National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for molecular beam mass

  1. Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. NREL has six MBMS systems that researchers and industry partners can use to understand thermochemical biomass conversion and biomass composition recalcitrance.

  2. Atmospheric pressure plasma analysis by modulated molecular beam mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aranda Gonzalvo, Y.; Whitmore, T.D.; Rees, J.A.; Seymour, D.L.; Stoffels, E.

    2006-05-15

    Fractional number density measurements for a rf plasma 'needle' operating at atmospheric pressure have been obtained using a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS) system designed for diagnostics of atmospheric plasmas. The MBMS system comprises three differentially pumped stages and a mass/energy analyzer and includes an automated beam-to-background measurement facility in the form of a software-controlled chopper mechanism. The automation of the beam modulation allows the neutral components in the plasma to be rapidly and accurately measured using the mass spectrometer by threshold ionization techniques. Data are reported for plasma generated by a needle plasma source operated using a helium/air mixture. In particular, data for the conversion of atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen into nitric oxide are discussed with reference to its significance for medical applications such as disinfecting wounds and dental cavities and for microsurgery.

  3. The effect of cluster formation on mass separation in binary molecular beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibener, Steven

    The effect of cluster formation on mass separation in binary molecular beams Wei Li,a) M. J of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 Received 15 July 1999; accepted 17 November 1999 The downstream in these studies. Strong evidence is herein reported which implicates cluster formation in the heavier carrier gas

  4. A laser and molecular beam mass spectrometer study of low-pressure dimethyl ether flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew McIlroy; Toby D. Hain; Hope A. Michelsen; Terrill A. Cool

    2000-12-15

    The oxidation of dimethyl ether (DME) is studied in low-pressure flames using new molecular beam mass spectrometer and laser diagnostics. Two 30.0-Torr, premixed DME/oxygen/argon flames are investigated with stoichiometries of 0.98 and 1.20. The height above burner profiles of nine stable species and two radicals are measured. These results are compared to the detailed chemical reaction mechanism of Curran and coworkers. Generally good agreement is found between the model and data. The largest discrepancies are found for the methyl radical profiles where the model predicts qualitatively different trends in the methyl concentration with stoichiometry than observed in the experiment.

  5. Molecular beam mass spectrometry with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golan, Amir; Ahmed, Musahid

    2012-01-01

    Tunable soft ionization coupled to mass spectroscopy is a powerful method to investigate isolated molecules, complexes and clusters and their spectroscopy and dynamics.[1-4] Fundamental studies of photoionization processes of biomolecules provide information about electronic structure of these systems. Furthermore determinations of ionization energies and other properties of biomolecules in the gas phase are not trivial, and these experiments provide a platform to generate these data. We have developed a thermal vaporization technique coupled with supersonic molecular beams that provides a gentle way to transport these species into the gas phase. Judicious combination of source gas and temperature allows for formation of dimers and higher clusters of the DNA bases. The focus of this particular work is on the effects of non-covalent interactions, i.e., hydrogen bonding, stacking, and electrostatic interactions, on the ionization energies and proton transfer of individual biomolecules, their complexes and upon micro-hydration by water.[1, 5-9] We have performed experimental and theoretical characterization of the photoionization dynamics of gas-phase uracil and 1,3-methyluracil dimers using molecular beams coupled with synchrotron radiation at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline[10] located at the Advanced Light Source and the experimental details are visualized here. This allowed us to observe the proton transfer in 1,3-dimethyluracil dimers, a system with pi stacking geometry and with no hydrogen bonds[1]. Molecular beams provide a very convenient and efficient way to isolate the sample of interest from environmental perturbations which in return allows accurate comparison with electronic structure calculations[11, 12]. By tuning the photon energy from the synchrotron, a photoionization efficiency (PIE) curve can be plotted which informs us about the cationic electronic states. These values can then be compared to theoretical models and calculations and in turn, explain in detail the electronic structure and dynamics of the investigated species [1, 3].

  6. Molecular beam mass spectrometric characterization of biomass pyrolysis products for fuels and chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agblevor, F.A.; Davis, M.F.; Evans, R.J. [National Renewal Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Converting biomass feedstocks to fuels and chemicals requires rapid characterization of the wide variety of possible feedstocks. The combination of pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (Py-MBMS) and multivariate statistical analysis offers a unique capability for characterizing these feedstocks. Herbaceous and woody biomass feedstocks that were harvested at different periods were used in this study. The pyrolysis mass spectral data were acquired in real time on the MBMS, and multivariate statistical analysis (factor analysis) was used to analyze and classify Py-MBMS data into compound classes. The effect of harvest times on the thermal conversion of these feedstocks was assessed from these data. Apart from sericea lespedeza, the influence of harvest time on the pyrolysis products of the various feedstocks was insignificant. For sericea lespedeza, samples harvested before plant defoliation were significantly different from those harvested after defoliation. The defoliated plant samples had higher carbohydrate-derived pyrolysis products than the samples obtained from the foliated plant. Additionally, char yields from the defoliated plant samples were lower than those from the foliated plant samples.

  7. Rapid characterization of lignocellulosic feedstocks for fuels and chemicals: Molecular beam mass spectrometric approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agblevor, F.A.; Davis, M.F. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Rapid characterization of biomass feedstocks has a pivotal role in the development of biomass energy because of the large number of samples that must be analyzed due to the diversity of biomass feedstocks and the significant differences in the chemical and physical properties of these feedstocks. Several biomass feedstocks (herbaceous, woody, and agricultural residues) were screened for the effects of storage, season of harvest, geographic location, clonal, and species variation on the pyrolysis products of the feed stocks. For herbaceous species such as sericea lespedeza, the season of harvest had a significant effect on the pyrolysis products. Effects of clonal variation on the composition of hybrid poplar feedstocks was easily discerned with the molecular beam mass spectrometric analysis. The effect of geographic location on the poplar clones pyrolysis products was minimal. However in the case of switchgrass, varietal influence on the pyrolysis products was minimal, but where the plant was grown had a strong influence on the pyrolysis products of the feedstock. Significant differences because of species variation could also be shown from the pyrolysis products of various biomass feedstocks. The influence of storage time on biomass samples stored outside in the open could also be discerned from the pyrolysis products of the feedstocks. The differences noted in the pyrolysis products of the feedstocks were noted for samples which were significantly degraded during storage either through the action of microflora or weathering.

  8. Molecular-beam scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vernon, M.F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N/sub 2/ from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HCl ..-->.. NaCl + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included.

  9. Effusive molecular beam-sampled Knudsen flow reactor coupled to vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization mass spectrometry using an external free radical source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leplat, N.; Rossi, M. J.

    2013-11-15

    A new apparatus using vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization mass spectrometry (VUV SPIMS) of an effusive molecular beam emanating from a Knudsen flow reactor is described. It was designed to study free radical-molecule kinetics over a significant temperature range (300–630 K). Its salient features are: (1) external free radical source, (2) counterpropagating molecular beam and diffuse VUV photon beam meeting in a crossed-beam ion source of a quadrupole mass spectrometer with perpendicular ion extraction, (3) analog detection of the photocurrent of the free radical molecular cation, and (4) possibility of detecting both free radicals and closed shell species in the same apparatus and under identical reaction conditions owing to the presence of photoelectrons generated by the photoelectric effect of the used VUV-photons. The measured thermal molecular beam-to-background ratio was 6.35 ± 0.39 for Ar and 10.86 ± 1.59 for i-C{sub 4}H{sub 10} at 300 K, a factor of 2.52 and 1.50 smaller, respectively, than predicted from basic gas-dynamic considerations. Operating parameters as well as the performance of key elements of the instrument are presented and discussed. Coupled to an external free radical source a steady-state specific exit flow of 1.6 × 10{sup 11} and 5.0 × 10{sup 11} molecule s{sup ?1} cm{sup ?3} of C{sub 2}H{sub 5}{sup •} (ethyl) and t-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}{sup •} (t-butyl) free radicals have been detected using VUV SPIMS at their molecular ion m/z 29 and 57, respectively, at 300 K.

