Sample records for molecular biology csmb

  1. CSMB | Center for Structural Molecular Biology | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteries BatteriesCAESMission Welcomefor GasforCSMB

  2. Molecular Biology DEGREE PROGRAMME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    to the course co-ordinator for that module (See University Catalogue of Courses or SMS World Wide Web Pages in molecular biology have a wide range of career options, including virtually all areas of biology, medicine with mastering statistics, graphics and word processing software packages. General Enquiries The Degree Programme

  3. BE.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shuguang, Dr.

    Basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. Molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, including collagen, silk, bone, protein adhesives, GFP, self-assembling peptides. Molecular ...

  4. Molecular biology of signal transduction in plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions of the 1991 Cold Springs Harbor Meeting entitled Molecular Biology of Signal Transduction in Plants.

  5. Applications to Computational Molecular Biology Giuseppe Lancia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lancia, Giuseppe

    of the first type Bioinformatics problems, and reserve the term Computational Biology for the study of problemsApplications to Computational Molecular Biology Giuseppe Lancia 1 Introduction Computational decade. The seeds for the birth of Computational Biology were sowed in the end of the Seventies, when

  6. COMPUTATIONAL MOLECULAR BIOLOGY TRAINING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, John

    in the burgeoning fields of bioinformatics and computational biology. A major outcome of the initial funding period was the establishment of ISU's interdepartmental graduate program in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BCB for Research Excellence in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BCB). The ISU-NMSU partnership

  7. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, M.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Lippman, M. [Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)] [comps.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  8. advanced molecular biology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    311 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Molecular Biology Biology 311 Fall 2013 Syllabus Instructor: Dr. Deborah Lycan Class: MWF 9@lclark.edu Website: http:...

  9. Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomes, R.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

  10. Frontiers of NMR in Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    NMR spectroscopy is expanding the horizons of structural biology by determining the structures and describing the dynamics of blobular proteins in aqueous solution, as well as other classes of proteins including membrane proteins and the polypeptides that form the aggregates diagnostic of prion and amyloid diseases. Significant results are also emerging on DNA and RNA oligomers and their complexes with proteins. This meeting focused attention on key structural questions emanating from molecular biology and how NMR spectroscopy can be used to answer them.

  11. Molecular Biology Basics Planning Restriction Enzyme Digests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aris, John P.

    Molecular Biology Basics Planning Restriction Enzyme Digests A. Checklist: Buffer type Addition of BSA Optimum temperature Number of units of enzyme B. Plan to digest DNA with an "excess" of enzyme activity. Plan for the "excess" to be divided between time of digestion and number of units of enzyme

  12. 2004 Reversible Associations in Structure & Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward Eisenstein Nancy Ryan Gray

    2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2004 Gordon Research Conference on Reversible Associations in Structure & Molecular Biology was held at Four Points Sheraton, CA, 1/25-30/2004. The Conference was well attended with 82 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students.

  13. 2009 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism & Molecular Biology GRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Julie Maupin- Furlow

    2009-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses; and industrial applications. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  14. 2011 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism, & Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keneth Stedman

    2011-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  15. 2007 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism and Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imke Schroeder

    2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Archaea are a fascinating and diverse group of prokaryotic organisms with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of this GRC conference, 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology', expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting the evolution and composition of microbial communities and novel archaeal species, their impact on the environment, archaeal metabolism, and research that stems from sequence analysis of archaeal genomes. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple reputable areas with new scientific topics in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  16. Multispectral optical tweezers for molecular diagnostics of single biological cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Multispectral optical tweezers for molecular diagnostics of single biological cells Author, Townes Laser Institute, CREOL ­ The College of Optics and Photonics, Univ. of Central Florida (United States) ABSTRACT Optical trapping of single biological cells has become an established technique

  17. Molecular biology of signal transduction in plants. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions of the 1991 Cold Springs Harbor Meeting entitled Molecular Biology of Signal Transduction in Plants.

  18. Third international congress of plant molecular biology: Molecular biology of plant growth and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallick, R.B. [ed.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Congress was held October 6-11, 1991 in Tucson with approximately 3000 scientists attending and over 300 oral presentations and 1800 posters. Plant molecular biology is one of the most rapidly developing areas of the biological sciences. Recent advances in the ability to isolate genes, to study their expression, and to create transgenic plants have had a major impact on our understanding of the many fundamental plant processes. In addition, new approaches have been created to improve plants for agricultural purposes. This is a book of presentation and posters from the conference.

  19. SAFE WORKING ENVIRONMENT THE DEPARTMENT OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND GENETICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAFE WORKING ENVIRONMENT THE DEPARTMENT OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND GENETICS MAY 2013MAY 2013 #12;#12;SAFE WORKING ENVIRONMENT 1 The Working Environment Organisation at the Department The Working Environment organisation at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics (MBG) is divided into 11 working

  20. BIOINFORMATICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY 2014 Molecular Biology Building, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011-3260

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, John

    BIOINFORMATICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY 2014 Molecular Biology Building, Iowa State University of recommendation in my file at the Bioinformatics and Computational Biology program, Iowa State University. [ ] I in the Bioinformatics and Computational Biology program at Iowa State University. We would appreciate your evaluation

  1. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ MOLECULAR, CELL, & DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ MOLECULAR, CELL, & DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY Junior Specialist I ­ Assistant Specialist II The University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) invites applications will be conducted. Reappointment is also contingent upon availability of funding. TO APPLY: Applications

  2. Journal of Steroid Biochemistry & Molecular Biology 94 (2005) 273277 11 -Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in the heart of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miksik, Ivan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Symposium of the Journal of Steriod Biochemistry and Molecular Biology on Recent Advances in Steroid

  3. Statistical Applications in Genetics and Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    groups of childhood leukemia patients: acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL testing, preprocessing, leukemia, tail probability Merrill D. Birkner is a trainee of the U.C. Berkeley of the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study, for access to the biological samples. This study

  4. M. Madan Babu MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, M. Madan

    M. Madan Babu MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge Avenues and Career Options #12;Career options Undergraduate (B. Sc, B. Tech) 3-4 years Postgraduate (M. Sc, M. Tech) 2 years Ph. Sc, B. Tech) Postgraduate (M. Sc, M. Tech) PhD (Specialization) Teaching (Lecturer) Technical

  5. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 16, 48524866, October 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 16, 4852­4866, October 2005 Helicobacter pylori VacA Cytotoxin cytotoxin VacA is a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium responsible for gastrodu-independent mechanism, and routed to the degradative compartment. INTRODUCTION Gastric infection by Helicobacter pylori

  6. Review article Molecular biology of fish viruses: a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Review article Molecular biology of fish viruses: a review J Bernard, M Brémont* INRA, laboratoire aspects in the fish virus studies. Although more than 50 different fish virus have been isolated family, the fish lym- phocystis disease virus (FLDV) is the most studied. Retroviridae have been recently

  7. Computational Molecular Biology of Genome Expression and Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computational Molecular Biology of Genome Expression and Regulation Michael Q. Zhang, Ph.D. Cold in genome expression and regulation network in which better modern statistical and machine learning referring to the cellular processes that lead to pro- tein production, is controlled and regulated

  8. SchoolofMedicalSciences BSc (Hons) Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    Catalogue of Courses or SMS World Wide Web Pages for names). The Head of School of Medical Sciences as to the development of improved crops. Graduates in molecular biology have a wide range of career options, including, and in the transferable skills associated with mastering statistics, graphics and word processing software packages

  9. Genomics and computational molecular biology Douglas L Brutlag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brutlag, Doug

    340 Genomics and computational molecular biology Douglas L Brutlag There has been a dramatic increase in the number of completely sequenced bacterial genomes during the past two years as a result of the efforts both of public genome agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. The availability of completely

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - applications molecular biology Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    applications molecular biology Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 COMMITTEE ON GENETICS, GENOMICS & SYSTEMS BIOLOGY: SUGGESTED STUDENT TRACKS AUTUMN QUARTER WINTER QUARTER SPRING...

  11. Overview of selected molecular biological databases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayl, K.D.; Gaasterland, T.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of the purpose, content, and design of a subset of the currently available biological databases, with an emphasis on protein databases. Databases included in this summary are 3D-ALI, Berlin RNA databank, Blocks, DSSP, EMBL Nucleotide Database, EMP, ENZYME, FSSP, GDB, GenBank, HSSP, LiMB, PDB, PIR, PKCDD, ProSite, and SWISS-PROT. The goal is to provide a starting point for researchers who wish to take advantage of the myriad available databases. Rather than providing a complete explanation of each database, we present its content and form by explaining the details of typical entries. Pointers to more complete ``user guides`` are included, along with general information on where to search for a new database.

  12. Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shugart, L.R.; D'Surney, S.J.; Gettys-Hull, C.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.

    1991-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Several molecular and cellular markers of genotoxicity were adapted for measurement in the Medaka (Oryzias latipes), and were used to describe the effects of treatment of the organism with diethylnitrosamine (DEN). NO{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts were detected, and a slight statistically significant, increase in DNA strand breaks was observed. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that prolonged exposure to high levels of DEN induced alkyltransferase activity which enzymatically removes any O{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts but does not result in strand breaks or hypomethylation of the DNA such as might be expected from excision repair of chemically modified DNA. Following a five week continuous DEN exposure with 100 percent renewal of DEN-water every third day, the F values (DNA double strandedness) increased considerably and to similar extent in fish exposed to 25, 50, and 100 ppM DEN. This has been observed also in medaka exposed to BaP.

  13. 10/29/12 EBS AY12/13 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    to Molecular Biology EBS 514 ­ Metabolism and Bioenergetics Advanced Elective Courses (16 credits, including EBS 514 ­ Metabolism and Bioenergetics Advanced Elective Courses (8 credits, including special topics 613 ­ Introduction to Molecular Biology EBS 614 ­ Metabolism and Bioenergetics Advanced Elec

  14. 4/30/13 EBS AY13/14 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    to Molecular Biology EBS 514 ­ Metabolism and Bioenergetics Advanced Elective Courses (16 credits, including EBS 514 ­ Metabolism and Bioenergetics Advanced Elective Courses (8 credits, including special topics 613 ­ Introduction to Molecular Biology EBS 614 ­ Metabolism and Bioenergetics Advanced Elective

  15. 12/15/11 EBS AY11/12 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    to Molecular Biology EBS 514 ­ Metabolism and Bioenergetics Advanced Elective Courses (16 credits, including EBS 514 ­ Metabolism and Bioenergetics Advanced Elective Courses (8 credits, including special topics 613 ­ Introduction to Molecular Biology EBS 614 ­ Metabolism and Bioenergetics Advanced Elec

  16. Revised 7/19/2011 B.S. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Degree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microbiology 4 BL3300 Introduction to Genomics 3 BL4030 Molecular Biology 3 CH4995 Undergrad Research

  17. Molecular biology of Homo sapiens: Abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Spring Harbor symposium on quantitative biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, J.D.; Siniscalco, M.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Springs Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology. The topic for this meeting was the ''Molecular Biology of Homo sapiens.'' Sessions were entitled Human Gene Map, Human Cancer Genes, Genetic Diagnosis, Human Evolution, Drugs Made Off Human Genes, Receptors, and Gene Therapy. (DT)

  18. Collection Policy: BIOCHEMISTRY, MOLECULAR AND CELL BIOLOGY Subject Scope | Priority Tables | Other policies . . .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    , recombinant DNA and its applications, metabolism, molecular biology, computer graphics in molecular biology regulation and chromatin structure in eukaryotes q Regulation of the heat shock genes q Control of gene-response regulatory protein in bacteria q Bacterial transcription mechanisms, especially termination, and control

  19. STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE RESEARCH PROGRAM (LSBMM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenberg, David S.

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The UCLA-DOE Institute of Genomics and Proteomics is an organized research unit of the University of California, sponsored by the Department of Energy through the mechanism of a Cooperative Agreement. Today the Institute consists of 10 Principal Investigators and 7 Associate Members, developing and applying technologies to promote the biological and environmental missions of the Department of Energy, and 5 Core Technology Centers to sustain this work. The focus is on understanding genomes, pathways and molecular machines in organisms of interest to DOE, with special emphasis on developing enabling technologies. Since it was founded in 1947, the UCLA-DOE Institute has adapted its mission to the research needs of DOE and its progenitor agencies as these research needs have changed. The Institute started as the AEC Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, directed by Stafford Warren, who later became the founding Dean of the UCLA School of Medicine. In this sense, the entire UCLA medical center grew out of the precursor of our Institute. In 1963, the mission of the Institute was expanded into environmental studies by Director Ray Lunt. I became the third director in 1993, and in close consultation with David Galas and John Wooley of DOE, shifted the mission of the Institute towards genomics and proteomics. Since 1993, the Principal Investigators and Core Technology Centers are entirely new, and the Institute has separated from its former division concerned with PET imaging. The UCLA-DOE Institute shares the space of Boyer Hall with the Molecular Biology Institute, and assumes responsibility for the operation of the main core facilities. Fig. 1 gives the organizational chart of the Institute. Some of the benefits to the public of research carried out at the UCLA-DOE Institute include the following: The development of publicly accessible, web-based databases, including the Database of Protein Interactions, and the ProLinks database of genomicly inferred protein function linkages. The development of publicly accessible, web-based servers, including the HOTPATCH server, the ProKnow Server and the SAVEs server. All of these are accessible from the home page of the Institute. Advancing the science of bioenergy, in the laboratories of the Principal Investigators of the Institute, including the laboratories of Shimon Weiss, James Liao, James Bowie, Todd Yeates, Rob Gunsalus.

  20. Towards Microsecond Biological Molecular Dynamics Simulations on Hybrid Processors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hampton, Scott S [ORNL; Agarwal, Pratul K [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomolecular simulations continue to become an increasingly important component of molecular biochemistry and biophysics investigations. Performance improvements in the simulations based on molecular dynamics (MD) codes are widely desired. This is particularly driven by the rapid growth of biological data due to improvements in experimental techniques. Unfortunately, the factors, which allowed past performance improvements of MD simulations, particularly the increase in microprocessor clock frequencies, are no longer improving. Hence, novel software and hardware solutions are being explored for accelerating the performance of popular MD codes. In this paper, we describe our efforts to port and optimize LAMMPS, a popular MD framework, on hybrid processors: graphical processing units (GPUs) accelerated multi-core processors. Our implementation is based on porting the computationally expensive, non-bonded interaction terms on the GPUs, and overlapping the computation on the CPU and GPUs. This functionality is built on top of message passing interface (MPI) that allows multi-level parallelism to be extracted even at the workstation level with the multi-core CPUs as well as extend the implementation on GPU clusters. The results from a number of typically sized biomolecular systems are provided and analysis is performed on 3 generations of GPUs from NVIDIA. Our implementation allows up to 30-40 ns/day throughput on a single workstation as well as significant speedup over Cray XT5, a high-end supercomputing platform. Moreover, detailed analysis of the implementation indicates that further code optimization and improvements in GPUs will allow {approx}100 ns/day throughput on workstations and inexpensive GPU clusters, putting the widely-desired microsecond simulation time-scale within reach to a large user community.

  1. 2012 PLANT MOLECULAR BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JULY 15-20, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sussman, Michael

    2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2012 Gordon Conference on Plant Molecular Biology will present cutting-edge research on molecular aspects of plant growth and development, with particular emphasis on recent discoveries in molecular mechanisms involved with plant signaling systems. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics in plant molecular biology including hormone receptors and early events in hormone signaling, plant perception of and response to plant pathogen and symbionts, as well as technological and biological aspects of epigenomics particularly as it relates to signaling systems that regulate plant growth and development. Genomic approaches to plant signaling will be emphasized, including genomic profiling technologies for quantifying various biological subsystems, such as the epigenome, transcriptome, phosphorylome, and metabolome. The meeting will include an important session devoted to answering the question, "What are the biological and technological limits of plant breeding/genetics, and how can they be solved"?

  2. Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Department of Environmental and Biomolecular Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Biology _____ _____ _____ EBS 514 ­ Biochemistry III: Metabolism and Bioenergetics Biology _____ _____ _____ EBS 614 ­ Biochemistry III: Metabolism and Bioenergetics _____ _____ _____ Three (3) of the following courses are required: EBS 625 ­ Bioenergetics and Membrane Transport

  3. Eric C. Achberger -molecular biology; transcription Christopher C. Austin -herpetology, systematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Jacqueline

    - pathogenicity of Vibrio and Streptomyces William J. Platt III - plant populations and communities James VBIOLOGICAL SCIENCES Eric C. Achberger - molecular biology; transcription Christopher C. Austin Prosanta Chakrabarty - ichthyology; systematics Brent C. Christner - microbes in the cryosphere

  4. 2012 CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 17 - 22, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judith Berman

    2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gordon Research Conference on CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY was held at Holderness School, Holderness New Hampshire, June 17 - 22, 2012. The 2012 Gordon Conference on Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology (CMFB) will present the latest, cutting-edge research on the exciting and growing field of molecular and cellular aspects of fungal biology. Topics will range from yeast to filamentous fungi, from model systems to economically important organisms, and from saprophytes and commensals to pathogens of plants and animals. The CMFB conference will feature a wide range of topics including systems biology, cell biology and morphogenesis, organismal interactions, genome organisation and regulation, pathogenesis, energy metabolism, biomass production and population genomics. The Conference was well-attended with 136 participants. Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings.

  5. Workshop in computational molecular biology, April 15, 1991--April 14, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tavare, S.

    1995-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Funds from this award were used to the Workshop in Computational Molecular Biology, `91 Symposium entitled Interface: Computing Science and Statistics, Seattle, Washington, April 21, 1991; the Workshop in Statistical Issues in Molecular Biology held at Stanford, California, August 8, 1993; and the Session on Population Genetics a part of the 56th Annual Meeting, Institute of Mathematical Statistics, San Francisco, California, August 9, 1993.

  6. DNA fragment assembly: an application of graph theory in molecular biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willems, Wolfgang

    DNA fragment assembly: an application of graph theory in molecular biology Martin Mascher Leibniz Technology Since the central importance of the DNA in storing biological informa- tion had been recognised limitations permit scientists only to obtain contigu- ous DNA fragments whose lengths range from a few dozen

  7. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 19, 11041112, March 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morimoto, Richard

    . Morimoto, and Kevin A. Morano* *Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas treatment induces a battery of oxidant defense genes in addition to heat shock genes. Celastrol activated

  8. Computational Molecular Biology Biochem 218 BioMedical Informatics 231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the names of the genes and enter them in Go Term Finder to discover common biological processes, common the Yeast Cell Cycle Database by first entering a single gene of interest to you and then clicking on select all co- expressed genes: http://genome-www.stanford.edu/cgi-bin/cellcycle/search · Collect all

  9. Modeling human risk: Cell & molecular biology in context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is anticipated that early in the next century manned missions into outer space will occur, with a mission to Mars scheduled between 2015 and 2020. However, before such missions can be undertaken, a realistic estimation of the potential risks to the flight crews is required. One of the uncertainties remaining in this risk estimation is that posed by the effects of exposure to the radiation environment of outer space. Although the composition of this environment is fairly well understood, the biological effects arising from exposure to it are not. The reasons for this are three-fold: (1) A small but highly significant component of the radiation spectrum in outer space consists of highly charged, high energy (HZE) particles which are not routinely experienced on earth, and for which there are insufficient data on biological effects; (2) Most studies on the biological effects of radiation to date have been high-dose, high dose-rate, whereas in space, with the exception of solar particle events, radiation exposures will be low-dose, low dose-rate; (3) Although it has been established that the virtual absence of gravity in space has a profound effect on human physiology, it is not clear whether these effects will act synergistically with those of radiation exposure. A select panel will evaluate the utilizing experiments and models to accurately predict the risks associated with exposure to HZE particles. Topics of research include cellular and tissue response, health effects associated with radiation damage, model animal systems, and critical markers of Radiation response.

  10. Turn Scanning 133 From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 168: Protein Structure, Stability, and Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponder, Jay

    Turn Scanning 133 133 From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 168: Protein Structure, Stability, and Folding Edited by: K. P. Murphy © Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 7 Turn Scanning: Experimental extended structures. Here we present the use of turn scanning as an experimental method for assessing

  11. Plant Molecular Biology 50: 803818, 2002. 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korban, Schuyler S.

    Plant Molecular Biology 50: 803­818, 2002. © 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed. Unfortunately, such markers are not available for most plant species, including woody perennial plants. Here, we, and provides a minimal tiling path of 16 contiguous and overlapping BAC clones, thus generating a sequence

  12. 12/13/11 EBS AY10/11 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    EBS 514 ­ Metabolism and Bioenergetics Advanced Elective Courses (16 credits, including special topics and Bioenergetics Advanced Elective Courses (8 credits, including special topics and independent studies): Reading to Molecular Biology EBS 614 ­ Metabolism and Bioenergetics Advanced Elective Courses (12 credits, including

  13. Exploring the free-energy landscapes of biological systems with steered molecular dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Liao Y.

    1 Exploring the free-energy landscapes of biological systems with steered molecular dynamics fluctuation-dissipation-theorem (BD -FDT) to accurately compute the free-energy profiles for several compute the free-energy profiles for all the afore-listed systems that represent various important aspects

  14. Online tools for sequence retrieval and multivariate statistics in molecular biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thioulouse, Jean

    On­line tools for sequence retrieval and multivariate statistics in molecular biology Guy Perričre@biomserv.univ­lyon1.fr Keywords: World­Wide Web; Sequence data banks; Retrieval system; Multivariate analysis; Sequence analysis. * To whom reprint requests should be sent. #12; Abstract We have developed a World

  15. On-line tools for sequence retrieval and multivariate statistics in molecular biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thioulouse, Jean

    On-line tools for sequence retrieval and multivariate statistics in molecular biology Guy Perričre@biomserv.univ-lyon1.fr Keywords: World-Wide Web; Sequence data banks; Retrieval system; Multivariateanalysis; Sequence for browsing sequence collections structured under ACNUC format and for performing multivariate analyses

  16. Bowtie-Shaped Microwells 1 From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 370

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Christopher S.

    Bowtie-Shaped Microwells 1 1 From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 370: Adhesion Protein­Cell Adhesion Using Bowtie-Shaped Microwells Celeste M. Nelson, Wendy F. Liu, and Christopher S. Chen Summary­substratum adhesion. Using microfabri- cated stamps of poly(dimethylsiloxane), we construct bowtie-shaped agarose

  17. Optimization in Computational Chemistry and Molecular Biology, pp. ???? C. A. Floudas and P. M. Pardalos, Editors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlick, Tamar

    Optimization in Computational Chemistry and Molecular Biology, pp. ??­?? C. A. Floudas and P. M case, multivariate nonlinear optimization and optionally configurational sampling is involved library. This problem is a combinatorial optimization task, and is known to have a non­polynomial time

  18. Optimization in Computational Chemistry and Molecular Biology, pp. ??-?? C. A. Floudas and P. M. Pardalos, Editors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlick, Tamar

    Optimization in Computational Chemistry and Molecular Biology, pp. ??-?? C. A. Floudas and P. M, multivariate nonlinear optimization and optionally con gurational sampling is involved. The diversity problem. This problem is a combinatorial optimization task, and is known to have a non-polynomial time complexity 8, 24

  19. Molecular biology in marine science: Scientific questions, technological approaches, and practical implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes molecular techniques that could be invaluable in addressing process-oriented problems in the ocean sciences that have perplexed oceanographers for decades, such as understanding the basis for biogeochemical processes, recruitment processes, upper-ocean dynamics, biological impacts of global warming, and ecological impacts of human activities. The coupling of highly sophisticated methods, such as satellite remote sensing, which permits synoptic monitoring of chemical, physical, and biological parameters over large areas, with the power of modern molecular tools for ``ground truthing`` at small scales could allow scientists to address questions about marine organisms and the ocean in which they live that could not be answered previously. Clearly, the marine sciences are on the threshold of an exciting new frontier of scientific discovery and economic opportunity.

  20. 2010 CELL AND MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 13-18, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelle Momany

    2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology Conference provides a forum for presentation of the latest advances in fungal research with an emphasis on filamentous fungi. This open-registration scientific meeting brings together the leading scientists from academia, government and industry to discuss current research results and future directions at Holderness School, an outstanding venue for scientific interaction. A key objective of the conference is to foster interaction among scientists working on model fungi such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Neurospora crassa and Aspergillus nidulans and scientists working on a variety of filamentous fungi whose laboratory tractability is often inversely proportional to their medical, industrial or ecological importance. Sessions will be devoted to Systems Biology, Fungi and Cellulosic Biomass, Small RNAs, Population Genomics, Symbioses, Pathogenesis, Membrane Trafficking and Polarity, and Cytoskeleton and Motors. A session will also be devoted to hot topics picked from abstracts. The CMFB conference provides a unique opportunity to examine the breadth of fungal biology in a small meeting format that encourages in-depth discussion among the attendees.

  1. Systems Biology. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biology. Systems Biology. Abstract: The biology revolution over the last 50 years has been driven by the ascendancy of molecular biology. This was enthusiastically embraced by most...

