteins. This meeting focused attention on key structural questions emanating from molecular biology and how NMR spectroscopy can be used to answer them.

  8. Ringleader: Jay Nix, Beamline Director for the Molecular Biology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Molecular Biology Consortium Print Jay Nix started started the user program at Beamline 4.2.2 back in 2004, shortly after the Molecular Biology Consortium built the beamline. ...

  9. Ringleader: Jay Nix, Beamline Director for the Molecular Biology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jay Nix, Beamline Director for the Molecular Biology Consortium Print Jay Nix started started the user program at Beamline 4.2.2 back in 2004, shortly after the Molecular Biology ...

  10. 2009 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism & Molecular Biology GRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Julie Maupin- Furlow

    2009-07-26

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses; and industrial applications. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  11. 2011 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism, & Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keneth Stedman

    2011-08-05

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  12. 2010 Plant Molecular Biology Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Sussman

    2010-07-23

    The Plant Molecular Biology Conference has traditionally covered a breadth of exciting topics and the 2010 conference will continue in that tradition. Emerging concerns about food security have inspired a program with three main themes: (1) genomics, natural variation and breeding to understand adaptation and crop improvement, (2) hormonal cross talk, and (3) plant/microbe interactions. There are also sessions on epigenetics and proteomics/metabolomics. Thus this conference will bring together a range of disciplines, will foster the exchange of ideas and enable participants to learn of the latest developments and ideas in diverse areas of plant biology. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for individuals to discuss their research because additional speakers in each session will be selected from submitted abstracts. There will also be a poster session each day for a two-hour period prior to dinner. In particular, this conference plays a key role in enabling students and postdocs (the next generation of research leaders) to mingle with pioneers in multiple areas of plant science.

  13. Third international congress of plant molecular biology: Molecular biology of plant growth and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallick, R.B.

    1995-02-01

    The Congress was held October 6-11, 1991 in Tucson with approximately 3000 scientists attending and over 300 oral presentations and 1800 posters. Plant molecular biology is one of the most rapidly developing areas of the biological sciences. Recent advances in the ability to isolate genes, to study their expression, and to create transgenic plants have had a major impact on our understanding of the many fundamental plant processes. In addition, new approaches have been created to improve plants for agricultural purposes. This is a book of presentation and posters from the conference.

  14. Molecular biology of signal transduction in plants. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This volume contains abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions of the 1991 Cold Springs Harbor Meeting entitled Molecular Biology of Signal Transduction in Plants.

  15. Genetics and Molecular Biology of Hydrogen Metabolism in Sulfate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Genetics and Molecular Biology of Hydrogen Metabolism in Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria The degradation of our environment and the depletion of fossil fuels make the exploration ...

  16. Ringleader: Jay Nix, Beamline Director for the Molecular Biology Consortium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jay Nix, Beamline Director for the Molecular Biology Consortium Print Jay Nix started started the user program at Beamline 4.2.2 back in 2004, shortly after the Molecular Biology Consortium built the beamline. The macromolecular crystallography beamline is a little different than most at the ALS because it's privately managed by a consortium of 10 Midwest universities that pooled their money together to build the beamline, and now continue to do so to maintain it. Nix serves about 50 labs,

  17. Overview of selected molecular biological databases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayl, K.D.; Gaasterland, T.

    1994-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the purpose, content, and design of a subset of the currently available biological databases, with an emphasis on protein databases. Databases included in this summary are 3D-ALI, Berlin RNA databank, Blocks, DSSP, EMBL Nucleotide Database, EMP, ENZYME, FSSP, GDB, GenBank, HSSP, LiMB, PDB, PIR, PKCDD, ProSite, and SWISS-PROT. The goal is to provide a starting point for researchers who wish to take advantage of the myriad available databases. Rather than providing a complete explanation of each database, we present its content and form by explaining the details of typical entries. Pointers to more complete ``user guides`` are included, along with general information on where to search for a new database.

  18. Computational approaches to discovering semantics in molecular biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipton, R.J. ); Marr, T.G. . Theoretical Div.); Welsh, J.D. . Dept. of Biology)

    1989-07-01

    One of the central questions of molecular biology is the discovery of the semantics of DNA. This discovery relies in a critical way on a variety of expensive computations. In order to solve these computations, both parallel computers and special-purpose hardware play a major role.

  19. STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE RESEARCH PROGRAM (LSBMM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenberg, David S.

    2008-07-15

    The UCLA-DOE Institute of Genomics and Proteomics is an organized research unit of the University of California, sponsored by the Department of Energy through the mechanism of a Cooperative Agreement. Today the Institute consists of 10 Principal Investigators and 7 Associate Members, developing and applying technologies to promote the biological and environmental missions of the Department of Energy, and 5 Core Technology Centers to sustain this work. The focus is on understanding genomes, pathways and molecular machines in organisms of interest to DOE, with special emphasis on developing enabling technologies. Since it was founded in 1947, the UCLA-DOE Institute has adapted its mission to the research needs of DOE and its progenitor agencies as these research needs have changed. The Institute started as the AEC Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, directed by Stafford Warren, who later became the founding Dean of the UCLA School of Medicine. In this sense, the entire UCLA medical center grew out of the precursor of our Institute. In 1963, the mission of the Institute was expanded into environmental studies by Director Ray Lunt. I became the third director in 1993, and in close consultation with David Galas and John Wooley of DOE, shifted the mission of the Institute towards genomics and proteomics. Since 1993, the Principal Investigators and Core Technology Centers are entirely new, and the Institute has separated from its former division concerned with PET imaging. The UCLA-DOE Institute shares the space of Boyer Hall with the Molecular Biology Institute, and assumes responsibility for the operation of the main core facilities. Fig. 1 gives the organizational chart of the Institute. Some of the benefits to the public of research carried out at the UCLA-DOE Institute include the following: The development of publicly accessible, web-based databases, including the Database of Protein Interactions, and the ProLinks database of genomicly inferred protein function linkages

  20. International Conference on the Cell and Molecular Biology of Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Stephen Miller

    2010-06-10

    The 2010 Conference on the Cell and Molecular Biology of Chlamydomonas was held June 6-10 near Boston, MA, and attracted a record 273 participants, 146 from US labs, 10 from Canada, and the remainder from 18 other countries. The single-celled algal protist Chlamydomonas is a key research organism for many investigators, including those who study photosynthesis, cell motility, adaptation to environmental stresses, the evolution of multicellularity, and the production of biofuels. Chlamydomonas researchers gather every two years at a research conference to exchange methods, develop collaborative efforts, disseminate recent findings, and plan large-scale studies to improve the usefulness of this unique research organism. This conference provides the only opportunity for Chlamydomonas scientists who work on different research problems to meet face to face, and greatly speeds progress in their respective fields. An important function of these Chlamydomonas conferences is to promote and showcase the work of younger scientists, and to attract new investigators into the Chlamydomonas community. DOE award SC0004085 was used to offset the travel and registration costs for 18 young investigators, 9 of whom were women, including one African American. Most of these scientists would not have been able to attend the conference without DOE support. A total of 208 research presentations were made at the meeting, 80 talks (63 presented by students, postdocs, and pre-tenured faculty) and 128 posters. Cell motility and biofuels/metabolism were the best-represented research areas, with a total of 77 presentations. This fact underscores the growing importance of Chlamydomonas as a research and production tool in the rapidly expanding world of biofuels research. A total of 28 talks and posters were presented on the topics of photosynthesis and stress responses, which were among the next best-represented research areas. As at several recent Chlamydomonas meetings, important advances were

  1. Molecular biology of Homo sapiens: Abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Spring Harbor symposium on quantitative biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, J.D.; Siniscalco, M.

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Springs Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology. The topic for this meeting was the ''Molecular Biology of Homo sapiens.'' Sessions were entitled Human Gene Map, Human Cancer Genes, Genetic Diagnosis, Human Evolution, Drugs Made Off Human Genes, Receptors, and Gene Therapy. (DT)

  2. 2012 PLANT MOLECULAR BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JULY 15-20, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sussman, Michael

    2013-07-20

    The 2012 Gordon Conference on Plant Molecular Biology will present cutting-edge research on molecular aspects of plant growth and development, with particular emphasis on recent discoveries in molecular mechanisms involved with plant signaling systems. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics in plant molecular biology including hormone receptors and early events in hormone signaling, plant perception of and response to plant pathogen and symbionts, as well as technological and biological aspects of epigenomics particularly as it relates to signaling systems that regulate plant growth and development. Genomic approaches to plant signaling will be emphasized, including genomic profiling technologies for quantifying various biological subsystems, such as the epigenome, transcriptome, phosphorylome, and metabolome. The meeting will include an important session devoted to answering the question, "What are the biological and technological limits of plant breeding/genetics, and how can they be solved"?

  3. 2012 CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 17 - 22, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judith Berman

    2012-06-22

    The Gordon Research Conference on CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY was held at Holderness School, Holderness New Hampshire, June 17 - 22, 2012. The 2012 Gordon Conference on Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology (CMFB) will present the latest, cutting-edge research on the exciting and growing field of molecular and cellular aspects of fungal biology. Topics will range from yeast to filamentous fungi, from model systems to economically important organisms, and from saprophytes and commensals to pathogens of plants and animals. The CMFB conference will feature a wide range of topics including systems biology, cell biology and morphogenesis, organismal interactions, genome organisation and regulation, pathogenesis, energy metabolism, biomass production and population genomics. The Conference was well-attended with 136 participants. Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings.

  4. Workshop in computational molecular biology, April 15, 1991--April 14, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tavare, S.

    1995-04-12

    Funds from this award were used to the Workshop in Computational Molecular Biology, `91 Symposium entitled Interface: Computing Science and Statistics, Seattle, Washington, April 21, 1991; the Workshop in Statistical Issues in Molecular Biology held at Stanford, California, August 8, 1993; and the Session on Population Genetics a part of the 56th Annual Meeting, Institute of Mathematical Statistics, San Francisco, California, August 9, 1993.

  5. Genetics and Molecular Biology of Hydrogen Metabolism in Sulfate-Reducing

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bacteria (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Genetics and Molecular Biology of Hydrogen Metabolism in Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Genetics and Molecular Biology of Hydrogen Metabolism in Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria The degradation of our environment and the depletion of fossil fuels make the exploration of alternative fuels evermore imperative. Among the alternatives is biohydrogen which has high energy content by weight and produces only water when

  6. Recent advances in yeast molecular biology: recombinant DNA. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 25 papers presented at a workshop focusing on chromosomal structure, gene regulation, recombination, DNA repair, and cell type control, that have been obtained by experimental approaches incorporating the new technologies of yeast DNA transformation, molecular cloning, and DNA sequence analysis. (KRM)

  7. Modeling human risk: Cell & molecular biology in context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    It is anticipated that early in the next century manned missions into outer space will occur, with a mission to Mars scheduled between 2015 and 2020. However, before such missions can be undertaken, a realistic estimation of the potential risks to the flight crews is required. One of the uncertainties remaining in this risk estimation is that posed by the effects of exposure to the radiation environment of outer space. Although the composition of this environment is fairly well understood, the biological effects arising from exposure to it are not. The reasons for this are three-fold: (1) A small but highly significant component of the radiation spectrum in outer space consists of highly charged, high energy (HZE) particles which are not routinely experienced on earth, and for which there are insufficient data on biological effects; (2) Most studies on the biological effects of radiation to date have been high-dose, high dose-rate, whereas in space, with the exception of solar particle events, radiation exposures will be low-dose, low dose-rate; (3) Although it has been established that the virtual absence of gravity in space has a profound effect on human physiology, it is not clear whether these effects will act synergistically with those of radiation exposure. A select panel will evaluate the utilizing experiments and models to accurately predict the risks associated with exposure to HZE particles. Topics of research include cellular and tissue response, health effects associated with radiation damage, model animal systems, and critical markers of Radiation response.

  8. Inhibition Of Molecular And Biological Processes Using Modified Oligonucleotides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kozyavkin, Sergei A.; Malykh, Andrei G.; Polouchine, Nikolai N.; Slesarev, Alexei I.

    2003-04-15

    A method of inhibiting at least one molecular process in a sample, comprising administering to the sample an oligonucleotide or polynucleotide containing at least one monomeric unit having formula (I): wherein A is an organic moiety, n is at least 1, and each X is independently selected from the group consisting of --NRCOCONu, --NHCOCR.sub.2 CR.sub.2 CONu, --NHCOCR.dbd.CRCONu, and --NHCOSSCONu, wherein each R independently represents H or a substituted or unsubstituted alkyl group, and Nu represents a nucleophile, or a salt of the compound.

  9. Facilities for exploring molecular biology databases on the Web: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markowitz, V.M.; Chen, I.M.A.; Kosky, A.S.; Szeto, E.

    1996-12-31

    We discuss criteria for evaluating and comparing the main facilities provided by molecular biology databases (MBDs) for exploring (that is, retrieving and interpreting data) on the Web. We use these criteria for examining the facilities supported by typical MBDs such as Genbank, AtDB, GSDB, GDB, and MGD (as of September 5, 1996). 19 refs.

  10. Molecular biology in marine science: Scientific questions, technological approaches, and practical implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    This report describes molecular techniques that could be invaluable in addressing process-oriented problems in the ocean sciences that have perplexed oceanographers for decades, such as understanding the basis for biogeochemical processes, recruitment processes, upper-ocean dynamics, biological impacts of global warming, and ecological impacts of human activities. The coupling of highly sophisticated methods, such as satellite remote sensing, which permits synoptic monitoring of chemical, physical, and biological parameters over large areas, with the power of modern molecular tools for ``ground truthing`` at small scales could allow scientists to address questions about marine organisms and the ocean in which they live that could not be answered previously. Clearly, the marine sciences are on the threshold of an exciting new frontier of scientific discovery and economic opportunity.

  11. Molecular Biology for the Environment: an EC-US hands-on Course in Environmental Biotechnology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Victor de Lorenzo; Juan Luis Ramos; Jerome Kukor; Gerben J. Zylstra

    2004-02-15

    One of the central goals of this activity is to bring together young scientists (at the late Ph.D. or early postdoctoral stages of their careers) in a forum that should result in future collaborations. The course is designed to give scientists hands-on experience in modern, up-to-date biotechnological methods at the interface between molecular biology and environmental biotechnology for the analysis of microorganisms and their activities with regard to the remediation of pollutants in the environment.

  12. Plant Molecular Biology 2008 Gordon Research Conference - July 13-18, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard M. Amasino

    2009-08-28

    The Plant Molecular Biology Conference has traditionally covered a breadth of exciting topics and the 2008 conference will continue in that tradition. There will be sessions on metabolism; new methods to study genomes, proteomes and metabolomes; plant-microbe interactions; plant hormones; epigenetics. A new topic for the conference this year will be bioenergy. Thus this conference will bring together a range of disciplines to foster the exchange ideas and to permit the participants to learn of the latest developments and ideas in diverse areas of plant biology. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for individuals to discuss their research because additional speakers in each session will be selected from submitted abstracts. There will also be a poster session each day for a two-hour period prior to dinner.