  10. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation & dynamics; and surfaces.

  11. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation dynamics; and surfaces.

  12. Physics with fast molecular-ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanter, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    Fast (MeV) molecular-ion beams provide a unique source of energetic projectile nuclei which are correlated in space and time. The recognition of this property has prompted several recent investigations of various aspects of the interactions of these ions with matter. High-resolution measurements on the fragments resulting from these interactions have already yielded a wealth of new information on such diverse topics as plasma oscillations in solids and stereochemical structures of molecular ions as well as a variety of atomic collision phenomena. The general features of several such experiments will be discussed and recent results will be presented.

  13. Counting molecular-beam grown graphene layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plaut, Annette S.; Wurstbauer, Ulrich; Pinczuk, Aron; Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 ; Garcia, Jorge M.; Pfeiffer, Loren N.

    2013-06-17

    We have used the ratio of the integrated intensity of graphene's Raman G peak to that of the silicon substrate's first-order optical phonon peak, accurately to determine the number of graphene layers across our molecular-beam (MB) grown graphene films. We find that these results agree well both, with those from our own exfoliated single and few-layer graphene flakes, and with the results of Koh et al.[ACS Nano 5, 269 (2011)]. We hence distinguish regions of single-, bi-, tri-, four-layer, etc., graphene, consecutively, as we scan coarsely across our MB-grown graphene. This is the first, but crucial, step to being able to grow, by such molecular-beam-techniques, a specified number of large-area graphene layers, to order.

  14. BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT A.RASPEREZA DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D­22607#erential luminosity spectrum measurements and beam energy spread on the precision of the Higgs boson mass measurement possible impact of the beam related systematic errors on the Higgs boson mass measurement is discussed

  15. Molecular beam-thermal hydrogen desorption from palladium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobo, R. F. M.; Berardo, F. M. V.; Ribeiro, J. H. F.

    2010-04-15

    Among the most efficient techniques for hydrogen desorption monitoring, thermal desorption mass spectrometry is a very sensitive one, but in certain cases can give rise to uptake misleading results due to residual hydrogen partial pressure background variations. In this work one develops a novel thermal desorption variant based on the effusive molecular beam technique that represents a significant improvement in the accurate determination of hydrogen mass absorbed on a solid sample. The enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio for trace hydrogen is on the order of 20%, and no previous calibration with a chemical standard is required. The kinetic information obtained from the hydrogen desorption mass spectra (at a constant heating rate of 1 deg. C/min) accounts for the consistency of the technique.

  16. Note: High density pulsed molecular beam for cold ion chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kokish, M. G.; Rajagopal, V.; Marler, J. P.; Odom, B. C.

    2014-08-15

    A recent expansion of cold and ultracold molecule applications has led to renewed focus on molecular species preparation under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Meanwhile, molecular beams have been used to study gas phase chemical reactions for decades. In this paper, we describe an apparatus that uses pulsed molecular beam technology to achieve high local gas densities, leading to faster reaction rates with cold trapped ions. We characterize the beam's spatial profile using the trapped ions themselves. This apparatus could be used for preparation of molecular species by reactions requiring excitation of trapped ion precursors to states with short lifetimes or for obtaining a high reaction rate with minimal increase of background chamber pressure.

  17. BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT A.RASPEREZA DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 and differential luminosity spectrum measurements and beam energy spread on the precision of the Higgs boson mass such as Higgs boson mass, decay branching fractions and production rate. However, most of these studies did

  18. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Y.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  19. Molecular beam surface analysis. 1993 Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appelhans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Groenewold, G.S.; Dahl, D.A.; Delmore, J.E.

    1993-09-01

    The Molecular Beam Surface Analysis (MBSA) program is developing both laboratory-based and potentially field-portable chemical analyses systems taking advantage of new surface analysis technology developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The objective is to develop the means to rapidly detect and identify, with high specificity and high sensitivity, nonvolatile and low volatile organics found in Chemical Weapons (CW) and High Explosives (HE) feedstocks, agents, and decomposition products on surfaces of plants, rocks, paint chips, filters, smears of buildings, vehicles, equipment, etc.. Ideally, the method would involve no sample preparation and no waste generation, and would have the potential for being implemented as a field-portable instrument. In contrast to existing analytical methods that rely on sample volatility, MBSA is optimized for nonvolatile and low volatile compounds. This makes it amenable for rapidly screening field samples for CW agent decomposition products and feedstock chemicals and perhaps actual agents. In its final configuration (benchtop size) it could be operated in a non-laboratory environment (such as an office building) requiring no sample preparation chemistry or chemical supplies. It could also be included in a mobile laboratory used in on-site, ore remote site cooperative surveys, or in a standard laboratory, where it would provide fast screening of samples at minimal cost.

  20. The mean molecular mass of Titan's atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    , Mars, Mars #12;Science Questions · Mean molecular mass (µ) -> Chemical composition · How did Titan form? · Current reservoirs of volatiles · Ethane/methane puddles/ocean · Thermal structure of atmosphere #12, delicate, etc ­ T/p sensors are simple, cheap, reliable · Is it possible to know µ based on simple

  1. Apparatus and methods for continuous beam fourier transform mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLuckey, Scott A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goeringer, Douglas E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-01-01

    A continuous beam Fourier transform mass spectrometer in which a sample of ions to be analyzed is trapped in a trapping field, and the ions in the range of the mass-to-charge ratios to be analyzed are excited at their characteristic frequencies of motion by a continuous excitation signal. The excited ions in resonant motions generate real or image currents continuously which can be detected and processed to provide a mass spectrum.

  2. Velocity Augmentation of a Supersonic Source and The Production of Slow, Cold, Molecular Beams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, Les

    2015-02-16

    In this thesis I describe the second generation of a rotating supersonic beam source. The purpose of this device is to produce velocity augmented molecular beams for use with scattering experiments or subsequent slowing methods. The beam emerges...

  3. High-efficiency GaAs solar cells grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melloch, M.R. (School of Electrical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (USA)); Tobin, S.P. (Spire Corporation, Patriots Park, Bedford, Massachusetts 01730 (USA)); Stellwag, T.B. (School of Electrical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (USA)); Bajgar, C. (Spire Corporation, Patriots Park, Bedford, Massachusetts 01730 (USA)); Keshavarzi, A.; Lundstrom, M.S. (School of Electrical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (USA)); Emery, K. (Solar Energy Research Institute, Golden, Colorado 80401 (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Previously, solar cells fabricated from molecular-beam epitaxually (MBE)-grown material have been inferior in performance to those fabricated from metalorganic chemical vapor deposited (MOCVD) material. We have obtained 1-sun air mass (AM) 1.5 efficiencies of 23.8% for 0.25 cm{sup 2} GaAs solar cells fabricated on MBE-grown material. This is the first solar cell fabricated on MBE material which is of comparable performance to solar cells fabricated on MOCVD material. Details of the MBE system preparation and film growth procedure along with a detailed evaluation of the solar cells will be presented.