  2. Molecular biology on a microfluidic chip This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Molecular biology on a microfluidic chip This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please:10.1088/0953-8984/18/18/S14 Molecular biology on a microfluidic chip Jong Wook Hong1,4 , Yan Chen2 Published 19 April 2006 Online at stacks.iop.org/JPhysCM/18/S691 Abstract We have developed microfluidic

  3. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society (1998), 63: 367378. With 4 figures Herbivores and molecular clocks as tools in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, John N.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a powerful tool to historical plant biogeography. © 1998 The Linnean Society of London ADDITIONAL KEY WORDS and molecular clocks as tools in plant biogeography OLLE PELLMYR AND JAMES LEEBENS-MACK Department of Biology (Apiaceae) and the host-specific herbivore Greya powelli (Lepidoptera: Prodoxidae) in California

  4. Statistics in Microarray Analysis 111 From: Methods in Molecular Biology: vol. 224: Functional Genomics: Methods and Protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Gordon K.

    Statistics in Microarray Analysis 111 111 From: Methods in Molecular Biology: vol. 224: Functional, NJ 9 Statistical Issues in cDNA Microarray Data Analysis Gordon K. Smyth,Yee Hwa Yang, and Terry Speed 1. Introduction Statistical considerations are frequently to the fore in the analysis

  5. DNA Recombination by Random Priming 99 From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 231: Directed Evolution Library Creation: Methods and Protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    DNA Recombination by Random Priming 99 99 From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 231: Directed., Totowa, NJ 13 In Vitro DNA Recombination by Random Priming Olga Esteban, Ryan D. Woodyer, and Huimin Zhao recombination was first demonstrated by Stemmer in 1994 with the technique of DNA shuffling or sexual PCR (7

  6. Chemotherapy efficiency increase via shock wave interaction with biological membranes: a molecular dynamics study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Silvia

    Application of ultrasound to biological tissues has been identified as a promising cancer treatment technique relying on temporal enhancement of biological membrane permeability via shock wave impact. In the present study, ...

  7. Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplexMaterialProductionBiological andU.S.Biology

  8. Biologic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis H. Kauffman

    2002-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers >protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  9. Environmental Biology | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    microbiology, biogeochemistry, molecular biology, molecular dynamics, bioinformatics, genomics, neutron science, chemistry, and computing-and spans multiple scales, from the...

  10. July 2012 M.S. in Molecular Cellular and Genetic Biology (honors) -University of A Corua, A Corua, Spain July 2011 B.S. in Biology -University of A Corua, A Corua, Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eirin Lopez, Jose Maria

    of A Coruña, A Coruña, Spain July 2011 B.S. in Biology - University of A Coruña, A Coruña, Spain RESEARCH, University of A Coruña, Spain. Advisors: Dr. Jose M. Eirin Lopez, Dr. Josefina Mendez. 2011 - 2012 Master student, Dept. Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of A Coruña, Spain. 2005 - 2011 Bachelor student

  11. Example 1 -LIFE SCIENCES/SCIENCES DE LA VIE Biology A Gene, Cell, Molecular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Nancy

    (Immunology Host-cell interactions, Immune response, antigens, antibodies) LS9 Microbiology (Microbial ecology/behavioural and cognitive neuroscience (Behavioural neuroscience ­ learning, reward, mot., Sensory systems and perception;Example 1 - LIFE SCIENCES/SCIENCES DE LA VIE Biology C - Ecology LS18 General Ecology (Physiological

  12. Journal of Steroid Biochemistry & Molecular Biology 127 (2011) 915 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumberg, Bruce

    -2300, United States b Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA, United energy balance to favor the storage of calories and by altering the hormonal control of appetite Biological Sciences 3, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-2300, United States. Tel.: +1 949 824 8573

  13. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 20, 13401347, March 1, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , Ĺbo Akademi University, 20520 Turku, Finland; Departments of Biochemistry and Pharmacy and Biology to satellite III DNA in nuclear stress bodies, subnuclear structures in which HSF1 induces transcription to Hsps, HSFs are associated with ex- pression of noncoding satellite III (sat III) RNA in nuclear stress

  14. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 21, 41974211, December 1, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbes, Douglass

    Fusion in Nuclear Pore Assembly Biochemical Demonstration and Molecular Analysis Boris Fichtman,* Corinne and was prevented by LPC or OA, but not by LPC OA. These results map the crucial inner/outer nuclear membrane fusion al., 2005). The formation of the eukaryotic nuclear envelope (NE) also requires membrane fusion

  15. 2006 Reversible Associations in Structural and Molecular Biology Conference-January 15-20, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Ackers

    2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Many biological processes are carried out through the formation of macromolecular complexes, ranging from the simplest conformational organization to the most sophisticated interactions among complexes themselves. Reversible associations generate specific local conformations, active site configurations, and subunit--subunit interfaces, and encompass larger scale quaternary rearrangements and dissociation events. Assembled complexes exhibit properties different from those of component parts, such that 'the whole is greater than the sum of the parts', resulting in biological functioning of the assembly. This Gordon Research Conference brings together researchers from what may appear to be disparate fields with the common focus of applying quantitative kinetic and thermodynamic analysis to reversible macromolecular interactions. This conference will include the following session topics: (1) Protein design in evolution and recognition; (2) Emerging technologies; (3) Single molecule mechanics; (4) Nucleic acid/protein recognition; (5) Lipid/protein recognition; (6) Protein switches and networks; (7) Advances in classic technologies; (8) Ligand/macromolecule complexes and drug design; and (9) Selected student oral presentations; all from the perspective of reversibly associating systems. A wide array of techniques are typically covered, from single molecule to computational methods, chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation, spectroscopic dynamics and titration calorimetry. The quantitative analysis of assembled complexes demonstrates that these biologically important functions depend not just upon a single part of the molecule, but on the coordination brought about by the ensemble of interactions. Applications from graduate students and young postdoctoral scientists are welcomed. A selection of short talks will be invited from students presenting posters.

  16. MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY, 0270-7306/01/$04.00 0 DOI: 10.1128/MCB.21.20.68206832.2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY, 0270-7306/01/$04.00 0 DOI: 10.1128/MCB.21.20.6820­6832.2001 Oct. 2001, p. 6820­6832 Vol. 21, No. 20 Copyright © 2001, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York2 Received 9 May 2001/Returned for modification 25 June 2001/Accepted

  17. M.D./PH.D. PROGRAM GENERAL INFORMATION The Department of Molecular Biology has joined forces with UMDNJ Robert Wood Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M.D./PH.D. PROGRAM GENERAL INFORMATION The Department of Molecular Biology has joined forces with UMDNJ Robert Wood Johnson Medical School (RWJMS) and Rutgers to create a multi-institutional M Chiarchiaro (Princeton). ADMISSIONS: A maximum of six students are admitted each year by an M

  18. MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY, Oct. 2007, p. 70287040 Vol. 27, No. 20 0270-7306/07/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/MCB.00579-07

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    ; Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, Human Cancer Genetics, The Ohio State University School 2-1, Aobaku Sendai 980-8575, Japan1 ; Department of Cellular Biology,2 Department of Human Genetics,3 and Department of Experimental Oncology,4 RIRBM, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 734-8553, Japan

  19. From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 350: Protein Folding Protocols Edited by: Y. Bai and R. Nussinov Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caflisch, Amedeo

    225 From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 350: Protein Folding Protocols Edited by: Y. Bai and R in the transition state. Key Words: Protein folding; energy landscape; transition state ensemble; denatured state- sively applied to the analysis of protein folding (1­5). Although proteins are essential macromolecules

  20. From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 350: Protein Folding Protocols Edited by: Y. Bai and R. Nussinov Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuler, Ben

    115 From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 350: Protein Folding Protocols Edited by: Y. Bai and R to Protein Folding Benjamin Schuler Summary Protein folding is a process characterized by a large degree this method to protein folding. Key Words: Protein folding; fluorescence spectroscopy; single molecule

  1. Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity. Final report, September 15, 1988--September 14, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shugart, L.R.; D`Surney, S.J.; Gettys-Hull, C.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.

    1991-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Several molecular and cellular markers of genotoxicity were adapted for measurement in the Medaka (Oryzias latipes), and were used to describe the effects of treatment of the organism with diethylnitrosamine (DEN). NO{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts were detected, and a slight statistically significant, increase in DNA strand breaks was observed. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that prolonged exposure to high levels of DEN induced alkyltransferase activity which enzymatically removes any O{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts but does not result in strand breaks or hypomethylation of the DNA such as might be expected from excision repair of chemically modified DNA. Following a five week continuous DEN exposure with 100 percent renewal of DEN-water every third day, the F values (DNA double strandedness) increased considerably and to similar extent in fish exposed to 25, 50, and 100 ppM DEN. This has been observed also in medaka exposed to BaP.

  2. Postdoctoral opportunities are available immediately in a project investigating molecular mechanisms of neurogenic hypertension. We take a systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pillow, Jonathan

    mechanisms of neurogenic hypertension. We take a systems biology approach involving high-throughput data

  3. FINAL REPORT: DOE CONTRACT NUMBER FG0205ER64026 Biological Neutron Scattering: A Collaboration with the Oak Ridge Center for Structural Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jill Trewhella

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The overarching goal of this project was to promote applications of small-angle scattering in structural molecular biology by providing model examples of cutting edge applications that demonstrate the unique capabilities and potential of the DOE national user facilities at Oak Ridge, especially the newly commissioned BioSANS. The approach taken was three-fold: (1) to engage in high impact collaborative research projects that would benefit from small-angle neutron scattering to both demonstrate the power of the technique while expanding the potential user community; (2) to provide access to scattering facilities established at the University of Utah to as broad a set of researchers as possible to increase the expertise in small-angle scattering generally; and (3) to develop new methods and tools for small-angle scattering. To these ends, three major research collaborations were pursued that resulted in a significant body of published work where neutron scattering and contrast variation played a major role. These major collaborations involved studies of protein complexes involved in (1) bacterial transcription regulation and adaptive response (a DOE/BER priority area); (2) regulation of cardiac muscle; and (3) neuronal disorders. In addition, to broaden the impact of the project, smaller collaborative efforts were supported that used either small-angle X-ray or neutron scattering. Finally, the DOE supported facilities at the University of Utah were made available to researchers on a service basis and a number of independent groups took advantage of this opportunity. In all of this work, there was an emphasis on the training of students and post docs in scattering techniques, and a set of publications (a book chapter, a review, and an encyclopedia article) were produced to guide the non-specialist potential user of scattering techniques in successful applications of the techniques. We also developed a suite of user friendly web-based computational tools currently being accessed world-wide by researchers as an aid in neutron scattering data interpretation. In all, these collaborative projects and resulted in 29 original refereed journal articles published between 2005 and 2010 and engaged groups from at least 14 Universities (10 US, 4 international) and 3 National Laboratories (2 US, 1 international). An important final initiative from this project was to begin a process for international community agreement on a set of standards for the publication of biomolecular small-angle scattering data. This initiative is being championed with the International Union of Crystallography and has engaged a number of Journal Editors and is a very important step in the maturing of this now burgeoning field.

  4. Encounter with Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macfarlane, Alan

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    , Hopkins was the Professor but was old; towards the end of the War Professor Chibnall came who was also interested in proteins; my first paper was on nitrogen of the potato 20 20:59:23 I was starting on a research degree at that stage...

  5. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900SteepStrengthening northernDeterminationScience Highlights

  6. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900SteepStrengthening northernDeterminationScience

  7. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900SteepStrengthening northernDeterminationScienceTraining

  8. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ... Strengthening a solid

  9. NATURE STRUCTURAL & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY VOLUME 16 NUMBER 12 DECEMBER 2009 1267 A RT I C L E S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, James

    of BM2 is also a coiled-coil tetramer, and its unusually large electrostatic dipole moment suggests-coil tetramer with a packing angle of about -37° (Fig. 1a). The tetramer has a well 1Department of Biological

  10. 7.013 Introductory Biology, Spring 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sive, Hazel L.

    The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological ...

  11. Cellular and Molecular BiologyTM 52, N6,47-52 ISSN 1165-158X

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    an impaired trafficking of Cx43 proteins in early carcinogenesis. In collaboration with biologists, we propose and the statistical validation of biological hypotheses about Cx43 expressions and configurations during tumorogenesis connexins (Cx), among which Cx43 is the most representative in mammalians. Recently, impaired GJC and Cx

  12. 7.012 Introduction to Biology, Fall 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinberg, Robert A. (Robert Allan), 1942-

    Cell biology, immunology, neurobiology, and an exploration into current research in cancer, genomics, and molecular medicine.

  13. Biology 494 Biology Internship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    Biology 494 Biology Internship Guidelines The Biology Program encourages students to seek out and participate in internship opportunities that have a clear biological focus. Internships may be arranged may receive credit in Biology 494 (Biology Internship) for participation in internships, regardless

  14. Iosif Vaisman Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaisman, Iosif

    Iosif Vaisman Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Email: ivaisman@gmu.edu BINF agreed on the following definitions of bioinformatics and computational biology recognizing STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY COMPUTATIONAL MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIOINFORMATICS GENOMICS STRUCTURAL GENOMICS PROTEOMICS

  15. Human Embryology & Developmental Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    Biology is the modern synthesis of biological and medical sciences that looks at how the tissues, and is at the forefront of recent advances in modern medicine. Current research has shown that many of the molecular Web Pages for names). The Head of School of Medical Sciences is always available for advice regarding

  16. Report on the research conducted under the funding of the Sloan foundation postdoctoral fellowship in Computational Molecular Biology [Systematic study of protein-protein complexes] Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheinerman, Felix

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A central question in molecular biology is what structural features are common at protein-protein interfaces and what energetic factors define the affinity and specificity of protein-protein association. Analysis of structural and mutational data on protein-protein interfaces revealed that protein-protein interfaces of different functional classes contain many more energetically important charged and polar residues than was previously thought. Since, in the context of protein folding studies, polar interactions are believed to destabilize the folded proteins, this observation raised the question as to the forces that determine the stability of protein complexes. To investigate this issue in detail, the authors developed a number of partitioning schemes that allowed them to investigate the role of selected residues, ion pairs, and networks of polar interactions in protein-protein association. The methods developed were applied to the analysis of four different protein-protein interfaces: the ribonuclease barnase and its inhibitor barstar, the human growth hormone and its receptor, subtype N9 influenze virus neuraminidase and NC41 antibody, and the Ras Binding Domain of kinase cRaf and a Ras homologue Rap1A. The calculations revealed a surprising variability in how polar interactions affect the stability of different complexes. The finding that positions of charged and polar residues on protein-protein interfaces are optimized with respect to electrostatic interactions suggests that this property can be employed for the discrimination between native conformations and trial complexes generated by a docking algorithm. Analysis indicated the presence of SH2 domains in Janus family of non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases.

  17. Eric Bennett Computational Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and secondary structure elements to predict a protein's propensity to form amyloids. Introduction Protein to a common feature. These aggregation prone proteins are normally soluble with a variety of three-dimensional to amyloid formation (7-9). Amyloid fibrils have an extremely characteristic structure in which

  18. Molecular Phylogeny and Biogeography of West Indian Teiid Lizards of the Genus Ameiva

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedges, Blair

    . HOWER AND S. BLAIR HEDGES* *Department of Biology and Institute of Molecular Evolutionary Genetics, 208

  19. Noah A. Rosenberg Department of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Noah

    , Life Sciences Institute and Center for Computational Medicine & Bioinformatics, University of Michigan Education 2001-2005 University of Southern California, Postdoc, Molecular and Computational Biology 1998, BMC Bioinformatics 2010- Editorial Board Member, Human Biology 2010- Associate Editor, Genetics 2009

  20. July 2010 M.S. in Molecular, Cellular Biology and Genetics -University of A Corua, A Corua, Spain. July 2009 B.S. in Biology -University of A Corua, A Corua, Spain.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eirin Lopez, Jose Maria

    , A Coruña, Spain. July 2009 B.S. in Biology - University of A Coruña, A Coruña, Spain. RESEARCH INTERESTS, Spain. ISBN:978-3-8484-5960-8, pp. 1-66. Ciro Rivera-Casas Ph. D. Student - Department of Cellular15171, Spain GRANTS Grants as a particioant researcher 2011 MICINN, Spanish Research Program

  1. Mol. Biol. Evol. 17(12):17761788. 2000 2000 by the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. ISSN: 0737-4038

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, David

    and Evolution. ISSN: 0737-4038 A Case for Evolutionary Genomics and the Comprehensive Examination of Sequence; Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge; Institute for Genomic Research, Gaithersburg, Maryland; §Genomics Group, Bioscience Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New

  2. Vol. 12, No. 3MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY, Mar. 1992, p. 1330-1339 0270-7306/92/031330-10$02.00/0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knipe, David M.

    of a Nuclear Localization Signal MIN GAOt AND DAVID M. KNIPE* Department ofMicrobiology and Molecular Genetics virus can localize to the cell nucleus independently ofother viral proteins. To define the nuclear analysis of the ICP8 gene showed that several portions of ICP8 are involved in its nuclear localization

  3. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Take-Home Exam #2.5 Spring 2008 Spring 2008 Biology 111 Exam #2.5 KEY -Molecular Genetics Take-Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    - Molecular Genetics Take-Home Exam There is no time limit on this test, though I have tried to design one natural protein did you find? cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit alpha isoform 1 b these proteins if you only count the energy used to charge tRNA and assemble the amino acids? (show your work

  4. BIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    Microscope) Analytical Equipment · High Performance Liquid Chromatography · Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography · Gas Chromatography · GC/MS · Elemental Analyser Molecular Biology Equipment · Biorad PCR Machine reactor for scale up studies In-line Particle sizers Rheometers Separation tanks Oscillating column (4m

  5. Graduate Programs in Plant Biology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildermuth, Mary C

    not re- biochemistry, cell and molecular biology (B22). pmb.berkeley.edu Plant&Microbial Biology #12;The to the environment will continue to fuel the expansion of plant research well into the future. The plant biology program focuses on contemporary ba- sic plant research, design of biotechnologies, and plant-microbe

  6. An atypical residue in the pore of the Varroa destructor GABA-activated RDL receptors affects picrotoxin block and thymol modulation Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Kerry; Lummis, Sarah C. R.

    2014-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    RNAwas transcribed in vitro from linearised pGEMHE cDNA template using the mMessage mMachine T7 Transcription kit (Ambion, Austin, Texas, USA). Stage V and VI oocytes were injected with 5 ng cRNA, incubated at 18 #3;C, and currents recorded 18e24 h post-injection. 2... ., Bourgeois, L., Elsik, C., Anderson, D., Grozinger, C.M., Evans, J.D., 2010. Genomic survey of the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor, a major pest of the honey bee Apis mel- lifera. BMC Genomics 11, 602. Das, P., Dillon, G.H., 2005. Molecular determinants...

  7. Distribution and localization of microsatellites in the Perigord black truffle genome and identification of new molecular markers (2010) Fungal Genetics and Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murat, Claude [INRA, Nancy, France; Riccioni, C [INRA, Nancy, France; Belfiori, B [INRA, Nancy, France; Cichocki, N [INRA, Nancy, France; Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL; Morin, Emmanuelle [INRA, Nancy, France; Tisserant, Emilie [INRA, Nancy, France; Paolocci, F [INRA, Nancy, France; Rubini, A [INRA, Nancy, France; Martin, Francis [INRA, Nancy, France

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The level of genetic diversity and genetic structure in the Perigord black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.) has been debated for several years, mainly due to the lack of appropriate genetic markers. Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are important for the genome organisation, phenotypic diversity and are one of the most popular molecular markers. In this study, we surveyed the T. melanosporum genome (1) to characterise its SSR pattern; (2) to compare it with SSR patterns found in 48 other fungal and three oomycetes genomes and (3) to identify new polymorphic SSR markers for population genetics. The T. melanosporum genome is rich in SSRs with 22,425 SSRs with mono-nucleotides being the most frequent motifs. SSRs were found in all genomic regions although they are more frequent in non-coding regions (introns and intergenic regions). Sixty out of 135 PCR-amplified mono-, di-, tri-, tetra, penta, and hexanucleotides were polymorphic (44%) within black truffle populations and 27 were randomly selected and analysed on 139 T. melanosporum isolates from France, Italy and Spain. The number of alleles varied from 2 to 18 and the expected heterozygosity from 0.124 to 0.815. One hundred and thirty-two different multilocus genotypes out of the 139 T. melanosporum isolates were identified and the genotypic diversity was high (0.999). Polymorphic SSRs were found in UTR regulatory regions of fruiting bodies and ectomycorrhiza regulated genes, suggesting that they may play a role in phenotypic variation. In conclusion, SSRs developed in this study were highly polymorphic and our results showed that T. melanosporum is a species with an important genetic diversity, which is in agreement with its recently uncovered heterothallic mating system.

  8. Conformational Transitions in Molecular Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Bachmann; Wolfhard Janke

    2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Proteins are the "work horses" in biological systems. In almost all functions specific proteins are involved. They control molecular transport processes, stabilize the cell structure, enzymatically catalyze chemical reactions; others act as molecular motors in the complex machinery of molecular synthetization processes. Due to their significance, misfolds and malfunctions of proteins typically entail disastrous diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Therefore, the understanding of the trinity of amino acid composition, geometric structure, and biological function is one of the most essential challenges for the natural sciences. Here, we glance at conformational transitions accompanying the structure formation in protein folding processes.

  9. biology | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Science Computing Facility: Quiet Wing Science Theme: Biosystem Dynamics & Design Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Energy Materials & Processes Atmospheric...

  10. Biological Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE's Biological Safety Program provides a forum for the exchange of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of biological safety. This content is supported by the Biosurety Executive Team. The Biosurety Executive Team is a DOE-chartered group. The DOE Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy provides administrative support for this group. The group identifies biological safety-related issues of concern to the DOE and pursues solutions to issues identified.

  11. BE.462J Molecular Principles of Biomaterials, Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irvine, Darrell J.

    Analysis and design at a molecular scale of materials used in contact with biological systems, including biotechnology and biomedical engineering. Topics include molecular interactions between bio- and synthetic molecules ...

  12. THE PLANT BIOLOGY SEMINAR Molecular Plant Biology, Department of Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahlberg, Niklas

    and microalgae. Arje Scheinin ­sali (DenAud, Lemminkäisenkatu 2) 19.02.2014 Natalia Battchikova Ser, Thr and Tyr fluorescence in characterization of mutants with altered regulation of photosynthetic energy transduction Pha1

  13. molecular BIologY Long RNAs turn up gene expression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    individual parts of the mitotic apparatus, the researchers surmise that, in the absence of spindles as 2 parts per billion. They show that, in a gas flow treated with a solid acid catalyst, TATP. Chem. Soc. doi:10.1021/ ja107419t (2010) PHYsIcs Insulator insight into constant Enigmatic materials

  14. Theory in Biology available light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Martin A.

    Magazine R406 Theory in Biology Theory is available light Martin A. Nowak Many people praise Gregor the neutral theory of evolution, which assumes that the overwhelming majority of molecular mutations do assume the neutral theory is correct. In a brilliant PhD thesis submitted in 1964, Bill Hamilton

  15. A unified model of electroporation and molecular transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Kyle Christopher

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological membranes form transient, conductive pores in response to elevated transmembrane voltage, a phenomenon termed electroporation. These pores facilitate electrical and molecular transport across cell membranes that ...

  16. Ninth International Workshop on Plant Membrane Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of abstracts from papers which were discussed at a workshop on plant membrane biology. Topics include: plasma membrane ATP-ases; plant-environment interactions, membrane receptors; signal transduction; ion channel physiology; biophysics and molecular biology; vaculor H+ pumps; sugar carriers; membrane transport; and cellular structure and function.

  17. Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology Thomas E. Creighton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oster, George

    binding and to liberate ATP from the catalytic site where it was formed. Remarkably, this process can. Creighton ISBN: 0-471-15302-8 #12;2 suggestively as the `rotor' and `stator' for reasons that derive from the rotary mechanism by which the protein operates. The rotor consists of gec10-14; the stator consists of a3

  18. Intra-molecular refrigeration in enzymes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans J. Briegel; Sandu Popescu

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simple mechanism for intra-molecular refrigeration, where parts of a molecule are actively cooled below the environmental temperature. We discuss the potential role and applications of such a mechanism in biology, in particular in enzymatic reactions.

  19. Magnetismo Molecular (Molecular Magentism)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reis, Mario S [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brasil; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F [ORNL

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new synthesis processes in chemistry open a new world of research, new and surprising materials never before found in nature can now be synthesized and, as a wonderful result, observed a series of physical phenomena never before imagined. Among these are many new materials the molecular magnets, the subject of this book and magnetic properties that are often reflections of the quantum behavior of these materials. Aside from the wonderful experience of exploring something new, the theoretical models that describe the behavior these magnetic materials are, in most cases, soluble analytically, which allows us to know in detail the physical mechanisms governing these materials. Still, the academic interest in parallel this subject, these materials have a number of properties that are promising to be used in technological devices, such as in computers quantum magnetic recording, magnetocaloric effect, spintronics and many other devices. This volume will journey through the world of molecular magnets, from the structural description of these materials to state of the art research.

  20. Biological preconcentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Bunker, Bruce C. (Albuquerque, NM); Huber, Dale L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A biological preconcentrator comprises a stimulus-responsive active film on a stimulus-producing microfabricated platform. The active film can comprise a thermally switchable polymer film that can be used to selectively absorb and desorb proteins from a protein mixture. The biological microfabricated platform can comprise a thin membrane suspended on a substrate with an integral resistive heater and/or thermoelectric cooler for thermal switching of the active polymer film disposed on the membrane. The active polymer film can comprise hydrogel-like polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) or poly(n-isopropylacrylamide), that are tethered to the membrane. The biological preconcentrator can be fabricated with semiconductor materials and technologies.

