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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Molecular Biology Major www.biology.pitt.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular Biology Major www.biology.pitt.edu Revised: 07/2012 Molecular biology emphasizes question, whether in biochemistry, cell biology, developmental biology, or some other biological discipline, applies molecular biology, often as the prime approach, in its solution. Biochemical and molecular

Jiang, Huiqiang

2

Princeton Diversity Programs in Molecular Biology and Quantitative & Computational Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CASE STUDY Princeton Diversity Programs in Molecular Biology and Quantitative & Computational Biology Author Princeton University Acknowledgments. Vides estius moluptaquis aut maxime vitin peroribus: Diversity Programs in Molecular Biology and Quantitative & Computational Biology Founded in 2007 in response

3

Master of Molecular and cellular biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Master of Molecular and cellular biology From molecular developmental biology to biomedicine, evolution and systems biology ©UPMC-Directiondelacommunication-éditionF?VRIER2010-Imprimerie Biol, Development of marine organisms, Senior Lab practical Or Systems Biology -Barcelona: IEO Omics

Arleo, Angelo

4

Connecting Genomic Alterations to Cancer Biology with Proteomics: The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium is applying the latest generation of proteomic technologies to genomically annotated tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program, a joint initiative of the NCI and the National Human Genome Research Institute. By providing a fully integrated accounting of DNA, RNA, and protein abnormalities in individual tumors, these datasets will illuminate the complex relationship between genomic abnormalities and cancer phenotypes, thus producing biologic insights as well as a wave of novel candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets amenable to verifi cation using targeted mass spectrometry methods.

Ellis, Matthew; Gillette, Michael; Carr, Steven A.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Townsend, Reid; Kinsinger, Christopher; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Liebler, Daniel

2013-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

5

Molecular Biology The molecular biology major at Stetson University is designed for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular Biology The molecular biology major at Stetson University is designed for students interested in the interface between the life sciences and physical sciences. Molecular biology is an interdisciplinary science that uses the techniques of biology and chemistry to examine genetic inheritance

Miles, Will

6

BE.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. Molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, including collagen, silk, bone, protein adhesives, GFP, self-assembling peptides. Molecular ...

Zhang, Shuguang, Dr.

7

Molecular biology of signal transduction in plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions of the 1991 Cold Springs Harbor Meeting entitled Molecular Biology of Signal Transduction in Plants.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

advanced molecular biology: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

311 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Molecular Biology Biology 311 Fall 2013 Syllabus Instructor: Dr. Deborah Lycan Class: MWF 9@lclark.edu Website: http:...

9

Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

Pomes, R.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Frontiers of NMR in Molecular Biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NMR spectroscopy is expanding the horizons of structural biology by determining the structures and describing the dynamics of blobular proteins in aqueous solution, as well as other classes of proteins including membrane proteins and the polypeptides that form the aggregates diagnostic of prion and amyloid diseases. Significant results are also emerging on DNA and RNA oligomers and their complexes with proteins. This meeting focused attention on key structural questions emanating from molecular biology and how NMR spectroscopy can be used to answer them.

NONE

1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

11

Molecular Biology Basics Planning Restriction Enzyme Digests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular Biology Basics Planning Restriction Enzyme Digests A. Checklist: Buffer type Addition of BSA Optimum temperature Number of units of enzyme B. Plan to digest DNA with an "excess" of enzyme activity. Plan for the "excess" to be divided between time of digestion and number of units of enzyme

Aris, John P.

12

2011 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism, & Molecular Biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

Keneth Stedman

2011-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

13

Genome Clone Libraries and Data from the Integrated Molecular Analysis of Genomes and their Expression (I.M.A.G.E.) Consortium  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The I.M.A.G.E. Consortium was initiated in 1993 by four academic groups on a collaborative basis after informal discussions led to a common vision of how to achieve an important goal in the study of the human genome: the Integrated Molecular Analysis of Genomes and their Expression Consortium's primary goal is to create arrayed cDNA libraries and associated bioinformatics tools, and make them publicly available to the research community. The primary organisms of interest include intensively studied mammalian species, including human, mouse, rat and non-human primate species. The Consortium has also focused on several commonly studied model organisms; as part of this effort it has arrayed cDNAs from zebrafish, and Fugu (pufferfish) as well as Xenopus laevis and X. tropicalis (frog). Utilizing high speed robotics, over nine million individual cDNA clones have been arrayed into 384-well microtiter plates, and sufficient replicas have been created to distribute copies both to sequencing centers and to a network of five distributors located worldwide. The I.M.A.G.E. Consortium represents the world's largest public cDNA collection, and works closely with the National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection(MGC) to help it achieve its goal of creating a full-length cDNA clone for every human and mouse gene. I.M.A.G.E. is also a member of the ORFeome Collaboration, working to generate a complete set of expression-ready open reading frame clones representing each human gene. Custom informatics tools have been developed in support of these projects to better allow the research community to select clones of interest and track and collect all data deposited into public databases about those clones and their related sequences. I.M.A.G.E. clones are publicly available, free of any royalties, and may be used by anyone agreeing with the Consortium's guidelines.

14

Molecular biology of signal transduction in plants. Abstracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions of the 1991 Cold Springs Harbor Meeting entitled Molecular Biology of Signal Transduction in Plants.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Third international congress of plant molecular biology: Molecular biology of plant growth and development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Congress was held October 6-11, 1991 in Tucson with approximately 3000 scientists attending and over 300 oral presentations and 1800 posters. Plant molecular biology is one of the most rapidly developing areas of the biological sciences. Recent advances in the ability to isolate genes, to study their expression, and to create transgenic plants have had a major impact on our understanding of the many fundamental plant processes. In addition, new approaches have been created to improve plants for agricultural purposes. This is a book of presentation and posters from the conference.

Hallick, R.B. [ed.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

2010 Plant Molecular Biology Gordon Research Conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Plant Molecular Biology Conference has traditionally covered a breadth of exciting topics and the 2010 conference will continue in that tradition. Emerging concerns about food security have inspired a program with three main themes: (1) genomics, natural variation and breeding to understand adaptation and crop improvement, (2) hormonal cross talk, and (3) plant/microbe interactions. There are also sessions on epigenetics and proteomics/metabolomics. Thus this conference will bring together a range of disciplines, will foster the exchange of ideas and enable participants to learn of the latest developments and ideas in diverse areas of plant biology. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for individuals to discuss their research because additional speakers in each session will be selected from submitted abstracts. There will also be a poster session each day for a two-hour period prior to dinner. In particular, this conference plays a key role in enabling students and postdocs (the next generation of research leaders) to mingle with pioneers in multiple areas of plant science.

Michael Sussman

2010-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

17

SAFE WORKING ENVIRONMENT THE DEPARTMENT OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND GENETICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAFE WORKING ENVIRONMENT THE DEPARTMENT OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND GENETICS MAY 2013MAY 2013 #12;#12;SAFE WORKING ENVIRONMENT 1 The Working Environment Organisation at the Department The Working Environment organisation at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics (MBG) is divided into 11 working

18

Roadmap: Biology Molecular and Cellular Biology Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-BSCI-MCBI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Biology ­ Molecular and Cellular Biology ­ Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-BSCI-MCBI] College of Arts and Sciences Department of Biological Sciences Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated Biological Diversity 4 Fulfills Kent Core Basic Sciences CHEM 10060 General Chemistry I 4 Fulfills Kent

Sheridan, Scott

19

Roadmap: Biology Molecular and Cellular Biology Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-BSCI-MCBI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Biology ­ Molecular and Cellular Biology ­ Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-BSCI-MCBI] College of Arts and Sciences Department of Biological Sciences Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated Biological Diversity 4 Fulfills Kent Core Basic Sciences CHEM 10060 General Chemistry I 4 Fulfills Kent

Sheridan, Scott

20

12/15/11 EBS AY11/12 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12/15/11 EBS AY11/12 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Division of Environmental and Biomolecular and Molecular Biology ­ Master of Science ­ Nonthesis ............................2 Track: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.................................................................................2

Chapman, Michael S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

10/13/08 DSE/BMB AY08/09 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10/13/08 DSE/BMB AY08/09 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Division of Environmental-2009 Degree: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology ­ Master of Science ­ Nonthesis...........................2 Track: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Chapman, Michael S.

22

12/13/11 EBS AY10/11 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12/13/11 EBS AY10/11 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Division of Environmental and Biomolecular and Molecular Biology ­ Master of Science ­ Nonthesis ............................2 Track: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.................................................................................2

Chapman, Michael S.

23

10/29/12 EBS AY12/13 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10/29/12 EBS AY12/13 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Division of Environmental and Biomolecular and Molecular Biology ­ Master of Science ­ Nonthesis ............................2 Track: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.................................................................................2

Chapman, Michael S.

24

12/21/09 DSE/BMB AY09/10 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12/21/09 DSE/BMB AY09/10 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Division of Environmental and Molecular Biology ­ Master of Science ­ Nonthesis ............................2 Track: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.................................................................................2 Degree

Chapman, Michael S.

25

4/30/13 EBS AY13/14 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4/30/13 EBS AY13/14 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Division of Environmental and Biomolecular and Molecular Biology ­ Master of Science ­ Nonthesis ............................2 Track: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.................................................................................2

Chapman, Michael S.

26

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ MOLECULAR, CELL, & DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ MOLECULAR, CELL, & DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY Junior Specialist I ­ Assistant Specialist II The University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) invites applications will be conducted. Reappointment is also contingent upon availability of funding. TO APPLY: Applications

California at Santa Cruz, University of

27

Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the roles and responsibilities of each position within the Combustion Byproducts Recyclcing Consortium.

Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul chugh; James Hower

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

28

Genomics and computational molecular biology Douglas L Brutlag  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

340 Genomics and computational molecular biology Douglas L Brutlag There has been a dramatic increase in the number of completely sequenced bacterial genomes during the past two years as a result of the efforts both of public genome agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. The availability of completely

Brutlag, Doug

29

Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 16, 48524866, October 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 16, 4852­4866, October 2005 Helicobacter pylori VacA Cytotoxin cytotoxin VacA is a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium responsible for gastrodu-independent mechanism, and routed to the degradative compartment. INTRODUCTION Gastric infection by Helicobacter pylori

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

30

Review article Molecular biology of fish viruses: a review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review article Molecular biology of fish viruses: a review J Bernard, M Brémont* INRA, laboratoire aspects in the fish virus studies. Although more than 50 different fish virus have been isolated family, the fish lym- phocystis disease virus (FLDV) is the most studied. Retroviridae have been recently

Boyer, Edmond

31

Overview of selected molecular biological databases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the purpose, content, and design of a subset of the currently available biological databases, with an emphasis on protein databases. Databases included in this summary are 3D-ALI, Berlin RNA databank, Blocks, DSSP, EMBL Nucleotide Database, EMP, ENZYME, FSSP, GDB, GenBank, HSSP, LiMB, PDB, PIR, PKCDD, ProSite, and SWISS-PROT. The goal is to provide a starting point for researchers who wish to take advantage of the myriad available databases. Rather than providing a complete explanation of each database, we present its content and form by explaining the details of typical entries. Pointers to more complete ``user guides`` are included, along with general information on where to search for a new database.

Rayl, K.D.; Gaasterland, T.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

E-Print Network 3.0 - applications molecular biology Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

applications molecular biology Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 COMMITTEE ON GENETICS, GENOMICS & SYSTEMS BIOLOGY: SUGGESTED STUDENT TRACKS AUTUMN QUARTER WINTER QUARTER SPRING...

33

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS FOR MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (ISMB)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB) conference has provided a general forum for disseminating the latest developments in bioinformatics on an annual basis for the past 13 years. ISMB is a multidisciplinary conference that brings together scientists from computer science, molecular biology, mathematics and statistics. The goal of the ISMB meeting is to bring together biologists and computational scientists in a focus on actual biological problems, i.e., not simply theoretical calculations. The combined focus on ??intelligent systems? and actual biological data makes ISMB a unique and highly important meeting, and 13 years of experience in holding the conference has resulted in a consistently well organized, well attended, and highly respected annual conference. The ISMB 2005 meeting was held June 25-29, 2005 at the Renaissance Center in Detroit, Michigan. The meeting attracted over 1,730 attendees. The science presented was exceptional, and in the course of the five-day meeting, 56 scientific papers, 710 posters, 47 Oral Abstracts, 76 Software demonstrations, and 14 tutorials were presented. The attendees represented a broad spectrum of backgrounds with 7% from commercial companies, over 28% qualifying for student registration, and 41 countries were represented at the conference, emphasizing its important international aspect. The ISMB conference is especially important because the cultures of computer science and biology are so disparate. ISMB, as a full-scale technical conference with refereed proceedings that have been indexed by both MEDLINE and Current Contents since 1996, bridges this cultural gap.

Debra Goldberg; Matthew Hibbs; Lukas Kall; Ravikumar Komandurglayavilli; Shaun Mahony; Voichita Marinescu; Itay Mayrose; Vladimir Minin; Yossef Neeman; Guy Nimrod; Marian Novotny; Stephen Opiyo; Elon Portugaly; Tali Sadka; Noboru Sakabe; Indra Sarkar; Marc Schaub; Paul Shafer; Olena Shmygelska; Gregory Singer; Yun Song; Bhattacharya Soumyaroop; Michael Stadler; Pooja Strope; Rong Su; Yuval Tabach; Hongseok Tae; Todd Taylor; Michael Terribilini; Asha Thomas; Nam Tran; Tsai-Tien Tseng; Akshay Vashist; Parthiban Vijaya; Kai Wang; Ting Wang; Lai Wei; Yong Woo; Chunlei Wu; Yoshihiro Yamanishi; Changhui Yan; Jack Yang; Mary Yang; Ping Ye; Miao Zhang

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

34

BS in MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (285125) Map Sheet Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chem Laboratory Chem 351 Organic Chemistry Chem 352 Organic Chemistry Chem 353 Organic Chemistry Lab) Requirements Doctrinal Foundation Book of Mormon New Testament Doctrine and Covenants The Individual 120 Science of Biology PDBio 360 Cell Biology PWS 340* Genetics Complete the following chemistry

Olsen Jr., Dan R.

35

n. ISBN Title Subject 1 9780444519245 Comprehensive Molecular Insect Science Agricultural and Biological Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

n. ISBN Title Subject 1 9780444519245 Comprehensive Molecular Insect Science Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9780080453378 Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 9780122270505 Encyclopedia of Applied Plant Sciences Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 9780123739629

Malerba, Donato

36

Consortium for Energy Efficiency  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the Consortium for Energy Efficiency at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

37

Molecular biology of Homo sapiens: Abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Spring Harbor symposium on quantitative biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Springs Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology. The topic for this meeting was the ''Molecular Biology of Homo sapiens.'' Sessions were entitled Human Gene Map, Human Cancer Genes, Genetic Diagnosis, Human Evolution, Drugs Made Off Human Genes, Receptors, and Gene Therapy. (DT)

Watson, J.D.; Siniscalco, M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Collection Policy: BIOCHEMISTRY, MOLECULAR AND CELL BIOLOGY Subject Scope | Priority Tables | Other policies . . .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, recombinant DNA and its applications, metabolism, molecular biology, computer graphics in molecular biology regulation and chromatin structure in eukaryotes q Regulation of the heat shock genes q Control of gene-response regulatory protein in bacteria q Bacterial transcription mechanisms, especially termination, and control

Angenent, Lars T.

39

2012 PLANT MOLECULAR BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JULY 15-20, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2012 Gordon Conference on Plant Molecular Biology will present cutting-edge research on molecular aspects of plant growth and development, with particular emphasis on recent discoveries in molecular mechanisms involved with plant signaling systems. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics in plant molecular biology including hormone receptors and early events in hormone signaling, plant perception of and response to plant pathogen and symbionts, as well as technological and biological aspects of epigenomics particularly as it relates to signaling systems that regulate plant growth and development. Genomic approaches to plant signaling will be emphasized, including genomic profiling technologies for quantifying various biological subsystems, such as the epigenome, transcriptome, phosphorylome, and metabolome. The meeting will include an important session devoted to answering the question, "What are the biological and technological limits of plant breeding/genetics, and how can they be solved"?

Sussman, Michael

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

40

Proteogenomic Analysis of a Thermophilic Bacterial Consortium...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Analysis of a Thermophilic Bacterial Consortium Adapted to Deconstruct Switchgrass. Proteogenomic Analysis of a Thermophilic Bacterial Consortium Adapted to Deconstruct...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Stakeholder Consortium Meeting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stakeholder Consortium Meeting March 22, 2013 Susan Riha Director, NYS Water Resources Institute of regional water planning / inefficiencies "Build it they will come" has resulted in significant excess Resources Institute #12;#12;NYS POTW Design Flows 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960

Keinan, Alon

42

International milk genomics consortium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University, Wooster, OH 44691, USA c University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844, USA d University of Colorado. The general goals of the Milk Genomics Consortium are to link the scientific community through milk and geno value of milk's components is known (German, Dillard, & Ward, 2002). The scientific challenge, therefore

Rocke, David M.

43

Eric C. Achberger -molecular biology; transcription Christopher C. Austin -herpetology, systematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- pathogenicity of Vibrio and Streptomyces William J. Platt III - plant populations and communities James VBIOLOGICAL SCIENCES Eric C. Achberger - molecular biology; transcription Christopher C. Austin Prosanta Chakrabarty - ichthyology; systematics Brent C. Christner - microbes in the cryosphere

Stephens, Jacqueline

44

2012 CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 17 - 22, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gordon Research Conference on CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY was held at Holderness School, Holderness New Hampshire, June 17 - 22, 2012. The 2012 Gordon Conference on Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology (CMFB) will present the latest, cutting-edge research on the exciting and growing field of molecular and cellular aspects of fungal biology. Topics will range from yeast to filamentous fungi, from model systems to economically important organisms, and from saprophytes and commensals to pathogens of plants and animals. The CMFB conference will feature a wide range of topics including systems biology, cell biology and morphogenesis, organismal interactions, genome organisation and regulation, pathogenesis, energy metabolism, biomass production and population genomics. The Conference was well-attended with 136 participants. Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings.

Judith Berman

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

45

Advanced Separation Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was formed in 2001 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy to conduct fundamental research in advanced separation and to develop technologies that can be used to produce coal and minerals in an efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The CAST consortium consists of seven universities - Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, Montana Tech, University of Utah, University of Nevada-Reno, and New Mexico Tech. The consortium brings together a broad range of expertise to solve problems facing the US coal industry and the mining sector in general. At present, a total of 60 research projects are under way. The article outlines some of these, on topics including innovative dewatering technologies, removal of mercury and other impurities, and modelling of the flotation process. 1 photo.

NONE

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

Robert W. Watson

2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

47

Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 19, 11041112, March 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Morimoto, and Kevin A. Morano* *Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas treatment induces a battery of oxidant defense genes in addition to heat shock genes. Celastrol activated

Morimoto, Richard

48

Carbon Fiber Consortium | Partnerships | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in 2011 to accelerate the development and deployment of new, lower cost carbon fiber composite materials. The Consortium draws on the broad experience that the Oak Ridge National...

49

CONSORTIUM FOR CLEAN COAL UTILIZATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSORTIUM FOR CLEAN COAL UTILIZATION Call for Proposals Date of Issue: July 29, 2013 The Consortium for Clean Coal Utilization (CCCU) at Washington University in St. Louis was established in January of Clean Coal Utilization. The format may be a conference or workshop, or a seminar given by a leading

Subramanian, Venkat

50

Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research Results Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research Results Dr. Jose Olivares of Los Alamos...

51

Modeling human risk: Cell & molecular biology in context  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is anticipated that early in the next century manned missions into outer space will occur, with a mission to Mars scheduled between 2015 and 2020. However, before such missions can be undertaken, a realistic estimation of the potential risks to the flight crews is required. One of the uncertainties remaining in this risk estimation is that posed by the effects of exposure to the radiation environment of outer space. Although the composition of this environment is fairly well understood, the biological effects arising from exposure to it are not. The reasons for this are three-fold: (1) A small but highly significant component of the radiation spectrum in outer space consists of highly charged, high energy (HZE) particles which are not routinely experienced on earth, and for which there are insufficient data on biological effects; (2) Most studies on the biological effects of radiation to date have been high-dose, high dose-rate, whereas in space, with the exception of solar particle events, radiation exposures will be low-dose, low dose-rate; (3) Although it has been established that the virtual absence of gravity in space has a profound effect on human physiology, it is not clear whether these effects will act synergistically with those of radiation exposure. A select panel will evaluate the utilizing experiments and models to accurately predict the risks associated with exposure to HZE particles. Topics of research include cellular and tissue response, health effects associated with radiation damage, model animal systems, and critical markers of Radiation response.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period July 1, 2004, through September 30, 2004. During this time period there were three main activities. First was the ongoing negotiations of the four sub-awards working toward signed contracts with the various organizations involved. Second, an Executive Council meeting was held at Penn State September 9, 2004. And third, the GSTC participated in the SPE Eastern Regional Meeting in Charleston, West Virginia, on September 16th and 17th. We hosted a display booth with the Stripper Well Consortium.

Robert W. Watson

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

53

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

Robert W. Watson

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

55

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission & distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1 to June 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: (1) Develop and process subcontract agreements for the eight projects selected for cofunding at the February 2006 GSTC Meeting; (2) Compiling and distributing the three 2004 project final reports to the GSTC Full members; (3) Develop template, compile listserv, and draft first GSTC Insider online newsletter; (4) Continue membership recruitment; (5) Identify projects and finalize agenda for the fall GSTC/AGA Underground Storage Committee Technology Transfer Workshop in San Francisco, CA; and (6) Identify projects and prepare draft agenda for the fall GSTC Technology Transfer Workshop in Pittsburgh, PA.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

56

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

57

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

Joel Morrison

2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

58

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

59

Nuclear Fabrication Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) â?? Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : â?¢ Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. â?¢ Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. â?¢ Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. â?¢ Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. â?¢ Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. â?¢ Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. â?¢ Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. â?¢ Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium projects. Full technical reports for each of the projects have been submitted as well.

Levesque, Stephen

2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

60

Exploring the free-energy landscapes of biological systems with steered molecular dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Exploring the free-energy landscapes of biological systems with steered molecular dynamics fluctuation-dissipation-theorem (BD -FDT) to accurately compute the free-energy profiles for several compute the free-energy profiles for all the afore-listed systems that represent various important aspects

Chen, Liao Y.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CELL BIOLOGY & MOLECULAR GENETICS Forage Yields of Alfalfa Populations Derived from Parents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CELL BIOLOGY & MOLECULAR GENETICS Forage Yields of Alfalfa Populations Derived from Parents inbreeding (Bus- bice, 1970).It is important to know if forage yields of alfalfa (Medicago sativa variabilitythe level of genetic diversity among 93 alfalfa genotypes previously selected as parents

Yandell, Brian S.

62

Optimization in Computational Chemistry and Molecular Biology, pp. ???? C. A. Floudas and P. M. Pardalos, Editors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization in Computational Chemistry and Molecular Biology, pp. ??­?? C. A. Floudas and P. M case, multivariate nonlinear optimization and optionally configurational sampling is involved library. This problem is a combinatorial optimization task, and is known to have a non­polynomial time

Schlick, Tamar

63

Optimization in Computational Chemistry and Molecular Biology, pp. ??-?? C. A. Floudas and P. M. Pardalos, Editors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization in Computational Chemistry and Molecular Biology, pp. ??-?? C. A. Floudas and P. M, multivariate nonlinear optimization and optionally con gurational sampling is involved. The diversity problem. This problem is a combinatorial optimization task, and is known to have a non-polynomial time complexity 8, 24

Schlick, Tamar

64

2Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 13, 24612473, July 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

report the first procedure for the large-scale purification of CBs from HeLa cell nuclei, resulting2Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 13, 2461­2473, July 2002 Large-Scale Isolation of Cajal Bodies, such as the maturation of splicing small nuclear ribonucleoproteins and the assembly of transcription complexes. Here, we

Lamond, Angus I.

65

nature structural & molecular biology VOLUME 20 NUMBER 3 MARCH 2013 347 a rt i c l e s  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Italy. 5Institute for Molecular Systems Biology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. 6Competence Center for Systems Physiology and Metabolic Diseases, ETH Zurich, Zurich of Molecular Cancer Research, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. 3Structural Biology Laboratory

Monnat, Ray

66

Biology & Biomedical Sciences ACADEMIC PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biology & Biomedical Sciences ACADEMIC PROGRAM GUIDELINES Programs in Cell & Molecular Biology Developmental, Regenerative and Stem Cell Biology Molecular Cell Biology Molecular Genetics & Genomics Molecular Microbiology & Microbial Pathogenesis #12;PAGE 2 GUIDELINES TO THE PROGRAMS IN CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

Stormo, Gary

67

Laboratory and New Mexico Consortium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

USDA awards 1 million eor e. coli research by Los Alamos National Laboratory and New Mexico Consortium February 29, 2012 LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, February 29, 2012-Researchers from...

68

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

69

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host technology transfer meetings and occasional field excursions. A total of 15 technology transfer/strategic planning workshops were held.

Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

70

Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, 'clean coal' combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered 'allowable' under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and private-sector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, clean coal combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered allowable under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Molecular biology in marine science: Scientific questions, technological approaches, and practical implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes molecular techniques that could be invaluable in addressing process-oriented problems in the ocean sciences that have perplexed oceanographers for decades, such as understanding the basis for biogeochemical processes, recruitment processes, upper-ocean dynamics, biological impacts of global warming, and ecological impacts of human activities. The coupling of highly sophisticated methods, such as satellite remote sensing, which permits synoptic monitoring of chemical, physical, and biological parameters over large areas, with the power of modern molecular tools for ``ground truthing`` at small scales could allow scientists to address questions about marine organisms and the ocean in which they live that could not be answered previously. Clearly, the marine sciences are on the threshold of an exciting new frontier of scientific discovery and economic opportunity.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

BETO Announces June Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research Results BETO Announces June Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research Results...

74

Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F-fly ash. Some developed technologies have similar potential in the longer term. (3) Laboratory studies have been completed that indicate that much higher amounts of fly ash could be added in cement-concrete applications under some circumstances. This could significantly increase use of fly ash in cement-concrete applications. (4) A study of the long-term environmental effects of structural fills in a surface mine in Indiana was completed. This study has provided much sought after data for permitting large-volume management options in both beneficial as well as non-beneficial use settings. (5) The impact of CBRC on CCBs utilization trends is difficult to quantify. However it is fair to say that the CBRC program had a significant positive impact on increased utilization of CCBs in every region of the USA. Today, the overall utilization of CCBs is over 43%. (6) CBRC-developed knowledge base led to a large number of other projects completed with support from other sources of funding. (7) CBRC research has also had a large impact on CCBs management across the globe. Information transfer activities and visitors from leading coal producing countries such as South Africa, Australia, England, India, China, Poland, Czech Republic and Japan are truly noteworthy. (8) Overall, the CBRC has been a truly successful, cooperative research program. It has brought together researchers, industry, government, and regulators to deal with a major problem facing the USA and other coal producing countries in the world.

Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

2010 CELL AND MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 13-18, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology Conference provides a forum for presentation of the latest advances in fungal research with an emphasis on filamentous fungi. This open-registration scientific meeting brings together the leading scientists from academia, government and industry to discuss current research results and future directions at Holderness School, an outstanding venue for scientific interaction. A key objective of the conference is to foster interaction among scientists working on model fungi such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Neurospora crassa and Aspergillus nidulans and scientists working on a variety of filamentous fungi whose laboratory tractability is often inversely proportional to their medical, industrial or ecological importance. Sessions will be devoted to Systems Biology, Fungi and Cellulosic Biomass, Small RNAs, Population Genomics, Symbioses, Pathogenesis, Membrane Trafficking and Polarity, and Cytoskeleton and Motors. A session will also be devoted to hot topics picked from abstracts. The CMFB conference provides a unique opportunity to examine the breadth of fungal biology in a small meeting format that encourages in-depth discussion among the attendees.

Michelle Momany

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

76

National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC) Clean...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

ti017ebron2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC) Clean Cities Learning Program Clean Cities Education & Outreach...

77

National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC) Clean...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

ti017ebron2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC) Clean Cities Learning Program Clean Cities Education & Outreach...

78

A Documentation Consortium 1 8/18/10 A Documentation Consortium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Documentation Consortium 1 8/18/10 A Documentation Consortium Ted Habermann Executive Documentation Consortium," it would leverage the efforts and commitments of multiple agencies, such as NOAA in the deployment of ISOcompliant documentation. Such exemplars can be found in a growing and diverse set

79

Consortium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2Workshops 2008 To report

80

ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling White Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling (ECOD) White Paper An ESF Programme September 2003 #12;The, maintains the ship over a specific location while drilling into water depths up to 27,000 feet. A seven Amsterdam, The Netherlands #12;1 ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling (ECOD) White Paper Foreword 3

Purkis, Sam

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

NNSA Hosts Cybersecurity Consortium Members Following White House...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Blog NNSA Hosts Cybersecurity Consortium Members Following White ... NNSA Hosts Cybersecurity Consortium Members Following White House Announcement of 25 Million in Grants...

82

Smart Grid Consortium, Response of New York State Smart Grid...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Consortium, Response of New York State Smart Grid Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Smart Grid Consortium, Response of New York State Smart Grid Addressing Policy and...

83

A University Consortium on Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

A University Consortium on Efficient and Clean High-Pressure, Lean Burn (HPLB) Engines A University Consortium on High Pressure, Lean Combustion for Efficient and Clean IC...

84

Vehicle Technologies Office 2013 Merit Review: A University Consortium...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Review: A University Consortium on Efficient and Clean High-Pressure, Lean Burn (HPLB) Engines Vehicle Technologies Office 2013 Merit Review: A University Consortium on Efficient...

85

Energy Department Announces $4 Million for University Consortium...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

4 Million for University Consortium to Advance America's Water Power Industry Energy Department Announces 4 Million for University Consortium to Advance America's Water Power...

86

Biological Sciences http://www.clas.wayne.edu/biology/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological Sciences http://www.clas.wayne.edu/biology/ Divisions: Evolutionary and Organismal Biology Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Cellular, Developmental, and Neurobiology #12;Biological Sciences http://www.clas.wayne.edu/biology/ · Cell Biology and Cytogenetics (Beningo, Tucker, Greenberg

Berdichevsky, Victor

87

Biometric Consortium 2004 Conference R. JAMES WOOLSEY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biometric Consortium 2004 Conference R. JAMES WOOLSEY Vice President Booz Allen Hamilton 8283 joined Booz Allen Hamilton in July 2002 as a Vice President and officer in the firm's Global Resilience

88

Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

arms- control-technology experts LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 7, 2014-A consortium led by the University of Michigan that includes Los Alamos National Laboratory as a partner has been...

89

LI Delivery Consortium AISBL Rue Montoyer 23  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Romania. The ELI facilities will be operated jointly under a single pan-European consortium ­ preferably of the Management Board is, in general, two (2) years and is renewable. The Management Board consists

90

ELI Delivery Consortium AISBL Rue Montoyer 23  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Romania. The ELI facilities will be operated jointly under a single pan-European consortium ­ preferably of the Management Board is, in general, two (2) years and is renewable. The Management Board consists

91

Biologic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers >protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

Louis H. Kauffman

2002-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

92

X-ray and neutron scattering studies on some nanoscale structures in molecular biology.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Scattering of X-rays and neutrons has been applied to the study of nanostructures with interesting biological functions. The systems studied were the protein calmodulin and (more)

Ikonen, Teemu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Biology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien,Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray1.2U.S. DOEBiology

94

Penn State Consortium for Building Energy Innovation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Penn State Consortium for Building Energy Innovation (formerly the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub) develops, demonstrates, and deploys energy-saving technologies that can achieve 50% energy reduction in small- and medium-sized buildings. Its headquarters serves as a test bed for real-world integration of technology and market solutions.

95

Continuous Casting Consortium Report to POSCO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Fig. 2, the gas fuel (such as propane C3H8) and oxygen leaving the torch combust into a high of the heat is transported away through radiation and advection with the combustion gas and the rest- 1 - Continuous Casting Consortium Report to POSCO Modeling Steel Slab Heat Transfer During

Thomas, Brian G.

96

Engineering Insights 2006 Complex Fluids Design Consortium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Insights 2006 Complex Fluids Design Consortium (CFDC) www.mrl.ucsb.edu/cfdc Overview;Engineering Insights 2006 Objectives -- continued · Create a world-class center for complex fluid and soft and Research Highlights Glenn Fredrickson October 18, 2006 #12;Engineering Insights 2006 What is the CFDC

California at Santa Barbara, University of

97

Newtonian Constant of Gravitation International Consortium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Newtonian Constant of Gravitation International Consortium I. BACKGROUND Recent measurements of the Newtonian constant of gravitation G are in disagreement, with discrepancies that are roughly ten times forces on a laboratory scale. It also raises the question of whether the Newtonian force law

98

Presented by CASL: The Consortium for Advanced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presented by Nuclear Energy CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors A DOE Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors Doug Kothe Director, CASL is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub? · Modeled after research entities like the Manhattan Project (nuclear

99

A Documentation Consortium Ted Habermann, NOAA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Documentation Consortium Ted Habermann, NOAA Documentation: It's not just discovery... 50% change this settles the issue.. #12;New Documentation Needs For skeptics, the 1,000 or so e-mails and documents hacked Communities - Users Documentation: communicating with the future #12;Geoffrey Moore has attributed the S

100

Environmental Biology | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

microbiology, biogeochemistry, molecular biology, molecular dynamics, bioinformatics, genomics, neutron science, chemistry, and computing-and spans multiple scales, from the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

BS in MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE (285220) MAP Sheet Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bio-organic Chemistry Complete the following department courses: MMBio 102 Introduction to Clinical PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS (62 total hours) UNIVERSITY CORE REQUIREMENTS Requirements Doctrinal Foundation Book 360 Cell Biology PWS 340 Genetics Complete the following chemistry courses: Chem 105* General College

Olsen Jr., Dan R.

102

BS in MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE (285220) MAP Sheet Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chem 285 Intro Bio-organic Chemistry Complete the following department courses: MMBio 102 Introduction PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS (75 total hours) UNIVERSITY CORE REQUIREMENTS Requirements Doctrinal Foundation Book (with lab) PDBio 360 Cell Biology PWS 340 Genetics Complete the following chemistry courses: Chem 105

Olsen Jr., Dan R.

103

Example 1 -LIFE SCIENCES/SCIENCES DE LA VIE Biology A Gene, Cell, Molecular  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Immunology Host-cell interactions, Immune response, antigens, antibodies) LS9 Microbiology (Microbial ecology/behavioural and cognitive neuroscience (Behavioural neuroscience ­ learning, reward, mot., Sensory systems and perception;Example 1 - LIFE SCIENCES/SCIENCES DE LA VIE Biology C - Ecology LS18 General Ecology (Physiological

Reid, Nancy

104

Journal of Steroid Biochemistry & Molecular Biology 127 (2011) 915 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-2300, United States b Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA, United energy balance to favor the storage of calories and by altering the hormonal control of appetite Biological Sciences 3, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-2300, United States. Tel.: +1 949 824 8573

Blumberg, Bruce

105

July 2012 M.S. in Molecular Cellular and Genetic Biology (honors) -University of A Corua, A Corua, Spain July 2011 B.S. in Biology -University of A Corua, A Corua, Spain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of A Coruña, A Coruña, Spain July 2011 B.S. in Biology - University of A Coruña, A Coruña, Spain RESEARCH, University of A Coruña, Spain. Advisors: Dr. Jose M. Eirin Lopez, Dr. Josefina Mendez. 2011 - 2012 Master student, Dept. Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of A Coruña, Spain. 2005 - 2011 Bachelor student

Eirin Lopez, Jose Maria

106

Biology is the study of life. Its scope ranges from the molecular to the ecosystem. It deals with fundamental questions such as the origin and evolution of plants and animals, interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biology is the study of life. Its scope ranges from the molecular to the ecosystem. It deals diseases, and the operation of the brain and the nervous system. The study of Biology has major practical. The programs in Biology provide students with an introduction to the broad spectrum of Biological Sciences

Barthelat, Francois

107

MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY, 0270-7306/98/$04.00 0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,2,4 * Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center,1 Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics,2 and Program in Molecular in initiating a cascade of events leading to activation of lineage-specific genes and, ultimately, to conversion deter- mined muscle precursor cells first enter the differentiation pathway and then undergo phenotypic

Xiong, Yue

108

DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium shares technical information and experiences related to LED street and area lighting demonstrations and serves as an objective resource for evaluating new products on the market intended for those applications. Cities, power providers, and others who invest in street and area lighting are invited to join the Consortium and share their experiences. The goal is to build a repository of valuable field experience and data that will significantly accelerate the learning curve for buying and implementing high-quality, energy-efficient LED lighting. Consortium members are part of an international knowledge base and peer group, receive updates on Consortium tools and resources, receive the Consortium E-Newsletter, and help steer the work of the Consortium by participating on a committee. Learn more about the Consortium.

109

Revised 7/19/2011 B.S. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Degree  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Biology 4 MA1160 Calculus with Technology I 4 UN1001 Perspectives on Inquiry 3 TOTAL 17 CH1160 University OR CH1122 University Chem-Studio Lab II 5 MA2160 Calculus with Technology II 4 PH1100 Physics by Inquiry Physics II ­ E&M 3 CS1121 Intro to Programming I 3 UN2002 Institutions 3 General Education Distribution 3

110

Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium (MNSEC) is to enhance the scope, quality and integration of educational and research capabilities of nuclear sciences and engineering (NS/E) programs at partner schools in support of the U.S. nuclear industry (including DOE laboratories). With INIE support, MNSEC had a productive seven years and made impressive progress in achieving these goals. Since the past three years have been no-cost-extension periods, limited -- but notable -- progress has been made in FY10. Existing programs continue to be strengthened and broadened at Consortium partner institutions. The enthusiasm generated by the academic, state, federal, and industrial communities for the MNSEC activities is reflected in the significant leveraging that has occurred for our programs.

Dr. Wynn Volkert; Dr. Arvind Kumar; Dr. Bryan Becker; Dr. Victor Schwinke; Dr. Angel Gonzalez; Dr. DOuglas McGregor

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

111

MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY, 0270-7306/01/$04.00 0 DOI: 10.1128/MCB.21.5.16031612.2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY, 0270-7306/01/$04.00 0 DOI: 10.1128/MCB.21.5.1603­1612.2001 Mar. 2001, p. 1603­1612 Vol. 21, No. 5 Copyright © 2001, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights

Lahav, Galit

112

From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 350: Protein Folding Protocols Edited by: Y. Bai and R. Nussinov Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

115 From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 350: Protein Folding Protocols Edited by: Y. Bai and R to Protein Folding Benjamin Schuler Summary Protein folding is a process characterized by a large degree this method to protein folding. Key Words: Protein folding; fluorescence spectroscopy; single molecule

Schuler, Ben

113

From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 350: Protein Folding Protocols Edited by: Y. Bai and R. Nussinov Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

225 From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 350: Protein Folding Protocols Edited by: Y. Bai and R in the transition state. Key Words: Protein folding; energy landscape; transition state ensemble; denatured state- sively applied to the analysis of protein folding (1­5). Although proteins are essential macromolecules

Caflisch, Amedeo

114

GreenTouch Consortium Passes 50-Member Milestone, Adds Seven...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GreenTouch is open to any organization or individual that is committed to environmental sustainability and to supporting the consortium in realizing its vision. More information...

115

A University Consortium on Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) for High Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission Engines A University Consortium on Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) for High Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission...

116

NETL Researcher Honored with 2013 Federal Laboratory Consortium...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Jeffrey Hawk of the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been awarded a Far West region Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) award for Outstanding Technology Development...

117

University Research Consortium annual review meeting program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

U. K. consortium Stirling engine programme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper covers the design and construction of a high pressure helium-charged two cylinder 20 kW Stirling engine to be operated in either the alpha or gamma configuration. The design includes a sodium heat pipe head. A joint University/ Industry Consortium was set up for the production of this research engine and the various contributions of the members are outlined in the paper. A dynamic test rig has been built to test regenerators and the paper illustrates the unique feature of this rig which enables measurement of the enthalpy loss through the regenerator and its effectiveness.

Rice, G.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Consortium Participant List - Spreadsheet | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codestheatfor Optimized91 *09ofName TitleConsortium

120

Florida Biomass Energy Consortium | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf JumpFlix Solar Jump to:Consortium Jump to: navigation, search

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Consortium Support (Fixed Support) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Ownedof EnergyAdvanced-30 QERDNA linkers allowMarch 31, 2015Consortium Fixed

122

The Solar Energy Consortium | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump Jump to:InformationThe PotomacInc Jump to:Consortium Jump

123

Exergy Consortium Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It isInformationexplains a4Evendale, - FloodplainExergy Consortium Pvt

124

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 116 GENERAL BIOLOGY 2 Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 115 GENERAL BIOLOGY 1 Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY

Suzuki, Masatsugu

125

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIOL 105 GENERAL BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIOL 104 GENERAL BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY

Suzuki, Masatsugu

126

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 1580 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 1570 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107

Suzuki, Masatsugu

127

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 102 GENERAL BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 101 GENERAL BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY

Suzuki, Masatsugu

128

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIOL 117 + BIOL 118 GENERAL BIOLOGY II and LAB Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIOL 115 + BIOL 116 GENERAL BIOLOGY I and LAB Introductory Chemistry

Suzuki, Masatsugu

129

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BI 202 GENERAL BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BI 201 GENERAL BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY

Suzuki, Masatsugu

130

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 152 GENERAL BIOLOGY I Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 151 GENERAL BIOLOGY II Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY

Suzuki, Masatsugu

131

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 156 GENERAL BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 155 GENERAL BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY

Suzuki, Masatsugu

132

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIOL 1520 GENERAL BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIOL 1510 GENERAL BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY

Suzuki, Masatsugu

133

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 152 / BY 52 MODERN BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 150 / BY 50 MODERN BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107

Suzuki, Masatsugu

134

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 220 BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 210 BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY I CHE 201

Suzuki, Masatsugu

135

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIOL 102 GENERAL BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIOL 101 GENERAL BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY

Suzuki, Masatsugu

136

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 110 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 109 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107

Suzuki, Masatsugu

137

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY SC 139 INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY: ANIMALS AND PLANTS Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY SC 135 INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY: MOLECULES AND CELLS Introductory Chemistry

Suzuki, Masatsugu

138

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 117 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY I Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 118 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY II Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107

Suzuki, Masatsugu

139

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 132 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY 2 Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 131 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY 1 Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107

Suzuki, Masatsugu

140

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BI 102 GENERAL BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BI 101 GENERAL BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY

Suzuki, Masatsugu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 01400 GENERAL BIOLOGY II Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 01300 GENERAL BIOLOGY I Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY

Suzuki, Masatsugu

142

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BIO 106H GENERAL BIOLOGY II HONORS Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BIO 105H GENERAL BIOLOGY I HONORS Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107

Suzuki, Masatsugu

143

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY MAJOR First two years Introductory Biology with labs Biology 117 AND INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY BI 102 GENERAL BIOLOGY 2 Biology 118 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BI 101 GENERAL BIOLOGY 1 Introductory Chemistry with labs Chemistry 107 AND INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY

Suzuki, Masatsugu

144

Postdoctoral opportunities are available immediately in a project investigating molecular mechanisms of neurogenic hypertension. We take a systems biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mechanisms of neurogenic hypertension. We take a systems biology approach involving high-throughput data

Pillow, Jonathan

145

FINAL REPORT: DOE CONTRACT NUMBER FG0205ER64026 Biological Neutron Scattering: A Collaboration with the Oak Ridge Center for Structural Molecular Biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overarching goal of this project was to promote applications of small-angle scattering in structural molecular biology by providing model examples of cutting edge applications that demonstrate the unique capabilities and potential of the DOE national user facilities at Oak Ridge, especially the newly commissioned BioSANS. The approach taken was three-fold: (1) to engage in high impact collaborative research projects that would benefit from small-angle neutron scattering to both demonstrate the power of the technique while expanding the potential user community; (2) to provide access to scattering facilities established at the University of Utah to as broad a set of researchers as possible to increase the expertise in small-angle scattering generally; and (3) to develop new methods and tools for small-angle scattering. To these ends, three major research collaborations were pursued that resulted in a significant body of published work where neutron scattering and contrast variation played a major role. These major collaborations involved studies of protein complexes involved in (1) bacterial transcription regulation and adaptive response (a DOE/BER priority area); (2) regulation of cardiac muscle; and (3) neuronal disorders. In addition, to broaden the impact of the project, smaller collaborative efforts were supported that used either small-angle X-ray or neutron scattering. Finally, the DOE supported facilities at the University of Utah were made available to researchers on a service basis and a number of independent groups took advantage of this opportunity. In all of this work, there was an emphasis on the training of students and post docs in scattering techniques, and a set of publications (a book chapter, a review, and an encyclopedia article) were produced to guide the non-specialist potential user of scattering techniques in successful applications of the techniques. We also developed a suite of user friendly web-based computational tools currently being accessed world-wide by researchers as an aid in neutron scattering data interpretation. In all, these collaborative projects and resulted in 29 original refereed journal articles published between 2005 and 2010 and engaged groups from at least 14 Universities (10 US, 4 international) and 3 National Laboratories (2 US, 1 international). An important final initiative from this project was to begin a process for international community agreement on a set of standards for the publication of biomolecular small-angle scattering data. This initiative is being championed with the International Union of Crystallography and has engaged a number of Journal Editors and is a very important step in the maturing of this now burgeoning field.

Jill Trewhella

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

146

SEEA SOUTHEAST CONSORTIUM FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2010 the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) received a $20 million Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) under the U.S. Department of Energys Better Building Neighborhood Program (BBNP). This grant, funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, also included sub-grantees in 13 communities across the Southeast, known as the Southeast Consortium. The objective of this project was to establish a framework for energy efficiency retrofit programs to create models for replication across the Southeast and beyond. To achieve this goal, SEEA and its project partners focused on establishing infrastructure to develop and sustain the energy efficiency market in specific localities across the southeast. Activities included implementing minimum training standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency through strategic marketing and outreach and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency through a variety of financing mechanisms. The anticipated outcome of these activities would be best practice models for program design, marketing, financing, data collection and evaluation as well as increased market demand for energy efficiency retrofits and products. The Southeast Consortiums programmatic impacts along with the impacts of the other BBNP grantees would further the progress towards the overall goal of energy efficiency market transformation. As the primary grantee SEEA served as the overall program administrator and provided common resources to the 13 Southeast Consortium sub-grantees including contracted services for contractor training, quality assurance testing, data collection, reporting and compliance. Sub-grantee programs were located in cities across eight states including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each sub-grantee program was designed to address the unique local conditions and population of its community. There was great diversity in programs design, types of financing and incentives, building stock characteristics, climate and partnerships. From 2010 through 2013, SEEA and its sub-grantee programs focused on determining best practices in program administration, workforce development, marketing and consumer education, financing, and utility partnerships. One of the common themes among programs that were most successful in each of these areas was strong partnerships and collaborations with people or organizations in the community. In many instances engaged partners proved to be the key to addressing barriers such as access to financing, workforce development opportunities and access to utility bill data. The most challenging barrier proved to be the act of building a market for energy efficiency where none previously existed. With limited time and resources, educating homeowners of the value in investing in energy efficiency while engaging electric and gas utilities served as a significant barrier for several programs. While there is still much work to be done to continue to transform the energy efficiency market in the Southeast, the programmatic activities led by SEEA and its sub-grantees resulted in 8,180 energy audits and 5,155 energy efficiency retrofits across the Southeast. In total the Southeast Consortium saved an estimated 27,915,655.93 kWh and generated an estimated $ 2,291,965.90 in annual energy cost savings in the region.

Block, Timothy [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance] [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance; Ball, Kia [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance] [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance; Fournier, Ashley [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance] [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

147

Urban Consortium Energy Task Force - Year 21 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF), comprised of representatives of large cities and counties in the United States, is a subgroup of the Urban Consortium, an organization of the nation's largest cities and counties joined together to identify, develop and deploy innovative approaches and technological solutions to pressing urban issues.

NONE

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

West Virginia Space Grant Consortium G-68 Engineering Sciences Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NASA West Virginia Space Grant Consortium G-68 Engineering Sciences Building West Virginia.nasa.wvu.edu West Virginia University Bethany College Bluefield State College Fairmont State University Consortium Foundation West Virginia State University WVU Institute of Technology West Virginia Wesleyan

Mohaghegh, Shahab

149

THE DANISH CONSORTIUM FOR WIND ENERGY RESEARCH Lars Landberg1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DANISH CONSORTIUM FOR WIND ENERGY RESEARCH Lars Landberg1 and Peter Hauge Madsen2 1 Risø National Laboratory, Wind Energy Department, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark; lars.landberg@risoe.dk 2 Siemens Wind Power, DK-7330 Brande, Denmark Abstract The Danish Wind Energy Research Consortium

150

for the Open Source Modelica Consortium December 4, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 BYLAWS for the Open Source Modelica Consortium (OSMC) December 4, 2007 Adopted at the statutory Source Modelica Consortium, abbreviated as OSMC. The association has its seat in Linkping, Sweden. 1 and promoting the development and usage of the OpenModelica open source implementation of the Modelica computer

Zhao, Yuxiao

151

ABB and Energy Utilities Form Consortium to Fund SCADA/EMS Cyber...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Energy Utilities Form Consortium to Fund SCADAEMS Cyber Security Assessment at National SCADA Test Bed ABB and Energy Utilities Form Consortium to Fund SCADAEMS Cyber...

152

A consortium approach to glass furnace modeling.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using computational fluid dynamics to model a glass furnace is a difficult task for any one glass company, laboratory, or university to accomplish. The task of building a computational model of the furnace requires knowledge and experience in modeling two dissimilar regimes (the combustion space and the liquid glass bath), along with the skill necessary to couple these two regimes. Also, a detailed set of experimental data is needed in order to evaluate the output of the code to ensure that the code is providing proper results. Since all these diverse skills are not present in any one research institution, a consortium was formed between Argonne National Laboratory, Purdue University, Mississippi State University, and five glass companies in order to marshal these skills into one three-year program. The objective of this program is to develop a fully coupled, validated simulation of a glass melting furnace that may be used by industry to optimize the performance of existing furnaces.