  13. 2010 CELL AND MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 13-18, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelle Momany

    2010-06-18

    The Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology Conference provides a forum for presentation of the latest advances in fungal research with an emphasis on filamentous fungi. This open-registration scientific meeting brings together the leading scientists from academia, government and industry to discuss current research results and future directions at Holderness School, an outstanding venue for scientific interaction. A key objective of the conference is to foster interaction among scientists working on model fungi such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Neurospora crassa and Aspergillus nidulans and scientists working on a variety of filamentous fungi whose laboratory tractability is often inversely proportional to their medical, industrial or ecological importance. Sessions will be devoted to Systems Biology, Fungi and Cellulosic Biomass, Small RNAs, Population Genomics, Symbioses, Pathogenesis, Membrane Trafficking and Polarity, and Cytoskeleton and Motors. A session will also be devoted to hot topics picked from abstracts. The CMFB conference provides a unique opportunity to examine the breadth of fungal biology in a small meeting format that encourages in-depth discussion among the attendees.

  14. Theoretical Biology and Biophysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theoretical Biology and Biophysics Modeling biological systems and analysis and informatics of molecular and cellular biological data Mathematical BiologyImmunology Fundamental ...

  15. WHOLE CELL TOMOGRAPHY/MOLECULAR BIOLOGY/STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY: Affordable x-ray microscopy with nanoscale resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, James E.; Blackborow, Paul; Horne, Stephen J.; Gelb, Jeff

    2013-03-01

    Biological research spans 10 orders of magnitude from angstroms to meters. While electron microscopy can reveal structural details at most of these spatial length scales, transmission electron tomography only reliably reconstructs three-dimensional (3-D) volumes of cellular material with a spatial resolution between 1-5 nm from samples less than 500 nm thick1. Most biological cells are 2-30 times thicker than this threshold, which means that a cell must be cut into consecutive slices with each slice reconstructed individually in order to approximate the contextual information of the entire cell. Fortunately, due to a larger penetration depth2, X-ray computed tomography bypasses the need to physically section a cell and enables imaging of intact cells and tissues on the micrometer or larger scale with tens to hundreds of nanometer spatial resolution. While the technique of soft x-ray microscopy has been extensively developed in synchrotron facilities, advancements in laboratory x-ray source designs now increase its accessibility by supporting commercial systems suitable for a standard laboratory. In this paper, we highlight a new commercial compact cryogenic soft x-ray microscope designed for a standard laboratory setting and explore its capabilities for mesoscopic investigations of intact prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

  16. Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biology @WIPP Life Begins at 250,000,000 Years WIPP's underground isn't just suited for physics experiments aiming to unlock the mysteries of the Universe, it is also a perfect "dig site" for biologists wanting to chronicle the history of life. 250 million years ago, the area around WIPP was all part of the Permian Sea. Today, the salt beds that make up the WIPP underground provide a time capsule, of sorts, to this ancient era. Researchers have uncovered ancient bacteria, cellulose and

  17. Molecular Dynameomics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynameomics Molecular Dynameomics DaggettHiResWhitebg.png Key Challenges: Perform molecular dynamics simulations to characterize both native (i.e. biologically active) and...

  18. FINAL REPORT: DOE CONTRACT NUMBER FG0205ER64026 Biological Neutron Scattering: A Collaboration with the Oak Ridge Center for Structural Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jill Trewhella

    2011-01-12

    The overarching goal of this project was to promote applications of small-angle scattering in structural molecular biology by providing model examples of cutting edge applications that demonstrate the unique capabilities and potential of the DOE national user facilities at Oak Ridge, especially the newly commissioned BioSANS. The approach taken was three-fold: (1) to engage in high impact collaborative research projects that would benefit from small-angle neutron scattering to both demonstrate the power of the technique while expanding the potential user community; (2) to provide access to scattering facilities established at the University of Utah to as broad a set of researchers as possible to increase the expertise in small-angle scattering generally; and (3) to develop new methods and tools for small-angle scattering. To these ends, three major research collaborations were pursued that resulted in a significant body of published work where neutron scattering and contrast variation played a major role. These major collaborations involved studies of protein complexes involved in (1) bacterial transcription regulation and adaptive response (a DOE/BER priority area); (2) regulation of cardiac muscle; and (3) neuronal disorders. In addition, to broaden the impact of the project, smaller collaborative efforts were supported that used either small-angle X-ray or neutron scattering. Finally, the DOE supported facilities at the University of Utah were made available to researchers on a service basis and a number of independent groups took advantage of this opportunity. In all of this work, there was an emphasis on the training of students and post docs in scattering techniques, and a set of publications (a book chapter, a review, and an encyclopedia article) were produced to guide the non-specialist potential user of scattering techniques in successful applications of the techniques. We also developed a suite of user friendly web-based computational tools currently

  19. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Highlights Science Highlights Structure of Chinese Herbal-based Medicine Captured by ATP on a Human tRNA Synthetase For approximately 2,000 years, the Chinese have been ...

  20. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sources, as well as lasers that can be used in total internal reflectance mode (TIRF). ... to aid in work with biomolecules, microbes, molecular biology techniques and cell culture. ...

  1. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility RLGarcia@lbl.gov 510.486.4125 Biography Education B.A. Molecular Biology, Scripps College, Claremont, CA, 2005 Previous Professional Positions Principal...

  2. (Biological dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sega, G.A.

    1990-11-06

    The traveler participated in an International Symposium on Trends in Biological Dosimetry and presented an invited paper entitled, Adducts in sperm protamine and DNA vs mutation frequency.'' The purpose of the Symposium was to examine the applicability of new methods to study quantitatively the effects of xenobiotic agents (radiation and chemicals) on molecular, cellular and organ systems, with special emphasis on human biological dosimetry. The general areas covered at the meeting included studies on parent compounds and metabolites; protein adducts; DNA adducts; gene mutations; cytogenetic end-points and reproductive methods.

  3. Report on the research conducted under the funding of the Sloan foundation postdoctoral fellowship in Computational Molecular Biology [Systematic study of protein-protein complexes] Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheinerman, Felix

    2001-06-01

    A central question in molecular biology is what structural features are common at protein-protein interfaces and what energetic factors define the affinity and specificity of protein-protein association. Analysis of structural and mutational data on protein-protein interfaces revealed that protein-protein interfaces of different functional classes contain many more energetically important charged and polar residues than was previously thought. Since, in the context of protein folding studies, polar interactions are believed to destabilize the folded proteins, this observation raised the question as to the forces that determine the stability of protein complexes. To investigate this issue in detail, the authors developed a number of partitioning schemes that allowed them to investigate the role of selected residues, ion pairs, and networks of polar interactions in protein-protein association. The methods developed were applied to the analysis of four different protein-protein interfaces: the ribonuclease barnase and its inhibitor barstar, the human growth hormone and its receptor, subtype N9 influenze virus neuraminidase and NC41 antibody, and the Ras Binding Domain of kinase cRaf and a Ras homologue Rap1A. The calculations revealed a surprising variability in how polar interactions affect the stability of different complexes. The finding that positions of charged and polar residues on protein-protein interfaces are optimized with respect to electrostatic interactions suggests that this property can be employed for the discrimination between native conformations and trial complexes generated by a docking algorithm. Analysis indicated the presence of SH2 domains in Janus family of non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases.

  4. Molecular and biological characterization of the 5 human-bovine rotavirus (WC3)-based reassortant strains of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, RotaTeq (registered)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; Joelsson, Daniel B.; Warakomski, Donald J.; Zhou, Tingyi; Mathis, Pamela K.; Maanen, Marc-Henri van; Ranheim, Todd S.; Ciarlet, Max

    2010-08-01

    RotaTeq (registered) is a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine that contains five human-bovine reassortant strains (designated G1, G2, G3, G4, and P1) on the backbone of the naturally attenuated tissue culture-adapted parental bovine rotavirus (BRV) strain WC3. The viral genomes of each of the reassortant strains were completely sequenced and compared pairwise and phylogenetically among each other and to human rotavirus (HRV) and BRV reference strains. Reassortants G1, G2, G3, and G4 contained the VP7 gene from their corresponding HRV parent strains, while reassortants G1 and G2 also contained the VP3 gene (genotype M1) from the HRV parent strain. The P1 reassortant contained the VP4 gene from the HRV parent strain and all the other gene segments from the BRV WC3 strain. The human VP7s had a high level of overall amino acid identity (G1: 95-99%, G2: 94-99% G3: 96-100%, G4: 93-99%) when compared to those of representative rotavirus strains of their corresponding G serotypes. The VP4 of the P1 reassortant had a high identity (92-97%) with those of serotype P1A[8] HRV reference strains, while the BRV VP7 showed identities ranging from 91% to 94% to those of serotype G6 HRV strains. Sequence analyses of the BRV or HRV genes confirmed that the fundamental structure of the proteins in the vaccine was similar to those of the HRV and BRV references strains. Sequences analyses showed that RotaTeq (registered) exhibited a high degree of genetic stability as no mutations were identified in the material of each reassortant, which undergoes two rounds of replication cycles in cell culture during the manufacturing process, when compared to the final material used to fill the dosing tubes. The infectivity of each of the reassortant strains of RotaTeq (registered) , like HRV strains, did not require the presence of sialic acid residues on the cell surface. The molecular and biologic characterization of RotaTeq (registered) adds to the significant body of clinical data supporting the

  5. Biological Safety

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The DOE's Biological Safety Program provides a forum for the exchange of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of biological safety. This content is supported by the Biosurety Executive Team. The Biosurety Executive Team is a DOE-chartered group. The DOE Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy provides administrative support for this group. The group identifies biological safety-related issues of concern to the DOE and pursues solutions to issues identified.

  6. DockingShop: A Tool for Interactive Molecular Docking (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL ... FEEDBACK; FORECASTING; MOLECULAR STRUCTURE; NAVIGATION; OPTIMIZATION; PROTEINS; ...

  7. Algal Biology Toolbox Workshop Summary Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Algal Biology Toolbox Workshop Summary Report summarizes an event hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s Advanced Algal Systems Program in May 2016. The purpose of the Algal Biology Toolbox Workshop was to collect input from experts in the field of algal biology regarding (1) the current state of algal biological tools, including our understanding of algal biology and biochemistry, available molecular toolboxes, omics databases, and other resources; (2) challenges to developing and applying a full suite of biological tools to improve algae performance and system robustness; and (3) strategies to advance progress toward commercial algal biofuels.

  8. National Laboratory] Basic Biological Sciences(59) Biological...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Achievements of structural genomics Terwilliger, Thomas C. Los Alamos National Laboratory Basic Biological Sciences(59) Biological Science Biological Science Abstract Not...

  9. Biological preconcentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Huber, Dale L.

    2008-09-09

    A biological preconcentrator comprises a stimulus-responsive active film on a stimulus-producing microfabricated platform. The active film can comprise a thermally switchable polymer film that can be used to selectively absorb and desorb proteins from a protein mixture. The biological microfabricated platform can comprise a thin membrane suspended on a substrate with an integral resistive heater and/or thermoelectric cooler for thermal switching of the active polymer film disposed on the membrane. The active polymer film can comprise hydrogel-like polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) or poly(n-isopropylacrylamide), that are tethered to the membrane. The biological preconcentrator can be fabricated with semiconductor materials and technologies.

  10. (Biological dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, R.J.

    1990-12-17

    The traveler attended the 1st International Conference on Biological Dosimetry in Madrid, Spain. This conference was organized to provide information to a general audience of biologists, physicists, radiotherapists, industrial hygiene personnel and individuals from related fields on the current ability of cytogenetic analysis to provide estimates of radiation dose in cases of occupational or environmental exposure. There is a growing interest in Spain in biological dosimetry because of the increased use of radiation sources for medical and occupational uses, and with this the anticipated and actual increase in numbers of overexposure. The traveler delivered the introductory lecture on Biological Dosimetry: Mechanistic Concepts'' that was intended to provide a framework by which the more applied lectures could be interpreted in a mechanistic way. A second component of the trip was to provide advice with regard to several recent cases of overexposure that had been or were being assessed by the Radiopathology and Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital General Gregorio Maranon'' in Madrid. The traveler had provided information on several of these, and had analyzed cells from some exposed or purportedly exposed individuals. The members of the biological dosimetry group were referred to individuals at REACTS at Oak Ridge Associated Universities for advice on follow-up treatment.

  11. Ninth International Workshop on Plant Membrane Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This report is a compilation of abstracts from papers which were discussed at a workshop on plant membrane biology. Topics include: plasma membrane ATP-ases; plant-environment interactions, membrane receptors; signal transduction; ion channel physiology; biophysics and molecular biology; vaculor H+ pumps; sugar carriers; membrane transport; and cellular structure and function.

  12. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology LANL leads the world in computational finishing of microbial ... and experimental biology as the foundation of a dynamic systems biology capability. ...

  13. Systems biology approach to bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, Romy; Wu, Cindy H.; Hazen, Terry C.

    2012-06-01

    Bioremediation has historically been approached as a ‘black box’ in terms of our fundamental understanding. Thus it succeeds and fails, seldom without a complete understanding of why. Systems biology is an integrated research approach to study complex biological systems, by investigating interactions and networks at the molecular, cellular, community, and ecosystem level. The knowledge of these interactions within individual components is fundamental to understanding the dynamics of the ecosystem under investigation. Finally, understanding and modeling functional microbial community structure and stress responses in environments at all levels have tremendous implications for our fundamental understanding of hydrobiogeochemical processes and the potential for making bioremediation breakthroughs and illuminating the ‘black box’.

  14. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mike Brady ed_barnard Joint Molecular Foundry/ALS Project Scientist mabrady@lbl.gov 510.486.6548

  15. Molecular Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Science NETL's Molecular Science competency provides technology-enabling computational and experimental insight into the atomic-level processes occurring in condensed matter and gas phase systems or at the heterogeneous surface-gas interfaces used for energy applications. Research includes molecular optimization as well as both classical and high-throughput material design, specifically: Molecular Optimization Development and application of new computational approaches in the general

  16. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Nanostructures Staff Ron Zuckerman Ron Zuckermann Facility Director rnzuckermann@lbl.gov 510.486.7091 Caroline Ajo-Franklin Caroline Ajo-Franklin Staff Scientist...

  17. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NEWS Subatomic Microscopy Key to Building New Classes of Materials Molecular Foundry users from Penn State University and Cornell University have worked with staff to describe the first atomic scale evidence for strain-induced ferroelectricity in a layered oxide. [MORE] Molecular Foundry User Featured in MIT's Technology Review Cyclotron Road's Kendra Kuhl Featured in '35 Innovators Under 35' for 2016. [MORE] Foundry Fall Seminar Series Begins September 13 The next Molecular Foundry seminar

  18. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Branden Brough Branden Director of Strategy and External Relations bbrough@lbl.gov 510.486.4206 Biography Branden Brough is the Molecular Foundry's Director of Strategy and...

  19. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the Molecular Foundry as a Scientific Engineering Associate since 2007. Expertise Tracy's main focus is assisting users with their research projects (helping design reactions ...

  20. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liu's research aims to achieve coherent control of functionality and properties across different scales through molecular level design and synthesis. With the developed materials ...

