National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for molecular biology consortium

  1. Consortium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingConcentrating Solar DeploymentOilExperience |Consortium

  2. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Insect Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Insect Molecular Biology 03/21/2014 POSITION: Research Associate LOCATION in entomology, biochemistry, molecular biology and/or toxicology; extensive research experience in entomology, biochemistry, cell biology and/or molecular biology; excellent organizational, and written and interpersonal

  3. Connecting Genomic Alterations to Cancer Biology with Proteomics: The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, Matthew; Gillette, Michael; Carr, Steven A.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Townsend, Reid; Kinsinger, Christopher; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Liebler, Daniel

    2013-10-03

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium is applying the latest generation of proteomic technologies to genomically annotated tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program, a joint initiative of the NCI and the National Human Genome Research Institute. By providing a fully integrated accounting of DNA, RNA, and protein abnormalities in individual tumors, these datasets will illuminate the complex relationship between genomic abnormalities and cancer phenotypes, thus producing biologic insights as well as a wave of novel candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets amenable to verifi cation using targeted mass spectrometry methods.

  4. Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology Thomas E. Creighton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oster, George

    Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology Thomas E. Creighton ISBN: 0-471-15302-8 ATP Synthase: Two rotary be divided into two operational regions denoted Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 4 Volume Set Thomas E

  5. LifeMEETSscience Biochemistry, Molecular Biology & Biophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    LifeMEETSscience Biochemistry, Molecular Biology & Biophysics Science Meets Life. Minnesota with the guidance of internationally-renowned scientists in the Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics (BMBB that is a hallmark of the Twin Cities and Minnesota. The Biochemistry, Molecular Biology & Biophysics Graduate

  6. Molecular Biology The molecular biology major at Stetson University is designed for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miles, Will

    Molecular Biology The molecular biology major at Stetson University is designed for students interested in the interface between the life sciences and physical sciences. Molecular biology is an interdisciplinary science that uses the techniques of biology and chemistry to examine genetic inheritance

  7. BE.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials, Fall 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shuguang, Dr.

    Basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. Molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, including collagen, silk, bone, protein adhesives, GFP, self-assembling peptides. Molecular ...

  8. BE.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shuguang, Dr.

    Basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. Molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, including collagen, silk, bone, protein adhesives, GFP, self-assembling peptides. Molecular ...

  9. Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Department of Environmental and Biomolecular Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Department of Environmental and Biomolecular Systems Program Requirement Checklists Fall 2007 ­ Summer 2008 Master of Science ­ Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.............................................................2 Doctor of Philosophy ­ Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

  10. THE MOLECULAR BIOLOGY INSTITUTE AND THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grether, Gregory

    THE MOLECULAR BIOLOGY INSTITUTE AND THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY Three Nominees in Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Chemistry at UCLA #12;

  11. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, M.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Lippman, M. [Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)] [comps.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  12. Frontiers of NMR in Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-08-25

    NMR spectroscopy is expanding the horizons of structural biology by determining the structures and describing the dynamics of blobular proteins in aqueous solution, as well as other classes of proteins including membrane proteins and the polypeptides that form the aggregates diagnostic of prion and amyloid diseases. Significant results are also emerging on DNA and RNA oligomers and their complexes with proteins. This meeting focused attention on key structural questions emanating from molecular biology and how NMR spectroscopy can be used to answer them.

  13. Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomes, R.

    1998-09-01

    Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

  14. Molecular Biology Basics Planning Restriction Enzyme Digests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aris, John P.

    Molecular Biology Basics Planning Restriction Enzyme Digests A. Checklist: Buffer type Addition of BSA Optimum temperature Number of units of enzyme B. Plan to digest DNA with an "excess" of enzyme activity. Plan for the "excess" to be divided between time of digestion and number of units of enzyme

  15. BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Announcement Course: Biochemistry 301, Biochemistry Laboratory Number of Positions: It is anticipated the supervision of a faculty member in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of B

  16. BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Announcement, 2013 Course: Biochemistry 301, Biochemistry Laboratory Number of Positions: It is anticipated the supervision of a faculty member in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of B

  17. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Program College of Science and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    FACH06-11 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Program College of Science and Management Senior, in conjunction with the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Program, invites applications for a full-time eight support for undergraduate courses in the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology major. Duties include

  18. Systems biology analysis of Escherichia coli for discovery and metabolic engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Jeffrey David

    2012-01-01

    the unification of biology. The Gene Ontology Consortium.cellular and molecular biology. 2nd ed. 1996, ASM Press:Journal of Theoretical Biology, 1993. 165(4): p. 503- Feist,

  19. 2011 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism, & Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keneth Stedman

    2011-08-05

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  20. 2009 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism & Molecular Biology GRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Julie Maupin- Furlow

    2009-07-26

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses; and industrial applications. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  1. Modulhandbuch M.Sc. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Title of the module Basics in biochemistry and molecular cell biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    Modulhandbuch M.Sc. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Title of the module Basics in biochemistry and molecular cell biology Term/semester Winter term / 1 VAK-Number Will be assigned centrally Credit points 9 representative Prof. S. Kelm Instructors Prof. S. Kelm (Biochemistry), Prof. R. Stick (Cell Biology), Prof. A

  2. Modulhandbuch M.Sc. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Title of the module Selected aspects of biochemistry and molecular biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    Modulhandbuch M.Sc. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Title of the module Selected aspects of biochemistry and molecular biology Term/semester Summer term / 2 VAK-Number Credit points 6 ECTS Compulsory Instructors Prof. S. Kelm (Biochemistry), Prof. Stick (Cell Biology), Prof. R. Dringen (Biochemistry) Examiner

  3. Multispectral optical tweezers for molecular diagnostics of single biological cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Multispectral optical tweezers for molecular diagnostics of single biological cells Author, Townes Laser Institute, CREOL ­ The College of Optics and Photonics, Univ. of Central Florida (United States) ABSTRACT Optical trapping of single biological cells has become an established technique

  4. Molecular & Cellular Biology Program Departmental Retreats Autumn 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    Molecular & Cellular Biology Program Departmental Retreats ­ Autumn 2014 Z:\\FRONT DESK DOCUMENTS Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC) 1100 Fairview Ave. N. Seattle, WA 98109-1024 Molecular & Cellular

  5. UBC Biochemistry Comprehensive Exam Guidelines Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    UBC Biochemistry Comprehensive Exam Guidelines Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Comprehensive Examination Guidelines 20132014 #12;UBC Biochemistry Comprehensive Exam Guidelines Table #12;UBC Biochemistry Comprehensive Exam Guidelines

  6. Third international congress of plant molecular biology: Molecular biology of plant growth and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallick, R.B.

    1995-02-01

    The Congress was held October 6-11, 1991 in Tucson with approximately 3000 scientists attending and over 300 oral presentations and 1800 posters. Plant molecular biology is one of the most rapidly developing areas of the biological sciences. Recent advances in the ability to isolate genes, to study their expression, and to create transgenic plants have had a major impact on our understanding of the many fundamental plant processes. In addition, new approaches have been created to improve plants for agricultural purposes. This is a book of presentation and posters from the conference.

  7. 2010 Plant Molecular Biology Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Sussman

    2010-07-23

    The Plant Molecular Biology Conference has traditionally covered a breadth of exciting topics and the 2010 conference will continue in that tradition. Emerging concerns about food security have inspired a program with three main themes: (1) genomics, natural variation and breeding to understand adaptation and crop improvement, (2) hormonal cross talk, and (3) plant/microbe interactions. There are also sessions on epigenetics and proteomics/metabolomics. Thus this conference will bring together a range of disciplines, will foster the exchange of ideas and enable participants to learn of the latest developments and ideas in diverse areas of plant biology. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for individuals to discuss their research because additional speakers in each session will be selected from submitted abstracts. There will also be a poster session each day for a two-hour period prior to dinner. In particular, this conference plays a key role in enabling students and postdocs (the next generation of research leaders) to mingle with pioneers in multiple areas of plant science.

  8. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 17, 52415252, December 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wessel, Gary M.

    Proteome after Self-AssociationD Julian L. Wong and Gary M. Wessel Department of Molecular BiologyMolecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 17, 5241­5252, December 2006 Rendezvin: An Essential Gene. On fertiliza- tion in sea urchins, the contents of cortical granules are secreted and rapidly assemble

  9. BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Announcement 12, 2013 Course: Biochemistry 421, Recombinant DNA Techniques Number of Positions: Three one the supervision of a faculty member in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of B

  10. BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Announcement 1, 2014 Course: Biochemistry 421, Recombinant DNA Techniques Number of Positions: Three one the supervision of a faculty member in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of B

  11. MOLECULAR CELL BIOLOGY: FALL SEMESTER, 2010 BIOL 213 SYLLABUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summers, Max D.

    biotechnology, genetic engineering, M.D./Ph. D. programs or basic biological study and research. Honors MCB 213://www.tamu.edu/admissions/catalogs/ Benefit to students taking the The students will learn the basic details of molecular and course: cellularMOLECULAR CELL BIOLOGY: FALL SEMESTER, 2010 BIOL 213 SYLLABUS www.tamu.edu/summerslab/ I. Basic

  12. Genome Clone Libraries and Data from the Integrated Molecular Analysis of Genomes and their Expression (I.M.A.G.E.) Consortium

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The I.M.A.G.E. Consortium was initiated in 1993 by four academic groups on a collaborative basis after informal discussions led to a common vision of how to achieve an important goal in the study of the human genome: the Integrated Molecular Analysis of Genomes and their Expression Consortium's primary goal is to create arrayed cDNA libraries and associated bioinformatics tools, and make them publicly available to the research community. The primary organisms of interest include intensively studied mammalian species, including human, mouse, rat and non-human primate species. The Consortium has also focused on several commonly studied model organisms; as part of this effort it has arrayed cDNAs from zebrafish, and Fugu (pufferfish) as well as Xenopus laevis and X. tropicalis (frog). Utilizing high speed robotics, over nine million individual cDNA clones have been arrayed into 384-well microtiter plates, and sufficient replicas have been created to distribute copies both to sequencing centers and to a network of five distributors located worldwide. The I.M.A.G.E. Consortium represents the world's largest public cDNA collection, and works closely with the National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection(MGC) to help it achieve its goal of creating a full-length cDNA clone for every human and mouse gene. I.M.A.G.E. is also a member of the ORFeome Collaboration, working to generate a complete set of expression-ready open reading frame clones representing each human gene. Custom informatics tools have been developed in support of these projects to better allow the research community to select clones of interest and track and collect all data deposited into public databases about those clones and their related sequences. I.M.A.G.E. clones are publicly available, free of any royalties, and may be used by anyone agreeing with the Consortium's guidelines.

  13. Biology BS, Molecular Cell Biology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Biology BS, Molecular Cell Biology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title 160 or MATH 170 4 DLN BIOL 191 General Biology I 4 DLN CHEM 111, 111L General Chemistry I with Lab 4 in a first field 3 DLS Social Sciences course in a second field 3 BIOL 192 General Biology II 4 BIOL 301 Cell

  14. Protein NMR Techniques, 3rd Methods in Molecular Biology, Springer Verlag (Humana Press), 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linsley, Braddock K.

    Protein NMR Techniques, 3rd ed. Methods in Molecular Biology, Springer Verlag (Humana Press), 2011, Methods in Molecular Biology Series, Springer Verlag (Humana Press), Winter 2011. #12;

  15. BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Announcement 12, 2013 Course: Biochemistry 302, General Biochemistry Number of Positions: It is anticipated: Application forms are available from Biochemistry website (www.biochem.ubc.ca) and should be submitted

  16. BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Announcement Course: Biochemistry 202, Introductory Medical Biochemistry Number of Positions: It is anticipated-II: $2,839.00 Application: Application forms are available from Biochemistry website (www

  17. BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Announcement Course: Biochemistry 410, General Biochemistry Number of Positions: one quarter time Qualifications-II: $2,839.00 Application: Application forms are available from Biochemistry website (www

  18. Taiwan International Graduate Program --Molecular and Biological Agricultural Sciences Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taiwan International Graduate Program -- Molecular and Biological Agricultural Sciences Introduction Taiwan's academic interest in agricultural sciences began in earnest about 40 years ago with a breeding program in Taiwan's local rice varieties. Since then, various life science research institutes

  19. Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology 97 (2008) 115157 Scale relativity theory and integrative systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nottale, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology 97 (2008) 115­157 Review Scale relativity theory and integrative systems biology: 2 Macroscopic quantum-type mechanics Laurent Nottalea,b , Charles Auffrayb Meudon, France b Functional Genomics and Systems Biology for Health, UMR 7091-LGN, CNRS/Pierre & Marie

  20. BioFrameNet: A FrameNet Extension to the Domain of Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolbey, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Walter. 2002. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 4 th Edition.Natural Language Processing and Systems Biology. Artificialand Tools for Systems Biology: 147­174. Werner Dubitzky and

  1. MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY Introduction to Physical Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY MBB 323-3 Introduction to Physical Biochemistry DAY Fall 2007 theories of physics and chemistry, called thermodynamics, kinetics, and statistical mechanics, form for measuring physical properties of biological molecules are discussed, along with the models which

  2. CSMB | Center for Structural Molecular Biology | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    it. The suite of tools being developed by the CSMB includes: Bio-SANS, a Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) facility for biological samples, has been completed at the ORNL...

  3. Carbon Fiber Consortium | Partnerships | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Fiber Consortium SHARE Carbon Fiber Consortium Oak Ridge Carbon Fiber Composites Consortium The Oak Ridge Carbon Fiber Composites Consortium was established in 2011 to...

  4. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 11, 14991507, May 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trask, Barbara Crippes

    that tropoelastin can self-assemble in vitro (Bressan et al., 1986; Vrhovski et al., 1997), it is generally acceptedMolecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 11, 1499­1507, May 2000 The Microfibrillar Proteins MAGP-1 proteins is important for elastic fiber assembly because inhibition of sulfation was shown to prevent

  5. Computational Molecular Biology of Genome Expression and Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computational Molecular Biology of Genome Expression and Regulation Michael Q. Zhang, Ph.D. Cold in genome expression and regulation network in which better modern statistical and machine learning referring to the cellular processes that lead to pro- tein production, is controlled and regulated

  6. Computational approaches to discovering semantics in molecular biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipton, R.J. ); Marr, T.G. . Theoretical Div.); Welsh, J.D. . Dept. of Biology)

    1989-07-01

    One of the central questions of molecular biology is the discovery of the semantics of DNA. This discovery relies in a critical way on a variety of expensive computations. In order to solve these computations, both parallel computers and special-purpose hardware play a major role.

  7. Genomics and computational molecular biology Douglas L Brutlag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brutlag, Doug

    340 Genomics and computational molecular biology Douglas L Brutlag There has been a dramatic increase in the number of completely sequenced bacterial genomes during the past two years as a result of the efforts both of public genome agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. The availability of completely

  8. BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Announcement Course: Biochemistry 203, Fundamentals of Biochemistry Number of Positions: It is anticipated-I: $2,950.36 GTA-II: $2,839.00 Application: Application forms are available from Biochemistry website

  9. BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Announcement Course: Biochemistry 203, Fundamentals of Biochemistry Number of Positions: It is anticipated,835.50 GTA-II: $2,728.50 Application: Application forms are available from Biochemistry website (www

  10. BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Announcement Course: Biochemistry 302, General Biochemistry Number of Positions: It is anticipated that the equivalent: Application forms are available from Biochemistry website (www.biochem.ubc.ca) and should be submitted

  11. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology PhD Comprehensive Exam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology PhD Comprehensive Exam Form One Suggested Examination Topics Examination Topics: 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) Suggested Examiners: 1) Dr. 2) Dr. 3) Dr. 4) Dr. #12;Biochemistry. Dr. 3. Dr. 4. Dr. Exam Chair #12;Biochemistry

  12. BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Announcement Course: Biochemistry 302, General Biochemistry Number of Positions: It is anticipated that the equivalent from Biochemistry website (www.biochem.ubc.ca) and should be submitted to Sabrina Cheng by February 28

  13. BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Announcement Course: Biochemistry 302, General Biochemistry Number of Positions: It is anticipated that the equivalent from Biochemistry website (www.biochem.ubc.ca) and should be submitted to Sabrina Cheng by March 11

  14. Review article Molecular biology of fish viruses: a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Review article Molecular biology of fish viruses: a review J Bernard, M Brémont* INRA, laboratoire aspects in the fish virus studies. Although more than 50 different fish virus have been isolated family, the fish lym- phocystis disease virus (FLDV) is the most studied. Retroviridae have been recently

  15. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 18, 24912502, July 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvi, Brian R.

    are linked to other events that drive progression through the cell cycle by regulating the activityMolecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 18, 2491­2502, July 2007 Developmental and Cell Cycle Regulation zygotic histone transcription begins during nuclear cycle 11. Whereas the HLB is found in all cells after

  16. 10/29/12 EBS AY12/13 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    to Molecular Biology EBS 514 ­ Metabolism and Bioenergetics Advanced Elective Courses (16 credits, including EBS 514 ­ Metabolism and Bioenergetics Advanced Elective Courses (8 credits, including special topics 613 ­ Introduction to Molecular Biology EBS 614 ­ Metabolism and Bioenergetics Advanced Elec

  17. 4/30/13 EBS AY13/14 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    to Molecular Biology EBS 514 ­ Metabolism and Bioenergetics Advanced Elective Courses (16 credits, including EBS 514 ­ Metabolism and Bioenergetics Advanced Elective Courses (8 credits, including special topics 613 ­ Introduction to Molecular Biology EBS 614 ­ Metabolism and Bioenergetics Advanced Elective

  18. 12/15/11 EBS AY11/12 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    to Molecular Biology EBS 514 ­ Metabolism and Bioenergetics Advanced Elective Courses (16 credits, including EBS 514 ­ Metabolism and Bioenergetics Advanced Elective Courses (8 credits, including special topics 613 ­ Introduction to Molecular Biology EBS 614 ­ Metabolism and Bioenergetics Advanced Elec

  19. Revised 7/19/2011 B.S. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Degree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microbiology 4 BL3300 Introduction to Genomics 3 BL4030 Molecular Biology 3 CH4995 Undergrad Research

  20. SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PH.D. IN MOLECULAR AND CELL BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PH.D. IN MOLECULAR AND CELL BIOLOGY The Graduate Committee: Bruce.D. students: Biol 103b (Mechanisms of Cell Function), Biol 105b (Molecular Biology) and Biol 200a (Proseminar-level) and be listed or cross-listed in the Molecular and Cell Biology section of the Brandeis Bulletin (http

  1. People and Progress 2013-2014 UConn Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    People and Progress 2013- 2014 UConn Department of Molecular and Cell Biology In this Issue of the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the Univeristy about either publication to Department of Molecular & Cell Biology, University of Connecticut, 91 North

  2. Chemical Biology and Molecular Biophysics Program (CBMB) in Drug Discovery and Biotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    Chemical Biology and Molecular Biophysics Program (CBMB) in Drug Discovery and Biotechnology-2014), and Director Ching-Shih Chen, the Chemical Biology and Molecular Biophysics Program in Drug Discovery their expertise. Starting in autumn 2009, the program is divided into two tracks: Chemical Biology (CB) track

  3. Multimedia in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education Proteopedia: 3D Visualization and Annotation of Transcription

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    Multimedia in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education Proteopedia: 3D Visualization. Compeau§, and Remo Rohs From the Molecular and Computational Biology Program, Departments of Biological-DNA recognition, Hox, p53, DNA shape. Proteopedia is an online encyclopedia designed to illustrate the three

  4. Catalyst Manufacturing Consortium (CMC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muzzio, Fernando J.

    segment of the US industry, including the petroleum, chemical, pharmaceutical, automotive, and energy, extrusion, calcination, etc. This is integrated with a number of educational activities including research in the consortium is $37,000. These are unrestricted funds for research. The consortium members (companies

  5. 2012 PLANT MOLECULAR BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JULY 15-20, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sussman, Michael

    2013-07-20

    The 2012 Gordon Conference on Plant Molecular Biology will present cutting-edge research on molecular aspects of plant growth and development, with particular emphasis on recent discoveries in molecular mechanisms involved with plant signaling systems. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics in plant molecular biology including hormone receptors and early events in hormone signaling, plant perception of and response to plant pathogen and symbionts, as well as technological and biological aspects of epigenomics particularly as it relates to signaling systems that regulate plant growth and development. Genomic approaches to plant signaling will be emphasized, including genomic profiling technologies for quantifying various biological subsystems, such as the epigenome, transcriptome, phosphorylome, and metabolome. The meeting will include an important session devoted to answering the question, "What are the biological and technological limits of plant breeding/genetics, and how can they be solved"?

  6. DBBS Alumni 1977 to 2011 Carl Parker, Ph.D. Molecular Biology Lab of Dr. Robert Roeder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gereau, Robert W. IV

    .D. Molecular Biology Lab of Dr. Rosalind R. Kornfeld David Cox, Ph.D. Evolutionary Biology and Ecology Lab. Valeriote Alfonso Gonzalez Noriega, Ph.D. Cellular, Developmental, & Systemic Biology Lab of Dr. William W. Barbara G. Pickard 1981 James Bartles, Ph.D. Molecular Biology Lab of Dr. William A. Frazier Stewart

  7. Collection Policy: BIOCHEMISTRY, MOLECULAR AND CELL BIOLOGY Subject Scope | Priority Tables | Other policies . . .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Collection Policy: BIOCHEMISTRY, MOLECULAR AND CELL BIOLOGY Subject Scope | Priority Tables | Other The Section teaches courses on the following subjects: general biochemistry, bimolecular structure crystallography, ethical issues and professional responsibilities, and laboratory courses in biochemistry

  8. Mini-review Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV): Molecular biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damania, Blossom

    Mini-review Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV): Molecular biology and oncogenesis Kwun in revised form 10 July 2009 Accepted 13 July 2009 Available online xxxx Keywords: KSHV Oncogenesis AIDS

  9. n. ISBN Title Subject 1 9780444519245 Comprehensive Molecular Insect Science Agricultural and Biological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malerba, Donato

    and Molecular Biology 21 9780080967011 Comprehensive Polymer Science Chemical Engineering 22 9780444531537 Comprehensive Semiconductor Science and Technology Chemical Engineering 23 9780444527455 Encyclopedia of Electrochemical Power Sources Chemical Engineering 24 9780080878621 Polymer Science: A Comprehensive Reference

  10. 2012 CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 17 - 22, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judith Berman

    2012-06-22

    The Gordon Research Conference on CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY was held at Holderness School, Holderness New Hampshire, June 17 - 22, 2012. The 2012 Gordon Conference on Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology (CMFB) will present the latest, cutting-edge research on the exciting and growing field of molecular and cellular aspects of fungal biology. Topics will range from yeast to filamentous fungi, from model systems to economically important organisms, and from saprophytes and commensals to pathogens of plants and animals. The CMFB conference will feature a wide range of topics including systems biology, cell biology and morphogenesis, organismal interactions, genome organisation and regulation, pathogenesis, energy metabolism, biomass production and population genomics. The Conference was well-attended with 136 participants. Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings.

  11. Workshop in computational molecular biology, April 15, 1991--April 14, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tavare, S.

    1995-04-12

    Funds from this award were used to the Workshop in Computational Molecular Biology, `91 Symposium entitled Interface: Computing Science and Statistics, Seattle, Washington, April 21, 1991; the Workshop in Statistical Issues in Molecular Biology held at Stanford, California, August 8, 1993; and the Session on Population Genetics a part of the 56th Annual Meeting, Institute of Mathematical Statistics, San Francisco, California, August 9, 1993.

  12. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 20, 29432953, June 15, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hancock, William O.

    , play an inconsequential role in mediating MT bending in LLC-PK1 cells and that MT-based molecular mechanical forces control the spatial distribution of the MT array. INTRODUCTION Microtubules (MTs) are self-assemblingMolecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 20, 2943­2953, June 15, 2009 Anterograde Microtubule Transport

  13. BIOC 35400 Biochemistry: Molecular Biology of the Gene `The Central Dogma'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIOC 35400 ­ Biochemistry: Molecular Biology of the Gene `The Central Dogma' Spring 2014 Ithaca Description: Biochemistry is the study of the molecular basis for life processes. This course is an upper or research careers. In Biochemistry : Protein Structure & Function, we cover structures of major biomolecules

  14. Media Contacts: Molecular Biology Initiative, Georgia Southern University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    (biotechnology, chemistry, physics, biology, forensics), including applicable technology and math skills. "This-ready workforce needed to fill these jobs and we applaud them for standing out as leaders in Georgia's educational

  15. Chapter Fourteen Telescope Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    206 Chapter Fourteen Telescope Consortium Paul Leath (1995-2000) When Allen Robbins stepped down, and all other universities. Also in 1998, U.S. News & World Report ranked the Rutgers program 16th.S. in High Energy Elementary Particle Physics, 6th among public universities.4 This assessment was followed

  16. Stakeholder Consortium Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    Stakeholder Consortium Meeting March 22, 2013 Susan Riha Director, NYS Water Resources Institute at Cornell University New York State Water Resources Institute #12;NY's Water Infrastructure Wastewater 610 septic systems 22,000 miles of sewer pipes many systems over 35 years old Water Supply over 10

  17. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 12, 27562766, September 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Janet M.

    Sequence of the Dnm1p GTPase Regulates Self-Assembly and Controls a Rate-limiting Step in Mitochondrial assembles to form rings or collars that surround mitochondrial tubules. Based on previous findings, a K705AMolecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 12, 2756­2766, September 2001 The GTPase Effector Domain

  18. Computational Molecular Biology Biochem 218 BioMedical Informatics 231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the names of the genes and enter them in Go Term Finder to discover common biological processes, common the Yeast Cell Cycle Database by first entering a single gene of interest to you and then clicking on select all co- expressed genes: http://genome-www.stanford.edu/cgi-bin/cellcycle/search · Collect all

  19. Recent advances in yeast molecular biology: recombinant DNA. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 25 papers presented at a workshop focusing on chromosomal structure, gene regulation, recombination, DNA repair, and cell type control, that have been obtained by experimental approaches incorporating the new technologies of yeast DNA transformation, molecular cloning, and DNA sequence analysis. (KRM)

  20. Critical Reviews in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 27(4,5):403-444 (1992) Aspects in Structural Studies on Ribosomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yonath, Ada E.