  4. Cerenkov emission induced by external beam radiation stimulates molecular fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Axelsson, Johan; Davis, Scott C.; Gladstone, David J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Cerenkov emission is induced when a charged particle moves faster than the speed of light in a given medium. Both x-ray photons and electrons produce optical Cerenkov photons in everyday radiation therapy of tissue; yet, this phenomenon has never been fully documented. This study quantifies the emissions and also demonstrates that the Cerenkov emission can excite a fluorophore, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), embedded in biological phantoms. Methods: In this study, Cerenkov emission induced by radiation from a clinical linear accelerator is investigated. Biological mimicking phantoms were irradiated with x-ray photons, with energies of 6 or 18 MV, or electrons at energies 6, 9, 12, 15, or 18 MeV. The Cerenkov emission and the induced molecular fluorescence were detected by a camera or a spectrometer equipped with a fiber optic cable. Results: It is shown that both x-ray photons and electrons, at MeV energies, produce optical Cerenkov photons in tissue mimicking media. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Cerenkov emission can excite a fluorophore, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), embedded in biological phantoms. Conclusions: The results here indicate that molecular fluorescence monitoring during external beam radiotherapy is possible.

  5. Mass spectrometer with electron source for reducing space charge effects in sample beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houk, Robert S.; Praphairaksit, Narong

    2003-10-14

    A mass spectrometer includes an ion source which generates a beam including positive ions, a sampling interface which extracts a portion of the beam from the ion source to form a sample beam that travels along a path and has an excess of positive ions over at least part of the path, thereby causing space charge effects to occur in the sample beam due to the excess of positive ions in the sample beam, an electron source which adds electrons to the sample beam to reduce space charge repulsion between the positive ions in the sample beam, thereby reducing the space charge effects in the sample beam and producing a sample beam having reduced space charge effects, and a mass analyzer which analyzes the sample beam having reduced space charge effects.

  6. Junction silicon solar cells made with molecular beam glow discharge bombardment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caine, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    The fabrication of silicon PN junction solar cells with molecular implanted emitter regions is described. A simple, economical high current (0.5 mA/cm/sup 2/), low voltage (4-6 kV) glow discharge apparatus without any ion mass separation is used for implantation. The discharge beam is characterized with a current-voltage conduction curve, radial profile of target sheet resistance and operating temperature of implant target. Molecular implantation compounds discussed include: boron trifluoride, trimethyl borate, boron trichloride, trimethyl phosphite, arsenic trifluoride, phosphorus trichloride, phosphorus oxychloride and arsenic trichloride. Annealing is accomplished with a Q-switched ruby laser and with a standard diffusion furnace. Solar cell performance parameters (conversion efficiency, quantum efficiency and junction ideality) are compared with cells conventionally implanted at 30 keV with /sup 11/B and /sup 31/P and cells made with a standard open tube phosphorus oxychloride diffusion. Cell substrate thickness was found to limit short circuit current. Total area simulated AM1 power conversion efficiencies of molecular cells without antireflection coatings or backsurface fields are at best 8.2% as compared to 9.0% for conventional implanted or diffused devices. To achieve optimum performance, laser light had to be incorporated in the molecular implant annealing procedure.

  7. Nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries in deeply virtual Compton scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The HERMES collaboration; A. Airapetian

    2010-01-22

    The nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal cross section asymmetries with respect to charge and longitudinal polarization of the lepton beam is studiedfor hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons. The observed beam-charge and beam-helicity asymmetries are attributed to the interference between the Bethe-Heitler and deeply virtual Compton scattering processes. For various nuclei, the asymmetries are extracted for both coherent and incoherent-enriched regions, which involve different (combinations of) generalized parton distributions. For both regions, the asymmetries are compared to those for a free proton, and no nuclear-mass dependence is found.

  8. Fabrication of precision high quality facets on molecular beam epitaxy material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petersen, Holly E. (Tracy, CA); Goward, William D. (Antioch, CA); Dijaili, Sol P. (Moraga, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Fabricating mirrored vertical surfaces on semiconductor layered material grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Low energy chemically assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) is employed to prepare mirrored vertical surfaces on MBE-grown III-V materials under unusually low concentrations of oxygen in evacuated etching atmospheres of chlorine and xenon ion beams. UV-stabilized smooth-surfaced photoresist materials contribute to highly vertical, high quality mirrored surfaces during the etching.

  9. Low-temperature grown graphene films by using molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Meng-Yu [Institute of Electronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Guo, Wei-Ching; Wang, Pro-Yao [Institute of Optoelectronic Sciences, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Meng-Hsun [College of Photonics, National Chiao-Tung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Liu, Te-Huan; Chang, Chien-Cheng [Institute of Applied Mechanics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Pao, Chun-Wei; Lin, Shih-Yen [Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Si-Chen [Institute of Electronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2012-11-26

    Complete graphene film is prepared by depositing carbon atoms directly on Cu foils in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber at 300 Degree-Sign C. The Raman spectrum of the film has indicated that high-quality few-layer graphene is obtained. With back-gated transistor architecture, the characteristic current modulation of graphene transistors is observed. Following the similar growth procedure, graphitization is observed at room temperature, which is consistent with the molecular dynamics simulations of graphene growth.

  10. Mass Resolving Power Requirement for Molecular Formula Determination of Fossil Oils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Mass Resolving Power Requirement for Molecular Formula Determination of Fossil Oils Chang Samuel numbers based on the molecular formulas determined from accurate mass measurement.1 We have reported of molecular formulas of the components is reviewed. The resolving power required for overlapping compound

  11. Measuring the Density of a Molecular Cluster Injector via Visible Emission from an Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundberg, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. M.; Stotler, D. P.

    2010-06-28

    A method to measure the density distribution of a dense hydrogen gas jet is pre- sented. A Mach 5.5 nozzle is cooled to 80K to form a flow capable of molecular cluster formation. A 250V, 10mA electron beam collides with the jet and produces H? emission that is viewed by a fast camera. The high density of the jet, several 1016cm?3, results in substantial electron depletion, which attenuates the H? emission. The attenuated emission measurement, combined with a simplified electron-molecule collision model, allows us to determine the molecular density profile via a simple iterative calculation.

  12. Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of GaAs on (631) Oriented Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruz Hernandez, Esteban; Rojas Ramirez, Juan-Salvador; Contreras Hernandez, Rocio; Lopez Lopez, Maximo; Pulzara Mora, Alvaro; Mendez Garcia, Victor H.

    2007-02-09

    In this work, we report the study of the homoepitaxial growth of GaAs on (631) oriented substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). We observed the spontaneous formation of a high density of large scale features on the surface. The hilly like features are elongated towards the [-5, 9, 3] direction. We show the dependence of these structures with the growth conditions and we present the possibility of to create quantum wires structures on this surface.

  13. 62-TeV center of mass hadron collider with superbunch beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryuji Yamada et al.