  1. Systems biology approach to bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, R.; Wu, C. H.; Hazen, T. C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioremediation has historically been approached as a ?black box? in terms of our fundamental understanding. Thus it succeeds and fails, seldom without a complete understanding of why. Systems biology is an integrated research approach to study complex biological systems, by investigating interactions and networks at the molecular, cellular, community, and ecosystem level. The knowledge of these interactions within individual components is fundamental to understanding the dynamics of the ecosystem under investigation. Understanding and modeling functional microbial community structure and stress responses in environments at all levels have tremendous implications for our fundamental understanding of hydrobiogeochemical processes and the potential for making bioremediation breakthroughs and illuminating the ?black box?.

  2. First Passage Problems in Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Chou; Maria R. D'Orsogna

    2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Applications of first passage times in stochastic processes arise across a wide range of length and time scales in biological settings. After an initial technical overview, we survey representative applications and their corresponding models. Within models that are effectively Markovian, we discuss canonical examples of first passage problems spanning applications to molecular dissociation and self-assembly, molecular search, transcription and translation, neuronal spiking, cellular mutation and disease, and organismic evolution and population dynamics. In this last application, a simple model for stem-cell ageing is presented and some results derived. Various approximation methods and the physical and mathematical subtleties that arise in the chosen applications are also discussed.

  3. Structure and mechanics of the spasmoneme, a biological spring within the protozoan Vorticella convallaria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    France, Danielle Cook

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular springs have recently emerged as the basis for the fastest and most powerful movements at the cellular level in biology. The spasmoneme of the protozoan, Vorticella convallaria, is a model molecular spring, relying ...

  4. Bioinformatics & Computational Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Bioinformatics & Computational Biology Master of Science in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (90 ECTS) Contact Information Programme administration Bioinformatics and Computational Biology.unifr.ch/msc Programme administration Bioinformatics and Computational Biology University of Bern Baltzerstrasse 6 CH

  5. Genetics & Plant Biology Major Requirements Lower Division Requirements (all major requirements must be taken for a letter grade)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Bioinformatics Plant Microbe Interactions · PMB C134: Chromosome Biology and Cytogenetics [3 · PMB 142: Plant Microscopy [3] · BioE 131: Intro to Computational Molecular and Cell Biology [4] · BioE 143: Computational] · Math 127: Math. and Computational Methods in Molecular Biology [4] · Stat C143: Stat. Methods

  6. BSCI 338V Biology of Vision Spring 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carleton, Karen L.

    of perspectives and will include topics from physics, molecular biology, sensory ecology, evolution, development TH Apr 22 23. Color perception and visual cortex Jacobs et al 2007 T Apr 27 24. Object recognition TH

  7. BE.440 Analysis of Biological Networks, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Essigmann, John

    This class analyzes complex biological processes from the molecular, cellular, extracellular, and organ levels of hierarchy. Emphasis is placed on the basic biochemical and biophysical principles that govern these processes. ...

  8. Biological Statistics and Computational Biology Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    . Williams Professor of Biomedical Informations and Co-Director, Yale Computational Biology & Bioinformatics co-director of the Yale Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Program. In addition to the KeckBiological Statistics and Computational Biology Seminar Series Dr. Mark B. Gerstein Albert L

  9. Micro/nanofabricated environments for synthetic biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collier, Pat [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A better understanding of how confinement, crowding and reduced dimensionality modulate reactivity and reaction dynamics will aid in the rational and systematic discovery of functionality in complex biological systems. Artificial micro- and nanofabricated structures have helped elucidate the effects of nanoscale spatial confinement and segregation on biological behavior, particularly when integrated with microfluidics, through precise control in both space and time of diffusible signals and binding interactions. Examples of nanostructured interfaces for synthetic biology include the development of cell-like compartments for encapsulating biochemical reactions, nanostructured environments for fundamental studies of diffusion, molecular transport and biochemical reaction kinetics, and regulation of biomolecular interactions as functions of micro- and nanofabricated topological constraints.

  10. Genomics-Bioinformatics Day: "Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, Systems Biology & Mathematical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldschmidt, Christina

    3rd Genomics-Bioinformatics Day: "Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, Systems Biology on "Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, Systems Biology & Mathematical Biology: Their Relationship". Genomics, Bioinformatics, Computational Biology have a tremendous appeal and these fields have originated or grown

  11. Brent Craig Christner Department of Biological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christner, Brent C.

    , 1996. Thesis advisor: John J. Rowe B.S., Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Westminster College, New. Assistant Research Professor, August 2004-2006. Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences of John C. Priscu, Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University

  12. Brent Craig Christner Department of Biological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christner, Brent C.

    , Ohio, 1996. Thesis advisor: John J. Rowe B.S., Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Westminster College Resources and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana. Postdoctoral Researcher, June 2002-August 2004. Laboratory of John C. Priscu, Department of Land Resources and Environmental

  13. Physics Meets Biology (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chu, Steve [Director, LBNL

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: If scientists could take advantage of the awesomely complex and beautiful functioning of biologys natural molecular machines, their potential for application in many disciplines would be incalculable. Nobel Laureate and Director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Steve Chu explores Possible solutions to global warming and its consequences.

  14. Bioinformatics Computational Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, John

    Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Interdepartmental Graduate Program GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK FALL 2006 Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Interdepartmental Graduate Program GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK FALL 2006 #12;1 Welcome to the Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BCB) program

  15. Biological Statistics and Computational Biology Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    Science and the Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics at Columbia University. Dr. PeBiological Statistics and Computational Biology Seminar Series Dr. Itsik Pe'er Associate Professor of Computer Science Columbia University Itsik Pe'er is an associate professor in the Department of Computer

  16. Microfluidics for quantitative biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Micha

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Microfluidics for Quantitative BiologyChapter 1: Microfluidics.………………………………………………………..… 1 1.1OF THE DISSERTATION Microfluidics for Quantitative Biology

  17. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology Genomics and Systems Biology Los Alamos scientists perform research in functional genomics and structural genomics, and applications for such work...

  18. HST.176 Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Fall 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pillai, Shiv

    Covers cells and tissues of the immune system, lymphocyte development, the structure and function of antigen receptors, the cell biology of antigen processing and presentation including molecular structure and assembly of ...

  19. analysis molecular investigation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Molecular Dynamics Analysis Toolchest Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: (Please see Appendix L)....

  20. Optimization of parameters for coverage of low molecular weight proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muller, Stephan A.

    Proteins with molecular weights of <25 kDa are involved in major biological processes such as ribosome formation, stress adaption (e.g., temperature reduction) and cell cycle control. Despite their importance, the coverage ...

  1. Sandia Energy - Molecular Geochemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    molecular spectroscopy, and molecular simulation to complex multicomponent and multiphase systems; particular emphasis on the use of molecular simulation and various...

  2. 20.462J / 3.962J Molecular Principles of Biomaterials (BE.462J), Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irvine, Darrell J.

    Analysis and design at a molecular scale of materials used in contact with biological systems, including biotechnology and biomedical engineering. Topics include molecular interactions between bio- and synthetic molecules ...

  3. Calibration and Testing of a Water Model for Simulation of the Molecular Dynamics of Proteins and Nucleic Acids in Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levitt, Michael

    Calibration and Testing of a Water Model for Simulation of the Molecular Dynamics of Proteins important in biological macromolecules, where fewer experimental results are available for calibration. Our

  4. Molecular Science Computing | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Capabilities Molecular Science Computing Overview Cell Isolation and Systems Analysis Deposition and Microfabrication Mass Spectrometry Microscopy Molecular Science...

  5. Biology and Medicine Division: Annual report 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Biology and Medicine Division continues to make important contributions in scientific areas in which it has a long-established leadership role. For 50 years the Division has pioneered in the application of radioisotopes and charged particles to biology and medicine. There is a growing emphasis on cellular and molecular applications in the work of all the Division's research groups. The powerful tools of genetic engineering, the use of recombinant products, the analytical application of DNA probes, and the use of restriction fragment length polymorphic DNA are described and proposed for increasing use in the future.

  6. Institute for Molecular Medicine Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, Michael E

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the project are the development of new Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging instrumentation, chemistry technology platforms and new molecular imaging probes to examine the transformations from normal cellular and biological processes to those of disease in pre-clinical animal models. These technology platforms and imaging probes provide the means to: 1. Study the biology of disease using pre-clinical mouse models and cells. 2. Develop molecular imaging probes for imaging assays of proteins in pre-clinical models. 3. Develop imaging assays in pre-clinical models to provide to other scientists the means to guide and improve the processes for discovering new drugs. 4. Develop imaging assays in pre-clinical models for others to use in judging the impact of drugs on the biology of disease.

  7. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxide Capture inFacility AMFInnovationMolecularOne of

  8. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxide Capture inFacility AMFInnovationMolecularOne

  9. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxide Capture inFacility AMFInnovationMolecularOneThe

  10. 2003 Synthetic Biology study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endy, Drew

    2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Biology is a technology for processing information, materials, and energy. As a technology platform, biological systems provide access to artifacts and processes across a range of scales (e.g., the ribosome is a programmable ...

  11. Biological Systems Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    encompasses the areas of priority pathogen detection, extremophile biology and genomics, biohydrometallurgy, biomass conversion, coal bioprocessing, biodegradation...

  12. Process Manual Biological & Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boas, Harold P.

    · · · · ·t t ·t ·t t t ·t . ~ t · · Process· Manual Biological & Agricultural Engineering MANUAL FOR THE BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT TexasA&MUniversity Article I. NAME The name ofthis organization shall be the Biological and Agricultural Engineering Department (abbreviated

  13. Computational Biology & Bioinformatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Marcia K.

    Computational Biology & Bioinformatics at Yale An Interdepartmental PhD Program and a Track within://www.yale.edu/graduateschool/admissions/apply_online.html 2 #12;Introduction Computational Biology and Bioinformatics (CBB) is a rapidly developing multi experimentation. Computational and theoretical approaches to understanding biological systems provide an essential

  14. Computational Biology & Bioinformatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computational Biology & Bioinformatics at Yale An Interdepartmental PhD Program and a Track within://www.yale.edu/graduateschool/admissions/apply_online.html #12;3 Introduction Computational Biology and Bioinformatics (CBB) is a rapidly developing multi experimentation. Computational and theoretical approaches to understanding biological systems provide an essential

  15. structural biology | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Science Computing Facility: Quiet Wing Science Theme: Biosystem Dynamics & Design Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Energy Materials & Processes Atmospheric...

  16. Molecular Science Computing | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Science Computing Overview Cell Isolation and Systems Analysis Deposition and Microfabrication Mass Spectrometry Microscopy Molecular Science Computing NMR and EPR...

  17. Engineering optical traps for new environments and applications in the measurement of biological adhesives and motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appleyard, David Collins

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical traps have played a central role in the exploration of biological systems through the examination of molecular motors, biopolymers, and many other interactions at the nano and micro length scales. This thesis seeks ...

  18. Computational Biology and High Performance Computing 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, Horst D.; Zorn, Manfred D.; Spengler, Sylvia J.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Stewart, Craig; Dubchak, Inna L.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2000-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The pace of extraordinary advances in molecular biology has accelerated in the past decade due in large part to discoveries coming from genome projects on human and model organisms. The advances in the genome project so far, happening well ahead of schedule and under budget, have exceeded any dreams by its protagonists, let alone formal expectations. Biologists expect the next phase of the genome project to be even more startling in terms of dramatic breakthroughs in our understanding of human biology, the biology of health and of disease. Only today can biologists begin to envision the necessary experimental, computational and theoretical steps necessary to exploit genome sequence information for its medical impact, its contribution to biotechnology and economic competitiveness, and its ultimate contribution to environmental quality. High performance computing has become one of the critical enabling technologies, which will help to translate this vision of future advances in biology into reality. Biologists are increasingly becoming aware of the potential of high performance computing. The goal of this tutorial is to introduce the exciting new developments in computational biology and genomics to the high performance computing community.

  19. Biological tracer method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. 2 figs.

  20. Biological tracer method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strong-Gunderson, Janet M. (Ten Mile, TN); Palumbo, Anthony V. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer.

  1. Biological detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  2. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology LANL leads the world in computational finishing of microbial genomes Read caption + In 2013, Los Alamos scientist Richard Sayre and his team...

  3. Biological and Environmental Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Focus Area team for Soil Metagenomics and Carbon Cycling develops and uses community genomics approaches to link the biological processes controlling belowground carbon storage...

  4. Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Biology Conservation Biology Bachelor of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Biology ­Conservation Biology Bachelor of Science [AS or upper division) 4 #12;Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Biology ­Conservation Biology Bachelor Summary on page 2 Conservation Biology Concentration Elective 2 See note 3 on page 2 Semester Five: [15

  5. Biomimetic Mineralization: Mesoporous Biological mineral synthesis, in contrast to conven-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomimetic Mineralization: Mesoporous Structures Biological mineral synthesis, in contrast of mineral crystals. Mesophases are materials which have domain length scales of the order of a few as a molecular blueprint for the site- directed formation of the inorganic phase, by providing an interface

  6. AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM Prepare... yourself for a career in integrating life and engineering for systems in agriculture, food, environment, and energy, and to contribute to the world's largest industry. COLLEGE OF ACES COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING #12;AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL

  7. RNAiFold: A web server for RNA inverse folding and molecular Juan Antonio Garcia-Martin, Peter Clote

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clote, Peter

    RNAiFold: A web server for RNA inverse folding and molecular design Juan Antonio Garcia title: RNAiFold web server Key words: RNA, inverse folding, molecular design, synthetic biology, RNA to the 21st century. In this paper, we describe a new web server to support in silico RNA molecular design

  8. Role of dynamics in tuning fidelity of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase elucidated by molecular dynamics simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjřrnstad, Ottar Nordal

    Role of dynamics in tuning fidelity of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase elucidated by molecular dynamics simulation Ibrahim M. Moustafa Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Eberly College fidelity is not clear but suggested to be linked to dynamics of the enzyme [1]. By using molecular dynamics

  9. July 2013 M.S. in Genetics -University of A Corua, A Corua, Spain June 2012 B.S. in Biology -University of A Corua, A Corua, Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eirin Lopez, Jose Maria

    EDUCATION July 2013 M.S. in Genetics - University of A Coruña, A Coruña, Spain June 2012 B.S. in Biology - University of A Coruña, A Coruña, Spain RESEARCH INTERESTS Marine Biology, Genotoxicology, Chromosomal Proteins, Molecular Evolution, Genomics, Molecular Techniques. 2011 University of A Coruña, Spain

  10. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a blend of physics, chemistry and biology and epitomizes the multidisciplinary approach towards understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. To an increasing extent, the focus of attention is on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights from the past year are briefly described.

  11. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 15, 19601968, April 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrissette, Naomi

    to treat medical conditions, including cancer, gout, and helminth infection (Jordan et al., 1998). Dinitroa

  12. Molecular biology study of satellite panicum mosaic virus capsid protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, Dong

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Satellite panicum mosaic virus (SPMV) depends on its helper Panicum mosaic virus (PMV) for replication and movement in host plants. The positive-sense single-stranded genomic RNA of SPMV encodes a 17-kDa capsid protein (CP) to form 16-nm virions...

  13. Biochemistry Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 37 (2007) 891902

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ,Ă a CSIRO Entomology, GPO Box 1700, Canberra, ACT, 2601, Australia b Department of Entomology and Cancer

  14. Computational Molecular Biology Biochem 218 BioMedical Informatics 231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    alleles. Many have multiple identified genes (*) Gene ABO HLA APOE F5 HBB CCR5 APC PPAR Phenotype Peptic, Nature 2007 Control Population Disease Population SNP chip Thanks to Daniel Newburger #12;A Quantitative Expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTLs) and Thanks to Daniel Newburger cDNA Levels #12;Genome

  15. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 15, 12541261, March 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botstein, David

    to heat stress in mammalian cells. We characterized the heat shock response of mammalian cells are unable to induce expression of hsp70 in re- sponse to heat stress (McMillan et al., 1998), whereas HSF2 processes in addition to the response to heat stress (Xiao et al., 1999). The heat shock response is highly

  16. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 15, 48544865, November 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Kristen M

    embryos are treated with nocodazole to disassemble microtubules, the Skeletor spin- dle persists (Walker with the spin- dle matrix hypothesis. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen with Skeletor sequence as bait Rath et al at interphase as well as to the Skeletor-defined spin- dle during metaphase. Furthermore, functional assays

  17. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 12, 32043213, October 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devreotes, Peter

    and Devreotes, 1996; Krump et al., 1997; Araki et al., 1998). Evidence suggests that it is the -complexes

  18. Plant Molecular Biology Reporter Volume 11(1) 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    ,thusenhanc ingpatientandfamilysatisfactionandreducingthelevelofanxietyandfearwhichtheymaybeexperiencing. Efficientlymovingthepatienttotheirinpatientproviders'resultsinopenEDexamrooms.Thisshortensthe

  19. Contact Information: Dalhousie University, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archibald, John

    , University of Wisconsin-Madison Advisor: Prof. Tom Sharkey - Isoprene emission in plants: Purified the kudzu

  20. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 16, 47554764, October 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Edwin R.

    that syt was in fact a Ca2 and PS binding protein (Brose et al., 1992) and that these interactions were function as a Ca2 sensor during regulated exocytosis (Brose et al., 1992). This idea has been addressed

  1. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 9, 22012216, August 1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Trisha N.

    with Spc110p Reveals Distinct Functions of Spc97p and Spc98p, Components of the Yeast -Tubulin Complex Thu) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae functions as the microtubule- organizing center. Spc110p is an essential structural. The amino termi- nus of Spc110p faces the inner plaque, the substructure from which spindle microtubules

  2. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 16, 33413352, July 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Trisha N.

    the proteins Spc42, Spc110 (kendrin/pericentrin ortholog), calmodulin (Cmd1), Spc29, and Cnm67. Each was tagged. The N-termini of Spc42 and Spc29, and the C-termini of all the core proteins face the gap between the IL2 layer and the central plaque. Spc110 traverses the central plaque and Cnm67 spans the IL2 layer

  3. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 13, 11441157, April 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Trisha N.

    molecule of Spc97p, one molecule of Spc98p, and two molecules of Tub4p. The reconstituted Tub4p complex to the spindle pole body docking protein Spc110p affects its nucleating activity. The solubility of recombinant Spc110p in insect cells is improved by coexpression with yeast calmodulin (Cmd1p). The Spc110p/Cmd1p

  4. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 19, 207215, January 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Trisha N.

    yeast -tubulin) and one each of the homologous proteins Spc97p/Dgrip84/GCP3 and Spc98p/Dgrip91/GCP4 to the spindle pole body (SPB) by Spc110p on the nuclear face and Spc72p on the cytoplasmic face. In most other

  5. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 14, 34943505, August 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and dynamics of the core structural SPB component Spc110p. The SPB core exhibits both exchange and growth in a cell cycle-dependent manner. During G1/S phase, the old SPB exchanges 50% of old Spc110p for new Spc110p. In G2 little Spc110p is exchangeable. Thus, Spc110p is dynamic during G1/S and becomes stable

  6. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 11, 7991, January 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tail is a rod-shaped coiled-coil dimer that aggregates in low salt like other myosin-II tails. The Myp2 mechanisms. The tails are rod-shaped coiled coils of two parallel alpha-helices, resulting in a myosin

  7. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 16, 53465355, November 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; Bezanilla et al., 2000). Myo2p is "conven- tional" in the sense that two heavy chains form a rod- shaped, coiled-coil tail that is insoluble at low ionic strength, presumably owing to the formation of filaments

  8. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 18, 547556, February 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Peter

    by forming tight coiled-coil interactions that bring membrane anchors from each membrane in proximity the possibility that the observed role of Ca2 is to engage a wound repair mechanism. Thus, our results suggest to their union. Current models suggest that first a lipid stalk forms between the apposing monlayers of the two

  9. Adrienne Roeder Address: Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    -2008 Helen Hay Whitney Postdoctoral Fellowship 1999-2004 Howard Hughes Medical Institute Predoctoral University 1999 Stanford University Excellence in Teaching Award 1998 Howard Hughes Medical Institute-273. Jun, J., Fiume, E., Roeder, A.H.K. , Meng, L., Sharma, V.K., Osmont, K.S., Baker, C., Ha, C

  10. Graduate Student Achievements 09-10 MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Clower, C.V.*, Chatterjee, D.*, Wang, Z., Cantley, L.C., Vander Heiden, M.G., Krainer, A.R. (2010 metabolism. PNAS 107:1894-1899. (*equal contributors) Cheng, H., Megha, and London, E. (2009) Preparation

  11. Physical Mapping of Chromosomes: A Combinatorial Problem in Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alizadeh, Farid

    of nucleotides from the set fA; T ; C;Gg. The nucleotides A and T are complementary to each other, as are the nucleotides C and G. Each nucleotide on one strand is bound to a complementary nucleotide on the other strand will cleave a DNA molecule at every site where a certain short sequence of nucleotides occurs. A separation

  12. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 16, 37403752, August 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hebert, Daniel N.

    of the Type I Membrane Glycoprotein Tyrosinase: The Heat Shock Protein 70 System Hands Off to the Lectin maturation pathway for the human type I membrane glycoprotein tyrosinase. To recapitulate the cotranslational was cross-linked to tyrosinase when calnexin and calreticulin were associated. This timing coincided

  13. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 12, 85100, January 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Robert D.

    the matrix to the cyto- plasm of the cell and vice versa (Howe et al., 1998; Smilenov et al., 1999; Zamir et

  14. CELLULAR & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY LETTERS http://www.cmbl.org.pl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglic, Ales

    by the University of Wroclaw, Poland * Author for correspondence: e-mail: doron.kabaso@fe.uni-lj.si , phone: +386 1 a continuum model based on the Helfrich free energy to investigate the binding dynamics of a lipid bilayer, contributing a negative binding energy to the system free energy. In addition, the cone-like shape

  15. CELLULAR & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY LETTERS Volume 11, (2006) pp 90 101

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglic, Ales

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by the University of Wroclaw, Poland * Corresponding author; e-mail: ales.iglic@fe.uni-lj.si SHAPE VARIATION membrane bending energy [5], i.e. the bending energy of a membrane composed of molecules which

  16. CELLULAR & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY LETTERS http://www.cmbl.org.pl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglic, Ales

    2011 © 2011 by the University of Wroclaw, Poland * Author for correspondence: e-mail: doron Abstract: We used a continuum model based on the Helfrich free energy to investigate the binding dynamics of BAR proteins, contributing a negative binding energy to the system free energy. In addition, the cone

  17. M. Madan Babu MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, M. Madan

    in Biotechnology #12;Career options in Biotechnology Discussion Academic Industry Tips to increase general awareness Q & A session Outline #12;General Sugestions Read review articles in Journals ­ PLoS, BMC, open with people whose work interest you #12;General Tips Read review articles in Journals ­ PLoS, BMC, open access

  18. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 14, 14681478, April 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Robert D.

    -dependent Disassembly of Vimentin Intermediate Filaments During Mitosis Ying-Hao Chou*, Satya Khuon*, Harald Herrmann Monitoring Editor: Paul T. Matsudaira The expression of the intermediate filament (IF) protein nestin (Chou et al., 1996). For example, in mitotic BHK-21 cells, the interphase IF network, which is composed

  19. Molecular Modeling Study for Interaction between Bacillus subtilis Obg and Nucleotides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Keun Woo

    * 1 Division of Applied Life Science, Environmental Biotechnology National Core Research Center, Plant (2009-0093813), and Environmental Biotechnology National Core Research Center program (20090091489 Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Gyeongsangnam

  20. Encoded hydrogel microparticles for high-throughput molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapin, Stephen Clifford

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to accurately detect and quantify biological molecules in complex mixtures is crucial in basic research as well as in clinical settings. Advancements in genetic analysis, molecular diagnostics, and patient-tailored ...

  1. Molecular display of synthetic oligonucleotide libraries and their analysis with high throughput DNA sequencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larman, Harry Benjamin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High throughput methods in molecular biology have changed the landscape of biomedical research. In particular, advances in massively parallel DNA sequencing and synthesis technologies are defining our genomes and the ...

  2. Extracting information from biological networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chindelevitch, Leonid Alexandrovich

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems biology, the study of biological systems in a holistic manner, has been catalyzed by a dramatic improvement in experimental techniques, coupled with a constantly increasing availability of biological data. The ...

  3. Master track Theoretical Biology & Bioinformatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    their master. Our two MSc courses "Computational Biology" and "Bioinformatics and Evolutionary GenomicsMaster track Theoretical Biology & Bioinformatics Modeling and bioinformatics is an important Biology & Bioinformatics provides courses introducing you to the basic concepts of modeling

  4. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

  5. Method and apparatus for the gas phase decontamination of chemical and biological agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Hugh J.; Brubaker, Kenneth L.

    2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for decontaminating chemical and biological agents using the reactive properties of both the single atomic oxygen and the hydroxyl radical for the decontamination of chemical and biological agents. The apparatus is self contained and portable and allows for the application of gas reactants directly at the required decontamination point. The system provides for the use of ultraviolet light of a specific spectral range to photolytically break down ozone into molecular oxygen and hydroxyl radicals where some of the molecular oxygen is in the first excited state. The excited molecular oxygen will combine with water vapor to produce two hydroxyl radicals.