    1992-01-01

    Critical Reviews in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 27(4,5):403-444 (1992) Aspects-9238/92/$.50 0 1992 by CRC Press, Inc. 403 Critical

  1. Advanced Separation Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was formed in 2001 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy to conduct fundamental research in advanced separation and to develop technologies that can be used to produce coal and minerals in an efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The CAST consortium consists of seven universities - Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, Montana Tech, University of Utah, University of Nevada-Reno, and New Mexico Tech. The consortium brings together a broad range of expertise to solve problems facing the US coal industry and the mining sector in general. At present, a total of 60 research projects are under way. The article outlines some of these, on topics including innovative dewatering technologies, removal of mercury and other impurities, and modelling of the flotation process. 1 photo.

  2. Booly : a new data integration platform for systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Long Hoang

    2010-01-01

    for enabling conceptual biology. Bioinformatics 2005, 21for data integration in biology. Trends Biotechnol 1999, 17(the unification of biology. The Gene Ontology Consortium.

  3. 12/13/11 EBS AY10/11 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    EBS 514 ­ Metabolism and Bioenergetics Advanced Elective Courses (16 credits, including special topics and Bioenergetics Advanced Elective Courses (8 credits, including special topics and independent studies): Reading to Molecular Biology EBS 614 ­ Metabolism and Bioenergetics Advanced Elective Courses (12 credits, including

  4. 2014NatureAmerica,Inc.Allrightsreserved. nature structural & molecular biology advance online publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yi

    ©2014NatureAmerica,Inc.Allrightsreserved. nature structural & molecular biology advance online building block of chromatin1. Assembly of genomic DNA into nucleosomes not only helps in storing genomic that nucleosome assembly is a prerequisite for functional nuclear-envelope (NE) formation and particularly

  5. 1238 | S. Bansal and A. Mittal Molecular Biology of the Cell MBoC | ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Aditya

    lim- ited. Self-aggregation/assembly of amphipathic molecules was a crucial step in the origin of life1238 | S. Bansal and A. Mittal Molecular Biology of the Cell MBoC | ARTICLE A statistical anomaly evidence (to our knowledge) on the symbiotic origins of eukaryotic cells based on the "third front" (i

  6. MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY, 0270-7306/99/$04.00 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY, 0270-7306/99/$04.00 0 Dec. 1999, p. 8526­8535 Vol. 19, No. 12 show that the SCAN motif functions as an oligomerization domain mediating self an important role in the assembly and function of this newly defined subclass of transcriptional regulators

  7. Salt stress response in rice: genetics, molecular biology, and comparative genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumwald, Eduardo

    REVIEW Salt stress response in rice: genetics, molecular biology, and comparative genomics Chandan. Evidence show that salt tolerance in plants is a quantitative trait. Several traditional cultivars materials for donation of requisite salt tolerance genes. A large number of quantitative trait loci (QTL

  8. Modules M.Sc. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Titel of the module Development of Microbial Strains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    Modules M.Sc. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Titel of the module Development of Microbial Compulsory/ elective course Core elective course Teaching methods Method SWS CP Lecture Seminar Lab course 4 features. Adoption of methods and results from fundamental research with respect to industrial application

  9. Modules M.Sc. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Title of module Recombinant proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    Modules M.Sc. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Title of module Recombinant proteins Term are to provide · a basic understanding of concepts in the design of constructs for recombinant proteins · develop, analytical electrophoresis, primer design · transformation and expression of proteins in bacterial

  10. Plant Molecular Biology 50: 803818, 2002. 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korban, Schuyler S.

    Plant Molecular Biology 50: 803­818, 2002. © 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed. Unfortunately, such markers are not available for most plant species, including woody perennial plants. Here, we, and provides a minimal tiling path of 16 contiguous and overlapping BAC clones, thus generating a sequence

  11. Plant Molecular Biology 43: 621633, 2000. Dirk Inz (Ed.), The Plant Cell Cycle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, J.A.H.

    Plant Molecular Biology 43: 621­633, 2000. Dirk Inzé (Ed.), The Plant Cell Cycle. © 2000 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. 621 The role and regulation of D-type cyclins in the plant.murray@biotech.cam.ac.uk) Key words: D-type cyclins, differentiation, G1/S control, plant cell cycle, proliferation

  12. Plant Molecular Biology 37: 155169, 1998. 155 c 1998 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in Belgium.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, J.A.H.

    Plant Molecular Biology 37: 155­169, 1998. 155 cæ 1998 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed and displays conserved interactions with G1/S regulators and plant cyclin D (CycD) proteins Rachael Huntley1 in revised form 23 December 1997 Key words: evolution, G1-S control, plant cell cycle, retinoblastoma protein

  13. Plant Molecular Biology 53: 423442, 2003. 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, J.A.H.

    Plant Molecular Biology 53: 423­442, 2003. © 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers. PrintedInstitute of Plant Sciences, ETH Zürich, LFW E57.1, 8092 Zürich, Switzerland Received 28 July 2003; accepted cultures, transcript profiling Abstract Plant cell suspension cultures are invaluable models for the study

  14. DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY The University of British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    (over) DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY The University of British Columbia SUMMER/Eight-time: Undergraduate Biochemistry Training and Previous Experience (please see reverse) Degree(s) Obtained (Discipline outline of the University of B.C. Biochemistry 303 course is given below. Please outline all undergraduate

  15. DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY The University of British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY The University of British Columbia WINTER SESSION. to Apr. Half-time TAs work both terms: Sep. to Apr.] Undergraduate Biochemistry Training and Previous;ONLY NEW APPLICANTS NEED COMPLETE THIS SECTION Brief outlines for the University of B.C. Biochemistry

  16. DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY The University of British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY The University of British Columbia SPRING 2015 Biochemistry Training and Previous Experience (please see reverse) Degree(s) Obtained (Discipline, Place, Date for the University of B.C. Biochemistry 301 and 303 courses are given below. Please outline all undergraduate

  17. DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY The University of British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    (over) DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY The University of British Columbia SUMMER-time: Undergraduate Biochemistry Training and Previous Experience (please see reverse) Degree(s) Obtained (Discipline outline of the University of B.C. Biochemistry 303 course is given below. Please outline all undergraduate

  18. DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY The University of British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY The University of British Columbia WINTER SESSION.] Undergraduate Biochemistry Training and Previous Experience (please see reverse) Degree(s) Obtained (Discipline outlines for the University of B.C. Biochemistry 301 and 303 courses are given below. Please outline all

  19. Methods in Molecular Biology: Protocols in Confocal microscopy Chapter 17. Live imaging of green fluorescent protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haseloff, Jim

    , an accessory protein that accepts energy from aequorin and re-emits it as green light [8] . GFP is an extremelyMethods in Molecular Biology: Protocols in Confocal microscopy Chapter 17. Live imaging of green biologists won the lottery when it was demonstrated that green fluorescent protein (GFP), a kind gift from

  20. Exploring the free-energy landscapes of biological systems with steered molecular dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Liao Y.

    1 Exploring the free-energy landscapes of biological systems with steered molecular dynamics fluctuation-dissipation-theorem (BD -FDT) to accurately compute the free-energy profiles for several compute the free-energy profiles for all the afore-listed systems that represent various important aspects

  1. Facilities for exploring molecular biology databases on the Web: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markowitz, V.M.; Chen, I.M.A.; Kosky, A.S.; Szeto, E.

    1996-12-31

    We discuss criteria for evaluating and comparing the main facilities provided by molecular biology databases (MBDs) for exploring (that is, retrieving and interpreting data) on the Web. We use these criteria for examining the facilities supported by typical MBDs such as Genbank, AtDB, GSDB, GDB, and MGD (as of September 5, 1996). 19 refs.

  2. Biology & Biomedical Sciences ACADEMIC PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gereau, Robert W. IV

    Biology & Biomedical Sciences ACADEMIC PROGRAM GUIDELINES Programs in Cell & Molecular Biology Developmental, Regenerative and Stem Cell Biology Molecular Cell Biology Molecular Genetics & Genomics Molecular Microbiology & Microbial Pathogenesis #12;PAGE 2 GUIDELINES TO THE PROGRAMS IN CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

  3. The New York Consortium on Membrane Protein Structure (NYCOMPS): a high-throughput platform for structural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    The New York Consortium on Membrane Protein Structure (NYCOMPS): a high-throughput platform Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010 Abstract The New York Consortium on Membrane Protein Structure Core Laboratory, New York Structural Biology Center, New York, NY 10027, USA F. Mancia Á M. Zhou

  4. CONSORTIUM FOR CLEAN COAL UTILIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    1 CONSORTIUM FOR CLEAN COAL UTILIZATION Request for Proposals Date of Issue: February 16, 2015 The Consortium for Clean Coal Utilization (CCCU) at Washington University in St. Louis was established in January of 2009. The mission of the CCCU is to enable environmentally benign and sustainable use of coal, both

  5. CONSORTIUM FOR CLEAN COAL UTILIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    CONSORTIUM FOR CLEAN COAL UTILIZATION Call for Proposals Date of Issue: July 29, 2013 The Consortium for Clean Coal Utilization (CCCU) at Washington University in St. Louis was established in January of Clean Coal Utilization. The format may be a conference or workshop, or a seminar given by a leading

  6. Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research Results Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research Results Dr. Jose Olivares of Los Alamos...

  7. Quantum Information Biology: from information interpretation of quantum mechanics to applications in molecular biology and cognitive psychology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanari Asano; Irina Basieva; Andrei Khrennikov; Masanori Ohya; Yoshiharu Tanaka; Ichiro Yamato

    2015-03-09

    We discuss foundational issues of quantum information biology (QIB) -- one of the most successful applications of the quantum formalism outside of physics. QIB provides a multi-scale model of information processing in bio-systems: from proteins and cells to cognitive and social systems. This theory has to be sharply distinguished from "traditional quantum biophysics". The latter is about quantum bio-physical processes, e.g., in cells or brains. QIB models the dynamics of information states of bio-systems. It is based on the quantum-like paradigm: complex bio-systems process information in accordance with the laws of quantum information and probability. This paradigm is supported by plenty of statistical bio-data collected at all scales, from molecular biology and genetics/epigenetics to cognitive psychology and behavioral economics. We argue that the information interpretation of quantum mechanics (its various forms were elaborated by Zeilinger and Brukner, Fuchs and Mermin, and D' Ariano) is the most natural interpretation of QIB. We also point out that QBIsm (Quantum Bayesianism) can serve to find a proper interpretation of bio-quantum probabilities. Biologically QIB is based on two principles: a) adaptivity; b) openness (bio-systems are fundamentally open). These principles are mathematically represented in the framework of a novel formalism -- quantum adaptive dynamics which, in particular, contains the standard theory of open quantum systems as a special case of adaptivity (to environment).

  8. Small-angle Neutron Scattering for Molecular Biology: Basics and Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heller, William T [ORNL; Littrell, Ken [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    As researchers strive to understand the interplay between the complex molecular systems that make up living cells, tools for characterizing the interactions between the various players involved have developed. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) plays an important role in building a molecular-level understanding of the structures of macromolecular systems that make up cells. SANS is widely applicable to the study of biological structures including, but by no means limited to, protein-protein or protein-nucleic acid complexes, lipid membranes, cellular scaffolding, and amyloid plaques. Here, we present a brief description of the technique as it is commonly applied to the study of biological systems and an overview instrumentation that is available at the various facilities around the world.

  9. Molecular biology in marine science: Scientific questions, technological approaches, and practical implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    This report describes molecular techniques that could be invaluable in addressing process-oriented problems in the ocean sciences that have perplexed oceanographers for decades, such as understanding the basis for biogeochemical processes, recruitment processes, upper-ocean dynamics, biological impacts of global warming, and ecological impacts of human activities. The coupling of highly sophisticated methods, such as satellite remote sensing, which permits synoptic monitoring of chemical, physical, and biological parameters over large areas, with the power of modern molecular tools for ``ground truthing`` at small scales could allow scientists to address questions about marine organisms and the ocean in which they live that could not be answered previously. Clearly, the marine sciences are on the threshold of an exciting new frontier of scientific discovery and economic opportunity.

  10. Molecular Biology for the Environment: an EC-US hands-on Course in Environmental Biotechnology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Victor de Lorenzo; Juan Luis Ramos; Jerome Kukor; Gerben J. Zylstra

    2004-02-15

    One of the central goals of this activity is to bring together young scientists (at the late Ph.D. or early postdoctoral stages of their careers) in a forum that should result in future collaborations. The course is designed to give scientists hands-on experience in modern, up-to-date biotechnological methods at the interface between molecular biology and environmental biotechnology for the analysis of microorganisms and their activities with regard to the remediation of pollutants in the environment.

  11. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levesque, Stephen

    2013-04-05

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) � Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : � Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. � Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. � Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. � Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. � Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. � Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. � Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. � Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium projects. Full technical reports for each of the projects have been submitted as well.

  12. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology -Bachelor of Science (SMBCUG) Total Credits Required: 128 Major Requirements -62 credits Concentration Requirements -29 credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology - Bachelor of Science (SMBCUG) Total Credits Required: 128 Major University Chemistry II AND 3 CH4995 Undergraduate Research in Biochemistry OR 6 CH1161 University Chemistry

  13. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host technology transfer meetings and occasional field excursions. A total of 15 technology transfer/strategic planning workshops were held.

  14. Laboratory and New Mexico Consortium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USDA awards 1 million eor e. coli research by Los Alamos National Laboratory and New Mexico Consortium February 29, 2012 LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, February 29, 2012-Researchers from...

  15. Plant Molecular Biology 2008 Gordon Research Conference - July 13-18, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard M. Amasino

    2009-08-28

    The Plant Molecular Biology Conference has traditionally covered a breadth of exciting topics and the 2008 conference will continue in that tradition. There will be sessions on metabolism; new methods to study genomes, proteomes and metabolomes; plant-microbe interactions; plant hormones; epigenetics. A new topic for the conference this year will be bioenergy. Thus this conference will bring together a range of disciplines to foster the exchange ideas and to permit the participants to learn of the latest developments and ideas in diverse areas of plant biology. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for individuals to discuss their research because additional speakers in each session will be selected from submitted abstracts. There will also be a poster session each day for a two-hour period prior to dinner.

  16. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  17. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; et al

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and theirmore »embedded functional traits.« less

  18. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F-fly ash. Some developed technologies have similar potential in the longer term. (3) Laboratory studies have been completed that indicate that much higher amounts of fly ash could be added in cement-concrete applications under some circumstances. This could significantly increase use of fly ash in cement-concrete applications. (4) A study of the long-term environmental effects of structural fills in a surface mine in Indiana was completed. This study has provided much sought after data for permitting large-volume management options in both beneficial as well as non-beneficial use settings. (5) The impact of CBRC on CCBs utilization trends is difficult to quantify. However it is fair to say that the CBRC program had a significant positive impact on increased utilization of CCBs in every region of the USA. Today, the overall utilization of CCBs is over 43%. (6) CBRC-developed knowledge base led to a large number of other projects completed with support from other sources of funding. (7) CBRC research has also had a large impact on CCBs management across the globe. Information transfer activities and visitors from leading coal producing countries such as South Africa, Australia, England, India, China, Poland, Czech Republic and Japan are truly noteworthy. (8) Overall, the CBRC has been a truly successful, cooperative research program. It has brought together researchers, industry, government, and regulators to deal with a major problem facing the USA and other coal producing countries in the world.

  19. Overlay Costs National Concrete Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overlay Costs National Concrete Consortium TTCC April 6, 2010 Savannah, Georgia Gary Fick Representing The National Concrete Pavement Technology Center #12;Overlay Cost Tech Brief · Developed to address common questions we have received during our implementation efforts #12;Overlay Cost Tech Brief

  20. Modulhandbuch M.Sc. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Title of the module Functional genomics of marine eukaryotes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    Modulhandbuch M.Sc. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Title of the module Functional genomics and functional genomics), Prof. Frickenhaus (Bioinformatic) Examiner Dr. U. John Objectives Consolidation genomics Development of the abilities to the experimental work and understanding in the field of functional

  1. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society (1998), 63: 367378. With 4 figures Herbivores and molecular clocks as tools in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, John N.

    1998-01-01

    a powerful tool to historical plant biogeography. © 1998 The Linnean Society of London ADDITIONAL KEY WORDS and molecular clocks as tools in plant biogeography OLLE PELLMYR AND JAMES LEEBENS-MACK Department of Biology (Apiaceae) and the host-specific herbivore Greya powelli (Lepidoptera: Prodoxidae) in California

  2. Molecular Based Mathematical Biology Research Article DOI: 10.2478/mlbmb-2013-0005 MBMB 2012 90-108

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Benzhuo

    Computing, Institute of Computational Mathematics and Scientific/Engineering Computing, AcademyMolecular Based Mathematical Biology Research Article · DOI: 10.2478/mlbmb-2013-0005 · MBMB · 2012-relaxation techniques, the effective- ness of which on acceleration is shown by numerical tests. It is worth noting

  3. Molecular biology on a microfluidic chip This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Molecular biology on a microfluidic chip This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please:10.1088/0953-8984/18/18/S14 Molecular biology on a microfluidic chip Jong Wook Hong1,4 , Yan Chen2 Published 19 April 2006 Online at stacks.iop.org/JPhysCM/18/S691 Abstract We have developed microfluidic

  4. DTC DATA MINING CONSORTIUM MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    DTC DATA MINING CONSORTIUM MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS I Collaboration with leading companies I Creation Analysis Optimization Scalable Database Mining Auto-Mining Agents CUTTING-EDGE CAPABILITIES

  5. Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boston, MA Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials-Boston, MA This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal...

  6. Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dallas, TX Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials-Dallas, TX This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal...

  7. Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory as a partner has been awarded a 25 million grant by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The consortium of 13 universities and 8 national...

  8. 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Northwest Region Workshop, held in Seattle July 15, 2011.

  9. National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC) Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation Meeting ti017ebron2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC) Clean Cities Learning Program Clean Cities...

  10. Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Charlotte M

    Nightty Enrichment} is a FREE tutoring program to neip students succeed in ?rst year. Biology science courses. CUSINE offers eyening tutoring right in your own ...

  11. Biological Sciences http://www.clas.wayne.edu/biology/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Biological Sciences http://www.clas.wayne.edu/biology/ Divisions: Evolutionary and Organismal Biology Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Cellular, Developmental, and Neurobiology #12;Biological Sciences http://www.clas.wayne.edu/biology/ · Cell Biology and Cytogenetics (Beningo, Tucker, Greenberg

  12. Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos A consortium led by the University of Michigan that includes LANL as...

  13. SMART Wind Consortium Composites Subgroup Virtual Meeting: Advanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SMART Wind Consortium Composites Subgroup Virtual Meeting: Advanced Manufacturing of Wind Turbine Blades SMART Wind Consortium Composites Subgroup Virtual Meeting: Advanced...

  14. DOE Street Lighting Consortium Releases Results of Public Street...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Street Lighting Consortium Releases Results of Public Street and Area Lighting Inventory Survey DOE Street Lighting Consortium Releases Results of Public Street and Area Lighting...

  15. Sandia Energy - Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Advanced Nuclear Energy Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water...

  16. Overview and Progress of United States Advanced Battery Consortium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consortium (USABC) Activity Overview and Progress of United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) Activity 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies...

  17. Undergraduate Programs BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dellaire, Graham

    Undergraduate Programs in BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Dalhousie University 5850 College Street.............................................................................................................................. 3 1. Biochemistry Degree Programs .............................................................................................................. 4 Minor in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

  18. Undergraduate Programs BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dellaire, Graham

    Undergraduate Programs in BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Dalhousie University 9B1 - 5850 College........................................................................................................................................................ 3 1. Biochemistry Degree Programs ............................................................................................................................. 5 Minor in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

  19. Undergraduate Programs BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dellaire, Graham

    Undergraduate Programs in BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Dalhousie University 5850 College Street ............................................................................................................................. 3 1. Biochemistry Degree Programs .............................................................................................................. 4 Minor in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

  20. WHOLE CELL TOMOGRAPHY/MOLECULAR BIOLOGY/STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY: Affordable x-ray microscopy with nanoscale resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, James E.; Blackborow, Paul; Horne, Stephen J.; Gelb, Jeff

    2013-03-01

    Biological research spans 10 orders of magnitude from angstroms to meters. While electron microscopy can reveal structural details at most of these spatial length scales, transmission electron tomography only reliably reconstructs three-dimensional (3-D) volumes of cellular material with a spatial resolution between 1-5 nm from samples less than 500 nm thick1. Most biological cells are 2-30 times thicker than this threshold, which means that a cell must be cut into consecutive slices with each slice reconstructed individually in order to approximate the contextual information of the entire cell. Fortunately, due to a larger penetration depth2, X-ray computed tomography bypasses the need to physically section a cell and enables imaging of intact cells and tissues on the micrometer or larger scale with tens to hundreds of nanometer spatial resolution. While the technique of soft x-ray microscopy has been extensively developed in synchrotron facilities, advancements in laboratory x-ray source designs now increase its accessibility by supporting commercial systems suitable for a standard laboratory. In this paper, we highlight a new commercial compact cryogenic soft x-ray microscope designed for a standard laboratory setting and explore its capabilities for mesoscopic investigations of intact prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

  1. Risk Analysis of Prostate Cancer in PRACTICAL, a Multinational Consortium, Using 25 Known Prostate Cancer Susceptibility Loci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin Al Olama, Ali; Benlloch, Sara; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Neal, David; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Muir, Kenneth; Schleutker, Johanna; Henderson, Brian E.; Haiman, Christopher; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Pashayan, Nora; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Stanford, Janet L.; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith A.; Chambers, Suzanne K.; Weischer, Maren; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Ingles, Sue Ann; Sorensen, Karina D.; Orntoft, Torben F.; Park, Jong Y.; Cybulski, Cezary; Maier, Christiane; Doerk, Thilo; Dickinson, Joanne L.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Zeigler-Johnson, Charnita; Habuchi, Tomonori; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Cooney, Kathleen; Chappuis, Pierre O.; Hutter, Pierre; Kaneva, Radka P.; Foulkes, William D.; Zeegers, Maurice P.; Lu, Yong-Jie; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Stephenson, Robert; Cox, Angela; Southey, Melissa C.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; FitzGerald, Liesel; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Saunders, Edward; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Guy, Michelle; Dadaev, Tokhir; Little, Sarah J.; Govindasami, Koveela; Sawyer, Emma; Wilkinson, Rosemary; Herkommer, Kathleen; Hopper, John L.; Lophatonanon, Aritaya; Rinckleb, Antje E.; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.

    2015-04-02

    & Prevention.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 1 Risk Analysis of Prostate Cancer in PRACTICAL, a Multinational Consortium, Using 25 Known Prostate Cancer Susceptibility Loci Ali Amin Al Olama1,56, Sara Benlloch1,56, Antonis C... @medschl.cam.ac.uk Tel: 0044 1223 748638 Fax: 0044 1223 748628 Running Title: Risk Analysis of Prostate Cancer in PRACTICAL Consortium Keywords: Prostate Cancer risk, Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology, Genitourinary Cancers: Prostate, Risk...

  2. A User's Guide to the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements The ENCODE Project Consortium"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A User's Guide to the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) The ENCODE Project Consortium" * Abstract The mission of the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project is to enable the scientific and medical communities to interpret the human genome sequence and apply it to understand human biology

  3. Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Vol. 33, No. 6, November 2000, pp. 476-482 BSRK & Springer-Verlag 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jong-Sang

    -Lysinamide-carbamoyl] cholesterol could self- assemble with plasmid DNA forming discrete lipoplexes. From atomic force microscopicJournal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Vol. 33, No. 6, November 2000, pp. 476-482 © BSRK & Molecular Engineering, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Shillim-dong, Kwanak-ku, Seoul, 151-742, Korea

  4. 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Northeast Region Workshop, held in Philadelphia, May 19–20, 2011.

  5. 2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Southeast Region Workshop, held in Tampa, FL, February 17–18, 2011.

  6. 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Southwest Region Workshop, held in Los Angeles on September 30, 2010.

  7. 2011 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Southwest Region Workshop, held in San Jose, California, August 25­–26, 2011.

  8. Commercial Buildings Consortium | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12Power,5 BUDGETUCivilConsortium Commercial Buildings Consortium

  9. Example 1 -LIFE SCIENCES/SCIENCES DE LA VIE Biology A Gene, Cell, Molecular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Nancy

    Bacteriology, Virology, Protozoology Bioremediation, Environmental microbiology, Food microbiology Parasitology, Mycology) Link with ENG2 and ES6 for bioremediation LS7a Cellular and molecular Neuroscience Water and minerals in plants, Plant morphology, Nutrition and metabolism, Photosynthesis, Stress

  10. Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & InspectionsBeryllium andSamplerBiological Imaging byU.S.

  11. Studying chemical reactions in biological systems with MBN Explorer: implementation of molecular mechanics with dynamical topology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sushko, Gennady B; Verkhovtsev, Alexey V; Volkov, Sergey N; Solov'yov, Andrey V

    2015-01-01

    The concept of molecular mechanics force field has nowadays been widely accepted for studying various processes in biomolecular systems. In this paper we suggest a modification for the standard CHARMM force field, that permits simulations of systems with dynamically changing molecular topologies. The implementation of the modified force field was carried out in the popular program MBN Explorer, and, to support the development, in this paper we provide several case studies where dynamical topology is necessary. In particular, it is shown, that the modified molecular mechanics force field can be applied for studying processes where rupture of chemical bonds plays an essential role, e.g., in irradiation or collision induced damage, transformation and fragmentation processes involving biomolecular systems.