    2001-11-05

    The scheme of a 62-TeV center of mass p-p collider with superbunch beams at Fermilab is proposed as a practical and realistically achievable future project. It will be built in two stages, using the same tunnel, first with a 2 Tesla low field magnet collider ring and later with a 10 Tesla high field magnet collider ring. Both low and high field magnets have twin bore aperture and will be installed in the tunnel with the circumference of 87.25 km. In each bore a proton beam is accelerated, using induction cavities to increase luminosity. In the first stage they install a 7 TeV accelerator ring with operating field of 2 Tesla, based on the superferric transmission-line design. This ring will be operated at a 14-TeV center of mass collider. This will have the same energy as the LHC, but it will have 15 times higher luminosity, namely 1.5 x 10{sup 35}/cm{sup 2}/sec. The estimated synchrotron radiation is negligible with this machine. The existing Fermilab accelerator system, including the 150 GeV main injector, will be used as the injector system. Its rough cost estimation and schedule for this first stage are presented. In the second stage proton beams are accelerated, also using induction cavities up to 31 TeV with the 10 Tesla dipole magnets. The counter circulating beams will collide with the 62-TeV center of mass energy. With the superbunch beams they can expect the luminosity can be increased about 15 times more than the conventional method with RF cavities. It will be 10{sup 35}/cm{sup 2}/sec. In the second stage, the synchrotron radiation power will be about 12 W/m, and they need an elaborated beam screen.

  14. Structural and optoelectronic properties of germanium-rich islands grown on silicon using molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nataraj, L.; Sustersic, N.; Coppinger, M.; Gerlein, L. F.; Kolodzey, J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Cloutier, S. G. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Delaware Biotechnology Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19711 (United States)

    2010-03-22

    We report on the structural and optoelectronic properties of self-assembled germanium-rich islands grown on silicon using molecular beam epitaxy. Raman, photocurrent, photoluminescence, and transient optical spectroscopy measurements suggest significant built-in strains and a well-defined interface with little intermixing between the islands and the silicon. The shape of these islands depends on the growth conditions and includes pyramid, dome, barn-shaped, and superdome islands. Most importantly, we demonstrate that these germanium-rich islands provide efficient light emission at telecommunication wavelengths on a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor-compatible platform.

  15. Bismuth nano-droplets for group-V based molecular-beam droplet epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, C.; Zeng, Z. Q.; Hirono, Y.; Morgan, T. A.; Hu, X.; Salamo, G. J.; Fan, D. S.; Wu, J.; Yu, S. Q.; Wang, Zh. M.

    2011-12-12

    Self-assembly of bismuth droplets at nanoscale on GaAs(100) surface using molecular beam epitaxy was demonstrated. Fine control of density and size was achieved by varying growth temperature and total bismuth deposition. Droplet density was tuned by roughly 3 orders of magnitude, and the density-temperature dependence was found to be consistent with classical nucleation theory. These results may extend the flexibility of droplet epitaxy by serving as templates for group V based droplet epitaxy, which is in contrast to conventional group III based droplet epitaxy and may encourage nanostructure formation of bismuth-containing materials.

  16. Growth of atomically smooth MgO films on graphene by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, W. H.; Han, W.; Pi, K.; McCreary, K. M.; Miao, F.; Bao, W.; Lau, C. N.; Kawakami, R. K.

    2008-11-03

    We investigate the growth of MgO films on graphene by molecular beam epitaxy and find that surface diffusion promotes a rough morphology. To reduce the mobility of surface atoms, the graphene surface is dressed by Ti atoms prior to MgO deposition. With as little as 0.5 ML (monolayer) of Ti, the MgO overlayer becomes atomically smooth. Furthermore, no aggregation of MgO is observed at the edges of the graphene sheet. These results are important for the fabrication of nanoscale electronic and spintronic devices.

  17. Quality of epitaxial InAs nanowires controlled by catalyst size in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhi; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Liao, Zhi-Ming; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Shi, Sui-Xing; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin; Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072

    2013-08-12

    In this study, the structural quality of Au-catalyzed InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy is investigated. Through detailed electron microscopy characterizations and analysis of binary Au-In phase diagram, it is found that defect-free InAs nanowires can be induced by smaller catalysts with a high In concentration, while comparatively larger catalysts containing less In induce defected InAs nanowires. This study indicates that the structural quality of InAs nanowires can be controlled by the size of Au catalysts when other growth conditions remain as constants.

  18. Antimony segregation in stressed SiGe heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drozdov, M. N.; Novikov, A. V.; Yurasov, D. V., E-mail: Inquisitor@ipm.sci.nnov.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    The effects of the growth temperature, composition, and elastic strains in separate layers on the segregation of antimony are studied experimentally for stressed SiGe structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. It is established that the growth conditions and parameters of the structures exert an interrelated influence on the segregation of Sb: the degree of the influence of the composition and elastic stresses in the SiGe layers on Sb segregation depends on the growth temperature. It is shown that usage of a method previously proposed by us for the selective doping of silicon structures with consideration for the obtained dependences of Sb segregation on the growth conditions and parameters of the SiGe layers makes it possible to form SiGe structures selectively doped with antimony.

  19. Intense terahertz emission from molecular beam epitaxy-grown GaAs/GaSb(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadia, Cyril P.; Laganapan, Aleena Maria; Agatha Tumanguil, Mae; Estacio, Elmer; Somintac, Armando; Salvador, Arnel; Que, Christopher T.; Yamamoto, Kohji; Tani, Masahiko

    2012-12-15

    Intense terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave emission was observed in undoped GaAs thin films deposited on (100) n-GaSb substrates via molecular beam epitaxy. GaAs/n-GaSb heterostructures were found to be viable THz sources having signal amplitude 75% that of bulk p-InAs. The GaAs films were grown by interruption method during the growth initiation and using various metamorphic buffer layers. Reciprocal space maps revealed that the GaAs epilayers are tensile relaxed. Defects at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb interface were confirmed by scanning electron microscope images. Band calculations were performed to infer the depletion region and electric field at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb and the air-GaAs interfaces. However, the resulting band calculations were found to be insufficient to explain the THz emission. The enhanced THz emission is currently attributed to a piezoelectric field induced by incoherent strain and defects.

  20. Improved tunneling magnetoresistance at low temperature in manganite junctions grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werner, R.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.; Petrov, A. Yu.; Davidson, B. A.; Mino, L. Alvarez

    2011-04-18

    We report resistance versus magnetic field measurements for a La{sub 0.65}Sr{sub 0.35}MnO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3}/La{sub 0.65}Sr{sub 0.35}MnO{sub 3} tunnel junction grown by molecular-beam epitaxy, that show a large field window of extremely high tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) at low temperature. Scanning the in-plane applied field orientation through 360 deg., the TMR shows fourfold symmetry, i.e., biaxial anisotropy, aligned with the crystalline axis but not the junction geometrical long axis. The TMR reaches {approx}1900% at 4 K, corresponding to an interfacial spin polarization of >95% assuming identical interfaces. These results show that uniaxial anisotropy is not necessary for large TMR, and lay the groundwork for future improvements in TMR in manganite junctions.