  6. Biological effectiveness of neutrons: Research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casarett, G.W.; Braby, L.A.; Broerse, J.J.; Elkind, M.M.; Goodhead, D.T.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this report was to provide a conceptual plan for a research program that would provide a basis for determining more precisely the biological effectiveness of neutron radiation with emphasis on endpoints relevant to the protection of human health. This report presents the findings of the experts for seven particular categories of scientific information on neutron biological effectiveness. Chapter 2 examines the radiobiological mechanisms underlying the assumptions used to estimate human risk from neutrons and other radiations. Chapter 3 discusses the qualitative and quantitative models used to organize and evaluate experimental observations and to provide extrapolations where direct observations cannot be made. Chapter 4 discusses the physical principles governing the interaction of radiation with biological systems and the importance of accurate dosimetry in evaluating radiation risk and reducing the uncertainty in the biological data. Chapter 5 deals with the chemical and molecular changes underlying cellular responses and the LET dependence of these changes. Chapter 6, in turn, discusses those cellular and genetic changes which lead to mutation or neoplastic transformation. Chapters 7 and 8 examine deterministic and stochastic effects, respectively, and the data required for the prediction of such effects at different organizational levels and for the extrapolation from experimental results in animals to risks for man. Gaps and uncertainties in this data are examined relative to data required for establishing radiation protection standards for neutrons and procedures for the effective and safe use of neutron and other high-LET radiation therapy.

  7. Viewing biology in action | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biology in action Released: June 11, 2014 DOE-funded pilot program will create mesoscale biological imaging platform James Evans EMSL received first-year funding of almost...

  8. Todd Newberry: Professor of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newberry, Andrew Todd; Jarrell, Randall; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Professor of Biology: Early Retirement page 44 Jarrell: ToProfessor of Biology: Early Retirement page 45 Jarrell: ToWar 33 Voluntary Early Retirement Incentive Program (VERIP)

  9. Biological Interactions and Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    proactive "EMSL 2.0-style" research paradigm. Because of the rapid pace of modern genomics and systems biology research, it is necessary to respond rapidly and flexibly to...

  10. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal...

  11. Molecular information ratchets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Adam Christopher

    2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In the emerging aield of molecular machines, a molecular ratchet is a chemical system that allows the positional displacement of a submolecular component of be captured and directionally relea ...

  12. EMSL - Molecular Science Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    computing Resources and Techniques Molecular Science Computing - Sophisticated and integrated computational capabilities, including scientific consultants, software, Cascade...

  13. Computational methods for molecular docking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klebe, G. [BASF AG, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Lengauer, T.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the protein can be used to derive new protein ligands with improved binding properties. This tutorial focuses on the following questions: What is its binding affinity toward a particular receptor? What are putative conformations of a ligand at the binding site? What are the similarities of different ligands in terms of their recognition capabilities? Where and in which orientation will a ligand bind to the active site? How is a new putative protein ligand selected? An overview is presented of the algorithms which are presently used to handle and predict protein-ligand interactions and to dock small molecule ligands into proteins.

  14. 7th Annual Systems Biology Symposium: Systems Biology and Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitski, Timothy P.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems biology recognizes the complex multi-scale organization of biological systems, from molecules to ecosystems. The International Symposium on Systems Biology has been hosted by the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle, Washington, since 2002. The annual two-day event gathers the most influential researchers transforming biology into an integrative discipline investingating complex systems. Engineering and application of new technology is a central element of systems biology. Genome-scale, or very small-scale, biological questions drive the enigneering of new technologies, which enable new modes of experimentation and computational analysis, leading to new biological insights and questions. Concepts and analytical methods in engineering are now finding direct applications in biology. Therefore, the 2008 Symposium, funded in partnership with the Department of Energy, featured global leaders in "Systems Biology and Engineering."

  15. Complex biological and bio-inspired systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecke, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The understanding and characterization ofthe fundamental processes of the function of biological systems underpins many of the important challenges facing American society, from the pathology of infectious disease and the efficacy ofvaccines, to the development of materials that mimic biological functionality and deliver exceptional and novel structural and dynamic properties. These problems are fundamentally complex, involving many interacting components and poorly understood bio-chemical kinetics. We use the basic science of statistical physics, kinetic theory, cellular bio-chemistry, soft-matter physics, and information science to develop cell level models and explore the use ofbiomimetic materials. This project seeks to determine how cell level processes, such as response to mechanical stresses, chemical constituents and related gradients, and other cell signaling mechanisms, integrate and combine to create a functioning organism. The research focuses on the basic physical processes that take place at different levels ofthe biological organism: the basic role of molecular and chemical interactions are investigated, the dynamics of the DNA-molecule and its phylogenetic role are examined and the regulatory networks of complex biochemical processes are modeled. These efforts may lead to early warning algorithms ofpathogen outbreaks, new bio-sensors to detect hazards from pathomic viruses to chemical contaminants. Other potential applications include the development of efficient bio-fuel alternative-energy processes and the exploration ofnovel materials for energy usages. Finally, we use the notion of 'coarse-graining,' which is a method for averaging over less important degrees of freedom to develop computational models to predict cell function and systems-level response to disease, chemical stress, or biological pathomic agents. This project supports Energy Security, Threat Reduction, and the missions of the DOE Office of Science through its efforts to accurately model biological systems at the molecular and cellular level. The project's impact encompasses applications to biofuels, to novel sensors and to materials with broad use for energy or threat reduction. The broad, interdisciplinary approach of CNLS offers the unparalleled strength of combining science backgrounds and expertise -a unique and important asset in attacking the complex science of biological organisms. This approach also allows crossfertilization, with concepts and techniques transferring across field boundaries.

  16. Original article 3D QSAR pharmacophore based virtual screening and molecular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Keun Woo

    Original article 3D QSAR pharmacophore based virtual screening and molecular docking a , Yong Jung Kwon b , Keun Woo Lee a,* a Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Program), Environmental Biotechnology National Core Research Center (EB-NCRC), Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Research Center

  17. DockingShop: A Tool for Interactive Molecular Docking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ting-Cheng; Max, Nelson L.; Ding, Jinhui; Bethel, E. Wes; Crivelli, Silvia N.

    2005-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Given two independently determined molecular structures, the molecular docking problem predicts the bound association, or best fit between them, while allowing for conformational changes of the individual molecules during construction of a molecular complex. Docking Shop is an integrated environment that permits interactive molecular docking by navigating a ligand or protein to an estimated binding site of a receptor with real-time graphical feedback of scoring factors as visual guides. Our program can be used to create initial configurations for a protein docking prediction process. Its output--the structure of aprotein-ligand or protein-protein complex--may serve as an input for aprotein docking algorithm, or an optimization process. This tool provides molecular graphics interfaces for structure modeling, interactive manipulation, navigation, optimization, and dynamic visualization to aid users steer the prediction process using their biological knowledge.

  18. THE JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 1995 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raines, Ronald T.

    promotes angiogenesis in mice at least as extensively as does authentic ANG. Thus we present a protein endowed with a noncognate bio- logical activity simply by replacing a single element of secondary angiogenesis in mice. These results support a model in which both a surface loop and a catalytic site

  19. Biology 325: Special Topics in Plant Molecular Biology (Dorweiler/Schlppi)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schläppi, Michael

    in plants: · Biofuels · Virus resistance · Disease resistance · Nutritional value (e.g. "golden rice

  20. 6th Annual Systems Biology Symposium: Systems Biology and the Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitski, Timothy, P.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems biology recognizes the complex multi-scale organization of biological systems, from molecules to ecosystems. The International Symposium on Systems Biology is an annual two-day event gathering the most influential researchers transforming biology into an integrative discipline investigating complex systems. In recognition of the fundamental similarity between the scientific problems addressed in environmental science and systems biology studies at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels, the 2007 Symposium featured global leaders in “Systems Biology and the Environment.” The objective of the 2007 “Systems Biology and the Environment” International Symposium was to stimulate interdisciplinary thinking and research that spans systems biology and environmental science. This Symposium was well aligned with the DOE’s Genomics:GTL program efforts to achieve scientific objectives for each of the three DOE missions: • Develop biofuels as a major secure energy source for this century, • Develop biological solutions for intractable environmental problems, and • Understand biosystems’ climate impacts and assess sequestration strategies Our scientific program highlighted world-class research exemplifying these priorities. The Symposium featured 45 minute lectures from 12 researchers including: Penny/Sallie Chisholm of MIT gave the keynote address “Tiny Cells, Global Impact: What Prochlorococcus Can Teach Us About Systems Biology”, plus Jim Fredrickson of PNNL, Nitin Baliga of ISB, Steve Briggs of UCSD, David Cox of Perlegen Sciences, Antoine Danchin of Institut Pasteur, John Delaney of the U of Washington, John Groopman of Johns Hopkins, Ben Kerr of the U of Washington, Steve Koonin of BP, Elliott Meyerowitz of Caltech, and Ed Rubin of LBNL. The 2007 Symposium promoted DOE’s three mission areas among scientists from multiple disciplines representing academia, non-profit research institutions, and the private sector. As in all previous Symposia, we had excellent attendance of participants representing 20-30 academic or research-oriented facilities along with 25-30 private corporations from 5-10 countries. To broaden the audience for the Symposium and ensure the continued accessibility of the presentations, we made the presentation videos available afterward on the ISB’s website.

  1. Nano Research Kinetics of Molecular Recognition Mediated Nanoparticle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nano Research Kinetics of Molecular Recognition Mediated Nanoparticle Self-Assembly Chinmay Soman1 is an important phenomenon in many biological systems. Assembly of virus coat proteins into capsids [1 diseases. This approach to studying the kinetics of nanoparticle self-assembly may also provide a valuable

  2. Computer simulations of soft self-organising molecular materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Mark R.

    biology. In each of these systems, the materials are classified as soft, that is, small changes in energyComputer simulations of soft self-organising molecular materials Mark R. Wilson Department to problems in soft matter chemistry. Simulation of soft matter has pro- gressed rapidly in the last decade

  3. The use of molecular tools in Parks Canada Agency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    species inventory knowledge is crucial for park management and biodiversity monitoring #12;Outline of genetics to preserve species as dynamic entities ..." · "a mixture of ecology, molecular biology restoration Protected areas management #12;Parks Canada and conservation · Parks Canada is a world leader

  4. BASAL CLADES AND MOLECULAR SYSTEMATICS OF HETEROMYID RODENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riddle, Brett R.

    , they may be superior to nuclear genes for resolving short, basal branches. Our molecular data (2,381 base of Zoology and Department of Biology, Occidental College, Los Angeles, CA 90041, USA (JCH, ER) Department pairs for the 3-gene data set) affirm the monophyly of the family and resolve the major basal clades

  5. DISCOVERING BRAIN MECHANISMS AND THE RULES OF MOLECULAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stengel, Robert F.

    DISCOVERING BRAIN MECHANISMS AND THE RULES OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Paul Shapshak, PhD*1 and Robert-324-2723 ABSTRACT The human genome has approximately 30,000 genes. Brain cells express at least 15,000. The human brain is subject to many acute and chronic diseases including viral encephalitis, AIDS/HIV Associated

  6. Scientist Position In Human Molecular Genetics: Toronto, ON, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queitsch, Christine

    Scientist Position In Human Molecular Genetics: Toronto, ON, Canada Genetics & Genome Biology) Program at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids), Canada's largest paediatric research hospital and research hospitals and Canada's largest university in close proximity. Candidates must have a PhD, or MD Ph

  7. Molecular electrostatic potentials by systematic molecular fragmentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, David M.; Collins, Michael A. [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)] [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method is presented for estimating the molecular electrostatic potential in and around molecules using systematic molecular fragmentation. This approach estimates the potential directly from the electron density. The accuracy of the method is established for a set of organic molecules and ions. The utility of the approach is demonstrated by estimating the binding energy of a water molecule in an internal cavity in the protein ubiquitin.

  8. Biology Division progress report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Progress Report summarizes the research endeavors of the Biology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1995. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the Division`s major organizational units. Lists of information to convey the entire scope of the Division`s activities are compiled at the end of the report. Attention is focused on the following research activities: molecular, cellular, and cancer biology; mammalian genetics and development; genome mapping program; and educational activities.

  9. Fishery Biology Graduate Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fishery Biology Graduate Programs University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska 997750820 Program/degrees/index.html University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona 95721 Program: Fisheries Conservation and Management http://ag.arizona.edu/srnr/academicprograms/wildlifefisheries/gradstudiesFisheries.html Auburn University Auburn, Alabama 368490001 Programs: Aquaculture, Aquatic Ecology, Fishery Management

  10. Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linhardt, Robert J.

    and interdisciplinary areas, including biochemical solar energy research, artificial photosynthesis and bio Biology at Rensselaer invites applications from students interested in pursuing a Ph.D. degree in an interdisciplinary environment with research opportunities in emerging fields, such as energy and the environment

  11. Biological and Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and sustainable biofuel but will also advance our understanding in areas of fundamental biological science. After capitalize on recent technological and scientific advances. Several multidisciplinary projects of key,ecosystemmonitoringandrestoration,combiningcropresearchandmicrobial engineering to make biofuels a viable alternative to fossil fuels, and personalized medicine to improve health

  12. Biological and Environmental Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    recalcitrance. Using an integrated approach to solving the challenge of producing biofuel from cellulosic materials, the center will not only provide the scientific basis for affordable and sustainable biofuel but will also advance our understanding in areas of fundamental biological science. BESC researchers have

  13. CANCER BIOLOGY Infectioustumourcells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Martin A.

    CANCER BIOLOGY Infectioustumourcells David Dingli and Martin A. Nowak Cancer cells are generally infectious agents and be transmitted between individuals. The current view of cancer development is that normal cells are transformed into tumour cells by sequential mutations that activate cancer- promoting

  14. ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vonessen, Nikolaus

    Page 1 ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341 Fall Semester 2008 Bighorn Sheep Rams at Bison Range National ecological data; and 3) oral and written communication skills. Thus, these ecology labs, and statistical analyses appropriate for ecological data. A major goal of this class will be for you to gain

  15. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, W.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  16. Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Biology Conservation Biology Bachelor of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Biology ­Conservation Biology Bachelor of Science [AS Geology Elective 3-4 See note 2 on page 2 General Elective 4 #12;Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Summary on page 2 Conservation Biology Concentration Elective 2 See note 3 on page 2 Semester Five: [15

  17. Molecular modeling study on orphan human protein CYP4A22 for identification of potential ligand binding site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Keun Woo

    ), Environmental Biotechnology National Core Research Center (EBNCRC), Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology and Modelling 28 (2010) 524­532 A R T I C L E I N F O Article history: Received 6 July 2009 Received in revised

  18. Guest Editors' Introduction: Synthetic Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Densmore, Douglas

    + undergraduate participants from around the world. Synthetic Biology had a global market which gene- rated $233 Tufts University h SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY IS trending, as evidenced by the recent achievements in biofuels

  19. Experiment design for systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apgar, Joshua Farley

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanism-based chemical kinetic models are increasingly being used to describe biological signaling. Such models serve to encapsulate current understanding of pathways and to enable insight into complex biological processes. ...

  20. Modular architecture in biological networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramachandran, Gopal (Gopal Sebastian)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decade, biology has been revolutionized by an explosion in the availability of data. Translating this new wealth of information into meaningful biological insights and clinical breakthroughs will require a ...

  1. Biological Engineering integrates life sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    mitigating 40 million pounds of carbon dioxide greenhouse gases each year, and would pay for itself in les with the constantly evolving science of biology, the field of Biological Engineering tackles local, national

  2. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood biological fingerprint'' of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

  3. Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory 2004 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Julia C.

    2005-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This 2004 Annual Report describes the research and accomplishments of staff and users of the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), located in Richland, Washington. EMSL is a multidisciplinary, national scientific user facility and research organization, operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The resources and opportunities within the facility are an outgrowth of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to fundamental research for understanding and resolving environmental and other critical scientific issues.

  4. Biological Interactions and Dynamics Workshop | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Interactions and Dynamics Workshop Biological Interactions and Dynamics Workshop Wiley HS, Kaplan S. 2011. "Biological Interactions and Dynamics Science Theme Advisory...

  5. 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report November 2013 summary report for the 2013 Biological Hydrogen...

  6. Systems Biology | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of interdisciplinary scientists. Additional systems biology resources Research Highlights Media Mentions Publications Newsletters Biosciences Division Recent news releases 11...

  7. DEPARTAMENTO DE BIOMEDICINA MOLECULAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Estudio celular y mo- lecular de malaria maternal. rohernan@mail.cinvestav.mx ÍndiceÍndiceÍndice #12 (1994) Cinvestav. Temas de investigación: Estudio molecular y celular de las proteínas involucradas en el patogénesis de la amibiasis y caracterización molecular de la motilidad celular en Entamoeba

  8. Perspectives Computational Biology in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neshich, Goran

    Perspectives Computational Biology in Brazil Goran Neshich Introduction At the request of the PLoS Computational Biology Editor-in- Chief, I agreed to write about computational biology in Brazil (see author of the field itself is short); b) the current state of the field in Brazil; c) the influence of computational

  9. Biological particle identification apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzman, Gary C. (Los Alamos, NM); Gregg, Charles T. (Los Alamos, NM); Grace, W. Kevin (Los Alamos, NM); Hiebert, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for making multiparameter light scattering measurements from suspensions of biological particles is described. Fourteen of the sixteen Mueller matrix elements describing the particles under investigation can be substantially individually determined as a function of scattering angle and probing radiations wavelength, eight elements simultaneously for each of two apparatus configurations using an apparatus which incluees, in its simplest form, two polarization modulators each operating at a chosen frequency, one polarizer, a source of monochromatic electromagnetic radiation, a detector sensitive to the wavelength of radiation employed, eight phase-sensitive detectors, and appropriate electronics. A database of known biological particle suspensions can be assembled, and unknown samples can be quickly identified once measurements are performed on it according to the teachings of the subject invention, and a comparison is made with the database.

  10. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Raymond E

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular $Chlamydomonas$ to multicellular $Volvox$, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 $\\mu$m to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these re...

  11. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond E. Goldstein

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular $Chlamydomonas$ to multicellular $Volvox$, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 $\\mu$m to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these remarkable organisms.

  12. UC Merced Center for Computational Biology Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colvin, Michael; Watanabe, Masakatsu

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Final report for the UC Merced Center for Computational Biology. The Center for Computational Biology (CCB) was established to support multidisciplinary scientific research and academic programs in computational biology at the new University of California campus in Merced. In 2003, the growing gap between biology research and education was documented in a report from the National Academy of Sciences, Bio2010 Transforming Undergraduate Education for Future Research Biologists. We believed that a new type of biological sciences undergraduate and graduate programs that emphasized biological concepts and considered biology as an information science would have a dramatic impact in enabling the transformation of biology. UC Merced as newest UC campus and the first new U.S. research university of the 21st century was ideally suited to adopt an alternate strategy - to create a new Biological Sciences majors and graduate group that incorporated the strong computational and mathematical vision articulated in the Bio2010 report. CCB aimed to leverage this strong commitment at UC Merced to develop a new educational program based on the principle of biology as a quantitative, model-driven science. Also we expected that the center would be enable the dissemination of computational biology course materials to other university and feeder institutions, and foster research projects that exemplify a mathematical and computations-based approach to the life sciences. As this report describes, the CCB has been successful in achieving these goals, and multidisciplinary computational biology is now an integral part of UC Merced undergraduate, graduate and research programs in the life sciences. The CCB began in fall 2004 with the aid of an award from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), under its Genomes to Life program of support for the development of research and educational infrastructure in the modern biological sciences. This report to DOE describes the research and academic programs made possible by the CCB from its inception until August, 2010, at the end of the final extension. Although DOE support for the center ended in August 2010, the CCB will continue to exist and support its original objectives. The research and academic programs fostered by the CCB have led to additional extramural funding from other agencies, and we anticipate that CCB will continue to provide support for quantitative and computational biology program at UC Merced for many years to come. Since its inception in fall 2004, CCB research projects have continuously had a multi-institutional collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, as well as individual collaborators at other sites. CCB affiliated faculty cover a broad range of computational and mathematical research including molecular modeling, cell biology, applied math, evolutional biology, bioinformatics, etc. The CCB sponsored the first distinguished speaker series at UC Merced, which had an important role is spreading the word about the computational biology emphasis at this new campus. One of CCB's original goals is to help train a new generation of biologists who bridge the gap between the computational and life sciences. To archive this goal, by summer 2006, a new program - summer undergraduate internship program, have been established under CCB to train the highly mathematical and computationally intensive Biological Science researchers. By the end of summer 2010, 44 undergraduate students had gone through this program. Out of those participants, 11 students have been admitted to graduate schools and 10 more students are interested in pursuing graduate studies in the sciences. The center is also continuing to facilitate the development and dissemination of undergraduate and graduate course materials based on the latest research in computational biology.

  13. Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria Autofermentative Biological Hydrogen Production by Cyanobacteria Presentation by Charles Dismukes, Rutgers...

  14. Molecular heat pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dvira Segal; Abraham Nitzan

    2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a novel molecular device that pumps heat against a thermal gradient. The system consists of a molecular element connecting two thermal reservoirs that are characterized by different spectral properties. The pumping action is achieved by applying an external force that periodically modulates molecular levels. This modulation affects periodic oscillations of the internal temperature of the molecule and the strength of its coupling to each reservoir resulting in a net heat flow in the desired direction. The heat flow is examined in the slow and fast modulation limits and for different modulation waveforms, thus making it possible to optimize the device performance.

  15. Molecular Science Computing Facility Scientific Challenges: Linking Across Scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Jong, Wibe A.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to define the evolving science drivers for performing environmental molecular research at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) and to provide guidance associated with the next-generation high-performance computing center that must be developed at EMSL's Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in order to address this critical research. The MSCF is the pre-eminent computing facility?supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER)?tailored to provide the fastest time-to-solution for current computational challenges in chemistry and biology, as well as providing the means for broad research in the molecular and environmental sciences. The MSCF provides integral resources and expertise to emerging EMSL Scientific Grand Challenges and Collaborative Access Teams that are designed to leverage the multiple integrated research capabilities of EMSL, thereby creating a synergy between computation and experiment to address environmental molecular science challenges critical to DOE and the nation.

  16. Biological and Environmental Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplexMaterialProductionBiological and

  17. Biology | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplexMaterialProductionBiologicalLaboratories

  18. Statistical Inference for Big Data Problems in Molecular Biophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanathan, Arvind [ORNL; Savol, Andrej [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh PA; Burger, Virginia [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh PA; Quinn, Shannon [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh PA; Agarwal, Pratul K [ORNL; Chennubhotla, Chakra [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh PA

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We highlight the role of statistical inference techniques in providing biological insights from analyzing long time-scale molecular simulation data. Technologi- cal and algorithmic improvements in computation have brought molecular simu- lations to the forefront of techniques applied to investigating the basis of living systems. While these longer simulations, increasingly complex reaching petabyte scales presently, promise a detailed view into microscopic behavior, teasing out the important information has now become a true challenge on its own. Mining this data for important patterns is critical to automating therapeutic intervention discovery, improving protein design, and fundamentally understanding the mech- anistic basis of cellular homeostasis.

  19. A determination of air-sea gas exchange and upper ocean biological production from five noble gasses and tritiugenic helium-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, Rachel H. R

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The five noble gases (helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon) are biologically and chemically inert, making them ideal oceanographic tracers. Additionally, the noble gases have a wide range of solubilities and molecular ...

  20. Asymptotic Analysis of Cooperative Molecular Motor System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durrett, Richard

    Mesoscale Model for Collections of Molecular Motors Stochastic Asymptotic Techniques #12;Molecular Motors

  1. Department of Systems Biology & Bioinformatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rostock, Universität

    Department of Systems Biology & Bioinformatics Faculty of Computer Sciences & Electrical, comparability and fairness. Practical Aspects and Soft Skills Technical Achievement Background understanding

  2. Biological & Environmental Research Abstracts Database

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Welcome to the Administrative section of the Biological and Environmental Research Abstracts Database. Please logon. Logon Name: Password: Logon CommentsEmail Us * Security...

  3. CollegeofScience Biological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    ,populations,and even ecosystems. Our courses will help prepare you for a career in biology,be it in biodiversity

  4. COMPLEX BIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS: CYCLIC, OSCILLATORY,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bechtel, William

    COMPLEX BIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS: CYCLIC, OSCILLATORY, AND AUTONOMOUS William Bechtel and Adele- nomological framework and its focus on laws as the primary explanatory vehicle; for them, a scientific

  5. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  6. Experimental Data from the Proteomics Research Center for Integrative Biology

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Smith, Richard D.