  12. Environmental Biology | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    microbiology, biogeochemistry, molecular biology, molecular dynamics, bioinformatics, genomics, neutron science, chemistry, and computing-and spans multiple scales, from the...

  13. Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Garima

    2011-01-01

    for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium Afor Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium byConsortium for efficient biofuel production: A New Candidate

  14. Postdoctoral position -UC Davis -plant-vector interactions, plant-microbe interactions, molecular biology, ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Postdoctoral position - UC Davis - plant-vector interactions, plant-microbe interactions, molecular August 2014. The primary research goal of the Casteel lab is to identify the functions of microbes- microbe or plant-insect interactions will be preferred. Candidates with a proven record of excellence

  15. Computational Biology | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Biology SHARE Computational Biology Computational Biology research encompasses many important aspects including molecular biophysics for bio-energy, genetic level...

  16. A University Consortium on Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consortium on Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) for High Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission Engines Acknowledgements DOE LTC Consortium project DE-FC26-06NT42629 Sandia National...

  17. Penn State Consortium for Building Energy Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Penn State Consortium for Building Energy Innovation (formerly the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub) develops, demonstrates, and deploys energy-saving technologies that can achieve 50% energy reduction in small- and medium-sized buildings. Its headquarters serves as a test bed for real-world integration of technology and market solutions.

  18. Modeling Microbial Consortiums as Distributed Metabolic Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Modeling Microbial Consortiums as Distributed Metabolic Networks JOSEPH J. VALLINO Ecosystems living systems in combination with abiotic reactions process and cycle mass and energy on local, regional by microbial processes, and it appears to closely follow thermodynamic constraints in that electron acceptor (O

  19. Presented by CASL: The Consortium for Advanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and apply the VR to address 3 critical performance goals for nuclear power Reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by: · Power uprates · Lifetime extension Reduce nuclear waste volume generatedPresented by Nuclear Energy CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

  20. From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 350: Protein Folding Protocols Edited by: Y. Bai and R. Nussinov Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuler, Ben

    115 From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 350: Protein Folding Protocols Edited by: Y. Bai and R to Protein Folding Benjamin Schuler Summary Protein folding is a process characterized by a large degree this method to protein folding. Key Words: Protein folding; fluorescence spectroscopy; single molecule

  1. From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 350: Protein Folding Protocols Edited by: Y. Bai and R. Nussinov Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caflisch, Amedeo

    225 From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 350: Protein Folding Protocols Edited by: Y. Bai and R in the transition state. Key Words: Protein folding; energy landscape; transition state ensemble; denatured state- sively applied to the analysis of protein folding (1­5). Although proteins are essential macromolecules

  2. MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY, 0270-7306/01/$04.00 0 DOI: 10.1128/MCB.21.20.68206832.2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY, 0270-7306/01/$04.00 0 DOI: 10.1128/MCB.21.20.6820­6832.2001 Oct. 2001, p. 6820­6832 Vol. 21, No. 20 Copyright © 2001, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York2 Received 9 May 2001/Returned for modification 25 June 2001/Accepted

  3. Biology & Biomedical Sciences ACADEMIC PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gereau, Robert W. IV

    Biology & Biomedical Sciences ACADEMIC PROGRAM GUIDELINES Programs in Cell & Molecular Biology Molecular Microbiology & Microbial Pathogenesis Overview of the Programs in Cell and Molecular Biology Graduate training in Cell and Molecular Biology at Washington University is offered by the Programs in Cell

  4. Resource Letter: Bio-molecular Nano-machines: where Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Technology meet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debashish Chowdhury

    2008-07-17

    Cell is the structural and functional unit of life. This Resource Letter serves as a guide to the literature on nano-machines which drive not only intracellular movements, but also motility of the cell. These machines are usually proteins or macromolecular assemblies which require appropriate fuel for their operations. Although, traditionally, these machines were subjects of investigation in biology and biochemistry, increasing use of the concepts and techniques of physics in recent years have contributed to the quantitative understanding of the fundamental principles underlying their operational mechanisms. The possibility of exploiting these principles for the design and control of artificial nano-machines has opened up a new frontier in the bottom-up approach to nano-technology.

  5. New York-Structural GenomiX Research Consortium (NYSGXRC): a large scale center for the protein structure initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sali, Andrej

    New York-Structural GenomiX Research Consortium (NYSGXRC): a large scale center for the protein, NY 11973, USA; 4 Department Biochemistry, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; 5 Structural Biology Program, Sloan-Kettering Institute, New York, NY 10021, USA; 6 University of California, San Diego

  6. Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Wynn Volkert; Dr. Arvind Kumar; Dr. Bryan Becker; Dr. Victor Schwinke; Dr. Angel Gonzalez; Dr. DOuglas McGregor

    2010-12-08

    The objective of the Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium (MNSEC) is to enhance the scope, quality and integration of educational and research capabilities of nuclear sciences and engineering (NS/E) programs at partner schools in support of the U.S. nuclear industry (including DOE laboratories). With INIE support, MNSEC had a productive seven years and made impressive progress in achieving these goals. Since the past three years have been no-cost-extension periods, limited -- but notable -- progress has been made in FY10. Existing programs continue to be strengthened and broadened at Consortium partner institutions. The enthusiasm generated by the academic, state, federal, and industrial communities for the MNSEC activities is reflected in the significant leveraging that has occurred for our programs.

  7. Systems biology of the cardiac hypoxia response in Drosophila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feala, Jacob Daniel

    2008-01-01

    in Molecular Systems Biology , volume 3, article number 99,appear in Molecular Systems Biology. The dissertation authoret al. (2003) The systems biology markup language (SBML): a

  8. FINAL REPORT: DOE CONTRACT NUMBER FG0205ER64026 Biological Neutron Scattering: A Collaboration with the Oak Ridge Center for Structural Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jill Trewhella

    2011-01-12

    The overarching goal of this project was to promote applications of small-angle scattering in structural molecular biology by providing model examples of cutting edge applications that demonstrate the unique capabilities and potential of the DOE national user facilities at Oak Ridge, especially the newly commissioned BioSANS. The approach taken was three-fold: (1) to engage in high impact collaborative research projects that would benefit from small-angle neutron scattering to both demonstrate the power of the technique while expanding the potential user community; (2) to provide access to scattering facilities established at the University of Utah to as broad a set of researchers as possible to increase the expertise in small-angle scattering generally; and (3) to develop new methods and tools for small-angle scattering. To these ends, three major research collaborations were pursued that resulted in a significant body of published work where neutron scattering and contrast variation played a major role. These major collaborations involved studies of protein complexes involved in (1) bacterial transcription regulation and adaptive response (a DOE/BER priority area); (2) regulation of cardiac muscle; and (3) neuronal disorders. In addition, to broaden the impact of the project, smaller collaborative efforts were supported that used either small-angle X-ray or neutron scattering. Finally, the DOE supported facilities at the University of Utah were made available to researchers on a service basis and a number of independent groups took advantage of this opportunity. In all of this work, there was an emphasis on the training of students and post docs in scattering techniques, and a set of publications (a book chapter, a review, and an encyclopedia article) were produced to guide the non-specialist potential user of scattering techniques in successful applications of the techniques. We also developed a suite of user friendly web-based computational tools currently being accessed world-wide by researchers as an aid in neutron scattering data interpretation. In all, these collaborative projects and resulted in 29 original refereed journal articles published between 2005 and 2010 and engaged groups from at least 14 Universities (10 US, 4 international) and 3 National Laboratories (2 US, 1 international). An important final initiative from this project was to begin a process for international community agreement on a set of standards for the publication of biomolecular small-angle scattering data. This initiative is being championed with the International Union of Crystallography and has engaged a number of Journal Editors and is a very important step in the maturing of this now burgeoning field.

  9. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J.C., CASL: Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors - A DOE Energy Innovation Hub, ANS MC2015 Joint Internation Conference on Mathematics and Computation...

  10. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Virtual Environment for Scientific Collaboration Posted: April 30, 2013 The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, the Department of Energy's first...

  11. A University Consortium on High Pressure, Lean Combustion for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Pressure, Lean Combustion for Efficient and Clean IC Engines (UM - lead, MIT, UCB) A University Consortium on High Pressure, Lean Combustion for Efficient and Clean IC Engines...

  12. Smart Grid Consortium, Response of New York State Smart Grid...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Smart Grid Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges More Documents & Publications SmartGrid Consortium: Smart Grid Roadmap for the State of New York New York Independent System...

  13. BETO Announces June Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Related Articles DOE Announces Webinars on Algal Biofuels Consortium Research Results, Solar Energy Maps, and More BETO Deputy Director Publishes Commentary on Development of...

  14. A University Consortium on Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Low-Temperature Combustion for High-Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission Engines A University Consortium on Efficient and Clean High-Pressure,...

  15. A University Consortium on Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) for High Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission Engines A University Consortium on Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) for High Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission...

  16. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of technology. Management Performance reflects CASL's ability to meet its virtual one-roof plan (collocation), maintain consortium cohesion and chemistry, and deliver its...

  17. Municipal Consortium Annual Meeting Presentations and Materials—Phoenix, AZ

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to presentations and materials from the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Annual Meeting held in Phoenix on September 11, 2013.

  18. Biology is the study of life. Biologists analyze how systems function in organisms at the cellular and molecular levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Biology is the study of life. Biologists analyze how systems function in organisms at the cellular and public sectors. People with degrees in biology are needed in areas as diverse as farming, food processing, and the environment, as well as in the biomedical and biotechnology fields. A degree in biology can also be used

  19. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators.

  20. Florida Biomass Energy Consortium | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport Jump to:Flanders, NewFlorham Park, New Jersey:Consortium

  1. University of Delaware | CCEI Industrial Consortium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopmentat LENA| ReactionSiteCCEI Industrial Consortium &

  2. Encounter with Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macfarlane, Alan

    2014-12-12

    aged fifteen; commuted every day, by bicycle, train, then walking; tough regime with lectures or laboratory sessions every day including Saturday morning from 8am; enjoyed it as there did meet interesting people; a man in the botany department...

  3. Encounter with Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macfarlane, Alan

    2014-08-28

    how you could put them back together again; went to University of Witwatersrand aged fifteen; commuted every day, by bicycle, train, then walking; tough regime with lectures or laboratory sessions every day including Saturday morning from 8am...

  4. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveAprilPhoton SourceSuperconductors

  5. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3X-rays3EnergyParameter SpecificationsInsights

  6. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3X-rays3EnergyParameter SpecificationsInsightsOur

  7. Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3X-rays3EnergyParameter

  8. SEEA SOUTHEAST CONSORTIUM FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, Timothy; Ball, Kia; Fournier, Ashley

    2014-01-21

    In 2010 the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) received a $20 million Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Building Neighborhood Program (BBNP). This grant, funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, also included sub-grantees in 13 communities across the Southeast, known as the Southeast Consortium. The objective of this project was to establish a framework for energy efficiency retrofit programs to create models for replication across the Southeast and beyond. To achieve this goal, SEEA and its project partners focused on establishing infrastructure to develop and sustain the energy efficiency market in specific localities across the southeast. Activities included implementing minimum training standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency through strategic marketing and outreach and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency through a variety of financing mechanisms. The anticipated outcome of these activities would be best practice models for program design, marketing, financing, data collection and evaluation as well as increased market demand for energy efficiency retrofits and products. The Southeast Consortium’s programmatic impacts along with the impacts of the other BBNP grantees would further the progress towards the overall goal of energy efficiency market transformation. As the primary grantee SEEA served as the overall program administrator and provided common resources to the 13 Southeast Consortium sub-grantees including contracted services for contractor training, quality assurance testing, data collection, reporting and compliance. Sub-grantee programs were located in cities across eight states including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each sub-grantee program was designed to address the unique local conditions and population of its community. There was great diversity in programs design, types of financing and incentives, building stock characteristics, climate and partnerships. From 2010 through 2013, SEEA and its sub-grantee programs focused on determining best practices in program administration, workforce development, marketing and consumer education, financing, and utility partnerships. One of the common themes among programs that were most successful in each of these areas was strong partnerships and collaborations with people or organizations in the community. In many instances engaged partners proved to be the key to addressing barriers such as access to financing, workforce development opportunities and access to utility bill data. The most challenging barrier proved to be the act of building a market for energy efficiency where none previously existed. With limited time and resources, educating homeowners of the value in investing in energy efficiency while engaging electric and gas utilities served as a significant barrier for several programs. While there is still much work to be done to continue to transform the energy efficiency market in the Southeast, the programmatic activities led by SEEA and its sub-grantees resulted in 8,180 energy audits and 5,155 energy efficiency retrofits across the Southeast. In total the Southeast Consortium saved an estimated 27,915,655.93 kWh and generated an estimated $ 2,291,965.90 in annual energy cost savings in the region.

  9. Urban Consortium Energy Task Force - Year 21 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-04-01

    The Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF), comprised of representatives of large cities and counties in the United States, is a subgroup of the Urban Consortium, an organization of the nation's largest cities and counties joined together to identify, develop and deploy innovative approaches and technological solutions to pressing urban issues.

  10. THE DANISH CONSORTIUM FOR WIND ENERGY RESEARCH Lars Landberg1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE DANISH CONSORTIUM FOR WIND ENERGY RESEARCH Lars Landberg1 and Peter Hauge Madsen2 1 Risø National Laboratory, Wind Energy Department, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark; lars.landberg@risoe.dk 2 Siemens Wind Power, DK-7330 Brande, Denmark Abstract The Danish Wind Energy Research Consortium

  11. ABB and Energy Utilities Form Consortium to Fund SCADA/EMS Cyber...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Utilities Form Consortium to Fund SCADAEMS Cyber Security Assessment at National SCADA Test Bed ABB and Energy Utilities Form Consortium to Fund SCADAEMS Cyber Security...

  12. Dedicated Beamline Facilities for Catalytic Research. Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jingguang; Frenkel, Anatoly; Rodriguez, Jose; Adzic, Radoslav; Bare, Simon R.; Hulbert, Steve L.; Karim, Ayman; Mullins, David R.; Overbury, Steve

    2015-03-04

    Synchrotron spectroscopies offer unique advantages over conventional techniques, including higher detection sensitivity and molecular specificity, faster detection rate, and more in-depth information regarding the structural, electronic and catalytic properties under in-situ reaction conditions. Despite these advantages, synchrotron techniques are often underutilized or unexplored by the catalysis community due to various perceived and real barriers, which will be addressed in the current proposal. Since its establishment in 2005, the Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC) has coordinated significant efforts to promote the utilization of cutting-edge catalytic research under in-situ conditions. The purpose of the current renewal proposal is aimed to provide assistance, and to develop new sciences/techniques, for the catalysis community through the following concerted efforts: Coordinating the implementation of a suite of beamlines for catalysis studies at the new NSLS-II synchrotron source; Providing assistance and coordination for catalysis users at an SSRL catalysis beamline during the initial period of NSLS to NSLS II transition; Designing in-situ reactors for a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic studies; Assisting experimental set-up and data analysis by a dedicated research scientist; Offering training courses and help sessions by the PIs and co-PIs.

  13. Genome Analyses and Supplement Data from the International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)

    The sequencing of the first tree genome, that of Populus, was a project initiated by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE’s Office of Science. The International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC) was formed to help develop and guide post-sequence activities. The IPGC website, hosted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, provides draft sequence data as it is made available from DOE Joint Genome Institute, genome analyses for Populus, lists of related publications and resources, and the science plan. The data are available at http://www.ornl.gov/sci/ipgc/ssr_resource.htm.

  14. BIOLOGY, B.S. WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATE Biology (BIOT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    BIOLOGY, B.S. WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATE Biology (BIOT) (Fall 2015-Summer 2016) IPFW Residency/Gen Ed Biology BS Core/Supporting Courses (64 credits) *Note: 3.0 GPA required in Biology Core 21800 Genetics & Molecular Biology ______ 4 BIOL 21900 Principles of Functional Biology ______ 3 BIOL

  15. NATURE STRUCTURAL & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY VOLUME 16 NUMBER 12 DECEMBER 2009 1267 A RT I C L E S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, James

    of BM2 is also a coiled-coil tetramer, and its unusually large electrostatic dipole moment suggests-coil tetramer with a packing angle of about -37° (Fig. 1a). The tetramer has a well 1Department of Biological

  16. Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayman Hawari; Nolan Hertel; Mohamed Al-Sheikhly; Laurence Miller; Abdel-Moeze Bayoumi; Ali Haghighat; Kenneth Lewis

    2010-12-29

    2 Project Summary: The Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium (MUSIC) was established in response to the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) program. MUSIC was established as a consortium composed of academic members and national laboratory partners. The members of MUSIC are the nuclear engineering programs and research reactors of Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), North Carolina State University (NCSU), University of Maryland (UMD), University of South Carolina (USC), and University of Tennessee (UTK). The University of Florida (UF), and South Carolina State University (SCSU) were added to the MUSIC membership in the second year. In addition, to ensure proper coordination between the academic community and the nation’s premier research and development centers in the fields of nuclear science and engineering, MUSIC created strategic partnerships with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) including the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project and the Joint Institute for Neutron Scattering (JINS), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A partnership was also created with the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) with the aim of utilizing their reactor in research if funding becomes available. Consequently, there are three university research reactors (URRs) within MUSIC, which are located at NCSU (1-MW PULSTAR), UMD (0.25-MW TRIGA) and UF (0.10-MW Argonaut), and the AFRRI reactor (1-MW TRIGA MARK F). The overall objectives of MUSIC are: a) Demonstrate that University Research Reactors (URR) can be used as modern and innovative instruments of research in the basic and applied sciences, which include applications in fundamental physics, materials science and engineering, nondestructive examination, elemental analysis, and contributions to research in the health and medical sciences, b) Establish a strong technical collaboration between the nuclear engineering faculty and the MUSIC URRs. This will be achieved by involving the faculty in the development of state-of-the-art research facilities at the URRs and subsequently, in the utilization of these facilities, c) Facilitate the use of the URRs by the science and engineering faculty within the individual institutions and by the general community of science and engineering, d) Develop a far-reaching educational component that is capable of addressing the needs of the nuclear science and engineering community. Specifically, the aim of this component will be to perform public outreach activities, contribute to the active recruitment of the next generation of nuclear professionals, strengthen the education of nuclear engineering students, and promote nuclear engineering education for minority students.

  17. National Consortium Supports Cities in Evaluating LED Streetlights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-30

    Fact sheet that introduces Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium, a group of municipalities, utilities, and energy efficiency organizations who are interested in making investments in LED street and area lighting.

  18. Eliot Feibush leads new Princeton consortium to visualize Big...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eliot Feibush leads new Princeton consortium to visualize Big Data By John Greenwald April 22, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Eliot Feibush (Photo by Elle...

  19. Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This May 6, 2010 webcast served as the first official meeting of the new DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium. Ed Smalley of Seattle City Light and Bruce Kinzey of Pacific Northwest...

  20. NETL Researcher Honored with 2013 Federal Laboratory Consortium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (NETL) has been awarded a Mid-Atlantic region Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) award for Excellence in Technology Transfer for his work on the 3D Virtual Energy Plant...

  1. Midwest Motor Systems Consortium- A Unique Business Partnership 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hackner, R.; Cockrill, C.

    1995-01-01

    in the Midwest Motor systems Consortium: the U.S. De partment of Energy; Steven Schultz, 3M; Jim Kelsey and Angela Prestil, Wisconsin Center for Demand Side Research; Sam Mahany Braithwait, Christensen Associates; Ted Atkins, Baldor Electric; Bobbi Mc...

  2. Genome Structure Gallery from the Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Structual Genomics Consortium

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The TB Structural Genomics Consortium works with the structures of proteins from M. tuberculosis, analyzing these structures in the context of functional information that currently exists and that the Consortium generates. The database of linked structural and functional information constructed from this project will form a lasting basis for understanding M. tuberculosis pathogenesis and for structure-based drug design. The Consortium's structural and functional information is publicly available. The Structures Gallery makes more than 650 total structures available by PDB identifier. Some of these are not consortium targets, but all are viewable in 3D color and can be manipulated in various ways by Jmol, an open-source Java viewer for chemical structures in 3D from http://www.jmol.org/

  3. COLLOQUIUM: CASL: Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: CASL: Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, a DOE Energy Innovation Hub Dr. Douglas Kothe Oak...

  4. 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium North Central Region Workshop, held in Kansas City, MO, March 8–9, 2011.

  5. 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium North Central Region Workshop, held in Detroit, June 16–17, 2011.

  6. Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research 2015 Annual Symposium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Director Jonathan Male spoke on BETO’s role in the bioeconomy and crosscutting opportunities with plant biotechnology at the Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research 2015 Annual Symposium.

  7. University consortium faulted on management, accounting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, C.

    1993-07-09

    Four years into the job of building the superconducting Super Collider (SSC)-and in the face of growing political pressure to kill the project-congressional and federal officials are questioning whether the university consortium that run the SSC is up to the job. Universities Research Association Inc. (URA), a group of 80 public and private research universities that also operates Fermilab, was selected as prime contractor in January 1989. But after repeated charges of mismanagement and accounting buses, the Department of Energy (DOE), which funds the project, is contemplating major changes to the contract, including terminating it. DOE Secretary Hazel O'Leary has begun a 30-day review of the project and has laid out three options: terminating the URA contract; awarding separate contracts for science and conventional construction; and renegotiating the existing contract to give DOE a larger oversight role. Sources close to the project predict that O'Leary will pick a variation of the third option and will remove at least one of the managers grilled at last week's hearing.

  8. Cellular and Molecular BiologyTM 52, N6,47-52 ISSN 1165-158X

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    an impaired trafficking of Cx43 proteins in early carcinogenesis. In collaboration with biologists, we propose and the statistical validation of biological hypotheses about Cx43 expressions and configurations during tumorogenesis connexins (Cx), among which Cx43 is the most representative in mammalians. Recently, impaired GJC and Cx

  9. Authors' pre-print version. Manuscript published in Molecular Biology and Evolution MBE-13-0254.R2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gogarten, J. Peter

    of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, United States of America 2 University of Connecticut Biotechnology Center, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, United States of America 3 Current affiliation: Department of Cell Biology, Yale University Medical School, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America 4

  10. A R T I C L E S NATURE STRUCTURAL & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY VOLUME 11 NUMBER 8 AUGUST 2004 721

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, James M.

    in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae, suggesting a role for sul- fated metabolites in plant), to carbohydrates, proteins and a variety of other low-molecular-mass metabolites3­5. Just as kinases are of consid and physiological substrates. Cytosolic STs add sulfate to steroids and other small hydrophobic metabolites, whereas

  11. B.S. Biochemistry Planning Worksheet. Updated 09/06 Bachelor of Science Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Requirements (BIOC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adali, Tulay

    B.S. Biochemistry Planning Worksheet. Updated 09/06 Bachelor of Science Biochemistry and Molecular Biochemistry (12 credits; all upper-level) CHEM 437 Comprehensive Biochem I* BIOL 100, CHEM 352 4 F CHEM 437L Biochemistry Laboratory* CHEM 352L; 437 (pre- or co-req) 4 FS CHEM 438 Comprehensive Biochem II* CHEM 437 4

  12. 7.013 Introductory Biology, Spring 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sive, Hazel L.

    The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological ...

  13. Biological Science courses BE 513 Molecuar and Celluar Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang-Yen, Christopher

    Biological Science courses BE 513 Molecuar and Celluar Biology BE 555 Nanoscale Systems Biology. BIOM 501 Mechanisms of Disease and Therapeutic BIOM 600 Cell Biology BMB 508 Molecular Biophysics I BMB 509 Macromolecular Biophysics II BMB 567 Bioinorganic Chemistry BMB 590 Biological Physics BMB 614

  14. Center for Theoretical Biological Physics University of California, San Diego

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collar, Juan I.

    Center for Theoretical Biological Physics University of California, San Diego CHEMOTAXIS ­ To Go physicists with the Center for Theoretical Biological Physics at the University of California, San Diego at the University of California, San Diego. CTBP is a consortium of researchers from UCSD, The Salk Institute

  15. BIOLOGY SEMINAR PROMOTION LECTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlizerman, Eli

    BIOLOGY SEMINAR PROMOTION LECTURE 12:00 PM SEMINAR HITCHCOCK HALL 132 REFRESHMENTS SERVED IN FOYER, November 24, 2014 "Life is flux" Dr. Jennifer Nemhauser Associate Professor Department of Biology drawn from molecular genetics, genomics, physiology and synthetic biology to build new tools to study

  16. MICROBIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY REVIEWS, Sept. 2004, p. 403431 Vol. 68, No. 3 1092-2172/04/$08.00 0 DOI: 10.1128/MMBR.68.3.403431.2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    MICROBIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY REVIEWS, Sept. 2004, p. 403­431 Vol. 68, No. 3 1092-2172/04/$08.00 0 DOI: 10.1128/MMBR.68.3.403­431.2004 Copyright © 2004, American Society for Microbiology. All.........................................................................................................403 OCCURRENCE AND IMPORTANCE

  17. Terragenome: International Soil Metagenome Sequencing Consortium (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jansson, Janet [LBNL

    2011-04-29

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Janet Jansson of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory discusses the Terragenome Initiative at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009

  18. 7.012 Introduction to Biology, Fall 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinberg, Robert A. (Robert Allan), 1942-

    Cell biology, immunology, neurobiology, and an exploration into current research in cancer, genomics, and molecular medicine.

  19. Quantum Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Sergi

    2009-07-11

    A critical assessment of the recent developments of molecular biology is presented. The thesis that they do not lead to a conceptual understanding of life and biological systems is defended. Maturana and Varela's concept of autopoiesis is briefly sketched and its logical circularity avoided by postulating the existence of underlying {\\it living processes}, entailing amplification from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale, with increasing complexity in the passage from one scale to the other. Following such a line of thought, the currently accepted model of condensed matter, which is based on electrostatics and short-ranged forces, is criticized. It is suggested that the correct interpretation of quantum dispersion forces (van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, and so on) as quantum coherence effects hints at the necessity of including long-ranged forces (or mechanisms for them) in condensed matter theories of biological processes. Some quantum effects in biology are reviewed and quantum mechanics is acknowledged as conceptually important to biology since without it most (if not all) of the biological structures and signalling processes would not even exist. Moreover, it is suggested that long-range quantum coherent dynamics, including electron polarization, may be invoked to explain signal amplification process in biological systems in general.