  1. ZnO:Sb/ZnO:Ga Light Emitting Diode on c-Plane Sapphire by Molecular Beam Epitaxy Zheng Yang, Sheng Chu, Winnie V. Chen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zheng

    ZnO:Sb/ZnO:Ga Light Emitting Diode on c-Plane Sapphire by Molecular Beam Epitaxy Zheng Yang, Sheng substrates using plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy. Mesa geometry light emitting diodes (LEDs) were demonstrated in recent years, such as photodetectors,8,9) light-emitting diodes (LEDs),10­13) and random lasing

  2. Adsorption of iso-/n-butane on an Anatase Thin Film: A Molecular Beam Scattering and TDS Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goering, J.; Kadossov, E.; Burghaus, Uwe; Yu, Zhongqing; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2007-07-01

    Binding energies and adsorption probabilities have been determined for n/iso-butane adsorption on an anatase thin film grown on SrTiO3(001) by means of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and molecular beam scattering. The sample has been characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Auger electrons spectroscopy (AES).

  3. Crossed beam reaction of the phenyl radical, (C6H5, X2 with molecular oxygen O2; X3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    ) plus carbon monoxide (CO) (reac- tion (4)) [5]. However, experimental data on the reaction products of the combustion-relevant reaction of phenyl radicals with molecular oxygen were investigated in a crossed beam to its importance of incipient soot formation and also in the combustion processes of aromatic hydro

  4. Molecular beam epitaxy of n-type ZnS: A wide band gap emitter for heterojunction PV devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    Molecular beam epitaxy of n-type ZnS: A wide band gap emitter for heterojunction PV devices Jeffrey and AZO transparent conductive oxides did not. Applications to novel PV devices incorporating low electron-ray diffraction, zinc compounds. I. INTRODUCTION The growing interest in scalable, thin-film photovoltaics (PV

  5. Reaction Dynamics on the Formation of Styrene: A Crossed Molecular Beam Study of the Reaction of Phenyl Radicals with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    Reaction Dynamics on the Formation of Styrene: A Crossed Molecular Beam Study of the Reaction the styrene molecule (C6H5C2H3). Experiments with D4-ethylene verified that in the corresponding reaction. The overall reaction to form styrene plus atomic hydrogen from the reactants was found to be exoergic by 25

  6. Hetero-epitaxy of perovskite oxides on GaAs(001) by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Y.; Kulik, J.; Eschrich, T.C.; Droopad, R.; Yu, Z.; Maniar, P. [Microelectronics and Physical Sciences Laboratory, Process and Materials Characterization Laboratory, and Microelectronics and Physical Sciences Laboratory, Motorola Inc., 2100 East Elliot Road, Tempe, Arizona 85284 (United States)

    2004-08-16

    Hetero-epitaxy of single-crystal perovskite SrTiO{sub 3} on GaAs(001) was achieved using molecular beam epitaxy. The growth was accomplished by deposition of a submonolayer of titanium on GaAs(001), followed by the co-deposition of strontium and titanium initiated at a low-temperature, low-oxygen-pressure condition. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the Ti prelayer reacted with As and formed TiAs-like species on the As terminated GaAs(001) surface. Reflection-high-energy-electron diffraction showed that SrTiO{sub 3} grew coherently on the GaAs(001) at early stage of growth. This coherent behavior began to degrade when SrTiO{sub 3} thickness exceeded 20 A ring . Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed an abrupt interface between SrTiO{sub 3} and GaAs and good crystallinity of the SrTiO{sub 3} film. An epitaxial relationship between SrTiO{sub 3} and GaAs was further confirmed by x-ray diffraction. The success of growth of SrTiO{sub 3} on GaAs paves the way for integration of various functional perovskite oxides with GaAs.

  7. Magnetotransport in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions grown by molecular beam epitaxy (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrieu, S. Bonell, F.; Hauet, T.; Montaigne, F.; Lefevre, P.; Bertran, F.

    2014-05-07

    The strong impact of molecular beam epitaxy growth and Synchrotron Radiation characterization tools in the understanding of fundamental issues in nanomagnetism and spintronics is illustrated through the example of fully epitaxial MgO-based Magnetic Tunnel Junctions (MTJs). If ab initio calculations predict very high tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in such devices, some discrepancy between theory and experiments still exists. The influence of imperfections in real systems has thus to be considered like surface contaminations, structural defects, unexpected electronic states, etc. The influence of possible oxygen contamination at the Fe/MgO(001) interface is thus studied, and is shown to be not so detrimental to TMR as predicted by ab initio calculations. On the contrary, the decrease of dislocations density in the MgO barrier of MTJs using Fe{sub 1?x}V{sub x} electrodes is shown to significantly increase TMR. Finally, unexpected transport properties in Fe{sub 1?X}Co{sub x}/MgO/Fe{sub 1?X}Co{sub x} (001) are presented. With the help of spin and symmetry resolved photoemission and ab initio calculation, the TMR decrease for Co content higher than 25% is shown to come from the existence of an interface state and the shift of the empty ?1 minority spin state towards the Fermi level.

  8. Molecular beam epitaxial growth of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanowires and nanoflakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knebl, G. M. Gessler, J. R.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2014-09-29

    Topological Insulators are in focus of immense research efforts and rapid scientific progress is obtained in that field. Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has proven to be a topological insulator material that provides a large band gap and a band structure with a single Dirac cone at the ?-point. This makes Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} one of the most promising three dimensional topological insulator materials. While Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanowires and nanoflakes so far were fabricated with different methods and for different purposes, we here present the first Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanowires as well as nanoflakes grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The nanostructures were nucleated on pretreated, silicon (100) wafers. Altering the growth conditions nanoflakes could be fabricated instead of nanowires; both with high crystalline quality, confirmed by scanning electron microscopy as well as transmission electron microscopy. These nanostructures have promise for spintronic devices and Majorana fermion observation in contact to superconductor materials.

  9. Growth and magnetic property of antiperovskite manganese nitride films doped with Cu by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Fengmei; Ren, Lizhu; Meng, Meng; Wang, Yunjia; Yang, Mei; Wu, Shuxiang; Li, Shuwei

    2014-04-07

    Manganese nitrides thin films on MgO (100) substrates with and without Cu-doping have been fabricated by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Antiperovskite compounds Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N have been grown in the case of Cu-doping, and the pure Mn{sub 3}N{sub 2} single crystal has been obtained without Cu-doping. The Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N exhibits ferrimagnetism, and the magnetization of Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N increases upon the temperature decreasing from 300?K to 5?K, similar to Mn{sub 4}N. The exchange bias (EB) effects emerge in the Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N films. The EB behavior is originated from the interfaces between ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N and antiferromagnetic metal Mn, which is verified to be formed by the data of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The present results not only provide a strategy for producing functional antiperovskite manganese nitrides, but also shed promising light on fabricating the exchange bias part of spintronic devices.

  10. Lattice-registered growth of GaSb on Si (211) with molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosseini Vajargah, S.; Botton, G. A.; Ghanad-Tavakoli, S.; Preston, J. S.; Kleiman, R. N.

    2012-11-01

    A GaSb film was grown on a Si(211) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy indicating full lattice relaxation as well as full lattice registration and dislocation-free growth in the plane perpendicular to the [01 - 1]-direction. Heteroepitaxy of GaSb on a Si(211) substrate is dominated by numerous first order and multiple higher order micro-twins. The atomic-resolved structural study of GaSb films by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy reveals that slight tilt, along with twinning, favors the lattice registry to Si(211) substrates. Preferential bonding of impinging Ga and Sb atoms at the interface due to two distinctive bonding sites on the Si(211) surface enables growth that is sublattice-ordered and free of anti-phase boundaries. The role of the substrate orientation on the strain distribution of GaSb epilayers is further elucidated by investigating the local change in the lattice parameter using the geometric phase analysis method and hence effectiveness of the lattice tilting in reducing the interfacial strain was confirmed further.