    The possible roles and importance of proteomics are rapidly growing across essentially all areas of biological research. The precise and comprehensive measurement of levels of expressed proteins and their modified forms can provide new insights into the molecular nature of cell-signaling pathways and networks, the cell cycle, cellular differentiation, and other processes relevant to understanding human health and the progression of various disease states. The ability to characterize protein complexes complements this capability, allowing hypotheses to be tested and the biological system operation to be defined. The Proteomics Research Center for Integrative Biology is a national user facility established and funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences component of the National Institutes of Health. This Center has been established to serve the biomedical research community by developing and integrating new proteomic technologies for collaborative and service studies, disseminating the new technologies, and training scientists in their use. The Center is housed in DOE’s William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  7. Biological Interaction Networks Based on Sparse Temporal Expansion of Graphical Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garofalakis, Minos

    . This problem has two aspects. Firstly, the lack of features experimental samples (genes/proteins) when in the context of gene and protein sequence analysis in molecular biology. Microarrays and proteomics technology compared to the number of observed genes/proteins makes the inference of the network structure quite

  8. IEEE/ACM TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY AND BIOINFORMATICS, VOL. ??, NO. ??, XX 20XX 1 Efficient Maximal Repeat Finding Using the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Bojian

    in genomes and proteins is important to understand their biological functions. Many data compressors problems in molecular sequence analysis can be reduced to repeat finding [29]. It is of great interests for biologists to find such repeats in order to understand their biological functions and solve other problems

  9. Fundamental Biology of Plants and Plant Pests Goal: Colorado State University will enhance its focus and depth in graduate education and research in fundamental plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and research in molecular biology and genomics of crop plants and their pests, mechanisms of biological and genomics are opening many new pathways for crop plant improvement and pest management, which will enhance organisms. Build faculty capacity in secondary metabolism and the genomics and population genetics

  10. Staunton State Park Biological Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staunton State Park Biological Inventory Prepared by: Susan Spackman, David Anderson, Jeremy Biological Inventory Prepared by: Susan Spackman, David Anderson, Jeremy Siemers, Phyllis Pineda, and Jill. The information management staff with CNHP was responsible for integrating the data resulting from the inventory

  11. FISHERY RESEARCH BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY, GALVESTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stations conduct fish ry re - search in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the work of the Bureau's Gulf, St. Pet rsburg Beach, Fla. Biological Res earch Biological Laboratory, Beaufort, N. C hw Gulf of Mexico Abundance of postlarval and juv nil shrimp Pink shrimp life history . Brown

  12. Purdue extension Agricultural&Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for an extended period and encourage biological treatment to minimize organic matter (BOD), nitrogenPurdue extension Don Jones Agricultural&Biological Engineering Alan Sutton AnimalSciences Purdue structures must be designed and managed to contain manure, wastewater, contaminated runoff, and ma- nure

  13. Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

  14. Comparative Microbial Genomics group CenterforBiologicalSequenceanalysisDepartmentofSystemsBiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ussery, David W.

    Comparative Microbial Genomics group CenterforBiologicalSequenceanalysisDepartmentofSystemsBiology Visualisation of Large Amounts of Data Dave Ussery 27 February, 2008 #12;Comparative Microbial Genomics group CenterforBiologicalSequenceanalysisDepartmentofSystemsBiology #12;Comparative Microbial Genomics group

  15. Loop Quantum Theory Applied to Biology and Nonlinear Whole Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fang Chang

    2008-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The loop quantum theory, which constitutes a very small discontinuous space, as new method is applied to biology. The model of protein folding and lungs is proposed. In the model, some known results are used, and four approximate conclusions are obtained: their structures are quantized, their space regions are finite, various singularities correspond to folding and crossed points, and different types of catastrophe exist. Further, based on the inseparability and correlativity of the biological systems, the nonlinear whole biology is proposed, and four basic hypotheses are formed. It may unify reductionism and holism, structuralism and functionalism. Finally, the medical meaning of the theory is discussed briefly.

  16. (Quantum Molecular Dynamics Method) (Classical Molecular Dynamics Method)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    1-1 (Quantum Molecular Dynamics Method) (Classical Molecular Dynamics Method) 2) Verlet(Verlet's leap frog) (17)(18) ( ) i i ii m t t t t t t F vv + -= + 22 (17

  17. Mesangial cell biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abboud, Hanna E., E-mail: Abboud@uthscsa.edu

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesangial cells originate from the metanephric mesenchyme and maintain structural integrity of the glomerular microvascular bed and mesangial matrix homeostasis. In response to metabolic, immunologic or hemodynamic injury, these cells undergo apoptosis or acquire an activated phenotype and undergo hypertrophy, proliferation with excessive production of matrix proteins, growth factors, chemokines and cytokines. These soluble factors exert autocrine and paracrine effects on the cells or on other glomerular cells, respectively. MCs are primary targets of immune-mediated glomerular diseases such as IGA nephropathy or metabolic diseases such as diabetes. MCs may also respond to injury that primarily involves podocytes and endothelial cells or to structural and genetic abnormalities of the glomerular basement membrane. Signal transduction and oxidant stress pathways are activated in MCs and likely represent integrated input from multiple mediators. Such responses are convenient targets for therapeutic intervention. Studies in cultured MCs should be supplemented with in vivo studies as well as examination of freshly isolated cells from normal and diseases glomeruli. In addition to ex vivo morphologic studies in kidney cortex, cells should be studied in their natural environment, isolated glomeruli or even tissue slices. Identification of a specific marker of MCs should help genetic manipulation as well as selective therapeutic targeting of these cells. Identification of biological responses of MCs that are not mediated by the renin–angiotensin system should help development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies to treat diseases characterized by MC pathology.

  18. Molecular Gas in Early-type Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alatalo, Katherine Anne

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    toward the center (first seen in the molecular gas in A+3.4 Molecular Gas Mass . . . . . . .of the molecular gas . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.3 Mass of

  19. B13+: Photodriven Molecular Wankel Engine. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B13+: Photodriven Molecular Wankel Engine. B13+: Photodriven Molecular Wankel Engine. Abstract: Synthetic molecular motors that are capable of delivering controlled movement upon...

  20. Bacterial Community Structure in Geographically Distributed Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    Bacterial Community Structure in Geographically Distributed Biological Wastewater Treatment of the microbial communities within biological wastewater treatment reactors is incomplete due to limitations microbial community composition in five biological wastewater treatment reactors in China and the United

  1. Introduction to Bioinformatics A Systems Biology Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocha, Luis

    Introduction to Bioinformatics A Systems Biology Approach Luis M. Rocha Complex Systems Modeling Computational Biology to Bioinformatics Course Layout: March 11-15, 2002 #12;P Systems Biology P Synthetic, Multi- Disciplinary Approach

  2. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual research summary, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, S.H. (ed.)

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research summary contains brief descriptions of research in the following areas: (1) mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis; (2) role of metals in cocarcinogenesis and the use of liposomes for metal mobilization; (3) control of mutagenesis and cell differentiation in cultured cells by tumor promoters; (4) radiation effects in mammalian cells; (5) radiation carcinogenesis and radioprotectors; (6) life shortening, tumor induction, and tissue dose for fission-neutron and gamma-ray irradiations; (7) mammalian genetics and biostatistics; (8) radiation toxicity studies; (9) hematopoiesis in chronic toxicity; (10) molecular biology studies; (11) chemical toxicology; (12) carcinogen identification and metabolism; (13) metal metabolism and toxicity; and (14) neurobehavioral chronobiology. (ACR)

  3. DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY Hurricane Savitz Hits Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, John J.

    DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY Hurricane Savitz Hits Florida (Photo Credit: Michael Masellis, Biology Major Hurricane Savitz Hits Florida Future Science Teachers' Club Recent Grant Successes Forthcoming Publications

  4. The sequestration efficiency of the biological pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVries, Tim; Primeau, Francois; Deutsch, Curtis

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preformed phosphate, soft tissue pump and atmospheric CO 2 ,efficiency of the biological pump Tim DeVries, 1 Francoisproduces a “biological pump” that reduces the concentration

  5. Computational biology and high performance computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoichet, Brian

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biology and High Performance Computing Manfred Zorn, TeresaBiology and High Performance Computing Presenters: Manfred99-Portland High performance computing has become one of the

  6. Biological and Chemical Sciences Department of Biological and Chemical Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Chromatography Regulatory Science Synthesis and Characterization of Inorganic Materials Synthesis Analytical Method Development Analytical Spectroscopy Characterization of Inorganic and Organic Materials, molecular biophysics and biochem- istry; analytical chemistry, inorganic chemistry, materi- als chemistry

  7. Synthetic biology and crop engineering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2-A: Synthetic Biology and the Promise of Biofuels Jonathan Burbaum, Program Director, Department of Energy, Office of Science, ARPA–E

  8. AGRI-SCIENCE CHEMICAL BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    photosynthetic efficiency Improve chemical agronomic and agro-ecological control measures Modelling through translation of chemical biology tools and technologies Control weeds, disease and pests Minimise a platform to steer future research and policy directions. · Encourage external outreach to engage

  9. Preparing for Transfer Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Environmental Engineering Game Design Industrial Systems & Information Technology Information Science MaterialsPreparing for Transfer Majors: Biological Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical & Computer Engineering Engineering Physics Environmental Engineering

  10. BIOLOGICAL SAFETY POLICY PROGRAM TOPICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang-Yen, Christopher

    research protocols involving hazardous materials, reviews construction design for safety features with or near biologically hazardous materials (infectious agents, biohazards or recombinant DNA). 1.3 "Infectious waste" or "biohazardous waste" is defined by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental

  11. Chemistry Division Department of Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    1 Chemistry Division Department of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Illinois Institute-13 Chemistry Division invites nominations for Kilpatrick Fellowship for the academic year 2012's Chemistry Department from 1947­1960. Mary Kilpatrick was a chemistry faculty member from 1947

  12. Modular design of biological systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norville, Julie Erin, 1980-

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of my research is the development of technology for building compound biological systems from simpler pieces. I designed BioScaffold parts, a family of variable regions that can be inserted into a DNA sequence ...

  13. FPGA Acceleration of Discrete Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbordt, Martin

    ' & $ % FPGA Acceleration of Discrete Molecular Dynamics Simulation Joshua Model Thesis submitted UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Thesis FPGA Acceleration of Discrete Molecular Dynamics Simulation Acceleration of Discrete Molecular Dynamics Simulation Joshua Model ABSTRACT Molecular dynamics simulation

  14. Biological Science | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeIdleBiological Science Biological Science The protozoan

  15. The Molecular Structure of a Phosphatidylserine Bilayer Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Jianjun [University of South Florida, Tampa (USF)] [University of South Florida, Tampa (USF); Cheng, Xiaolin [ORNL] [ORNL; Monticelli, Luca [Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) and INTS, France] [Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) and INTS, France; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kucerka, Norbert [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,; Tieleman, D. Peter [University of Calgary, ALberta, Canada] [University of Calgary, ALberta, Canada; Katsaras, John [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids play essential roles in biological processes, including enzyme activation and apoptosis. We report on the molecular structure and atomic scale interactions of a fluid bilayer composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS). A scattering density profile model, aided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was developed to jointly refine different contrast small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data, which yielded a lipid area of 62.7 A2 at 25 C. MD simulations with POPS lipid area constrained at different values were also performed using all-atom and aliphatic united-atom models. The optimal simulated bilayer was obtained using a model-free comparison approach. Examination of the simulated bilayer, which agrees best with the experimental scattering data, reveals a preferential interaction between Na+ ions and the terminal serine and phosphate moieties. Long-range inter-lipid interactions were identified, primarily between the positively charged ammonium, and the negatively charged carboxylic and phosphate oxygens. The area compressibility modulus KA of the POPS bilayer was derived by quantifying lipid area as a function of surface tension from area-constrained MD simulations. It was found that POPS bilayers possess a much larger KA than that of neutral phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. We propose that the unique molecular features of POPS bilayers may play an important role in certain physiological functions.

  16. Photoelectron Angular Distribution and Molecular Structure in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Angular Distribution and Molecular Structure in Multiply Charged Anions. Photoelectron Angular Distribution and Molecular Structure in Multiply Charged Anions. Abstract:...

  17. Molecular conformations, interactions, and properties associated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular conformations, interactions, and properties associated with drug efficiency and clinical performance among VEGFR TK inhibitors Molecular conformations, interactions, and...

  18. ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John R. Gallagher

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During the production of oil and gas, large amounts of water are brought to the surface and must be disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner. This is an especially difficult problem in offshore production facilities where space is a major constraint. The chief regulatory criterion for produced water is oil and grease. Most facilities have little trouble meeting this criterion using conventional oil-water separation technologies. However, some operations have significant amounts of naphthenic acids in the water that behave as oil and grease but are not well removed by conventional technologies. Aerobic biological treatment of naphthenic acids in simulated-produced water has been demonstrated by others; however, the system was easily overloaded by the large amounts of low-molecular-weight organic acids often found in produced waters. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of an anaerobic biological system to treat these organic acids in a simulated produced water and to examine the potential for biodegradation of the naphthenic acids in the anaerobic environment. A small fixed-film anaerobic biological reactor was constructed and adapted to treat a simulated produced water. The bioreactor was tubular, with a low-density porous glass packing material. The inocula to the reactor was sediment from a produced-water holding pond from a municipal anaerobic digester and two salt-loving methanogenic bacteria. During start-up, the feed to the reactor contained glucose as well as typical produced-water components. When glucose was used, rapid gas production was observed. However, when glucose was eliminated and the major organic component was acetate, little gas was generated. Methane production from acetate may have been inhibited by the high salt concentrations, by sulfide, or because of the lack, despite seeding, of microbes capable of converting acetate to methane. Toluene, a minor component of the produced water (0.1 g/L) was removed in the reactor. Batch tests were conducted to examine naphthenic acid biodegradability under several conditions. The conditions used were seed from the anaerobic reactor, wetland sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and a sterile control. The naphthenic acid was from a commercial source isolated from Gulf Coast petroleum as was dosed at 2 mg/mL. The incubations were for 30 days at 30 C. The results showed that the naphthenic acids were not biodegraded under anaerobic conditions, but were degraded under aerobic conditions. Despite poor performance of the anaerobic reactor, it remains likely that anaerobic treatment of acetate, toluene, and, potentially, other produced-water components is feasible.

  19. PHYSICS OF CHEMORECEPTION HOWARD C. BERG AND EDWARD M. PURCELL, Department ofMolecular,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voigt, Chris

    PHYSICS OF CHEMORECEPTION HOWARD C. BERG AND EDWARD M. PURCELL, Department ofMolecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University ofColorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 and the Department ofPhysics, Harvard. In these circumstances, what are the physical limitations on the cell's ability to sense and respond to changes in its

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulations: Methods and Value in the Folding Problem Devon Chandler-Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March 2013 Introduction The protein folding has been an outstanding problem in molecular biology for a long period of time. Stated simply, the question of protein folding is that of how the primary amino that govern protein folding are thought to be well established. Forces driven by ionic, Van der Waals

  1. Journal of Molecular Graphics and Modelling 29 (2010) 382395 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Keun Woo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Science (BK21 Program), Environmental Biotechnology National Core Research Center (EB-NCRC), Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Research Center (PMBBRC), Gyeongsang National University (GNU), 900 Gazwa-dong, Jinju 660-701, Republic of Korea a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 19 April

  2. Journal of Molecular Graphics and Modelling 29 (2010) 573580 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Keun Woo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kim, Yuno Lee, Keun Woo Lee Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Program), Environmental Biotechnology National Core Research Center (EB-NCRC), Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Research Center l e i n f o Article history: Received 10 September 2010 Received in revised form 1 November 2010

  3. POLYMER END-GROUP ANALYSIS: THE DETERMINATION OF AVERAGE MOLECULAR WEIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    POLYMER END-GROUP ANALYSIS: THE DETERMINATION OF AVERAGE MOLECULAR WEIGHT Background reading. 11. Skoog, West, Holler and Crouch, 7th ed., Chap. 14. Introduction Polymers Polymers are a special in this experiment, or may be of different types. Polymers are very important in biological systems. For example

  4. INVITED REVIEWS AND META-ANALYSES A road map for molecular ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    INVITED REVIEWS AND META-ANALYSES A road map for molecular ecology ROSE L. ANDREW,1 LOUIS, University of Wyoming, 1000 E. University Ave., Laramie, WY 82071, USA, 5 Department of Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology, 318 W. 12th Ave., The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA, 6 Island Ecology

  5. Scaling Relations and Optimization of Excitonic Energy Transfer Rates between One-Dimensional Molecular Aggregates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Jianshu

    systems such as organic photovoltaic systems and the low-dimensional aggregates formed by amphiphilic on the donor- acceptor separation, nonmonotonic dependence on aggregate size and the breakdown of far on the nano scale and to decipher the molecular details of important biological systems. The FRET theory has

  6. Three Dimensional Molecular Imaging for Lignocellulosic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohn, Paul W.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of high efficiency, inexpensive processing protocols to render biomass components into fermentable substrates for the sequential processing of cell wall components into fuels and important feedstocks for the biorefinery of the future is a key goal of the national roadmap for renewable energy. Furthermore, the development of such protocols depends critically on detailed knowledge of the spatial and temporal infiltration of reagents designed to remove and separate the phenylpropenoid heteropolymer (lignin) from the processable sugar components sequestered in the rigid cell walls of plants. A detailed chemical and structural understanding of this pre-enzymatic processing in space and time was the focus of this program. We worked to develop new imaging strategies that produce real-time molecular speciation information in situ; extract sub-surface information about the effects of processing; and follow the spatial and temporal characteristics of the molecular species in the matrix and correlate this complex profile with saccharification. Spatially correlated SIMS and Raman imaging were used to provide high quality, high resolution subcellular images of Miscanthus cross sections. Furthermore, the combination of information from the mass spectrometry and Raman scattering allows specific chemical assignments of observed structures, difficult to assign from either imaging approach alone and lays the foundation for subsequent heterocorrelated imaging experiments targeted at more challenging biological systems, such as the interacting plant-microbe systems relevant to the rhizosphere.

  7. Integrative Biology Keith A. Crandall, Chair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    . The bioinformatics major is for students with interests in both the computer and the biological sciences. The degree merges these interests in the areas of bioinformatics and computational biology, giving students Programs and Degrees BS Bioinformatics BS Biology Composite Teaching BS Integrative Biology Students should

  8. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, M.W. (ed.)

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes research during 1982 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Carcinogenesis address mechanisms of chemical and radiation carcinogenesis including the processes of tumor initiation and promotion. The studies employ rat liver and mouse skin models as well as human rodent cell culture systems. The use of liposomes for metal mobilization is also explored. Low Level Radiation studies include delineation of the hematopoietic and other responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiation. Molecular Biology research develops two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other diseases. Fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and other key proteins are included, as are studies of cell growth, and of molecular and cellular effects of solar uv light. Research in Toxicology uses cellular, physiological, whole animal, and chronobiological end points and chemical separations to elucidate mechanisms and evaluate hazards of coal conversion by-products, actinides, and toxic metals. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies.

  9. Sandia Energy - Molecular Geochemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home Distribution Grid Integration Permalink Gallery Mesa delMissionMolecular

  10. Assessment of Molecular Modeling & Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2002-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews the development and applications of molecular and materials modeling in Europe and Japan in comparison to those in the United States. Topics covered include computational quantum chemistry, molecular simulations by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, mesoscale modeling of material domains, molecular-structure/macroscale property correlations like QSARs and QSPRs, and related information technologies like informatics and special-purpose molecular-modeling computers. The panel's findings include the following: The United States leads this field in many scientific areas. However, Canada has particular strengths in DFT methods and homogeneous catalysis; Europe in heterogeneous catalysis, mesoscale, and materials modeling; and Japan in materials modeling and special-purpose computing. Major government-industry initiatives are underway in Europe and Japan, notably in multi-scale materials modeling and in development of chemistry-capable ab-initio molecular dynamics codes.

  11. QSAR of Progestogens: Use of a Priori and Computed Molecular Descriptors and Molecular Graphics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

    QSAR of Progestogens: Use of a Priori and Computed Molecular Descriptors and Molecular Graphics) and molecular graphics and modeling descriptors were employed. Mo- lecular graphics and modeling studies

  12. Molecular Gas in Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Combes

    2000-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the molecular component of the ISM is fundamental to understand star formation. The H2 component appears to dominate the gas mass in the inner parts of galaxies, while the HI component dominates in the outer parts. Observation of the CO and other lines in normal and starburst galaxies have questioned the CO-to-H2 conversion factor, and detection of CO in dwarfs have shown how sensitive the conversion f actor is to metallicity. Our knowledge has made great progress in recent years, because of sensitivity and spatial resolution improvements. Large-scale CO maps of nearby galaxies are now available, which extend our knowledge on global properties, radial gradients, and spiral structure of the molecular ISM. Millimetric interferometers reveal high velocity gradients in galaxy nuclei, and formation of embedded structures, like bars within bars. Galaxy interactions are very effective to enhance gas concentrations and trigger starbursts. Nuclear disks or rings are frequently observed, that concentrate the star formation activity. Since the density of starbursting galaxies is strongly increasing with redshift, the CO lines and the mm dust emission are a privileged tool to follow evolution of galaxies and observe the ISM dynamics at high redshift: they could give an answer about the debated question of the star-formation history, since many massive remote starbursts could be dust-enshrouded.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Molecular Geochemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aqueous uranyl carbonate interacting with the basal surface of sodium montmorillonite. Free energy profiles for cation adsorption to gibbsite surface calculated from molecular...

  14. Chemical and Biological Engineering Department Code 1 Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemical and Biological Engineering Department Code 1 CODE of the Department of Chemical of Chemical & Biological Engineering. For clarity of presentation, some passages are copied directly from shall offer an undergraduate chemical and biological engineering program of technological, scientific

  15. A bioinformatics/computational biology postdoctoral research position available to analyze biological networks in plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jiaheng

    A bioinformatics/computational biology postdoctoral research position available to analyze biological networks in plants A bioinformatics postdoctoral position is available immediately in the laboratory of Dr. Sue Rhee at the Carnegie Institution, Department of Plant Biology (Stanford, CA

  16. Columbia University, Department of Pathology & Cell Biology Recent Graduates of the Residency Program -Fellowships and Faculty positions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazar, Aurel A.

    Columbia University, Department of Pathology & Cell Biology Recent Graduates of the Residency Molecular Genetic Pathology, Columbia Assistant Attending Pathologist, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital John Crary, PhD AP/NP 2010 NP, Columbia Assistant Professor, Columbia Kalpana Devaraj AP/CP 2010 GI

  17. *Corresponding author. Department of Biology, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-71409 Heraklion, Crete, Greece.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petratos, Kyriacos

    Heraklion, Crete, Greece. Tel.: #30-81-394455; fax: #30-81-394351. E-mail address: kokkinid@imbb.forth.gr (M of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete, Greece Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB), P.O. Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete, Greece Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba

  18. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  19. CFTF | Carbon Fiber Technology Facility | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BTRIC CNMS CSMB CFTF Working with CFTF HFIR MDF NTRC OLCF SNS Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Home | User Facilities | CFTF CFTF | Carbon Fiber Technology Facility SHARE Oak...

  20. Theoretical Physics in Cellular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theoretical Physics in Cellular Biology: Some Illustrative Case Studies Living matter obeys the laws of physics, and the principles and methods of theoretical physics ought to find useful application observation, I will describe a few specific instances where approaches inspired by theoretical physics allow

  1. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    DEGREE REQUIREMENTS BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY The curriculum in the technology programs must satisfy the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS for the technology programs are listed by subject matter in three major categories: (A) Basic Subjects, (B) Advanced

  2. WithCarbonSequestration Biological-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Techno-Economic Analysis of H2 Production by Gasification of Biomass · Renewables Analysis · BiomassWithCarbonSequestration Biomass Hydro Wind Solar Coal Nuclear Natural Gas Oil Biological- and Biomass- Based Hydrogen Production RoxanneRoxanne DanzDanz #12;Barriers Hydrogen Production from Biomass

  3. Biological Impacts of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarty, John P.

    Biological Impacts of Climate Change John P McCarty, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE and reproduction depend on how well adapted individuals are to local climate patterns. Climate change can disrupt subsequent impacts on populations or species' distributions across geographic regions. Climate change may

  4. Characterization and analysis of the molecular weight of lignin for biorefining studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolbert, Allison [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Akinosho, Hannah [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Khunsupat, Taya Ratayakorn [ORNL] [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL] [ORNL; Ragauskas, Arthur [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The molecular weight of lignin is a fundamental property that infl uences the recalcitrance of biomass and the valorization of lignin. The determination of the molecular weight of lignin in native biomass is dependent on the bioresources used and the isolation and purifi cation procedures employed. The three most commonly employed isolation methods are milled wood lignin (MWL), cellulolytic enzyme lignin (CEL), and enzymatic mild acidolysis lignin (EMAL). Common characterization techniques for determining the molecular weight of lignin will be addressed, with an emphasis on gel permeation chromatography (GPC). This review also examines the mechanisms behind several biological, physical, and chemical pre-treatments and their impact on the molecular weight of lignin. The number average molecular weight (Mn), weight average molecular weight (Mw) and polydispersity index (D) all vary in magnitude depending on the biomass source, pre-treatment conditions, and isolation method. Additionally, there is a growing body of literature that supports changes in the molecular weight of lignin in response to genetic modifi cations in the lignin biosynthetic pathways. This review summarizes different procedures for obtaining the molecular weight of lignin that have been used in recent years and highlight future opportunities for applications of lignin.

  5. Large-Scale Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Highly Parallel Infrastructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pazúriková, Jana

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational chemistry allows researchers to experiment in sillico: by running a computer simulations of a biological or chemical processes of interest. Molecular dynamics with molecular mechanics model of interactions simulates N-body problem of atoms$-$it computes movements of atoms according to Newtonian physics and empirical descriptions of atomic electrostatic interactions. These simulations require high performance computing resources, as evaluations within each step are computationally demanding and billions of steps are needed to reach interesting timescales. Current methods decompose the spatial domain of the problem and calculate on parallel/distributed infrastructures. Even the methods with the highest strong scaling hit the limit at half a million cores: they are not able to cut the time to result if provided with more processors. At the dawn of exascale computing with massively parallel computational resources, we want to increase the level of parallelism by incorporating parallel-in-time comput...