Chang, S.-L.; Golchert, B.; Petrick, M.

1999-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

153

Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The SWC represents a partnership between U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the NETL. This document serves as the twelfth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Drafting and releasing the 2007 Request for Proposals; (2) Securing a meeting facility, scheduling and drafting plans for the 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; (3) Conducting elections and announcing representatives for the four 2007-2008 Executive Council seats; (4) 2005 Final Project Reports; (5) Personal Digital Assistant Workshops scheduled; and (6) Communications and outreach.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

Genome Analyses and Supplement Data from the International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The sequencing of the first tree genome, that of Populus, was a project initiated by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOEs Office of Science. The International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC) was formed to help develop and guide post-sequence activities. The IPGC website, hosted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, provides draft sequence data as it is made available from DOE Joint Genome Institute, genome analyses for Populus, lists of related publications and resources, and the science plan. The data are available at http://www.ornl.gov/sci/ipgc/ssr_resource.htm.

International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)

155

Biology is the study of life. Biologists analyze how systems function in organisms at the cellular and molecular levels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biology is the study of life. Biologists analyze how systems function in organisms at the cellular and public sectors. People with degrees in biology are needed in areas as diverse as farming, food processing, and the environment, as well as in the biomedical and biotechnology fields. A degree in biology can also be used

Saldin, Dilano

156

Encounter with Molecular Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be purchased from the pharmacy chain Boots and was one of the very few proteins that were available in a pure form. Up to this time Sanger had been funding himself. In Chibnall's group he was initially supported by the Medical Research Council and then from...

Macfarlane, Alan

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

157

Encounter with Molecular Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and suggested that Sanger look at the amino groups in the protein. Insulin could be purchased from the pharmacy chain Boots and was one of the very few proteins that were available in a pure form. Up to this time Sanger had been funding himself. In Chibnall...

Macfarlane, Alan

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

158

Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategic

159

Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategicOur Mission Our Mission The SSRL Structural

160

Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategicOur Mission Our Mission The SSRL

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout » Staff125,849| OSTI, US AboutStructural HealthToggle

162

Genome Structure Gallery from the Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Structual Genomics Consortium  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The TB Structural Genomics Consortium works with the structures of proteins from M. tuberculosis, analyzing these structures in the context of functional information that currently exists and that the Consortium generates. The database of linked structural and functional information constructed from this project will form a lasting basis for understanding M. tuberculosis pathogenesis and for structure-based drug design. The Consortium's structural and functional information is publicly available. The Structures Gallery makes more than 650 total structures available by PDB identifier. Some of these are not consortium targets, but all are viewable in 3D color and can be manipulated in various ways by Jmol, an open-source Java viewer for chemical structures in 3D from http://www.jmol.org/

163

Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This May 6, 2010 webcast served as the first official meeting of the new DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium. Ed Smalley of Seattle City Light and Bruce Kinzey of Pacific Northwest...

164

DOE Street Lighting Consortium Releases Results of Public Street...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium (MSSLC) has released the results of a voluntary web-based inventory survey of public street and area lighting across the U.S., conducted...

165

CAIIAC: Consortium for Accelerated Innovation and Insertion of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grant Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AMTech) Program will spur consortium-planned, industry-led R Standardized composite design and testing for faster and more affordable certifications Recycling and reuse

Das, Suman

166

A University Consortium on Efficient and Clean High-Pressure...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Efficient and Clean High-Pressure, Lean Burn (HPLB) Engines A University Consortium on Efficient and Clean High-Pressure, Lean Burn (HPLB) Engines 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and...

167

Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

2 Project Summary: The Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium (MUSIC) was established in response to the US Department of Energys (DOE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) program. MUSIC was established as a consortium composed of academic members and national laboratory partners. The members of MUSIC are the nuclear engineering programs and research reactors of Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), North Carolina State University (NCSU), University of Maryland (UMD), University of South Carolina (USC), and University of Tennessee (UTK). The University of Florida (UF), and South Carolina State University (SCSU) were added to the MUSIC membership in the second year. In addition, to ensure proper coordination between the academic community and the nations premier research and development centers in the fields of nuclear science and engineering, MUSIC created strategic partnerships with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) including the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project and the Joint Institute for Neutron Scattering (JINS), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A partnership was also created with the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) with the aim of utilizing their reactor in research if funding becomes available. Consequently, there are three university research reactors (URRs) within MUSIC, which are located at NCSU (1-MW PULSTAR), UMD (0.25-MW TRIGA) and UF (0.10-MW Argonaut), and the AFRRI reactor (1-MW TRIGA MARK F). The overall objectives of MUSIC are: a) Demonstrate that University Research Reactors (URR) can be used as modern and innovative instruments of research in the basic and applied sciences, which include applications in fundamental physics, materials science and engineering, nondestructive examination, elemental analysis, and contributions to research in the health and medical sciences, b) Establish a strong technical collaboration between the nuclear engineering faculty and the MUSIC URRs. This will be achieved by involving the faculty in the development of state-of-the-art research facilities at the URRs and subsequently, in the utilization of these facilities, c) Facilitate the use of the URRs by the science and engineering faculty within the individual institutions and by the general community of science and engineering, d) Develop a far-reaching educational component that is capable of addressing the needs of the nuclear science and engineering community. Specifically, the aim of this component will be to perform public outreach activities, contribute to the active recruitment of the next generation of nuclear professionals, strengthen the education of nuclear engineering students, and promote nuclear engineering education for minority students.

Ayman Hawari; Nolan Hertel; Mohamed Al-Sheikhly; Laurence Miller; Abdel-Moeze Bayoumi; Ali Haghighat; Kenneth Lewis

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

168

Biological Systems Research Staff New  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Staff The INL Biological Systems department employs a workforce of highly talented scientists, including microbiologists, biochemists, molecular biologists, geochemists,...

169

7.013 Introductory Biology, Spring 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological ...

Sive, Hazel L.

170

Journal of Steroid Biochemistry & Molecular Biology 127 (2011) 204215 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.elsevier.com/locate/jsbmb Review Endocrine disrupting chemicals and disease susceptibility Thaddeus T. Schuga, , Amanda Janesickb 2011 Accepted 6 August 2011 Keywords: Endocrine disrupting chemicals Hormone Disease susceptibility t Environmental chemicals have significant impacts on biological systems. Chemical exposures during early stages

Blumberg, Bruce

171

Terragenome: International Soil Metagenome Sequencing Consortium (GSC8 Meeting)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Janet Jansson of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory discusses the Terragenome Initiative at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009

Jansson, Janet [LBNL

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

172

Sustainability Research & Development Consortium for DoD Installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability Research & Development Consortium for DoD Installations Warner College of Natural the growing need for sustainability planning, imple- mentation, and facilitation on United States military bases. CEMML is already a proven global provider of re- search and sustainable management of natural

173

Gravity&MagneticsResearchConsortium CGEMaestro v.1.0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravity&MagneticsResearchConsortium CGEMaestro v.1.0 A potential fields software package developed at the Center for Gravity, Electrical & Magnetic Studies (CGEM) Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://geophysics.mines.edu/cgem Developed for the sponsors of the Gravity

174

The Chicago Wilderness Consortium Melinda Pruett-Jones, Executive Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of natural areas embedded in the third largest metropolitan area in the country, a consortium of diverse is to reclaim the cultural tradition of restoring, protecting and managing the globally outstanding natural to the protection, restoration and management of the Chicago region's natural resources. The Chicago Wilderness

175

Presented by CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presented by Nuclear Energy CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors A DOE Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors Doug Kothe Director, CASL (BWR) Common types of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) #12;www.casl.gov U.S. Nuclear Energy Increasing

176

Internship Opportunities at Hessen Universities Consortium, New York Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internship Opportunities at Hessen Universities Consortium, New York Office The New York office in Hessen to serve as interns. Successful candidates will be motivated and energetic individuals who expenses incurred in New York. Important notice: New York City is an expensive city. Applicants must budget

Hoffmann, Rolf

177

Moving Toward Product Line Engineering in a Nuclear Industry Consortium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Moving Toward Product Line Engineering in a Nuclear Industry Consortium Sana Ben Nasr, Nicolas line engineering, variability mining 1. INTRODUCTION Nuclear power plants are some of the most.ben-nasr, nicolas.sannier, mathieu.acher, benoitbaudry}@inria.fr ABSTRACT Nuclear power plants are some of the most

Boyer, Edmond

178

Quantum Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A critical assessment of the recent developments of molecular biology is presented. The thesis that they do not lead to a conceptual understanding of life and biological systems is defended. Maturana and Varela's concept of autopoiesis is briefly sketched and its logical circularity avoided by postulating the existence of underlying {\\it living processes}, entailing amplification from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale, with increasing complexity in the passage from one scale to the other. Following such a line of thought, the currently accepted model of condensed matter, which is based on electrostatics and short-ranged forces, is criticized. It is suggested that the correct interpretation of quantum dispersion forces (van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, and so on) as quantum coherence effects hints at the necessity of including long-ranged forces (or mechanisms for them) in condensed matter theories of biological processes. Some quantum effects in biology are reviewed and quantum mechanics is acknowledged as conceptually important to biology since without it most (if not all) of the biological structures and signalling processes would not even exist. Moreover, it is suggested that long-range quantum coherent dynamics, including electron polarization, may be invoked to explain signal amplification process in biological systems in general.

Alessandro Sergi

2009-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

179

Biology 494 Biology Internship  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biology 494 Biology Internship Guidelines The Biology Program encourages students to seek out and participate in internship opportunities that have a clear biological focus. Internships may be arranged may receive credit in Biology 494 (Biology Internship) for participation in internships, regardless

Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

180

7.012 Introduction to Biology, Fall 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cell biology, immunology, neurobiology, and an exploration into current research in cancer, genomics, and molecular medicine.

Weinberg, Robert A. (Robert Allan), 1942-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A University Consortium on Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the course of this four year project, the consortium team members from UM, MIT, Stanford, and Berkeley along with contributors from Sandia National Labs and LLNL, have produced a wide range of results on gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The work spanned a wide range of activities including engine experiments, fundamental chemical kinetics experiments, and an array of analytical modeling techniques and simulations. Throughout the project a collaborative approach has produced a many significant new insights into HCCI engines and their behavior while at the same time we achieved our key consortium goal: to develop workable strategies for gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The major accomplishments in each task are summarized, followed by detailed discussion.

Assanis, Dennis; Atreya, Arvind; Bowman, Craig; Chen, Jyh-Yuan; Cheng, Wai; Davidson, David; Dibble, Robert; Edwards, Chris; Filipi, Zoran; Golden, David; Green, William; Hanson, Ronald; Hedrick, J Karl; Heywood, John; Im, Hong; Lavoie, George; Sick, Volker; Wooldridge, Margaret

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

Integrative Biology Keith A. Crandall, Chair  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrative Biology Keith A. Crandall, Chair 401 WIDB, (801) 422-2582 College of Biology of Integrative Biology focus on training students in the organismal and broader perspectives of the biological on the application of molecular biology and genetics. Career Opportunities Integrative biology entails rigorous

Hart, Gus

183

Life Sciences Computational Biology 51  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Sciences #12;Computational Biology 51 4 Life Sciences Research in Life Sciences at Jacobs Sciences at Jacobs clus- tered in six major areas: Cellular and Molecu- lar Biology (Protein Trafficking and Regulation); Computational Biology (Modeling of Biologi- cal Processes); Molecular Biophysics (Membrane

Henkel, Werner

184

Monte Carlo simulation in systems biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 The history of Monte Carlo Sampling in Systems Biology 1.1simulation tools: the systems biology workbench and biospiceCellular and Molecular Biology. ASM Press, Washington

Schellenberger, Jan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

E-Print Network 3.0 - association studies consortium Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FOR WIND ENERGY RESEARCH Lars Landberg1 and Peter Hauge Madsen2 1 Ris... Wind Power, DK-7330 Brande, Denmark Abstract The Danish Wind Energy Research Consortium......

186

Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using YeastBiomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using YeastConsortium for efficient biofuel production: A New Candidate

Goyal, Garima

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool Webcast  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below is the text-alternative version of the "Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool" webcast, held April 3, 2012.

188

Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below is the text-alternative version of the Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff webcast, held May 6, 2010.

189

E-Print Network 3.0 - area consortium research Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New Mexico State University Collection: Engineering 27 Complex Fluids Design Consortium (CFDC) at the University of California,...

190

Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 30, 2008, the US Department of Energy (DoE), issued a cooperative agreement award, DE-FC26-08NT01914, to the Metropolitan Energy Center (MEC), for a project known as Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty Certification project. The cooperative agreement was awarded pursuant to H15915 in reference to H. R. 2764 Congressionally Directed Projects. The original agreement provided funding for The Consortium to implement the established project objectives as follows: (1) to understand the current state of the development of a test protocol for PHEV configurations; (2) to work with industry stakeholders to recommend a medium duty vehicle test protocol; (3) to utilize the Phase 1 Eaton PHEV F550 Chassis or other appropriate PHEV configurations to conduct emissions testing; (4) and to make an industry PHEV certification test protocol recommendation for medium duty trucks. Subsequent amendments to the initial agreement were made, the most significant being a revised Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) that did not address actual field data since it was not available as originally expected. This project was mated by DOE with a parallel project award given to the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in California. The SCAQMD project involved designing, building and testing of five medium duty plug-in hybrid electric trucks. SCAQMD had contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to manage the project. EPRI provided the required match to the federal grant funds to both the SCAQMD project and the Kansas Consortium project. The rational for linking the two projects was that the data derived from the SCAQMD project could be used to validate the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium team. At the same time, the consortium team would be a useful resource to SCAQMD in designating their test procedures for emissions and operating parameters and determining vehicle mileage. The years between award of the cooperative agreements and their completion were problematic for the US and world economies. This resulted in the President and Congress implementing the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, abbreviated ARRA (Pub.L. 111-5), commonly referred to as the Stimulus or The Recovery Act. The stimulus money available for transportation projects encouraged the SCAQMD to seek additional funds. In August of 2009, they eventually were awarded an additional $45.5 M, and the scope of their project was expanded to 378 vehicles. However, as a consequence of the stimulus money and the inundation of DOE with applications for new project under the ARRA, the expected time table for producing and testing vehicles was significantly delayed. As a result, these vehicles were not available for validating the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium. Therefore, in April of 2011, the Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) for the project was revised, and limited to producing the draft protocol for PHEV certification as its deliverable.

None, None

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

Linking Texas irrigation: Consortium communicates research, education projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on irrigation studies, past and present, as well as to input their own information to be shared throughout the state.? Consortium communicates research, education projects I rrigation research and education profes-sionals have had a tremendous impact... to exchange ideas and collaborate on more proj- ects.? It is our hope that the CIRE Web site will be a common place for irrigators across Texas to come for information on irrigat ion studies, past and present....? ? Dr. B.L. Harris, TWRI associate director...

Supercinski, Danielle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group andCompositional AccountExperience |Reactors The Consortium

193

New Mexico Consortium works toward food and energy security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNational Library of1,DepartmentMeasurementNew Mexico Consortium

194

Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos April 7, 2014

195

Consortium Template (Expenditure-Based) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Ownedof EnergyAdvanced-30 QERDNA linkers allowMarch 31, 2015Consortium

196

US Advanced Battery Consortium USABC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformation UC 19-6-401 et seq. - UtahAsia ClimateConsortium USABC Jump to:

197

Marine Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this door. Marine Biology I joined the military RIVERSIDE Marine Biology A Thesis submitted in partialBiology

Zaffino, Kyle

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Report on the research conducted under the funding of the Sloan foundation postdoctoral fellowship in Computational Molecular Biology [Systematic study of protein-protein complexes] Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A central question in molecular biology is what structural features are common at protein-protein interfaces and what energetic factors define the affinity and specificity of protein-protein association. Analysis of structural and mutational data on protein-protein interfaces revealed that protein-protein interfaces of different functional classes contain many more energetically important charged and polar residues than was previously thought. Since, in the context of protein folding studies, polar interactions are believed to destabilize the folded proteins, this observation raised the question as to the forces that determine the stability of protein complexes. To investigate this issue in detail, the authors developed a number of partitioning schemes that allowed them to investigate the role of selected residues, ion pairs, and networks of polar interactions in protein-protein association. The methods developed were applied to the analysis of four different protein-protein interfaces: the ribonuclease barnase and its inhibitor barstar, the human growth hormone and its receptor, subtype N9 influenze virus neuraminidase and NC41 antibody, and the Ras Binding Domain of kinase cRaf and a Ras homologue Rap1A. The calculations revealed a surprising variability in how polar interactions affect the stability of different complexes. The finding that positions of charged and polar residues on protein-protein interfaces are optimized with respect to electrostatic interactions suggests that this property can be employed for the discrimination between native conformations and trial complexes generated by a docking algorithm. Analysis indicated the presence of SH2 domains in Janus family of non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases.

Sheinerman, Felix

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The numbers of individuals with adequate education and training to participate effectively in the highly technical aspects of environmental site cleanup are insufficient to meet the increasing demands of industry and government. Young people are particularly sensitive to these issues and want to become better equipped to solve the problems which will confront them during their lives. Educational institutions, on the other hand, have been slow in offering courses and curricula which will allow students to fulfill these interests. This has been in part due to the lack of federal funding to support new academic programs. This Consortium has been organized to initiate focused educational effort to reach inner-city youth with interesting and useful energy and environmental programs which can lead to well-paying and satisfying careers. Successful Consortium programs can be replicated in other parts of the nation. This report describes a pilot program in Washington, DC, Philadelphia, and Baltimore with the goal to attract and retain inner-city youth to pursue careers in energy-related scientific and technical areas, environmental restoration, and waste management.

Not Available

1993-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Open Geospatial Consortium and EarthCube An EarthCube Technology Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The Open Geospatial Consortium and EarthCube An EarthCube Technology Paper Prepared by David information that is used by the entire geosciences community. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC open source standards for sharing geospatial and observational information. The authors of this paper

Tarboton, David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

IllInoIs InstItute of technology's WInd energy research consortIum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IllInoIs InstItute of technology's WInd energy research consortIum Wanger Institute for Sustainable Energy Research (WISER) Illinois Institute of Technology On-campus wind turbine [OVER] The U.S. Department of Energy has invested $8 Million in the IIT-led Wind Energy Consortium to improve wind generation

Heller, Barbara

202

Eric Bennett Computational Molecular Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and secondary structure elements to predict a protein's propensity to form amyloids. Introduction Protein to a common feature. These aggregation prone proteins are normally soluble with a variety of three-dimensional to amyloid formation (7-9). Amyloid fibrils have an extremely characteristic structure in which

203

Technical Progress Report for the Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2005 through September 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) receiving proposals in response to the RFP, and (2) organizing and hosting the proposal selection meeting on August 30-31, 2005.

Joel L. Morrison

2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

204

Technical Progress Report for the Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of October 1, 2005 through December 31, 2005. Activities during this time period were: (1) Nomination and election of Executive Council members for 2006-07 term, (2) Release the 2006 GSTC request-for-proposals (RFP), (3) Recruit and invoice membership for FY2006, (4) Improve communication efforts, and (5) Continue planning the GSTC spring meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

205

aerobic bacterial consortium: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

biology of its aerobic physiology is well studied. Our deer mice grew throughout life, and, as is typical for mammals, their basal metabolic rate (BMR) and maximal oxygen...

206

National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC), Biofuels for Advancing America (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Introduction to the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium, a collaboration between 17 national laboratory, university, and industry partners that is conducting cutting-edge research to develop infrastructure-compatible, sustainable, biomass-based hydrocarbon fuels.

Not Available

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Genomic Standards Consortium's Eighth Annual Meeting: Opening Remarks (GSC8 Meeting)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dawn Field of the UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology presents the overview of the Genomic Standards Consortium 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009.

Field, Dawn

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

208

Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This April 3, 2012 webcast presented information about the Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool developed by DOE"s Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium. Doug Elliott of Pacific Northwest...

209

New Technologies that Enhance Environmental Protection, Increase Domestic Production, Result from DOE-Supported Consortium  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

New technologies that help small, independent oil and natural gas operators contribute to domestic energy production while improving environmental protection have resulted from U.S. Department of Energy support of the Stripper Well Consortium.

210

Bioconversion of cyanide and acetonitrile by a municipal-sewage-derived anaerobic consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, an anaerobic consortium was examined for its ability to adapt to and degrade the representative organonitriles, cyanide and acetonitrile. Adaptation to cyanide and acetonitrile was achieved by adding increasing levels of cyanide and acetonitrile to the anaerobic consortium, followed by extensive incubation over a 90-day period. The anaerobic consortium adapted most rapidly to the lower concentrations of each substrate and resulted in reductions of 85% and 83% of the cyanide and acetonitrile, respectively, at the 50 mg/L addition level. Increasing the concentration of both cyanide and acetonitrile resulted in reduced bioconversion. Two continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTR) were set up to examine the potential for continuous bioconversion of organonitriles. The anaerobic consortium was adapted to continuous infusion of acetonitrile at an initial concentration of 10 mg/L{center_dot}day in phosphate buffer.

Nagle, N.J.; Rivard, C.J.; Mohagheghi, A.; Philippidis, G. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

Washoe Tribe Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding from the Department of Energy to complete the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project. The main goal of the project was to enhance the capacity of the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium (NITEC) to effectively assist tribes within Nevada to technically manage tribal energy resources and implement tribal energy projects.

Johnson, Jennifer [Washoe Tribe of NV and Ca

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

212

Chemical Biology Coop Program (New for January 2011) Students from the Chemical Biology Coop Program will be prepared to conduct work terms in areas such as  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Biology Coop Program (New for January 2011) Students from the Chemical Biology Coop of the Chemical Biology Coop Program: Bioanalytical Chemistry Organic Chemistry & synthesis Cellular & molecular biology Nucleic acid structure & function Metabolism and regulation Modern physics Genetics Biomolecular

Hitchcock, Adam P.

213

Oil Production by a Consortium of Oleaginous Microorganisms grown on primary effluent wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Municipal wastewater could be a potential growth medium that has not been considered for cultivating oleaginous microorganisms. This study is designed to determine if a consortium of oleaginous microorganism can successfully compete for carbon and other nutrients with the indigenous microorganisms contained in primary effluent wastewater. RESULTS: The oleaginous consortium inoculated with indigenous microorganisms reached stationary phase within 24 h, reaching a maximum cell concentration of 0.58 g L -1. Water quality post-oleaginous consortium growth reached a maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction of approximately 81%, supporting the consumption of the glucose within 8 h. The oleaginous consortium increased the amount of oil produced per gram by 13% compared with indigenous microorganisms in raw wastewater. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) results show a substantial population increase in bacteria within the first 24 h when the consortium is inoculated into raw wastewater. This result, along with the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) results, suggests that conditions tested were not sufficient for the oleaginous consortium to compete with the indigenous microorganisms.

Hall, Jacqueline; Hetrick, Mary; French, Todd; Hernandez, Rafael; Donaldson, Janet; Mondala, Andro; Holmes, William

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

July 2010 M.S. in Molecular, Cellular Biology and Genetics -University of A Corua, A Corua, Spain. July 2009 B.S. in Biology -University of A Corua, A Corua, Spain.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, A Coruña, Spain. July 2009 B.S. in Biology - University of A Coruña, A Coruña, Spain. RESEARCH INTERESTS, Spain. ISBN:978-3-8484-5960-8, pp. 1-66. Ciro Rivera-Casas Ph. D. Student - Department of Cellular15171, Spain GRANTS Grants as a particioant researcher 2011 MICINN, Spanish Research Program

Eirin Lopez, Jose Maria

215

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort was made to locate and retain the services of a suitable vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) following the storms and the loss of the contracted vessel, the M/V Ocean Quest and its two submersibles, but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

J. Robert Woolsey; Tom McGee; Carol Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Molecular Phylogeny and Biogeography of West Indian Teiid Lizards of the Genus Ameiva  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. HOWER AND S. BLAIR HEDGES* *Department of Biology and Institute of Molecular Evolutionary Genetics, 208

Hedges, Blair

217

From Tucson to Genomics and Transgenics: The Vector Biology Network and the Emergence of Modern Vector Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mosquitoes. A PL meeting at the Biology of Disease Vectors (as a tool in vector biology. Transformation of the vector ofelement. Insect Molecular Biology 10: 597604. 11. Balter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

Ronaldo Szilard; Hongbin Zhang; Doug Kothe; Paul Turinsky

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report, 1991--1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The member institutions of the Consortium continue to play a significant role in increasing the number of African Americans who enter the environmental professions through the implementation of the Consortium`s RETT Plan for Research, Education, and Technology Transfer. The four major program areas identified in the RETT Plan are as follows: (1) minority outreach and precollege education; (2) undergraduate education and postsecondary training; (3) graduate and postgraduate education and research; and (4) technology transfer.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Take-Home Exam #2.5 Spring 2008 Spring 2008 Biology 111 Exam #2.5 KEY -Molecular Genetics Take-Home  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Molecular Genetics Take-Home Exam There is no time limit on this test, though I have tried to design one natural protein did you find? cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit alpha isoform 1 b these proteins if you only count the energy used to charge tRNA and assemble the amino acids? (show your work

Campbell, A. Malcolm

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

EMBO reports VOL 10 | NO 11 | 2009 2009 EurOpEaN MOLEcuLar BiOLOgy OrgaNizatiON1206 meeting reportmeeting report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Hendershot and r. Hegde. Keywords: unfolded protein response; protein quality control; molecular chaperone of disease. During times of stress or changes in demand for newly synthesized proteins, signalling pathways presentations in Saxtons river is that upr signalling is an adaptive response that helps cells to survive acute

Hebert, Daniel N.