  11. Molecular fountain.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-09-01

    A molecular fountain directs slowly moving molecules against gravity to further slow them to translational energies that they can be trapped and studied. If the molecules are initially slow enough they will return some time later to the position from which they were launched. Because this round trip time can be on the order of a second a single molecule can be observed for times sufficient to perform Hz level spectroscopy. The goal of this LDRD proposal was to construct a novel Molecular Fountain apparatus capable of producing dilute samples of molecules at near zero temperatures in well-defined user-selectable, quantum states. The slowly moving molecules used in this research are produced by the previously developed Kinematic Cooling technique, which uses a crossed atomic and molecular beam apparatus to generate single rotational level molecular samples moving slowly in the laboratory reference frame. The Kinematic Cooling technique produces cold molecules from a supersonic molecular beam via single collisions with a supersonic atomic beam. A single collision of an atom with a molecule occurring at the correct energy and relative velocity can cause a small fraction of the molecules to move very slowly vertically against gravity in the laboratory. These slowly moving molecules are captured by an electrostatic hexapole guiding field that both orients and focuses the molecules. The molecules are focused into the ionization region of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and are ionized by laser radiation. The new molecular fountain apparatus was built utilizing a new design for molecular beam apparatus that has allowed us to miniaturize the apparatus. This new design minimizes the volumes and surface area of the machine allowing smaller pumps to maintain the necessary background pressures needed for these experiments.

  12. Defect study in molecular beam epitaxy-grown HgCdTe films with activated and unactivated arsenic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izhnin, I. I.; Dvoretsky, S. A.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Varavin, V. S.; Mynbaev, K. D.; Fitsych, O. I.; Pociask-Bialy, M.; Sheregii, E.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.

    2014-04-28

    A defect study was performed on molecular beam epitaxy-grown HgCdTe films in situ doped with arsenic. Doping was performed from either effusion cell or cracker cell, and studied were both as-grown samples and samples subjected to arsenic activation annealing. Electrical properties of the films were investigated with the use of ion milling as a means of “stirring” defects in the material. As a result of the study, it was confirmed that the most efficient incorporation of electrically active arsenic occurs at the cracking zone temperature of 700?°C. Interaction between arsenic and tellurium during the growth was observed and is discussed in the paper.

  13. Chirped-pulse manipulated carrier dynamics in low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Chao-Kuei, E-mail: chuckcklee@yahoo.com [Department of Photonics, National Sun-Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80400, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yuan-Yao [Department of Electrical Engineering, Institute of Photonics Technologies, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Lin, Sung-Hui [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Lin, Gong-Ru [Department of Electrical Engineering, Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Roosevelt Road, Sec. 4, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Pan, Ci-Ling [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Tsing Hwa University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China)

    2014-04-28

    Chirped pulse controlled carrier dynamics in low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaAs are investigated by degenerate pump-probe technique. Varying the chirped condition of excited pulse from negative to positive increases the carrier relaxation time so as to modify the dispersion and reshape current pulse in time domain. The spectral dependence of carrier dynamics is analytically derived and explained by Shockley-Read Hall model. This observation enables the new feasibility of controlling carrier dynamics in ultrafast optical devices via the chirped pulse excitations.

  14. Nucleation of single GaN nanorods with diameters smaller than 35 nm by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yen-Ting [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, S-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Araki, Tsutomu [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, 525-8577 Shiga (Japan)] [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, 525-8577 Shiga (Japan); Palisaitis, Justinas; Persson, Per O. Å.; Olof Holtz, Per; Birch, Jens [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, S-58183 Linköping (Sweden)] [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, S-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Chen, Li-Chyong [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kuei-Hsien [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Nanishi, Yasushi [Global Innovation Research Organization, Ritsumeikan University, 525-8577 Shiga (Japan)] [Global Innovation Research Organization, Ritsumeikan University, 525-8577 Shiga (Japan)

    2013-11-11

    Nucleation mechanism of catalyst-free GaN nanorod grown on Si(111) is investigated by the fabrication of uniform and narrow (<35 nm) nanorods without a pre-defined mask by molecular beam epitaxy. Direct evidences show that the nucleation of GaN nanorods stems from the sidewall of the underlying islands down to the Si(111) substrate, different from commonly reported ones on top of the island directly. Accordingly, the growth and density control of the nanorods is exploited by a “narrow-pass” approach that only narrow nanorod can be grown. The optimal size of surrounding non-nucleation area around single nanorod is estimated as 88 nm.

  15. Physical properties and band structure of reactive molecular beam epitaxy grown oxygen engineered HfO{sub 2{+-}x}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hildebrandt, Erwin; Kurian, Jose; Alff, Lambert [Institute of Materials Science, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-12-01

    We have conducted a detailed thin film growth structure of oxygen engineered monoclinic HfO{sub 2{+-}x} grown by reactive molecular beam epitaxy. The oxidation conditions induce a switching between (111) and (002) texture of hafnium oxide. The band gap of oxygen deficient hafnia decreases with increasing amount of oxygen vacancies by more than 1 eV. For high oxygen vacancy concentrations, defect bands form inside the band gap that induce optical transitions and p-type conductivity. The resistivity changes by several orders of magnitude as a function of oxidation conditions. Oxygen vacancies do not give rise to ferromagnetic behavior.

  16. Optical properties of strain-free AlN nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Q.; Zhao, S.; Connie, A. T.; Shih, I.; Mi, Z.; Gonzalez, T.; Andrews, M. P.; Du, X. Z.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2014-06-02

    The optical properties of catalyst-free AlN nanowires grown on Si substrates by molecular beam epitaxy were investigated. Such nanowires are nearly free of strain, with strong free exciton emission measured at room temperature. The photoluminescence intensity is significantly enhanced, compared to previously reported AlN epilayer. Moreover, the presence of phonon replicas with an energy separation of ?100?meV was identified to be associated with the surface-optical phonon rather than the commonly reported longitudinal-optical phonon, which is further supported by the micro-Raman scattering experiments.

  17. Investigation of Spin-Based Phenomena in Candidate Spintronic Materials by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swartz, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Phenomena in Candidate Spintronic Materials by MolecularPhenomena in Candidate Spintronic Materials by Molecularmolecules) and candidate spintronic mate- rials (i.e. GaAs,

  18. DESIGN OF A MOLECULAR BEAM SURFACE SCATTERING APPARATUS FOR VELOCITY AND ANGULAR DISTRIBUTION MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceyer, S.T.