  6. Molecular Biology & Genetics Coop Program Students from the Molecular Biology & Genetics Coop Program have conducted work terms in the fields of drug

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    keeping pH measurement and titration Analytical Instrumentation Liquid scintillation counting Absorption and fluorescent spectrometry DNA isolation and purification Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) Protein isolation

  7. Systems Biology Group Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    entities (e.g., molecular, cellular, organism, ecological) #12;OHIO STATE T . H . E UNIVERSITY Systems/analysis of perception, attention, choice, learning, optimality,... #12;OHIO STATE T . H . E UNIVERSITY Group decision making, evolution and ecology Current work: Modeling/analysis of coordinated motion, foraging, choice

  8. Fluorescence of molecular excimers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nurmukhametov, R.N.; Sakhno, T.V.; Saukov, G.G.; Khakhel, O.A. [L. Ya. Karpov Research Physiochemical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The phenomena of excimer fluorescence are most thoroughly studied in solutions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Therefore, excimer formation is usually treated with reference to molecules of this class of compounds. In the literature, only a qualitative picture of the energetics of excimer formation is given. It is assumed that dimerization of electron-excited and unexcited molecules is followed by the splitting of molecular electron-excited levels. PAH molecules are characterized by two lower excited levels: {sup 1}L{sub a} and {sup 1}L{sub b} (according to Platt`s classification). The S{sub 1}* state of some PAH compounds (e.g., naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene) is {sup 1}L{sub b}, while in other PAH (anthracene, naphthacene, perylene, etc.) it is the {sup 1}L{sub a} state. It is assumed that the {sup 1}L{sub a}-level is split more significantly than the {sup 1}L{sub b} level. Therefore, for all PAH investigated the excimer state is described as a lower-lying component of the split {sup 1}L{sub a} level. Quantum-chemical consideration of the splitting of electron levels of PAH molecules in excimers is undertaken. Unfortunately, in this case the description is also of a qualitative character. In the cited work, a correlation is noted between the energy of the {sup 1}L{sub a} state of the molecule and the wave number corresponding to the maximum of the emission band of the excimer. However, it does not give the wavelength of the maximum of the excimer band for some PAH, in other words, a definite dependence of the position of this band on molecular structure. The present work is devoted to a search for an answer to this question.

  9. Direct Calculation of Ice Homogeneous Nucleation Rate for a Molecular Model of Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haji-Akbari, Amir

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice formation is ubiquitous in nature, with important consequences in a variety of systems and environments, including biological cells [1], soil [2], aircraft [3], transportation infrastructure [4] and atmospheric clouds [5,6]. However, its intrinsic kinetics and microscopic mechanism are difficult to discern with current experiments. Molecular simulations of ice nucleation are also challenging, and direct rate calculations have only been performed for coarse-grained models of water [7-9]. For the more realistic molecular models, only indirect estimates have been obtained, e.g.~by assuming the validity of classical nucleation theory [10]. Here, we use a path sampling approach to perform the first direct rate calculation of homogeneous nucleation of ice in a molecular model of water. We use TIP4P/Ice [11], the most accurate among the existing molecular models for studying ice polymorphs. By using a novel topological order parameter for distinguishing different polymorphs, we are able to identify a freezing me...

  10. Department of Biology -Committees and Representatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons Biology Safety Committee Dave Omond Ed Bruggink Jim Cheetham (Chair) Mike Weber Biology Space Committee Jim Cheetham (Chair) Mike Weber Tom Sherratt Ed Bruggink Curriculum Committee (elected) Tom

  11. MS.BIOLOGY.THESIS ACADEMIC LEARNING PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    effectively to constructive feedback. Job Prospects for Biology Graduates MS in Biology Bioremediation Biotechnology Medical Research Industry Government Education Microbiology Health Professions Research Health Food Production Pollution Control Environmental Diagnostics Forestry Agriculture #12;APPENDIX B

  12. Stochastic processes in biological systems : selected problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artomov, Maksym

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Majority of biological processes can not be described deterministically. Multple levels of regulation contribute to the noise in the observable properties of the cells: fluctuations are ubiquitous in biological networks ...

  13. Foundational platform for mammalian synthetic biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidsohn, Noah (Noah Justin)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emergent field of synthetic biology is different from many other biological engineering efforts, in that its roots, design principles, and forward engineering perspective have been adopted from electrical engineering ...

  14. Abiotic and Biological Transformation of Tetraalkoxysilanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semprini, Lewis

    . An aerobic microbial culture from the local wastewater treatment plant that could grow and mineralizeAbiotic and Biological Transformation of Tetraalkoxysilanes and Trichloroethene/ cis-1 compounds (tetra- alkoxysilanes) by abiotic hydrolysis and biological mineralization was investigated

  15. Autonomous observations of the ocean biological carbon pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, James K.B.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiency of biological pump in the global ocean. JournalOcean Biological Carbon Pump Carbon Flux Explorerocean’s “biological carbon pump” (Broecker and Peng, 1982;

  16. PG&E Reconductoring Project Biological Assessment (Revised) ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PG&E Reconductoring Project Biological Assessment (Revised) PG&E Reconductoring Project Biological Assessment (Revised) PG&E Reconductoring Project Biological Assessment (1216...

  17. EMSL Biological Interactions and Dynamics Science Theme Advisory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Interactions and Dynamics Science Theme Advisory Panel Workshop EMSL Biological Interactions and Dynamics Science Theme Advisory Panel Workshop "Biological Interactions...

  18. Molecular Weight & Energy Transport 7 September 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    't transport the bulk of the energy in the sun. #12;Molecular Weight & Energy Transport 7 September 2011 Goals · Review mean molecular weight this intuitively before looking back at your quantitative results. #12;molecular weight & energy transport 2 Energy

  19. Transition metal complex-based molecular machines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sooksawat, Dhassida

    2015-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Inspired by the performance and evolutionarily-optimised natural molecular machines that carry out all the essential tasks contributing to the molecular basis of life, chemists aim towards fabricating synthetic molecular ...

  20. Biological Inventory Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Inventory of the Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area Prepared by: Joe Stevens .............................. 12 Identify Targeted Inventory Areas

  1. A Biological Inventory and Conservation Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Biological Inventory and Conservation Recommendations for the Great Sand Dunes and San Luis Lakes General Services Building Ft. Collins, Colorado 80523 March 1999 i #12;A Biological Inventory PROGRAM SAGUACHE, COLORADO P.O. Box 674, Saguache, Colorado 81149 ii #12;Biological Inventory of the Great

  2. School of Environmental and Biological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    School of Environmental and Biological Sciences #12;Who We are and What We do Students at the Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences are part of a rich history of learning, innovation) Biological Sciences Biotechnology Animal Biotechnology Bioinformatics Bioscience Policy and Management

  3. Undergraduate Minor in Computational biology & bioinformatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, David

    Undergraduate Minor in Computational biology & bioinformatics Course Title Hours CSCE 155T Intro@unl.edu The Computational Biology and Bioinformatics (CBB) Minor is an interdisciplinary program that prepares students and for related graduate studies. The Computational Biology & Bioinformatics (CBB) Minor requires 13 credit hours

  4. Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Services Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steiner, Ullrich

    Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Services Introduction Jenny Barna, Department of the Biological Sciences bioinformatics and computational biology research support service, which is used it provides. There are servers with many cores and very large memory (RAM) on which you can run computing jobs

  5. SU-E-I-39: Molecular Image Guided Cancer Stem Cells Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdollahi, H

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Cancer stem cells resistance to radiation is a problematic issue that has caused a big fail in cancer treatment. Methods: As a primary work, molecular imaging can indicate the main mechanisms of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. By developing and commissioning new probes and nanomolecules and biomarkers, radiation scientist will able to identify the essential pathways of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. As the second solution, molecular imaging is a best way to find biological target volume and delineate cancer stem cell tissues. In the other hand, by molecular imaging techniques one can image the treatment response in tumor and also in normal tissue. In this issue, the response of cancer stem cells to radiation during therapy course can be imaged, also the main mechanisms of radiation resistance and finding the best radiation modifiers (sensitizers) can be achieved by molecular imaging modalities. In adaptive radiotherapy the molecular imaging plays a vital role to have higher tumor control probability by delivering high radiation doses to cancer stem cells in any time of treatment. The outcome of a feasible treatment is dependent to high cancer stem cells response to radiation and removing all of which, so a good imaging modality can show this issue and preventing of tumor recurrence and metastasis. Results: Our results are dependent to use of molecular imaging as a new modality in the clinic. We propose molecular imaging as a new radiobiological technique to solve radiation therapy problems due to cancer stem cells. Conclusion: Molecular imaging guided cancer stem cell diagnosis and therapy is a new approach in the field of cancer treatment. This new radiobiological imaging technique should be developed in all clinics as a feasible tool that is more biological than physical imaging.

  6. Roadmap: Biology Organismal Biology Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-BSCI-ORBI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Biology ­ Organismal Biology ­ Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-BSCI-ORBI] College of Arts/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However, courses General Elective 3 #12;Roadmap: Biology ­ Organismal Biology ­ Bachelor of Science [AS

  7. SPECIAL ISSUE ON SYSTEMS BIOLOGY, JANUARY 2008 51 Stochastic Modeling and Control of Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappas, George J.

    of modeling, abstraction, and control of a biological system, namely, the lactose regulation systemSPECIAL ISSUE ON SYSTEMS BIOLOGY, JANUARY 2008 51 Stochastic Modeling and Control of Biological for stochastic modeling, model abstraction, and controller design for a biological system. The first half

  8. ECOLOGY, EVOLUTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY (for students entering Biology in Fall 2011 or later)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Wen

    ECOLOGY, EVOLUTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY (for students entering Biology in Fall 2011 or later course other than BIOL 54200 124 Total Credits BIOLOGY: 1. BIOL 12100 Biology I: Diversity, Ecology 28600 Intro. to Ecology and Evolution (2 cr.; spring) or BIOL 29500, Intro. to Evolution & Ecology (2 cr

  9. Junction Plasmon-Induced Molecular Reorientation. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Junction Plasmon-Induced Molecular Reorientation. Junction Plasmon-Induced Molecular Reorientation. Abstract: Time and frequency dependent intensity variations in sequences of...

  10. Protein Structure Suggests Role as Molecular Adapter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protein Structure Suggests Role as Molecular Adapter Print To split and copy DNA during replication, all cellular organisms use a multicomponent molecular machine known as the...

  11. Division of Biological and Medical Research research summary 1984-1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, S.H. (ed.)

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Division of Biological and Medical Research at Argonne National Laboratory conducts multidisciplinary research aimed at defining the biological and medical hazards to man from energy technologies and new energy options. These technically oriented studies have a strong base in fundamental research in a variety of scientific disciplines, including molecular and cellular biology, biophysics, genetics, radiobiology, pharmacology, biochemistry, chemistry, environmental toxicology, and epidemiology. This research summary is organized into six parts. The first five parts reflect the Divisional structure and contain the scientific program chapters, which summarize the activities of the individual groups during the calendar year 1984 and the first half of 1985. To provide better continuity and perspective, previous work is sometimes briefly described. Although the summaries are short, efforts have been made to indicate the range of research activities for each group.

  12. Final report for Conference Support Grant "From Computational Biophysics to Systems Biology - CBSB12"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansmann, Ulrich H.E.

    2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the outcome of the international workshop �From Computational Biophysics to Systems Biology (CBSB12)� which was held June 3-5, 2012, at the University of Tennessee Conference Center in Knoxville, TN, and supported by DOE through the Conference Support Grant 120174. The purpose of CBSB12 was to provide a forum for the interaction between a data-mining interested systems biology community and a simulation and first-principle oriented computational biophysics/biochemistry community. CBSB12 was the sixth in a series of workshops of the same name organized in recent years, and the second that has been held in the USA. As in previous years, it gave researchers from physics, biology, and computer science an opportunity to acquaint each other with current trends in computational biophysics and systems biology, to explore venues of cooperation, and to establish together a detailed understanding of cells at a molecular level. The conference grant of $10,000 was used to cover registration fees and provide travel fellowships to selected students and postdoctoral scientists. By educating graduate students and providing a forum for young scientists to perform research into the working of cells at a molecular level, the workshop adds to DOE's mission of paving the way to exploit the abilities of living systems to capture, store and utilize energy.

  13. AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING PURSUE A GRADUATE DEGREE IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING PURSUE A GRADUATE DEGREE IN AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering 338 Agricultural Engineering Sciences of Agricultural and Biological Engineering offers a limited number of graduate fellowships and assistantships

  14. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology The Wiess School of Natural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Ecology and Evolutionary Biology The Wiess School of Natural Sciences Chair Evan Siemann Professors of Ecology and Evolutionary Biologyoffersabroadrangeofcoursesinthebiosciences:animalbehavior,animal biology, bioinformatics, conservation biology, diseases, ecology, evolutionary biology, field ecology, genetics, genomics

  15. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, K.W.; Vogel, J.S.; Felton, J.S.; Gledhill, B.L.: Davis, J.C.; Stanker, L.H.

    1993-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed of quantifying molecules in biological substances, comprising: selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere; preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie; administering the chemical specie to the biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system; allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of the chemical specie with the host throughout the biological system of the host; isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from the host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of the substance from extraneous sources; converting the fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation; and measuring the radioisotope concentration in the material by means of direct isotopic counting.

  16. The Development of New User Research Capabilities in Environmental Molecular Science: Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Baer, Donald R.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Gephart, Roy E.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    On August 1, and 2, 2006, 104 scientists representing 40 institutions including 24 Universities and 5 National Laboratories gathered at the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a National scientific user facility, to outline important science challenges for the next decade and identify major capabilities needed to pursue advanced research in the environmental molecular sciences. EMSL’s four science themes served as the framework for the workshop. The four science themes are 1) Biological Interactions and Interfaces, 2) Geochemistry/Biogeochemistry and Surface Science, 3) Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry, and 4) Science of Interfacial Phenomena.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation study of valyl-tRNA synthetase with its pre-and post-transfer editing substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Keun Woo

    of Applied Life Science (BK21 Program), Environmental Biotechnology National Core Research Center (EB-NCRC), Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Research Center (PMBBRC), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701, Republic of Korea a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 25

  18. Identification of critical chemical features for Aurora kinase-B inhibitors using Hip-Hop, virtual screening and molecular docking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Keun Woo

    Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Program), Environmental Biotechnology National Core Research Center (EB-NCRC), Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Research Center (PMBBRC), Gyeongsang National since it plays a major role in regulating mitosis and cytokinesis [2]. Mito- sis is a vital process

  19. Developmental Cell, Vol. 6, 791800, June, 2004, Copyright 2004 by Cell Press Major Molecular Differences between Mammalian Sexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into the documented sex-specific propensities2 Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology to diseases and 3Most mammals exhibit obvious phenotypic differences between the male and female sexes, and many. replicate two cRNAs (technical replicates) were prepared and independently hybridized to Affymetrix MOE430

  20. Molecular biomechanics of collagen molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Shu-Wei

    Collagenous tissues, made of collagen molecules, such as tendon and bone, are intriguing materials that have the ability to respond to mechanical forces by altering their structures from the molecular level up, and convert ...

  1. Molecular Gas in Quasar Hosts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Barvainis

    1997-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of molecular gas in quasar host galaxies addresses a number of interesting questions pertaining to the hosts' ISM, to unified schemes relating quasars and IR galaxies, and to the processes fueling nuclear activity. In this contribution I review observations of molecular gas in quasar hosts from z=0.06 to z=4.7. The Cloverleaf quasar at z=2.5 is featured as a case where there are now enough detected transitions (four in CO, and one each in CI and HCN) to allow detailed modeling of physical conditions in the molecular ISM. We find that the CO-emitting gas is warmer, denser, and less optically thick than that found in typical Galactic molecular clouds. These differences are probably due to the presence of the luminous quasar in the nucleus of the Cloverleaf's host galaxy.

  2. Molecular motors: design, mechanism and control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debashish Chowdhury

    2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological functions in each animal cell depend on coordinated operations of a wide variety of molecular motors. Some of the these motors transport cargo to their respective destinations whereas some others are mobile workshops which synthesize macromolecules while moving on their tracks. Some other motors are designed to function as packers and movers. All these motors require input energy for performing their mechanical works and operate under conditions far from thermodynamic equilibrium. The typical size of these motors and the forces they generate are of the order of nano-meters and pico-Newtons, respectively. They are subjected to random bombardments by the molecules of the surrounding aqueous medium and, therefore, follow noisy trajectories. Because of their small inertia, their movements in the viscous intracellular space exhibits features that are characteristics of hydrodynamics at low Reynold's number. In this article we discuss how theoretical modeling and computer simulations of these machines by physicists are providing insight into their mechanisms which engineers can exploit to design and control artificial nano-motors.

  3. Systems biology of Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navid, A; Ghim, C; Fenley, A; Yoon, S; Lee, S; Almaas, E

    2008-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbes exist naturally in a wide range of environments, spanning the extremes of high acidity and high temperature to soil and the ocean, in communities where their interactions are significant. We present a practical discussion of three different approaches for modeling microbial communities: rate equations, individual-based modeling, and population dynamics. We illustrate the approaches with detailed examples. Each approach is best fit to different levels of system representation, and they have different needs for detailed biological input. Thus, this set of approaches is able to address the operation and function of microbial communities on a wide range of organizational levels.

  4. Biological Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyandapproximately 10 wt%inand FuelBiological

  5. Computational Biology | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit theInnovationComputational Biology SHARE Computational

  6. Systems Biology | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposed Action(InsertAbout the GeothermalSystems Biology

  7. Green Biologics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska:Ethanol LLC GO EthanolBiologics Jump to:

  8. Biological Applications of Synchrotron Radiation:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplexMaterialProduction PetraBiological

  9. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saibil, Helen R., E-mail: h.saibil@mail.cryst.bbk.ac.uk [Birkbeck College, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom); Grünewald, Kay [University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Stuart, David I. [University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Birkbeck College, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This review provides a brief update on the use of cryo-electron microscopy for integrated structural biology, along with an overview of the plans for the UK national facility for electron microscopy being built at the Diamond synchrotron. Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback.

  10. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, M.W. (ed.)

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes research during 1981 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Low Level Radiation include comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, delineation of the responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, elucidation of mechanisms of radiation damage and repair in mammalian cells, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiations. Carcinogenesis research addresses mechanisms of tumor initiation and promotion in rat liver, chemical carcinogenesis in cultured mammalian cells, and molecular and genetic mechanisms of chemical and ultraviolet mutagenesis in bacteria. Research in Toxicology uses a variety of cellular, whole animal, and chronobiological end points, chemical separations, and statistical models to evaluate the hazards and mechanisms of actions of metals, coal gasification by products, and other energy-related pollutants. Human Protein Index studies develop two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other disease. Biophysics research includes fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and key biological molecules using NMR, crystallographic, and x-ray and neutron small-angle scattering techniques. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies.

  11. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Barrett, Karen B. (Meridian, ID); Key, Diane E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do not form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to a subject's identity.

  12. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Barrett, Karen B.; Key, Diane E.

    2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens to the surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  13. Rapid classification of biological components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Vicki S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Barrett, Karen B. (Meridian, ID); Key, Diane E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens of the surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do not form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to a subject's identity.

  14. Matrix Effects in Biological Mass Spectrometry Imaging: Identification and Compensation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Stevens, Susan; Stenzel-Poore, Mary; Laskin, Julia

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Matrix effects in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) may affect the observed molecular distribution in chemical and biological systems. In this study, we introduce an experimental approach that efficiently compensates for matrix effects in nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) MSI without introducing any complexity into the experimental protocol. We demonstrate compensation for matrix effects in nano-DESI MSI of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in normal and ischemic mouse brain tissue by doping the nano-DESI solvent with PC standards. Specifically, we use mouse brain tissue of a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke model with an ischemic region localized to one hemisphere of the brain. Due to similar suppression in ionization of endogenous PC molecules extracted from the tissue and PC standards added to the solvent, matrix effects are eliminated by normalizing the intensity of the sodium and potassium adducts of endogenous PC to the intensity of the corresponding adduct of the PC standard. This approach efficiently compensates for signal variations resulting from differences in the local concentrations of sodium and potassium in tissue sections and from the complexity of the extracted analyte mixture derived from local variations in molecular composition.

  15. Integrating Molecular Evolution and Morphology to Study the Evolutionary History of Lizardfishes and Their Allies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Matthew P.

    2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    INTEGRATING MOLECULAR EVOLUTION AND MORPHOLOGY TO STUDY THE EVOLUTIONARY HISTORY OF LIZARDFISHES AND THEIR ALLIES by Matthew P. Davis B.S., Regis University, 2004 Submitted to the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology... origin for the order (e.g., Rosen 1973, Fielitz 2004) in a marine environment. Aulopiformes are classified within the Superorder Cyclosquamata, and are currently divided into four monophyletic suborders as shown in Figure 1.2 (Baldwin & Johnson 1996...

  16. Electrostatic thin film chemical and biological sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prelas, Mark A. (Columbia, MO); Ghosh, Tushar K. (Columbia, MO); Tompson, Jr., Robert V. (Columbia, MO); Viswanath, Dabir (Columbia, MO); Loyalka, Sudarshan K. (Columbia, MO)

    2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical and biological agent sensor includes an electrostatic thin film supported by a substrate. The film includes an electrostatic charged surface to attract predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A charge collector associated with said electrostatic thin film collects charge associated with surface defects in the electrostatic film induced by the predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A preferred sensing system includes a charge based deep level transient spectroscopy system to read out charges from the film and match responses to data sets regarding the agents of interest. A method for sensing biological and chemical agents includes providing a thin sensing film having a predetermined electrostatic charge. The film is exposed to an environment suspected of containing the biological and chemical agents. Quantum surface effects on the film are measured. Biological and/or chemical agents can be detected, identified and quantified based on the measured quantum surface effects.

  17. Functional quantum biology in photosynthesis and magnetoreception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambert, Neill; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Li, Che-Ming; Chen, Guang-Yin; Nori, Franco

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Is there a functional role for quantum mechanics or coherent quantum effects in biological processes? While this question is as old as quantum theory, only recently have measurements on biological systems on ultra-fast time-scales shed light on a possible answer. In this review we give an overview of the two main candidates for biological systems which may harness such functional quantum effects: photosynthesis and magnetoreception. We discuss some of the latest evidence both for and against room temperature quantum coherence, and consider whether there is truly a functional role for coherence in these biological mechanisms. Finally, we give a brief overview of some more speculative examples of functional quantum biology including the sense of smell, long-range quantum tunneling in proteins, biological photoreceptors, and the flow of ions across a cell membrane.

  18. Functional quantum biology in photosynthesis and magnetoreception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neill Lambert; Yueh-Nan Chen; Yuan-Chung Cheng; Che-Ming Li; Guang-Yin Chen; Franco Nori

    2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Is there a functional role for quantum mechanics or coherent quantum effects in biological processes? While this question is as old as quantum theory, only recently have measurements on biological systems on ultra-fast time-scales shed light on a possible answer. In this review we give an overview of the two main candidates for biological systems which may harness such functional quantum effects: photosynthesis and magnetoreception. We discuss some of the latest evidence both for and against room temperature quantum coherence, and consider whether there is truly a functional role for coherence in these biological mechanisms. Finally, we give a brief overview of some more speculative examples of functional quantum biology including the sense of smell, long-range quantum tunneling in proteins, biological photoreceptors, and the flow of ions across a cell membrane.

  19. On Biology as an Emergent Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Pierre Noyes

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Biology is considered here as an "emergent science" in the sense of Anderson and of Laughlin and Pines. It is demonstrated that a straightforward mathematical definition of "biological system" is useful in showing how biology differs in structure from the lower levels in Anderson's "More is Different" hierarchy. Using cells in a chemostat as a paradigmatic exemplar of a biological system, it is found that a coherent collection of metabolic pathways through a single cell in the chemostat also satisfies the proposed definition of a biological system. This provides a theoretical and mathematical underpinning for Young's fundamental model of biological organization and integration. Evidence for the therapeutic efficacy of Young's method of analysis is provided by preliminary results of clinical trials of a specific application of Young's model to the treatment of cancer cachexia.

  20. Ab-Initio Molecular Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas D. Kühne

    2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer simulation methods, such as Monte Carlo or Molecular Dynamics, are very powerful computational techniques that provide detailed and essentially exact information on classical many-body problems. With the advent of ab-initio molecular dynamics, where the forces are computed on-the-fly by accurate electronic structure calculations, the scope of either method has been greatly extended. This new approach, which unifies Newton's and Schr\\"odinger's equations, allows for complex simulations without relying on any adjustable parameter. This review is intended to outline the basic principles as well as a survey of the field. Beginning with the derivation of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, the Car-Parrinello method and the recently devised efficient and accurate Car-Parrinello-like approach to Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, which unifies best of both schemes are discussed. The predictive power of this novel second-generation Car-Parrinello approach is demonstrated by a series of applications ranging from liquid metals, to semiconductors and water. This development allows for ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations on much larger length and time scales than previously thought feasible.

  1. Innovative Breakthrough Demonstrated for Biological Ethanol Production...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for Biological Ethanol Production June 30, 2015 - 11:43am Addthis Advanced Biofuels Process Demonstration Unit at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Photo credit:...

  2. Carbonic Acid Shows Promise in Geology, Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Probing the Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Berkeley Lab Study Holds Implications for Geological and Biological Processes October 23,...