222

The central focus of the graduate program in Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics (BMB) is the relationship between biological form and function at a fundamental level. This  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as sensory transduction, cell division, death and control of the cell cycle. · Determination of protein, RNA protein-protein interactions. · Molecular basis of energy transduction, including contractility and fluorescence microscopy · Nuclear magnetic and electron paramagnetic spectroscopy. · Optical and magnetic

Sharp, Kim

223

Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities of Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research that shared the need for a way to conduct investigations of gas hydrates and their stability zone in the Gulf of Mexico in situ on a more-or-less continuous basis. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor and to discover the configuration and composition of the subsurface pathways or 'plumbing' through which fluids migrate into and out of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the sediment-water interface. Monitoring changes in this zone and linking them to coincident and perhaps consequent events at the seafloor and within the water column is the eventual goal of the Consortium. This mission includes investigations of the physical, chemical and biological components of the gas hydrate stability zone - the sea-floor/sediment-water interface, the near-sea-floor water column, and the shallow subsurface sediments. The eventual goal is to monitor changes in the hydrate stability zone over time. Establishment of the Consortium succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among those involved in gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Following extensive investigation into candidate sites, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) was chosen by consensus of the Consortium at their fall, 2004, meeting as the site most likely to satisfy all criteria established by the group. Much of the preliminary work preceding the establishment of the site - sensor development and testing, geophysical surveys, and laboratory studies - has been reported in agency documents including the Final Technical Report to DOE covering Cooperative Agreement DEFC26-00NT40920 and Semiannual Progress Reports for this award, DE-FC26-02NT41628. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in MC118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. SFO completion, now anticipated for 2009-10, has, therefore, been delayed. Although delays caused scheduling and deployment difficulties, many sensors and instruments were completed during this period. Software has been written that will accommodate the data that the station retrieves, when it begins to be delivered. In addition, new seismic data processing software has been written to treat the peculiar data to be received by the vertical line array (VLA) and additional software has been developed that will address the horizontal line array (HLA) data. These packages have been tested on data from the test deployments of the VLA and on data from other, similar, areas of the Gulf (in the case of the HLA software). During the life of this Cooperative Agreement (CA), the CMRET conducted many cruises. Early in the program these were executed primarily to survey potential sites and test sensors and equipment being developed for the SFO. When MC118 was established as the observatory site, subsequent cruises focused on this location. Beginning in 2005 and continuing to the present, 13 research cruises to MC118 have been conducted by the Consortium. During September, 2006, the Consortium was able to secure 8 days aboard the R/V Seward Johnson with submersible Johnson SeaLink, a critical chapter in the life of the Observatory project as important documentation, tests, recoveries and deployments were accomplished during this trip (log appended). Consortium members have participated materially in a number of additional cruises including several of the NIUST autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), Ea

J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas McGee; Carol Lutken

2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Space System Architecture: Final Report of SSPARC: the Space Systems, Policy, and Architecture Research Consortium (Thrust I and II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Space Systems, Policy and Architecture Research Consortium (SSPARC) was formed to make substantial progress on problems of national importance. The goals of SSPARC were to:

Hastings, Daniel

225

BIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microscope) Analytical Equipment High Performance Liquid Chromatography Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography Gas Chromatography GC/MS Elemental Analyser Molecular Biology Equipment Biorad PCR Machine reactor for scale up studies In-line Particle sizers Rheometers Separation tanks Oscillating column (4m

Greenaway, Alan

226

biology | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

biology biology Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a candidate material for...

227

JV Task 6 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCB utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP), which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCB performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 1998 to 2007 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCBs. CARRC topical reports were prepared on several completed tasks. Specific CARRC 1998B2007 accomplishments included: (1) Development of several ASTM International Standard Guides for CCB utilization applications. (2) Organization and presentation of training courses for CCB professionals and teachers. (3) Development of online resources including the Coal Ash Resource Center, Ash from Biomass in Coal (ABC) of cocombustion ash characteristics, and the Buyer's Guide to Coal-Ash Containing Products. In addition, development of expanded information on the environmental performance of CCBs in utilization settings included the following: (1) Development of information on physical properties and engineering performance for concrete, soil-ash blends, and other products. (2) Training of students through participation in CARRC research projects. (3) Participation in a variety of local, national, and international technical meetings, symposia, and conferences by presenting and publishing CCB-related papers.

Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Erick Zacher

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education From the SW Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the final expenditures for the INIE project during FY 08/09. (There were no expenditures during FY09/10 or during FY10/11.) To see the list of accomplishments done using the INIE funds, please see the reports included here. The last of the FY 07/08 funds were brought forward and used to complete two distance education modules teaching reactor experiments. These modules and parts from the modules are still being used and are being disseminated off-campus as a part of our distance education effort. The second largest expenditure was sending students to the ANS to present student papers on work that they had done the previous year underwritten by INIE funds. The remaining expenditures were IDC charges and minor travel expenses to give students a tour of a medical facility. Once again we wish to express of sincere appreciation of the INIE program and hope that the return on investment is appreciated by the DOE. Although INIE has come to a close, looking back at all the Consortium has accomplished is astounding. And, as was hoped, these funds have proved to be a springboard for continuing work, particularly at Texas A&M. With the resurgence of nuclear power, the utilities have realized that the nuclear workforce in the near future will be too small for the task of bringing dozens of new plants on line and have turned their attention to the URRs to help feed the workforce pipeline. The distance education modules developed at the A&M are soon to be broadcast throughout the country to help train a new generation of nuclear workers. Our students at the Nuclear Science Center at being snapped up by the nuclear power plants after graduating. Our research projects at A&M have all ended with new data, new ways of looking at old problems, and produced a covey of good students. I want to say 'Thanks' with utmost sincerity because without the INIE funds our efforts would yield a small fraction of the accomplishments you see in this report.

Warren Reece

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

229

JV Task 120 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') is the core coal combustion product (CCP) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCPs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCP utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program, which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCP performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 2007 to 2009 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCPs. The tasks were included in four categories: (1) Environmental Evaluations of CCPs; (2) Evaluation of Impacts on CCPs from Emission Controls; (3) Construction and Product-Related Activities; and (4) Technology Transfer and Maintenance Tasks. All tasks are designed to work toward achieving the CARRC overall goal and supporting objectives. The various tasks are coordinated in order to provide broad and useful technical data for CARRC members. Special projects provide an opportunity for non-CARRC members to sponsor specific research or technology transfer consistent with CARRC goals. This report covers CARRC activities from January 2007 through March 2009. These activities have been reported in CARRC Annual Reports and in member meetings over the past 2 years. CARRC continues to work with industry and various government agencies with its research, development, demonstration, and promotional activities nearing completion at the time of submission of this report. CARRC expects to continue its service to the coal ash industry in 2009 and beyond to work toward the common goal of advancing coal ash utilization by solving CCP-related technical issues and promoting the environmentally safe, technically sound, and economically viable management of these complex and changing materials.

Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Loreal Heebink; David Hassett; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher

2009-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

230

Abstract--This paper reports on work the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) has been  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract-- This paper reports on work the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions markets is: How The work described in this paper was coordinated by the Consortium for Electric. The work was funded by the Assistant Secretary of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Power

231

FACULTY EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF BIOLOGY Permanent Full-Time Position (Tenure-Track) Assistant Professor Starting mid-August 2014 REFER of Biology at Sonoma State University seeks applications from broadly trained biologists with teaching and research interests and expertise in molecular biology, for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position

Ravikumar, B.

232

Dr. Brian L. Wardle Director, Nano-Engineered Composite aerospace STructures (NECST) Consortium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are in the areas of nano-engineered advanced composites, bulk nanostructured materials, carbon-based material applications. Such hybrid advanced composites employ aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to enhance laminate Composite aerospace STructures (NECST) Consortium and has served as the materials/structures lead on MIT

Guiltinan, Mark

233

Microbial Corrosion in Linepipe Steel Under the Influence of a Sulfate-Reducing Consortium Isolated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbial Corrosion in Linepipe Steel Under the Influence of a Sulfate-Reducing Consortium Isolated) This work investigates microbiologically influenced corrosion of API 5L X52 linepipe steel by a sulfate the corrosion behavior. Through circuit modeling, EIS results were used to interpret the physicoelectric

234

University of Delaware -Tribology Laboratory Atlantic Advanced O shore Wind Energy Consortium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind Energy Consortium Assessing Tribological Aspects of Gearbox Reliability in Wind Turbines Prof for analysis by the group. Downtime hours accumulated from 2003 to 2007 for wind turbines in Germany #12. Instrument Lewes Turbine - Evaluate the loads on a large-scale turbine; Q4 D. Collect Turbine Data; Q4-8 E

Firestone, Jeremy

235

The Southern Ontario Smart Computing Consortium helps strengthen Canada's digital economy by providing a new innovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conservation and management through the application of advanced weather modeling and smart grid technologiesThe Southern Ontario Smart Computing Consortium helps strengthen Canada's digital economy by providing a new innovation framework that helps solve critical challenges facing our cities, environment

Denham, Graham

236

Genome Sequence of the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon The International Aphid Genomics Consortium"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genome Sequence of the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum The International Aphid Genomics Consortium we present the 464 Mb draft genome assembly of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. This first published whole genome sequence of a basal hemimetabolous insect provides an outgroup to the multiple

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

237

Short Communication A rapid selection strategy for an anodophilic consortium for microbial fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbial fuel cell (MFC) a b s t r a c t A rapid selection method was developed to enrich for a stable and efficient anodophilic consortium (AC) for microbial fuel cells (MFCs). A biofilm sample from a microbial. Introduction Current generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is dependent on the presence of exoelectrogenic

238

CAR 2 CAR Communication Consortium WG Workshop 3 -Wireless Aspects for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 CAR 2 CAR Communication Consortium WG Workshop 3 - Wireless Aspects for deployment StationIdentities Management MAC, IP addresses, Station ID, Driver ID, ... Shared with Security Layer (protects the identities... Forum 2011 Operational components Cross-layer Management Managing and sharing common parameters

Gesbert, David

239

Wireless Internet for The Mobile Enterprise Consortium http://winmec.ucla.edu/ WHITE PAPER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-WINMEC-2003-301-MOBILE-MULTIMEDIA-MW CONFIDENTIAL, Su, Prabhu, Chu and Gadh, UCLA-WINMEC-2003-301-MOBILE-Cheng Chu, Rajit Gadh Wireless Internet for the Mobile Enterprise Consortium (WINMEC) - wireless://winmec.ucla.edu/ WHITE PAPER UCLA-WINMEC-2003-301-MOBILE-MULTIMEDIA-MW CONFIDENTIAL, Su, Prabhu, Chu and Gadh, UCLA

California at Los Angeles, University of

240

Results from an array produced by the Consortium for Functional Glycomics. A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to provide internal controls. (Source: Consortium for Functional Glycomics) Sugar-Coated Proteins Though its, Counting Carbs: Glycomics Gears Up Alan Dove, PhD, Contributing Editor Drug Discovery & Development - March sugar modifications is the biochemical equivalent of an extreme sport, and much of the gear is still

Sasisekharan, Ram

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Cyberinfrastructure Development for the Western Consortium of Idaho, Nevada, and New Mexico Project Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cyberinfrastructure Development for the Western Consortium of Idaho, Nevada, and New Mexico Project natural resources, disturbance regimes, and the region's economies and citizens. In 2008, Idaho, Nevada of the scientific challenge and subsequent ramifications for science, education, and economic development Project

Walden, Von P.

242

A RESTful API for exchanging Materials Data in the AFLOWLIB.org consortium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A RESTful API for exchanging Materials Data in the AFLOWLIB.org consortium Richard H. Taylor1, an Application Program Interface (API) follow- ing REST principles is introduced for the AFLOWLIB.org materials through a RESTful API and a python library enabling ad-hoc ap- plications [17]. Other examples of online

Curtarolo, Stefano

243

Consortium for Robotics and Unmanned Systems Education and Research Captain Jeff Kline, USN (ret)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/SSG § Advanced Undersea Warfare Systems (AUWS) Warfare Innovation Workshop § Systems Engineering Analysis § Ux) Wargame Competition § Chair for Undersea Warfare FUNS Wargame ­ Mar 2011 AUWS ­ Dec 2010 #12;Consortium Aerial Vehicles (UAV) § LT Matthew Pawlenko § Self-propelled semi-submersibles [electronic resource

244

THE CONSORTIUM OF MANON ASSELIN ARCHITECTE + JODOIN LAMARRE PRATTE ARCHITECTES WIN THE MONTREAL MUSEUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS' ARCHITECTURAL COMPETITION TO DESIGN ITS NEW FIFTH PAVILION THIS NEW PAVILION, in the presence of Maka Kotto, Quebec's Ministre de la Culture et des Communications, the Montreal Museum of Fine Museums Day, Sunday, May 26, at the MMFA. "With the consortium of Manon Asselin Architecte and Jodoin

Barthelat, Francois

245

The Pacific Northwest Consortium (PNC) CAT in Sector 20:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 andThe Molecular Bond:EnvironmentalThe TakeatThe!

246

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The group is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently received increased attention and the group of researchers working on the station has expanded to include several microbial biologists. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments are planned for fall 2005 and center about the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles. The subs will be used to effect bottom surveys, emplace sensors and sea floor experiments and make connections between sensor data loggers and the integrated data power unit (IDP). Station/observatory completion is anticipated for 2007 following the construction, testing and deployment of the horizontal line arrays, not yet funded. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

New York Nano-Bio Molecular Information Technology (NYNBIT) Incubator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project presents the outcome of an effort made by a consortium of six universities in the State of New York to develop a Center for Advanced technology (CAT) in the emerging field of Nano-Bio-Molecular Information Technology. The effort consists of activities such as organization of the NYNBIT incubator, collaborative research projects, development of courses, an educational program for high schools, and commercial start-up programs.

Das, Digendra K

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

248

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has already succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. As funding for this project, scheduled to commence December 1, 2002, had only been in place for less than half of the reporting period, project progress has been less than for other reporting periods. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made and several cruises are planned for the summer/fall of 2003 to test equipment, techniques and compatibility of systems. En route to reaching the primary goal of the Consortium, the establishment of a monitoring station on the sea floor, the following achievements have been made: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, Incorporation of capability to map the bottom location of the VLA, Improvements in timing issues for data recording. (2) Sea Floor Probe: The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed; The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments. (3) Electromagnetic bubble detector and counter: Initial tests performed with standard conductivity sensors detected nonconductive objects as small as .6mm, a very encouraging result, Components for the prototype are being assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed. (4) Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate; these measurements will be used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station; A scattering system and bubble-producing device, being assembled at USM, will be tested in the next two months, and the results compared to a physical scattering model. (5) Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: Progress has been made toward minimizing system maintenance through increased capacity and operational longevity, Miniaturization of many components of the sensor systems has been completed, A software package has been designed especially for the MIR sensor data evaluation, Custom electronics have been developed that reduce power consumption and, therefore, increase the length of time the system can remain operational. (6) Seismo-acoustic characterization of sea floor properties and processes at the hydrate monitoring station. (7) Adaptation of the acoustic-logging device, developed as part of the European Union-funded research project, Sub-Gate, for monitoring temporal variations in seabe

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Distribution and localization of microsatellites in the Perigord black truffle genome and identification of new molecular markers (2010) Fungal Genetics and Biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The level of genetic diversity and genetic structure in the Perigord black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.) has been debated for several years, mainly due to the lack of appropriate genetic markers. Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are important for the genome organisation, phenotypic diversity and are one of the most popular molecular markers. In this study, we surveyed the T. melanosporum genome (1) to characterise its SSR pattern; (2) to compare it with SSR patterns found in 48 other fungal and three oomycetes genomes and (3) to identify new polymorphic SSR markers for population genetics. The T. melanosporum genome is rich in SSRs with 22,425 SSRs with mono-nucleotides being the most frequent motifs. SSRs were found in all genomic regions although they are more frequent in non-coding regions (introns and intergenic regions). Sixty out of 135 PCR-amplified mono-, di-, tri-, tetra, penta, and hexanucleotides were polymorphic (44%) within black truffle populations and 27 were randomly selected and analysed on 139 T. melanosporum isolates from France, Italy and Spain. The number of alleles varied from 2 to 18 and the expected heterozygosity from 0.124 to 0.815. One hundred and thirty-two different multilocus genotypes out of the 139 T. melanosporum isolates were identified and the genotypic diversity was high (0.999). Polymorphic SSRs were found in UTR regulatory regions of fruiting bodies and ectomycorrhiza regulated genes, suggesting that they may play a role in phenotypic variation. In conclusion, SSRs developed in this study were highly polymorphic and our results showed that T. melanosporum is a species with an important genetic diversity, which is in agreement with its recently uncovered heterothallic mating system.

Murat, Claude [INRA, Nancy, France; Riccioni, C [INRA, Nancy, France; Belfiori, B [INRA, Nancy, France; Cichocki, N [INRA, Nancy, France; Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL; Morin, Emmanuelle [INRA, Nancy, France; Tisserant, Emilie [INRA, Nancy, France; Paolocci, F [INRA, Nancy, France; Rubini, A [INRA, Nancy, France; Martin, Francis [INRA, Nancy, France

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

E-Print Network 3.0 - aflp molecular markers Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plant Molecular Biology... . A high resolution map of the R1 locus on chromosome V of potato based on RFLP and AFLP markers. Molecular... cremnophylax var. ... Source: Fetzner...

251

Biology Undergraduate Scholarships Deadline: Noon, April 5 (Thur.) 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biology Undergraduate Scholarships Deadline: Noon, April 5 (Thur.) 2012 The Department of Biology will be awarded in the amount of $1000/each to a BS degree candidate in any major in biology. One Kuby-Hensill Scholarship will be awarded in the amount of $1000 to a BS degree candidate in Cell and Molecular Biology

252

Biology Undergraduate Scholarships Deadline: Noon, April 4 (Thur.) 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biology Undergraduate Scholarships Deadline: Noon, April 4 (Thur.) 2013 The Department of Biology will be awarded in the amount of $1000/each to a BS degree candidate in any major in biology. One Kuby-Hensill Scholarship will be awarded in the amount of $1000 to a BS degree candidate in Cell and Molecular Biology

253

Standards in Genomic Science: An Open-Access Journal of the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC8 Meeting)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

George Garrity of Michigan State University talks about the GSC's open-access journal SIGS at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009.

Garrity, George

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

254

Wireless Internet for The Mobile Enterprise Consortium http://winmec.ucla.edu/ TECHNICAL REPORT/WHITE PAPER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, COMMUNICATIONS AND APPLICATIONS (TOMCCAP) CONFIDENTIAL, Su, Prabhu, Chu and Gadh, UCLA-WINMEC-2005-201-SVG Gadh UCLA Wireless Internet for Mobile Enterprise Consortium (WINMEC) This research investigates, Prabhu, Chu and Gadh, UCLA-WIN

California at Los Angeles, University of

255

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology and Waste Management Consortium annual report, 1990--1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HBCU/MI Environmental Technology and Waste Management Consortium was established in January 1990, through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) among the member institutions. This group of research-oriented Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions (HBCU/MI) agreed to work together to initiate research, technology development and education programs to address the nation`s critical environmental problems. As a group the HBCU/MI Consortium is uniquely positioned to reach women and the minority populations of African Americans, Hispanics and American Indians. As part of their initial work, they developed the Research, Education, and Technology Transfer (RETT) Plan to actualize the Consortium`s guiding principles. In addition to developing a comprehensive research agenda, four major programs were begun to meet these goals. This report summarizes the 1990--1991 progress.

NONE

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Ohio Coal Research Consortium fifth year final reports summary, September 1, 1994--February 29, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of its efforts to improve the use of high-sulfur Ohio coal within environmental limits, the Ohio Coal Development Office, an entity within the Ohio Department of Development (OCDO/ODOD), in late 1988 established a consortium of four Ohio universities. The purpose of the Ohio Coal Research Consortium is to conduct a multi-year fundamental research programs focused on: (1) the enhancement or development of dry sorption processes for the economical removal of high levels of SO{sub 2} and other pollutants, and (2) an increased understanding of methods for reduction in air toxics emissions from combustion gases produced by burning high-sulfur Ohio coal. This report contains summaries of eleven studies in these areas.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium. Technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium has been established to help U.S. Coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. In keeping with the recommendations of the Advisory Committee, first-year R&D activities are focused on two areas of research: fine coal dewatering and modeling of spirals. The industry representatives to the Consortium identified fine coal dewatering as the most needed area of technology development. Dewatering studies are conducted by Virginia Tech`s Center for Coal and Minerals Processing. A spiral model will be developed by West Virginia University. The research to be performed by the University of Kentucky has recently been defined as: A Study of Novel Approaches for Destabilization of Flotation Froth. Accomplishments to date of these three projects are presented in this report.

NONE

1996-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

258

Ohio Coal Research Consortium fourth year final summary report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a part of its efforts to improve the use of high-sulfur Ohio coal within environmental limits, the Ohio Coal Development Office, an entity within the Ohio Department of Development (OCDO/ODOD), in late 1988 established a consortium of four Ohio universities. The purpose of the Ohio Coal Research Consortium is to conduct a multi-year fundamental research program focused on (1) the enhancement or development of dry sorption processes for the economical removal of high levels of SO{sub 2} and other pollutants and (2) an increased understanding of methods for reduction in air toxics emissions from combustion gases produced by burning high-sulfur Ohio coal. This report contains summaries of twelve studies in these areas.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Biological Safety  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE's Biological Safety Program provides a forum for the exchange of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of biological safety. This content is supported by the Biosurety Executive Team. The Biosurety Executive Team is a DOE-chartered group. The DOE Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy provides administrative support for this group. The group identifies biological safety-related issues of concern to the DOE and pursues solutions to issues identified.

260

EMSL - biology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

biology en Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmagnesium-behavior-and-structural-defects-mg...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Biological Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological Processing and Manufacturing The bioloical processing and manufacturing research being performed at the Idaho National Laboratory is primarily focused on using...

262

www.cambridge.org/us/9780521194280 Molecular Machines in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.cambridge.org/us/9780521194280 Molecular Machines in Biology Workshop of the Cell Joachim Frank Columbia University, New York About the Book The concept of molecular machines in biology has transformed, translation, protein folding, and protein degradation, are all carried out by molecular machines. This volume

Grishok, Alla

263

THE PLANT BIOLOGY SEMINAR Molecular Plant Biology, Department of Biochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biofuel production Mikro (Kiinamyllynkatu 13) 22.01.2014 Eevi Rintamki Thioredoxin networks) 12.03.2014 Pauli Kallio Recent advances in bioenergy research Arje Scheinin sali (Den

Wahlberg, Niklas

264

Method for in situ biological conversion of coal to methane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are provided for the in situ biological conversion of coal to methane comprising culturing on a coal-containing substrate a consortium of microorganisms capable of degrading the coal into methane under suitable conditions. This consortium of microorganisms can be obtained from an underground cavity such as an abandoned mine which underwent a change from being supplied with sewage to where no sewage was present, since these conditions have favored the development of microorganisms capable of using coal as a carbon source and converting coal to methane. The consortium of microorganisms obtained from such abandoned coal mines can be isolated and introduced to hard-to-reach coal-containing substrates which lack such microorganisms and which would otherwise remain unrecoverable. The present invention comprises a significant advantage in that useable energy can be obtained from a number of abandoned mine sites or other areas wherein coal is no longer being recovered, and such energy can be obtained in a safe, efficient, and inexpensive manner.

Volkwein, Jon C. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Ninth International Workshop on Plant Membrane Biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of abstracts from papers which were discussed at a workshop on plant membrane biology. Topics include: plasma membrane ATP-ases; plant-environment interactions, membrane receptors; signal transduction; ion channel physiology; biophysics and molecular biology; vaculor H+ pumps; sugar carriers; membrane transport; and cellular structure and function.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology ] (  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model of ischemic stroke with stress on spreading depressions G. Chapuisata,d,?, M.A. Dronneb,c,d , E establish a new global phenomenological model of ischemic stroke. It takes into account local ischemia reserved. Keywords: Modelling; Ischemic stroke; Spreading depression; Parameters value Contents 1

Chapuisat, Guillemette

267

MOLEKYLR CELLBIOLOGI KMB050 Molecular Cell Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

samband med metabolismen belyses energiproduktion genom respiration samt fotosyntesen. Laborationskursen

268

Molecular Biology DNA: The Genetic Macromolecule  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(LB-A) 2 LB/amicillin/arabinose plates (LB-A-A) #12;1 tube transformation solution (CaCl2) 1 tube LB

269

Molecular Biology Building North Lobby Entrance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Facilities MBB 1.420 and 1.426 Cryostat North Refrigerators/Freezers Sample Drop off Light Scopes(1) Night

Ben-Yakar, Adela

270

CSMB | Center for Structural Molecular Biology | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASL Symposium: CelebratingMission WelcomeforCSMB Capabilities

271

Quantum physics meets biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum physics and biology have long been regarded as unrelated disciplines, describing nature at the inanimate microlevel on the one hand and living species on the other hand. Over the last decades the life sciences have succeeded in providing ever more and refined explanations of macroscopic phenomena that were based on an improved understanding of molecular structures and mechanisms. Simultaneously, quantum physics, originally rooted in a world view of quantum coherences, entanglement and other non-classical effects, has been heading towards systems of increasing complexity. The present perspective article shall serve as a pedestrian guide to the growing interconnections between the two fields. We recapitulate the generic and sometimes unintuitive characteristics of quantum physics and point to a number of applications in the life sciences. We discuss our criteria for a future quantum biology, its current status, recent experimental progress and also the restrictions that nature imposes on bold extrapolations of quantum theory to macroscopic phenomena.