    2013-01-01

    due to the beam load and outgassing, mainly H 2 less steelbulk of the stain~ The outgassing rate of the walls of theThis procedure reduces the outgassing rate of stainless i 2

  19. Low virial parameters in molecular clouds: Implications for high-mass star formation and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kauffmann, Jens; Pillai, Thushara [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Goldsmith, Paul F., E-mail: jens.kauffmann@astro.caltech.edu, E-mail: tpillai@astro.caltech.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    Whether or not molecular clouds and embedded cloud fragments are stable against collapse is of utmost importance for the study of the star formation process. Only 'supercritical' cloud fragments are able to collapse and form stars. The virial parameter ? = M {sub vir}/M, which compares the virial mass to the actual mass, provides one way to gauge stability against collapse. Supercritical cloud fragments are characterized by ? ? 2, as indicated by a comprehensive stability analysis considering perturbations in pressure and density gradients. Past research has suggested that virial parameters ? ? 2 prevail in clouds. This would suggest that collapse toward star formation is a gradual and relatively slow process and that magnetic fields are not needed to explain the observed cloud structure. Here, we review a range of very recent observational studies that derive virial parameters <<2 and compile a catalog of 1325 virial parameter estimates. Low values of ? are in particular observed for regions of high-mass star formation (HMSF). These observations may argue for a more rapid and violent evolution during collapse. This would enable 'competitive accretion' in HMSF, constrain some models of 'monolithic collapse', and might explain the absence of high-mass starless cores. Alternatively, the data could point at the presence of significant magnetic fields ?1 mG at high gas densities. We examine to what extent the derived observational properties might be biased by observational or theoretical uncertainties. For a wide range of reasonable parameters, our conclusions appear to be robust with respect to such biases.

  20. Laser-Driven Shock Acceleration of Ion Beams from Spherical Mass-Limited Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henig, A.; Kiefer, D.; Hoerlein, R.; Major, Zs.; Krausz, F.; Habs, D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany); Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Geissler, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Rykovanov, S. G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany); Moscow Physics Engineering Institute, Kashirskoe shosse 31, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ramis, R. [ETSI Aeronauticos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain); Osterhoff, J.; Veisz, L.; Karsch, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany); Schreiber, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany); Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-06

    We report on experimental studies of ion acceleration from spherical targets of diameter 15 {mu}m irradiated by ultraintense (1x10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) pulses from a 20-TW Ti:sapphire laser system. A highly directed proton beam with plateau-shaped spectrum extending to energies up to 8 MeV is observed in the laser propagation direction. This beam arises from acceleration in a converging shock launched by the laser, which is confirmed by 3-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The temporal evolution of the shock-front curvature shows excellent agreement with a two-dimensional radiation pressure model.

  1. Multiple-ion-beam time-of-flight mass spectrometer Andreas Rohrbacher and Robert E. Continettia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Continetti, Robert E.

    spot was simultaneously irradiated by a beam of quadrupled Nd:YLF laser radiation 261.75 nm to produce with this detector. Experiments were performed using both metal atom cations Ti and Cr produced by laser desorption discovery of new catalysts,2,3 and the human ge- nome project4 have opened ways to attack important prob

  2. Ultra-high frequency photoconductivity decay in GaAs/Ge/GaAs double heterostructure grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudait, M. K.; Zhu, Y. [Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Johnston, S. W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Maurya, D.; Priya, S. [Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems (CEHMS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems (CEHMS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Umbel, R. [Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2013-03-04

    GaAs/Ge/GaAs double heterostructures (DHs) were grown in-situ using two separate molecular beam epitaxy chambers. High-resolution x-ray rocking curve demonstrates a high-quality GaAs/Ge/GaAs heterostructure by observing Pendelloesung oscillations. The kinetics of the carrier recombination in Ge/GaAs DHs were investigated using photoconductivity decay measurements by the incidence excitation from the front and back side of 15 nm GaAs/100 nm Ge/0.5 {mu}m GaAs/(100)GaAs substrate structure. High-minority carrier lifetimes of 1.06-1.17 {mu}s were measured when excited from the front or from the back of the Ge epitaxial layer, suggests equivalent interface quality of GaAs/Ge and Ge/GaAs. Wavelength-dependent minority carrier recombination properties are explained by the wavelength-dependent absorption coefficient of Ge.

  3. Super-dense array of Ge quantum dots grown on Si(100) by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talochkin, A. B., E-mail: tal@isp.nsc.ru; Shklyaev, A. A. [A.V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Lavrentyev Avenue 13, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Mashanov, V. I. [A.V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Lavrentyev Avenue 13, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-14

    Ge layer grown on Si(100) at the low temperature of ?100?°C by molecular beam epitaxy is studied using scanning tunneling microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. It is found that crystalline and pseudomorphic to the Si substrate Ge islands are formed at the initial growth stage. The islands acquire the base size of 1.2–2.6?nm and they form arrays with the super-high density of (5–8)?×?10{sup 12}?cm{sup ?2} at 1–2?nm Ge coverages. Such a density is at least 10 times higher than that of Ge “hut” clusters grown via the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. It is shown that areas between the crystalline Ge islands are filled with amorphous Ge, which is suggested to create potential barrier for holes localized within the islands. As a result, crystalline Ge quantum dots appear being isolated from each other.

  4. Spinel-structured metal oxide on a substrate and method of making same by molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chambers, Scott A.

    2006-02-21

    A method of making a spinel-structured metal oxide on a substrate by molecular beam epitaxy, comprising the step of supplying activated oxygen, a first metal atom flux, and at least one other metal atom flux to the surface of the substrate, wherein the metal atom fluxes are individually controlled at the substrate so as to grow the spinel-structured metal oxide on the substrate and the metal oxide is substantially in a thermodynamically stable state during the growth of the metal oxide. A particular embodiment of the present invention encompasses a method of making a spinel-structured binary ferrite, including Co ferrite, without the need of a post-growth anneal to obtain the desired equilibrium state.

  5. High-efficiency Al sub 0. 22 Ga sub 0. 78 As solar cells grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melloch, M.R. (School of Electrical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (USA)); Tobin, S.P.; Bajgar, C. (Spire Corporation, Patriots Park, Bedford, MA (USA)); Keshavarzi, A.; Stellwag, T.B.; Lush, G.B.; Lundstrom, M.S. (School of Electrical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (USA)); Emery, K. (Solar Energy Research Institute, Golden, CO (USA))

    1990-07-02

    The quality of {ital pn} junction photodetectors made of Al{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As has been investigated as a first step in the optimization of tandem solar cells. We have obtained 1 sun AM1.5 efficiencies of 16.1% for 0.25 cm{sup 2} Al{sub 0.22}Ga{sub 0.78}As solar cells fabricated from molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) material. This efficiency is 3.2 percentage points higher than the previously best reported efficiency of 12.9% for an Al{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As solar cell fabricated from MBE material.

  6. Growth mode and strain relaxation of InAs on InP (111)A grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, H.; Daniels-Race, T.; Wang, Z.

    1999-03-01

    Growth mode and strain relaxation of molecular-beam-epitaxy grown InAs/InAlAs/InP (111)A system have been investigated using reflection high-energy electron diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and photoluminescence measurements. In direct contrast to the well-studied InAs/GaAs system, our experimental results show that the InAs grown on InAlAs/InP (111)A follows the Stranski{endash}Krastanov mode. Both self-organized InAs quantum dots and relaxed InAs islands are formed depending on the InAs coverage. Intense luminescence signals from both the InAs quantum dots and wetting layer are observed. The luminescence efficiency of (111)A samples is comparable to that of (001) samples, suggesting the feasibility of fabricating quantum dot optoelectronic devices on InP (111)A surfaces. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}/II-VI semiconductor heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Zhiyi Zhao, Lukas; Krusin-Elbaum, Lia; Garcia, Thor Axtmann; Tamargo, Maria C.; Hernandez-Mainet, Luis C.; Deng, Haiming

    2014-12-15

    Surfaces of three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs) have been proposed to host quantum phases at the interfaces with other types of materials, provided that the topological properties of interfacial regions remain unperturbed. Here, we report on the molecular beam epitaxy growth of II-VI semiconductor–TI heterostructures using c-plane sapphire substrates. Our studies demonstrate that Zn{sub 0.49}Cd{sub 0.51}Se and Zn{sub 0.23}Cd{sub 0.25}Mg{sub 0.52}Se layers have improved quality relative to ZnSe. The structures exhibit a large relative upward shift of the TI bulk quantum levels when the TI layers are very thin (?6nm), consistent with quantum confinement imposed by the wide bandgap II-VI layers. Our transport measurements show that the characteristic topological signatures of the Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} layers are preserved.