  20. Department of Energy Selects U.C. Berkeley to Lead Consortium...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    U.C. Berkeley to Lead Consortium for U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center's Energy-Water Track Department of Energy Selects U.C. Berkeley to Lead Consortium for U.S.-China...

  1. Los Alamos-led consortium works to enhance fuel cell technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos-led consortium works to enhance fuel cell technology Los Alamos-led consortium works to enhance fuel cell technology Los Alamos National Laboratory is leading a...

  2. The San Francisco Consortium CT Host, CE Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ovchinnikov, Sergei

    The San Francisco Consortium CT Host, CE Home me l r Student: Complete Sections 1 through 5. Print Campus Campus California College of Podiatric Medicine City College of San Francisco Cogswell College Golden Gate University Tuition Required Hastings College of the Law San Francisco State University

  3. Intelligent Storage Consortium A Center of the Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Intelligent Storage Consortium A Center of the Institute of Technology MEMBERSHIP ADVANTAGES I opportunities MISSION Explores pre-competitive development of intelligent object-based storage systems I, and public sector I OBJECTS INTERCONNECT STORAGE DEVICE BLOCKS FILE SYSTEM FILE SYSTEM USER COMPONENT FILE

  4. Montana Space Grant Consortium Montana NASA EPSCoR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Montana Space Grant Consortium and Montana NASA EPSCoR CALL FOR PROPOSALS 3 OPPORTUNITIES http campuses is a goal of Space Grant and NASA EPSCoR. If you wish to have an example of a successful MSGC MSU must still include at least 1:1 non-federal cost share for requested NASA/MSGC funds. If you have

  5. Presented by CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory #12;www.casl.gov Nuclear Power in the US Top 10 Nuclear Generating cost of electricity · Essentially expands existing nuclear power fleet · Requires ability to predictPresented by Nuclear Energy CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

  6. Sustainability Research & Development Consortium for DoD Installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    bases. CEMML is already a proven global provider of re- search and sustainable management of natural-campus consortium that provides technical ex- pertise in support of broader sustainability initiatives at Department of Defense (DoD) installations. CSU is a leading test bed for our changing energy culture, as well

  7. Monte Carlo simulation in systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schellenberger, Jan

    2010-01-01

    2 The history of Monte Carlo Sampling in Systems Biology 1.1simulation tools: the systems biology workbench and biospiceCellular and Molecular Biology. ASM Press, Washington

  8. A University Consortium on Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Assanis, Dennis; Atreya, Arvind; Bowman, Craig; Chen, Jyh-Yuan; Cheng, Wai; Davidson, David; Dibble, Robert; Edwards, Chris; Filipi, Zoran; Golden, David; Green, William; Hanson, Ronald; Hedrick, J Karl; Heywood, John; Im, Hong; Lavoie, George; Sick, Volker; Wooldridge, Margaret

    2007-03-31

    Over the course of this four year project, the consortium team members from UM, MIT, Stanford, and Berkeley along with contributors from Sandia National Labs and LLNL, have produced a wide range of results on gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The work spanned a wide range of activities including engine experiments, fundamental chemical kinetics experiments, and an array of analytical modeling techniques and simulations. Throughout the project a collaborative approach has produced a many significant new insights into HCCI engines and their behavior while at the same time we achieved our key consortium goal: to develop workable strategies for gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The major accomplishments in each task are summarized, followed by detailed discussion.

  9. SEEWEC Consortium lead partner Ghent University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan:Roxbury,RushS.K Enterprise PvtSEEWEC Consortium lead

  10. Consortium Template (Expenditure-Based) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:I DueBETOofforCompanyResults,ConservingDecemberConsortium

  11. Report on the research conducted under the funding of the Sloan foundation postdoctoral fellowship in Computational Molecular Biology [Systematic study of protein-protein complexes] Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheinerman, Felix

    2001-06-01

    A central question in molecular biology is what structural features are common at protein-protein interfaces and what energetic factors define the affinity and specificity of protein-protein association. Analysis of structural and mutational data on protein-protein interfaces revealed that protein-protein interfaces of different functional classes contain many more energetically important charged and polar residues than was previously thought. Since, in the context of protein folding studies, polar interactions are believed to destabilize the folded proteins, this observation raised the question as to the forces that determine the stability of protein complexes. To investigate this issue in detail, the authors developed a number of partitioning schemes that allowed them to investigate the role of selected residues, ion pairs, and networks of polar interactions in protein-protein association. The methods developed were applied to the analysis of four different protein-protein interfaces: the ribonuclease barnase and its inhibitor barstar, the human growth hormone and its receptor, subtype N9 influenze virus neuraminidase and NC41 antibody, and the Ras Binding Domain of kinase cRaf and a Ras homologue Rap1A. The calculations revealed a surprising variability in how polar interactions affect the stability of different complexes. The finding that positions of charged and polar residues on protein-protein interfaces are optimized with respect to electrostatic interactions suggests that this property can be employed for the discrimination between native conformations and trial complexes generated by a docking algorithm. Analysis indicated the presence of SH2 domains in Janus family of non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases.

  12. Eric Bennett Computational Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    they are built up from -strands perpendicular and parallel to the main fiber axis (10-11). It appears in the protein folding pathway have been shown to decrease the cell's ability to clear cellular waste leading

  13. Stacy Evans Computational Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    genome project, genes horizontally and laterally gene transferred have been implicated as the source of bacterial protein homologs in the human genome. Additionally, similar protein homologs have been identified to determine HT genes. For instance, original work conducted in 2001 by the human genome sequencing effort

  14. Marine Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaffino, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    this  door. ”   Marine  Biology   I  joined  the  military  RIVERSIDE   Marine  Biology   A Thesis submitted in partialBiology                                                                                                                        

  15. Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool Webcast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the "Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool" webcast, held April 3, 2012.

  16. Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff webcast, held May 6, 2010.

  17. ABB and Energy Utilities Form Consortium to Fund SCADA/EMS Cyber...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy's (DOE) National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB), announced a recent article in the journal Transmission & Distribution World. ABB and Energy Utilities Form Consortium to Fund...

  18. Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Garima

    2011-01-01

    Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using YeastBiomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using YeastConsortium for efficient biofuel production: A New Candidate

  19. A longstanding goal for regulatory biology is to learn howgenomesencodethediversepatternsof geneexpres-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    A longstanding goal for regulatory biology is to learn howgenomesencodethediversepatternsof'être of the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project consortium1. Although large-scale ChIP and transcriptome studies for Advanced Computing Research and 2Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

  20. Molecular and biological characterization of the 5 human-bovine rotavirus (WC3)-based reassortant strains of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, RotaTeq (registered)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; Joelsson, Daniel B.; Warakomski, Donald J.; Zhou, Tingyi; Mathis, Pamela K.; Maanen, Marc-Henri van; Ranheim, Todd S.; Ciarlet, Max

    2010-08-01

    RotaTeq (registered) is a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine that contains five human-bovine reassortant strains (designated G1, G2, G3, G4, and P1) on the backbone of the naturally attenuated tissue culture-adapted parental bovine rotavirus (BRV) strain WC3. The viral genomes of each of the reassortant strains were completely sequenced and compared pairwise and phylogenetically among each other and to human rotavirus (HRV) and BRV reference strains. Reassortants G1, G2, G3, and G4 contained the VP7 gene from their corresponding HRV parent strains, while reassortants G1 and G2 also contained the VP3 gene (genotype M1) from the HRV parent strain. The P1 reassortant contained the VP4 gene from the HRV parent strain and all the other gene segments from the BRV WC3 strain. The human VP7s had a high level of overall amino acid identity (G1: 95-99%, G2: 94-99% G3: 96-100%, G4: 93-99%) when compared to those of representative rotavirus strains of their corresponding G serotypes. The VP4 of the P1 reassortant had a high identity (92-97%) with those of serotype P1A[8] HRV reference strains, while the BRV VP7 showed identities ranging from 91% to 94% to those of serotype G6 HRV strains. Sequence analyses of the BRV or HRV genes confirmed that the fundamental structure of the proteins in the vaccine was similar to those of the HRV and BRV references strains. Sequences analyses showed that RotaTeq (registered) exhibited a high degree of genetic stability as no mutations were identified in the material of each reassortant, which undergoes two rounds of replication cycles in cell culture during the manufacturing process, when compared to the final material used to fill the dosing tubes. The infectivity of each of the reassortant strains of RotaTeq (registered) , like HRV strains, did not require the presence of sialic acid residues on the cell surface. The molecular and biologic characterization of RotaTeq (registered) adds to the significant body of clinical data supporting the consistent efficacy, immunogenicity, and safety of RotaTeq (registered) .

  1. Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2012-03-31

    On September 30, 2008, the US Department of Energy (DoE), issued a cooperative agreement award, DE-FC26-08NT01914, to the Metropolitan Energy Center (MEC), for a project known as “Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty Certification” project. The cooperative agreement was awarded pursuant to H15915 in reference to H. R. 2764 Congressionally Directed Projects. The original agreement provided funding for The Consortium to implement the established project objectives as follows: (1) to understand the current state of the development of a test protocol for PHEV configurations; (2) to work with industry stakeholders to recommend a medium duty vehicle test protocol; (3) to utilize the Phase 1 Eaton PHEV F550 Chassis or other appropriate PHEV configurations to conduct emissions testing; (4) and to make an industry PHEV certification test protocol recommendation for medium duty trucks. Subsequent amendments to the initial agreement were made, the most significant being a revised Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) that did not address actual field data since it was not available as originally expected. This project was mated by DOE with a parallel project award given to the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in California. The SCAQMD project involved designing, building and testing of five medium duty plug-in hybrid electric trucks. SCAQMD had contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to manage the project. EPRI provided the required match to the federal grant funds to both the SCAQMD project and the Kansas Consortium project. The rational for linking the two projects was that the data derived from the SCAQMD project could be used to validate the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium team. At the same time, the consortium team would be a useful resource to SCAQMD in designating their test procedures for emissions and operating parameters and determining vehicle mileage. The years between award of the cooperative agreements and their completion were problematic for the US and world economies. This resulted in the President and Congress implementing the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, abbreviated ARRA (Pub.L. 111-5), commonly referred to as the Stimulus or The Recovery Act. The stimulus money available for transportation projects encouraged the SCAQMD to seek additional funds. In August of 2009, they eventually were awarded an additional $45.5 M, and the scope of their project was expanded to 378 vehicles. However, as a consequence of the stimulus money and the inundation of DOE with applications for new project under the ARRA, the expected time table for producing and testing vehicles was significantly delayed. As a result, these vehicles were not available for validating the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium. Therefore, in April of 2011, the Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) for the project was revised, and limited to producing the draft protocol for PHEV certification as its deliverable.

  2. India-US Lab Consortium Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA JumpDuimenMaking Energy Efficiency Real (MEER)US Lab Consortium

  3. Chemical Consortium Holdings Inc ChemCon | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla,Thermal GradientChateau Tebeau LLC Jump to:Consortium Holdings

  4. Consortium Template (Expenditure-Based) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergy comparing LED lightingConsortium Exp-based

  5. CONSORTIUM GETS WISE ABOUT ENERGY UPGRADES | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l DeInsulation at04-86)ContractorsCNG ExportsCONSORTIUM GETS WISE

  6. Northeast Advanced Vehicle Consortium NAVC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to:Information 3rd| OpenInformationConsortium NAVC Jump to:

  7. Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-11

    The numbers of individuals with adequate education and training to participate effectively in the highly technical aspects of environmental site cleanup are insufficient to meet the increasing demands of industry and government. Young people are particularly sensitive to these issues and want to become better equipped to solve the problems which will confront them during their lives. Educational institutions, on the other hand, have been slow in offering courses and curricula which will allow students to fulfill these interests. This has been in part due to the lack of federal funding to support new academic programs. This Consortium has been organized to initiate focused educational effort to reach inner-city youth with interesting and useful energy and environmental programs which can lead to well-paying and satisfying careers. Successful Consortium programs can be replicated in other parts of the nation. This report describes a pilot program in Washington, DC, Philadelphia, and Baltimore with the goal to attract and retain inner-city youth to pursue careers in energy-related scientific and technical areas, environmental restoration, and waste management.

  8. The Southern Ontario Smart Computing Consortium helps strengthen Canada's digital economy by providing a new innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    The Southern Ontario Smart Computing Consortium helps strengthen Canada's digital economy. Overview · Partnership between IBM Canada, the Governments of Canada and Ontario, and a consortium of sevenMaster University, University of Ottawa, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Queen's University

  9. A Consortium of the United States Council for Automotive Research Nondestructive Evaluation Steering Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    A Consortium of the United States Council for Automotive Research Nondestructive Evaluation Automotive Industry September 6, 2006 United States Automotive Materials Partnership, A Consortium of the United States Council for Automotive Research 1000 Town Center Building, Suite 300 Southfield, MI 48075

  10. Enhanced biodegradation of phenol by a microbial consortium in a solidliquid two phase partitioning bioreactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugulis, Andrew J.

    the benefits of using a mixed microbial population for the degradation of phenol in a TPPB that uses solid degradation (0.71 g phenol g)1 cell h). Investigation of the four-member consortium showed that it consisted. The enhanced effects of the use of a microbial consortium now offer improved degradation of phenol, and open

  11. Systems Biology Approaches Investigating Cardiac Epigenome Dynamics in Heart Hypertrophy and Failure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Haodong

    2013-01-01

    reviews. Molecular cell biology 11, 264–75 (2010). Cairns,structural & molecular biology 18, 107–14 Li, G. et al.data. PLoS computational biology 5, e1000598 (2009).

  12. Current Biology, Vol. 13, 448453, March 4, 2003, 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. PII S0960-9822(03)00128-3 Molecular Genetics and Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eizirik, Eduardo

    . PII S0960-9822(03)00128-3 Molecular Genetics and Evolution of Melanism in the Cat Family cat (Felis catus) is inherited as a recessive trait, sug- gesting agouti/ASIP as a candidate gene [1, 2], whereas

  13. Enhancement in current density and energy conversion efficiency of 3-dimensional MFC anodes using pre-enriched consortium and continuous supply of electron donors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A

    2011-01-01

    Using a pre-enriched microbial consortium as the inoculum and continuous supply of carbon source, improvement in performance of a three-dimensional, flow-through MFC anode utilizing ferricyanide cathode was investigated. The power density increased from 170 W/m3 (1800 mW/m2) to 580 W/m3 (6130 mW/m2), when the carbon loading increased from 2.5 g/l-day to 50 g/l-day. The coulombic efficiency (CE) decreased from 90% to 23% with increasing carbon loading. The CEs are among the highest reported for glucose and lactate as the substrate with the maximum current density reaching 15.1 A/m2. This suggests establishment of a very high performance exoelectrogenic microbial consortium at the anode. A maximum energy conversion efficiency of 54% was observed at a loading of 2.5 g/l-day. Biological characterization of the consortium showed presence of Burkholderiales and Rhodocyclales as the dominant members. Imaging of the biofilms revealed thinner biofilms compared to the inoculum MFC, but a 1.9-fold higher power density.

  14. The Science Institutes at Yale's West Campus Chemical Biology Cancer Biology Energy Sciences Microbial Diversity Nanobiology Systems Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Science Institutes at Yale's West Campus Chemical Biology Cancer Biology Energy Sciences Microbial Diversity Nanobiology Systems Biology The Chemical Biology Institute at Yale's West Campus #12 and molecular assem- blies, large and small, to address challenging problems in health, energy

  15. MASTER OF SCIENCE STUDIES IN BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Don

    Ver. 1.15 MASTER OF SCIENCE STUDIES IN BIOLOGY GUIDE FOR APPLICANTS, GRADUATE STUDENTS AND GRADUATE Biology and Ecology Physiology and Cellular/Molecular Biology Research Tools COURSE LOADS AND RECOMMENDED.......................................................................................................................................12 Change of Thesis Advisor Registration for Biological Research Thesis Proposal Registration

  16. Biosensors combine the high selectivity and sensitivity of molecular recognition processes of biologi-cal macromolecules with a transducer. The increase in mass by the recognition process can in princi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turova, Varvara

    Biosensors combine the high selectivity and sensitivity of molecular recognition processes. Keywords: biosensor, linear electro-elasticity, multi-layer structure, fluid-structure interaction, finite for Sensors and Actuators Modeling and Simulation Wave Propagation in Biosensors K.-H. Hoffmann N. Botkin, M

  17. From Tucson to Genomics and Transgenics: The Vector Biology Network and the Emergence of Modern Vector Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    mosquitoes. A PL meeting at the Biology of Disease Vectors (as a tool in vector biology. Transformation of the vector ofelement. Insect Molecular Biology 10: 597–604. 11. Balter

  18. Consortium biology in immunology: the perspective from the Immunological Genome Project.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoist, C; Lanier, L; Merad, M; Mathis, D

    2012-01-01

    significance, the Human Genome Project (1990–2003) is1990s against the Human Genome Project 5 , and more recentlycompletion of the Human Genome Project, Eric Lander argued

  19. Consortium biology in immunology: the perspective from the Immunological Genome Project.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoist, C; Lanier, L; Merad, M; Mathis, D

    2012-01-01

    P.  M. & Walker, W.  A. Probiotics and the gut microbiota in39. Kalliomaki, M. et al. Probiotics in primary preventionAbrahamsson, T.  R. et al. Probiotics in prevention of IgE-

  20. Mol. Biol. Evol. 17(12):17761788. 2000 2000 by the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. ISSN: 0737-4038

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, David

    and Evolution. ISSN: 0737-4038 A Case for Evolutionary Genomics and the Comprehensive Examination of Sequence; Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge; Institute for Genomic Research, Gaithersburg, Maryland; §Genomics Group, Bioscience Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New

  1. National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC), Biofuels for Advancing America (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01

    Introduction to the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium, a collaboration between 17 national laboratory, university, and industry partners that is conducting cutting-edge research to develop infrastructure-compatible, sustainable, biomass-based hydrocarbon fuels.

  2. SMART Wind Consortium Virtual Meeting on Installation: Reducing Electrical and Foundation Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 90-minute SMART Wind Consortium virtual meeting is intended to foster dialogue on actions to improve safety and efficiency and to reduce installation costs for distributed wind turbines. Gary...

  3. New Technologies that Enhance Environmental Protection, Increase Domestic Production, Result from DOE-Supported Consortium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New technologies that help small, independent oil and natural gas operators contribute to domestic energy production while improving environmental protection have resulted from U.S. Department of Energy support of the Stripper Well Consortium.

  4. BETO Announces June Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BETO will host a live webinar titled “Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research Results” on Wednesday, June 11, 2014, from 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.

  5. SMART Wind Consortium Composites Subgroup Virtual Meeting: Advanced Manufacturing of Wind Turbine Blades

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Funded by the U.S. Department of Commerce, the SMART Wind Consortium is connecting collaborators to form consensus on near-term and mid-term plans needed to increase cost competitiveness of U.S....

  6. Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This April 3, 2012 webcast presented information about the Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool developed by DOE"s Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium. Doug Elliott of Pacific Northwest...

  7. Asymptotic Analysis of Cooperative Molecular Motor System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durrett, Richard

    McKinley1,4, John Fricks1,5 1Statistical and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute 2Rensselaer Biological engines which catabolize ATP (fuel) to do useful work in a biological cell. Molecular pumps

  8. Mapping molecular dynamics computations to hypercubes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakamsani, Vamsee Krishna

    1993-01-01

    This thesis proposes an approach for systematic modeling, mapping and performance analysis of a Grand Challenge application problem in computational biology called Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Proteins. Molecular Dynamics (MD) is an important...

  9. Washoe Tribe Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jennifer

    2014-11-06

    The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding from the Department of Energy to complete the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project. The main goal of the project was to enhance the capacity of the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium (NITEC) to effectively assist tribes within Nevada to technically manage tribal energy resources and implement tribal energy projects.

  10. Biology 2250 Principles of Genetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Innes, David J.

    . David J. Innes B MendelianGenetics Tentative Lecture Dates and Topics Carr: Sept. 14 - 30 Structure1 Biology 2250 Principles of Genetics Instructors: Dr. Steven M. Carr B Molecular Genetics Dr and function of DNA and genes Innes: Oct. 7 ­ Nov. 12 Mendelian Genetics Carr: Nov. 18 ­ Dec. 2 Molecular

  11. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Tom McGee; Carol Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2006-06-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort was made to locate and retain the services of a suitable vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) following the storms and the loss of the contracted vessel, the M/V Ocean Quest and its two submersibles, but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  12. A special report on the human genome Biology 2.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weimer, Westley

    A special report on the human genome Biology 2.0 A decade after the human-genome project, writes was to sequence the human genome, all 3 billion genetic letters of it, and thus--as headline writers put it, in the form of Dr Collins's International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium. There was the promise

  13. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-12-31

    The member institutions of the Consortium continue to play a significant role in increasing the number of African Americans who enter the environmental professions through the implementation of the Consortium`s RETT Plan for Research, Education, and Technology Transfer. The four major program areas identified in the RETT Plan are as follows: (1) minority outreach and precollege education; (2) undergraduate education and postsecondary training; (3) graduate and postgraduate education and research; and (4) technology transfer.

  14. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities of Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas McGee; Carol Lutken

    2008-05-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research that shared the need for a way to conduct investigations of gas hydrates and their stability zone in the Gulf of Mexico in situ on a more-or-less continuous basis. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor and to discover the configuration and composition of the subsurface pathways or 'plumbing' through which fluids migrate into and out of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the sediment-water interface. Monitoring changes in this zone and linking them to coincident and perhaps consequent events at the seafloor and within the water column is the eventual goal of the Consortium. This mission includes investigations of the physical, chemical and biological components of the gas hydrate stability zone - the sea-floor/sediment-water interface, the near-sea-floor water column, and the shallow subsurface sediments. The eventual goal is to monitor changes in the hydrate stability zone over time. Establishment of the Consortium succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among those involved in gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Following extensive investigation into candidate sites, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) was chosen by consensus of the Consortium at their fall, 2004, meeting as the site most likely to satisfy all criteria established by the group. Much of the preliminary work preceding the establishment of the site - sensor development and testing, geophysical surveys, and laboratory studies - has been reported in agency documents including the Final Technical Report to DOE covering Cooperative Agreement DEFC26-00NT40920 and Semiannual Progress Reports for this award, DE-FC26-02NT41628. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in MC118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. SFO completion, now anticipated for 2009-10, has, therefore, been delayed. Although delays caused scheduling and deployment difficulties, many sensors and instruments were completed during this period. Software has been written that will accommodate the data that the station retrieves, when it begins to be delivered. In addition, new seismic data processing software has been written to treat the peculiar data to be received by the vertical line array (VLA) and additional software has been developed that will address the horizontal line array (HLA) data. These packages have been tested on data from the test deployments of the VLA and on data from other, similar, areas of the Gulf (in the case of the HLA software). During the life of this Cooperative Agreement (CA), the CMRET conducted many cruises. Early in the program these were executed primarily to survey potential sites and test sensors and equipment being developed for the SFO. When MC118 was established as the observatory site, subsequent cruises focused on this location. Beginning in 2005 and continuing to the present, 13 research cruises to MC118 have been conducted by the Consortium. During September, 2006, the Consortium was able to secure 8 days aboard the R/V Seward Johnson with submersible Johnson SeaLink, a critical chapter in the life of the Observatory project as important documentation, tests, recoveries and deployments were accomplished during this trip (log appended). Consortium members have participated materially in a number of additional cruises including several of the NIUST autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), Ea

  15. Graduate Programs in Plant Biology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildermuth, Mary C

    not re- biochemistry, cell and molecular biology (B22). pmb.berkeley.edu Plant&Microbial Biology #12;The to the environment will continue to fuel the expansion of plant research well into the future. The plant biology program focuses on contemporary ba- sic plant research, design of biotechnologies, and plant-microbe

  16. FACULTY EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    OF BIOLOGY Permanent Full-Time Position (Tenure-Track) Assistant Professor Starting mid-August 2014 REFER of Biology at Sonoma State University seeks applications from broadly trained biologists with teaching and research interests and expertise in molecular biology, for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position

  17. Space System Architecture: Final Report of SSPARC: the Space Systems, Policy, and Architecture Research Consortium (Thrust I and II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hastings, Daniel

    The Space Systems, Policy and Architecture Research Consortium (SSPARC) was formed to make substantial progress on problems of national importance. The goals of SSPARC were to:

  18. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carol Lutken

    2006-09-30

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The CMRET has conducted several research cruises during this reporting period: one in April, one in June, one in September. April's effort was dedicated to surveying the mound at MC118 with the Surface-Source-Deep-Receiver (SSDR) seismic surveying system. This survey was completed in June and water column and bottom samples were collected via box coring. A microbial filtering system developed by Consortium participants at the University of Georgia was also deployed, run for {approx}12 hours and retrieved. The September cruise, designed to deploy, test, and in some cases recover, geochemical and microbial instruments and experiments took place aboard Harbor Branch's Seward Johnson and employed the Johnson SeaLink manned submersible. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in a previously submitted report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs. In addition, Barrodale Computing Services Ltd. (BCS) completed their work; their final report is the bulk of the semiannual report that precedes (abstract truncated)

  19. JV Task 120 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Loreal Heebink; David Hassett; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher

    2009-03-28

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') is the core coal combustion product (CCP) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCPs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCP utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program, which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCP performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 2007 to 2009 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCPs. The tasks were included in four categories: (1) Environmental Evaluations of CCPs; (2) Evaluation of Impacts on CCPs from Emission Controls; (3) Construction and Product-Related Activities; and (4) Technology Transfer and Maintenance Tasks. All tasks are designed to work toward achieving the CARRC overall goal and supporting objectives. The various tasks are coordinated in order to provide broad and useful technical data for CARRC members. Special projects provide an opportunity for non-CARRC members to sponsor specific research or technology transfer consistent with CARRC goals. This report covers CARRC activities from January 2007 through March 2009. These activities have been reported in CARRC Annual Reports and in member meetings over the past 2 years. CARRC continues to work with industry and various government agencies with its research, development, demonstration, and promotional activities nearing completion at the time of submission of this report. CARRC expects to continue its service to the coal ash industry in 2009 and beyond to work toward the common goal of advancing coal ash utilization by solving CCP-related technical issues and promoting the environmentally safe, technically sound, and economically viable management of these complex and changing materials.