  1. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jeff Urban of the Molecular. Both of these positions involved the application of his laser physics and chemistry knowledge to implement various spectroscopic imaging techniques. ...

  2. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Guide Download the complete Users' Guide (PDF) Submit a Proposal Learn about the Molecular Foundry and its user program Explore Foundry capabilities and plan your proposal...

  3. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flatter and Faster: Transition Metal Dichalcogendies at the Molecular Foundry (Part II) Brain Imaging and Optical Manipulation Active Nanointerfaces for Electrochemistry SAXS-WAXS...

  4. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dmitry Soustin dmitry User Program Administrator dsoustin@lbl.gov 510.486.7687 Biography Dmitry Soustin is the Molecular Foundry's User Program Administrator. In this role, Dmitry...

  5. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theory of Nanostructured Materials jbneaton@lbl.gov 510.486.4527 personal website Biography Jeffrey B. Neaton is Director of the Molecular Foundry, a Department of Energy...

  6. Modern concepts in molecular modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bajorath, J.; Klein, T.E.

    1996-12-31

    This session focused on the application of computer models and the development and application of various energy functions to study the structure, energetics and dynamics of proteins and their interactions with ligands. These studies provide an exciting view of current developments in computer-aided molecular modeling and theoretical analysis of biological molecules.

  7. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology Genomics and Systems Biology Los Alamos scientists perform research in functional genomics and structural genomics, and applications for such work ...

  8. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cells, viruses), plant or soil samples (USDA quarantines), recombinant DNA, or blood-borne pathogen. Biological Use Authorization The great majority of biological work at...

  9. Micro/nanofabricated environments for synthetic biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collier, Pat [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    A better understanding of how confinement, crowding and reduced dimensionality modulate reactivity and reaction dynamics will aid in the rational and systematic discovery of functionality in complex biological systems. Artificial micro- and nanofabricated structures have helped elucidate the effects of nanoscale spatial confinement and segregation on biological behavior, particularly when integrated with microfluidics, through precise control in both space and time of diffusible signals and binding interactions. Examples of nanostructured interfaces for synthetic biology include the development of cell-like compartments for encapsulating biochemical reactions, nanostructured environments for fundamental studies of diffusion, molecular transport and biochemical reaction kinetics, and regulation of biomolecular interactions as functions of micro- and nanofabricated topological constraints.

  10. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B.E., & Chuang, H.-h.. Activity-dependent targeting of TRPV1 with a pore-permeating capsaicin analog. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 108, 8497-8500 (2011). link Cohen, B.E. Biological...

  11. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ralph J. Greenspan, Director, Center for Brain Activity Mapping; Professor of BiologyNeurobiology Section and of Cognitive Science, UC San Diego; Co-Director, Cal-BRAIN. Roger ...

  12. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agenda March 24, 2016 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory AGENDA Registration 8:30 am - 9:00 am The Molecular Foundry's History and Impact 9:00 am - 10:30 am Jeff Neaton, Molecular Foundry Welcome Paul Alivisatos, Berkeley Lab/UC Berkeley The Creation of the Molecular Foundry Michael Witherell, Berkeley Lab Berkeley Lab Impact Brian Schowengerdt, Magic Leap Industry Impact Representative Mike Honda (D-CA) National Impact Break 10:30 am - 11:00 am Session 1: Functional Nanointerfaces 11:00 am -

  13. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Nanostructures This facility studies the synthesis, analysis and mimicry of biological nanostructures. Expertise and capabilities are available to develop new materials based on the folding and assembly of sequence-defined, bioinspired polymers (including peptides,,nucleic acids, and peptoids). New biocompatible imaging probes based on organic dyes and functionalized inorganic nanocrystals are being developed and are available to facilitate state-of-the-art bioimaging studies.

  14. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Basic understanding of this nature is required to achieve the mission of the Molecular Foundry, the atomic-level design, creation and control of energy-relevant materials. My group ...

  15. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Seminars occur on Tuesdays at 11:00 am, in Building 67, Room 3111 unless otherwise noted. To be added to the Molecular Foundry's seminar mailing list, please email Jason Sweet. ...

  16. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Meg Holm Meg Senior Administrator mcholm@lbl.gov 510.486.5135 Biography Meg is the Molecular Foundry's Senior Administrator. In this role, she supervises the Foundry budget...

  17. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alison Hatt allison User Program Director ajhatt@lbl.gov 510.486.7154 Biography Alison Hatt is the Director of the User Program at the Molecular Foundry and a former Foundry...

  18. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gil Torres Gil Torres gjtorres@lbl.gov 510.486.4395 Biography Gil is the Building Manager for MSD in buildings 62, 66, 2, 30, JCAP and the Molecular Foundry. Gil supports Foundry...

  19. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See the Foundry's full equipment list Organic and Macromolecular Synthesis Capabilities & Tools Instrument Scheduler Major Instruments and Capabilities AB SCIEX TF4800 MALDI TOF-TOF Mass Spectrometer This instrument is the tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer systems, providing the excellent level of molecular mass coverage in the range of molecular masses 500 and 150,000 Da, high throughput, and confidence in both qualitative and quantitative analyses. The analyzer combines all of the

  20. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foundry Molecular Foundry HOME REGISTRATION AGENDA SYMPOSIA POSTERS EXHIBITOR INFO TRAVEL & LODGING Molecular Foundry User Meeting: August 11-12, 2016 This conference focuses on frontier research topics in nanoscale science, providing a forum for discussion and development of new results and ideas. Whether you are a returning user, a prospective user, or someone who is curious about the Foundry, you are encouraged to attend the User Meeting. Participants are invited to submit abstracts for

  1. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Media and Resources MEDIA Molecular Foundry Youtube Channel Berkeley Lab Youtube Channel Berkeley Lab Photo Archive Webcam The Molecular Foundry and its users benefit from its location at Berkeley Lab within the Bay Area's vibrant scientific ecosystem. The expansive views serve to fuel the imagination and build connections among the Foundry's diverse research community. Baycam Click here for a full screen view from our webcam. RESOURCES Style Guide PDF 308 KB Logos Signature Preferred 41 KB ZIP

  2. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications Advanced Materials Special Issue » The Molecular Foundry publication database lists peer-reviewed work that has resulted from internal and user research. New publications can be added to the database here. All published work resulting from the use of this facility must acknowledge the Molecular Foundry, regardless of whether Foundry staff are included as authors. Proper acknowledgement text can be found here. Citation Year Facility User Loading data from server

  3. Biological conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, C.D.

    A system for bioconversion of organic material comprises a primary bioreactor column wherein a biological active agent (zymomonas mobilis) converts the organic material (sugar) to a product (alcohol), a rejuvenator column wherein the biological activity of said biological active agent is enhanced, and means for circulating said biological active agent between said primary bioreactor column and said rejuvenator column.

  4. [Studies of biologic activation associated with molecular receptor increase and tumor response in ChL6/L6 protocol patients; Studies in phantoms; Quantitative SPECT; Preclinical studies; and Clinical studies]. DOE annual report, 1994--95

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeNardo, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The authors describe results which have not yet been published from their associated studies listed in the title. For the first, they discuss Lym-1 single chain genetically engineered molecules, analysis of molecular genetic coded messages to enhance tumor response, and human dosimetry and therapeutic human use radiopharmaceuticals. Studies in phantoms includes a discussion of planar image quantitation, counts coincidence correction, organ studies, tumor studies, and {sup 90}Y quantitation with Bremsstrahlung imaging. The study on SPECT discusses attenuation correction and scatter correction. Preclinical studies investigated uptake of {sup 90}Y-BrE-3 in mice using autoradiography. Clinical studies discuss image quantitation verses counts from biopsy samples, S factors for radiation dose calculation, {sup 67}Cu imaging studies for lymphoma cancer, and {sup 111}In MoAb imaging studies for breast cancer to predict {sup 90}Y MoAb therapy.

  5. Physics Meets Biology (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chu, Steve [Director, LBNL

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: If scientists could take advantage of the awesomely complex and beautiful functioning of biologys natural molecular machines, their potential for application in many disciplines would be incalculable. Nobel Laureate and Director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Steve Chu explores Possible solutions to global warming and its consequences.

  6. Molecular fountain.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-09-01

    A molecular fountain directs slowly moving molecules against gravity to further slow them to translational energies that they can be trapped and studied. If the molecules are initially slow enough they will return some time later to the position from which they were launched. Because this round trip time can be on the order of a second a single molecule can be observed for times sufficient to perform Hz level spectroscopy. The goal of this LDRD proposal was to construct a novel Molecular Fountain apparatus capable of producing dilute samples of molecules at near zero temperatures in well-defined user-selectable, quantum states. The slowly moving molecules used in this research are produced by the previously developed Kinematic Cooling technique, which uses a crossed atomic and molecular beam apparatus to generate single rotational level molecular samples moving slowly in the laboratory reference frame. The Kinematic Cooling technique produces cold molecules from a supersonic molecular beam via single collisions with a supersonic atomic beam. A single collision of an atom with a molecule occurring at the correct energy and relative velocity can cause a small fraction of the molecules to move very slowly vertically against gravity in the laboratory. These slowly moving molecules are captured by an electrostatic hexapole guiding field that both orients and focuses the molecules. The molecules are focused into the ionization region of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and are ionized by laser radiation. The new molecular fountain apparatus was built utilizing a new design for molecular beam apparatus that has allowed us to miniaturize the apparatus. This new design minimizes the volumes and surface area of the machine allowing smaller pumps to maintain the necessary background pressures needed for these experiments.

  7. Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities User Facilities Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ARM) Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) Community Resources Contact Information Biological and

  8. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See the Foundry's full equipment list Research Themes Discovering the Future, Atom by Atom The six-story, 94,000 square-foot Molecular Foundry building at LBNL overlooks the UC Berkeley campus and, from a distance, the San Francisco Bay. Directly adjacent to the Foundry is the NCEM complex that was established in 1983 to maintain a forefront research center for electron microscopy with state-of-the-art instrumentation and expertise. Merged with the Molecular Foundry in 2014 to take advantage of

  9. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SEMINARS ARCHIVE The Molecular Foundry regularly offers seminars and events that feature compelling research and information for those who investigate at the nanoscale. Seminars occur on Tuesdays at 11:00 am, in Building 67, Room 3111 unless otherwise noted. < seminars and events Tuesday, June 28, 2016 at 11am Revealing the Mechanisms of Deformation in Structural Materials Using Advanced Characterization Techniques Mike Mills, The Ohio State University [MORE] Tuesday, June 14, 2016 at 11am

  10. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emory Chan Brand Staff Scientist, Inorganic Nanostructures EMChan@lbl.gov 510.486.7874 personal website Biography Education Postdoctoral fellow, Molecular Foundry with Dr. Delia Milliron Ph. D., Chemistry, UC Berkeley with Prof. Paul Alivisatos and Prof. Richard Mathies, B. S., Chemistry, Stanford University with Prof. Hongjie Dai Expertise Dr. Chan's expertise lies in the combinatorial and high-throughput synthesis of colloidal inorganic nanoparticles. As part of the Foundry's Combinatorial

  11. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Foundry User Policies and Definitions Download the complete User Policies and Definitions (PDF) Guiding principles Safety Costs 50/50 staff time model User proposal types Proposal questions and evaluation criteria Proposal Review Board (PRB) and review process User agreements with Berkeley Lab Access to other user facilities at LBNL Final project report Publications and acknowledgement User feedback and end-of-project survey Users' Executive Committee (UEC) Scientific Advisory Board

  12. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Dinner On March 24, 2016, the Molecular Foundry celebrated the 10th anniversary of the dedication of its iconic building with a full day scientific symposium and dinner event. This celebration recognized the Foundry's major scientific and operational milestones and looked forward to the promising future of nanoscience. Leaders from Congress, DOE, academia, industry, and Berkeley Lab joined prominent Foundry users and staff, both past and present, to participate in this celebration.

  13. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    One of the World's Premier Nanoscience Research Institutions Supported by the Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) through their Nanoscale Science Research Center (NSRC) program, the Molecular Foundry is a national User Facility for nanoscale science serving hundreds of academic, industrial and government scientists around the world each year. Users come to the Foundry to perform multidisciplinary research beyond the scope of an individual's own laboratory. By taking

  14. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theory of Nanostructured Materials The Theory of Nanostructured Materials Facility at the Molecular Foundry is focused on expanding our understanding of materials at the nanoscale. Our research connects the structural and dynamical properties of materials to their functions, such as electrical conductivity and storage, light-harvesting for electricity and fuel, or gas separation and sequestration. We develop and employ a broad range of tools, including advanced electronic-structure theory,

  15. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    POLICIES AND DEFINITIONS PROPOSAL GUIDE USER GUIDE USER PROGRAM SUBMIT A PROPOSAL » Reviewer Login » Proposal Deadline September 30, 2016 Instrument Scheduler Nanofabrication Instrument Scheduler User Program The Molecular Foundry user program gives researchers access to expertise and equipment for cutting-edge nanoscience in a collaborative, multidisciplinary environment. The program is open to scientists from academia, industry, and research institutes worldwide. These users join a vibrant

  16. Biology and Medicine Division: Annual report 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The Biology and Medicine Division continues to make important contributions in scientific areas in which it has a long-established leadership role. For 50 years the Division has pioneered in the application of radioisotopes and charged particles to biology and medicine. There is a growing emphasis on cellular and molecular applications in the work of all the Division's research groups. The powerful tools of genetic engineering, the use of recombinant products, the analytical application of DNA probes, and the use of restriction fragment length polymorphic DNA are described and proposed for increasing use in the future.

  17. Biological tracer method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1998-09-15

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. 2 figs.

  18. Biological tracer method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strong-Gunderson, Janet M. (Ten Mile, TN); Palumbo, Anthony V. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer.

  19. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology Genomics and Systems Biology Los Alamos scientists perform research in functional genomics and structural genomics, and applications for such work cover diverse fields such as energy, agriculture, and environmental cleanup. Contact Us Babetta Marrone Biofuels Program Manager Email Cheryl Kuske DOE BER Biological System Science Division Program Manager Email Kirsten McCabe Emerging Threats Program Manager Email Rebecca McDonald Bioscience Communications Email "We

  20. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology LANL leads the world in computational finishing of microbial genomes Read caption + In 2013, Los Alamos scientist Richard Sayre and his team genetically modified the organisms to harvest light more efficiently for maximum production. Overview of Research and Highlights Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory are using their renowned expertise in genomics, computation, and experimental biology as the foundation of a dynamic systems biology capability. Systems

  1. Biological detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M.; McDowell, Andrew F.

    2015-11-24

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  2. Biological detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2013-02-26

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  3. Biological detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2014-04-15

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  4. The Intersection of Physics and Biology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Liphardt, Jan [University of California, Berkeley, California, United States

    2010-09-01

    In April 1953, Watson and Crick largely defined the program of 20th century biology: obtaining the blueprint of life encoded in the DNA. Fifty years later, in 2003, the sequencing of the human genome was completed. Like any major scientific breakthrough, the sequencing of the human genome raised many more questions than it answered. I'll brief you on some of the big open problems in cell and developmental biology, and I'll explain why approaches, tools, and ideas from the physical sciences are currently reshaping biological research. Super-resolution light microscopies are revealing the intricate spatial organization of cells, single-molecule methods show how molecular machines function, and new probes are clarifying the role of mechanical forces in cell and tissue function. At the same time, Physics stands to gain beautiful new problems in soft condensed matter, quantum mechanics, and non-equilibrium thermodynamics.