  3. Biological Survey of the Upper Purgatoire Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Survey of the Upper Purgatoire Watershed Las Animas County, CO John Carney Colorado ...............................................................................................................9 Management Urgency Ranks ........................................................................................................10 POTENTIAL CONSERVATION SITE PLANNING BOUNDARIES........................................12 Off

  4. SINGLE MOLECULE APPROACHES TO BIOLOGY, 2010 GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 27-JULY 2, 2010, ITALY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Professor William Moerner

    2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2010 Gordon Conference on Single-Molecule Approaches to Biology focuses on cutting-edge research in single-molecule science. Tremendous technical developments have made it possible to detect, identify, track, and manipulate single biomolecules in an ambient environment or even in a live cell. Single-molecule approaches have changed the way many biological problems are addressed, and new knowledge derived from these approaches continues to emerge. The ability of single-molecule approaches to avoid ensemble averaging and to capture transient intermediates and heterogeneous behavior renders them particularly powerful in elucidating mechanisms of biomolecular machines: what they do, how they work individually, how they work together, and finally, how they work inside live cells. The burgeoning use of single-molecule methods to elucidate biological problems is a highly multidisciplinary pursuit, involving both force- and fluorescence-based methods, the most up-to-date advances in microscopy, innovative biological and chemical approaches, and nanotechnology tools. This conference seeks to bring together top experts in molecular and cell biology with innovators in the measurement and manipulation of single molecules, and will provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present their work in poster format and to exchange ideas with leaders in the field. A number of excellent poster presenters will be selected for short oral talks. Topics as diverse as single-molecule sequencing, DNA/RNA/protein interactions, folding machines, cellular biophysics, synthetic biology and bioengineering, force spectroscopy, new method developments, superresolution imaging in cells, and novel probes for single-molecule imaging will be on the program. Additionally, the collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with programmed discussion sessions as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings in the beauty of the Il Ciocco site in Tuscany, provides an avenue for scientists from different disciplines to interact and brainstorm and promotes cross-disciplinary collaborations directed toward compelling biological problems.

  5. Ab-Initio Molecular Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kühne, Thomas D

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer simulations and molecular dynamics in particular, is a very powerful method to provide detailed and essentially exact informations of classical many-body problems. With the advent of \\textit{ab-initio} molecular dynamics, where the forces are computed on-the-fly by accurate electronic structure calculations, the scope of either method has been greatly extended. This new approach, which unifies Newton's and Schr\\"odinger's equations, allows for complex simulations without relying on any adjustable parameter. This review is intended to outline the basic principles as well as a survey of the field. Beginning with the derivation of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, the Car-Parrinello method as well as novel hybrid scheme that unifies best of either approach are discussed. The predictive power is demonstrated by a series of applications ranging from insulators to semiconductors and even metals in condensed phases.

  6. Charge exchange molecular ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vella, Michael C.

    2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Ions, particularly molecular ions with multiple dopant nucleons per ion, are produced by charge exchange. An ion source contains a minimum of two regions separated by a physical barrier and utilizes charge exchange to enhance production of a desired ion species. The essential elements are a plasma chamber for production of ions of a first species, a physical separator, and a charge transfer chamber where ions of the first species from the plasma chamber undergo charge exchange or transfer with the reactant atom or molecules to produce ions of a second species. Molecular ions may be produced which are useful for ion implantation.

  7. Radiative transfer in molecular lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Asensio Ramos; J. Trujillo Bueno; J. Cernicharo

    2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The highly convergent iterative methods developed by Trujillo Bueno and Fabiani Bendicho (1995) for radiative transfer (RT) applications are generalized to spherical symmetry with velocity fields. These RT methods are based on Jacobi, Gauss-Seidel (GS), and SOR iteration and they form the basis of a new NLTE multilevel transfer code for atomic and molecular lines. The benchmark tests carried out so far are presented and discussed. The main aim is to develop a number of powerful RT tools for the theoretical interpretation of molecular spectra.

  8. Molecular weight and molecular weight distribution of kraft lignins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidl, W.; Dong, D.; Fricke, A.L. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kraft lignins are the lignin degradation products from kraft pulping. They are complex, heterogeneous polymers with some polar character. The molecular weight of kraft lignins greatly affect the physical properties of black liquors, and are of primary importance in separation from black liquor and in evaluating potential uses. Several purified kraft lignins from slash pine were analyzed for number average molecular weight by vapor pressure osmometry (VPO), for weight average molecular weight by low angle laser light scattering (LALLS), and for the molecular weight distribution by high temperature size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The lignins were run in tetrahydrofuran (THF), N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF), DMF with 0.1M LiBr, and pyridine at conditions above the Theta temperature. Experimental methods are discussed. The results show that VPO may be used to determine M[sub n] for kraft lignins if the purity of the lignins and the identity of the impurities are known. LALLS can be used to determine M[sub w] for kraft lignins if measurements are made at or above the Theta temperature of the lignin-solvent pair. SEC should be used at temperatures at, or above, the Theta temperature of the lignin-solvent pair. Size separation is highly dependent on the solvent used, and DMF is a much better solvent than THF for high temperature SEC. Future work using moment resolution procedures to derive an accurate calibration curve are also discussed.

  9. Plant Species Biology (2003) 18, 123127 2003 The Society for the Study of Species Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomimatsu,, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Genetics, Graduate School of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810, JapanPlant Species Biology (2003) 18, 123­127 © 2003 The Society for the Study of Species Biology Blackwell Science, LtdOxford, UKPSBPlant Species Biology1442-1984The Society for the Study of Species

  10. Bias-dependent molecular-level structure of electrical double layer in ionic liquid on graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, Jennifer M [ORNL] [ORNL; Walters, Deron [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA] [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA; Labuda, Aleksander [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA] [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA; Feng, Guang [ORNL] [ORNL; Hillesheim, Patrick C [ORNL] [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL] [ORNL; Cummings, Peter T [ORNL] [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL] [ORNL; Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA] [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA; Balke, Nina [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bias-dependent structure of electrochemical double layers at liquid-solid interfaces underpin a multitude of phenomena in virtually all areas of scientific enquiry ranging from energy storage and conversion systems, biology, to geophysics and geochemistry. Here we report the bias-evolution of the electric double layer structure of an ionic liquid on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite as a model system for carbon-based electrodes for electrochemical supercapacitors measured by atomic force microscopy. Matching the observed structures to molecular dynamics simulations allows us to resolve steric effects due to cation and anion layers. We observe reconfiguration under applied bias and the orientational transitions in the Stern layer. The synergy between molecular dynamics simulation and experiment provides a comprehensive picture of structural phenomena and long- and short range interactions. This insight will improve understanding of the mechanism of charge storage in electrochemical capacitors on a molecular level which can be used to enhance their electrochemical performance.

  11. Concepts in Molecular Biology COURSE CHAIR: Dr. LeAnn Howe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    ;GRADING: The final grade will be based on marks from eight assignments (5% each), an oral group-based resources and each other, each student is expected to submit only his or her own work, and not a group Mar. 11 Feb. 1 Mar. 20 Feb. 13 Apr. 3 · For the oral group presentation, students will be divided

  12. Plenty of room at the bottom Feynman questions on molecular biology (1959-1960)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muiño, Ricardo Díez

    ://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/handbook/mutationsanddisorders/possiblemutations #12;epli ation b! the "#$ pol!merase robot #12;Feynman question · o is the base o e in the DNA' end by an enzyme robot specific to the anticodon #12;(rans ription)a hiner! * #$ pol!merase robot m ? · Whe e oes the otein sit · Whe e oes the a ino aci o in ? The ri o o e ro ot #12;+u ar!oti ribosome

  13. Molecular Imaging Approaches to Understanding the Roles of Hydrogen Peroxide Biology in Stress and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickinson, Bryan Craig

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cell Culture and Analysis Protocols Portions of this work were adapted from the following source: Peltier,

  14. Operations capability improvement of a molecular biology laboratory in a high throughput genome sequencing center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vokoun, Matthew R. (Matthew Richard)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Broad Institute is a research collaboration of MIT, Harvard University and affiliated hospitals, and the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. Its scientific mission is to "(1) create tools for genomic medicine ...

  15. Aptamers Generated from Cell-SELEX for Molecular Medicine: A Chemical Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Weihong

    of Chemistry and Department of Physiology and Functional Genomics, Genetics Institute, and McKnight Brain, engineers, and other scientists is a new class of nucleic acid probes called aptamers, which are ss integrate the properties of aptamers and, for example, nanoparticles or microfluidic devices, to improve

  16. 1260 volume 17 number 10 october 2010 nature structural & molecular biology Human BRCA2 protein promotes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of California, Davis, Davis, California, USA. 3Present addresses: Novozymes, Inc., Davis, California, USA (T

  17. Algorithms for Molecular Biology Fall Semester, 2001 Lecture 6: December ,28, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boetticher, Gary D.

    tremendously over the years. DNA (nucleotide) Protein EMBL UK PIR US GenBank US MIPS Germany DDBJ Japan Swiss Acid Sequence) PIR - International Protein Sequence Database) PIR - The Protein Sequence Database [20 1988 it has been maintained by PIR-International (see [21]). PIR currently contains 250,417 entries

  18. The Mineralocorticoid Receptor: Insights in its Molecular and (Patho)Physiological Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ; Nedd: Neuronal precursor cell-expressed, developmentally down-regulated gene; NES: Nuclear Export-1: Early growth response gene-1; ELL: Eleven-nineteen Lysine-rich Leukemia; ENaC: Epithelial Sodium

  19. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 21, 1517, January 1, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Peter

    -controlled, and only properly folded proteins are transported onwards. The UPR detects an insufficiency in the protein-folding to need. If the protein-folding defect in the ER cannot be corrected, the UPR switches from a cell the UPR in the center of numerous pathologies, including viral infection, protein-folding diseases

  20. 2009NatureAmerica,Inc.Allrightsreserved. nature structural & molecular biology advance online publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chait, Brian T.

    publication b r i e F com mu n i cat i on s Helicobacter pylori CagA inhibits PAR1-MARK family kinases T Chait2 & C Erec Stebbins1 The CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori interacts with numerous cellular of conserved residues central to this interaction renders CagA inactive as an inhibitor of MARK2. Helicobacter

  1. Department of Molecular and Cell Biology Graduate Advisers, GAC Reps, and Division Heads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doudna, Jennifer A.

    Jeremy Thorner James Berger John Kuriyan (F) 374D Stanley 608A Stanley 526 Barker 374D Stanley 508B Stanley 3-9483 3-9706 2-2558 3-9483 3-0137 Student Reps: Dan Portnoy Bryan Krantz Qing Zhong 1) Elisa Zhang Jennifer Doudna (Sp) 508 Barker 476 Stanley 306 Barker Tjian Lab, 2-8258 708A Stanley 3-3925 6

  2. 1986 | N. Slavov et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell MBoC | ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    , Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 ABSTRACT The respiratory metabolic cycle in budding yeast cultures and in single cells of slowly growing unsynchronized cultures. System- atic variation to growth rate differences. Here we show that a similar mechanism--transitions from the HOC phase to the LOC

  3. Plant Molecular Biology 35: 355365, 1997. 355 c 1997 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in Belgium.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhlemeier, Cris

    , cytoplasmic male sterility, fermentation, glyoxylate cycle, pollen, tobacco Abstract Acetaldehyde is one of the intermediate products of ethanolic fermentation, which can be reduced to ethanol by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Alternatively, acetaldehyde can be oxidized to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and subsequently

  4. Metabolomics of Complex Biological Systems to Uncover Molecular Mechanisms in Rice and Other Organisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barding, Gregory Alan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metabolomics Data 1.7 Isotope Enrichment and Metabolic Fluxchemometrics. 122-124 1.7 Isotope Enrichment and Metabolicand tracing the positional enrichment of 13 C isotopes in

  5. 4192 | M. J. Hickman et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell MBoC | ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botstein, David

    and standard genetic analyses. The most common suppressors were loss-of-function mutations in OPI1, encoding using this system with and without Opi1p showed that Met4 activates and Opi1p represses genes is overexpressed. SAM is used as a methyl donor in three Opi1p- regulated reactions to create the abundant membrane

  6. MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY, 0270-7306/97/$04.00 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spang, Rainer

    for this parasite heat shock protein during the initial stages of a mammalian infection. Under environmental stress the stress-induced expression of Hsp104, a member of the ClpB family of heat shock proteins (7, 26), leads to increased tolerance to heat stress and various chemical stresses (25, 33, 34). Hsp104 forms a homohexamer

  7. Genetics and Molecular Biology of Hydrogen Metabolism in Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, Judy D. [University of Missouri-Columbia

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The degradation of our environment and the depletion of fossil fuels make the exploration of alternative fuels evermore imperative. Among the alternatives is biohydrogen which has high energy content by weight and produces only water when combusted. Considerable effort is being expended to develop photosynthetic systems -- algae, cyanobacteria, and anaerobic phototrophs -- for sustainable H2 production. While promising, this approach also has hurdles such as the harvesting of light in densely pigmented cultures that requires costly constant mixing and large areas for exposure to sunlight. Little attention is given to fermentative H2 generation. Thus understanding the microbial pathways to H2 evolution and metabolic processes competing for electrons is an essential foundation that may expand the variety of fuels that can be generated or provide alternative substrates for fine chemical production. We studied a widely found soil anaerobe of the class Deltaproteobacteria, a sulfate-reducing bacterium to determine the electron pathways used during the oxidation of substrates and the potential for hydrogen production.

  8. Molecular Imaging Approaches to Understanding the Roles of Hydrogen Peroxide Biology in Stress and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickinson, Bryan Craig

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    calculate required volumes of pOrn and Laminin workingovernight at 4 °C. 3. Dilute pOrn in sterile water toµg/mL working solution. 4. Add pOrn working solution to each

  9. International symposium on cellular and molecular biology of phosphate and phosphorylated compounds in microorganisms: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the abstracts of papers presented at the conference. Attention is focused on the following topics: regulation of phosphate metabolism in bacteria; structure-function of alkaline phosphatase; regulation of phosphate metabolism in yeast; transport of phosphate and phosphorylated compounds; and phosphate regulation in pathogenesis and secondary metabolism.

  10. NIRT: Redox and Conduction Routing in Molecular Electronics Hctor D. Abrua, Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    -Loeb, Entomology­Geneva Campus $106,408, U.S. Department of Agriculture Nanohybrid Membranes for Fuel Cells,240, Department of Health and Human Services The Role of the Cell Cycle in Luteal Regression Susan M. Quirk--Transmission of MDR Salmonella Lorin D. Warnick, Population Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences $1,119,959, Department

  11. Plant Molecular Biology 51: 599607, 2003. 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leubner, Gerhard

    and the basic-type pathogenesis-related PR-1 protein (PRB-1b) gene promoters. The minimal PRB-1b promoter that ethylene is signalling ozone-induced expression of class I -1,3-glucanase and PRB-1b genes. Promoter, glucuronidase; HR, hypersensi- tive response; 1-MCP, 1-methylcyclopropene; PRB-1b, basic-type pathogenesis

  12. Plant Molecular Biology 52: 91102, 2003. 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kieliszewski, Marcia

    xylem of loblolly pine Yi Zhang1,2,7, Garth Brown3, Ross Whetten1, Carol A. Loopstra4, David Neale3 xylem of pine trees by using -glucosyl Yariv reagent (-glcY) and was recognized by antibodies against group 5. Abbreviations: AGPs, arabinogalactan proteins; -glc-Y, Yariv reagent Introduction AGPs

  13. CURRICULUM VITAE MERRILL, ALFRED H., JR. Professor and Smithgall Chair in Molecular Cell Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weissburg, Marc

    of view of 2005. Gascom Inc. has decided to develop an already well-defined offshore gas field. The gas. At some point, it can build a carbon capture and storage (CCS) plant into the production facility, which will compress the CO2 and pipe it to an otherwise useless underground reservoir for injection. Once gas

  14. Naam: dhr. prof. dr. J.L. Bos Leeropdracht Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    ) · Catherijnen award, UMC Utrecht (2006) Publicaties · Rehmann H., Arias-Palomo E., Hadders M.A., Schwede F

  15. Copyright 2010 C.M.B. Edition Cellular and Molecular Biology TM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nucléaires, Maroc 2 Service d'Anatomie Pathologique. Institut National d'Oncologie, Rabat. Maroc 3 Laboratoire d'Oncologie, Institut Pasteur du Maroc, Casablanca, Maroc 4 Laboratoire de Virologie, Hygiène & Microbiologie, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques Mohammedia, Maroc Unité de Biologie et Recherche Médicale

  16. Copyright 2010 C.M.B. Edition Cellular and Molecular BiologyTM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Laboratoire d'Onco-Virologie, Institut Pasteur du Maroc, Casablanca, Maroc. 2 Laboratoire de Biochimie et de Biologie Moléculaire, Université Hassan II, Casablanca, Maroc. 3 Unité de Biologie et recherche Médicale, Centre National de l'Energie, des Sciences et Techniques Nucléaires (CNESTEN), Rabat, Maroc. 4 Centre d

  17. Therapeutics, Targets, and Chemical Biology Real-time In Vivo Molecular Detection of Primary Tumors and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    T. Nguyen2 Abstract Management of metastatic disease is integral to cancer treatment. Evaluation protease sensors and sentinel lymph node detection methods, which give no information about cancer invasion. Cancer Res; 73(2); 855­64. Ó2012 AACR. Introduction Cancer staging depends on evaluation of both

  18. CELL BIOLOGY & MOLECULAR GENETICS Infection of Somatic Embryos of Tall Fescue with Acremonium coenophialum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Wayne

    by the endophyte naturally occurs in planta, attempts were made to duplicate this phenomenon in vitro. Callus of the interactions between tall fescue and its endophyte. TALL FESCUE is & pasture grass grown on 16 million ha in Canada and the southeastern USA (Bacon and Siegel, 1988). It is commonly infected with an endophytic

  19. Quasielastic Light Scattering 153 From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 299: Amyloid Proteins: Methods and Protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benedek, George B.

    ), and other neurodegenerative diseases (5), sickle cell anemia (6), and cataract disease (7). In each case

  20. Insect Molecular Biology (2006) 15(4), 455464 2006 The Royal Entomological Society 455

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buczkowski, Grzegorz

    reaction. Some of these genes have been shown to be over-transcribed in metabolically DDT al., 1997; Maitra et al., 2000). PB causes a 15-fold increase in expression of Cyp6a2 in the DDT-susceptible strain Canton-S (Brun et al., 1996). Numerous DDT laboratory-selected (e.g. 91R) and field- collected DDT

  1. Journal of Steroid Biochemistry & Molecular Biology 113 (2009) 222226 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - tions. Here we used two strains of VDR knock-out (VDR-KO) mice to study whether a lack of vitamin D protein (SREBP2), apolipoprotein A-I (ApoAI), low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and liver X receptor. Because the mutant mice were fed with a special rescue diet, we wanted to test whether the increased

  2. Plant Molecular Biology 45: 115, 2001. 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheen, Jen

    maize Albert P. Kausch1,2,, T. Page Owen Jr.2, Susan J. Zachwieja3, Adam R. Flynn2 and Jen Sheen4 1; Edwards and Walker, 1983; Furbank and Taylor, 1995). The differentia- tion of mesophyll and bundle sheath with these pathways (Dengler and Taylor, 2000). The developmental expression of C4 photosyn- thetic genes has been

  3. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 20, 915923, February 1, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Trisha N.

    Monitoring Editor: Tim Stearns The Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomal passenger proteins Ipl1 (Aurora B. The mutant displays a biorientation defect, a defective checkpoint response to lack of tension proteins coordinate cell cycle events that are required for proper chromosome segregation (Ruchaud et al

  4. Insect Molecular Biology (2004) 13(6), 587594 2004 The Royal Entomological Society 587

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Lausanne, Switzerland Abstract Representatives of three ancient gene families of the antioxidant enzyme cleavage peptide that routes the extracellular Cu Zn SOD for secretion (Tibell et al., 1996; Folz et al

  5. Molecular Imaging Approaches to Understanding the Roles of Copper in Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domaille, Dylan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    129 Appendix D: Protocols for XRF Data Collection and GNMRand X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopy provide a coherentbe used in combination with XRF if one seeks oxidation state

  6. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 21, 3804, November 15, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindquist, Susan

    . One of the great glories of our field is that it is bursting the dam and flooding the plains. Cell. Take a look at what Uri Alon and members the Weizmann Institute are doing (www.weizmann.ac.il

  7. THEJOURNALOF BIOLOGICALCHEMISTRY 0 1987by The AmericanSociety for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology,Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    in sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) by diethyl ether. Conventional and saturation-transfer electron para- magnetic resonance (EPR) were used to probe rota- tional motions of spin labels attached either to fatty acid ether progressively fluidizes the SR membrane with respect to lipid hydrocarbon chaindy- namics probed

  8. 12th Biennial conference on Cellular and Molecular Biology of Soybeans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Scott A.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2008 meeting attracted ~350 academic and industrial representatives and was the capstone of the DOE-led sequencing of the soybean genome (published 2010 in Nature). Many of the talks focused on engineering of soybean for biodiesel production and how to protect soybean yield. Several of the plenary talks were focused on the newly available genome sequence and how to effectively capitalize on this investment.

  9. Molecular Imaging Approaches to Understanding the Roles of Hydrogen Peroxide Biology in Stress and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickinson, Bryan Craig

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dissolved in 3 mL of dry acetonitrile. Acetic anhydride (14dissolved in 10 mL of acetonitrile. Diisopropylethylamine (Then, 20 mL of dry acetonitrile was added and the reaction

  10. Molecular Imaging Approaches to Understanding the Roles of Copper in Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domaille, Dylan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MeCN) 4 ][PF 6 ] from an acetonitrile stock solution (2 mM).K + in mixed aqueous-acetonitrile media has been reported.silica gel, 20:1 toluene/acetonitrile, collected in 1 mL

  11. Department of Molecular and Cell Biology Graduate Advisers, GAC Reps, and Division Heads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doudna, Jennifer A.

    :Airmail:General:Tmp:Dept. Advisers.xlsx BBS James Hurley Carlos Bustamante 374D Stanley 608A Stanley 3-9483 3-9706 Jeremy Thorner James Hurley Jennifer Doudna Nicholas Ingolia(S) 526 Barker 374D Stanley 708A Stanley Koshland 2-5962 3-9395 3-5223 Barbara Meyer 2-5859 131 Koshland 3-5585 IM&P Laurent Coscoy Bill Sha

  12. Department of Molecular and Cell Biology Graduate Advisers, GAC Reps, and Division Heads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doudna, Jennifer A.

    Stanley 608A Stanley 3-9483 3-9706 Jeremy Thorner James Hurley Jennifer Doudna Nicholas Ingolia(S) 526 Barker 374D Stanley 708A Stanley 422 Barker Hall Nicholas Ingolia 2-2558 3-9483 3-0225 4-7071 422 Barker Koshland Gian Garriga 608 Barker 505 LSA 408 Barker 3-4144 141 Koshland 2-5962 3-9395 3-5223 Barbara Meyer

  13. Department of Molecular and Cell Biology Graduate Advisers, GAC Reps, and Division Heads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doudna, Jennifer A.

    Kathleen Collins Jennifer Doudna 508 Barker 608A Stanley 526 Barker 331A LSA 708A Stanley 3-3925 3-9706 2-2558 3-1589 3-0225 Kathleen Collins Bryan Krantz Student 331A LSA 476 Stanley Nikki Koshland Gian Garriga Andrew Dillin (Sp) 3-4144 141 Koshland 400A LKS Barbara Meyer 2-5859 Jun

  14. 2002 Gordon Research Conference on Reversible Associations in Structural & Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2002-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  15. Molecular Imaging Approaches to Understanding the Roles of Copper in Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domaille, Dylan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H. & Hulme, A. N. A sensitized europium complex generated byH. & Hulme, A. N. A sensitized europium complex generated by

  16. Molecular Imaging Approaches to Understanding the Roles of Hydrogen Peroxide Biology in Stress and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickinson, Bryan Craig

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tan, M. ; Yuan, J. A Europium(III) Complex as an EfficientA. ; Wu, M. ; Lin, Z. A Europium-Ion-Based Luminescent4498. Meng, O. ; Lin, W. Z. A europium-ion-based luminescent

  17. Chemistry & Biology 13, 815823, August 2006 2006 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved DOI 10.1016/j.chembiol.2006.06.001 Rational Dissection of Binding Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pompeu Fabra, Universitat

    University Dr Aiguader 80 08003 Barcelona Spain 2 Barcelona Science Park University of Barcelona Josep Samitier 1-15 08028 Barcelona Spain 3 Severo Ochoa Center for Molecular Biology (CBMSO) CSIC-UAM 28049 Cantoblanco Spain 4 Animal Health Research Center (CISA-INIA) 28130 Valdeolmos Spain Summary Peptide

  18. Biological Hydrogen Production Using a Membrane Bioreactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Hydrogen Production Using a Membrane Bioreactor Sang-Eun Oh,1 Prabha Iyer,1,2 Mary Ann bioreactor (MBR) for biological hydrogen production. The reactor was fed glucose (10,000 mg/L) and inoculated were used. B 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Keywords: membrane bioreactor; hydrogen production

  19. Southeastern Colorado Survey of Critical Biological Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southeastern Colorado Survey of Critical Biological Resources 2007 #12;ii #12;Southeastern Colorado Survey of Critical Biological Resources Prepared for: Colorado Cattleman's Agricultural Land Trust 8833 Department of Natural Resources Division of State Board of Land Commissioners 1313 Sherman Street Denver, CO

  20. Book Review Geothermal Biology and Geochemis-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Book Review Geothermal Biology and Geochemis- try in Yellowstone National Park. (eds WP Inskeep of life. The legacy of chemical and biologi- cal research in geothermal regimes, while short in duration geothermal areas, including Yellowstone, are largely confined to the specialty literature of geochemical

  1. STOCHASTIC GENERATION OF BIOLOGICALLY ACCURATE BRAIN NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STOCHASTIC GENERATION OF BIOLOGICALLY ACCURATE BRAIN NETWORKS A Thesis by ARAVIND ALURI Submitted OF BIOLOGICALLY ACCURATE BRAIN NETWORKS A Thesis by ARAVIND ALURI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Head of Department, Valerie Taylor December 2005 Major Subject: Computer Science #12;iii ABSTRACT

  2. Bi23 BIOLOGY TUTORIALS WINTER TERM 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Bi23 BIOLOGY TUTORIALS WINTER TERM 2014 SECTIONS 1 ­ 3 The Function and Regulation of Sleep (3. Huang, x3446, MC 156-29 #12;Bi23 BIOLOGY TUTORIALS WINTER TERM 2014 SECTIONS 4-6 Physical Principles crystallography and neutron scattering; nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging; peptide and DNA

  3. Genome Biology 2005, 6:312 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kellis, Manolis

    Genome Biology 2005, 6:312 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch Meeting report Large-scale discovery and validation of functional elements in the human genome-mail: bbernst@fas.harvard.edu. Manolis Kellis. E-mail: manoli@mit.edu Published: 1 March 2005 Genome Biology

  4. Genome Biology 2006, 7:320 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritham, Ellen J.

    Genome Biology 2006, 7:320 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch Meeting report Mobile DNA: genomes under the influence Cédric Feschotte and Ellen J Pritham Feschotte. Email: cedric@uta.edu Published: 30 June 2006 Genome Biology 2006, 7:320 (doi:10.1186/gb-2006

  5. FINAL REPORT FOR: OPTIMIZATION OF BIOLOGICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AND SUSPENDED GROWTH WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEM DECEMBER, 1994 Prepared for: Environment Canada Environment#12;FINAL REPORT FOR: OPTIMIZATION OF BIOLOGICAL PHOSPHORUS AND AMMONIA REMOVAL IN A COMBINED FIXED;Optimization of Biological Phosphorus and Ammonia Removal in a Combined Fixed & Suspended Growth System i

  6. Waste Handling and Disposal Biological Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    plumbing services, EHS personnel wastewater treatment plant personnel, and the general public canWaste Handling and Disposal Biological Safety General Biosafety Practices (GBP) Why You Should Care on the next experiment. Are you working with r/sNA, biological toxins, human materials, needles, plasticware

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation and ab intio studies of electrolytes...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DFT calculations on molecular clusters and electrode surfaces, reactive molecular dynamics simulations allowing modeling of SEI formation, and classical molecular dynamics...