  20. Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education From the SW Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren Reece

    2011-03-22

    This report describes the final expenditures for the INIE project during FY 08/09. (There were no expenditures during FY09/10 or during FY10/11.) To see the list of accomplishments done using the INIE funds, please see the reports included here. The last of the FY 07/08 funds were brought forward and used to complete two distance education modules teaching reactor experiments. These modules and parts from the modules are still being used and are being disseminated off-campus as a part of our distance education effort. The second largest expenditure was sending students to the ANS to present student papers on work that they had done the previous year underwritten by INIE funds. The remaining expenditures were IDC charges and minor travel expenses to give students a tour of a medical facility. Once again we wish to express of sincere appreciation of the INIE program and hope that the return on investment is appreciated by the DOE. Although INIE has come to a close, looking back at all the Consortium has accomplished is astounding. And, as was hoped, these funds have proved to be a springboard for continuing work, particularly at Texas A&M. With the resurgence of nuclear power, the utilities have realized that the nuclear workforce in the near future will be too small for the task of bringing dozens of new plants on line and have turned their attention to the URRs to help feed the workforce pipeline. The distance education modules developed at the A&M are soon to be broadcast throughout the country to help train a new generation of nuclear workers. Our students at the Nuclear Science Center at being snapped up by the nuclear power plants after graduating. Our research projects at A&M have all ended with new data, new ways of looking at old problems, and produced a covey of good students. I want to say 'Thanks' with utmost sincerity because without the INIE funds our efforts would yield a small fraction of the accomplishments you see in this report.

  1. New York Nano-Bio Molecular Information Technology (NYNBIT) Incubator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Digendra K

    2008-12-19

    This project presents the outcome of an effort made by a consortium of six universities in the State of New York to develop a Center for Advanced technology (CAT) in the emerging field of Nano-Bio-Molecular Information Technology. The effort consists of activities such as organization of the NYNBIT incubator, collaborative research projects, development of courses, an educational program for high schools, and commercial start-up programs.

  2. Assessing computational methods and science policy in systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castillo, Andrea R. (Andrea Redwing)

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, I discuss the development of systems biology and issues in the progression of this science discipline. Traditional molecular biology has been driven by reductionism with the belief that breaking down a ...

  3. Washington University/BJH/SLCH Consortium Adult Critical Care Medicine Institutional Resources Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Gregory

    an institutional policy governing the educational resources committed to Critical Care Medicine to insure will monitor the educational and financial resources committed to the Critical Care Medicine training programsWashington University/BJH/SLCH Consortium Adult Critical Care Medicine Institutional Resources

  4. Genome Sequence of the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon The International Aphid Genomics Consortium"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Genome Sequence of the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum The International Aphid Genomics Consortium we present the 464 Mb draft genome assembly of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. This first published whole genome sequence of a basal hemimetabolous insect provides an outgroup to the multiple

  5. IllInoIs InstItute of technology's WInd energy research consortIum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    and management using smart grid technology, as well as several other research projects focusing on wind energyIllInoIs InstItute of technology's WInd energy research consortIum Wanger Institute for Sustainable Energy Research (WISER) Illinois Institute of Technology On-campus wind turbine [OVER] The U

  6. A Consortium to Promote Distributed Computing Rahman Tashakkori, Barry L. Kurtz Barry Wilkinson Mark A. Holliday

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holliday, Mark A.

    a consortium to promote high performance computing at comprehensive universities throughout the state [2 in high-performance computing, information systems, and computational and computer science." [1] Twelve. BACKGROUND In the realm of high performance computing there has been a shift from traditional parallel

  7. 3D Systems Packaging Research Center AN INDUSTRY-ACADEMIA CONSORTIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    3D Systems Packaging Research Center AN INDUSTRY-ACADEMIA CONSORTIUM 3D Systems Packaging Research.prc.gatech.edu · prcinfo@ece.gatech.edu 60GHz Design and Test Methods for Packaging of 60 GHz Front-End Modules A worldwide for the implementation of the mm-wave front- end. However, little work has been done on the components and packaging side

  8. Dr. Brian L. Wardle Director, Nano-Engineered Composite aerospace STructures (NECST) Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    Composite aerospace STructures (NECST) Consortium and has served as the materials/structures lead on MIT's Microchemical Power MURI team developing MEMS-scale solid oxide fuel cells. Prof. Wardle is a principal member of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), discovery of a new class of oxide catalysts for carbon nanotube (CNT

  9. Nerve Garden: A Virtual Terrarium In Cyberspace Contact Consortium, Biota.org Special Interest Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbus, Kenneth D.

    -systems, which are suggestive of the processes in real plant DNA. A-Life Powering Better Virtual World ("real dirt" terraria). Students can "dissect" virtual plants to glean the underlying algorithms, LNerve Garden: A Virtual Terrarium In Cyberspace Contact Consortium, Biota.org Special Interest

  10. ON THE POSSIBLE ROLE(S) OF A "UNIVERSITY CONSORTIUM FOR GEOGRAPHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    , and then summarizes the panel discussion. Introduction Geographic information systems (if broadly defined to include many aspects of land information systems, geographical analysis, cartography, geomatics, and remoteON THE POSSIBLE ROLE(S) OF A "UNIVERSITY CONSORTIUM FOR GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION AND ANALYSIS" (UCGIA

  11. Microbial Corrosion in Linepipe Steel Under the Influence of a Sulfate-Reducing Consortium Isolated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    biofilm, carbon steel API 5L X52, microbiologically influenced corrosion, pipeline, sulfateMicrobial Corrosion in Linepipe Steel Under the Influence of a Sulfate-Reducing Consortium Isolated) This work investigates microbiologically influenced corrosion of API 5L X52 linepipe steel by a sulfate

  12. LBL/JSU/AGMUS science consortium annual report, FY 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    In 1983, a formal Memorandum of Understanding joined the Ana G. Mendez University System (AGMUS), Jackson State University (JSU), and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in a consortium designed to advance the science and technology programs of JSU and AGMUS. This is the first such collaboration between a Hispanic university system, a historically Black university, and a national laboratory. The goals of this alliance are basic and direct: to develop and effect a long-term, comprehensive program that will enable the campuses of AGMUS and JSU to provide a broad, high-quality offering in the natural and computer sciences, to increase the number of minority students entering these fields, and to contribute to scientific knowledge and the federal government`s science mission through research. This report documents the progress toward these goals and includes individual success stories. The LBL/JSU/AGMUS Science Consortium has developed plans for utilizing its program successes to help other institutions to adopt or adapt those elements of the model that have produced the greatest results. Within the five-year plan formulated in 1990 are eight major components, each with defining elements and goals. These elements have become the components of the Science Consortium`s current plan for expansion and propagation.

  13. A User's Guide to the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements The ENCODE Project Consortium"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieb, Jason

    and improve health. The ENCODE Consortium is integrating multiple technologies and approaches in a collective methylation patterns. In the process, standards to ensure high-quality data have been implemented, and novel Research Institute; PASRs, promoter-associated short RNAs; PET, Paired-End diTag; RACE, Rapid Amplification

  14. Navigation Links Biology News

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    Navigation Links Biology News Medicine News Biology Products Medicine Products Biology Definition Medicine Definition Biology Technology Medicine Technology Biology Dictionary Medicine Dictionary Biology Navigation Medical Navigation MHOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS Single-cell transfection tool enables added control

  15. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The group is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently received increased attention and the group of researchers working on the station has expanded to include several microbial biologists. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments are planned for fall 2005 and center about the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles. The subs will be used to effect bottom surveys, emplace sensors and sea floor experiments and make connections between sensor data loggers and the integrated data power unit (IDP). Station/observatory completion is anticipated for 2007 following the construction, testing and deployment of the horizontal line arrays, not yet funded. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  16. Modular languages for systems and synthetic biology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Systems biology is a rapidly growing field which seeks a refined quantitative understanding of organisms, particularly studying how molecular species such as metabolites, proteins and genes interact in cells to form the ...

  17. MOLECULAR AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Department of Biological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    Year Initiation of dissertation research by the first summer. 6. 2nd /3rd Year Completion of other required coursework. 7. 2nd /3rd Year Complete Written Qualifying Exam; pass by end of first semester of 3rd year. 8. 2nd /3rd Year Complete Oral Qualifying Examination; pass by end of first semester of 3rd

  18. molecular BIologY Long RNAs turn up gene expression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    individual parts of the mitotic apparatus, the researchers surmise that, in the absence of spindles as 2 parts per billion. They show that, in a gas flow treated with a solid acid catalyst, TATP. Chem. Soc. doi:10.1021/ ja107419t (2010) PHYsIcs Insulator insight into constant Enigmatic materials

  19. Biological Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE's Biological Safety Program provides a forum for the exchange of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of biological safety. This content is supported by the Biosurety Executive Team. The Biosurety Executive Team is a DOE-chartered group. The DOE Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy provides administrative support for this group. The group identifies biological safety-related issues of concern to the DOE and pursues solutions to issues identified.

  20. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2004-03-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has already succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. As funding for this project, scheduled to commence December 1, 2002, had only been in place for less than half of the reporting period, project progress has been less than for other reporting periods. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made and several cruises are planned for the summer/fall of 2003 to test equipment, techniques and compatibility of systems. En route to reaching the primary goal of the Consortium, the establishment of a monitoring station on the sea floor, the following achievements have been made: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, Incorporation of capability to map the bottom location of the VLA, Improvements in timing issues for data recording. (2) Sea Floor Probe: The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed; The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments. (3) Electromagnetic bubble detector and counter: Initial tests performed with standard conductivity sensors detected nonconductive objects as small as .6mm, a very encouraging result, Components for the prototype are being assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed. (4) Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate; these measurements will be used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station; A scattering system and bubble-producing device, being assembled at USM, will be tested in the next two months, and the results compared to a physical scattering model. (5) Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: Progress has been made toward minimizing system maintenance through increased capacity and operational longevity, Miniaturization of many components of the sensor systems has been completed, A software package has been designed especially for the MIR sensor data evaluation, Custom electronics have been developed that reduce power consumption and, therefore, increase the length of time the system can remain operational. (6) Seismo-acoustic characterization of sea floor properties and processes at the hydrate monitoring station. (7) Adaptation of the acoustic-logging device, developed as part of the European Union-funded research project, Sub-Gate, for monitoring temporal variations in seabe

  1. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Carol Blanton Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2007-03-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. These delays caused scheduling and deployments difficulties but many sensors and instruments were completed during this period. Software has been written that will accommodate the data that the station retrieves, when it begins to be delivered. In addition, new seismic data processing software has been written to treat the peculiar data to be received by the vertical line array (VLA) and additional software has been developed that will address the horizontal line array (HLA) data. These packages have been tested on data from the test deployments of the VLA and on data from other, similar, areas of the Gulf (in the case of the HLA software). The CMRET has conducted one very significant research cruise during this reporting period: a March cruise to perform sea trials of the Station Service Device (SSD), the custom Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) built to perform several of the unique functions required for the observatory to become fully operational. March's efforts included test deployments of the SSD and Florida Southern University's mass spectrometer designed to measure hydrocarbon gases in the water column and The University of Georgia's microbial collector. The University of Georgia's rotational sea-floor camera was retrieved as was Specialty Devices storm monitor array. The former was deployed in September and the latter in June, 2006. Both were retrieved by acoustic release from a dispensable weight. Cruise participants also went prepared to recover any and all instruments left on the sea-floor during the September Johnson SeaLink submersible cruise. One of the pore-fluid samplers, a small ''peeper'' was retrieved successfully and in fine condition. Other instrumentation was left on the sea-floor until modifications of the SSD are complete and a return cruise is accomplished.

  2. BE.462J Molecular Principles of Biomaterials, Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irvine, Darrell J.

    Analysis and design at a molecular scale of materials used in contact with biological systems, including biotechnology and biomedical engineering. Topics include molecular interactions between bio- and synthetic molecules ...

  3. Molecular Cell Structure and Biological Importance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Chris

    ,* and Christopher P. Hill1,* 1Department of Biochemistry, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT- dues 140­300) that is flanked on both sides by regions that are predicted to be disordered (Ward et al that is expected to be unstructured (Ward et al., 2004) and a C-terminal domain (CTD) that adopts an SH2 fold

  4. A unified model of electroporation and molecular transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Kyle Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Biological membranes form transient, conductive pores in response to elevated transmembrane voltage, a phenomenon termed electroporation. These pores facilitate electrical and molecular transport across cell membranes that ...

  5. Offered Fall Semester: Biological Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Offered Fall Semester: Biological Physics Physics 466 / Physics 566 (conjoint) provides a fundamental physical understanding of the operation of cells, biomolecules and molecular machines. MWF 4:10-5:00pm, Webster 11 (3 cr) Instructor: Fred Gittes, Clinical Professor of Physics and Astronomy: gittes

  6. Ninth International Workshop on Plant Membrane Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This report is a compilation of abstracts from papers which were discussed at a workshop on plant membrane biology. Topics include: plasma membrane ATP-ases; plant-environment interactions, membrane receptors; signal transduction; ion channel physiology; biophysics and molecular biology; vaculor H+ pumps; sugar carriers; membrane transport; and cellular structure and function.

  7. Charting a Path to Net Zero Energy: Public-Private Sector Perspectives of the Commercial Buildings Consortium 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, J.

    2011-01-01

    system throughout a building's life cycle. In response to this need, in 2007 Congress called for creation of a Commercial Buildings Consortium (CBC) as a joint effort by the US Department of Energy (DOE), building owners and developers, states, utilities...

  8. Standards in Genomic Science: An Open-Access Journal of the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Garrity, George

    2011-06-03

    George Garrity of Michigan State University talks about the GSC's open-access journal SIGS at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009.

  9. National Laboratory] Basic Biological Sciences(59) Biological...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Achievements of structural genomics Terwilliger, Thomas C. Los Alamos National Laboratory Basic Biological Sciences(59) Biological Science Biological Science Abstract Not...

  10. Quantum physics meets biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Arndt; Thomas Juffmann; Vlatko Vedral

    2009-11-01

    Quantum physics and biology have long been regarded as unrelated disciplines, describing nature at the inanimate microlevel on the one hand and living species on the other hand. Over the last decades the life sciences have succeeded in providing ever more and refined explanations of macroscopic phenomena that were based on an improved understanding of molecular structures and mechanisms. Simultaneously, quantum physics, originally rooted in a world view of quantum coherences, entanglement and other non-classical effects, has been heading towards systems of increasing complexity. The present perspective article shall serve as a pedestrian guide to the growing interconnections between the two fields. We recapitulate the generic and sometimes unintuitive characteristics of quantum physics and point to a number of applications in the life sciences. We discuss our criteria for a future quantum biology, its current status, recent experimental progress and also the restrictions that nature imposes on bold extrapolations of quantum theory to macroscopic phenomena.

  11. US-India Consortium for Development of Sustainable Advanced Lignocellulosic Biofuels Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsStateofEnergyof EnergyEnergyUS-India Consortium

  12. Method for in situ biological conversion of coal to methane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Volkwein, Jon C. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for the in situ biological conversion of coal to methane comprising culturing on a coal-containing substrate a consortium of microorganisms capable of degrading the coal into methane under suitable conditions. This consortium of microorganisms can be obtained from an underground cavity such as an abandoned mine which underwent a change from being supplied with sewage to where no sewage was present, since these conditions have favored the development of microorganisms capable of using coal as a carbon source and converting coal to methane. The consortium of microorganisms obtained from such abandoned coal mines can be isolated and introduced to hard-to-reach coal-containing substrates which lack such microorganisms and which would otherwise remain unrecoverable. The present invention comprises a significant advantage in that useable energy can be obtained from a number of abandoned mine sites or other areas wherein coal is no longer being recovered, and such energy can be obtained in a safe, efficient, and inexpensive manner.

  13. The BioASP Library: ASP Solutions for Systems Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaub, Torsten

    The BioASP Library: ASP Solutions for Systems Biology Martin Gebser, Arne K¨onig, Torsten Schaub--Today's molecular biology is confronted with enor- mous amounts of data, generated by new high-throughput tech- nologies, along with an increasing number of biological models available over web repositories. This poses

  14. Biological preconcentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Bunker, Bruce C. (Albuquerque, NM); Huber, Dale L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-09-09

    A biological preconcentrator comprises a stimulus-responsive active film on a stimulus-producing microfabricated platform. The active film can comprise a thermally switchable polymer film that can be used to selectively absorb and desorb proteins from a protein mixture. The biological microfabricated platform can comprise a thin membrane suspended on a substrate with an integral resistive heater and/or thermoelectric cooler for thermal switching of the active polymer film disposed on the membrane. The active polymer film can comprise hydrogel-like polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) or poly(n-isopropylacrylamide), that are tethered to the membrane. The biological preconcentrator can be fabricated with semiconductor materials and technologies.

  15. Biomimetics Engineering from Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    Biomimetics or Engineering from Biology Hari Dharan Department of Mechanical Engineering University" ­ copying only? !!"Biologically-Inspired Design" !!"Engineering from Biology" Definition !!It is not "biology for engineers". !!It is not "imitating" or "copying" biology. !!It is not "reverse

  16. Modern concepts in molecular modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bajorath, J.; Klein, T.E.

    1996-12-31

    This session focused on the application of computer models and the development and application of various energy functions to study the structure, energetics and dynamics of proteins and their interactions with ligands. These studies provide an exciting view of current developments in computer-aided molecular modeling and theoretical analysis of biological molecules.

  17. Systems biology approach to bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, R.; Wu, C. H.; Hazen, T. C.

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation has historically been approached as a ?black box? in terms of our fundamental understanding. Thus it succeeds and fails, seldom without a complete understanding of why. Systems biology is an integrated research approach to study complex biological systems, by investigating interactions and networks at the molecular, cellular, community, and ecosystem level. The knowledge of these interactions within individual components is fundamental to understanding the dynamics of the ecosystem under investigation. Understanding and modeling functional microbial community structure and stress responses in environments at all levels have tremendous implications for our fundamental understanding of hydrobiogeochemical processes and the potential for making bioremediation breakthroughs and illuminating the ?black box?.

  18. This article is available online at http://www.jlr.org Journal of Lipid Research Volume 54, 2013 3215 Copyright 2013 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    that the 20-HETE pathway contrib- utes to the cardiovascular risks of COX inhibitors (9). More studies method to prepare 20-HETE would greatly facilitate the evaluation of its biological ac- tivities

  19. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-09-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements six months into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Analysis and repair attempts of the VLA used in the deep water deployment during October 2003 have been completed; Definition of an interface protocol for the VLA DATS to the SFO has been established; Design modifications to allow integration of the VLA to the SFO have been made; Experience gained in the deployments of the first VLA is being applied to the design of the next VLAs; One of the two planned new VLAs being modified to serve as an Oceanographic Line Array (OLA). (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: The decision to replace the Sea Floor Probe technology with the borehole emplacement of a geophysical array was reversed due to the 1300m water depth at the JIP selected borehole site. The SFP concept has been revisited as a deployment technique for the subsea floor array; The SFP has been redesigned to include gravity driven emplacement of an array up to 10m into the shallow subsurface of the sea floor. (3) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been analyzed for effects of currents and temperature changes; Several acoustic monitoring system concepts have been evaluated for their appropriateness to MC118, i.e., on the deep sea floor; A mock-up system was built but was rejected as too impractical for deployment on the sea floor. (4) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: The initial Inductive Conductivity Cell has been constructed from components acquired during the previous reporting period; Laboratory tests involving measuring bubble volume as a component of conductivity have been performed; The laboratory tests were performed in a closed system, under controlled conditions; the relationship between voltage and bubble volume appears to be linear. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: Designs and construction schematics for all electronic mounting pieces and an electronics system baseplate were finalized after extensive modeling to facilitate the successful fabrication and implementation of electronic components into the deep-sea, glass instrument housing; Construction schematics and fabrication of an electronics system baseplate have been completed with successful integration of all currently fabricated electronic mounting pieces; Modeling and design of an optics platform complementary to the constructed electronics platform for successful incorporation into ''sphereIR'' has commenced; A second generation chemometric data evaluation software package for evaluating complex spectra including corrections for baseline drifts and spectral anomalies resulting from matrix substances has been developed and will be incorporated into an optimized ''deepSniff'' program upon c

  20. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-05-18

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The primary objective of the group has been to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently achieved reality via the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology's (NIUST) solicitation for proposals for research to be conducted at the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, have had to be postponed and the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles sacrificed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort is being made to locate and retain the services of a replacement vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in the previous report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

  1. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-08-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. A year into the life of this cooperative agreement, we note the following achievements: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (A) Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, (B) Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, (C) Adaptation of SDI's Angulate program to use acoustic slant ranges and DGPS data to compute and map the bottom location of the vertical array, (D) Progress in T''0'' delay and timing issues for improved control in data recording, (E) Successful deployment and recovery of the VLA twice during an October, 2003 cruise, once in 830m water, once in 1305m water, (F) Data collection and recovery from the DATS data logger, (G) Sufficient energy supply and normal functioning of the pressure compensated battery even following recharge after the first deployment, (H) Survival of the acoustic modem following both deployments though it was found to have developed a slow leak through the transducer following the second deployment due, presumably, to deployment in excess of 300m beyond its rating. (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (A) The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed, (B) The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments, (C) The MPS has been adapted to serve as an energy source for both p- and s-wave studies at the station as well as to deploy the horizontal line arrays and the SFP. (3) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (A) Components for the prototype have been assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed, (B) The prototype has been constructed and preliminary data collected, (C) The construction of the field system is underway. (4) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (A) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate. These measurements have been used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station, (B) Laboratory tests performed using the project prototype have produced a conductivity data set that is being used to refine parameters of the field model. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (A) Preliminary designs of mounting pieces for electrical components of ''sphereIR'' have been completed using AutoCAD software, (B) The preliminary design of an electronics baseplate has been completed and aided in the optimization of

  2. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report 1994--1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    The HBCU/MI ET Consortium was established in January 1990, through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) among its member institutions. This group of research oriented Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions (HBCU/MIs) agreed to work together to initiate or revise education programs, develop research partnerships with public and private sector organizations, and promote technology development to address the nation`s critical environmental contamination problems. The Consortium`s Research, Education and Technology Transfer (RETT) Plan became the working agenda. The Consortium is a resource for collaboration among the member institutions and with federal an state agencies, national and federal laboratories, industries, (including small businesses), majority universities, and two and four-year technical colleges. As a group of 17 institutions geographically located in the southern US, the Consortium is well positioned to reach a diverse group of women and minority populations of African Americans, Hispanics and American Indians. This Report provides a status update on activities and achievements in environmental curriculum development, outreach at the K--12 level, undergraduate and graduate education, research and development, and technology transfer.

  3. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flatter and Faster: Transition Metal Dichalcogendies at the Molecular Foundry (Part II) Brain Imaging and Optical Manipulation Active Nanointerfaces for Electrochemistry SAXS-WAXS...

  4. The Solar Energy Consortium of New York Photovoltaic Research and Development Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Petra M.

    2012-10-15

    Project Objective: To lead New York State to increase its usage of solar electric systems. The expected outcome is that appropriate technologies will be made available which in turn will help to eliminate barriers to solar energy usage in New York State. Background: The Solar Energy Consortium has been created to lead New York State research on solar systems specifically directed at doubling the efficiency, halving the cost and reducing the cost of installation as well as developing unique form factors for the New York City urban environment.

  5. Molecular Biomechanics: The Molecular Basis of How Forces Regulate Cellular Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao, Gang

    Recent advances have led to the emergence of molecular biomechanics as an essential element of modern biology. These efforts focus on theoretical and experimental studies of the mechanics of proteins and nucleic acids, and ...

  6. DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY AND MARINE BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY AND MARINE BIOLOGY GRADUATE PROGRAM REVIEW 2000-2007 #12;i TABLE OF CONTENTS ....................................................................... 389 #12;ii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Department of Biology and Marine Biology contributes importantly). The department began offering the Master of Science in Marine Biology in 1980, and the Master of Science

  7. CONSORTIUM MODEL

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment|Marketing, LLCEfficiency |CBA.PDF&#0;ASSISTANCEU S

  8. CONSORTIUM MODEL

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment|Marketing, LLCEfficiency |CBA.PDF&#0;ASSISTANCEU S(Fixed Support)

  9. CONSORTIUM MODEL

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment|Marketing, LLCEfficiency |CBA.PDF&#0;ASSISTANCEU S(Fixed

  10. CONSORTIUM MODEL

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment|Marketing, LLCEfficiency |CBA.PDF&#0;ASSISTANCEU S(FixedTEMPLATE

  11. Biology reflective assessment curriculum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayley, Cheryl Ann

    2011-01-01

    Penick, J. E. (1998). Biology: A community context. Newof a standards-based high school biology curriculum.The American Biology Teacher Li, J. , Klahr, D. , & Siler,

  12. The Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1990--1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-02-25

    In February, 1990, the Secretary of Energy, James Watkins approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) . This program known by the acronym, WERC'' includes NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT), the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Sandia National Laboratories. The program is designed to provide an integrated approach to the national need via the following: (1) Education in waste management by the Consortium universities resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. The term waste management is used in a broad sense throughout this paper and includes all aspects of environmental management and environmental restoration. (2) Research programs at the leading edge, providing training to faculty and students and feeding into the education programs. (3) Education and research at the campuses, as well as from three field sites. (4) Ties with other multi-disciplinary university facilities. (5) Ties with two National Laboratories located in New Mexico. (6) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a proposed satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (7) An outreach program to interest others in environmental management, especially precollege students, minority students and practitioners in the field. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the first year.