  5. Integrated Biological Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, A.R.

    2002-09-01

    Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects; and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (apriori) or in response to existing contamination spread (aposteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and apriori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, aposteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

  6. Integrated Biological Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, A.R.

    2003-10-09

    Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects, and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (a priori) or in response to existing contamination spread (a posteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and a priori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, a posteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

  7. Biological sample collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, Gloria A.

    2010-09-07

    A biological sample collector is adapted to a collect several biological samples in a plurality of filter wells. A biological sample collector may comprise a manifold plate for mounting a filter plate thereon, the filter plate having a plurality of filter wells therein; a hollow slider for engaging and positioning a tube that slides therethrough; and a slide case within which the hollow slider travels to allow the tube to be aligned with a selected filter well of the plurality of filter wells, wherein when the tube is aligned with the selected filter well, the tube is pushed through the hollow slider and into the selected filter well to sealingly engage the selected filter well and to allow the tube to deposit a biological sample onto a filter in the bottom of the selected filter well. The biological sample collector may be portable.

  8. Biological and Chemical Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitch, P J

    2002-12-19

    The LLNL Chemical & Biological National Security Program (CBNP) provides science, technology and integrated systems for chemical and biological security. Our approach is to develop and field advanced strategies that dramatically improve the nation's capabilities to prevent, prepare for, detect, and respond to terrorist use of chemical or biological weapons. Recent events show the importance of civilian defense against terrorism. The 1995 nerve gas attack in Tokyo's subway served to catalyze and focus the early LLNL program on civilian counter terrorism. In the same year, LLNL began CBNP using Laboratory-Directed R&D investments and a focus on biodetection. The Nunn-Lugar-Domenici Defense Against Weapons of Mass Destruction Act, passed in 1996, initiated a number of U.S. nonproliferation and counter-terrorism programs including the DOE (now NNSA) Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (also known as CBNP). In 2002, the Department of Homeland Security was formed. The NNSA CBNP and many of the LLNL CBNP activities are being transferred as the new Department becomes operational. LLNL has a long history in national security including nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction. In biology, LLNL had a key role in starting and implementing the Human Genome Project and, more recently, the Microbial Genome Program. LLNL has over 1,000 scientists and engineers with relevant expertise in biology, chemistry, decontamination, instrumentation, microtechnologies, atmospheric modeling, and field experimentation. Over 150 LLNL scientists and engineers work full time on chemical and biological national security projects.

  9. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal process or may be completed as an independent document. In the ESS, identify each material (including all biological materials) with which you will be working. The regulatory oversight for biological work is very complicated and we need to understand the risk levels involved with the material you plan to use at the ALS,

  10. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal process or may be completed as an independent document. In the ESS, identify each material (including all biological materials) with which you will be working. The regulatory oversight for biological work is very complicated and we need to understand the risk levels involved with the material you plan to use at the ALS,

  11. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal process or may be completed as an independent document. In the ESS, identify each material (including all biological materials) with which you will be working. The regulatory oversight for biological work is very complicated and we need to understand the risk levels involved with the material you plan to use at the ALS,

  12. Institute for Molecular Medicine Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, Michael E

    2012-12-14

    The objectives of the project are the development of new Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging instrumentation, chemistry technology platforms and new molecular imaging probes to examine the transformations from normal cellular and biological processes to those of disease in pre-clinical animal models. These technology platforms and imaging probes provide the means to: 1. Study the biology of disease using pre-clinical mouse models and cells. 2. Develop molecular imaging probes for imaging assays of proteins in pre-clinical models. 3. Develop imaging assays in pre-clinical models to provide to other scientists the means to guide and improve the processes for discovering new drugs. 4. Develop imaging assays in pre-clinical models for others to use in judging the impact of drugs on the biology of disease.

  13. Computational Biology: A Recipe for Ligand-Binding Proteins

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Biology: A Recipe for Ligand-Binding Proteins Authors: Ghirlanda, G. Title: Computational Biology: A Recipe for Ligand-Binding Proteins Source: Nature Year: 2013 Volume: 501 Pages: 177-178 ABSTRACT: Cellular cross-talk, enzymatic catalysis and regulation of gene expression all depend on molecular recognition. A method that allows the design of proteins with desired recognition sites could thus be revolutionary Date of online publication: Thu, 2013-09-12 Link online:

  14. Biological and Environmental Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Science Biological Science The protozoan Plasmodium falciparum gliding through a cell in the gut of a mosquito, its primary host. Although five different species of Plasmodium can cause malaria, Plasmodium falciparum causes the most severe disease. | Photo courtesy of Wikipedia Commons. <a href="http://energy.gov/articles/malaria-researchers-find-weakness-global-killer">Read more</a> The protozoan Plasmodium falciparum gliding through a cell in the gut of a

  15. Biological and Environmental Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological and Environmental Research Biological and Environmental Research Understanding how genomic information is translated to functional capabilities, and the roles of Earth's biogeochemical systems so we can predict climate decades or centuries into the future. Get Expertise Cheryl Kuske (505) 665-4800 Email James Bossert (505) 667-3644 Email Manvendra Dubey (505) 665-3128 Email Kim Nitschke (505) 667-1186 Email Phil Jones (505) 667-6387 Email Cathy Wilson (505) 667-0202 Email Conducting

  16. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  17. Green Biologics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biologics Jump to: navigation, search Name: Green Biologics Place: Oxfordshire, United Kingdom Sector: Biomass, Renewable Energy Product: Oxfordshire-based industrial biotech...

  18. 7th Annual Systems Biology Symposium: Systems Biology and Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitski, Timothy P.

    2008-04-01

    Systems biology recognizes the complex multi-scale organization of biological systems, from molecules to ecosystems. The International Symposium on Systems Biology has been hosted by the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle, Washington, since 2002. The annual two-day event gathers the most influential researchers transforming biology into an integrative discipline investingating complex systems. Engineering and application of new technology is a central element of systems biology. Genome-scale, or very small-scale, biological questions drive the enigneering of new technologies, which enable new modes of experimentation and computational analysis, leading to new biological insights and questions. Concepts and analytical methods in engineering are now finding direct applications in biology. Therefore, the 2008 Symposium, funded in partnership with the Department of Energy, featured global leaders in "Systems Biology and Engineering."

  19. Biological effectiveness of neutrons: Research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casarett, G.W.; Braby, L.A.; Broerse, J.J.; Elkind, M.M.; Goodhead, D.T.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1994-02-01

    The goal of this report was to provide a conceptual plan for a research program that would provide a basis for determining more precisely the biological effectiveness of neutron radiation with emphasis on endpoints relevant to the protection of human health. This report presents the findings of the experts for seven particular categories of scientific information on neutron biological effectiveness. Chapter 2 examines the radiobiological mechanisms underlying the assumptions used to estimate human risk from neutrons and other radiations. Chapter 3 discusses the qualitative and quantitative models used to organize and evaluate experimental observations and to provide extrapolations where direct observations cannot be made. Chapter 4 discusses the physical principles governing the interaction of radiation with biological systems and the importance of accurate dosimetry in evaluating radiation risk and reducing the uncertainty in the biological data. Chapter 5 deals with the chemical and molecular changes underlying cellular responses and the LET dependence of these changes. Chapter 6, in turn, discusses those cellular and genetic changes which lead to mutation or neoplastic transformation. Chapters 7 and 8 examine deterministic and stochastic effects, respectively, and the data required for the prediction of such effects at different organizational levels and for the extrapolation from experimental results in animals to risks for man. Gaps and uncertainties in this data are examined relative to data required for establishing radiation protection standards for neutrons and procedures for the effective and safe use of neutron and other high-LET radiation therapy.

  20. Biological response modifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Much of what used to be called immunotherapy is now included in the term biological response modifiers. Biological response modifiers (BRMs) are defined as those agents or approaches that modify the relationship between the tumor and host by modifying the host's biological response to tumor cells with resultant therapeutic effects.'' Most of the early work with BRMs centered around observations of spontaneous tumor regression and the association of tumor regression with concurrent bacterial infections. The BRM can modify the host response in the following ways: Increase the host's antitumor responses through augmentation and/or restoration of effector mechanisms or mediators of the host's defense or decrease the deleterious component by the host's reaction; Increase the host's defenses by the administration of natural biologics (or the synthetic derivatives thereof) as effectors or mediators of an antitumor response; Augment the host's response to modified tumor cells or vaccines, which might stimulate a greater response by the host or increase tumor-cell sensitivity to an existing response; Decrease the transformation and/or increase differentiation (maturation) of tumor cells; or Increase the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic modalities of cancer treatment.

  1. Biological particle identification apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzman, Gary C.; Gregg, Charles T.; Grace, W. Kevin; Hiebert, Richard D.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method for making multiparameter light scattering measurements from suspensions of biological particles is described. Fourteen of the sixteen Mueller matrix elements describing the particles under investigation can be substantially individually determined as a function of scattering angle and probing radiations wavelength, eight elements simultaneously for each of two apparatus configurations using an apparatus which incluees, in its simplest form, two polarization modulators each operating at a chosen frequency, one polarizer, a source of monochromatic electromagnetic radiation, a detector sensitive to the wavelength of radiation employed, eight phase-sensitive detectors, and appropriate electronics. A database of known biological particle suspensions can be assembled, and unknown samples can be quickly identified once measurements are performed on it according to the teachings of the subject invention, and a comparison is made with the database.

  2. BIOLOGICAL IRRADIATION FACILITY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCorkle, W.H.; Cern, H.S.

    1962-04-24

    A facility for irradiating biological specimens with neutrons is described. It includes a reactor wherein the core is off center in a reflector. A high-exposure room is located outside the reactor on the side nearest the core while a low-exposure room is located on the opposite side. Means for converting thermal neutrons to fast neutrons are movably disposed between the reactor core and the high and low-exposure rooms. (AEC)

  3. Report of The Structural Biology Subcommittee of The Biological and

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Environmental Research Advisory Committee | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Report of The Structural Biology Subcommittee of The Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Current BERAC Charges Archive of BERAC Reports Charter .pdf file (135KB) BER Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees BER Home Charges/Reports Report of The Structural Biology Subcommittee of

  4. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics | Argonne Leadership Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility reactive molecular dynamics Authors: Chris KnighT, Gerrick E. Lindberg, Gregory A. Voth Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data

  5. Abengoa Mojave Final Biological Opinion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biological Opinion on Mojave Solar, LLC's Mojave Solar Project, San Bernardino County, California (8-8-11-F-3)

  6. Elements in biological AMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogel, J.S.; McAninch, J.; Freeman, S.

    1996-08-01

    AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) provides high detection sensitivity for isotopes whose half-lives are between 10 years and 100 million years. {sup 14}C is the most developed of such isotopes and is used in tracing natural and anthropogenic organic compounds in the Earth`s biosphere. Thirty-three elements in the main periodic table and 17 lanthanides or actinides have long lived isotopes, providing potential tracers for research in elemental biochemistry. Overlap of biologically interesting heavy elements and possible AMS tracers is discussed.

  7. Method and apparatus for the gas phase decontamination of chemical and biological agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Hugh J.; Brubaker, Kenneth L.

    2003-10-07

    An apparatus and method for decontaminating chemical and biological agents using the reactive properties of both the single atomic oxygen and the hydroxyl radical for the decontamination of chemical and biological agents. The apparatus is self contained and portable and allows for the application of gas reactants directly at the required decontamination point. The system provides for the use of ultraviolet light of a specific spectral range to photolytically break down ozone into molecular oxygen and hydroxyl radicals where some of the molecular oxygen is in the first excited state. The excited molecular oxygen will combine with water vapor to produce two hydroxyl radicals.

  8. Computational methods for molecular docking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klebe, G.; Lengauer, T.

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the protein can be used to derive new protein ligands with improved binding properties. This tutorial focuses on the following questions: What is its binding affinity toward a particular receptor? What are putative conformations of a ligand at the binding site? What are the similarities of different ligands in terms of their recognition capabilities? Where and in which orientation will a ligand bind to the active site? How is a new putative protein ligand selected? An overview is presented of the algorithms which are presently used to handle and predict protein-ligand interactions and to dock small molecule ligands into proteins.

  9. Neutron instrumentation for biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    In the October 1994 round of proposals at the ILL, the external biology review sub- committee was asked to allocate neutron beam time to a wide range of experiments, on almost half the total number of scheduled neutron instruments: on 3 diffractometers, on 3 small angle scattering instruments, and on some 6 inelastic scattering spectrometers. In the 3.5 years since the temporary reactor shutdown, the ILL`s management structure has been optimized, budgets and staff have been trimmed, the ILL reactor has been re-built, and many of the instruments up-graded, many powerful (mainly Unix) workstations have been introduced, and the neighboring European Synchrotron Radiation Facility has established itself as the leading synchrotron radiation source and has started its official user program. The ILL reactor remains the world`s most intense dedicated neutron source. In this challenging context, it is of interest to review briefly the park of ILL instruments used to study the structure and energetics of small and large biological systems. A brief summary will be made of each class of experiments actually proposed in the latest ILL proposal round.

  10. 6th Annual Systems Biology Symposium: Systems Biology and the Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitski, Timothy, P.

    2007-04-01

    Systems biology recognizes the complex multi-scale organization of biological systems, from molecules to ecosystems. The International Symposium on Systems Biology is an annual two-day event gathering the most influential researchers transforming biology into an integrative discipline investigating complex systems. In recognition of the fundamental similarity between the scientific problems addressed in environmental science and systems biology studies at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels, the 2007 Symposium featured global leaders in “Systems Biology and the Environment.” The objective of the 2007 “Systems Biology and the Environment” International Symposium was to stimulate interdisciplinary thinking and research that spans systems biology and environmental science. This Symposium was well aligned with the DOE’s Genomics:GTL program efforts to achieve scientific objectives for each of the three DOE missions: • Develop biofuels as a major secure energy source for this century, • Develop biological solutions for intractable environmental problems, and • Understand biosystems’ climate impacts and assess sequestration strategies Our scientific program highlighted world-class research exemplifying these priorities. The Symposium featured 45 minute lectures from 12 researchers including: Penny/Sallie Chisholm of MIT gave the keynote address “Tiny Cells, Global Impact: What Prochlorococcus Can Teach Us About Systems Biology”, plus Jim Fredrickson of PNNL, Nitin Baliga of ISB, Steve Briggs of UCSD, David Cox of Perlegen Sciences, Antoine Danchin of Institut Pasteur, John Delaney of the U of Washington, John Groopman of Johns Hopkins, Ben Kerr of the U of Washington, Steve Koonin of BP, Elliott Meyerowitz of Caltech, and Ed Rubin of LBNL. The 2007 Symposium promoted DOE’s three mission areas among scientists from multiple disciplines representing academia, non-profit research institutions, and the private sector. As in all previous

  11. 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report November 2013 summary report for the 2013 Biological Hydrogen ...