Markus Arndt; Thomas Juffmann; Vlatko Vedral

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

BE.462J Molecular Principles of Biomaterials, Spring 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis and design at a molecular scale of materials used in contact with biological systems, including biotechnology and biomedical engineering. Topics include molecular interactions between bio- and synthetic molecules ...

Irvine, Darrell J.

273

A unified model of electroporation and molecular transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological membranes form transient, conductive pores in response to elevated transmembrane voltage, a phenomenon termed electroporation. These pores facilitate electrical and molecular transport across cell membranes that ...

Smith, Kyle Christopher

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report 1994--1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HBCU/MI ET Consortium was established in January 1990, through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) among its member institutions. This group of research oriented Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions (HBCU/MIs) agreed to work together to initiate or revise education programs, develop research partnerships with public and private sector organizations, and promote technology development to address the nation`s critical environmental contamination problems. The Consortium`s Research, Education and Technology Transfer (RETT) Plan became the working agenda. The Consortium is a resource for collaboration among the member institutions and with federal an state agencies, national and federal laboratories, industries, (including small businesses), majority universities, and two and four-year technical colleges. As a group of 17 institutions geographically located in the southern US, the Consortium is well positioned to reach a diverse group of women and minority populations of African Americans, Hispanics and American Indians. This Report provides a status update on activities and achievements in environmental curriculum development, outreach at the K--12 level, undergraduate and graduate education, research and development, and technology transfer.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. A year into the life of this cooperative agreement, we note the following achievements: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (A) Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, (B) Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, (C) Adaptation of SDI's Angulate program to use acoustic slant ranges and DGPS data to compute and map the bottom location of the vertical array, (D) Progress in T''0'' delay and timing issues for improved control in data recording, (E) Successful deployment and recovery of the VLA twice during an October, 2003 cruise, once in 830m water, once in 1305m water, (F) Data collection and recovery from the DATS data logger, (G) Sufficient energy supply and normal functioning of the pressure compensated battery even following recharge after the first deployment, (H) Survival of the acoustic modem following both deployments though it was found to have developed a slow leak through the transducer following the second deployment due, presumably, to deployment in excess of 300m beyond its rating. (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (A) The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed, (B) The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments, (C) The MPS has been adapted to serve as an energy source for both p- and s-wave studies at the station as well as to deploy the horizontal line arrays and the SFP. (3) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (A) Components for the prototype have been assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed, (B) The prototype has been constructed and preliminary data collected, (C) The construction of the field system is underway. (4) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (A) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate. These measurements have been used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station, (B) Laboratory tests performed using the project prototype have produced a conductivity data set that is being used to refine parameters of the field model. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (A) Preliminary designs of mounting pieces for electrical components of ''sphereIR'' have been completed using AutoCAD software, (B) The preliminary design of an electronics baseplate has been completed and aided in the optimization of

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements six months into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Analysis and repair attempts of the VLA used in the deep water deployment during October 2003 have been completed; Definition of an interface protocol for the VLA DATS to the SFO has been established; Design modifications to allow integration of the VLA to the SFO have been made; Experience gained in the deployments of the first VLA is being applied to the design of the next VLAs; One of the two planned new VLAs being modified to serve as an Oceanographic Line Array (OLA). (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: The decision to replace the Sea Floor Probe technology with the borehole emplacement of a geophysical array was reversed due to the 1300m water depth at the JIP selected borehole site. The SFP concept has been revisited as a deployment technique for the subsea floor array; The SFP has been redesigned to include gravity driven emplacement of an array up to 10m into the shallow subsurface of the sea floor. (3) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been analyzed for effects of currents and temperature changes; Several acoustic monitoring system concepts have been evaluated for their appropriateness to MC118, i.e., on the deep sea floor; A mock-up system was built but was rejected as too impractical for deployment on the sea floor. (4) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: The initial Inductive Conductivity Cell has been constructed from components acquired during the previous reporting period; Laboratory tests involving measuring bubble volume as a component of conductivity have been performed; The laboratory tests were performed in a closed system, under controlled conditions; the relationship between voltage and bubble volume appears to be linear. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: Designs and construction schematics for all electronic mounting pieces and an electronics system baseplate were finalized after extensive modeling to facilitate the successful fabrication and implementation of electronic components into the deep-sea, glass instrument housing; Construction schematics and fabrication of an electronics system baseplate have been completed with successful integration of all currently fabricated electronic mounting pieces; Modeling and design of an optics platform complementary to the constructed electronics platform for successful incorporation into ''sphereIR'' has commenced; A second generation chemometric data evaluation software package for evaluating complex spectra including corrections for baseline drifts and spectral anomalies resulting from matrix substances has been developed and will be incorporated into an optimized ''deepSniff'' program upon c

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The primary objective of the group has been to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently achieved reality via the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology's (NIUST) solicitation for proposals for research to be conducted at the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, have had to be postponed and the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles sacrificed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort is being made to locate and retain the services of a replacement vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in the previous report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

278

The Solar Energy Consortium of New York Photovoltaic Research and Development Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project Objective: To lead New York State to increase its usage of solar electric systems. The expected outcome is that appropriate technologies will be made available which in turn will help to eliminate barriers to solar energy usage in New York State. Background: The Solar Energy Consortium has been created to lead New York State research on solar systems specifically directed at doubling the efficiency, halving the cost and reducing the cost of installation as well as developing unique form factors for the New York City urban environment.

Klein, Petra M.

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

BIOLOGY MINOR WORKSHEET REQUIRED BIOLOGY COURSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY MINOR WORKSHEET 2008-2013 REQUIRED BIOLOGY COURSES: BIOL 115N General Biology I 4 ________ BIOL 116N General Biology II 4 ________ Upon completion of BIOL 115N and BIOL 116N, the Biology Minor requires the successful completion of a minimum of 12 credit-hours of Biology coursework at the advanced

280

The BioASP Library: ASP Solutions for Systems Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The BioASP Library: ASP Solutions for Systems Biology Martin Gebser, Arne K¨onig, Torsten Schaub--Today's molecular biology is confronted with enor- mous amounts of data, generated by new high-throughput tech- nologies, along with an increasing number of biological models available over web repositories. This poses

Schaub, Torsten

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

MArinE Biology School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MArinE Biology School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences Graduate Program in Marine Sciences Requirements for Degrees: MS: 30 credits; PhD: 18 thesis credits The marine biology graduate program focuses on the ecology, physiology and biochemistry/molecular biology of marine organisms. Students may pursue either

Hartman, Chris

282

CONSORTIUM MODEL  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top FiveDepartment of EnergyLANDSCAPE OF LOCAL ENERGY(Expenditure-Based)

283

CONSORTIUM MODEL  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top FiveDepartment of EnergyLANDSCAPE OF LOCAL ENERGY(Expenditure-Based) (Fixed

284

CONSORTIUM MODEL  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top FiveDepartment of EnergyLANDSCAPE OF LOCAL ENERGY(Expenditure-Based) (Fixed

285

CONSORTIUM MODEL  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top FiveDepartment of EnergyLANDSCAPE OF LOCAL ENERGY(Expenditure-Based)

286

The Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1990--1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February, 1990, the Secretary of Energy, James Watkins approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) . This program known by the acronym, WERC'' includes NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT), the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Sandia National Laboratories. The program is designed to provide an integrated approach to the national need via the following: (1) Education in waste management by the Consortium universities resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. The term waste management is used in a broad sense throughout this paper and includes all aspects of environmental management and environmental restoration. (2) Research programs at the leading edge, providing training to faculty and students and feeding into the education programs. (3) Education and research at the campuses, as well as from three field sites. (4) Ties with other multi-disciplinary university facilities. (5) Ties with two National Laboratories located in New Mexico. (6) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a proposed satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (7) An outreach program to interest others in environmental management, especially precollege students, minority students and practitioners in the field. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the first year.

None

1991-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

287

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements one year into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (1a) Repair attempts of the VLA cable damaged in the October >1000m water depth deployment failed; a new design has been tested successfully. (1b) The acoustic modem damaged in the October deployment was repaired successfully. (1c) Additional acoustic modems with greater depth rating and the appropriate surface communications units have been purchased. (1d) The VLA computer system is being modified for real time communications to the surface vessel using radio telemetry and fiber optic cable. (1e) Positioning sensors--including compass and tilt sensors--were completed and tested. (1f) One of the VLAs has been redesigned to collect near sea floor geochemical data. (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (2a) With the Consortium's decision to divorce its activities from those of the Joint Industries Program (JIP), due to the JIP's selection of a site in 1300m of water, the Sea Floor Probe (SFP) system was revived as a means to emplace arrays in the shallow subsurface until arrangements can be made for boreholes at >1000m water depth. (2b) The SFP penetrometer has been designed and construction begun. (2c) The SFP geophysical and pore-fluid probes have been designed. (3) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (3a) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been analyzed for effects of currents and temperature changes. (3b) Several acoustic monitoring system concepts have been evaluated for their appropriateness to MC118, i.e., on the deep sea floor. (3c) A mock-up system was built but was rejected as too impractical for deployment on the sea floor. (4) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (4a) Laboratory tests were performed using bubbles of different sizes in waters of different salinities to test the sensitivity of the. Differences were detected satisfactorily. (4b) The system was field tested, first at the dock and then at the shallow water test site at Cape Lookout Bight where methane bubbles from the sea floor, naturally, in 10m water depth. The system successfully detected peaks in bubbling as spike decreases in conductivity. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (5a) Modeling and design of an optics platform complementary to the constructed electronics platform for successful incorporation into ''sphereIR'' continues. AutoCAD design and manual construction of mounting pieces for major optical components have been completed. (5b) Initial design concepts for IR-ATR sensor probe geometries have been established and evaluated. Initial evaluations of a horizontal ATR (HATR) sensing probe with fiber optic guiding light have been performed and validate the design concept as a potentially viable deep sea sensing pr

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Magnetismo Molecular (Molecular Magentism)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new synthesis processes in chemistry open a new world of research, new and surprising materials never before found in nature can now be synthesized and, as a wonderful result, observed a series of physical phenomena never before imagined. Among these are many new materials the molecular magnets, the subject of this book and magnetic properties that are often reflections of the quantum behavior of these materials. Aside from the wonderful experience of exploring something new, the theoretical models that describe the behavior these magnetic materials are, in most cases, soluble analytically, which allows us to know in detail the physical mechanisms governing these materials. Still, the academic interest in parallel this subject, these materials have a number of properties that are promising to be used in technological devices, such as in computers quantum magnetic recording, magnetocaloric effect, spintronics and many other devices. This volume will journey through the world of molecular magnets, from the structural description of these materials to state of the art research.

Reis, Mario S [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brasil; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F [ORNL

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Systems biology approach to bioremediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bioremediation has historically been approached as a ?black box? in terms of our fundamental understanding. Thus it succeeds and fails, seldom without a complete understanding of why. Systems biology is an integrated research approach to study complex biological systems, by investigating interactions and networks at the molecular, cellular, community, and ecosystem level. The knowledge of these interactions within individual components is fundamental to understanding the dynamics of the ecosystem under investigation. Understanding and modeling functional microbial community structure and stress responses in environments at all levels have tremendous implications for our fundamental understanding of hydrobiogeochemical processes and the potential for making bioremediation breakthroughs and illuminating the ?black box?.

Chakraborty, R.; Wu, C. H.; Hazen, T. C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

First Passage Problems in Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applications of first passage times in stochastic processes arise across a wide range of length and time scales in biological settings. After an initial technical overview, we survey representative applications and their corresponding models. Within models that are effectively Markovian, we discuss canonical examples of first passage problems spanning applications to molecular dissociation and self-assembly, molecular search, transcription and translation, neuronal spiking, cellular mutation and disease, and organismic evolution and population dynamics. In this last application, a simple model for stem-cell ageing is presented and some results derived. Various approximation methods and the physical and mathematical subtleties that arise in the chosen applications are also discussed.

Tom Chou; Maria R. D'Orsogna

2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

291

Biology reflective assessment curriculum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Penick, J. E. (1998). Biology: A community context. Newof a standards-based high school biology curriculum.The American Biology Teacher Li, J. , Klahr, D. , & Siler,

Bayley, Cheryl Ann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

European Political Science Review, page 1 of 26 & European Consortium for Political Research doi:10.1017/S1755773911000282  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

European Political Science Review, page 1 of 26 & European Consortium for Political Research doi:10 competition J A N R O V N Y * Center for European Research, Department of Political Science, University that political parties have varying strategic stakes in different political issues, the article considers

Boyer, Edmond

293

Digital Gas Joins Asian Waste-to-Energy Consortium: To Eliminate Coal as a Power Plant Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy's patented technology produces a clean-burning by-product from the widest variety of processed-efficient technology represented by the coal-substitute technology. The same technology will be deployed by DIGGDigital Gas Joins Asian Waste-to-Energy Consortium: To Eliminate Coal as a Power Plant Fuel Digital

Columbia University

294

Wireless Internet for The Mobile Enterprise Consortium http://winmec.ucla.edu/ TECHNICAL REPORT/WHITE PAPER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/WHITE PAPER UCLA-WINMEC-2005-110-CONTENT SUBMITTED TO WIRELESSCOM2005 CONFIDENTIAL, Su, Prabhu, Chu and Gadh Engineering Computing Xiaoyong Su, B.S. Prabhu, Chi-Cheng Chu, Rajit Gadh UCLA Wireless Internet for Mobile Enterprise Consortium (WINMEC) 420 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 x.y.su, bsp, cchu, gadh

California at Los Angeles, University of

295

Wireless Internet for The Mobile Enterprise Consortium http://winmec.ucla.edu/ TECHNICAL REPORT/WHITE PAPER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/WHITE PAPER UCLA-WINMEC-2003-303-MOBILE_MULTIMEDIA-ENTERPRISE CONFIDENTIAL, Su, Prabhu and Gadh, UCLA (MobIME) Xiaoyong Su, B. S. Prabhu, Rajit Gadh Wireless Internet for the Mobile Enterprise Consortium and Gadh, UCLA-WINMEC-2003-303-MOBILE-MULTIMEDIA- ENTERPRISE, December 2003. PCA device [2]. CC/PP is very

California at Los Angeles, University of

296

Vehicle Technologies Office 2013 Merit Review: A University Consortium on Efficient and Clean High-Pressure, Lean Burn (HPLB) Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A presentation given by the University of Michigan at the 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about a university consortium to research efficient and clean high-pressure lean burn engines.

297

Selective enrichment of a methanol-utilizing consortium using pulp & paper mill waste streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient utilization of carbon inputs is critical to the economic viability of the current forest products sector. Input carbon losses occur in various locations within a pulp mill, including losses as volatile organics and wastewater . Opportunities exist to capture this carbon in the form of value-added products such as biodegradable polymers. Waste activated sludge from a pulp mill wastewater facility was enriched for 80 days for a methanol-utilizing consortium with the goal of using this consortium to produce biopolymers from methanol-rich pulp mill waste streams. Five enrichment conditions were utilized: three high-methanol streams from the kraft mill foul condensate system, one methanol-amended stream from the mill wastewater plant, and one methanol-only enrichment. Enrichment reactors were operated aerobically in sequencing batch mode at neutral pH and 25C with a hydraulic residence time and a solids retention time of four days. Non-enriched waste activated sludge did not consume methanol or reduce chemical oxygen demand. With enrichment, however, the chemical oxygen demand reduction over 24 hour feed/decant cycles ranged from 79 to 89 %, and methanol concentrations dropped below method detection limits. Neither the non-enriched waste activated sludge nor any of the enrichment cultures accumulated polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) under conditions of nitrogen sufficiency. Similarly, the non-enriched waste activated sludge did not accumulate PHAs under nitrogen limited conditions. By contrast, enriched cultures accumulated PHAs to nearly 14% on a dry weight basis under nitrogen limited conditions. This indicates that selectively-enriched pulp mill waste activated sludge can serve as an inoculum for PHA production from methanol-rich pulp mill effluents.

Gregory R. Mockos; William A. Smith; Frank J. Loge; David N. Thompson

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Fishery Biology Graduate Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fishery Biology Graduate Programs University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska 997750820 Program: Fisheries Biology, Marine Biology, Oceanography http://www.sfos.uaf.edu:8000/academics State University Fort Collins, Colorado 805230015 Programs: Fishery Biology http

299

Bioinformatics & Computational Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioinformatics & Computational Biology Master of Science in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (90 ECTS) Contact Information Programme administration Bioinformatics and Computational Biology.unifr.ch/msc Programme administration Bioinformatics and Computational Biology University of Bern Baltzerstrasse 6 CH

Richner, Heinz

300

The Biology of You  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Merced majoring in Human Biology with a minor in Creativeschool in the future. the biology of you 137 UC Merced

Inneh, Joy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Biological Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScienceCareers Apply for aCouldBiofuelHelp TableBiological

302

Biological Evaluation  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (AprilBiden Says U.S. Will LeadOverviewEnergy mythBiological

303

Structure and mechanics of the spasmoneme, a biological spring within the protozoan Vorticella convallaria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular springs have recently emerged as the basis for the fastest and most powerful movements at the cellular level in biology. The spasmoneme of the protozoan, Vorticella convallaria, is a model molecular spring, relying ...

France, Danielle Cook

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Molecular Architecture of the 40S,eIF1,eIF3 Translation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, ETH Zurich, Otto-Stern-Weg 5, 8093 Zurich, Switzerland 2Department of Biology, Institute of Molecular Systems Biology, ETH Zurich, Auguste-Piccard-Hof 1, 8093 Zurich, University of Zurich, 8006 Zurich, Switzerland 5Co-first authors *Correspondence: jan

Sali, Andrej

305

BS in MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (285125) MAP Sheet Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

General College Chemistry Chem 107 General College Chem Laboratory Chem 351 Organic Chemistry Chem 352 Organic Chemistry Chem 353 Organic Chemistry Lab Chem 481 Biochemistry 1 Complete the following physics Foundation Book of Mormon New Testament Doctrine and Covenants The Individual and Society Citizenship

Olsen Jr., Dan R.

306

BS in MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (285125) MAP Sheet Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry Chem 106 General College Chemistry Chem 107 General College Chem Laboratory Chem 351 Organic Chemistry Chem 352 Organic Chemistry Chem 353 Organic Chemistry Lab Chem 481 Biochemistry 1 Complete Foundation Book of Mormon New Testament Doctrine and Covenants The Individual and Society Citizenship

Olsen Jr., Dan R.

307

E-Print Network 3.0 - arthritis consortium dataset Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Wisconsin at Madison Collection: Biology and Medicine 14 Cross Haplotype Sharing Statistic: Haplotype length based method for whole genome association testing Summary: a...

308

BE.440 Analysis of Biological Networks, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This class analyzes complex biological processes from the molecular, cellular, extracellular, and organ levels of hierarchy. Emphasis is placed on the basic biochemical and biophysical principles that govern these processes. ...

Essigmann, John

309

BSCI 338V Biology of Vision Spring 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of perspectives and will include topics from physics, molecular biology, sensory ecology, evolution, development TH Apr 22 23. Color perception and visual cortex Jacobs et al 2007 T Apr 27 24. Object recognition TH

Carleton, Karen L.

310

Micro/nanofabricated environments for synthetic biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A better understanding of how confinement, crowding and reduced dimensionality modulate reactivity and reaction dynamics will aid in the rational and systematic discovery of functionality in complex biological systems. Artificial micro- and nanofabricated structures have helped elucidate the effects of nanoscale spatial confinement and segregation on biological behavior, particularly when integrated with microfluidics, through precise control in both space and time of diffusible signals and binding interactions. Examples of nanostructured interfaces for synthetic biology include the development of cell-like compartments for encapsulating biochemical reactions, nanostructured environments for fundamental studies of diffusion, molecular transport and biochemical reaction kinetics, and regulation of biomolecular interactions as functions of micro- and nanofabricated topological constraints.

Collier, Pat [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

315

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

The Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering will be host-ing our 6th annual consortium meeting on August 16-18, 2006. We  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as well as refereed technical publications in reputable scien- tific journals. Our strength lies in yet collaboration with consortium members through summer intern- ships and new in-house application projects. Our

Texas at Austin, University of

317

Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells PART 2 OF 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energys Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industrydriven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings dedicated to technology transfer to showcase and review SWC-funded technology. The workshops were open to the stripper well industry.

Morrison, Joel

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells PART 1 OF 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energys Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industrydriven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings dedicated to technology transfer to showcase and review SWC-funded technology. The workshops were open to the stripper well industry.

Morrison, Joel

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells PART 3 OF 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energys Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industrydriven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings dedicated to technology transfer to showcase and review SWC-funded technology. The workshops were open to the stripper well industry.

Morrison, Joel

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the seventeenth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) organizing and hosting the SWC fall technology transfer meetings in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma and State College, Pennsylvania, (2) planning of the upcoming SWC spring proposal meeting, (3) release of the SWC Request-for-proposals (RFP), (4) revision of the SWC By-Laws, and (5) the SWC Executive Council nomination and election for 2005-2006 term members.

Joel L. Morrison

2005-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Establishment of an Industry-Driven Consortium Focused on Improving the Production Performance of Domestic Stripper Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the seventh quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) Nomination and election of the Executive Council members for the 2006-07 term, (2) Finalize and release the 2006 Request for Proposals (RFP), (3) Invoice and recruit members, (4) Plan for the spring meeting, (5) Improving communication efforts, and (6) Continue distribution of the DVD entitled: ''Independent Oil: Rediscovering American's Forgotten Wells''.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

322

ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the US petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the four quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. During this reporting period, Penn State primary focus was on finalizing all subcontracts, planning the SWC technology transfer meeting and two workshops in the southern US, and preparing the next SWC newsletter. Membership in the SWC now stands at 49.

Joel L. Morrison

2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

323

ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the eighth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) issuing subcontracts, (2) SWC membership class expansion, (3) planning SWC technology transfer meetings, and (4) extending selected 2001 project periods of performance. In addition, a literature search that focuses on the use of lasers, microwaves, and acoustics for potential stripper well applications continued.

Joel L. Morrison

2002-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

324

ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the ninth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) organizing and hosting two fall technology transfer meetings, (2) SWC membership class expansion, and (3) planning the SWC 2003 Spring meeting. In addition, a literature search that focuses on the use of lasers, microwaves, and acoustics for potential stripper well applications continued.

Joel L. Morrison

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

325

Establishment of an Industry-Driven Consortium Focused on Improving the Production Performance of Domestic Stripper Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the sixth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Organized and hosted two technology transfer meetings; (2) Collaborated with the Pennsylvania Oil and Gas Association (POGAM) to host a Natural Gas Outlook conference in Pittsburgh, PA; (3) Provided a SWC presentation at the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) meeting in Jackson Hole, WY; and (4) Completed and released a stripper well industry documentary entitled: ''Independent Oil: Rediscovering America's Forgotten Wells''.

Joel Morrison; Sharon Elder

2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

326

Establishment of an Industry-Driven Consortium Focused on Improving the Production Performance of Domestic Stripper Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the eighth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in State College, PA to review and select projects for SWC co-funding; (2) Participation in the 2006 PA CleanEnergy Expo Energy Theater to air the DVD on ''Independent Oil: Rediscovering American's Forgotten Wells''; (3) New member additions; (4) Improving communications; and (5) Planning of the fall technology meetings.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the thirteenth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) hosting three fall technology transfer meetings in Wyoming, Texas, and Pennsylvania, (2) releasing the 2004 SWC request-for-proposal (RFP), and (3) initial planning of the SWC spring meeting in Golden Colorado for selecting the 2004 SWC projects. The Fall technology transfer meetings attracted 100+ attendees between the three workshops. The SWC membership which attended the Casper, Wyoming workshop was able to see several SWC-funded projects operating in the field at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center. The SWC is nearing the end of its initial funding cycle. The Consortium has a solid membership foundation and a demonstrated ability to review and select projects that have relevancy to meet the needs of domestic stripper well operators.

Joel L. Morrison

2004-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

328

Industrial Consortium for the Utilization of the Geopressured-Geothermal Resource. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Geopressured-Geothermal Program, now in its fifteenth year, is entering the transition period to commercial use. The industry cost-shared proposals to the consortium, represented in the presentations included in these proceedings, attest to the interest developing in the industrial community in utilizing the geopressured-geothermal resource. Sixty-five participants attended these sessions, two-thirds of whom represented industry. The areas represented by cost-shared proposals include (1) thermal enhanced oil recovery, (2) direct process use of thermal energy, e.g., aquaculture and agriculture, (3) conversion of thermal energy to electricity, (4) environment related technologies, e.g., use of supercritical processes, and (5) operational proposals, e.g., a field manual for scale inhibitors. It is hoped that from this array of potential use projects, some will persist and be successful in proving the viability of using the geopressured-geothermal resource. Such industrial use of an alternative and relatively clean energy resource will benefit our nation and its people.