  13. 60 Volume 81THE QUARTERLY REVIEW OF BIOLOGY orchestrate the dynamics of force production, di-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    ­471­45329­3. 2005. GENETICS & EVOLUTION Endless Forms Most Beautiful: The New Sci- ence of Evo Devo and the Making- veloping science of "evo devo" consists of, and why this is one of the most exciting areas of biology today. Evo devo is a fusion of genetics, molecular biology, developmental biology, and evolutionary biology

  14. BIOL 206-Introduction to Organismal Biology-Spring 2013 Alejandro Acevedo-Gutirrez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acevedo, Alejandro

    . 2010. Life: The Science of Biology. Vol. III. 9th edn. Freeman, W. H. & Co. ISBN: 9781429254281. [10th, K. 2009. A Student Handbook for Writing in Biology. 3rd edn. Sinauer Associates. [1st or 2nd and apply fundamental biological principles of ecology, genetics, evolution, cell and molecular biology

  15. Nonlinear Elasticity in Biological Gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornelis Storm; Jennifer J. Pastore; Fred C. MacKintosh; Tom C. Lubensky; Paul A. Janmey

    2004-06-01

    Unlike most synthetic materials, biological materials often stiffen as they are deformed. This nonlinear elastic response, critical for the physiological function of some tissues, has been documented since at least the 19th century, but the molecular structure and the design principles responsible for it are unknown. Current models for this response require geometrically complex ordered structures unique to each material. In this Article we show that a much simpler molecular theory accounts for strain stiffening in a wide range of molecularly distinct biopolymer gels formed from purified cytoskeletal and extracellular proteins. This theory shows that systems of semi-flexible chains such as filamentous proteins arranged in an open crosslinked meshwork invariably stiffen at low strains without the need for a specific architecture or multiple elements with different intrinsic stiffnesses.

  16. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-11-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements one year into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (1a) Repair attempts of the VLA cable damaged in the October >1000m water depth deployment failed; a new design has been tested successfully. (1b) The acoustic modem damaged in the October deployment was repaired successfully. (1c) Additional acoustic modems with greater depth rating and the appropriate surface communications units have been purchased. (1d) The VLA computer system is being modified for real time communications to the surface vessel using radio telemetry and fiber optic cable. (1e) Positioning sensors--including compass and tilt sensors--were completed and tested. (1f) One of the VLAs has been redesigned to collect near sea floor geochemical data. (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (2a) With the Consortium's decision to divorce its activities from those of the Joint Industries Program (JIP), due to the JIP's selection of a site in 1300m of water, the Sea Floor Probe (SFP) system was revived as a means to emplace arrays in the shallow subsurface until arrangements can be made for boreholes at >1000m water depth. (2b) The SFP penetrometer has been designed and construction begun. (2c) The SFP geophysical and pore-fluid probes have been designed. (3) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (3a) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been analyzed for effects of currents and temperature changes. (3b) Several acoustic monitoring system concepts have been evaluated for their appropriateness to MC118, i.e., on the deep sea floor. (3c) A mock-up system was built but was rejected as too impractical for deployment on the sea floor. (4) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (4a) Laboratory tests were performed using bubbles of different sizes in waters of different salinities to test the sensitivity of the. Differences were detected satisfactorily. (4b) The system was field tested, first at the dock and then at the shallow water test site at Cape Lookout Bight where methane bubbles from the sea floor, naturally, in 10m water depth. The system successfully detected peaks in bubbling as spike decreases in conductivity. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (5a) Modeling and design of an optics platform complementary to the constructed electronics platform for successful incorporation into ''sphereIR'' continues. AutoCAD design and manual construction of mounting pieces for major optical components have been completed. (5b) Initial design concepts for IR-ATR sensor probe geometries have been established and evaluated. Initial evaluations of a horizontal ATR (HATR) sensing probe with fiber optic guiding light have been performed and validate the design concept as a potentially viable deep sea sensing pr

  17. Published on Science 2.0 (http://www.science20.com) Home > Life Sciences > Genetics & Molecular Biology > News Articles > Rad51: Watching Single Strands Of DNA Being Prepped For Repair Could Help Fight Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    Biology > News Articles > Rad51: Watching Single Strands Of DNA Being Prepped For Repair Could Help Fight Breast Cancer Rad51: Watching Single Strands Of DNA Being Prepped For Repair Could Help Fight Breast: Watching Single Strands Of DNA Being Prepped For Repair Could Help Fight Br... 6/17/2013http

  18. Theory in Biology Computational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldbeter, Albert

    Magazine R601 Theory in Biology Computational biology: A propagating wave of interest Albert Goldbeter Systems biology, computational biology, integrative biology... many names are being used and tendency to take a global view of problems in biology. This field is not entirely novel, but what is clear

  19. Einar M. Sigurdsson et al. (eds.), Amyloid Proteins: Methods and Protocols, Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 849, DOI 10.1007/978-1-61779-551-0_6, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benedek, George B.

    69 Einar M. Sigurdsson et al. (eds.), Amyloid Proteins: Methods and Protocols, Methods in Molecular Quasielastic Light Scattering Study of Amyloid b-Protein Fibrillogenesis Aleksey Lomakin and David B. Teplow provides a powerful tool for studying protein assembly. We illustrate here how QLS has been applied

  20. Biology 3515/Chemistry 3515 Biological Chemistry Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    Biology 3515/Chemistry 3515 Biological Chemistry Laboratory Spring 2013 (Draft Syllabus, 23 August 2012) Course Description and Objectives: This course is intended for students who have taken Biology and function, particularly for enzymes. Prerequisites: Biology 3510 or Chemistry 3510 Instructor: David P

  1. Wireless Internet for The Mobile Enterprise Consortium http://winmec.ucla.edu/ TECHNICAL REPORT/WHITE PAPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    the smart RFID data management scheme developed in WINMEC. It pre-processes received RFID data based Consortium (WINMEC) http://winmec.ucla.edu/, 420 Westwood Plaza, University of California, Los Angeles, CA to upper-layer applications. This makes it easy to be integrated into various backend data processing

  2. ACS Web Editions/ACS Legacy Archives Multiple Site/Consortium Sales Agreement Page 1 of 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kisiel, Zbigniew

    ACS Web Editions/ACS Legacy Archives Multiple Site/Consortium Sales Agreement Page 1 of 2 I. Czasopisma ACS Web Edition 1. Accounts of Chemical Research 2. ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 3. ACS Letters http://pubs.acs.org/journal/jpclcd #12;ACS Web Editions/ACS Legacy Archives Multiple Site

  3. Wireless Internet for The Mobile Enterprise Consortium http://winmec.ucla.edu/ TECHNICAL REPORT/WHITE PAPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Wireless Internet for The Mobile Enterprise Consortium http://winmec.ucla.edu/ TECHNICAL REPORT-WINMEC-2003-203-WIFI-MANUFACTURING, September 2003. Study of potential of Wireless Internet Technologies@wireless.ucla.edu) Abstract The paper analyses the development of advanced and Internet manufacturing technologies

  4. Digital Gas Joins Asian Waste-to-Energy Consortium: To Eliminate Coal as a Power Plant Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Energy's patented technology produces a clean-burning by-product from the widest variety of processed-efficient technology represented by the coal-substitute technology. The same technology will be deployed by DIGGDigital Gas Joins Asian Waste-to-Energy Consortium: To Eliminate Coal as a Power Plant Fuel Digital

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office 2013 Merit Review: A University Consortium on Efficient and Clean High-Pressure, Lean Burn (HPLB) Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A presentation given by the University of Michigan at the 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about a university consortium to research efficient and clean high-pressure lean burn engines.

  6. Wireless Internet for The Mobile Enterprise Consortium http://winmec.ucla.edu/ TECHNICAL REPORT/WHITE PAPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Wireless Internet for The Mobile Enterprise Consortium http://winmec.ucla.edu/ TECHNICAL REPORT-609-MULTICAST-Bband, Nov. 2003. 1 Efficient broadband multi-media data distribution over the Internet using Multicast Harish Ramamurthy*, Abhay Karandikar** and Rajit Gadh* *Wireless Internet for the Mobile

  7. Standards in Genomic Sciences (2011) 4:257-270 DOI:10.4056/sigs.1664145 The Genomic Standards Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Standards in Genomic Sciences (2011) 4:257-270 DOI:10.4056/sigs.1664145 The Genomic Standards Consortium A proposal to sequence the genome of a garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis) Todd A. Castoe1* , Anne, Salt Lake City, UT 7 Genome Sequencing Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO

  8. Micro/nanofabricated environments for synthetic biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collier, Pat [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    A better understanding of how confinement, crowding and reduced dimensionality modulate reactivity and reaction dynamics will aid in the rational and systematic discovery of functionality in complex biological systems. Artificial micro- and nanofabricated structures have helped elucidate the effects of nanoscale spatial confinement and segregation on biological behavior, particularly when integrated with microfluidics, through precise control in both space and time of diffusible signals and binding interactions. Examples of nanostructured interfaces for synthetic biology include the development of cell-like compartments for encapsulating biochemical reactions, nanostructured environments for fundamental studies of diffusion, molecular transport and biochemical reaction kinetics, and regulation of biomolecular interactions as functions of micro- and nanofabricated topological constraints.

  9. Molecular fountain.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-09-01

    A molecular fountain directs slowly moving molecules against gravity to further slow them to translational energies that they can be trapped and studied. If the molecules are initially slow enough they will return some time later to the position from which they were launched. Because this round trip time can be on the order of a second a single molecule can be observed for times sufficient to perform Hz level spectroscopy. The goal of this LDRD proposal was to construct a novel Molecular Fountain apparatus capable of producing dilute samples of molecules at near zero temperatures in well-defined user-selectable, quantum states. The slowly moving molecules used in this research are produced by the previously developed Kinematic Cooling technique, which uses a crossed atomic and molecular beam apparatus to generate single rotational level molecular samples moving slowly in the laboratory reference frame. The Kinematic Cooling technique produces cold molecules from a supersonic molecular beam via single collisions with a supersonic atomic beam. A single collision of an atom with a molecule occurring at the correct energy and relative velocity can cause a small fraction of the molecules to move very slowly vertically against gravity in the laboratory. These slowly moving molecules are captured by an electrostatic hexapole guiding field that both orients and focuses the molecules. The molecules are focused into the ionization region of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and are ionized by laser radiation. The new molecular fountain apparatus was built utilizing a new design for molecular beam apparatus that has allowed us to miniaturize the apparatus. This new design minimizes the volumes and surface area of the machine allowing smaller pumps to maintain the necessary background pressures needed for these experiments.

  10. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-07

    In February, 1990, the Secretary of Energy, James Watkins approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, WERC'' includes NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT), Navajo Community College, the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Sandia National Laboratories. The program is designed to provide an integrated approach to the national need via the following: (1) Education in waste management to reach thousands of students by the three Consortium universities and the affiliate college resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (The term waste or environmental management is used in a broad sense throughout this paper and includes all aspects of environmental management and environmental restoration.) (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing training to students and information to faculty feeding into the education programs. (4) Education and technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos Sandia) located in New Mexico, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach program of special interest to pre-college students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the second year.

  11. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-07

    In February, 1990, the Secretary of Energy, James Watkins approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, ``WERC`` includes NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT), Navajo Community College, the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Sandia National Laboratories. The program is designed to provide an integrated approach to the national need via the following: (1) Education in waste management to reach thousands of students by the three Consortium universities and the affiliate college resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (The term waste or environmental management is used in a broad sense throughout this paper and includes all aspects of environmental management and environmental restoration.) (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing training to students and information to faculty feeding into the education programs. (4) Education and technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos & Sandia) located in New Mexico, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach program of special interest to pre-college students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the second year.

  12. CEL October 2006 Cell biology overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -electron therapy Multi-purpose projects · Cell nursing in 2D and 3D · Optical nanosensors Tools · Molecular biology be coupled to immobilized avidin In mold patterning of avidin makes it possible to structure the surface immune response to transplanted organs Aim Effects Materials Methods To discover antibodies in blood

  13. Physics Meets Biology (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chu, Steve [Director, LBNL

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: If scientists could take advantage of the awesomely complex and beautiful functioning of biologys natural molecular machines, their potential for application in many disciplines would be incalculable. Nobel Laureate and Director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Steve Chu explores Possible solutions to global warming and its consequences.

  14. Biological Frameworks for Engineers ME 411 / ME511

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sniadecki, Nathan J.

    nd Edition, Garland Press, ISBN: 0815332823 3) Alberts et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell, Garland://courses.washington.edu/nsniadec/ME411/A12 Course Description: Introduction to the fundamentals of biology for an engineer. Mechanisms to Biomechanics: From Cells to Organisms, Cambridge University Press, ISBN: 0521841127 2) Bray, Cell Movements, 2

  15. Biological Frameworks for Engineers ME 411 / ME511

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sniadecki, Nathan J.

    Movements, 2nd Edition, Garland Press, ISBN: 0815332823 2) Alberts et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell, 4thnd Edition. Garland Science, ISBN: 0815344503. 2) Ethier and Simmons, Introduction to Biomechanics: Introduction to the fundamentals of biology for an engineer. Mechanisms and biomechanics of DNA, proteins

  16. Splicing bioinformatics to biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Douglas L; Graveley, Brenton R

    2006-01-01

    Splicing bioinformatics to biology Douglas L Black* andand Developmental Biology, University of Connecticut Health26 May 2006 Genome Biology 2006, 7:317 (doi:10.1186/gb-2006-

  17. Continuum Electrostatics in Cell Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. John Gagliardi

    2010-02-06

    Recent experiments revealing possible nanoscale electrostatic interactions in force generation at kinetochores for chromosome motions have prompted speculation regarding possible models for interactions between positively charged molecules in kinetochores and negative charge on C-termini near the plus ends of microtubules. A clear picture of how kinetochores establish and maintain a dynamic coupling to microtubules for force generation during the complex motions of mitosis remains elusive. The current paradigm of molecular cell biology requires that specific molecules, or molecular geometries, for force generation be identified. However, it is possible to account for mitotic motions within a classical electrostatics approach in terms of experimentally known cellular electric charge interacting over nanometer distances. These charges are modeled as bound surface and volume continuum charge distributions. Electrostatic consequences of intracellular pH changes during mitosis may provide a master clock for the events of mitosis.

  18. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  19. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  20. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  1. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  2. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  3. Optimization of parameters for coverage of low molecular weight proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muller, Stephan A.

    Proteins with molecular weights of <25 kDa are involved in major biological processes such as ribosome formation, stress adaption (e.g., temperature reduction) and cell cycle control. Despite their importance, the coverage ...

  4. HST.176 Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Fall 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pillai, Shiv

    Covers cells and tissues of the immune system, lymphocyte development, the structure and function of antigen receptors, the cell biology of antigen processing and presentation including molecular structure and assembly of ...

  5. Dissecting the Molecular Basis of the Mechanics of Living Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Sanjay

    the past two decades, an exciting suite of sophisticated micro- and nanoscale technologies has emerged: atomic force microscopy, subcellular laser ablation, micropatterning, and microfluidics. Together biology. Keywords Cellular. Molecular. Structure . Mechanics . Atomic force microscopy. Laser

  6. Microfluidics for quantitative biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Micha

    2012-01-01

    CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Microfluidics for Quantitative BiologyChapter 1: Microfluidics.………………………………………………………..… 1 1.1OF THE DISSERTATION Microfluidics for Quantitative Biology

  7. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells PART 2 OF 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industrydriven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings dedicated to technology transfer to showcase and review SWC-funded technology. The workshops were open to the stripper well industry.

  8. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells PART 3 OF 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industrydriven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings dedicated to technology transfer to showcase and review SWC-funded technology. The workshops were open to the stripper well industry.

  9. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells PART 1 OF 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industrydriven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings dedicated to technology transfer to showcase and review SWC-funded technology. The workshops were open to the stripper well industry.

  10. Comparison of 6q25 Breast Cancer Hits from Asian and European Genome Wide Association Studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    Comparison of 6q25 Breast Cancer Hits from Asian andStudies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC)7 | Issue 8 | e42380 6q25 Breast Cancer GWAS Hits B. ]; the

  11. [Studies of biologic activation associated with molecular receptor increase and tumor response in ChL6/L6 protocol patients; Studies in phantoms; Quantitative SPECT; Preclinical studies; and Clinical studies]. DOE annual report, 1994--95

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeNardo, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The authors describe results which have not yet been published from their associated studies listed in the title. For the first, they discuss Lym-1 single chain genetically engineered molecules, analysis of molecular genetic coded messages to enhance tumor response, and human dosimetry and therapeutic human use radiopharmaceuticals. Studies in phantoms includes a discussion of planar image quantitation, counts coincidence correction, organ studies, tumor studies, and {sup 90}Y quantitation with Bremsstrahlung imaging. The study on SPECT discusses attenuation correction and scatter correction. Preclinical studies investigated uptake of {sup 90}Y-BrE-3 in mice using autoradiography. Clinical studies discuss image quantitation verses counts from biopsy samples, S factors for radiation dose calculation, {sup 67}Cu imaging studies for lymphoma cancer, and {sup 111}In MoAb imaging studies for breast cancer to predict {sup 90}Y MoAb therapy.

  12. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2003-04-08

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the ninth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) organizing and hosting two fall technology transfer meetings, (2) SWC membership class expansion, and (3) planning the SWC 2003 Spring meeting. In addition, a literature search that focuses on the use of lasers, microwaves, and acoustics for potential stripper well applications continued.

  13. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2002-09-30

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), has established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the second topical report. The SWC has grown and diversified its membership during its first 24 months of existence. The Consortium is now focused on building strategic alliances with additional industrial, state, and federal entities to expand further the SWC membership base and transfer technologies as they are developed. In addition, the Consortium has successfully worked to attract state support to co-fund SWC projects. Penn State has entered a co-funding arrangement with the New York State Energy Development Authority (NYSERDA) which has provided $200,000 over the last two years to co-fund stripper well production-orientated projects that have relevance to New York state producers. During this reporting period, the Executive Council approved co-funding for 14 projects that have a total project value of $2,116,897. Since its inception, the SWC has approved cofunding for 27 projects that have a total project value of $3,632,109.84. The SWC has provided $2,242,701 in co-funding for these projects and programmatically maintains a cost share of 39%.

  14. WIRELESS Eduroam Wireless Network for College Eduroam is a global wireless roaming consortium which gives members of education and research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    WIRELESS Eduroam Wireless Network for College Eduroam is a global wireless roaming consortium://cat.eduroam.org (You can visit https://cat.eduroam.org whilst connected to the OWL wireless network without a password://register.it.ox.ac.uk/self/remote_access If you are already in Oxford you can get to this URL via the OWL wireless network 2. Once you have

  15. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2004-05-17

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the thirteenth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) hosting three fall technology transfer meetings in Wyoming, Texas, and Pennsylvania, (2) releasing the 2004 SWC request-for-proposal (RFP), and (3) initial planning of the SWC spring meeting in Golden Colorado for selecting the 2004 SWC projects. The Fall technology transfer meetings attracted 100+ attendees between the three workshops. The SWC membership which attended the Casper, Wyoming workshop was able to see several SWC-funded projects operating in the field at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center. The SWC is nearing the end of its initial funding cycle. The Consortium has a solid membership foundation and a demonstrated ability to review and select projects that have relevancy to meet the needs of domestic stripper well operators.

  16. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2002-08-27

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the sixth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) release of 2002 SWC request-for-proposal, (2) organized and hosted the Spring SWC meeting in Columbus, Ohio for membership proposal presentations and review; (3) tentatively scheduled the 2002 fall technology transfer meeting sites, and (4) continued to recruit additional Consortium members. In addition, a literature search that focuses on the use of lasers, microwaves, and acoustics for potential stripper well applications continued.

  17. Industrial Consortium for the Utilization of the Geopressured-Geothermal Resource. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negus-deWys, J. (ed.)

    1990-03-01

    The Geopressured-Geothermal Program, now in its fifteenth year, is entering the transition period to commercial use. The industry cost-shared proposals to the consortium, represented in the presentations included in these proceedings, attest to the interest developing in the industrial community in utilizing the geopressured-geothermal resource. Sixty-five participants attended these sessions, two-thirds of whom represented industry. The areas represented by cost-shared proposals include (1) thermal enhanced oil recovery, (2) direct process use of thermal energy, e.g., aquaculture and agriculture, (3) conversion of thermal energy to electricity, (4) environment related technologies, e.g., use of supercritical processes, and (5) operational proposals, e.g., a field manual for scale inhibitors. It is hoped that from this array of potential use projects, some will persist and be successful in proving the viability of using the geopressured-geothermal resource. Such industrial use of an alternative and relatively clean energy resource will benefit our nation and its people.

  18. Industrial Consortium for the Utilization of the Geopressured-Geothermal Resource. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negus-deWys, J. (ed.)

    1990-03-01

    The Geopressured-Geothermal Program, now in its fifteenth year, is entering the transition period to commercial use. The industry cost-shared proposals to the consortium, represented in the presentations included in these proceedings, attest to the interest developing in the industrial community in utilizing the geopressured-geothermal resource. Sixty-five participants attended these sessions, two-thirds of whom represented industry. The areas represented by cost-shared proposals include (1) thermal enhanced oil recovery, (2) direct process use of thermal energy, e.g., aquaculture and agriculture, (3) conversion of thermal energy to electricity, (4) environment related technologies, e.g., use of supercritical processes, and (5) operational proposals, e.g., a field manual for scale inhibitors. It is hoped that from this array of potential use projects, some will persist and be successful in proving the viability of using the geopressured-geothermal resource. Such industrial use of an alternative and relatively clean energy resource will benefit our nation and its people.

  19. Stellar Evolution/Supernova Research Data Archives from the SciDAC Computational Astrophysics Consortium

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Woosley, Stan [University of California, Santa Cruz

    Theoretical high-energy astrophysics studies the most violent explosions in the universe - supernovae (the massive explosions of dying stars) and gamma ray bursts (mysterious blasts of intense radiation). The evolution of massive stars and their explosion as supernovae and/or gamma ray bursts describes how the "heavy" elements needed for life, such as oxygen and iron, are forged (nucleosynthesis) and ejected to later form new stars and planets. The Computational Astrophysics Consortium's project includes a Science Application Partnership on Adaptive Algorithms that develops software involved. The principal science topics are - in order of priority - 1) models for Type Ia supernovae, 2) radiation transport, spectrum formation, and nucleosynthesis in model supernovae of all types; 3) the observational implications of these results for experiments in which DOE has an interest, especially the Joint Dark Energy Mission, Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) satellite observatory, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and ground based supernova searches; 4) core collapse supernovae; 5) gamma-ray bursts; 6) hypernovae from Population III stars; and 7) x-ray bursts. Models of these phenomena share a common need for nuclear reactions and radiation transport coupled to multi-dimensional fluid flow. The team has developed and used supernovae simulation codes to study Type 1A and core-collapse supernovae. (Taken from http://www.scidac.gov/physics/grb.html) The Stellar Evolution Data Archives contains more than 225 Pre-SN models that can be freely accessed.

  20. Indiana Advanced Electric Vehicle Training and Education Consortium (I-AEVtec)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caruthers, James; Dietz, J.; Pelter, Libby; Chen, Jie; Roberson, Glen; McGinn, Paul; Kizhanipuram, Vinodegopal

    2013-01-31

    The Indiana Advanced Electric Vehicle Training and Education Consortium (I-AEVtec) is an educational partnership between six universities and colleges in Indiana focused on developing the education materials needed to support electric vehicle technology. The I-AEVtec has developed and delivered a number of degree and certificate programs that address various aspects of electric vehicle technology, including over 30 new or significantly modified courses to support these programs. These courses were shared on the SmartEnergyHub. The I-AEVtec program also had a significant outreach to the community with particular focus on K12 students. Finally, the evGrandPrix was established which is a university/college student electric go-kart race, where the students get hands-on experience in designing, building and racing electric vehicles. The evGrandPrix now includes student teams from across the US as well as from Europe and it is currently being held on Opening Day weekend for the Indy500 at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

  1. A University Consortium on Low Temperature Combustion for High Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis N. Assanis; Arvind Atreya; Jyh-Yuan Chen; Wai K. Cheng; Robert W. Dibble; Chris Edwards; Zoran S. Filipi; Christian Gerdes; Hong Im; George A. Lavoie; Margaret S. Wooldridge

    2009-12-31

    The objective of the University consortium was to investigate the fundamental processes that determine the practical boundaries of Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) engines and develop methods to extend those boundaries to improve the fuel economy of these engines, while operating with ultra low emissions. This work involved studies of thermal effects, thermal transients and engine management, internal mixing and stratification, and direct injection strategies for affecting combustion stability. This work also examined spark-assisted Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) and exhaust after-treatment so as to extend the range and maximize the benefit of Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI)/ Partially Premixed Compression Ignition (PPCI) operation. In summary the overall goals were: ? Investigate the fundamental processes that determine the practical boundaries of Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) engines. ? Develop methods to extend LTC boundaries to improve the fuel economy of HCCI engines fueled on gasoline and alternative blends, while operating with ultra low emissions. ? Investigate alternate fuels, ignition and after-treatment for LTC and Partially Premixed compression Ignition (PPCI) engines.

  2. computational modeling of biological systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    $author.value

    Faculty. Faculty listing for "computational modeling of biological systems" ... Research Interests: computational modeling of biological systems.