  12. Biology Division progress report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    This Progress Report summarizes the research endeavors of the Biology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1995. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the Division`s major organizational units. Lists of information to convey the entire scope of the Division`s activities are compiled at the end of the report. Attention is focused on the following research activities: molecular, cellular, and cancer biology; mammalian genetics and development; genome mapping program; and educational activities.

  13. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  14. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Methods

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation on Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Methods was given at the DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials on May 18, 2006.

  15. William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) | U.S.

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    DOE Office of Science (SC) William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change

  16. Biological Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological Select Agents Inspection Report: IG-0681, Concerns Regarding a Non-Viable (Dead) "Anthrax Sport" Research Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Inspection ...

  17. Biological Applications of Synchrotron Radiation:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Applications of Synchrotron Radiation: An Evaluation of the State of the Field ... Maxwell's equations show that electromagnetic radiation is generated when charged ...

  18. Biological & Environmental Research Abstracts Database

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Welcome to the Biological and Environmental Research Abstracts Database The U.S. ... This database contains abstracts of research projects supported by the program. Work was ...

  19. Modular Construction - on a Molecular Scale | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (SC) Modular Construction - on a Molecular Scale Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) Community Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301)

  20. Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory 2004 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Julia C.

    2005-04-17

    This 2004 Annual Report describes the research and accomplishments of staff and users of the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), located in Richland, Washington. EMSL is a multidisciplinary, national scientific user facility and research organization, operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The resources and opportunities within the facility are an outgrowth of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to fundamental research for understanding and resolving environmental and other critical scientific issues.

  1. THE DARK MOLECULAR GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfire, Mark G.; Hollenbach, David; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: dhollenbach@seti.or

    2010-06-20

    The mass of molecular gas in an interstellar cloud is often measured using line emission from low rotational levels of CO, which are sensitive to the CO mass, and then scaling to the assumed molecular hydrogen H{sub 2} mass. However, a significant H{sub 2} mass may lie outside the CO region, in the outer regions of the molecular cloud where the gas-phase carbon resides in C or C{sup +}. Here, H{sub 2} self-shields or is shielded by dust from UV photodissociation, whereas CO is photodissociated. This H{sub 2} gas is 'dark' in molecular transitions because of the absence of CO and other trace molecules, and because H{sub 2} emits so weakly at temperatures 10 K molecular component. This component has been indirectly observed through other tracers of mass such as gamma rays produced in cosmic-ray collisions with the gas and far-infrared/submillimeter wavelength dust continuum radiation. In this paper, we theoretically model this dark mass and find that the fraction of the molecular mass in this dark component is remarkably constant ({approx}0.3 for average visual extinction through the cloud A-bar{sub V{approx_equal}}8) and insensitive to the incident ultraviolet radiation field strength, the internal density distribution, and the mass of the molecular cloud as long as A-bar{sub V}, or equivalently, the product of the average hydrogen nucleus column and the metallicity through the cloud, is constant. We also find that the dark mass fraction increases with decreasing A-bar{sub V}, since relatively more molecular H{sub 2} material lies outside the CO region in this case.

  2. Optical Modulation of Molecular Conductance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transient absorption spectra of these molecular layers are consistent with formation of a long-lived charge separated state, a finding with implications for the design of molecular ...

  3. Biological Science | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological Science Biological Science The protozoan Plasmodium falciparum gliding through a cell in the gut of a mosquito, its primary host. Although five different species of Plasmodium can cause malaria, Plasmodium falciparum causes the most severe disease. | Photo courtesy of Wikipedia Commons. <a href="http://energy.gov/articles/malaria-researchers-find-weakness-global-killer">Read more</a> The protozoan Plasmodium falciparum gliding through a cell in the gut of a

  4. Michael Levitt and Computational Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Michael Levitt and Computational Biology Resources with Additional Information * Publications Michael Levitt Courtesy of Linda A. Cicero / Stanford News Service Michael Levitt, PhD, professor of structural biology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, has won the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. ... Levitt ... shares the ... prize with Martin Karplus ... and Arieh Warshel ... "for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems." Levitt's work focuses on

  5. Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report Renewable Hydrogen Production from Biological Systems Anthropogenic CO2 as a Feedstock for ...

  6. Repurposing the translation apparatus for synthetic biology ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    biology Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on July 14, 2017 Title: Repurposing the translation apparatus for synthetic biology ...

  7. Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BioSolarH 2 Autofermentative biological hydrogen production by cyanobacteria G.C. Dismukes Rutgers University Waksman Institute and Department of Chemistry & Chemical Biology ...

  8. Innovative Breakthrough Demonstrated for Biological Ethanol Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovative Breakthrough Demonstrated for Biological Ethanol Production Innovative Breakthrough Demonstrated for Biological Ethanol Production June 30, 2015 - 11:43am Addthis ...

  9. Experimental Data from the Proteomics Research Center for Integrative Biology

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Smith, Richard D.

    The possible roles and importance of proteomics are rapidly growing across essentially all areas of biological research. The precise and comprehensive measurement of levels of expressed proteins and their modified forms can provide new insights into the molecular nature of cell-signaling pathways and networks, the cell cycle, cellular differentiation, and other processes relevant to understanding human health and the progression of various disease states. The ability to characterize protein complexes complements this capability, allowing hypotheses to be tested and the biological system operation to be defined. The Proteomics Research Center for Integrative Biology is a national user facility established and funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences component of the National Institutes of Health. This Center has been established to serve the biomedical research community by developing and integrating new proteomic technologies for collaborative and service studies, disseminating the new technologies, and training scientists in their use. The Center is housed in DOEs William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  10. Experimental Data from the Proteomics Research Center for Integrative Biology

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Smith, Richard D.

    The possible roles and importance of proteomics are rapidly growing across essentially all areas of biological research. The precise and comprehensive measurement of levels of expressed proteins and their modified forms can provide new insights into the molecular nature of cell-signaling pathways and networks, the cell cycle, cellular differentiation, and other processes relevant to understanding human health and the progression of various disease states. The ability to characterize protein complexes complements this capability, allowing hypotheses to be tested and the biological system operation to be defined. The Proteomics Research Center for Integrative Biology is a national user facility established and funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences component of the National Institutes of Health. This Center has been established to serve the biomedical research community by developing and integrating new proteomic technologies for collaborative and service studies, disseminating the new technologies, and training scientists in their use. The Center is housed in DOE’s William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  11. Molecular Science Research Center annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knotek, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics group is studying chemical kinetics and reactions dynamics of terrestrial and atmospheric processes as well as the chemistry of complex waste forms and waste storage media. Staff are using new laser systems and surface-mapping techniques in combination with molecular clusters that mimic adsorbate/surface interactions. The Macromolecular Structure and Dynamics group is determining biomolecular structure/function relationships for processes the control the biological transformation of contaminants and the health effects of toxic substances. The Materials and Interfaces program is generating information needed to design and synthesize advanced materials for the analysis and separation of mixed chemical waste, the long-term storage of concentrated hazardous materials, and the development of chemical sensors for environmental monitoring of various organic and inorganic species. The Theory, Modeling, and Simulation group is developing detailed molecular-level descriptions of the chemical, physical, and biological processes in natural and contaminated systems. Researchers are using the full spectrum of computational techniques. The Computer and Information Sciences group is developing new approaches to handle vast amounts of data and to perform calculations for complex natural systems. The EMSL will contain a high-performance computing facility, ancillary computing laboratories, and high-speed data acquisition systems for all major research instruments.

  12. Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

    2006-11-01

    We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

  13. Molecular Foundry Bay Cam

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Baycam The Molecular Foundry is a Department of Energy-funded nanoscience research facility at Berkeley Lab that provides users from around the world with access to cutting-edge expertise and instrumentation in a collaborative, multidisciplinary environment. twitter instagram facebook

  14. Statistical Inference for Big Data Problems in Molecular Biophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Savol, Andrej; Burger, Virginia; Quinn, Shannon; Agarwal, Pratul K; Chennubhotla, Chakra

    2012-01-01

    We highlight the role of statistical inference techniques in providing biological insights from analyzing long time-scale molecular simulation data. Technologi- cal and algorithmic improvements in computation have brought molecular simu- lations to the forefront of techniques applied to investigating the basis of living systems. While these longer simulations, increasingly complex reaching petabyte scales presently, promise a detailed view into microscopic behavior, teasing out the important information has now become a true challenge on its own. Mining this data for important patterns is critical to automating therapeutic intervention discovery, improving protein design, and fundamentally understanding the mech- anistic basis of cellular homeostasis.

  15. ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John R. Gallagher

    2001-07-31

    During the production of oil and gas, large amounts of water are brought to the surface and must be disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner. This is an especially difficult problem in offshore production facilities where space is a major constraint. The chief regulatory criterion for produced water is oil and grease. Most facilities have little trouble meeting this criterion using conventional oil-water separation technologies. However, some operations have significant amounts of naphthenic acids in the water that behave as oil and grease but are not well removed by conventional technologies. Aerobic biological treatment of naphthenic acids in simulated-produced water has been demonstrated by others; however, the system was easily overloaded by the large amounts of low-molecular-weight organic acids often found in produced waters. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of an anaerobic biological system to treat these organic acids in a simulated produced water and to examine the potential for biodegradation of the naphthenic acids in the anaerobic environment. A small fixed-film anaerobic biological reactor was constructed and adapted to treat a simulated produced water. The bioreactor was tubular, with a low-density porous glass packing material. The inocula to the reactor was sediment from a produced-water holding pond from a municipal anaerobic digester and two salt-loving methanogenic bacteria. During start-up, the feed to the reactor contained glucose as well as typical produced-water components. When glucose was used, rapid gas production was observed. However, when glucose was eliminated and the major organic component was acetate, little gas was generated. Methane production from acetate may have been inhibited by the high salt concentrations, by sulfide, or because of the lack, despite seeding, of microbes capable of converting acetate to methane. Toluene, a minor component of the produced water (0.1 g/L) was removed in the

  16. Biological responses to engineered nanomaterials: Needs for the next decade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Catherine J.; Vartanian, Ariane M.; Geiger, Franz M.; Hamers, Robert J.; Pedersen, Joel A.; Cui, Qiang; Haynes, Christy L.; Carlson, Erin E.; Hernandez, Rigoberto; Klaper, Rebecca D.; Orr, Galya; Rosenzweig, Ze'ev

    2015-06-09

    In this study, the interaction of nanomaterials with biomolecules, cells, and organisms is an enormously vital area of current research, with applications in nanoenabled diagnostics, imaging agents, therapeutics, and contaminant removal technologies. Yet the potential for adverse biological and environmental impacts of nanomaterial exposure is considerable and needs to be addressed to ensure sustainable development of nanomaterials. In this Outlook four research needs for the next decade are outlined: (i) measurement of the chemical nature of nanomaterials in dynamic, complex aqueous environments; (ii) real-time measurements of nanomaterial-biological interactions with chemical specificity; (iii) delineation of molecular modes of action for nanomaterial effects on living systems as functions of nanomaterial properties; and (iv) an integrated systems approach that includes computation and simulation across orders of magnitude in time and space.

  17. The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with biological membranes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johs, Alexander; Whited, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of peripheral proteins with membrane surfaces are critical to many biological processes, including signaling, recognition, membrane trafficking, cell division and cell structure. On a molecular level, peripheral membrane proteins can modulate lipid composition, membrane dynamics and protein-protein interactions. Biochemical and biophysical studies have shown that these interactions are in fact highly complex, dominated by several different types of interactions, and have an interdependent effect on both the protein and membrane. Here we examine three major mechanisms underlying the interactions between peripheral membrane proteins and membranes: electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and fatty acid modification of proteins. While experimental approachesmore » continue to provide critical insights into specific interaction mechanisms, emerging bioinformatics resources and tools contribute to a systems-level picture of protein-lipid interactions. Through these recent advances, we begin to understand the pivotal role of protein-lipid interactions underlying complex biological functions at membrane interfaces.« less

  18. The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with biological membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johs, Alexander; Whited, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of peripheral proteins with membrane surfaces are critical to many biological processes, including signaling, recognition, membrane trafficking, cell division and cell structure. On a molecular level, peripheral membrane proteins can modulate lipid composition, membrane dynamics and protein-protein interactions. Biochemical and biophysical studies have shown that these interactions are in fact highly complex, dominated by several different types of interactions, and have an interdependent effect on both the protein and membrane. Here we examine three major mechanisms underlying the interactions between peripheral membrane proteins and membranes: electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and fatty acid modification of proteins. While experimental approaches continue to provide critical insights into specific interaction mechanisms, emerging bioinformatics resources and tools contribute to a systems-level picture of protein-lipid interactions. Through these recent advances, we begin to understand the pivotal role of protein-lipid interactions underlying complex biological functions at membrane interfaces.

  19. Biological responses to engineered nanomaterials: Needs for the next decade

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Murphy, Catherine J.; Vartanian, Ariane M.; Geiger, Franz M.; Hamers, Robert J.; Pedersen, Joel A.; Cui, Qiang; Haynes, Christy L.; Carlson, Erin E.; Hernandez, Rigoberto; Klaper, Rebecca D.; et al

    2015-06-09

    In this study, the interaction of nanomaterials with biomolecules, cells, and organisms is an enormously vital area of current research, with applications in nanoenabled diagnostics, imaging agents, therapeutics, and contaminant removal technologies. Yet the potential for adverse biological and environmental impacts of nanomaterial exposure is considerable and needs to be addressed to ensure sustainable development of nanomaterials. In this Outlook four research needs for the next decade are outlined: (i) measurement of the chemical nature of nanomaterials in dynamic, complex aqueous environments; (ii) real-time measurements of nanomaterial-biological interactions with chemical specificity; (iii) delineation of molecular modes of action for nanomaterialmore » effects on living systems as functions of nanomaterial properties; and (iv) an integrated systems approach that includes computation and simulation across orders of magnitude in time and space.« less

  20. Towards a Semantic Lexicon for Biological Language Processing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Verspoor, Karin

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the use of the resources in the National Library of Medicine's Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) for the construction of a lexicon useful for processing texts in the field of molecular biology. A lexicon is constructed from overlapping terms in the UMLS SPECIALIST lexicon and the UMLS Metathesaurus to obtain both morphosyntactic and semantic information for terms, and the coverage of a domain corpus is assessed. Over 77% of tokens in the domain corpus are found in the constructed lexicon, validating the lexicon's coverage of the most frequent terms in the domain and indicating that the constructedmore » lexicon is potentially an important resource for biological text processing.« less

  1. Method and apparatus to image biological interactions in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weisenberger, Andrew; Bonito, Gregory M.; Reid, Chantal D.; Smith, Mark Frederick

    2015-12-22

    A method to dynamically image the actual translocation of molecular compounds of interest in a plant root, root system, and rhizosphere without disturbing the root or the soil. The technique makes use of radioactive isotopes as tracers to label molecules of interest and to image their distribution in the plant and/or soil. The method allows for the study and imaging of various biological and biochemical interactions in the rhizosphere of a plant, including, but not limited to, mycorrhizal associations in such regions.