Negus-deWys, J. (ed.)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Industrial Consortium for the Utilization of the Geopressured-Geothermal Resource. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Geopressured-Geothermal Program, now in its fifteenth year, is entering the transition period to commercial use. The industry cost-shared proposals to the consortium, represented in the presentations included in these proceedings, attest to the interest developing in the industrial community in utilizing the geopressured-geothermal resource. Sixty-five participants attended these sessions, two-thirds of whom represented industry. The areas represented by cost-shared proposals include (1) thermal enhanced oil recovery, (2) direct process use of thermal energy, e.g., aquaculture and agriculture, (3) conversion of thermal energy to electricity, (4) environment related technologies, e.g., use of supercritical processes, and (5) operational proposals, e.g., a field manual for scale inhibitors. It is hoped that from this array of potential use projects, some will persist and be successful in proving the viability of using the geopressured-geothermal resource. Such industrial use of an alternative and relatively clean energy resource will benefit our nation and its people.

Negus-deWys, J. (ed.)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

A University Consortium on Low Temperature Combustion for High Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission Engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the University consortium was to investigate the fundamental processes that determine the practical boundaries of Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) engines and develop methods to extend those boundaries to improve the fuel economy of these engines, while operating with ultra low emissions. This work involved studies of thermal effects, thermal transients and engine management, internal mixing and stratification, and direct injection strategies for affecting combustion stability. This work also examined spark-assisted Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) and exhaust after-treatment so as to extend the range and maximize the benefit of Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI)/ Partially Premixed Compression Ignition (PPCI) operation. In summary the overall goals were: ? Investigate the fundamental processes that determine the practical boundaries of Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) engines. ? Develop methods to extend LTC boundaries to improve the fuel economy of HCCI engines fueled on gasoline and alternative blends, while operating with ultra low emissions. ? Investigate alternate fuels, ignition and after-treatment for LTC and Partially Premixed compression Ignition (PPCI) engines.

Dennis N. Assanis; Arvind Atreya; Jyh-Yuan Chen; Wai K. Cheng; Robert W. Dibble; Chris Edwards; Zoran S. Filipi; Christian Gerdes; Hong Im; George A. Lavoie; Margaret S. Wooldridge

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Indiana Advanced Electric Vehicle Training and Education Consortium (I-AEVtec)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Indiana Advanced Electric Vehicle Training and Education Consortium (I-AEVtec) is an educational partnership between six universities and colleges in Indiana focused on developing the education materials needed to support electric vehicle technology. The I-AEVtec has developed and delivered a number of degree and certificate programs that address various aspects of electric vehicle technology, including over 30 new or significantly modified courses to support these programs. These courses were shared on the SmartEnergyHub. The I-AEVtec program also had a significant outreach to the community with particular focus on K12 students. Finally, the evGrandPrix was established which is a university/college student electric go-kart race, where the students get hands-on experience in designing, building and racing electric vehicles. The evGrandPrix now includes student teams from across the US as well as from Europe and it is currently being held on Opening Day weekend for the Indy500 at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Caruthers, James; Dietz, J.; Pelter, Libby; Chen, Jie; Roberson, Glen; McGinn, Paul; Kizhanipuram, Vinodegopal

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Physics Meets Biology (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Summer Lecture Series 2006: If scientists could take advantage of the awesomely complex and beautiful functioning of biologys natural molecular machines, their potential for application in many disciplines would be incalculable. Nobel Laureate and Director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Steve Chu explores Possible solutions to global warming and its consequences.

Chu, Steve [Director, LBNL

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

333

Splicing bioinformatics to biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Splicing bioinformatics to biology Douglas L Black* andand Developmental Biology, University of Connecticut Health26 May 2006 Genome Biology 2006, 7:317 (doi:10.1186/gb-2006-

Black, Douglas L; Graveley, Brenton R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

E-Print Network 3.0 - associates molecular mechanisms Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Amount: 687,000 Aptamer-Mediated Sub-Molecular Modulation of Estrogen Receptor Activities More than half... . The biology and pharmacology of estrogen also rely on the...

335

E-Print Network 3.0 - all-atom molecular dynamics Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the presence of biological... of Protein Dynamics The self-assembly of proteins ("protein folding") is one of the key steps in the function... - standing question in molecular...

336

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal molecular imaging Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vanderbilt University Collection: Biology and Medicine 16 Fluorescence Molecular Tomography Of Small Animals Using The Radiative Transfer Equation For Curved Summary:...

337

AN INTEGRATED BIOLOGICAL CONTROL SYSTEM AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1999 an integrated biological control system was instituted at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Successes and changes to the program needed to be communicated to a large and diverse mix of organizations and individuals. Efforts at communication are directed toward the following: Hanford Contractors (Liquid or Tank Waste, Solid Waste, Environmental Restoration, Science and Technology, Site Infrastructure), General Hanford Employees, and Hanford Advisory Board (Native American Tribes, Environmental Groups, Local Citizens, Washington State and Oregon State regulatory agencies). Communication was done through direct interface meetings, individual communication, where appropriate, and broadly sharing program reports. The objectives of the communication efforts was to have the program well coordinated with Hanford contractors, and to have the program understood well enough that all stakeholders would have confidence in the work performed by the program to reduce or elimated spread of radioactive contamination by biotic vectors. Communication of successes and changes to an integrated biological control system instituted in 1999 at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site have required regular interfaces with not only a diverse group of Hanford contractors (i.e., those responsible for liquid or tank waste, solid wastes, environmental restoration, science and technology, and site infrastructure), and general Hanford employees, but also with a consortium of designated stake holders organized as the Hanford Advisory Board (i.e., Native American tribes, various environmental groups, local citizens, Washington state and Oregon regulatory agencies, etc.). Direct interface meetings, individual communication where appropriate, and transparency of the biological control program were the methods and outcome of this effort.

JOHNSON AR; CAUDILL JG; GIDDINGS RF; RODRIGUEZ JM; ROOS RC; WILDE JW

2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

338

Genomics and Systems Biology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Genomics and Systems Biology Genomics and Systems Biology Los Alamos scientists perform research in functional genomics and structural genomics, and applications for such work...

339

structural biology | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

structural biology structural biology Leads No leads are available at this time. Improved protocol to purify untagged amelogenin - Application to murine amelogenin containing the...

340

Development of biological coal gasification (MicGAS process). Final report, May 1, 1990--May 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ARCTECH has developed a novel process (MicGAS) for direct, anaerobic biomethanation of coals. Biomethanation potential of coals of different ranks (Anthracite, bitumious, sub-bitumious, and lignites of different types), by various microbial consortia, was investigated. Studies on biogasification of Texas Lignite (TxL) were conducted with a proprietary microbial consortium, Mic-1, isolated from hind guts of soil eating termites (Zootermopsis and Nasutitermes sp.) and further improved at ARCTECH. Various microbial populations of the Mic-1 consortium carry out the multi-step MicGAS Process. First, the primary coal degraders, or hydrolytic microbes, degrade the coal to high molecular weight (MW) compounds. Then acedogens ferment the high MW compounds to low MW volatile fatty acids. The volatile fatty acids are converted to acetate by acetogens, and the methanogens complete the biomethanation by converting acetate and CO{sub 2} to methane.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Continuum Electrostatics in Cell Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent experiments revealing possible nanoscale electrostatic interactions in force generation at kinetochores for chromosome motions have prompted speculation regarding possible models for interactions between positively charged molecules in kinetochores and negative charge on C-termini near the plus ends of microtubules. A clear picture of how kinetochores establish and maintain a dynamic coupling to microtubules for force generation during the complex motions of mitosis remains elusive. The current paradigm of molecular cell biology requires that specific molecules, or molecular geometries, for force generation be identified. However, it is possible to account for mitotic motions within a classical electrostatics approach in terms of experimentally known cellular electric charge interacting over nanometer distances. These charges are modeled as bound surface and volume continuum charge distributions. Electrostatic consequences of intracellular pH changes during mitosis may provide a master clock for the events of mitosis.

L. John Gagliardi

2010-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

342

The Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) - A Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the work conducted by the Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) (http://www.carb-swa.com/), one of the 'Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership' Industry Teams, for the period January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010. The Building America Program (BAP) is part of the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program (BTP). The long term goal of the BAP is to develop cost effective, production ready systems in five major climate zones that will result in zero energy homes (ZEH) that produce as much energy as they use on an annual basis by 2020. CARB is led by Steven Winter Associates, Inc. with Davis Energy Group, Inc. (DEG), MaGrann Associates, and Johnson Research, LLC as team members. In partnership with our numerous builders and industry partners, work was performed in three primary areas - advanced systems research, prototype home development, and technical support for communities of high performance homes. Our advanced systems research work focuses on developing a better understanding of the installed performance of advanced technology systems when integrated in a whole-house scenario. Technology systems researched included: - High-R Wall Assemblies - Non-Ducted Air-Source Heat Pumps - Low-Load HVAC Systems - Solar Thermal Water Heating - Ventilation Systems - Cold-Climate Ground and Air Source Heat Pumps - Hot/Dry Climate Air-to-Water Heat Pump - Condensing Boilers - Evaporative condensers - Water Heating CARB continued to support several prototype home projects in the design and specification phase. These projects are located in all five program climate regions and most are targeting greater than 50% source energy savings over the Building America Benchmark home. CARB provided technical support and developed builder project case studies to be included in near-term Joule Milestone reports for the following community scale projects: - SBER Overlook at Clipper Mill (mixed, humid climate) - William Ryan Homes - Tampa (hot, humid climate).

Robb Aldrich; Lois Arena; Dianne Griffiths; Srikanth Puttagunta; David Springer

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1992--1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February, 1990, The Secretary of Energy, James Watkins, approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program proposed by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, WERC'' includes as its founding members NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the Sandia National Laboratories. The Navajo Community College joined the program later in 1991. The program has the mission of expanding the nation's capability to address the issues related to management of all types of waste. The program is unique and innovative in many aspects. It provides an integrated approach to this national need, and includes: (1) Education in waste management at the educational institutions resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing hands-on training at the leading edge to students and information feeding into the education programs. (4) Education by technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos Sandia) located in New Mexico and with the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach programs of special interest to precollege students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the third year.

Not Available

1993-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1992--1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February, 1990, The Secretary of Energy, James Watkins, approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program proposed by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, ``WERC`` includes as its founding members NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the Sandia National Laboratories. The Navajo Community College joined the program later in 1991. The program has the mission of expanding the nation`s capability to address the issues related to management of all types of waste. The program is unique and innovative in many aspects. It provides an integrated approach to this national need, and includes: (1) Education in waste management at the educational institutions resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing hands-on training at the leading edge to students and information feeding into the education programs. (4) Education by technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos & Sandia) located in New Mexico and with the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach programs of special interest to precollege students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the third year.

Not Available

1993-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Biological enhancement of hydrocarbon extraction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of microbial enhanced oil recovery for recovering oil from an oil-bearing rock formation is provided. The methodology uses a consortium of bacteria including a mixture of surfactant producing bacteria and non-surfactant enzyme producing bacteria which may release hydrocarbons from bitumen containing sands. The described bioprocess can work with existing petroleum recovery protocols. The consortium microorganisms are also useful for treatment of above oil sands, ground waste tailings, subsurface oil recovery, and similar materials to enhance remediation and/or recovery of additional hydrocarbons from the materials.

Brigmon, Robin L. (North Augusta, SC); Berry, Christopher J. (Aiken, SC)

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

346

Computational Biology: A Strategic Initiative LDRD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this Strategic Initiative LDRD project was to establish at LLNL a new core capability in computational biology, combining laboratory strengths in high performance computing, molecular biology, and computational chemistry and physics. As described in this report, this project has been very successful in achieving this goal. This success is demonstrated by the large number of referred publications, invited talks, and follow-on research grants that have resulted from this project. Additionally, this project has helped build connections to internal and external collaborators and funding agencies that will be critical to the long-term vitality of LLNL programs in computational biology. Most importantly, this project has helped establish on-going research groups in the Biology and Biotechnology Research Program, the Physics and Applied Technology Directorate, and the Computation Directorate. These groups include three laboratory staff members originally hired as post-doctoral researchers for this strategic initiative.

Barksy, D; Colvin, M

2002-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

347

Mapping molecular dynamics computations to hypercubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

December 1993 Major Subject: ('omputer Science MAPPING MOLECULAR DYNAMICS COMPUTATIONS TO HYPERCUBES A Thesis by VAMSEE IvRISHNA LAIvAMSANI Submitted to Texas AX. 'M University in partial fnlfillment of the requirements for the degree of lv... for systematic modeling, mapping and perfornianrc analysis of a Grand Challenge application problein in computational biology called Moleru- lar Dynamics S&tnufat&un uj Proteins Molecular Dynamics (MD) is an important techn&que used m computational...

Lakamsani, Vamsee Krishna

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Optimization of parameters for coverage of low molecular weight proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proteins with molecular weights of <25 kDa are involved in major biological processes such as ribosome formation, stress adaption (e.g., temperature reduction) and cell cycle control. Despite their importance, the coverage ...

Muller, Stephan A.

349

analysis molecular investigation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Molecular Dynamics Analysis Toolchest Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: (Please see Appendix L)....

350

MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Biology with an Education Concentration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Biology with an Education Concentration College of Sciences www Education Career Options The Education concentration is designed for students seeking exceptionally strong with concentrations in Cell and Molecular Biology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Integrative Physiology

Walker, Lawrence R.

351

MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Biology with a Microbiology Concentration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Biology with a Microbiology Concentration College of Sciences www with concentrations in Cell and Molecular Biology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Integrative Physiology, and Microbiology. The Ph.D. is research intensive and is designed to prepare students for careers in academia

Walker, Lawrence R.

352

Biology and Medicine Division: Annual report 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Biology and Medicine Division continues to make important contributions in scientific areas in which it has a long-established leadership role. For 50 years the Division has pioneered in the application of radioisotopes and charged particles to biology and medicine. There is a growing emphasis on cellular and molecular applications in the work of all the Division's research groups. The powerful tools of genetic engineering, the use of recombinant products, the analytical application of DNA probes, and the use of restriction fragment length polymorphic DNA are described and proposed for increasing use in the future.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Syntrophic Effects in a Subsurface Clostridial Consortium on Fe(III)-(Oxyhydr)oxide Reduction and Secondary Mineralization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we cultivated from subsurface sediments an anaerobic Clostridia 25 consortium that was composed of a fermentative Fe-reducer Clostridium species (designated as 26 strain FGH) and a novel sulfate-reducing bacterium belonging to the Clostridia family 27 Vellionellaceae (designated as strain RU4). In pure culture, Clostridium sp. strain FGH mediated 28 the reductive dissolution/transformation of iron oxides during growth on peptone. When 29 Clostridium sp. FGH was grown with strain RU4 on peptone, the rates of iron oxide reduction 30 were significantly higher. Iron reduction by the consortium was mediated by multiple 31 mechanisms, including biotic reduction by Clostridium sp. FGH and biotic/abiotic reactions 32 involving biogenic sulfide by strain RU4. The Clostridium sp. FGH produced hydrogen during 33 fermentation, and the presence of hydrogen inhibited growth and iron reduction activity. The 34 sulfate-reducing partner strain RU4 was stimulated by the presence of H2 gas and generated 35 reactive sulfide which promoted the chemical reduction of the iron oxides. Characterization of 36 Fe(II) mineral products showed the formation of magnetite during ferrihydrite reduction, and 37 the precipitation of iron sulfides during goethite and hematite reduction. The results suggest an 38 important pathway for iron reduction and secondary mineralization by fermentative sulfate-39 reducing microbial consortia is through syntrophy-driven biotic/abiotic reactions with biogenic 40 sulfide.

Shah, Madhavi; Lin, Chu-Ching; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhao, Xiuhong; Wang, Yangping; Barkay, Tamar; Yee, Nathan

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

354

ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. the consortium creates a partnership with the US petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the third quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. During this reporting period the SWC entered into a co-funding arrangement with the New York State Energy Development Authority (NYSERDA) to provide an additional $100,000 in co-funding for stripper well production-orientated projects.The SWC hosted its first meeting in which members proposed research projects to the SWC membership. The meeting was held on April 9-10, 2001 in State College, Pennsylvania. Twenty three proposals were submitted to the SWC for funding consideration. Investigators of the proposed projects provided the SWC membership with a 20 minute (15 minute technical discussion, 5 minute question and answer session) presentation. Of the 23 proposals, the Executive Council approved $921,000 in funding for 13 projects. Penn State then immediately started the process of issuing subcontracts to the various projects approved for funding.

Joel L. Morrison

2001-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

355

Mathematical Biology 3 Jurgen Jost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical Biology 3 J¨urgen Jost Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences Leipzig, Germany Mathematical Biology 3 ­ p. 1 #12;Biological networks In biology, we find many examples of interacting elements: Mathematical Biology 3 ­ p. 2 #12;Biological networks In biology, we find many examples

Arnold, Anton

356

Modeling Molecular Dynamics from Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many important processes in biology occur at the molecular scale. A detailed understanding of these processes can lead to significant advances in the medical and life sciences. For example, many diseases are caused by protein aggregation or misfolding. One approach to studying these systems is to use physically-based computational simulations to model the interactions and movement of the molecules. While molecular simulations are computationally expensive, it is now possible to simulate many independent molecular dynamics trajectories in a parallel fashion by using super- or distributed- computing methods such as Folding@Home or Blue Gene. The analysis of these large, high-dimensional data sets presents new computational challenges. In this seminar, I will discuss a novel approach to analyzing large ensembles of molecular dynamics trajectories to generate a compact model of the dynamics. This model groups conformations into discrete states and describes the dynamics as Markovian, or history-independent, transitions between the states. I will discuss why the Markovian state model (MSM) is suitable for macromolecular dynamics, and how it can be used to answer many interesting and relevant questions about the molecular system. I will also discuss many of the computational and statistical challenges in building such a model, such as how to appropriately cluster conformations, determine the statistical reliability, and efficiently design new simulations.

Hinrichs, Nina Singhal (University of Chicago) [University of Chicago

2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

357

20.462J / 3.962J Molecular Principles of Biomaterials (BE.462J), Spring 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis and design at a molecular scale of materials used in contact with biological systems, including biotechnology and biomedical engineering. Topics include molecular interactions between bio- and synthetic molecules ...

Irvine, Darrell J.

358

Solution structure of Archaeglobus fulgidis peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase (Pth2) provides evidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Northeast Struc- tural Genomics Consortium, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York 10021, USA 3 Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, and Northeast Structural Genomics, and Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854, USA 6 Biological

Powers, Robert

359

Engineering scalable biological systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthetic biology is focused on engineering biological organisms to study natural systems and to provide new solutions for pressing medical, industrial, and environmental problems. At the core of engineered organisms are ...

Lu, Timothy K.

360

Biological Systems Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

encompasses the areas of priority pathogen detection, extremophile biology and genomics, biohydrometallurgy, biomass conversion, coal bioprocessing, biodegradation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Todd Newberry: Professor of Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Todd Newberry, Professor of Biology: Cowell College page 12Jarrell: Whys that? Todd Newberry, Professor of Biology:Biology Board page 14 Newberry: Well, besides the

Newberry, Andrew Todd; Jarrell, Randall; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Systems biology approach to bioremediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aspects of the systems biology approach (metagenomics withthe use of a number of sytems biology parameters can revealRL, Banfield JF: Systems Biology: functional analysis of

Chakraborty, R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

FGF-23 in bone biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6 REVIEW FGF-23 in bone biology Katherine Wesseling-Perryin impairments in bone biology. Although the defectiveof the protein on bone biology, a growing compendium of data

Wesseling-Perry, Katherine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Viewing biology in action | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Viewing biology in action Viewing biology in action DOE-funded pilot program will create mesoscale biological imaging platform James Evans EMSL received first-year funding of...

365

HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY PHD PROGRAM 2013-2014 Student Handbook #12;Program Contacts at the beginning of each semester. Laboratory Rotations Students in the Chemical Biology Program are expected an interest in having Chemical Biology Program Students in their labs. Students may rotate in the labs

Church, George M.

366

Instructors Marine Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instructors Marine Biology Location: Charleston Closes: 30-Nov-2012 The University of Oregon's Institute of Marine Biology maintains a pool of applicants for temporary instructional positions during the Institute's summer session. For summer 2012 we are interested in applicants to teach an eight week biology

Oregon, University of

367

Wildlife Biology Graduate Schools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wildlife Biology Graduate Schools University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska 997750820 Program: Wildlife Biology http://www.bw.uaf.edu/ University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona 95721 Program: Wildlife://www.forestry.auburn.edu/graduate/ProspectiveStudents/degrees.htm Clemson University Clemson, South Carolina 29634 Programs: Wildlife Fisheries Biology http

368

Evolutionary Conservation Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolutionary Conservation Biology Edited by R. Ferrière, U. Dieckmann, and D. Couvet Cambridge Studies in Adaptive Dynamics #12;Evolutionary Conservation Biology Edited by Régis Ferrière, Ulf Dieckmann.1 Demography, Genetics, and Ecology in Conservation Biology . . 1 1.2 Toward an Evolutionary Conservation

Dieckmann, Ulf

369

Careers with Forensic Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Careers with Forensic Biology www.twitter.com/mmu_careers www.facebook.com/MMUCareersandEmployability Careers & Employability Service www.mmu.ac.uk/careers/guides #12;2 08/12 Careers with Forensic Biology These are a range of careers and employers that would use and value your forensic biology knowledge: Laboratory

370

Institute for Molecular Medicine Research Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the project are the development of new Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging instrumentation, chemistry technology platforms and new molecular imaging probes to examine the transformations from normal cellular and biological processes to those of disease in pre-clinical animal models. These technology platforms and imaging probes provide the means to: 1. Study the biology of disease using pre-clinical mouse models and cells. 2. Develop molecular imaging probes for imaging assays of proteins in pre-clinical models. 3. Develop imaging assays in pre-clinical models to provide to other scientists the means to guide and improve the processes for discovering new drugs. 4. Develop imaging assays in pre-clinical models for others to use in judging the impact of drugs on the biology of disease.

Phelps, Michael E

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Encyclopedia of Systems Biology and OMICS (first presentation) and The ISA Infrastructure for Multi-omics Data (second presentation) (GSC8 Meeting)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Eugene Kolker from Seattle Children's Hospital briefly discusses "The Encyclopedia of Systems Biology and OMICS," followed by Susanna Sansone from the EBI on "The ISA Infrastructure for multi-omics data" at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 11, 2009.

Kolker, Eugene [Seattle Children's Hospital]; Sansone, Susanna [EBI

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

372

Minor in Marine Biology Minor in Marine Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minor in Marine Biology Minor in Marine Biology General Goals of the Minor in Marine Biology About who choose the Minor in Marine Biology will learn about the biology, evolution and ecology of organisms that inhabit these environments and the ecological processes linking them. Marine biology draws

Chen, Tsuhan

373

Regional variation of organic functional groups in aerosol particles on four U.S. east coast platforms during the International Consortium for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. SOA can be formed by condensation of species produced by gas aerosol samples were collected during the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport) spectroscopy at all four sampling platforms. The ratio of molar concentrations of carbonyl C=O to saturated

374

Sensor Consortium, Rm 214 Old Chemistry Building, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook NY 11794-3717  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensor Consortium, Rm 214 Old Chemistry Building, State University of New York at Stony Brook twice won the NYS Advisor of the Year Award. The seminar will cover the following topics: Statement and rationales Lunch will be served at 12:30 PM The NYS SBDC is partially funded by the U.S. Small Business

Luryi, Serge

375

Nature of Institutional Sponsorship/Compliance Policy/Definitions The GME Consortium will oversee all matters pertaining to graduate medical education including ensuring that all  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/or educational arrangement for major affiliation agreements. The DIO will provide periodic updates to the GME all matters pertaining to graduate medical education including ensuring that all GME programs comply, the GME Consortium will serve as the "sponsoring institution" for all graduate medical education conducted

Kornfeld, S. Kerry

376

Healthcare & Biology Licenses Available | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Healthcare and Biology SHARE Healthcare and Biology 200000830 Monolythic Analyte Concentrator and Separator for Cantilever Sensors 200000838 Nanoscale Photonic Spectrometer...

377

Invasion Biology Mark A. Davis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invasion Biology Mark A. Davis 2 biology 2 MarkA.DavisInvasionBiology2 1 With the exception of climate change, biological invasions have probably received more attention during the past ten years than on the subject, Invasion Biology provides a comprehensive and up-to-date review of the science of biological

Davis, Mark A.

378

Biological tracer method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. 2 figs.

Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Biological tracer method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer.

Strong-Gunderson, Janet M. (Ten Mile, TN); Palumbo, Anthony V. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Biological detector and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Genomics and Systems Biology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Genomics and Systems Biology LANL leads the world in computational finishing of microbial genomes Read caption + In 2013, Los Alamos scientist Richard Sayre and his team...

382

Biological and Environmental Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Focus Area team for Soil Metagenomics and Carbon Cycling develops and uses community genomics approaches to link the biological processes controlling belowground carbon storage...