  3. Thermodynamics of site-specific small molecular ion interactions with DNA duplex: a molecular dynamics study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Soumadwip; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi

    2015-01-01

    The stability and dynamics of a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is affected by the preferential occupancy of small monovalent molecular ions. Small metal and molecular ions such as sodium and alkyl ammonium have crucial biological functions in human body, affect the thermodynamic stability of the duplex DNA and exhibit preferential binding. Here, using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations we investigate the preferential binding of metal ion such as Na+ and molecular ions such as tetramethyl ammonium (TMA+) and 2-hydroxy-N,N,N-trimethylethanaminium (CHO+) to double stranded DNA. The thermodynamic driving force for a particular molecular ion- DNA interaction is determined by decomposing the free energy of binding into its entropic and enthalpic contributions. Our simulations show that each of these molecular ions preferentially binds to the minor groove of the DNA and the extent of binding is highest for CHO+. The ion binding processes are found to be entropically favourable. In addition, the contribution of hy...

  4. In this Issue CeBiTec Symposium: Molecular Biotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeller, Ralf

    of tools and techniques for transcriptome sequencing 3rd CeBiTec Students Academy Synthetic Biology and Bielefeld presented insights into cutting edge developments of Molecular Biotechnology. This regional focus compounds to biological halogenation, enzyme coatings and chemical protein labelling. One session

  5. 20.462J / 3.962J Molecular Principles of Biomaterials (BE.462J), Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irvine, Darrell J.

    Analysis and design at a molecular scale of materials used in contact with biological systems, including biotechnology and biomedical engineering. Topics include molecular interactions between bio- and synthetic molecules ...

  6. Molecular Dynameomics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework uses concrete7Modifications for Public CommentDynameomics Molecular

  7. Biological enhancement of hydrocarbon extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brigmon, Robin L. (North Augusta, SC); Berry, Christopher J. (Aiken, SC)

    2009-01-06

    A method of microbial enhanced oil recovery for recovering oil from an oil-bearing rock formation is provided. The methodology uses a consortium of bacteria including a mixture of surfactant producing bacteria and non-surfactant enzyme producing bacteria which may release hydrocarbons from bitumen containing sands. The described bioprocess can work with existing petroleum recovery protocols. The consortium microorganisms are also useful for treatment of above oil sands, ground waste tailings, subsurface oil recovery, and similar materials to enhance remediation and/or recovery of additional hydrocarbons from the materials.

  8. Biology and Medicine Division: Annual report 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The Biology and Medicine Division continues to make important contributions in scientific areas in which it has a long-established leadership role. For 50 years the Division has pioneered in the application of radioisotopes and charged particles to biology and medicine. There is a growing emphasis on cellular and molecular applications in the work of all the Division's research groups. The powerful tools of genetic engineering, the use of recombinant products, the analytical application of DNA probes, and the use of restriction fragment length polymorphic DNA are described and proposed for increasing use in the future.

  9. Institute for Molecular Medicine Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, Michael E

    2012-12-14

    The objectives of the project are the development of new Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging instrumentation, chemistry technology platforms and new molecular imaging probes to examine the transformations from normal cellular and biological processes to those of disease in pre-clinical animal models. These technology platforms and imaging probes provide the means to: 1. Study the biology of disease using pre-clinical mouse models and cells. 2. Develop molecular imaging probes for imaging assays of proteins in pre-clinical models. 3. Develop imaging assays in pre-clinical models to provide to other scientists the means to guide and improve the processes for discovering new drugs. 4. Develop imaging assays in pre-clinical models for others to use in judging the impact of drugs on the biology of disease.

  10. Final Technical Report. DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. January 15, 2010 - March 31, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagher, Habib; Viselli, Anthony; Goupee, Andrew; Thaler, Jeffrey; Brady, Damian; Browne, Peter; Browning, James; Chung, Jade; Coulling, Alexander; Deese, Heather; Fowler, Matthew; Holberton, Rebecca; Anant, Jain; Jalbert, Dustin; Johnson, Theresa; Jonkman, Jason; Karlson, Benjamin; Kimball, Richard; Koo, Bonjun; Lackner, Matthew; Lambrakos, Kostas; Lankowski, Matthew; Leopold, Adrienne; Lim, Ho-Joon; Mangum, Linda; Martin, Heather; Masciola, Marco; Maynard, Melissa; McCleave, James; Mizrahi, Robert; Molta, Paul; Pershing, Andrew; Pettigrew, Neal; Prowell, Ian; Qua, Andrew; Sherwood, Graham; Snape, Thomas; Steneck, Robert; Stewart, Gordon; Stockwell, Jason; Swift, Andrew H. P.; Thomas, Dale; Viselli, Elizabeth; Zydlewski, Gayle

    2013-06-11

    This is the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy-funded program, DE-0002981: DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. The project objective was the partial validation of coupled models and optimization of materials for offshore wind structures. The United States has a great opportunity to harness an indigenous abundant renewable energy resource: offshore wind. In 2010, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) estimated there to be over 4,000 GW of potential offshore wind energy found within 50 nautical miles of the US coastlines (Musial and Ram, 2010). The US Energy Information Administration reported the total annual US electric energy generation in 2010 was 4,120 billion kilowatt-hours (equivalent to 470 GW) (US EIA, 2011), slightly more than 10% of the potential offshore wind resource. In addition, deep water offshore wind is the dominant US ocean energy resource available comprising 75% of the total assessed ocean energy resource as compared to wave and tidal resources (Musial, 2008). Through these assessments it is clear offshore wind can be a major contributor to US energy supplies. The caveat to capturing offshore wind along many parts of the US coast is deep water. Nearly 60%, or 2,450 GW, of the estimated US offshore wind resource is located in water depths of 60 m or more (Musial and Ram, 2010). At water depths over 60 m building fixed offshore wind turbine foundations, such as those found in Europe, is likely economically infeasible (Musial et al., 2006). Therefore floating wind turbine technology is seen as the best option for extracting a majority of the US offshore wind energy resource. Volume 1 - Test Site; Volume 2 - Coupled Models; and Volume 3 - Composite Materials

  11. The Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) - A Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robb Aldrich; Lois Arena; Dianne Griffiths; Srikanth Puttagunta; David Springer

    2010-12-31

    This final report summarizes the work conducted by the Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) (http://www.carb-swa.com/), one of the 'Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership' Industry Teams, for the period January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010. The Building America Program (BAP) is part of the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program (BTP). The long term goal of the BAP is to develop cost effective, production ready systems in five major climate zones that will result in zero energy homes (ZEH) that produce as much energy as they use on an annual basis by 2020. CARB is led by Steven Winter Associates, Inc. with Davis Energy Group, Inc. (DEG), MaGrann Associates, and Johnson Research, LLC as team members. In partnership with our numerous builders and industry partners, work was performed in three primary areas - advanced systems research, prototype home development, and technical support for communities of high performance homes. Our advanced systems research work focuses on developing a better understanding of the installed performance of advanced technology systems when integrated in a whole-house scenario. Technology systems researched included: - High-R Wall Assemblies - Non-Ducted Air-Source Heat Pumps - Low-Load HVAC Systems - Solar Thermal Water Heating - Ventilation Systems - Cold-Climate Ground and Air Source Heat Pumps - Hot/Dry Climate Air-to-Water Heat Pump - Condensing Boilers - Evaporative condensers - Water Heating CARB continued to support several prototype home projects in the design and specification phase. These projects are located in all five program climate regions and most are targeting greater than 50% source energy savings over the Building America Benchmark home. CARB provided technical support and developed builder project case studies to be included in near-term Joule Milestone reports for the following community scale projects: - SBER Overlook at Clipper Mill (mixed, humid climate) - William Ryan Homes - Tampa (hot, humid climate).

  12. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-15

    In February, 1990, The Secretary of Energy, James Watkins, approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program proposed by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, ``WERC`` includes as its founding members NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the Sandia National Laboratories. The Navajo Community College joined the program later in 1991. The program has the mission of expanding the nation`s capability to address the issues related to management of all types of waste. The program is unique and innovative in many aspects. It provides an integrated approach to this national need, and includes: (1) Education in waste management at the educational institutions resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing hands-on training at the leading edge to students and information feeding into the education programs. (4) Education by technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos & Sandia) located in New Mexico and with the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach programs of special interest to precollege students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the third year.

  13. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-15

    In February, 1990, The Secretary of Energy, James Watkins, approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program proposed by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, WERC'' includes as its founding members NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the Sandia National Laboratories. The Navajo Community College joined the program later in 1991. The program has the mission of expanding the nation's capability to address the issues related to management of all types of waste. The program is unique and innovative in many aspects. It provides an integrated approach to this national need, and includes: (1) Education in waste management at the educational institutions resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing hands-on training at the leading edge to students and information feeding into the education programs. (4) Education by technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos Sandia) located in New Mexico and with the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach programs of special interest to precollege students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the third year.

  14. Mathematical Biology 3 Jurgen Jost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Anton

    Mathematical Biology 3 J¨urgen Jost Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences Leipzig, Germany Mathematical Biology 3 ­ p. 1 #12;Biological networks In biology, we find many examples of interacting elements: Mathematical Biology 3 ­ p. 2 #12;Biological networks In biology, we find many examples

  15. 2003 Synthetic Biology study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endy, Drew

    2007-08-14

    Biology is a technology for processing information, materials, and energy. As a technology platform, biological systems provide access to artifacts and processes across a range of scales (e.g., the ribosome is a programmable ...

  16. Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory Oxford, Maryland #12;Chart of the Tred Avon River, showing the location of the BCF Biological Laboratory and the orientation of this area modern laboratories for chem- ical, histological, microbiological, and physiological re- search

  17. Chemistry & Biology Brief Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    Chemistry & Biology Brief Communication Cloning, IL 61801, USA 3Department of Chemistry 4Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

  18. A Central Theory of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torday, JS

    2015-01-01

    JS, Rehan VK. Evolutionary biology, cell–cell communication6] Torday JS. Evolutionary Biology Redux. Pers Biol Med 56,explanations in evolutionary biology. Hist Philos Life Sci

  19. Systems biology approach to bioremediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakraborty, R.

    2013-01-01

    aspects of the systems biology approach (metagenomics withthe use of a number of sytems biology parameters can revealRL, Banfield JF: Systems Biology: functional analysis of

  20. Todd Newberry: Professor of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newberry, Andrew Todd; Jarrell, Randall; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

    2006-01-01

    Todd Newberry, Professor of Biology: Cowell College page 12Jarrell: Why’s that? Todd Newberry, Professor of Biology:Biology Board page 14 Newberry: Well, besides the

  1. HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY PHD PROGRAM 2013-2014 Student Handbook #12;Program Contacts at the beginning of each semester. Laboratory Rotations Students in the Chemical Biology Program are expected an interest in having Chemical Biology Program Students in their labs. Students may rotate in the labs

  2. The Intersection of Physics and Biology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Liphardt, Jan [University of California, Berkeley, California, United States

    2010-09-01

    In April 1953, Watson and Crick largely defined the program of 20th century biology: obtaining the blueprint of life encoded in the DNA. Fifty years later, in 2003, the sequencing of the human genome was completed. Like any major scientific breakthrough, the sequencing of the human genome raised many more questions than it answered. I'll brief you on some of the big open problems in cell and developmental biology, and I'll explain why approaches, tools, and ideas from the physical sciences are currently reshaping biological research. Super-resolution light microscopies are revealing the intricate spatial organization of cells, single-molecule methods show how molecular machines function, and new probes are clarifying the role of mechanical forces in cell and tissue function. At the same time, Physics stands to gain beautiful new problems in soft condensed matter, quantum mechanics, and non-equilibrium thermodynamics.

  3. Minor in Marine Biology Minor in Marine Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Minor in Marine Biology Minor in Marine Biology General Goals of the Minor in Marine Biology About who choose the Minor in Marine Biology will learn about the biology, evolution and ecology of organisms that inhabit these environments and the ecological processes linking them. Marine biology draws

  4. Establishment of an Industry-Driven Consortium Focused on Improving the Production Performance of Domestic Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2005-08-30

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the nineteenth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) deliver a keynote luncheon address to the 16th Annual Oil Recovery Conference in Wichita, Kansas, (2) participated in the Interstate Oil & Gas Compact Commission's (IOGCC) Midyear Issues Summit in Anchorage, Alaska, (3) completed and distributed the SWC technical bulletin ''Keeping the Home Wells Flowing: Helping Small Independent Oil and Gas Producers Develop New Technology Solutions'', and (4) completed the primary filming of the Public Broadcast of ''Independent Oil: Rediscovering America's Forgotten Wells''.

  5. Invasion Biology Mark A. Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Mark A.

    Invasion Biology Mark A. Davis 2 biology 2 MarkA.DavisInvasionBiology2 1 With the exception of climate change, biological invasions have probably received more attention during the past ten years than on the subject, Invasion Biology provides a comprehensive and up-to-date review of the science of biological

  6. The Encyclopedia of Systems Biology and OMICS (first presentation) and The ISA Infrastructure for Multi-omics Data (second presentation) (GSC8 Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolker, Eugene; Sansone, Susanna

    2011-09-11

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Eugene Kolker from Seattle Children's Hospital briefly discusses "The Encyclopedia of Systems Biology and OMICS," followed by Susanna Sansone from the EBI on "The ISA Infrastructure for multi-omics data" at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 11, 2009.

  7. The Encyclopedia of Systems Biology and OMICS (first presentation) and The ISA Infrastructure for Multi-omics Data (second presentation) (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Kolker, Eugene [Seattle Children's Hospital]; Sansone, Susanna [EBI

    2011-04-28

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Eugene Kolker from Seattle Children's Hospital briefly discusses "The Encyclopedia of Systems Biology and OMICS," followed by Susanna Sansone from the EBI on "The ISA Infrastructure for multi-omics data" at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 11, 2009.

  8. BiochEMiStry AnD MolEculAr College of Natural Science and Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    BiochEMiStry AnD MolEculAr Biology College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 907-474-5510 www.uaf.edu/chem/ MS, phD Degrees Minimum Requirements for Degrees: MS: 30 credits; PhD: 18 thesis credits Biochemistry and molecular biology is an interdepartmental

  9. Engineering optical traps for new environments and applications in the measurement of biological adhesives and motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appleyard, David Collins

    2009-01-01

    Optical traps have played a central role in the exploration of biological systems through the examination of molecular motors, biopolymers, and many other interactions at the nano and micro length scales. This thesis seeks ...

  10. Biological detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2014-04-15

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  11. Biological detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2013-02-26

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  12. Biology | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric Sciences Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics Environment Safety and Health More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Biology SHARE...

  13. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology LANL leads the world in computational finishing of microbial genomes Read caption + In 2013, Los Alamos scientist Richard Sayre and his team...

  14. Suzanne Barbour Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Richard

    and Disability Policy School readiness of high-risk youth: A longitudinal follow-up of early risk and resilience of labor market assignment Virginia Commonwealth University Presidential Research Incentive Program

  15. Biochemistry 218 -BioMedical Informatics 231 Computational Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ., 2003; Wouters et al., 2003; Yeung et al., 2004; Saidi et al., 2004; Girolami and Breitling, 2004), Saidi et al., 2004, Tham et al. (2003), Girolami and Breitling (2004), and Hubert and Engelen (2004

  16. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 15, 30053014, July 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Eric A.

    Is Dispensable for Essential Cytoplasmic Dynein Functions but Is Required during Spermatid DifferentiationD Min-end­directed microtubule motor cytoplasmic dynein has been implicated in a variety of cellular processes, including nuclear more than one cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain has been identified, the major cytoplasmic dynein motor

  17. Formal Molecular Biology done in CCSR Vincent Danos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danos, Vincent - Laboratoire Preuves, Programmes et Systèmes, Université Paris 7

    should the dense networks of interacting processes the cell is made of be described, simulated and analyzed ? The bulk of the reconstruction e#ort for now is aiming at genetic regula­ tion networks unnoticed, and many di#erent languages have already been proposed: plain di#erential systems [3], Petri Nets

  18. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 15, 12541261, March 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botstein, David

    to heat stress in mammalian cells. We characterized the heat shock response of mammalian cells are unable to induce expression of hsp70 in re- sponse to heat stress (McMillan et al., 1998), whereas HSF2 processes in addition to the response to heat stress (Xiao et al., 1999). The heat shock response is highly

  19. Plant Molecular Biology Reporter Volume 11(1) 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    ,thusenhanc ingpatientandfamilysatisfactionandreducingthelevelofanxietyandfearwhichtheymaybeexperiencing. Efficientlymovingthepatienttotheirinpatientproviders'resultsinopenEDexamrooms.Thisshortensthe

  20. Computational Molecular Biology Biochem 218 BioMedical Informatics 231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    evolution? Which nodes are orthologous and which are paralogous bifurcations? · Do the trees show evidence vs. Colicin #12;· Protein DataBase o Multiple Structure Viewers o Sequence & Structure Comparison and Entire Database PDB Protein Database http://www.rcsb.org/pdb/ #12;PDB Protein Database http

  1. Computational Molecular Biology Biochem 218 BioMedical Informatics 231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .edu/ Doug Brutlag Professor Emeritus Biochemistry & Medicine (by courtesy) The Human Genome Project #12 Gibson & Muse, A Primer of Genome Science http://www.sinauer.com/genomics/ #12;The Human Genome Project?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=3294162 #12;Public Genome Assembly Process #12;BAC and PAC Libraries in Public Human Genome Project http

  2. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 21, 39553966, November 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shorter, James

    are essential for the maintenance of cellular ion homeostasis. In the secretory pathway, the P-type ATPase to strains lacking Pmr1p, a Ca2 /Mn2 pump that resides in the medial-Golgi. Because of its localization

  3. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ MOLECULAR, CELL, & DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    is for one year. Should the hiring unit propose reappointment, a review to assess performance: Review of applications will begin on February 27, 2015. To ensure full consideration, applications should, disability, age, or protected veteran status. UC Santa Cruz is committed to excellence through diversity

  4. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ MOLECULAR, CELL, AND DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    . Should the hiring unit propose reappointment, a review to assess performance will be conducted statement at http://apo.ucsc.edu/confstm.htm. CLOSING DATE: Review of applications will begin on June 29, national origin, disability, age, or protected veteran status. UC Santa Cruz is committed to excellence

  5. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 18, 14101420, April 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinberg, Stanly

    , and Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 Submitted November 23, migration, and degran- ulation. Here, immunogold labeling is used to map the plasma membrane distributions

  6. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 14, 14681478, April 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Robert D.

    -dependent Disassembly of Vimentin Intermediate Filaments During Mitosis Ying-Hao Chou*, Satya Khuon*, Harald Herrmann Monitoring Editor: Paul T. Matsudaira The expression of the intermediate filament (IF) protein nestin (Chou et al., 1996). For example, in mitotic BHK-21 cells, the interphase IF network, which is composed

  7. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 14, 26652676, July 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    infused laminin-1 ( 1, 1, 1) into the mouse hippocampus. This infusion specifically disrupted chain with endogenous laminin-10, because infusion of anti-laminin 1 antibody had the same effect. The disruption of the laminin layer by laminin-1 1) did not require the intact protein because infusion

  8. C H A P T E R Molecular Biology for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    what mathematics is to physics." -- Harold Morowitz One of the major challenges for computer scientists, it is often necessary to use concepts involving, for example, cells, embryological development, or evolution to differ from each other, and to reach modern levels of complexity through evolution. Evolution has three

  9. Integrating molecular and network biology to decode endocytosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, Harvey

    design principles and of spatio-temporal dynamics behind pathways, and aids in experimental design and intermediate stages of vesicle formation have been docu- mented (Fig. 1a)3 . An extensive protein machinery in the literature16 ). To emphasize the core machinery of endocytosis we peeled away inter- actions that point

  10. Molecular pharmacology of an insect GABA receptor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGonigle, Ian Vincent

    2010-10-12

    and guided by Andy Thompson. Andy is an exceptional scientist and his electrophys expertise, his good company and his enthusiasm have made my PhD a truly enjoyable experience; thanks Andy. In moments of molecular biology crisis Kerry Price has always been... mention and thanks. They were always there to answer my questions about practical things and their knowledge and experience were greatly valued. The many students and visitors who have passed through ‘Skylab’ have enhanced the experience of my Ph...

  11. Intelligent systems for the molecular biologist

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brutlag, D.L.

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. In this paper, one objective is to identify properties of DNA sequences that determine their function, by computer-aided statistical analysis and to accurately predict its function, given a new sequence. A related problem is to predict protein structure and function from the sequence.

  12. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE BIOLOGY ECOLOGY & EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY OPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Brian M.

    BACHELOR OF SCIENCE ­ BIOLOGY ECOLOGY & EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY OPTION A Bachelor of Science degree hours must be upper division coursework. A B.S. in Biology requires a minimum of 19 semester hours of core BIOLOGY courses (BIOLOGY 106, 107, 301, 372 and 405 or 403). An additional 21 semester hours

  13. Biology and Marine Biology Research Areas and Assistantship Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    1 Biology and Marine Biology Research Areas and Assistantship Application Name: LAST FIRST MIDDLE and Marine Biology faculty members will accept graduate students to work in the general research areas listed Next Page Revised 3/08 850 #12;2 Biology and Marine Biology Statement of Interest Statement of Interest

  14. Agreement on SMSTC streams for Masters programmes All consortium departments indicated that they were in favour of the principle of allowing SMSTC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Agreement on SMSTC streams for Masters programmes All consortium departments indicated that they were in favour of the principle of allowing SMSTC streams to be used for credit-bearing masters-level courses (i.e. at SCQF level 11). Responses also indicated agreement with the proposed FTE-based charging

  15. This consortium is supported by funding from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs, Award No. H325H140001.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Lizy Kurian

    of Connecticut, University of Illinois at Chicago, University of Minnesota, University of Texas at Austin of Special Education Programs, Award No. H325H140001. The University of Texas at Austin is a member institutions in a consortium that includes Vanderbilt University, Southern Methodist University, University

  16. Integrated Biological Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, A.R.

    2003-10-09

    Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects, and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (a priori) or in response to existing contamination spread (a posteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and a priori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, a posteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

  17. Journal of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Imperial College Press

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vucetic, Slobodan

    focus on improving sequence-based predictions of long (> 30 amino acid residues) regions lacking the molecular biology community1-6 . Disorder refers to the structural property that the amino acid sequence unfolded or disordered region. Disordered regions longer than 30 consecutive amino acids are considered

  18. Biomimetic Mineralization: Mesoporous Biological mineral synthesis, in contrast to conven-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomimetic Mineralization: Mesoporous Structures Biological mineral synthesis, in contrast of mineral crystals. Mesophases are materials which have domain length scales of the order of a few as a molecular blueprint for the site- directed formation of the inorganic phase, by providing an interface

  19. Evolutionary developmental biology (evodevo) emerged as a distinct field of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Gerd B.

    Evolutionary developmental biology (evo­devo) emerged as a distinct field of research in the early of developmental processes of different taxa at the molecular level. Today, evo­devo research is characterized two decades, at least four major research programmes have formed in evo­devo, although

  20. Interlaboratory Evaluation of in Vitro Cytotoxicity and Inflammatory Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials: The NIEHS Nano GO Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Tian; Hamilton, Raymond F.; Bonner, James C.; Crandall, Edward D.; Elder, Alison C.; Fazlollahi, Farnoosh; Girtsman, Teri A.; Mitra, Somenath; Ntim, Susana A.; Orr, Galya; Tagmount, Mani; Taylor, Alexia J.; Telesca, Donatello; Tolic, Ana; Vulpe, Chris D.; Walker, Andrea J.; Wang, Xiang; Witzmann, Frank A.; Wu, Nianqiang; Xie, Yumei; Zink, Jeffery I.; Nel, Andre; Holian, Andrij

    2013-06-01

    Background: Differences in interlaboratory research protocols contribute to the conflicting data in the literature regarding engineered nanomaterial (ENM) bioactivity. Objectives: Grantees of a National Institute of Health Sciences (NIEHS)-funded consortium program performed two phases of in vitro testing with selected ENMs in an effort to identify and minimize sources of variability. Methods: Consortium program participants (CPPs) conducted ENM bioactivity evaluations on zinc oxide (ZnO), three forms of titanium dioxide (TiO2), and three forms of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). In addition, CPPs performed bioassays using three mammalian cell lines (BEAS-2B, RLE-6TN, and THP-1) selected in order to cover two different species (rat and human), two different lung epithelial cells (alveolar type II and bronchial epithelial cells), and two different cell types (epithelial cells and macrophages). CPPs also measured cytotoxicity in all cell types while measuring inflammasome activation [interleukin-1? (IL-1?) release] using only THP-1 cells. Results: The overall in vitro toxicity profiles of ENM were as follows: ZnO was cytotoxic to all cell types at ? 50 ? g/mL, but did not induce IL-1?. TiO2 was not cytotoxic except for the nanobelt form, which was cytotoxic and induced significant IL-1? production in THP-1 cells. MWCNTs did not produce cytotoxicity, but stimulated lower levels of IL-1? production in THP-1 cells, with the original MWCNT producing the most IL-1?. Conclusions: The results provide justification for the inclusion of mechanism-linked bioactivity assays along with traditional cytotoxicity assays for in vitro screening. In addition, the results suggest that conducting studies with multiple relevant cell types to avoid false-negative outcomes is critical for accurate evaluation of ENM bioactivity.