  2. Molecular-beam scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vernon, M.F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N/sub 2/ from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HCl ..-->.. NaCl + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included.

  3. A Systems Biology Approach to Infectious Disease Research: Innovating the Pathogen-Host Research Paradigm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aderem, Alan; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles; Galagan, James; Kaiser, Shari; Korth, Marcus J.; Law, G. L.; McDermott, Jason E.; Proll, Sean; Rosenberger, Carrie; Schoolnik, Gary; Katze, Michael G.

    2011-02-01

    The 20th century was marked by extraordinary advances in our understanding of microbes and infectious disease, but pandemics remain, food and water borne illnesses are frequent, multi-drug resistant microbes are on the rise, and the needed drugs and vaccines have not been developed. The scientific approaches of the pastincluding the intense focus on individual genes and proteins typical of molecular biologyhave not been sufficient to address these challenges. The first decade of the 21st century has seen remarkable innovations in technology and computational methods. These new tools provide nearly comprehensive views of complex biological systems and can provide a correspondingly deeper understanding of pathogen-host interactions. To take full advantage of these innovations, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases recently initiated the Systems Biology Program for Infectious Disease Research. As participants of the Systems Biology Program we think that the time is at hand to redefine the pathogen-host research paradigm.

  4. Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) held a Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on September 24-25, 2013, in Golden, Colorado. The workshop featured 29 participants representing academia, government, and national laboratories with expertise in the relevant fields. The objective of the Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop was to share information and identify

  5. MOLECULAR VACUUM PUMP

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eckberg, E.E.

    1960-09-27

    A multiple molecular vacuum pump capable of producing a vacuum of the order of 10/sup -9/ mm Hg is described. The pump comprises a casing of an aggregate of paired and matched cylindrical plates, a recessed portion on one face of each plate concentrically positioned formed by a radially extending wall and matching the similarly recessed portion of its twin plate of that pair of plates and for all paired and matched plates; a plurality of grooves formed in the radially extending walls of each and all recesses progressing in a spiral manner from their respective starting points out at the periphery of the recess inwardly to the central area; a plurality of rotors rotatably mounted to closely occupy the spaces as presented by the paired and matched recesses between all paired plates; a hollowed drive-shaft perforated at points adjacent to the termini of all spiral grooves; inlet ports at the starting points of all grooves and through all plates at common points to each respectively; and a common outlet passage presented by the hollow portion of the perforated hollowed drive-shaft of the molecular pump. (AEC)

  6. Engineering Molecular Transformations for Sustainable Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Engineering Molecular Transformations for Sustainable Energy Conversion Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Engineering Molecular Transformations for Sustainable Energy ...

  7. Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Biological Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-06-28

    Conventional organic fluorophores suffer from poor photo stability, narrow absorption spectra and broad emission feature. Semiconductor nanocrystals, on the other hand, are highly photo-stable with broad absorption spectra and narrow size-tunable emission spectra. Recent advances in the synthesis of these materials have resulted in bright, sensitive, extremely photo-stable and biocompatible semiconductor fluorophores. Commercial availability facilitates their application in a variety of unprecedented biological experiments, including multiplexed cellular imaging, long-term in vitro and in vivo labeling, deep tissue structure mapping and single particle investigation of dynamic cellular processes. Semiconductor nanocrystals are one of the first examples of nanotechnology enabling a new class of biomedical applications.

  8. The Molecular Structure of a Phosphatidylserine Bilayer Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Jianjun [University of South Florida, Tampa (USF)] [University of South Florida, Tampa (USF); Cheng, Xiaolin [ORNL] [ORNL; Monticelli, Luca [Institut National de la Sant et de la Recherche Mdicale (INSERM) and INTS, France] [Institut National de la Sant et de la Recherche Mdicale (INSERM) and INTS, France; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kucerka, Norbert [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,; Tieleman, D. Peter [University of Calgary, ALberta, Canada] [University of Calgary, ALberta, Canada; Katsaras, John [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids play essential roles in biological processes, including enzyme activation and apoptosis. We report on the molecular structure and atomic scale interactions of a fluid bilayer composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS). A scattering density profile model, aided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was developed to jointly refine different contrast small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data, which yielded a lipid area of 62.7 A2 at 25 C. MD simulations with POPS lipid area constrained at different values were also performed using all-atom and aliphatic united-atom models. The optimal simulated bilayer was obtained using a model-free comparison approach. Examination of the simulated bilayer, which agrees best with the experimental scattering data, reveals a preferential interaction between Na+ ions and the terminal serine and phosphate moieties. Long-range inter-lipid interactions were identified, primarily between the positively charged ammonium, and the negatively charged carboxylic and phosphate oxygens. The area compressibility modulus KA of the POPS bilayer was derived by quantifying lipid area as a function of surface tension from area-constrained MD simulations. It was found that POPS bilayers possess a much larger KA than that of neutral phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. We propose that the unique molecular features of POPS bilayers may play an important role in certain physiological functions.

  9. Assessment of Molecular Modeling & Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2002-01-03

    This report reviews the development and applications of molecular and materials modeling in Europe and Japan in comparison to those in the United States. Topics covered include computational quantum chemistry, molecular simulations by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, mesoscale modeling of material domains, molecular-structure/macroscale property correlations like QSARs and QSPRs, and related information technologies like informatics and special-purpose molecular-modeling computers. The panel's findings include the following: The United States leads this field in many scientific areas. However, Canada has particular strengths in DFT methods and homogeneous catalysis; Europe in heterogeneous catalysis, mesoscale, and materials modeling; and Japan in materials modeling and special-purpose computing. Major government-industry initiatives are underway in Europe and Japan, notably in multi-scale materials modeling and in development of chemistry-capable ab-initio molecular dynamics codes.

  10. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Barrett, Karen B.; Key, Diane E.

    2010-03-23

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do not form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to a subject's identity.

  11. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Barrett, Karen B.; Key, Diane E.

    2013-10-15

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do not form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to a subject's identity.

  12. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Barrett, Karen B.; Key, Diane E.

    2010-03-23

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens of the surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do not form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to a subject's identity.

  13. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Barrett, Karen B.; Key, Diane E.

    2006-01-24

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens to the surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  14. The 2011 Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nesbitt, David J.

    2011-07-11

    Yuan T. Lee & Professor George Schatz. Professor Lees research has been based on the development & use of advanced chemical kinetics & molecular beams to investigate & manipulate the behavior of fundamental chemical reactions. Lees work has been recognized by many awards, including the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1986, as well as Sloan Fellow, Dreyfus Scholar, Fellowship in the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, Fellowship in the American Physical Society, Guggenheim Fellow, Member National Academy of Sciences, Member Academia Sinica, E.O. Lawrence Award, Miller Professor, Berkeley, Fairchild Distinguished Scholar, Harrison Howe Award, Peter Debye Award, & the National Medal of Science. Lee also has served as the President of the Academia Sinica in Taiwan (ROC). Professor Schatzs research group is interested in using theory & computation to describe physical phenomena in a broad range of applications relevant to chemistry, physics, biology & engineering. Among the types of applications that we interested are: optical properties of nanoparticles & nanoparticle assemblies; using theory to model polymer properties; DNA structure, thermodynamics & dynamics; modeling self assembly & nanopatterning; & gas phase reaction dynamics. Among his many awards & distinctions have been appointment as an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow, Camille & Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar, the Fresenius Award, Fellow of the American Physical Society, the Max Planck Research Award, Fellowship in the American Association for the Advancement of Science, & election to the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Sciences & the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. Dr Schatz is also lauded for his highly successful work as Editor for the Journal of Physical Chemistry. We requested $10,000 from DOE in support of this meeting. The money was distributed widely among the student & post doctoral fellows & some used to attract the very best scientists in the field. The organizers were committed to

  15. Mysteries of 'molecular machines' revealed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mysteries of 'molecular machines' revealed Mysteries of 'molecular machines' revealed Scientists are making it easier for pharmaceutical companies and researchers to see the detailed inner workings of molecular machines. December 22, 2014 A picture of a membrane protein called cysZ determined with Phenix software using data that could not previously be analyzed. A picture of a membrane protein called cysZ determined with Phenix software using data that could not previously be analyzed. Contact

  16. Lubricant characterization by molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, J.D.; Cui, S.T.; Cummings, P.T.; Cochran, H.D.

    1997-12-01

    The authors have reported the calculation of the kinematic viscosity index of squalane from nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. This represents the first accurate quantitative prediction of this measure of lubricant performance by molecular simulation. Using the same general alkane potential model, this computational approach offers the possibility of predicting the performance of potential lubricants prior to synthesis. Consequently, molecular simulation is poised to become an important tool for future lubricant development.

  17. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print Wednesday, 27 April 2005 00:00 In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can

  18. Impact of Radiation Biology on Fundamental Insights in Biology

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Setlow, Richard B.

    1982-07-27

    Research supported by OHER [Office of Health and Environmental Research] and its predecessors has as one of its major goals an understanding of the effects of radiation at low doses and dose rates on biological systems, so as to predict their effects on humans. It is not possible to measure such effects directly. They must be predicted from basic knowledge on how radiation affects cellular components such as DNA and membranes and how cells react to such changes. What is the probability of radiation producing human mutations and what are the probabilities of radiation producing cancer? The end results of such studies are radiation exposure standards for workers and for the general population. An extension of these goals is setting standards for exposure to chemicals involved in various energy technologies. This latter problem is much more difficult because chemical dosimetry is a primitive state compared to radiation dosimetry.

  19. Impact of Radiation Biology on Fundamental in Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setlow, Richard B.

    1983-01-20

    Research supported by OHER and its predecessors has as one of its major goals an understanding of the effects of radiation at low doses and dose rates on biological systems, so as to predict their effects on humans. It is not possible to measure such effects directly. They must be predicted from basic knowledge on how radiation affects cellular components such as DNA and membranes and how cells react to such changes. What is the probability of radiation producing human mutations and what are the probabilities of radiation producing cancer? The end results of such studies are radiation exposure standards for workers and for the general population. An extension of these goals is setting standards for exposure to chemicals involved in various energy technologies. This latter problem is much more difficult because chemical dosimetry is is a primitive state compared to radiation dosimetry.

  20. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, K.W.; Vogel, J.S.; Felton, J.S.; Gledhill, B.L.: Davis, J.C.; Stanker, L.H.

    1993-05-11

    A method is disclosed of quantifying molecules in biological substances, comprising: selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere; preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie; administering the chemical specie to the biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system; allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of the chemical specie with the host throughout the biological system of the host; isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from the host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of the substance from extraneous sources; converting the fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation; and measuring the radioisotope concentration in the material by means of direct isotopic counting.

  1. Interface-assisted molecular spintronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raman, Karthik V.

    2014-09-15

    Molecular spintronics, a field that utilizes the spin state of organic molecules to develop magneto-electronic devices, has shown an enormous scientific activity for more than a decade. But, in the last couple of years, new insights in understanding the fundamental phenomena of molecular interaction on magnetic surfaces, forming a hybrid interface, are presenting a new pathway for developing the subfield of interface-assisted molecular spintronics. The recent exploration of such hybrid interfaces involving carbon based aromatic molecules shows a significant excitement and promise over the previously studied single molecular magnets. In the above new scenario, hybridization of the molecular orbitals with the spin-polarized bands of the surface creates new interface states with unique electronic and magnetic character. This study opens up a molecular-genome initiative in designing new handles to functionalize the spin dependent electronic properties of the hybrid interface to construct spin-functional tailor-made devices. Through this article, we review this subject by presenting a fundamental understanding of the interface spin-chemistry and spin-physics by taking support of advanced computational and spectroscopy tools to investigate molecular spin responses with demonstration of new interface phenomena. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling spectroscopy is favorably considered to be an important tool to investigate these hybrid interfaces with intra-molecular spatial resolution. Finally, by addressing some of the recent findings, we propose novel device schemes towards building interface tailored molecular spintronic devices for applications in sensor, memory, and quantum computing.

  2. Molecular Foundry User Meeting - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Foundry User Meeting Molecular Foundry User Meeting Thu, Aug 11, 2016 5:00pm 17:00 Fri, Aug 12, 2016 6:00pm 18:00 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA USA The Molecular Foundry is hosting its annual Users' Meeting - a nanoscience conference at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab - on August 11-12, 2016. The Molecular Foundry is a Department of Energy user facility for academic, national laboratory and industrial researchers. Whether you are a returning user, a prospective

  3. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally...

  4. Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June 2006 Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June 2006 Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic ...

  5. OTEC environmental biological oceanographic program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartwig, E.O.

    1981-07-01

    One of the major goals of the OTEC biological field measurement program is to assess the effect of OTEC operations on the environment. Prior understanding of the natural variability of the tropical oceanic plankton community is the most important method for determining changes due to operation of an OTEC plant. The spatial and temporal patterns of the plankton community in terms of absolute number, biomass and species composition have been investigated at potential OTEC sites. Considerable data exist which document the changes with depth of all three measurements. Diel fluctuations in number and species composition have been studied at one site. While horizontal and seasonal patterns of variability likely exist at all sites, they are subtle and remain somewhat unclear. Attempts are now being made to determine the overall trophic structure of the plankton community at these sites using these data, gut content analysis, and information already in the literature.

  6. Cerenkov emission induced by external beam radiation stimulates molecular fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Axelsson, Johan; Davis, Scott C.; Gladstone, David J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Cerenkov emission is induced when a charged particle moves faster than the speed of light in a given medium. Both x-ray photons and electrons produce optical Cerenkov photons in everyday radiation therapy of tissue; yet, this phenomenon has never been fully documented. This study quantifies the emissions and also demonstrates that the Cerenkov emission can excite a fluorophore, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), embedded in biological phantoms. Methods: In this study, Cerenkov emission induced by radiation from a clinical linear accelerator is investigated. Biological mimicking phantoms were irradiated with x-ray photons, with energies of 6 or 18 MV, or electrons at energies 6, 9, 12, 15, or 18 MeV. The Cerenkov emission and the induced molecular fluorescence were detected by a camera or a spectrometer equipped with a fiber optic cable. Results: It is shown that both x-ray photons and electrons, at MeV energies, produce optical Cerenkov photons in tissue mimicking media. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Cerenkov emission can excite a fluorophore, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), embedded in biological phantoms. Conclusions: The results here indicate that molecular fluorescence monitoring during external beam radiotherapy is possible.

  7. Electrostatic thin film chemical and biological sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prelas, Mark A.; Ghosh, Tushar K.; Tompson, Jr., Robert V.; Viswanath, Dabir; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.

    2010-01-19

    A chemical and biological agent sensor includes an electrostatic thin film supported by a substrate. The film includes an electrostatic charged surface to attract predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A charge collector associated with said electrostatic thin film collects charge associated with surface defects in the electrostatic film induced by the predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A preferred sensing system includes a charge based deep level transient spectroscopy system to read out charges from the film and match responses to data sets regarding the agents of interest. A method for sensing biological and chemical agents includes providing a thin sensing film having a predetermined electrostatic charge. The film is exposed to an environment suspected of containing the biological and chemical agents. Quantum surface effects on the film are measured. Biological and/or chemical agents can be detected, identified and quantified based on the measured quantum surface effects.