  8. Amorphous Molecular Organic Solids for Gas Adsorption. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Organic Solids for Gas Adsorption. Amorphous Molecular Organic Solids for Gas Adsorption. Abstract: We show that molecular organic compounds with large accessible...

  9. aluminophosphate molecular sieves: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    performing ethyleneethane (C?H?C?H?) separation carbon molecular sieve (CMS) dense film membranes. (more) Rungta, Meha 2012-01-01 15 Molecular Squares as Molecular Sieves:...

  10. aluminophosphate molecular sieve: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    performing ethyleneethane (C?H?C?H?) separation carbon molecular sieve (CMS) dense film membranes. (more) Rungta, Meha 2012-01-01 15 Molecular Squares as Molecular Sieves:...

  11. aluminosilicate molecular sieve: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    performing ethyleneethane (C?H?C?H?) separation carbon molecular sieve (CMS) dense film membranes. (more) Rungta, Meha 2012-01-01 14 Molecular Squares as Molecular Sieves:...

  12. alpo4 molecular sieves: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    performing ethyleneethane (C?H?C?H?) separation carbon molecular sieve (CMS) dense film membranes. (more) Rungta, Meha 2012-01-01 15 Molecular Squares as Molecular Sieves:...

  13. RMP Colloquia Modeling molecular motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jülicher, Frank

    The authors present general considerations and simple models for the operation of isothermal motors at small structural differences from the usual Carnot engines. Turning to more explicit models for a single motorRMP Colloquia Modeling molecular motors Frank Ju¨licher,* Armand Ajdari, and Jacques Prost

  14. Gnzburg, Germany Molecular Diabetology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    April 12th ­ 14th 2010 Günzburg, Germany Molecular Diabetology and Endocrinology in Medicine GRK-Einstein-Allee 23 89081 Ulm, Germany Contact Person: Erika Thanner Speaker GRK 1208 Prof. Dr. J. Köhrle Institut für Experimentelle Endokrinologie, Charité Berlin Augustenburger Platz 1 13353 Berlin, Germany Contact Person: Elke

  15. Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, California (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, N.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This case study provides information on the Molecular Foundry, which incorporates Labs21 principles in its design and construction. The design includes many of the strategies researched at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for energy efficient cleanroom and data centers. The result is an energy efficient high-performing sustainable laboratory.

  16. Challenges for molecular neuroimaging with MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lelyveld, Victor S.

    Magnetic resonance (MRI)-based molecular imaging methods are beginning to have impact in neuroscience. A growing number of molecular imaging agents have been synthesized and tested in vitro, but so far relatively few have ...

  17. FPGA ACCELERATION OF MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbordt, Martin

    ' & $ % FPGA ACCELERATION OF MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS YONGFENG GU Dissertation submitted;BOSTON UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Dissertation FPGA ACCELERATION OF MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS (Order No. ) YONGFENG GU Boston University, College of Engineering, 2008 Major

  18. Statistical Analysis of Molecular Signal Recording

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaser, Joshua I.

    A molecular device that records time-varying signals would enable new approaches in neuroscience. We have recently proposed such a device, termed a “molecular ticker tape”, in which an engineered DNA polymerase (DNAP) ...

  19. Transient Dynamics in Molecular Junctions: Coherent Bichromophoric Molecular Electron Pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roie Volkovich; Uri Peskin

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of using single molecule junctions as electron pumps for energy conversion and storage is considered. It is argued that the small dimensions of these systems enable to make use of unique intra-molecular quantum coherences in order to pump electrons between two leads and to overcome relaxation processes which tend to suppress the pumping efficiency. In particular, we demonstrate that a selective transient excitation of one chromophore in a bi-chromophoric donor-bridge-acceptor molecular junction model yields currents which transfer charge (electron and holes) unevenly to the two leads in the absence of a bias potential. The utility of this mechanism for charge pumping in steady state conditions is proposed.

  20. Efficiency, Robustness and Stochasticity of Gene Regulatory Networks in Systems Biology: lambda Switch as a Working Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Zhu; L. Yin; L. Hood; D. Galas; P. Ao

    2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Phage lambda is one of the most studied biological models in modern molecular biology. Over the past 50 years quantitative experimental knowledge on this biological model has been accumulated at all levels: physics, chemistry, genomics, proteomics, functions, and more. All its components have been known to a great detail. The theoretical task has been to integrate its components to make the organism working quantitatively in a harmonic manner. This would test our biological understanding and would lay a solid fundamental for further explorations and applications, an obvious goal of systems biology. One of the outstanding challenges in doing so has been the so-called stability puzzle of lambda switch: the biologically observed robustness and its difficult mathematical reconstruction based on known experimental values. In this chapter we review the recent theoretical and experimental efforts on tackling this problem. An emphasis is put on the minimum quantitative modeling where a successful numerical agreement between experiments and modeling has been achieved. A novel method tentatively named stochastic dynamical structure analysis emerged from such study is also discussed within a broad modeling perspective.

  1. Aspects of the political economy of development and synthetic biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellhausen, Rachel

    What implications might synthetic biology’s potential as a wholly new method of production have for the world economy, particularly developing countries? Theories of political economy predict that synthetic biology can ...

  2. ASTRONOMY BIOLOGY CHEMISTRY COMPUTER-SCIENCE GEOGRAPHY MATHEMATICS PHYSICS STATISTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Phil

    BIOMEDICAL-ENGINEERING ELECTRONIC- ENGINEERING ASTRONOMY BIOLOGY CHEMISTRY COMPUTER-SCIENCE GEOGRAPHY MATHEMATICS PHYSICS STATISTICS HEALTHCARE BIOMEDICAL-ENGINEERING ELECTRONIC-ENGINEERING ASTRONOMY BIOLOGY C H HEALTHCARE BIOMEDICAL-ENGINEERING ELECTRONIC-ENGINEERING ASTRONOMY BIOLOGY CHEMISTRY COMPUTER

  3. Crafting life : a sensory ethnography of fabricated biologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roosth, Hannah Sophia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This ethnography tracks a diverse set of practices I term "constructive biologies," by which I mean efforts in the post-genomic life sciences to understand how biology works by making new biological things. I examine five ...

  4. What rough beast? Synthetic Biology and the Future of Biosecurity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, Scott C.

    Synthetic biology seeks to create modular biological parts that can be assembled into useful devices, allowing the modification of biological systems with greater reliability, at lower cost, with greater speed, and by a ...

  5. 2012 SINGLE MOLECULE APPROACHES TO BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE (JULY 15-20, 2012 - MOUNT SNOW RESORT, WEST DOVER VT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, Julio [Columbia University

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Single molecule techniques are rapidly occupying a central role in biological research at all levels. This transition was made possible by the availability and dissemination of robust techniques that use fluorescence and force probes to track the conformation of molecules one at a time, in vitro as well as in live cells. Single-molecule approaches have changed the way many biological problems are studied. These novel techniques provide previously unobtainable data on fundamental biochemical processes that are essential for all forms of life. The ability of single-molecule approaches to avoid ensemble averaging and to capture transient intermediates and heterogeneous behavior renders them particularly powerful in elucidating mechanisms of the molecular systems that underpin the functioning of living cells. Hence, our conference seeks to disseminate the implementation and use of single molecule techniques in the pursuit of new biological knowledge. Topics covered include: Molecular Motors on the Move; Origin And Fate Of Proteins; Physical Principles Of Life; Molecules and Super-resolution Microscopy; Nanoswitches In Action; Active Motion Or Random Diffusion?; Building Blocks Of Living Cells; From Molecular Mechanics To Physiology; Tug-of-war: Force Spectroscopy Of Single Proteins.

  6. Method of measurement in biological systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, K.W.; Vogel, J.S.; Felton, J.S.; Gledhill, B.L.; Davis, J.C.

    1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method of quantifying molecules in biological substances comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering the chemical specie to the biological host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of the chemical specie with the host throughout the biological system of the host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from the host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of the substance from extraneous sources, f. converting the fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in the material by means of direct isotopic counting. 5 figures.

  7. Journal of Molecular Graphics and Modelling 21 (2003) 499515 A priori molecular descriptors in QSAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

    Journal of Molecular Graphics and Modelling 21 (2003) 499­515 A priori molecular descriptors in QSAR: a case of HIV-1 protease inhibitors II. Molecular graphics and modeling Rudolf Kiralj, Márcia M; accepted 14 November 2002 Abstract Molecular graphics and modeling methods illustrated the chemical

  8. Molecular Ecology NCGR May 2003 Physiology and Molecular Ecology of Synechococcus WH8102

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molecular Ecology NCGR May 2003 1 Physiology and Molecular Ecology of Synechococcus WH8102 DOE is to provide a summary of the literature on the physiology and molecular ecology of bacteria and in particular to be a comprehensive review. Excellent current detailed reviews are available on the physiology and molecular ecology

  9. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1991--November 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

  10. Nanoscale Electromechanics of Ferroelectric and Biological Systems: A New Dimension in Scanning Probe Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Rodriguez, Brian J [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Karapetian, Edgar [ORNL; Mirman, B [Suffolk University, Boston; Eliseev, E. A. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Morozovska, A. N. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Functionality of biological and inorganic systems ranging from nonvolatile computer memories and microelectromechanical systems to electromotor proteins and cellular membranes is ultimately based on the intricate coupling between electrical and mechanical phenomena. In the past decade, piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) has been established as a powerful tool for nanoscale imaging, spectroscopy, and manipulation of ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials. Here, we give an overview of the fundamental image formation mechanism in PFM and summarize recent theoretical and technological advances. In particular, we show that the signal formation in PFM is complementary to that in the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques, and we discuss the implications. We also consider the prospect of extending PFM beyond ferroelectric characterization for quantitative probing of electromechanical behavior in molecular and biological systems and high-resolution probing of static and dynamic polarization switching processes in low-dimensional ferroelectric materials and heterostructures.

  11. Mass Spectrometry Data from the Biological MS Data and Software Distribution Center

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Anderson, Gordon

    The mass spectrometry capabilities at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are primarily applied to biological research, with an emphasis on proteomics and metabolomics. Many of these cutting-edge mass spectrometry capabilities and bioinformatics methods are housed in the Department of Energy's Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility operated by PNNL. These capabilities have been developed and acquired through cooperation between the EMSL national scientific user program and PNNL programmatic research. At the website of the Biological MS Data and Software Distribution Center, the following resources are made available: PNNL-developed software tools and source code, PNNL-generated raw data and processed results, links to publications that used the data and results available on this site, and tutorials and user manuals. [taken from http://omics.pnl.gov/

  12. Landauer in the age of synthetic biology: energy consumption and information processing in biochemical networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, Pankaj; Schwab, David J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A central goal of synthetic biology is to design sophisticated synthetic cellular circuits that can perform complex computations and information processing tasks in response to specific inputs. The tremendous advances in our ability to understand and manipulate cellular information processing networks raises several fundamental physics questions: How do the molecular components of cellular circuits exploit energy consumption to improve information processing? Can one utilize ideas from thermodynamics to improve the design of synthetic cellular circuits and modules? Here, we summarize recent theoretical work addressing these questions. Energy consumption in cellular circuits serves five basic purposes: (1) increasing specificity, (2) manipulating dynamics, (3) reducing variability, (4) amplifying signal, and (5) erasing memory. We demonstrate these ideas using several simple examples and discuss the implications of these theoretical ideas for the emerging field of synthetic biology. We conclude by discussing h...

  13. Phytochrome from Green Plants: Properties and biological Function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quail, Peter H.

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Plants constantly monitor the light environment for informational light signals used to direct adaptational responses to the prevailing conditions. One major such response, the Shade-Avaoidance Response (SAR), triggered when plants sense the presence of competing neighbors, results in enhanced channeling of photosynthetically-fixed carbon into stem elongation at the expense of deposition in reproductive tissues. This response has been selected against in many modern food crops to ensure maximum edible yield (e.g. seeds). Converse enhancement of the SAR, with consequent increased carbon channeling into vegetative cellulose, could contribute to the generation of crops with improved yield of tissues suitable for cellulosic biofuel production. The signal for this response is light enriched in far-red wavelengths. This signal is produced by sunlight filtered through, or reflected from, neighboring vegetation, as a result of preferential depletion of red photons through chlorophyll absorption. The plant phytochrome (phy) photoreceptor system (predominantly phyB) senses this signal through its capacity to switch reversibly, in milliseconds, between two molecular states: the biologically inactive Pr (red-light-absorbing) and biologically active Pfr (far-red-light-absorbing) conformers. The photoequilibrium established between these two conformers in light-grown plants is determined by the ratio of red-to-far-red wavelengths in the incoming signal. The levels of Pfr then dictate the recipient plant’s growth response: high levels suppress elongation growth; low levels promote elongation growth. Studies on seedling deetiolation have advanced our understanding considerably in recent years, of the mechanism by which the photoactivated phy molecule transduces its signal into cellular growth responses. The data show that a subfamily of phy-interacting bHLH transcription factors (PIFs) promote skotomorphogenic seedling development in post-germinative darkness, but that the phy Pfr conformer reverses this activity upon initial light exposure, inducing the switch to photomorphogenic development. This reversal involves light-triggered translocation of the photoactivated phy molecule into the nucleus where it interacts with PIF-family members, inducing rapid phosphorylation and degradation of the PIFs via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This degradation in turn elicits rapid alterations in gene expression that drive the deetiolation transition. This project has made considerable progress in defining phy-PIF signaling activity in controlling the SAR. The biological functions of the multiple PIF-family members in controlling the SAR, including dissection of the relative contributions of the individual PIFs to this process, as well as to diurnal growth-control oscillations, have been investigated using higher-order pif-mutant combinations. Using microarray analysis of a quadruple pif mutant we have defined the shade-induced, PIF-regulated transcriptional network genome-wide. This has revealed that a dynamic antagonism between the phys and PIFs generates selective reciprocal responses during deetiolation and the SAR in a rapidly light-responsive transcriptional network. Using integrated RNA-seq and ChIP-seq analysis of higher order pif-mutant combinations, we have defined the direct gene-targets of PIF transcriptional regulation, and have obtained evidence that this regulation involves differential direct targeting of rapidly light-responsive genes by the individual PIF-family members. This project has provided significant advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which the phy-PIF photosensory signaling pathway regulates an important bioenergy-related plant response to the light environment. The identification of molecular targets in the primary transcriptional-regulatory circuitry of this pathway has the potential to enable genetic or reverse-genetic manipulation of the partitioning of carbon between reproductive and vegetative (cellulose-accumulating) tissue, toward enhanced bioenergy yield.

  14. advanced biological treatment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Patrice Ct DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY 12;BIOL 3020.03 Advanced Cell Biology Syllabus Page 2 Course description For a cell to function Adl, Sina 2 Biological Cybernetics...

  15. XPS Analysis of Nanostructured Materials and Biological Surfaces...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of Nanostructured Materials and Biological Surfaces. XPS Analysis of Nanostructured Materials and Biological Surfaces. Abstract: This paper examines the types of...

  16. Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production (2009) Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production (2009)...

  17. Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration: Research Needs and Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhancement of soil carbon sequestration by amendment withBiologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration: Research Needson Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration, October 29,

  18. A Systems Biology Approach to Infectious Disease Research: Innovating...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems Biology Approach to Infectious Disease Research: Innovating the Pathogen-Host Research Paradigm. A Systems Biology Approach to Infectious Disease Research: Innovating the...

  19. Comparative systems biology across an evolutionary gradient within...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    systems biology across an evolutionary gradient within the Shewanella genus . Comparative systems biology across an evolutionary gradient within the Shewanella genus . Abstract: To...

  20. Hierarchical analysis of molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.J.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel representation of molecular spectra in terms of hierarchical trees has proven to be an important aid for the study of many significant problems in gas-phase chemical dynamics. Trees are generated from molecular spectra by monitoring the changes that occur in a spectrum as resolution is changed in a continuous manner. A tree defines a genealogy among all lines of a spectrum. This allows for a detailed understanding of the assignment of features of a spectrum that may be difficult to obtain any other way as well as an understanding of intramolecular energy transfer time scales, mechanisms, and pathways. The methodology has been applied to several problems: transition state spectroscopy, intramolecular energy transfer in highly excited molecules, high-resolution overtone spectroscopy, and the nature of the classical-quantum correspondence when there is classical chaos (``quantum chaos``).

  1. Molecular engineering with bridged polysilsesquioxanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LOY,DOUGLAS A.; SHEA,KENNETH J.

    2000-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Bridged polysilsesquioxanes are a class of hybrid organic-inorganic materials that permit molecular engineering of bulk properties including porosity. Prepared by sol-gel polymerization of monomers with two or more trialkoxysilyl groups, the materials are highly cross-linked amorphous polymers that are readily obtained as gels. The bridging configuration of the hydrocarbon group insures that network polymers are readily formed and that the organic functionality is homogeneously distributed throughout the polymeric scaffolding at the molecular level. This permits the bulk properties, including surface area, pore size, and dielectric constant to be engineered through the selection of the bridging organic group. Numerous bridging groups have been incorporated. This presentation will focus on the effects that the length, flexibility, and substitution geometry of the hydrocarbon bridging groups have on the properties of the resulting bridged polysilsesquioxanes. Details of the preparation, characterization, and some structure property relationships of these bridged polysilsesquioxanes will be given.

  2. Molecular gas and AGN fueling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Combes

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO emission, tracing the molecular content and distribution in galaxies, is a privileged tool to trace gas towards the nucleus, since the HI tracer is in general depleted there. A review is done of recent CO line observations, with sufficient spatial resolution to indicate the morphology and kinematics of the gas near the nucleus. The puzzling result that nuclei presently observed in an active phase have little sign of fueling, is discussed.

  3. Molecular Science Computing: 2010 Greenbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Jong, Wibe A.; Cowley, David E.; Dunning, Thom H.; Vorpagel, Erich R.

    2010-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This 2010 Greenbook outlines the science drivers for performing integrated computational environmental molecular research at EMSL and defines the next-generation HPC capabilities that must be developed at the MSC to address this critical research. The EMSL MSC Science Panel used EMSL’s vision and science focus and white papers from current and potential future EMSL scientific user communities to define the scientific direction and resulting HPC resource requirements presented in this 2010 Greenbook.

  4. Journal of Molecular Graphics and Modelling 21 (2003) 435448 A priori molecular descriptors in QSAR: a case of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

    Journal of Molecular Graphics and Modelling 21 (2003) 435­448 A priori molecular descriptors- panion paper, Part II, which interprets a priori molecular descriptors in terms of molecular graphics

  5. Molecular and functional characterisation of resilin across three insect orders Russell E. Lyons a,1,*, Darren C.C. Wong b,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudek, Daniel M.

    , with resilience (energy storage efficiency) exceeding 97% and fatigue lifetime in excess of 300 million cycles a a CSIRO Livestock Industries, St Lucia, QLD 4067, Australia b Department of Molecular, Cell, Australia d School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, St Lucia 4072, Australia e CSIRO

  6. Molecular Ecology (2007) 16, 28932909 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2007.03305.x 2007 The Authors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular Ecology (2007) 16, 2893­2909 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2007.03305.x © 2007 The Authors models of ecological speciation. 1. Cichlids in a crater lake SERGEY GAVRILETS,* AARON VOSE,* MARTA BARLUENGA,§¶ WALTER SALZBURGER§¶ and AXEL MEYER§ Departments of *Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

  7. Biological and Chemical Approaches to Diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morimoto, Richard

    , chaperones, heat shock response, protein folding and misfolding, unfolded protein response Abstract Many that proteostasis is influenced both by an adjustable proteostasis network capacity and protein folding energetics INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 960 PROTEIN FOLDING IN VITRO . . . 961 BIOLOGICALLY ASSISTED

  8. VEHICLE OPERATING PROCEDURES DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    VEHICLE OPERATING PROCEDURES DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE GENERAL INFORMATION Vehicles resposniblity and disciplinary action. Vehicles may be used by faculty or staff from other departments complete the vehicle usage agreement form certifying that they have a valid driver's license

  9. Technical Working Group on Biological Evidence Preservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    of Forensic Science (AAFS) Annual Meeting Thursday, February 20, 2014 #12;The State of Biological Evidence Dennis Davenport, Senior Crime Scene Investigator, Commerce City PD Rock Harmon, Consultant, DNARock

  10. BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CIVIL, ARCHITECTURAL, AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING MECHANICAL, MATERIALS, AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING IIT ARMOUR #12;WHY ENGINEERINGAT IIT ARMOUR? Five Departments. One Distinctive Educational

  11. BIOLOGICAL & AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIOLOGICAL & AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Position Title: Assistant/Associate Professor and Extension Specialist (Water/Wastewater Engineering) Appointment: 70% Texas A&M Agri) and other environmental issues of concern to rural communities, agricultural producers, agri

  12. The Biology of Some Kansas Eumenidae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isely, Dwight

    1913-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is based on field observations and collections made by the author while connected with the Biological Survey of the University of Kansas, in Northwestern Kansas, during the summer of 1912. Specimens of fully ...

  13. Stochastic modeling of biological sequence evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Keyuan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Markov models of sequence evolution are a fundamental building block for making inferences in biological research. This thesis reviews several major techniques developed to estimate parameters of Markov models of sequence ...

  14. Biological applications of weal polyelectrolyte multilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, Michael C., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis research focused on biological applications of ultra-thin weak polyelectrolyte multilayers with specific emphasis on cell patterning, drug delivery, and antibacterial coatings. All of these very different ...

  15. Elizabeth R. Dumont Department of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumont, Elizabeth R.

    collection on the biology- engineering interface" (P.I.) Direct Costs: $670,425 (includes $7,500 REU, UMass Amherst. 2007 Plenary Speaker, 14th International Bat Research Congress, Merida, Mexico 2006

  16. Complexity and Systems Biology of Microbial Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rand, David

    Complexity and Systems Biology of Microbial Biofuels 20-24 June 2011 (All and issues Theme: Biofuel systems and issues (Chair: Nigel Burroughs) 13 (Bielefeld) Biofuels from algae- challenges for industrial levels

  17. TCD-IISc Symposium "Chemistry & Chemical Biology"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    actinide chemistry, with a focus on coordination and organometallic uranium chemistry. Paula ColavitaTCD-IISc Symposium "Chemistry & Chemical Biology" Trinity College Clive Williams, Dean of Chemistry. Research areas include supramolecular organic and inorganic chemistry and medicinal chemistry

  18. Nanotechnology: emerging tools for biology and medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Ian Y.

    Historically, biomedical research has been based on two paradigms. First, measurements of biological behaviors have been based on bulk assays that average over large populations. Second, these behaviors have then been ...

  19. Statistical methods to infer biological interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, George Jay

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological systems are extremely complex, and our ability to experimentally measure interactions in these systems is limited by inherent noise. Technological advances have allowed us to collect unprecedented amounts of raw ...

  20. Size adjustable separation of biologically active molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutierrez, Mauricio R. (Mauricio Roberto)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Separation of biologically active molecules (BAM's) is a problem for the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. Current technologies addressing this problem require too many techniques, toxic additives, and time to ...