  1. ePUB: Modellierung Molecular Life Sciences Master Major 90 ECTS-Credits with special qualification in Biochemistry/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    in Biochemistry/ Chemical Biology [Reglement 01.10.2005] Seite 1 1. Teil: Struktur des Studiums (Prüfungsfächer) Offizieller Abschluss: Master of Science in Molecular Life Sciences with special qualification in Biochemistry/Chemical Biology, Universität Bern ePUB - interne Bezeichnung: MLS M Major 90 ECTS Biochemistry/Chemical Biology

  2. Science Faculty Department of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Science Faculty Department of Biology Zoological Institute Community Ecology 1 December 2006 Hans-Sigrist-Symposium: Biological Invasions Hans-Sigrist-Stiftung 9.00 Prof. Dr. David M Richardson (Centre for Invasion Biology. Dr. Bruno Baur (Conservation Biology, Department of Integrative Biology, University of Basel

  3. Similarity Search in Biological and Engineering Databases Hans-Peter Kriegel, Martin Pfeifle, Stefan Schonauer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schönauer, Stefan

    applications which are presented in this article are functional classification of proteins in biological search grows in application areas such as multimedia, medical imaging, molecular biology, computer aided imaging and computer aided design. In recent years, considerable work on similarity search in database

  4. Computational and Systems Biology DOI: 10.1039/b921381n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, M. Madan

    Computational and Systems Biology DOI: 10.1039/b921381n Over the last few decades, we have all in this themed issue of Molecular BioSystems entitled ``Computational and Systems Biology''. The excitement contains papers that use contemporary computational and systems approaches that involve analysis

  5. Interfacial Engineering of Molecular Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelton, Steven Wade

    2014-01-01

    Engineering of Molecular Photovoltaics by Steven WadeEngineering of Molecular Photovoltaics Copyright © 2014 byEngineering of Molecular Photovoltaics by Steven Wade

  6. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1994-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a blend of physics, chemistry and biology and epitomizes the multidisciplinary approach towards understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. To an increasing extent, the focus of attention is on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights from the past year are briefly described.

  7. Molecular display of synthetic oligonucleotide libraries and their analysis with high throughput DNA sequencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larman, Harry Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    High throughput methods in molecular biology have changed the landscape of biomedical research. In particular, advances in massively parallel DNA sequencing and synthesis technologies are defining our genomes and the ...

  8. Encoded hydrogel microparticles for high-throughput molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapin, Stephen Clifford

    2012-01-01

    The ability to accurately detect and quantify biological molecules in complex mixtures is crucial in basic research as well as in clinical settings. Advancements in genetic analysis, molecular diagnostics, and patient-tailored ...

  9. Bioengineered Probes for Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Nervous System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, Vivian

    The development of molecular imaging probes has changed the nature of neurobiological research. Some of the most notable successes have involved the use of biological engineering techniques for the creation of fluorescent ...

  10. Extracting information from biological networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chindelevitch, Leonid Alexandrovich

    2010-01-01

    Systems biology, the study of biological systems in a holistic manner, has been catalyzed by a dramatic improvement in experimental techniques, coupled with a constantly increasing availability of biological data. The ...

  11. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Biological Engineering Undergraduate Class of 2013 Post-Graduation Report The Department Biological and Environmental Engineering (BEE) offers a bachelor degree program in Biological Engineering and a bachelor degree program in Environmental Engineering. Cornell Career Services surveys

  12. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

  13. Biological Conversion of Sugars To Hydrocarbons | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological Conversion of Sugars To Hydrocarbons Biological Conversion of Sugars To Hydrocarbons PDF explaining the biological process of bioenergy Biological Conversion of Sugars...

  14. Biological effectiveness of neutrons: Research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casarett, G.W.; Braby, L.A.; Broerse, J.J.; Elkind, M.M.; Goodhead, D.T.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1994-02-01

    The goal of this report was to provide a conceptual plan for a research program that would provide a basis for determining more precisely the biological effectiveness of neutron radiation with emphasis on endpoints relevant to the protection of human health. This report presents the findings of the experts for seven particular categories of scientific information on neutron biological effectiveness. Chapter 2 examines the radiobiological mechanisms underlying the assumptions used to estimate human risk from neutrons and other radiations. Chapter 3 discusses the qualitative and quantitative models used to organize and evaluate experimental observations and to provide extrapolations where direct observations cannot be made. Chapter 4 discusses the physical principles governing the interaction of radiation with biological systems and the importance of accurate dosimetry in evaluating radiation risk and reducing the uncertainty in the biological data. Chapter 5 deals with the chemical and molecular changes underlying cellular responses and the LET dependence of these changes. Chapter 6, in turn, discusses those cellular and genetic changes which lead to mutation or neoplastic transformation. Chapters 7 and 8 examine deterministic and stochastic effects, respectively, and the data required for the prediction of such effects at different organizational levels and for the extrapolation from experimental results in animals to risks for man. Gaps and uncertainties in this data are examined relative to data required for establishing radiation protection standards for neutrons and procedures for the effective and safe use of neutron and other high-LET radiation therapy.

  15. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Jackson State University, Ana G. Mendez Educational Foundation Consortium: Progress report, October 1985-September 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    Seventeen student papers are included, treating various topics in computer languages and software, physics, combustion and atmosphere, and biology. All are processed separately for the data base. (DLC)

  16. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal...

  17. Vibrations, Quanta and Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. F. Huelga; M. B. Plenio

    2013-06-27

    Quantum biology is an emerging field of research that concerns itself with the experimental and theoretical exploration of non-trivial quantum phenomena in biological systems. In this tutorial overview we aim to bring out fundamental assumptions and questions in the field, identify basic design principles and develop a key underlying theme -- the dynamics of quantum dynamical networks in the presence of an environment and the fruitful interplay that the two may enter. At the hand of three biological phenomena whose understanding is held to require quantum mechanical processes, namely excitation and charge transfer in photosynthetic complexes, magneto-reception in birds and the olfactory sense, we demonstrate that this underlying theme encompasses them all, thus suggesting its wider relevance as an archetypical framework for quantum biology.

  18. Method and apparatus for the gas phase decontamination of chemical and biological agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Hugh J.; Brubaker, Kenneth L.

    2003-10-07

    An apparatus and method for decontaminating chemical and biological agents using the reactive properties of both the single atomic oxygen and the hydroxyl radical for the decontamination of chemical and biological agents. The apparatus is self contained and portable and allows for the application of gas reactants directly at the required decontamination point. The system provides for the use of ultraviolet light of a specific spectral range to photolytically break down ozone into molecular oxygen and hydroxyl radicals where some of the molecular oxygen is in the first excited state. The excited molecular oxygen will combine with water vapor to produce two hydroxyl radicals.

  19. Biology Mathematics Connection Program Integrating Mathematics and Biology Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biology Mathematics Connection Program Integrating Mathematics and Biology Program BMC pioneered a series of instructional modules for use in high school mathematics and biology classrooms to highlight the interconnections between the mathematical and biological sciences. IMB follows up by developing the BMC modules

  20. Marine Biology Is Marine Biology right for me?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Marine Biology Is Marine Biology right for me? If you have an interest in learning about life in the sea then Marine Biology may be a good option for you. You will need good time management skills a marine biology degree are wide-ranging and provide a good basis for employment in almost any sector

  1. The Mississippi University Research Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass: Production of Alternative Fuels from Waste Biomass Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drs. Mark E. Zapp; Todd French; Lewis Brown; Clifford George; Rafael Hernandez; Marvin Salin; Drs. Huey-Min Hwang, Ken Lee, Yi Zhang; Maria Begonia; Drs. Clint Williford; Al Mikell; Drs. Robert Moore; Roger Hester .

    2009-03-31

    The Mississippi Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass was formed via funding from the US Department of Energy's EPSCoR Program, which is administered by the Office of Basic Science. Funding was approved in July of 1999 and received by participating Mississippi institutions by 2000. The project was funded via two 3-year phases of operation (the second phase was awarded based on the high merits observed from the first 3-year phase), with funding ending in 2007. The mission of the Consortium was to promote the utilization of biomass, both cultured and waste derived, for the production of commodity and specialty chemicals. These scientific efforts, although generally basic in nature, are key to the development of future industries within the Southeastern United States. In this proposal, the majority of the efforts performed under the DOE EPSCoR funding were focused primarily toward the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks and biogas from waste products. However, some of the individual projects within this program investigated the production of other products from biomass feeds (i.e. acetic acid and biogas) along with materials to facilitate the more efficient production of chemicals from biomass. Mississippi is a leading state in terms of raw biomass production. Its top industries are timber, poultry production, and row crop agriculture. However, for all of its vast amounts of biomass produced on an annual basis, only a small percentage of the biomass is actually industrially produced into products, with the bulk of the biomass being wasted. This situation is actually quite representative of many Southeastern US states. The research and development efforts performed attempted to further develop promising chemical production techniques that use Mississippi biomass feedstocks. The three processes that were the primary areas of interest for ethanol production were syngas fermentation, acid hydrolysis followed by hydrolyzate fermentation, and enzymatic conversion. All three of these processes are of particular interest to states in the Southeastern US since the agricultural products produced in this region are highly variable in terms of actual crop, production quantity, and the ability of land areas to support a particular type of crop. This greatly differs from the Midwestern US where most of this region's agricultural land supports one to two primary crops, such as corn and soybean. Therefore, developing processes which are relatively flexible in terms of biomass feedstock is key to the southeastern region of the US if this area is going to be a 'player' in the developing biomass to chemicals arena. With regard to the fermentation of syngas, research was directed toward developing improved biocatalysts through organism discovery and optimization, improving ethanol/acetic acid separations, evaluating potential bacterial contaminants, and assessing the use of innovative fermentors that are better suited for supporting syngas fermentation. Acid hydrolysis research was directed toward improved conversion yields and rates, acid recovery using membranes, optimization of fermenting organisms, and hydrolyzate characterization with changing feedstocks. Additionally, a series of development efforts addressed novel separation techniques for the separation of key chemicals from fermentation activities. Biogas related research focused on key factors hindering the widespread use of digester technologies in non-traditional industries. The digestion of acetic acids and other fermentation wastewaters was studied and methods used to optimize the process were undertaken. Additionally, novel laboratory methods were designed along with improved methods of digester operation. A search for better performing digester consortia was initiated coupled with improved methods to initiate their activity within digester environments. The third activity of the consortium generally studied the production of 'other' chemicals from waste biomass materials found in Mississippi. The two primary examples of this activity are production of chem

  2. 7th Annual Systems Biology Symposium: Systems Biology and Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitski, Timothy P.

    2008-04-01

    Systems biology recognizes the complex multi-scale organization of biological systems, from molecules to ecosystems. The International Symposium on Systems Biology has been hosted by the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle, Washington, since 2002. The annual two-day event gathers the most influential researchers transforming biology into an integrative discipline investingating complex systems. Engineering and application of new technology is a central element of systems biology. Genome-scale, or very small-scale, biological questions drive the enigneering of new technologies, which enable new modes of experimentation and computational analysis, leading to new biological insights and questions. Concepts and analytical methods in engineering are now finding direct applications in biology. Therefore, the 2008 Symposium, funded in partnership with the Department of Energy, featured global leaders in "Systems Biology and Engineering."

  3. Biological Macromolecular Structures Data from the RCSB Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB) is a non-profit consortium that works to improve understanding of the function of biological systems through the study of the 3-D structure of biological macromolecules. The RCSB PDB is one of three sites serving as deposition, data processing, and distribution sites of the Protein Data Bank Archive. Each site provides its own view of the primary data, thus providing a variety of tools and resources for the global community. RCSB is also the official keeper for the PDB archive, with sole access authority to the PDB archive directory structure and contents. The RCSB PDB Information Portal for Biological Macromolecular Structures offers online tools for search and retrieval, for visualizing structures, for depositing, validating, or downloading data, news and highlights, a discussion forum, and links to other areas of related research. The PDB archive is a repository of atomic coordinates and other information describing proteins and other important biological macromolecules. Structural biologists use methods such as X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy to determine the location of each atom relative to each other in the molecule. They then deposit this information, which is then annotated and publicly released into the archive by the wwPDB. Results can be viewed as 3-D images or models.

  4. The Consortium The CORAS consortium consists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stølen, Ketil

    ), - Solinet (Germany) and - Telenor (Norway); seven research institutes: - CLRC/RAL (UK), - CTI (Greece), - FORTH (Greece), - IFE (Norway), - NST (Norway), - NR (Norway) and - SINTEF (Norway); as well as one

  5. Complex biological and bio-inspired systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecke, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The understanding and characterization ofthe fundamental processes of the function of biological systems underpins many of the important challenges facing American society, from the pathology of infectious disease and the efficacy ofvaccines, to the development of materials that mimic biological functionality and deliver exceptional and novel structural and dynamic properties. These problems are fundamentally complex, involving many interacting components and poorly understood bio-chemical kinetics. We use the basic science of statistical physics, kinetic theory, cellular bio-chemistry, soft-matter physics, and information science to develop cell level models and explore the use ofbiomimetic materials. This project seeks to determine how cell level processes, such as response to mechanical stresses, chemical constituents and related gradients, and other cell signaling mechanisms, integrate and combine to create a functioning organism. The research focuses on the basic physical processes that take place at different levels ofthe biological organism: the basic role of molecular and chemical interactions are investigated, the dynamics of the DNA-molecule and its phylogenetic role are examined and the regulatory networks of complex biochemical processes are modeled. These efforts may lead to early warning algorithms ofpathogen outbreaks, new bio-sensors to detect hazards from pathomic viruses to chemical contaminants. Other potential applications include the development of efficient bio-fuel alternative-energy processes and the exploration ofnovel materials for energy usages. Finally, we use the notion of 'coarse-graining,' which is a method for averaging over less important degrees of freedom to develop computational models to predict cell function and systems-level response to disease, chemical stress, or biological pathomic agents. This project supports Energy Security, Threat Reduction, and the missions of the DOE Office of Science through its efforts to accurately model biological systems at the molecular and cellular level. The project's impact encompasses applications to biofuels, to novel sensors and to materials with broad use for energy or threat reduction. The broad, interdisciplinary approach of CNLS offers the unparalleled strength of combining science backgrounds and expertise -a unique and important asset in attacking the complex science of biological organisms. This approach also allows crossfertilization, with concepts and techniques transferring across field boundaries.

  6. 1085Research Article Kinesin-1 is a molecular transporter that trafficks along

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at speeds of up to 1 m second­1 and exchanged into cortically labelled clusters at microtubule ends and Cellular Biology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK 2 CRUK Clinical Centre at Leeds, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, St James University Hospital, Leeds, LS9 7TF, UK

  7. BASAL CLADES AND MOLECULAR SYSTEMATICS OF HETEROMYID RODENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riddle, Brett R.

    , they may be superior to nuclear genes for resolving short, basal branches. Our molecular data (2,381 base of Zoology and Department of Biology, Occidental College, Los Angeles, CA 90041, USA (JCH, ER) Department pairs for the 3-gene data set) affirm the monophyly of the family and resolve the major basal clades

  8. DISCOVERING BRAIN MECHANISMS AND THE RULES OF MOLECULAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stengel, Robert F.

    DISCOVERING BRAIN MECHANISMS AND THE RULES OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Paul Shapshak, PhD*1 and Robert-324-2723 ABSTRACT The human genome has approximately 30,000 genes. Brain cells express at least 15,000. The human brain is subject to many acute and chronic diseases including viral encephalitis, AIDS/HIV Associated

  9. Microscale Swimming: The Molecular Dynamics Approach D. C. Rapaport*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapaport, Dennis C.

    -dimensional swimming bodies employing a variety of propulsion mechanisms--motivated by biological and microrobotic among body designs and propulsion mechanisms. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.238101 PACS numbers: 47.63.Gd-propelled motion of microscopic bodies immersed in a fluid medium is studied using molecular dynamics simulation

  10. The use of molecular tools in Parks Canada Agency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    species inventory knowledge is crucial for park management and biodiversity monitoring #12;Outline of genetics to preserve species as dynamic entities ..." · "a mixture of ecology, molecular biology restoration Protected areas management #12;Parks Canada and conservation · Parks Canada is a world leader

  11. Report on the CEPA activities [Consorcio Educativo para la Proteccion Ambiental/Educational Consortium for Environmental Preservation] [Final report of activities from 1998 to 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruz, Miriam

    2003-02-01

    This report compiles the instances of scientific, educational, and institutional cooperation on environmental issues and other activities in which CEPA was engaged during the past five years, and includes several annual reports and meeting summaries. CEPA is a collaborative international consortium that brings together higher education institutions with governmental agencies, research laboratories, and private sector entities. CEPA's mission is to strengthen the technical, professional, and educational environmental infrastructure in the United States and Latin America. The CEPA program includes curriculum development, student exchange, faculty development, and creation of educational materials, joint research, and other cooperative activities. CEPA's goals are accomplished by actively working with Hispanic-serving institutions of higher education in the United States, in collaboration with institutions of higher education in Latin America and other Consortium members to deliver competitive environmental programs.

  12. Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, Kim

    cell with a monopolar spindle shows a gradient of Aurora B phosphorylation spreading outward from; molecular immunology; protein structure, dynamics and folding; enzymology; regulation of metabolism; RNA

  13. Molecular Phylogenetics (Hannes Luz)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spang, Rainer

    Molecular Phylogenetics (Hannes Luz) Contents: · Phylogenetic Trees, basic notions · A character Berlin, 2007) · Martin Vingron, Hannes Luz, Jens Stoye, Lecture notes on 'Al- gorithms for Phylogenetic

  14. Systems Biology Knowledgebase (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cottingham, Robert W [ORNL

    2011-04-29

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Robert W. Cottingham of Oak Ridge National Laboratory discusses the DOE KnowledgeBase at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009.

  15. Towards a Semantic Lexicon for Biological Language Processing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Verspoor, Karin

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the use of the resources in the National Library of Medicine's Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) for the construction of a lexicon useful for processing texts in the field of molecular biology. A lexicon is constructed from overlapping terms in the UMLS SPECIALIST lexicon and the UMLS Metathesaurus to obtain both morphosyntactic and semantic information for terms, and the coverage of a domain corpus is assessed. Over 77% of tokens in the domain corpus are found in the constructed lexicon, validating the lexicon's coverage of the most frequent terms in the domain and indicating that the constructedmore »lexicon is potentially an important resource for biological text processing.« less

  16. Fish Biology Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochem, Frank J.

    Lab 10: Fish Biology Introduction The effective management of fish populations requires knowledge of the growth rate of the fish. This requires determination of the age of fish to develop a relationship between the size and age of fish. For an inventory, this information provides insights to evaluate the potential

  17. Chemistry & Biology Brief Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herschlag, Dan

    . In each of these cases the native hydroxyl group interacts with a purine exocy- clic amine. Our resultsChemistry & Biology Brief Communication 20 -Fluoro Substituents Can Mimic Native 20 -Hydroxyls signature for tertiary interac- tions between 20 -hydroxyl groups and exocyclic amino groups within RNA

  18. Chemistry & Biology Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Loren

    Chemistry & Biology Perspective The Origin of RNA and ``My Grandfather's Axe'' Nicholas V. Hud,1 *Correspondence: hud@gatech.edu http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chembiol.2013.03.012 The origin of RNA is one

  19. Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linhardt, Robert J.

    /polymeric materials for electronics or energy storage, and polyelectrolyte membranes for fuel cell applications. http projects in emerging fields of science and technology that lie at the intersection between chemistry Biology at Rensselaer invites applications from students interested in pursuing a Ph.D. degree

  20. Biological Engineering 2014-2015 BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM PROGRESS FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Biological Engineering 2014-2015 8 BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM PROGRESS FORM Applies to students Calculus for Engineers I* MATH 1910 (4) ______ _____ _____ Calculus for Engineers II* MATH 1920 (4) ______ _____ _____ Engineering Math* (Differential Equations) MATH 2930 (4) ______ _____ _____ Engineering Math* (Linear Algebra

  1. Microscale swimming: The molecular dynamics approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. C. Rapaport

    2007-12-06

    The self-propelled motion of microscopic bodies immersed in a fluid medium is studied using molecular dynamics simulation. The advantage of the atomistic approach is that the detailed level of description allows complete freedom in specifying the swimmer design and its coupling with the surrounding fluid. A series of two-dimensional swimming bodies employing a variety of propulsion mechanisms -- motivated by biological and microrobotic designs -- is investigated, including the use of moving limbs, changing body shapes and fluid jets. The swimming efficiency and the nature of the induced, time-dependent flow fields are found to differ widely among body designs and propulsion mechanisms.

  2. Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory 2004 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Julia C.

    2005-04-17

    This 2004 Annual Report describes the research and accomplishments of staff and users of the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), located in Richland, Washington. EMSL is a multidisciplinary, national scientific user facility and research organization, operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The resources and opportunities within the facility are an outgrowth of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to fundamental research for understanding and resolving environmental and other critical scientific issues.

  3. Biology 472 Spring 2009 Biology of Amphibians and Reptiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Kate

    Biology 472 Spring 2009 1 Biology of Amphibians and Reptiles Dr. Kate Jackson Office: Science 200 E Encyclopedia of Reptiles and Amphibians. Oxford University Press. (2) Stebbins, R. and R. T. Peterson. 2003 of assorted herps (from labs). #12;Biology 472 Spring 2009 2 · ...know how to access primary sources

  4. Chemistry/Biology Interface Training Program (CBITG) Goals of the Program and Rationale for the Program Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    2011 Chemistry/Biology Interface Training Program (CBITG) Goals of the Program and Rationale recruited by the Chemistry, BMBB, Medicinal Chemistry and Microbiology Departments, at a stage of interest (e.g., synthetic/mechanistic chemistry, molecular biology, mechanistic enzymology, medicinal

  5. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE BIOLOGY GENERAL OPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Brian M.

    * OR 201 Physics 4 hrs. PHYSICS 102* OR 202 Physics 4 hrs. General Biology Option Requirements: CellBACHELOR OF SCIENCE ­ BIOLOGY GENERAL OPTION A Bachelor of Science degree from Washington State Requirements: Grade BIOLOGY 106 General Biology 4 hrs. BIOLOGY 107 General Biology 4 hrs. BIOLOGY 301 General

  6. Molecular Evolution, Networks in From: Meyers, R.A. (ed.) Encyclopedia of Complexity and System Science. Springer, Heidelberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Andreas

    Molecular Evolution, Networks in From: Meyers, R.A. (ed.) Encyclopedia of Complexity and System of Biochemistry Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Building Y27 Winterthurerstrasse 190 CH-8057 Zurich

  7. Mechanism of Molecular Ordering in Monolayer Liquid Crystal Films David L. Patrick, Victor J. Cee, and Thomas P. Beebe, Jr.*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick, David L.

    length scales with scanning probe micros- copy (SPM).1 Aside from investigations of biological macro- molecules, liquid crystal films are probably the most studied molecular system by SPM.2 It is therefore

  8. Modular architecture in biological networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramachandran, Gopal (Gopal Sebastian)

    2007-01-01

    In the past decade, biology has been revolutionized by an explosion in the availability of data. Translating this new wealth of information into meaningful biological insights and clinical breakthroughs will require a ...

  9. Experiment design for systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apgar, Joshua Farley

    2009-01-01

    Mechanism-based chemical kinetic models are increasingly being used to describe biological signaling. Such models serve to encapsulate current understanding of pathways and to enable insight into complex biological processes. ...

  10. Departments of Chemistry and Pharmacology Center for Structural Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meiler, Jens

    Departments of Chemistry and Pharmacology Center for Structural Biology Lecture 17 Jens Meiler #12.2 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 s I(s)a) b) c) d) e) f) Chemical Structure #12;Machine from constitution using atomic weights, atomic radii and standard bond lengths Molecular Weight 3 7 74

  11. Systems Biology | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORNL brings together multidisciplinary expertise and special facilities in genomics, computational biology, plant sciences, microbiology, microbial ecology, biophysics,...

  12. Systems Biology | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORNL brings together multidisciplinary expertise and special facilities in genomics, computational biology, plant sciences, microbiology, microbial ecology, biophysics,...

  13. Abengoa Mojave Final Biological Opinion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biological Opinion on Mojave Solar, LLC's Mojave Solar Project, San Bernardino County, California (8-8-11-F-3)

  14. Biological particle identification apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzman, Gary C. (Los Alamos, NM); Gregg, Charles T. (Los Alamos, NM); Grace, W. Kevin (Los Alamos, NM); Hiebert, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method for making multiparameter light scattering measurements from suspensions of biological particles is described. Fourteen of the sixteen Mueller matrix elements describing the particles under investigation can be substantially individually determined as a function of scattering angle and probing radiations wavelength, eight elements simultaneously for each of two apparatus configurations using an apparatus which incluees, in its simplest form, two polarization modulators each operating at a chosen frequency, one polarizer, a source of monochromatic electromagnetic radiation, a detector sensitive to the wavelength of radiation employed, eight phase-sensitive detectors, and appropriate electronics. A database of known biological particle suspensions can be assembled, and unknown samples can be quickly identified once measurements are performed on it according to the teachings of the subject invention, and a comparison is made with the database.

  15. Proportional Relationships in Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lega, Joceline

    Proportional Relationships in Biology #12;Bell Ringer... 1) Are 2/3 and 6/12 proportional? 1) No; 6/12 = 1/2 ! 2/3 2) Are 2/3 and 10/15 proportional? 1) Yes; 2/3 = (2*5)/(3*5) = 10/15 3) Are 2/3 and 4/9 proportional? 1) No; both are simplified #12;Proportional Shapes · What does it mean for two shapes

  16. Computational biology and high performance computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoichet, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Paper in Computational Biology The First Step Beyond theM . Glaeser, Mol. & Cell Biology, UCB and Life SciencesLBNL-44460 Computational Biology and High Performance

  17. Nutritional systems biology of type 2 diabetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Y; Barrere-Cain, RE; Yang, X

    2015-01-01

    HF (2015) Circadian systems biology in Metazoa. BriefingsNutritional systems biology: defini- tions and approaches.PAPER Nutritional systems biology of type 2 diabetes Yuqi

  18. DEPARTMENT OF DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turc, Catalin

    Masters of Science Degree Plan A: Thesis DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY #12;DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY Masters of Science Degree (Plan A) Thesis The Plan A Master of Science Degree in Biology is a thesis,graduate degree program.The purpose of the program is to provide advanced exposure

  19. Translational Biology, Medicine, and Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Translational Biology, Medicine, and Health PhDProgram Admissions The program seeks highly. PhD Program in Translational Biology, Medicine, and Health Focus Areas Cancer Development, Aging 24016 avanwart@vt.edu · www.tbmh.vt.edu www . tbmh.vt.edu #12;Translational Biology, Medicine

  20. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print Wednesday, 27 April 2005 00:00 In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the...