  8. Probing Interactions in Complex Molecular Systems through Ordered Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Yoreo, J J; Bartelt, M C; Orme, C A; Villacampa, A; Weeks, B L; Miller, A E

    2002-01-31

    Emerging from the machinery of epitaxial science and chemical synthesis, is a growing emphasis on development of self-organized systems of complex molecular species. The nature of self-organization in these systems spans the continuum from simple crystallization of large molecules such as dendrimers and proteins, to assembly into large organized networks of nanometer-scale structures such as quantum dots or nanoparticles. In truth, self-organization in complex molecular systems has always been a central feature of many scientific disciplines including fields as diverse as structural biology, polymer science and geochemistry. But over the past decade, changes in those fields have often been marked by the degree to which researchers are using molecular-scale approaches to understand the hierarchy of structures and processes driven by this ordered assembly. At the same time, physical scientists have begun to use their knowledge of simple atomic and molecular systems to fabricate synthetic self-organized systems. This increasing activity in the field of self-organization is testament to the success of the physical and chemical sciences in building a detailed understanding of crystallization and epitaxy in simple atomic and molecular systems, one that is soundly rooted in thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. One of the fundamental challenges of chemistry and materials science in the coming decades is to develop a similarly well-founded physical understanding of assembly processes in complex molecular systems. Over the past five years, we have successfully used in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the physical controls on single crystal epitaxy from solutions for a wide range of molecular species. More recently, we have combined this method with grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and kinetic Monte Carlo modeling in order to relate morphology to surface atomic structure and processes. The purpose of this proposal was to extend this approach to assemblies

  9. Method for photo-altering a biological system to improve biological effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, Richard A.; Doiron, Daniel R.; Crean, David H.

    2000-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a new adjunctive therapy for filtration surgery that does not use chemotherapy agents or radiation, but uses pharmacologically-active sensitizing compounds to produce a titratable, localized, transient, post operative avascular conjunctiva. A photosensitizing agent in a biological system is selectively activated by delivering the photosensitive agent to the biological system and laser activating only a spatially selected portion of the delivered photosensitive agent. The activated portion of the photosensitive agent reacts with the biological system to obtain a predetermined biological effect. As a result, an improved spatial disposition and effectuation of the biological effect by the photosensitive agent in the biological system is achieved.

  10. A brief history of the Biology Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex Most of the "Biology" buildings were constructed in early 1945 and were built as expansion capability for the uranium preparation operations being conducted across the...

  11. Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Charles Dismukes, Rutgers University, at the Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop held September 24-25, 2013, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado.

  12. Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This factsheet explains studies conducted in a highly reproducible manner to examine the biological effects to fish exposed to a shear environment in the laboratory.

  13. Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines The U.S. Department of Energy's ... which environmen- tal attributes, such as entrainment survival for fish, are emphasized. ...

  14. International symposium on cellular and molecular biology of phosphate and phosphorylated compounds in microorganisms: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-12-31

    This report contains the abstracts of papers presented at the conference. Attention is focused on the following topics: regulation of phosphate metabolism in bacteria; structure-function of alkaline phosphatase; regulation of phosphate metabolism in yeast; transport of phosphate and phosphorylated compounds; and phosphate regulation in pathogenesis and secondary metabolism.

  15. Molecular biological enhancement of coal biodesulfurization. Technical report, March 1, 1994--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilbane, J.J. II

    1994-09-01

    IGT has developed a microbial culture of Rhodococcus rhodochrous, designated as IGTS8, that is capable of specifically cleaving carbon-sulfur bonds in a range of organosulfur model compounds and is capable of removing organic sulfur from coal and petroleum without significantly sacrificing the calorific value of the fuel. Although IGTS8 possesses the ability to specifically remove organic sulfur from coal, a major research need is to develop improved strains of microorganisms that possess higher levels of desulfurization activity and therefore will permit more favorable biodesulfurization process conditions: faster rates, more complete removal, and smaller reactor size. Strain improvement is the single most important aspect to the development of a practical coal biodesulfurization process and accordingly is the focus of research in this project. During this quarter the DNA sequences and transcriptional initiation sites of several promoters derived from the chromosome of Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8 were determined. Several strong promoters have been used to replace the promoter of the desulfurization genes with the intent of obtaining cultures with enhanced levels of desulfurization activity. The evaluation of the ability of improved cultures to desulfurize coal will be evaluated during the final quarter of this project.

  16. HIV Molecular Immunology 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette Tina Marie; Barouch, Dan; Koup, Richard; de Boer, Rob; Moore, John P.; Brander, Christian; Haynes, Barton F.; Walker, Bruce D.

    2015-02-03

    HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2014 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as crossreactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins are provided.

  17. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-03-14

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  18. From systems biology to photosynthesis and whole-plant modeling: a conceptual model for integrating multi-scale networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weston, David; Hanson, Paul J; Norby, Richard J; Tuskan, Gerald A; Wullschleger, Stan D

    2012-01-01

    Network analysis is now a common statistical tool for molecular biologists. Network algorithms are readily used to model gene, protein and metabolic correlations providing insight into pathways driving biological phenomenon. One output from such an analysis is a candidate gene list that can be responsible, in part, for the biological process of interest. The question remains, however, as to whether molecular network analysis can be used to inform process models at higher levels of biological organization. In our previous work, transcriptional networks derived from three plant species were constructed, interrogated for orthology and then correlated to photosynthetic inhibition at elevated temperature. One unique aspect of that study was the link from co-expression networks to net photosynthesis. In this addendum, we propose a conceptual model where traditional network analysis can be linked to whole-plant models thereby informing predictions on key processes such as photosynthesis, nutrient uptake and assimilation, and C partitioning.

  19. Division of Biological and Medical Research research summary 1984-1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, S.H.

    1985-08-01

    The Division of Biological and Medical Research at Argonne National Laboratory conducts multidisciplinary research aimed at defining the biological and medical hazards to man from energy technologies and new energy options. These technically oriented studies have a strong base in fundamental research in a variety of scientific disciplines, including molecular and cellular biology, biophysics, genetics, radiobiology, pharmacology, biochemistry, chemistry, environmental toxicology, and epidemiology. This research summary is organized into six parts. The first five parts reflect the Divisional structure and contain the scientific program chapters, which summarize the activities of the individual groups during the calendar year 1984 and the first half of 1985. To provide better continuity and perspective, previous work is sometimes briefly described. Although the summaries are short, efforts have been made to indicate the range of research activities for each group.

  20. Final report for Conference Support Grant "From Computational Biophysics to Systems Biology - CBSB12"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansmann, Ulrich H.E.

    2012-07-02

    This report summarizes the outcome of the international workshop “From Computational Biophysics to Systems Biology (CBSB12)” which was held June 3-5, 2012, at the University of Tennessee Conference Center in Knoxville, TN, and supported by DOE through the Conference Support Grant 120174. The purpose of CBSB12 was to provide a forum for the interaction between a data-mining interested systems biology community and a simulation and first-principle oriented computational biophysics/biochemistry community. CBSB12 was the sixth in a series of workshops of the same name organized in recent years, and the second that has been held in the USA. As in previous years, it gave researchers from physics, biology, and computer science an opportunity to acquaint each other with current trends in computational biophysics and systems biology, to explore venues of cooperation, and to establish together a detailed understanding of cells at a molecular level. The conference grant of $10,000 was used to cover registration fees and provide travel fellowships to selected students and postdoctoral scientists. By educating graduate students and providing a forum for young scientists to perform research into the working of cells at a molecular level, the workshop adds to DOE's mission of paving the way to exploit the abilities of living systems to capture, store and utilize energy.

  1. Sharpening Our Tools: Algal Biology Toolbox Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) will host the Algal Biology Toolbox Workshop on May 24-25, 2016, in San Diego, California. Because biological productivity is a key driver for the economic viability of algae-based biofuels, improving on the performance of native strains is a critical element of the research efforts funded by the Advanced Algal Systems program at BETO.

  2. Apparatus for molecular weight separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Richard D.; Liu, Chuanliang

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to an apparatus and method for separating high molecular weight molecules from low molecular weight molecules. More specifically, the invention relates to the use of microdialysis for removal of the salt (low molecular weight molecules) from a nucleotide sample (high molecular weight molecules) for ESI-MS analysis. The dialysis or separation performance of the present invention is improved by (1) increasing dialysis temperature thereby increasing desalting efficiency and improving spectrum quality; (2) adding piperidine and imidazole to the dialysis buffer solution and reducing charge states and further increasing detection sensitivity for DNA; (3) using low concentrations (0-2.5 mM NH4OAc) of dialysis buffer and shifting the DNA negative ions to higher charge states, producing a nearly 10-fold increase in detection sensitivity and a slightly decreased desalting efficiency, (4) conducting a two-stage separation or (5) any combination of (1), (2), (3) and (4).

  3. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saibil, Helen R.; Grnewald, Kay; Stuart, David I.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides a brief update on the use of cryo-electron microscopy for integrated structural biology, along with an overview of the plans for the UK national facility for electron microscopy being built at the Diamond synchrotron. Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback.

  4. Sealable femtoliter chamber arrays for cell-free biology

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Retterer, Scott T.; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Collier, Charles Patrick; Simpson, Michael L.; Norred, Sarah Elizabeth; Caveney, Patrick M.; Boreyko, Jonathan B.

    2015-03-11

    Cell-free systems provide a flexible platform for probing specific networks of biological reactions isolated from the complex resource sharing (e.g. global gene expression, cell division) encountered within living cells. However, such systems, used in conventional macro-scale bulk reactors, often fail to exhibit the dynamic behaviors and efficiencies characteristic of their living micro-scale counterparts. Understanding the impact of internal cell structure and scale on reaction dynamics is crucial to understanding complex gene networks. Here we report a microfabricated device that confines cell-free reactions in cellular scale volumes while allowing flexible characterization of the enclosed molecular system. This multilayered poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) devicemore » contains femtoliter-scale reaction chambers on an elastomeric membrane which can be actuated (open and closed). When actuated, the chambers confine Cell-Free Protein Synthesis (CFPS) reactions expressing a fluorescent protein, allowing for the visualization of the reaction kinetics over time using time-lapse fluorescent microscopy. Lastly, we demonstrate how this device may be used to measure the noise structure of CFPS reactions in a manner that is directly analogous to those used to characterize cellular systems, thereby enabling the use of noise biology techniques to characterize CFPS gene circuits and their interactions with the cell-free environment.« less

  5. Institute for Molecular Engineering | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learn more about the Institute for Molecular Engineering. When completed in early 2015, the William Eckhardt Research Center at the University of Chicago will be the home of the Institute of Molecular Engineering. Institute for Molecular Engineering The new Institute for Molecular Engineering explores innovative technologies that address fundamental societal problems through advances in nanoscale manipulation and design at a molecular scale. Addressing Societal Problems with Molecular Science

  6. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can become temporarily trapped by the molecule before ultimately escaping,

  7. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can become temporarily trapped by the molecule before ultimately escaping,

  8. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can become temporarily trapped by the molecule before ultimately escaping,

  9. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can become temporarily trapped by the molecule before ultimately escaping,

  10. Matrix Effects in Biological Mass Spectrometry Imaging: Identification and Compensation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Stevens, Susan; Stenzel-Poore, Mary; Laskin, Julia

    2014-07-21

    Matrix effects in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) may affect the observed molecular distribution in chemical and biological systems. In this study, we introduce an experimental approach that efficiently compensates for matrix effects in nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) MSI without introducing any complexity into the experimental protocol. We demonstrate compensation for matrix effects in nano-DESI MSI of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in normal and ischemic mouse brain tissue by doping the nano-DESI solvent with PC standards. Specifically, we use mouse brain tissue of a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke model with an ischemic region localized to one hemisphere of the brain. Due to similar suppression in ionization of endogenous PC molecules extracted from the tissue and PC standards added to the solvent, matrix effects are eliminated by normalizing the intensity of the sodium and potassium adducts of endogenous PC to the intensity of the corresponding adduct of the PC standard. This approach efficiently compensates for signal variations resulting from differences in the local concentrations of sodium and potassium in tissue sections and from the complexity of the extracted analyte mixture derived from local variations in molecular composition.

  11. Protein Structure Suggests Role as Molecular Adapter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protein Structure Suggests Role as Molecular Adapter Print To split and copy DNA during replication, all cellular organisms use a multicomponent molecular machine known as the...

  12. Protein Structure Suggests Role as Molecular Adapter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure Suggests Role as Molecular Adapter Print To split and copy DNA during replication, all cellular organisms use a multicomponent molecular machine known as the...

  13. Connecting the Molecular and the Continuum Scales

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    range of phenomena, from climate change to contaminant remediation. Accomplishments: Used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to determine molecular-scale diffusion coefficients of...

  14. SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH DETECTION OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MOLECULAR HYDROGEN ROTATIONAL EMISSION TOWARDS TRANSLUCENT CLOUDS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH DETECTION OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN ...

  15. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, K.W.; Vogel, J.S.; Felton, J.S.; Gledhill, B.L.; Davis, J.C.

    1994-12-27

    Disclosed is a method of quantifying molecules in biological substances comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering the chemical specie to the biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of the chemical specie with the host throughout the biological system of the host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from the host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of the substance from extraneous sources, f. converting the fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in the material by means of direct isotopic counting. 5 figures.

  16. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Vogel, John S.; Felton, James S.; Gledhill, Barton L.; Davis, Jay C.; Stanker, Larry H.

    1993-05-11

    Disclosed is a method of quantifying molecules in biological substances, comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering said chemical specie to said biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system thereof, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of said chemical specie with said host throughout said biological system of said host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from said host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of said substance from extraneous sources, f. converting said fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in said material by means of direct isotopic counting.

  17. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Vogel, John S.; Felton, James S.; Gledhill, Barton L.; Davis, Jay C.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of quantifying molecules in biological substances comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering said chemical specie to said biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system thereof, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of said chemical specie with said host throughout said biological system of said host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from said host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of said substance from extraneous sources, f. converting said fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in said material by means of direct isotopic counting.

  18. Extended Lagrangian Density Functional Tight-Binding Molecular Dynamics for Molecules and Solids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aradi, Bálint; Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2015-06-26

    A computationally fast quantum mechanical molecular dynamics scheme using an extended Lagrangian density functional tight-binding formulation has been developed and implemented in the DFTB+ electronic structure program package for simulations of solids and molecular systems. The scheme combines the computational speed of self-consistent density functional tight-binding theory with the efficiency and long-term accuracy of extended Lagrangian Born–Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Furthermore, for systems without self-consistent charge instabilities, only a single diagonalization or construction of the single-particle density matrix is required in each time step. The molecular dynamics simulation scheme can also be applied to a broad range of problems in materialsmore » science, chemistry, and biology.« less

  19. Extended Lagrangian Density Functional Tight-Binding Molecular Dynamics for Molecules and Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aradi, Bálint; Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2015-06-26

    A computationally fast quantum mechanical molecular dynamics scheme using an extended Lagrangian density functional tight-binding formulation has been developed and implemented in the DFTB+ electronic structure program package for simulations of solids and molecular systems. The scheme combines the computational speed of self-consistent density functional tight-binding theory with the efficiency and long-term accuracy of extended Lagrangian Born–Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Furthermore, for systems without self-consistent charge instabilities, only a single diagonalization or construction of the single-particle density matrix is required in each time step. The molecular dynamics simulation scheme can also be applied to a broad range of problems in materials science, chemistry, and biology.