383

EMSL - structural biology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

structural-biology en Improved protocol to purify untagged amelogenin - Application to murine amelogenin containing the equivalent P70 ? T point http:www.emsl.pnl.gov...

384

Engineering optical traps for new environments and applications in the measurement of biological adhesives and motors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical traps have played a central role in the exploration of biological systems through the examination of molecular motors, biopolymers, and many other interactions at the nano and micro length scales. This thesis seeks ...

Appleyard, David Collins

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Decoding Photosynthesis' Molecular Mysteries  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Decoding Photosynthesis' Molecular Mysteries Decoding the Molecular Mysteries of Photosynthesis Understanding the inner workings of photosynthesis is key to building new man-made...

386

Integrated Biological Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects, and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (a priori) or in response to existing contamination spread (a posteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and a priori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, a posteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

JOHNSON, A.R.

2003-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

387

Integrated Biological Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects; and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (apriori) or in response to existing contamination spread (aposteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and apriori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, aposteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

JOHNSON, A.R.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION CONSERVATION BIOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.arlettaz@iee.unibe.ch www.conservation.unibe.ch Grassland management: designing tomorrow's farmland for biodiversity 1ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION CONSERVATION BIOLOGY Prof. Dr Raphaël Arlettaz Head of the division of Conservation Biology Office: Erlachstrasse 9a Mail: Baltzerstrasse 6 CH­3012 Bern +41 31 631 31 61 +41 79 637

Richner, Heinz

389

Biological sample collector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A biological sample collector is adapted to a collect several biological samples in a plurality of filter wells. A biological sample collector may comprise a manifold plate for mounting a filter plate thereon, the filter plate having a plurality of filter wells therein; a hollow slider for engaging and positioning a tube that slides therethrough; and a slide case within which the hollow slider travels to allow the tube to be aligned with a selected filter well of the plurality of filter wells, wherein when the tube is aligned with the selected filter well, the tube is pushed through the hollow slider and into the selected filter well to sealingly engage the selected filter well and to allow the tube to deposit a biological sample onto a filter in the bottom of the selected filter well. The biological sample collector may be portable.

Murphy, Gloria A. (French Camp, CA)

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

390

Synthetic biology: Understanding biological design from synthetic circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An important aim of synthetic biology is to uncover the design principles of natural biological systems through the rational design of gene and protein circuits. Here, we highlight how the process of engineering biological ...

Mukherji, Shankar

391

Contact Information: Dalhousie University, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of Wisconsin-Madison Advisor: Prof. Tom Sharkey - Isoprene emission in plants: Purified the kudzu

Archibald, John

392

Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 18, 38353844, October 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

phosphorylation of APP is a pathological trait of Alzheimer's disease. APP is overexpressed in Down's syndrome's disease and Down's syndrome--in the context of normal neuronal func- tion and during degeneration and tau (Selkoe, 2001). Patients with Down's syndrome also develop Alzheimer's disease pathology

Muresan, Virgil

393

Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 9, 22012216, August 1998  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Spc110p Reveals Distinct Functions of Spc97p and Spc98p, Components of the Yeast -Tubulin Complex Thu) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae functions as the microtubule- organizing center. Spc110p is an essential structural. The amino termi- nus of Spc110p faces the inner plaque, the substructure from which spindle microtubules

Davis, Trisha N.

394

Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 16, 33413352, July 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the proteins Spc42, Spc110 (kendrin/pericentrin ortholog), calmodulin (Cmd1), Spc29, and Cnm67. Each was tagged. The N-termini of Spc42 and Spc29, and the C-termini of all the core proteins face the gap between the IL2 layer and the central plaque. Spc110 traverses the central plaque and Cnm67 spans the IL2 layer

Davis, Trisha N.

395

Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 13, 11441157, April 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

molecule of Spc97p, one molecule of Spc98p, and two molecules of Tub4p. The reconstituted Tub4p complex to the spindle pole body docking protein Spc110p affects its nucleating activity. The solubility of recombinant Spc110p in insect cells is improved by coexpression with yeast calmodulin (Cmd1p). The Spc110p/Cmd1p

Davis, Trisha N.

396

Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 19, 207215, January 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

yeast -tubulin) and one each of the homologous proteins Spc97p/Dgrip84/GCP3 and Spc98p/Dgrip91/GCP4 to the spindle pole body (SPB) by Spc110p on the nuclear face and Spc72p on the cytoplasmic face. In most other

Davis, Trisha N.

397

Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 14, 34943505, August 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and dynamics of the core structural SPB component Spc110p. The SPB core exhibits both exchange and growth in a cell cycle-dependent manner. During G1/S phase, the old SPB exchanges 50% of old Spc110p for new Spc110p. In G2 little Spc110p is exchangeable. Thus, Spc110p is dynamic during G1/S and becomes stable

398

Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 15, 48544865, November 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

embryos are treated with nocodazole to disassemble microtubules, the Skeletor spin- dle persists (Walker with the spin- dle matrix hypothesis. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen with Skeletor sequence as bait Rath et al at interphase as well as to the Skeletor-defined spin- dle during metaphase. Furthermore, functional assays

Johansen, Kristen M

399

Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 12, 32043213, October 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Devreotes, 1996; Krump et al., 1997; Araki et al., 1998). Evidence suggests that it is the -complexes

Devreotes, Peter

400

Multispectral optical tweezers for molecular diagnostics of single biological cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Multispectral optical tweezers #12;Optical trapping ?particle >> laser : Mie regime approx. by ray opticsMedium : repulsion ?particle >> laser : Mie regime approx. by ray optics ?particle laser : Rayleigh regime, Shima Fardad, Alex Sincore, Marie Vangheluwe, Matthieu Baudelet, Martin Richardson Townes Laser

Wu, Shin-Tson

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Physical Mapping of Chromosomes: A Combinatorial Problem in Molecular Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of nucleotides from the set fA; T ; C;Gg. The nucleotides A and T are complementary to each other, as are the nucleotides C and G. Each nucleotide on one strand is bound to a complementary nucleotide on the other strand will cleave a DNA molecule at every site where a certain short sequence of nucleotides occurs. A separation

Alizadeh, Farid

402

Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 16, 37403752, August 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Type I Membrane Glycoprotein Tyrosinase: The Heat Shock Protein 70 System Hands Off to the Lectin maturation pathway for the human type I membrane glycoprotein tyrosinase. To recapitulate the cotranslational was cross-linked to tyrosinase when calnexin and calreticulin were associated. This timing coincided

Hebert, Daniel N.

403

Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 12, 11031116, April 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ca2 wave that begins at the sperm entry site (Stricker, 1999). Two major consequences- mature starfish oocytes (Chiba et al., 1990; Stricker et al., 1994), a change in Na ­Ca2 exchange

Terasaki, Mark

404

Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 14, 38043820, September 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-addition into host plasma membrane reverses this inhibitory effect of depletion on parasite secretion. These data (reviewed in Ikonen and Parton, 2000). Caveolae are enriched in cholesterol, glyco- lipids

Arnold, Jonathan

405

Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 15, 19601968, April 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to treat medical conditions, including cancer, gout, and helminth infection (Jordan et al., 1998). Dinitroa

Morrissette, Naomi

406

Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 12, 85100, January 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the matrix to the cyto- plasm of the cell and vice versa (Howe et al., 1998; Smilenov et al., 1999; Zamir et

Goldman, Robert D.

407

M. Madan Babu MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Biotechnology #12;Career options in Biotechnology Discussion Academic Industry Tips to increase general awareness Q & A session Outline #12;General Sugestions Read review articles in Journals ­ PLoS, BMC, open with people whose work interest you #12;General Tips Read review articles in Journals ­ PLoS, BMC, open access

Babu, M. Madan

408

Molecular biology study of satellite panicum mosaic virus capsid protein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Satellite panicum mosaic virus (SPMV) depends on its helper Panicum mosaic virus (PMV) for replication and movement in host plants. The positive-sense single-stranded genomic RNA of SPMV encodes a 17-kDa capsid protein (CP) to form 16-nm virions...

Qi, Dong

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 14, 18081817, May 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to damage unlabeled structures. UV light from a mercury arc lamp has been used to cut microtubules (Walker the plasma membrane and nuclear envelope in starfish oocytes. The starfish nucleus collapsed 1 h after (CALI; Buchstaller and Jay, 2000). With the appropriate fluorescent label, the plasma membrane can

Terasaki, Mark

410

Biochemistry Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 37 (2007) 891902  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, a CSIRO Entomology, GPO Box 1700, Canberra, ACT, 2601, Australia b Department of Entomology and Cancer

Hammock, Bruce D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Computational Molecular Biology Biochem 218 BioMedical Informatics 231  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alleles. Many have multiple identified genes (*) Gene ABO HLA APOE F5 HBB CCR5 APC PPAR Phenotype Peptic, Nature 2007 Control Population Disease Population SNP chip Thanks to Daniel Newburger #12;A Quantitative Expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTLs) and Thanks to Daniel Newburger cDNA Levels #12;Genome

412

The Mississippi University Research Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass: Production of Alternative Fuels from Waste Biomass Initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mississippi Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass was formed via funding from the US Department of Energy's EPSCoR Program, which is administered by the Office of Basic Science. Funding was approved in July of 1999 and received by participating Mississippi institutions by 2000. The project was funded via two 3-year phases of operation (the second phase was awarded based on the high merits observed from the first 3-year phase), with funding ending in 2007. The mission of the Consortium was to promote the utilization of biomass, both cultured and waste derived, for the production of commodity and specialty chemicals. These scientific efforts, although generally basic in nature, are key to the development of future industries within the Southeastern United States. In this proposal, the majority of the efforts performed under the DOE EPSCoR funding were focused primarily toward the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks and biogas from waste products. However, some of the individual projects within this program investigated the production of other products from biomass feeds (i.e. acetic acid and biogas) along with materials to facilitate the more efficient production of chemicals from biomass. Mississippi is a leading state in terms of raw biomass production. Its top industries are timber, poultry production, and row crop agriculture. However, for all of its vast amounts of biomass produced on an annual basis, only a small percentage of the biomass is actually industrially produced into products, with the bulk of the biomass being wasted. This situation is actually quite representative of many Southeastern US states. The research and development efforts performed attempted to further develop promising chemical production techniques that use Mississippi biomass feedstocks. The three processes that were the primary areas of interest for ethanol production were syngas fermentation, acid hydrolysis followed by hydrolyzate fermentation, and enzymatic conversion. All three of these processes are of particular interest to states in the Southeastern US since the agricultural products produced in this region are highly variable in terms of actual crop, production quantity, and the ability of land areas to support a particular type of crop. This greatly differs from the Midwestern US where most of this region's agricultural land supports one to two primary crops, such as corn and soybean. Therefore, developing processes which are relatively flexible in terms of biomass feedstock is key to the southeastern region of the US if this area is going to be a 'player' in the developing biomass to chemicals arena. With regard to the fermentation of syngas, research was directed toward developing improved biocatalysts through organism discovery and optimization, improving ethanol/acetic acid separations, evaluating potential bacterial contaminants, and assessing the use of innovative fermentors that are better suited for supporting syngas fermentation. Acid hydrolysis research was directed toward improved conversion yields and rates, acid recovery using membranes, optimization of fermenting organisms, and hydrolyzate characterization with changing feedstocks. Additionally, a series of development efforts addressed novel separation techniques for the separation of key chemicals from fermentation activities. Biogas related research focused on key factors hindering the widespread use of digester technologies in non-traditional industries. The digestion of acetic acids and other fermentation wastewaters was studied and methods used to optimize the process were undertaken. Additionally, novel laboratory methods were designed along with improved methods of digester operation. A search for better performing digester consortia was initiated coupled with improved methods to initiate their activity within digester environments. The third activity of the consortium generally studied the production of 'other' chemicals from waste biomass materials found in Mississippi. The two primary examples of this activity are production of chem

Drs. Mark E. Zapp; Todd French; Lewis Brown; Clifford George; Rafael Hernandez; Marvin Salin (from Mississippie State University); Drs. Huey-Min Hwang, Ken Lee, Yi Zhang; Maria Begonia (from Jackson State University); Drs. Clint Williford; Al Mikell (from the University of Mississippi); Drs. Robert Moore; Roger Hester (from the University of Southern Mississippi).

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

The Consortium The CORAS consortium consists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), - Solinet (Germany) and - Telenor (Norway); seven research institutes: - CLRC/RAL (UK), - CTI (Greece), - FORTH (Greece), - IFE (Norway), - NST (Norway), - NR (Norway) and - SINTEF (Norway); as well as one

Stølen, Ketil

414

Biology in Engineering Certificate Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biology in Engineering Certificate Program Prof. Willis Tompkins Department of Biomedical by a multidisciplinary faculty committee for engineering students Provides opportunity to strengthen biology background in biology and medicine Provides a credential for special effort #12;Prerequisites Prior admission

Van Veen, Barry D.

415

BIOLOGICAL SAFETY TABLE OF CONTENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SERVICES BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL SAFETY PROGRAM...4 1.3 LABORATORY MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE.........................................5 2.0 GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR HANDLING BIOLOGICAL AGENTS...........................................................11 5.0 TRANSPORTATION AND TRANSFER OF BIOLOGICAL AGENTS ........................11 5.1 INTRODUCTION

O'Toole, Alice J.

416

Report on the CEPA activities [Consorcio Educativo para la Proteccion Ambiental/Educational Consortium for Environmental Preservation] [Final report of activities from 1998 to 2002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report compiles the instances of scientific, educational, and institutional cooperation on environmental issues and other activities in which CEPA was engaged during the past five years, and includes several annual reports and meeting summaries. CEPA is a collaborative international consortium that brings together higher education institutions with governmental agencies, research laboratories, and private sector entities. CEPA's mission is to strengthen the technical, professional, and educational environmental infrastructure in the United States and Latin America. The CEPA program includes curriculum development, student exchange, faculty development, and creation of educational materials, joint research, and other cooperative activities. CEPA's goals are accomplished by actively working with Hispanic-serving institutions of higher education in the United States, in collaboration with institutions of higher education in Latin America and other Consortium members to deliver competitive environmental programs.

Cruz, Miriam

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Biological Macromolecular Structures Data from the RCSB Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB) is a non-profit consortium that works to improve understanding of the function of biological systems through the study of the 3-D structure of biological macromolecules. The RCSB PDB is one of three sites serving as deposition, data processing, and distribution sites of the Protein Data Bank Archive. Each site provides its own view of the primary data, thus providing a variety of tools and resources for the global community. RCSB is also the official keeper for the PDB archive, with sole access authority to the PDB archive directory structure and contents. The RCSB PDB Information Portal for Biological Macromolecular Structures offers online tools for search and retrieval, for visualizing structures, for depositing, validating, or downloading data, news and highlights, a discussion forum, and links to other areas of related research. The PDB archive is a repository of atomic coordinates and other information describing proteins and other important biological macromolecules. Structural biologists use methods such as X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy to determine the location of each atom relative to each other in the molecule. They then deposit this information, which is then annotated and publicly released into the archive by the wwPDB. Results can be viewed as 3-D images or models.

418

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

Hall, E.J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

July 2013 M.S. in Genetics -University of A Corua, A Corua, Spain June 2012 B.S. in Biology -University of A Corua, A Corua, Spain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EDUCATION July 2013 M.S. in Genetics - University of A Coruña, A Coruña, Spain June 2012 B.S. in Biology - University of A Coruña, A Coruña, Spain RESEARCH INTERESTS Marine Biology, Genotoxicology, Chromosomal Proteins, Molecular Evolution, Genomics, Molecular Techniques. 2011 University of A Coruña, Spain

Eirin Lopez, Jose Maria

420

Summary of Findings from the Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation (CAFI): Corn Stover Pretreatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation, with members from Auburn University, Dartmouth College, Michigan State University, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Purdue University, Texas A&M University, the University of British Columbia, and the University of California at Riverside, has developed comparative data on the conversion of corn stover to sugars by several leading pretreatment technologies. These technologies include ammonia fiber expansion pretreatment, ammonia recycle percolation pretreatment, dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment, flowthrough pretreatment (hot water or dilute acid), lime pretreatment, controlled pH hot water pretreatment, and sulfur dioxide steam explosion pretreatment. Over the course of two separate USDA- and DOE-funded projects, these pretreatment technologies were applied to two different corn stover batches, followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the remaining solids from each pretreatment technology using identical enzyme preparations, enzyme loadings, and enzymatic hydrolysis assays. Identical analytical methods and a consistent material balance methodology were employed to develop comparative sugar yield data for each pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Although there were differences in the profiles of sugar release, with the more acidic pretreatments releasing more xylose directly in the pretreatment step than the alkaline pretreatments, the overall glucose and xylose yields (monomers + oligomers) from combined pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis process steps were very similar for all of these leading pretreatment technologies. Some of the water-only and alkaline pretreatment technologies resulted in significant amounts of residual xylose oligomers still remaining after enzymatic hydrolysis that may require specialized enzyme preparations to fully convert xylose oligomers to monomers.

Elander, R. T.; Dale, B. E.; Holtzapple, M.; Ladisch, M. R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Mitchinson, C.; Saddler, J. N.; Wyman, C. E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

7th Annual Systems Biology Symposium: Systems Biology and Engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Systems biology recognizes the complex multi-scale organization of biological systems, from molecules to ecosystems. The International Symposium on Systems Biology has been hosted by the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle, Washington, since 2002. The annual two-day event gathers the most influential researchers transforming biology into an integrative discipline investingating complex systems. Engineering and application of new technology is a central element of systems biology. Genome-scale, or very small-scale, biological questions drive the enigneering of new technologies, which enable new modes of experimentation and computational analysis, leading to new biological insights and questions. Concepts and analytical methods in engineering are now finding direct applications in biology. Therefore, the 2008 Symposium, funded in partnership with the Department of Energy, featured global leaders in "Systems Biology and Engineering."

Galitski, Timothy P.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Molecular display of synthetic oligonucleotide libraries and their analysis with high throughput DNA sequencing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High throughput methods in molecular biology have changed the landscape of biomedical research. In particular, advances in massively parallel DNA sequencing and synthesis technologies are defining our genomes and the ...

Larman, Harry Benjamin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Encoded hydrogel microparticles for high-throughput molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ability to accurately detect and quantify biological molecules in complex mixtures is crucial in basic research as well as in clinical settings. Advancements in genetic analysis, molecular diagnostics, and patient-tailored ...

Chapin, Stephen Clifford

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Inverse Problems in Systems Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inverse Problems in Systems Biology Heinz W.Engl Johann Radon Institute for Computational.W. Engl, C. Flamm, P. K¨ugler, J. Lu, S. M¨uller and P. Schuster, Inverse problems in systems biology, Inverse Problems 25 (2009) 1 #12;Systems biology is a relatively young biological discipline that claims

Fulmek, Markus

425

Advanced Review Synthetic biology: putting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, with all its complexity and interconnectivity, biology has for many years been recalcitrant to engineering

Zhao, Huimin

426

Biology 325: Special Topics in Plant Molecular Biology (Dorweiler/Schlppi)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in plants: Biofuels Virus resistance Disease resistance Nutritional value (e.g. "golden rice

Schlppi, Michael

427

Systems Biology Knowledgebase (GSC8 Meeting)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Robert W. Cottingham of Oak Ridge National Laboratory discusses the DOE KnowledgeBase at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009.

Cottingham, Robert W [ORNL

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

428

Molecular information ratchets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the emerging aield of molecular machines, a molecular ratchet is a chemical system that allows the positional displacement of a submolecular component of be captured and directionally relea ...

Wilson, Adam Christopher

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

429

Standards in Genomic Sciences (2013) 9:495-504 DOI:10.4056/sigs.4708537 The Genomic Standards Consortium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

], wastewater [4-6], river sediments containing chromium [5], nematodes [7,8], food [1,9], potato plant-8T should help us to understand the molecular basis of adap- tation to a chromium

Bae, Jin-Woo

430

Computational methods for molecular docking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the protein can be used to derive new protein ligands with improved binding properties. This tutorial focuses on the following questions: What is its binding affinity toward a particular receptor? What are putative conformations of a ligand at the binding site? What are the similarities of different ligands in terms of their recognition capabilities? Where and in which orientation will a ligand bind to the active site? How is a new putative protein ligand selected? An overview is presented of the algorithms which are presently used to handle and predict protein-ligand interactions and to dock small molecule ligands into proteins.

Klebe, G. [BASF AG, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Lengauer, T.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

431

6th Annual Systems Biology Symposium: Systems Biology and the Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Systems biology recognizes the complex multi-scale organization of biological systems, from molecules to ecosystems. The International Symposium on Systems Biology is an annual two-day event gathering the most influential researchers transforming biology into an integrative discipline investigating complex systems. In recognition of the fundamental similarity between the scientific problems addressed in environmental science and systems biology studies at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels, the 2007 Symposium featured global leaders in Systems Biology and the Environment. The objective of the 2007 Systems Biology and the Environment International Symposium was to stimulate interdisciplinary thinking and research that spans systems biology and environmental science. This Symposium was well aligned with the DOEs Genomics:GTL program efforts to achieve scientific objectives for each of the three DOE missions: Develop biofuels as a major secure energy source for this century, Develop biological solutions for intractable environmental problems, and Understand biosystems climate impacts and assess sequestration strategies Our scientific program highlighted world-class research exemplifying these priorities. The Symposium featured 45 minute lectures from 12 researchers including: Penny/Sallie Chisholm of MIT gave the keynote address Tiny Cells, Global Impact: What Prochlorococcus Can Teach Us About Systems Biology, plus Jim Fredrickson of PNNL, Nitin Baliga of ISB, Steve Briggs of UCSD, David Cox of Perlegen Sciences, Antoine Danchin of Institut Pasteur, John Delaney of the U of Washington, John Groopman of Johns Hopkins, Ben Kerr of the U of Washington, Steve Koonin of BP, Elliott Meyerowitz of Caltech, and Ed Rubin of LBNL. The 2007 Symposium promoted DOEs three mission areas among scientists from multiple disciplines representing academia, non-profit research institutions, and the private sector. As in all previous Symposia, we had excellent attendance of participants representing 20-30 academic or research-oriented facilities along with 25-30 private corporations from 5-10 countries. To broaden the audience for the Symposium and ensure the continued accessibility of the presentations, we made the presentation videos available afterward on the ISBs website.

Galitski, Timothy, P.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Analyzing Data for Systems Biology: Working at the Intersection of Thermodynamics and Data Analytics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many challenges in systems biology have to do with analyzing data within the framework of molecular phenomena and cellular pathways. How does this relate to thermodynamics that we know govern the behavior of molecules? Making progress in relating data analysis to thermodynamics is essential in systems biology if we are to build predictive models that enable the field of synthetic biology. This report discusses work at the crossroads of thermodynamics and data analysis, and demonstrates that statistical mechanical free energy is a multinomial log likelihood. Applications to systems biology are presented.

Cannon, William R.; Baxter, Douglas J.

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

Biological and Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and sustainable biofuel but will also advance our understanding in areas of fundamental biological science. After capitalize on recent technological and scientific advances. Several multidisciplinary projects of key,ecosystemmonitoringandrestoration,combiningcropresearchandmicrobial engineering to make biofuels a viable alternative to fossil fuels, and personalized medicine to improve health

434

Biological and Environmental Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recalcitrance. Using an integrated approach to solving the challenge of producing biofuel from cellulosic materials, the center will not only provide the scientific basis for affordable and sustainable biofuel but will also advance our understanding in areas of fundamental biological science. BESC researchers have

435

Biology and Medicine  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biology and Medicine A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Aagaard, Jan - Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington at Seattle Aarts, Esther - Helen...

436

CONSERVATION BIOLOGY Thediversityofbiodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSERVATION BIOLOGY Thediversityofbiodiversity Arne ?. Mooers Species richness is not the same as evolutionary richness. So which is the better measure for setting conservation priorities? The flora- tion might lead to surprising choices among conservation areas. The study brings the concept of what

Mooers, Arne

437

Fish Biology Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lab 10: Fish Biology Introduction The effective management of fish populations requires knowledge of the growth rate of the fish. This requires determination of the age of fish to develop a relationship between the size and age of fish. For an inventory, this information provides insights to evaluate the potential

Jochem, Frank J.

438

ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341 Fall Semester 2008 Bighorn Sheep Rams at Bison Range National ecological data; and 3) oral and written communication skills. Thus, these ecology labs, and statistical analyses appropriate for ecological data. A major goal of this class will be for you to gain

Vonessen, Nikolaus

439

CANCER BIOLOGY Infectioustumourcells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CANCER BIOLOGY Infectioustumourcells David Dingli and Martin A. Nowak Cancer cells are generally infectious agents and be transmitted between individuals. The current view of cancer development is that normal cells are transformed into tumour cells by sequential mutations that activate cancer- promoting

Nowak, Martin A.

440

DockingShop: A Tool for Interactive Molecular Docking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Given two independently determined molecular structures, the molecular docking problem predicts the bound association, or best fit between them, while allowing for conformational changes of the individual molecules during construction of a molecular complex. Docking Shop is an integrated environment that permits interactive molecular docking by navigating a ligand or protein to an estimated binding site of a receptor with real-time graphical feedback of scoring factors as visual guides. Our program can be used to create initial configurations for a protein docking prediction process. Its output--the structure of aprotein-ligand or protein-protein complex--may serve as an input for aprotein docking algorithm, or an optimization process. This tool provides molecular graphics interfaces for structure modeling, interactive manipulation, navigation, optimization, and dynamic visualization to aid users steer the prediction process using their biological knowledge.