  20. Frontiers of Plant Cell Biology: Signals and Pathways, System-Based Approaches 22nd Symposium in Plant Biology (University of California-Riverside)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minorsky, Peter V.

    2003-06-01

    The symposium ''Frontiers of Plant Cell Biology: Signals and Pathways, Systems-Based Approaches'' was held January 15-18, 2003 at the Riverside Convention Center in Riverside, California. The host organization for the symposium was the Center for Plant Cell Biology (CEPCEB) at the University of California, Riverside (UCR). The meeting, focusing on systems-based approaches to plant cell biology research, was the first of this kind in the field of plant biology. The speakers and nearly 100 posters placed emphasis on recent developments in plant cellular biology and molecular genetics, particularly those employing emerging genomic tools, thereby sharing the most current knowledge in the field and stimulating future advances. In attendance were many well-established scientists and young investigators who approach plant cell biology from different but complementary conceptual and technical perspectives. Indeed, many disciplines are converging in the field of cell biology, producing synergies that will enable plant scientists to determine the function of gene products in the context of living cells in whole organisms. New, cross-disciplinary collaborations, as well as the involvement of computer scientists and chemists in plant biology research, are likely additional outcomes of the symposium. The program included 39 invited session speakers and workshop/panel speakers. Sessions were convened on the following themes: Cell-Cell Communication; Protein Trafficking; Cell Surface, Extracellular Matrix and Cell Wall; Signal Transduction; Signal Transduction and Proteosome; and Systems-Based Approaches to Plant Cell Biology. Workshops on Chemical Genetics and Visual Microscopy were also presented. Abstracts from each of the speaker presentations, as well as the posters presented at the meeting were published in a program booklet given to the 239 faculty members, researchers, postdoctoral scientists and graduate students in attendance. The booklet thus serves as a reference for

  1. Biological denitrification of high concentration nitrate waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Francis, Chester W.; Brinkley, Frank S.

    1977-01-01

    Biological denitrification of nitrate solutions at concentrations of greater than one kilogram nitrate per cubic meter is accomplished anaerobically in an upflow column having as a packing material a support for denitrifying bacteria.

  2. Algal Biology Program at Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Algal Biology Program at Los Alamos gets a star October 11, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, October 11, 2011-Richard Sayre, one of the nation's top specialists in algae and...

  3. Renewable Hydrogen Production from Biological Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Matthew Posewitz, Colorado School of Mines, at the Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop held September 24-25, 2013, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado.

  4. Molecular separation method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus for separating a gaseous mixture of chemically identical but physically different molecules based on their polarities. The gaseous mixture of molecules is introduced in discrete quantities into the proximal end of a porous glass molecular. The molecular sieve is exposed to microwaves to excite the molecules to a higher energy state from a lower energy state, those having a higher dipole moment being excited more than those with a lower energy state. The temperature of the sieve kept cold by a flow of liquid nitrogen through a cooling jacket so that the heat generated by the molecules colliding with the material is transferred away from the material. The molecules thus alternate between a higher energy state and a lower one, with the portion of molecules having the higher dipole moment favored over the others. The former portion can then be extracted separately from the distal end of the molecular sieve.

  5. Molecular separation method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    1996-04-09

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for separating a gaseous mixture of chemically identical but physically different molecules based on their polarities. The gaseous mixture of molecules is introduced in discrete quantities into the proximal end of a porous glass molecular sieve. The molecular sieve is exposed to microwaves to excite the molecules to a higher energy state from a lower energy state, those having a higher dipole moment being excited more than those with a lower energy state. The temperature of the sieve kept cold by a flow of liquid nitrogen through a cooling jacket so that the heat generated by the molecules colliding with the material is transferred away from the material. The molecules thus alternate between a higher energy state and a lower one, with the portion of molecules having the higher dipole moment favored over the others. The former portion can then be extracted separately from the distal end of the molecular sieve. 2 figs.

  6. SU-E-I-39: Molecular Image Guided Cancer Stem Cells Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdollahi, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Cancer stem cells resistance to radiation is a problematic issue that has caused a big fail in cancer treatment. Methods: As a primary work, molecular imaging can indicate the main mechanisms of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. By developing and commissioning new probes and nanomolecules and biomarkers, radiation scientist will able to identify the essential pathways of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. As the second solution, molecular imaging is a best way to find biological target volume and delineate cancer stem cell tissues. In the other hand, by molecular imaging techniques one can image the treatment response in tumor and also in normal tissue. In this issue, the response of cancer stem cells to radiation during therapy course can be imaged, also the main mechanisms of radiation resistance and finding the best radiation modifiers (sensitizers) can be achieved by molecular imaging modalities. In adaptive radiotherapy the molecular imaging plays a vital role to have higher tumor control probability by delivering high radiation doses to cancer stem cells in any time of treatment. The outcome of a feasible treatment is dependent to high cancer stem cells response to radiation and removing all of which, so a good imaging modality can show this issue and preventing of tumor recurrence and metastasis. Results: Our results are dependent to use of molecular imaging as a new modality in the clinic. We propose molecular imaging as a new radiobiological technique to solve radiation therapy problems due to cancer stem cells. Conclusion: Molecular imaging guided cancer stem cell diagnosis and therapy is a new approach in the field of cancer treatment. This new radiobiological imaging technique should be developed in all clinics as a feasible tool that is more biological than physical imaging.

  7. Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    February 26-27, 2015, Tysons, Virginia | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) February 26-27, 2015, Tysons, Virginia Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings BERAC Minutes BERAC Minutes Archive Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (135KB) BER Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees BER Home Meetings Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee February 26-27, 2015, Tysons, Virginia Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page

  8. Charge exchange molecular ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vella, Michael C.

    2003-06-03

    Ions, particularly molecular ions with multiple dopant nucleons per ion, are produced by charge exchange. An ion source contains a minimum of two regions separated by a physical barrier and utilizes charge exchange to enhance production of a desired ion species. The essential elements are a plasma chamber for production of ions of a first species, a physical separator, and a charge transfer chamber where ions of the first species from the plasma chamber undergo charge exchange or transfer with the reactant atom or molecules to produce ions of a second species. Molecular ions may be produced which are useful for ion implantation.

  9. All-Optical Molecular Orientation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oda, Keita; Hita, Masafumi; Minemoto, Shinichirou; Sakai, Hirofumi [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2010-05-28

    We report clear evidence of all-optical orientation of carbonyl sulfide molecules with an intense nonresonant two-color laser field in the adiabatic regime. The technique relies on the combined effects of anisotropic hyperpolarizability interaction and anisotropic polarizability interaction and does not rely on the permanent dipole interaction with an electrostatic field. It is demonstrated that the molecular orientation can be controlled simply by changing the relative phase between the two wavelength fields. The present technique brings researchers a new steering tool of gaseous molecules and will be quite useful in various fields such as electronic stereodynamics in molecules and ultrafast molecular imaging.

  10. SINGLE MOLECULE APPROACHES TO BIOLOGY, 2010 GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 27-JULY 2, 2010, ITALY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Professor William Moerner

    2010-07-09

    The 2010 Gordon Conference on Single-Molecule Approaches to Biology focuses on cutting-edge research in single-molecule science. Tremendous technical developments have made it possible to detect, identify, track, and manipulate single biomolecules in an ambient environment or even in a live cell. Single-molecule approaches have changed the way many biological problems are addressed, and new knowledge derived from these approaches continues to emerge. The ability of single-molecule approaches to avoid ensemble averaging and to capture transient intermediates and heterogeneous behavior renders them particularly powerful in elucidating mechanisms of biomolecular machines: what they do, how they work individually, how they work together, and finally, how they work inside live cells. The burgeoning use of single-molecule methods to elucidate biological problems is a highly multidisciplinary pursuit, involving both force- and fluorescence-based methods, the most up-to-date advances in microscopy, innovative biological and chemical approaches, and nanotechnology tools. This conference seeks to bring together top experts in molecular and cell biology with innovators in the measurement and manipulation of single molecules, and will provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present their work in poster format and to exchange ideas with leaders in the field. A number of excellent poster presenters will be selected for short oral talks. Topics as diverse as single-molecule sequencing, DNA/RNA/protein interactions, folding machines, cellular biophysics, synthetic biology and bioengineering, force spectroscopy, new method developments, superresolution imaging in cells, and novel probes for single-molecule imaging will be on the program. Additionally, the collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with programmed discussion sessions as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings in the beauty of the Il Ciocco site in

  11. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Wednesday, 24 November 2010 00:00 Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary

  12. The Development of New User Research Capabilities in Environmental Molecular Science: Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Baer, Donald R.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Gephart, Roy E.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2006-10-31

    On August 1, and 2, 2006, 104 scientists representing 40 institutions including 24 Universities and 5 National Laboratories gathered at the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a National scientific user facility, to outline important science challenges for the next decade and identify major capabilities needed to pursue advanced research in the environmental molecular sciences. EMSL’s four science themes served as the framework for the workshop. The four science themes are 1) Biological Interactions and Interfaces, 2) Geochemistry/Biogeochemistry and Surface Science, 3) Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry, and 4) Science of Interfacial Phenomena.

  13. Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production Report documenting the ...

  14. Detter, John C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory] Basic Biological

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    State of the Art for Autonomous Detection Systems using Genomic Sequencing Detter, John C. Los Alamos National Laboratory Basic Biological Sciences(59) Biological Science...

  15. Copy of Synthetic Biology of Novel Thermophilic Bacteria for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Copy of Synthetic Biology of Novel Thermophilic Bacteria for Enhanced Production of ... Title: Copy of Synthetic Biology of Novel Thermophilic Bacteria for Enhanced Production of ...

  16. Comparative systems biology across an evolutionary gradient within...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Comparative systems biology across an evolutionary gradient within the Shewanella genus Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Comparative systems biology across an ...

  17. Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol stress...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol stress responses Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol ...

  18. Flow cytometry aids basic cell biology research and drug discovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flow cytometry aids basic cell biology research and drug discovery Flow cytometry aids basic cell biology research and drug discovery Life Technologies Corporation and LANL have ...

  19. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for biology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biology Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for biology You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's ...

  20. UK Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council Jump to: navigation, search Name: UK Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council Place: London, United Kingdom...

  1. Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production (2009) Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production (2009) ...

  2. Nanojunction Sensors for the Detection of chemical and Biological...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanojunction Sensors for the Detection of chemical and Biological Species DOE Grant ... gaps for various applications, including chemical and biological sensors, magnetoresistive ...

  3. Synthetic Biology for Advanced Fuels (Opening Keynote Address...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Synthetic Biology for Advanced Fuels (Opening Keynote Address - 2010 JGI User Meeting) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Synthetic Biology for Advanced Fuels (Opening ...

  4. Sealable femtoliter chamber arrays for cell-free biology (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sealable femtoliter chamber arrays for cell-free biology Prev Next Title: Sealable femtoliter chamber arrays for cell-free biology You are accessing a document from the ...

  5. A Systems Biology Platform for Characterizing Regulatory and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: A Systems Biology Platform for Characterizing Regulatory and Metabolic ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Systems Biology Platform for Characterizing ...

  6. Importance of systems biology in engineering microbes for biofuel...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Importance of systems biology in engineering microbes for biofuel production Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Importance of systems biology in engineering microbes for ...

  7. California: Breakthrough in Algae Biology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Breakthrough in Algae Biology California: Breakthrough in Algae Biology January 31, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis Researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at University of ...

  8. Phytochrome from Green Plants: Properties and biological Function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quail, Peter H.

    2014-07-25

    Plants constantly monitor the light environment for informational light signals used to direct adaptational responses to the prevailing conditions. One major such response, the Shade-Avaoidance Response (SAR), triggered when plants sense the presence of competing neighbors, results in enhanced channeling of photosynthetically-fixed carbon into stem elongation at the expense of deposition in reproductive tissues. This response has been selected against in many modern food crops to ensure maximum edible yield (e.g. seeds). Converse enhancement of the SAR, with consequent increased carbon channeling into vegetative cellulose, could contribute to the generation of crops with improved yield of tissues suitable for cellulosic biofuel production. The signal for this response is light enriched in far-red wavelengths. This signal is produced by sunlight filtered through, or reflected from, neighboring vegetation, as a result of preferential depletion of red photons through chlorophyll absorption. The plant phytochrome (phy) photoreceptor system (predominantly phyB) senses this signal through its capacity to switch reversibly, in milliseconds, between two molecular states: the biologically inactive Pr (red-light-absorbing) and biologically active Pfr (far-red-light-absorbing) conformers. The photoequilibrium established between these two conformers in light-grown plants is determined by the ratio of red-to-far-red wavelengths in the incoming signal. The levels of Pfr then dictate the recipient plant’s growth response: high levels suppress elongation growth; low levels promote elongation growth. Studies on seedling deetiolation have advanced our understanding considerably in recent years, of the mechanism by which the photoactivated phy molecule transduces its signal into cellular growth responses. The data show that a subfamily of phy-interacting bHLH transcription factors (PIFs) promote skotomorphogenic seedling development in post-germinative darkness, but that the phy

  9. The acquisition of dangerous biological materials :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceto, Donato Gonzalo; Astuto-Gribble, Lisa M.; Gaudioso, Jennifer M.

    2007-11-01

    Numerous terrorist organizations have openly expressed interest in producing and deploying biological weapons. However, a limiting factor for many terrorists has been the acquisition of dangerous biological agents, as evidenced by the very few successful instances of biological weapons use compared to the number of documented hoaxes. Biological agents vary greatly in their ability to cause loss of life and economic damage. Some agents, if released properly, can kill many people and cause an extensive number of secondary infections; other agents will sicken only a small number of people for a short period of time. Consequently, several biological agents can potentially be used to perpetrate a bioterrorism attack but few are likely capable of causing a high consequence event. It is crucial, from a US national security perspective, to more deeply understand the likelihood that terrorist organizations can acquire the range of these agents. Few studies have attempted to comprehensively compile the technical information directly relevant to the acquisition of dangerous bacteria, viruses and toxins. In this report, technical fact sheets were assembled for 46 potentially dangerous biological agents. Much of the information was taken from various research sources which could ultimately and significantly expedite and improve bioterrorism threat assessments. By systematically examining a number of specific agent characteristics included in these fact sheets, it may be possible to detect, target, and implement measures to thwart future terrorist acquisition attempts. In addition, the information in these fact sheets may be used as a tool to help laboratories gain a rudimentary understanding of how attractive a method laboratory theft is relative to other potential acquisition modes.

  10. Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... including optical, X ray, elec- tron, and atomic force; and archives for molecular dynamic simulations of the molecular machinery that breaks down plant cell-wall components. ...