Lu, Ting-Cheng; Max, Nelson L.; Ding, Jinhui; Bethel, E. Wes; Crivelli, Silvia N.

2005-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Molecular electrostatic potentials by systematic molecular fragmentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simple method is presented for estimating the molecular electrostatic potential in and around molecules using systematic molecular fragmentation. This approach estimates the potential directly from the electron density. The accuracy of the method is established for a set of organic molecules and ions. The utility of the approach is demonstrated by estimating the binding energy of a water molecule in an internal cavity in the protein ubiquitin.

Reid, David M.; Collins, Michael A. [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)] [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

442

Exceptional tools for studying the structure and dynamics of materials at the molecular level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exceptional tools for studying the structure and dynamics of materials at the molecular level, complementary to x-rays, in under- standing the structure and dynamics of materials at the molecular level Soft matter Magnetism and superconductivity Life sciences Structural biology Complex fluids

443

Biology Division progress report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Progress Report summarizes the research endeavors of the Biology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1995. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the Division`s major organizational units. Lists of information to convey the entire scope of the Division`s activities are compiled at the end of the report. Attention is focused on the following research activities: molecular, cellular, and cancer biology; mammalian genetics and development; genome mapping program; and educational activities.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Scientist Position In Human Molecular Genetics: Toronto, ON, Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scientist Position In Human Molecular Genetics: Toronto, ON, Canada Genetics & Genome Biology) Program at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids), Canada's largest paediatric research hospital and research hospitals and Canada's largest university in close proximity. Candidates must have a PhD, or MD Ph

Queitsch, Christine

445

DISCOVERING BRAIN MECHANISMS AND THE RULES OF MOLECULAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DISCOVERING BRAIN MECHANISMS AND THE RULES OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Paul Shapshak, PhD*1 and Robert-324-2723 ABSTRACT The human genome has approximately 30,000 genes. Brain cells express at least 15,000. The human brain is subject to many acute and chronic diseases including viral encephalitis, AIDS/HIV Associated

Stengel, Robert F.

446

Modular architecture in biological networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past decade, biology has been revolutionized by an explosion in the availability of data. Translating this new wealth of information into meaningful biological insights and clinical breakthroughs will require a ...

Ramachandran, Gopal (Gopal Sebastian)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Guest Editors' Introduction: Synthetic Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

+ undergraduate participants from around the world. Synthetic Biology had a global market which gene- rated $233 Tufts University h SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY IS trending, as evidenced by the recent achievements in biofuels

Densmore, Douglas

448

Experiment design for systems biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanism-based chemical kinetic models are increasingly being used to describe biological signaling. Such models serve to encapsulate current understanding of pathways and to enable insight into complex biological processes. ...

Apgar, Joshua Farley

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Standards in Genomic Sciences (2011) 4:252-256 DOI:10.4056/sigs.1724282 The Genomic Standards Consortium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institute, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA 11 Department of Chemistry, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH, USA 12 Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH, USA 13 Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boulder, CO, USA 14 Department of Biology

Eddy, Sean

450

Systems Biology | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of interdisciplinary scientists. Additional systems biology resources Research Highlights Media Mentions Publications Newsletters Biosciences Division Recent news releases 11...

451

Biological particle identification apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for making multiparameter light scattering measurements from suspensions of biological particles is described. Fourteen of the sixteen Mueller matrix elements describing the particles under investigation can be substantially individually determined as a function of scattering angle and probing radiations wavelength, eight elements simultaneously for each of two apparatus configurations using an apparatus which incluees, in its simplest form, two polarization modulators each operating at a chosen frequency, one polarizer, a source of monochromatic electromagnetic radiation, a detector sensitive to the wavelength of radiation employed, eight phase-sensitive detectors, and appropriate electronics. A database of known biological particle suspensions can be assembled, and unknown samples can be quickly identified once measurements are performed on it according to the teachings of the subject invention, and a comparison is made with the database.

Salzman, Gary C. (Los Alamos, NM); Gregg, Charles T. (Los Alamos, NM); Grace, W. Kevin (Los Alamos, NM); Hiebert, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report November 2013 summary report for the 2013 Biological...

453

Computational biology and high performance computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paper in Computational Biology The First Step Beyond theM . Glaeser, Mol. & Cell Biology, UCB and Life SciencesLBNL-44460 Computational Biology and High Performance

Shoichet, Brian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Computational Biology & KBase | Clean Energy| ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computational Biology and KBase SHARE Computational Biology and KBase The ever-increasing scale and complexity of biological data require advanced computational tools and resources...

455

Systems Biology. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign Object DamageSystems Biology SHARE

456

Theoretical Physics in Cellular Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretical Physics in Cellular Biology: Some Illustrative Case Studies Living matter obeys in many areas of biology. This truism is becoming ever more relevant with the rapid growth of the ability of biological experiment to produce large amounts of quantitative data: comprehending that data surely

457

CONSORTIUM MEMBERS EU Universities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coordinator > University of Tirana, Albania > University of Sarajevo, Bosnia & Herzegovina > South East Foundation, Belgium > University of Tuzla, Bosnia & Herzegovina > Roma Virtual Network, Israel > University

Heermann, Dieter W.

458

Commercial Buildings Consortium  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codesthe NaturalCommercial Building

459

Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory 2004 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 2004 Annual Report describes the research and accomplishments of staff and users of the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), located in Richland, Washington. EMSL is a multidisciplinary, national scientific user facility and research organization, operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The resources and opportunities within the facility are an outgrowth of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to fundamental research for understanding and resolving environmental and other critical scientific issues.

White, Julia C.

2005-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

460

Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular $Chlamydomonas$ to multicellular $Volvox$, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 $\\mu$m to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these re...

Goldstein, Raymond E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular biology consortium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular $Chlamydomonas$ to multicellular $Volvox$, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 $\\mu$m to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these remarkable organisms.

Raymond E. Goldstein

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

462

Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2009/10 University Medal in Biology Jinnie Kim  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2009/10 University Medal in Biology Jinnie Kim University Medal in Marine Biology Jesse Kelly University Silver Medal Jinnie Kim Hugh P. Bell Scholarships Hsiang Yoh Prizes in Biology John O'Brien, Allison McFadden-Berean Developmental Biology Prize Jinnie Kim

Gunawardena, Arunika

463

Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2006/07 University Medal in Biology Yassein Shamout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2006/07 University Medal in Biology Yassein Shamout University Medal in Marine Biology Sophie Whoriskey Hugh P. Bell Scholarships Shana Watanabe Hsiang Yoh Prizes in Biology Matthew Morris , Michael Gavelis Developmental Biology Prize Adrienne

Gunawardena, Arunika

464

Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2007/08 University Medal in Biology Faiza Siddiqi, Ashley Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2007/08 University Medal in Biology Faiza Siddiqi, Ashley Smith University Medal in Marine Biology Shana Watanabe Hugh P. Bell Scholarships Faiza Siddiqi in Biology Jessica Arbour, Joshua Gillis Developmental Biology Award Joshua Amiel Teaching Assistants Awards

Gunawardena, Arunika

465

Graduates of 2003 Junaid Ahmad ---Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graduates of 2003 Junaid Ahmad --- Biology Theresa Alcorn --- Sports Management Iwona Antoniak and Communication Karis Carter --- Management Carrie Case --- Exercise Science Krishna Chaudhuri --- Biology Revelle Clark --- English Matthew Close --- Biology Kristina Cohen --- Biology David Corsar --- Environmental

466

Biological Interactions and Dynamics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien,Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray1.2 PNNL-20717

467

Biological and Environmental Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien,Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray1.2

468

Biology | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien,Biological Imaging by Soft Bioinformatics Nuclear

469

Brookhaven Symposium Biology 32  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScienceCareers ApplyResistant:NOAA-EPA UV BrewerandAaSymposium Biology

470

UC Merced Center for Computational Biology Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final report for the UC Merced Center for Computational Biology. The Center for Computational Biology (CCB) was established to support multidisciplinary scientific research and academic programs in computational biology at the new University of California campus in Merced. In 2003, the growing gap between biology research and education was documented in a report from the National Academy of Sciences, Bio2010 Transforming Undergraduate Education for Future Research Biologists. We believed that a new type of biological sciences undergraduate and graduate programs that emphasized biological concepts and considered biology as an information science would have a dramatic impact in enabling the transformation of biology. UC Merced as newest UC campus and the first new U.S. research university of the 21st century was ideally suited to adopt an alternate strategy - to create a new Biological Sciences majors and graduate group that incorporated the strong computational and mathematical vision articulated in the Bio2010 report. CCB aimed to leverage this strong commitment at UC Merced to develop a new educational program based on the principle of biology as a quantitative, model-driven science. Also we expected that the center would be enable the dissemination of computational biology course materials to other university and feeder institutions, and foster research projects that exemplify a mathematical and computations-based approach to the life sciences. As this report describes, the CCB has been successful in achieving these goals, and multidisciplinary computational biology is now an integral part of UC Merced undergraduate, graduate and research programs in the life sciences. The CCB began in fall 2004 with the aid of an award from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), under its Genomes to Life program of support for the development of research and educational infrastructure in the modern biological sciences. This report to DOE describes the research and academic programs made possible by the CCB from its inception until August, 2010, at the end of the final extension. Although DOE support for the center ended in August 2010, the CCB will continue to exist and support its original objectives. The research and academic programs fostered by the CCB have led to additional extramural funding from other agencies, and we anticipate that CCB will continue to provide support for quantitative and computational biology program at UC Merced for many years to come. Since its inception in fall 2004, CCB research projects have continuously had a multi-institutional collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, as well as individual collaborators at other sites. CCB affiliated faculty cover a broad range of computational and mathematical research including molecular modeling, cell biology, applied math, evolutional biology, bioinformatics, etc. The CCB sponsored the first distinguished speaker series at UC Merced, which had an important role is spreading the word about the computational biology emphasis at this new campus. One of CCB's original goals is to help train a new generation of biologists who bridge the gap between the computational and life sciences. To archive this goal, by summer 2006, a new program - summer undergraduate internship program, have been established under CCB to train the highly mathematical and computationally intensive Biological Science researchers. By the end of summer 2010, 44 undergraduate students had gone through this program. Out of those participants, 11 students have been admitted to graduate schools and 10 more students are interested in pursuing graduate studies in the sciences. The center is also continuing to facilitate the development and dissemination of undergraduate and graduate course materials based on the latest research in computational biology.

Colvin, Michael; Watanabe, Masakatsu

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

471

6/06/09 BS in Biology, Concentration in Marine Biology & Limnnology Bachelor of Science in Biology: Concentration in Marine Biology and Limnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6/06/09 BS in Biology, Concentration in Marine Biology & Limnnology Bachelor of Science in Biology: Concentration in Marine Biology and Limnology Department of Biology College of Science and Engineering Undergraduate Programs The concentration in Marine Biology and Limnology provides the foundations of chemistry

472

Biology Office Shauna C. Anderson, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biology Biology Office Shauna C. Anderson, Director 375 WIDB, (801) 422-4295 College of Biology program in biology has open enrollment. The Discipline A degree for students who desire a broad approach to biology, the major provides solid preparation for graduate schools in most fields of biology as well

Hart, Gus

473

Molecular cytogenetic characterization of a human thyroid cancercell line  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) increases significantly after exposure of the head and neck region to ionizing radiation, yet we know neither the steps involved in malignant transformation of thyroid epithelium nor the specific carcinogenic mode of action of radiation. Such increased tumor frequency became most evident in children after the 1986 nuclear accident in Chernobyl, Ukraine. In the twelve years following the accident, the average incidence of childhood PTCs (chPTC) increased over one hundred-fold compared to the rate of about 1 tumor incidence per 10{sup 6} children per year prior to 1986. To study the etiology of radiation-induced thyroid cancer, we formed an international consortium to investigate chromosomal changes and altered gene expression in cases of post-Chernobyl chPTC. Our approach is based on karyotyping of primary cultures established from chPTC specimens, establishment of cell lines and studies of genotype-phenotype relationships through high resolution chromosome analysis, DNA/cDNA micro-array studies, and mouse xenografts that test for tumorigenicity. Here, we report the application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based techniques for the molecular cytogenetic characterization of a highly tumorigenic chPTC cell line, S48TK, and its subclones. Using chromosome 9 rearrangements as an example, we describe a new approach termed ''BAC-FISH'' to rapidly delineate chromosomal breakpoints, an important step towards a better understanding of the formation of translocations and their functional consequences.

Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Tuton, Tiffany B.; Ito, Yuko; Chu, LisaW.; Lu, Chung-Mei; Baumgartner, Adolf; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier,Jingly F.

2006-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

474

Molecular heat pump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a novel molecular device that pumps heat against a thermal gradient. The system consists of a molecular element connecting two thermal reservoirs that are characterized by different spectral properties. The pumping action is achieved by applying an external force that periodically modulates molecular levels. This modulation affects periodic oscillations of the internal temperature of the molecule and the strength of its coupling to each reservoir resulting in a net heat flow in the desired direction. The heat flow is examined in the slow and fast modulation limits and for different modulation waveforms, thus making it possible to optimize the device performance.

Dvira Segal; Abraham Nitzan

2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

475

Accelerated molecular dynamics methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The molecular dynamics method, although extremely powerful for materials simulations, is limited to times scales of roughly one microsecond or less. On longer time scales, dynamical evolution typically consists of infrequent events, which are usually activated processes. This course is focused on understanding infrequent-event dynamics, on methods for characterizing infrequent-event mechanisms and rate constants, and on methods for simulating long time scales in infrequent-event systems, emphasizing the recently developed accelerated molecular dynamics methods (hyperdynamics, parallel replica dynamics, and temperature accelerated dynamics). Some familiarity with basic statistical mechanics and molecular dynamics methods will be assumed.

Perez, Danny [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

476

COMPLEX BIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS: CYCLIC, OSCILLATORY,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPLEX BIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS: CYCLIC, OSCILLATORY, AND AUTONOMOUS William Bechtel and Adele- nomological framework and its focus on laws as the primary explanatory vehicle; for them, a scientific

Bechtel, William

477

Plant Vascular Biology 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

Ding, Biao

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

478

Network biology methods integrating biological data for translational science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

types into a biologically meaningful frame- work suitable for joint analysis. Biological regulation, driving cooperation or competition be- tween different genes and proteins, are hallmarks of population is Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Proteomics and Bioinformatics at Case

Koyuturk, Mehmet

479

Theory of Molecular Machines. I. Channel Capacity of Molecular Machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theory of Molecular Machines. I. Channel Capacity of Molecular Machines running title: Channel Capacity of Molecular Machines Thomas D. Schneider version = 5.76 of ccmm.tex 2004 Feb 3 Version 5.67 was submitted 1990 December 5 Schneider, T. D. (1991). Theory of molecular machines. I. Channel capacity

Schneider, Thomas D.

480

A determination of air-sea gas exchange and upper ocean biological production from five noble gasses and tritiugenic helium-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The five noble gases (helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon) are biologically and chemically inert, making them ideal oceanographic tracers. Additionally, the noble gases have a wide range of solubilities and molecular ...

Stanley, Rachel H. R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Statistical Inference for Big Data Problems in Molecular Biophysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We highlight the role of statistical inference techniques in providing biological insights from analyzing long time-scale molecular simulation data. Technologi- cal and algorithmic improvements in computation have brought molecular simu- lations to the forefront of techniques applied to investigating the basis of living systems. While these longer simulations, increasingly complex reaching petabyte scales presently, promise a detailed view into microscopic behavior, teasing out the important information has now become a true challenge on its own. Mining this data for important patterns is critical to automating therapeutic intervention discovery, improving protein design, and fundamentally understanding the mech- anistic basis of cellular homeostasis.

Ramanathan, Arvind [ORNL; Savol, Andrej [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh PA; Burger, Virginia [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh PA; Quinn, Shannon [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh PA; Agarwal, Pratul K [ORNL; Chennubhotla, Chakra [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh PA

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2003 through September 30, 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) has been successfully operating the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by PSU, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with PSU responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes PSU and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. A second contract was executed with DOE NETL starting in October 2003 to continue the activities of CPCPC. An annual funding meeting was held in October 2003 and the council selected 10 projects for funding. Base funding for the projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the various subcontractors on March 1, 2004.

Andresen, John; Schobert, Harold; Miller, Bruce G

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2008/09 University Medal in Biology Alyssa Byers-Heinlein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2008/09 University Medal in Biology Alyssa Byers-Heinlein University Medal in Marine Biology Matthew Morris Avery Prize Jessica Arbour Hugh P. Bell Scholarships, Mark Youden Ming Fang Li Memorial Prize Kristin Dinning Shao Hua and Wen Hsiang Yoh Prizes in Biology

Gunawardena, Arunika

484

Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2011/12 University Medal in Biology Jaime Wertman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2011/12 University Medal in Biology Jaime Wertman University Medal in Marine Biology Cylia Civelek Hugh P. Bell Scholarships Sarah McBoyle, Lauren Kay, Daniel Prize Fiona Francis Shao Hua and Wen Hsiang Yoh Prizes in Biology Jenna Kuzniar, Brandon Scott

Gunawardena, Arunika

485

Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2010/11 University Medal in Biology Jennifer Kalil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biology/Marine Biology Prizes/Awards/Scholarships 2010/11 University Medal in Biology Jennifer Kalil University Medal in Marine Biology John O'Brien University Silver Medal John O'Brien Hugh P. Bell Prize Matthew Yates Shao Hua and Wen Hsiang Yoh Prizes in Biology Sarah McBoyle, Teagan Shlapak

Gunawardena, Arunika

486

Guidelines Graduate Studies In Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Biology Virginia Commonwealth University 1000 W. Cary St. Richmond, VA 23284-2012 Telephone: Application for Independent Study (BIOL 692) 19 #12;1 Introduction This document is intended to serve. The Master of Science program for the graduate student in biology is administered by the College

Bukaveckas, Paul A.

487

Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Graduate Handbook 2011-2012 University of California OVERVIEW The Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB) Graduate Program at UCSC reflects the remarkable local related fields as they acquire mastery in their areas of specialization. The graduate program in Ecology

California at Santa Cruz, University of

488

Staunton State Park Biological Inventory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Staunton State Park Biological Inventory Prepared by: Susan Spackman, David Anderson, Jeremy Biological Inventory Prepared by: Susan Spackman, David Anderson, Jeremy Siemers, Phyllis Pineda, and Jill. The information management staff with CNHP was responsible for integrating the data resulting from the inventory

489

Purdue extension Agricultural&Biological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for an extended period and encourage biological treatment to minimize organic matter (BOD), nitrogenPurdue extension Don Jones Agricultural&Biological Engineering Alan Sutton AnimalSciences Purdue structures must be designed and managed to contain manure, wastewater, contaminated runoff, and ma- nure

490

Biology The Science of Life Minor Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biology ­ The Science of Life Minor Requirements To minor in Biology students must complete the following courses (33-36 units): BIOL105 General Biology I BIOL106 General Biology II BIOL212 Cell Physiology (pre-requisite: minimum C- in General Biology BIOL105 and BIOL106) BIOL310 Genetics (prequisite

Galles, David

491

Imperial College Institute of Systems Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Imperial College Institute of Systems Biology Autumn Symposium on Systems and Synthetic Biology 13 Biology will bring together the considerable expertise that underpins Systems Biology across Imperial College. The Institute aims to be at the forefront of both national and international systems biology

492

Experimental Data from the Proteomics Research Center for Integrative Biology  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The possible roles and importance of proteomics are rapidly growing across essentially all areas of biological research. The precise and comprehensive measurement of levels of expressed proteins and their modified forms can provide new insights into the molecular nature of cell-signaling pathways and networks, the cell cycle, cellular differentiation, and other processes relevant to understanding human health and the progression of various disease states. The ability to characterize protein complexes complements this capability, allowing hypotheses to be tested and the biological system operation to be defined. The Proteomics Research Center for Integrative Biology is a national user facility established and funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences component of the National Institutes of Health. This Center has been established to serve the biomedical research community by developing and integrating new proteomic technologies for collaborative and service studies, disseminating the new technologies, and training scientists in their use. The Center is housed in DOEs William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Smith, Richard D.

493

Loop Quantum Theory Applied to Biology and Nonlinear Whole Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The loop quantum theory, which constitutes a very small discontinuous space, as new method is applied to biology. The model of protein folding and lungs is proposed. In the model, some known results are used, and four approximate conclusions are obtained: their structures are quantized, their space regions are finite, various singularities correspond to folding and crossed points, and different types of catastrophe exist. Further, based on the inseparability and correlativity of the biological systems, the nonlinear whole biology is proposed, and four basic hypotheses are formed. It may unify reductionism and holism, structuralism and functionalism. Finally, the medical meaning of the theory is discussed briefly.

Yi-Fang Chang

2008-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

494

Mesangial cell biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mesangial cells originate from the metanephric mesenchyme and maintain structural integrity of the glomerular microvascular bed and mesangial matrix homeostasis. In response to metabolic, immunologic or hemodynamic injury, these cells undergo apoptosis or acquire an activated phenotype and undergo hypertrophy, proliferation with excessive production of matrix proteins, growth factors, chemokines and cytokines. These soluble factors exert autocrine and paracrine effects on the cells or on other glomerular cells, respectively. MCs are primary targets of immune-mediated glomerular diseases such as IGA nephropathy or metabolic diseases such as diabetes. MCs may also respond to injury that primarily involves podocytes and endothelial cells or to structural and genetic abnormalities of the glomerular basement membrane. Signal transduction and oxidant stress pathways are activated in MCs and likely represent integrated input from multiple mediators. Such responses are convenient targets for therapeutic intervention. Studies in cultured MCs should be supplemented with in vivo studies as well as examination of freshly isolated cells from normal and diseases glomeruli. In addition to ex vivo morphologic studies in kidney cortex, cells should be studied in their natural environment, isolated glomeruli or even tissue slices. Identification of a specific marker of MCs should help genetic manipulation as well as selective therapeutic targeting of these cells. Identification of biological responses of MCs that are not mediated by the reninangiotensin system should help development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies to treat diseases characterized by MC pathology.

Abboud, Hanna E., E-mail: Abboud@uthscsa.edu

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

495

Efficiency at maximum power of interacting molecular machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the efficiency of systems of molecular motors operating at maximum power. We consider two models of kinesin motors on a microtubule: for both the simplified and the detailed model, we find that the many-body exclusion effect enhances the efficiency at maximum power of the many-motor system, with respect to the single motor case. Remarkably, we find that this effect occurs in a limited region of the system parameters, compatible with the biologically relevant range.

N. Golubeva; A. Imparato

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

496

Comparative Microbial Genomics group CenterforBiologicalSequenceanalysisDepartmentofSystemsBiology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparative Microbial Genomics group CenterforBiologicalSequenceanalysisDepartmentofSystemsBiology Visualisation of Large Amounts of Data Dave Ussery 27 February, 2008 #12;Comparative Microbial Genomics group CenterforBiologicalSequenceanalysisDepartmentofSystemsBiology #12;Comparative Microbial Genomics group

Ussery, David W.

497

Attention Biology Grad Students: Are you an aspiring college biology professor?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Attention Biology Grad Students: Are you an aspiring college biology professor teaching skills with community college students. Collaborate with Community College Biology Instructors online ccbfest.org Deadline Friday, May 1st , 2011 CCB FEST: Community College Biology Faculty

498

Biological Interaction Networks Based on Sparse Temporal Expansion of Graphical Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This problem has two aspects. Firstly, the lack of features experimental samples (genes/proteins) when in the context of gene and protein sequence analysis in molecular biology. Microarrays and proteomics technology compared to the number of observed genes/proteins makes the inference of the network structure quite

Garofalakis, Minos

499

JBC/2012/413260 Revision Identification of Biologically Relevant Enhancers in Human Erythroid Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

erythroid cells, a highly specialized cell type evolved to provide adequate amounts of oxygen throughout cells that have evolved to efficiently carry out their primary functions of oxygen transport and Molecular Biology, Center for Comparative Genomics and Bioinformatics, the Pennsylvania State University

Hardison, Ross C.

500

HNCO in molecular clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a survey of 18 molecular clouds, HNCO J/sub K/-1K1..-->..J'/sub K/'-1K'1 = 5/sub 05/..-->..4/sub 05/ and 4/sub 04/..-->..3/sub 03/ emission was etected in seven clouds, and possibly in one other. Emission in these transitions originates in high-density regions (n> or approx. =10/sup 6/ cm/sup -3/). The molecule's excitation requirements allow us to derive limits to excitation temperatures an optical depths. We discuss the possibility of clumping with respect to the beam and compare our results with data from other molecular species. The HNCO emission from Sgr A is an ordder of magnitude larger than the other detected sources as is the ratio ..delta..T +- /sub A/(HNCO 5/sub 05/..-->..4/sub 04/)/..delta..T +- /sub A/(C/sup 18/O 1..-->..0). HNCO is probably a constituent of most molecular clouds.

Jackson, J.M.; Armstrong, J.T.; Barrett, A.H.

1984-05-15T23:59:59.000Z