  8. Mg doping of GaN grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under nitrogen-rich conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Meng; Bhattacharya, Pallab; Guo Wei; Banerjee, Animesh [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Solid-State Electronics Laboratory, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

    2010-03-29

    Acceptor doping of GaN with Mg during plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, under N-rich conditions and a relatively high growth temperature of 740 deg. C, was investigated. The p-doping level steadily increases with increasing Mg flux. The highest doping level achieved, determined from Hall measurements, is 2.1x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. The corresponding doping efficiency and hole mobility are approx4.9% and 3.7 cm{sup 2}/V s at room temperature. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence measurements confirm good crystalline and optical quality of the Mg-doped layers. An InGaN/GaN quantum dot light emitting diode (lambda{sub peak}=529 nm) with p-GaN contact layers grown under N-rich condition exhibits a low series resistance of 9.8 OMEGA.

  9. Energy eigenfunctions for position-dependent mass particles in a new class of molecular Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christiansen, H. R.; Cunha, M. S.

    2014-09-15

    Based on recent results on quasi-exactly solvable Schrodinger equations, we review a new phenomenological potential class lately reported. In the present paper, we consider the quantum differential equations resulting from position-dependent mass (PDM) particles. We first focus on the PDM version of the hyperbolic potential V(x) = asech{sup 2}x + bsech{sup 4}x, which we address analytically with no restrictioon the parameters and the energies. This is the celebrated Manning potential, a double-well widely used in molecular physics, until now not investigated for PDM. We also evaluate the PDM version of the sixth power hyperbolic potential V(x) = asech{sup 6}x + bsech{sup 4}x for which we could find exact expressions under some special settings. Finally, we address a triple-well case V(x) = asech{sup 6}x + bsech{sup 4}x + csech{sup 2}x of particular interest for its connection to the new trends in atomtronics. The PDM Schrodinger equations studied in the present paper yield analytical eigenfunctions in terms of local Heun functions in its confluents forms. In all the cases PDM particles are more likely tunneling than ordinary ones. In addition, it is observed a merging of eigenstates when the mass becomes nonuniform.

  10. Graded InxGa1 xAs/GaAs 1.3 m wavelength light emitting diode structures grown with molecular beam epitaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graded InxGa1 xAs/GaAs 1.3 m wavelength light emitting diode structures grown with molecular beam 11 June 1997; accepted for publication 29 September 1997 In this study 1.1­1.3 m wavelength light at a lower cost. Such a technology could have an impact on the economic feasibility of fiber to the home

  11. New electric quadrupole transitions of K2 observed in a pulsed molecular beam: The 1 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Bongsoo

    been discussed previously.10 Briefly, we prepare K2 by expanding K atoms with Kr or Ar gas through a modified fuel injection valve. The temperature of the nozzle was maintained at 350 °C in this experiment-of-flight mass spectrometer. Since K has two naturally occurring iso- topes 39 K, 93.26%; 41 K, 6.73% , K2 has

  12. Atom probe tomography characterisation of a laser diode structure grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Samantha; Smeeton, Tim; Saxey, David; Smith, George; Hooper, Stewart; Heffernan, Jonathan; Humphreys, Colin; Oliver, Rachel

    2012-03-06

    ) and laser diodes (LDs) fabricated from gallium nitride (GaN) and the InxGa1-xN and AlyGa1-yN alloys are used in diverse technologies including lighting, televisions, mobile phones, optical storage systems and entertainment centers. The mass- market impact... silicon was used as the n-type dopant and bis-(cyclopentadienyl) magnesium (Cp2Mg) was used as the magnesium source for the p-type doping. All of the layers below the In0.18Ga0.82N QW were grown using ammonia as the source of nitrogen, the ammonia...

  13. Control of tensile strain and interdiffusion in Ge/Si(001) epilayers grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luong, T. K. P.; Dau, M. T.; Zrir, M. A.; Le Thanh, V.; Petit, M. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS CINaM-UMR 7325, F-13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France)] [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS CINaM-UMR 7325, F-13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Stoffel, M.; Rinnert, H. [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS UMR 7198, Nancy-Université, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France)] [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS UMR 7198, Nancy-Université, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France); Ghrib, A.; El Kurdi, M.; Boucaud, P. [Institut d'Electronique Fondamentale, CNRS UMR 8622, Université Paris-Sud, Ba-carett. 220, 91405 Orsay (France)] [Institut d'Electronique Fondamentale, CNRS UMR 8622, Université Paris-Sud, Ba-carett. 220, 91405 Orsay (France); Murota, J. [Research Institute of Electrical Communications, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)] [Research Institute of Electrical Communications, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2013-08-28

    Tensile-strained and n-doped Ge has emerged as a potential candidate for the realization of optoelectronic devices that are compatible with the mainstream silicon technology. Tensile-strained Ge/Si epilayers can be obtained by using the difference of thermal expansion coefficients between Ge and Si. We have combined various surface, structural, and compositional characterizations to investigate the growth mode and the strain state in Ge/Si epilayers grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The Ge growth was carried out using a two-step approach: a low-temperature growth to produce relaxed and smooth buffer layers, which is followed by a high-temperature growth to get high quality Ge layers. The existence of a substrate temperature window from 260 to 300 °C is evidenced, which allows to completely suppress the Ge/Si Stranski-Krastanov growth. As a consequence of the high temperature growth, a tensile strain lying in the range of 0.22%–0.24% is obtained. Concerning the effect of thermal annealing, it is shown that cyclic annealing may allow increasing the tensile strain up to 0.30%. Finally, we propose an approach to use carbon adsorption to suppress Si/Ge interdiffusion, which represents one of the main obstacles to overcome in order to realize pure Ge-based optoelectronic devices.

  14. Magnetic properties of MnSb inclusions formed in GaSb matrix directly during molecular beam epitaxial growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, Krystyna; Wolska, Anna; Klepka, Marcin T.; Kret, Slawomir; Kurowska, Boguslawa; Kowalski, Bogdan J.; Twardowski, Andrzej; Wasik, Dariusz; Kwiatkowski, Adam; Sadowski, Janusz

    2011-04-01

    Despite of intensive search for the proper semiconductor base materials for spintronic devices working at room temperature no appropriate material based on ferromagnetic semiconductors has been found so far. We demonstrate that the phase segregated system with MnSb hexagonal inclusions inside the GaSb matrix, formed directly during the molecular beam epitaxial growth reveals the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature and is a good candidate for exploitation in spintronics. Furthermore, the MnSb inclusions with only one crystalline structure were identified in this GaMn:MnSb granular material. The SQUID magnetometry confirmed that this material exhibits ferromagnetic like behavior starting from helium up to room temperature. Moreover, the magnetic anisotropy was found which was present also at room temperature, and it was proved that by choosing a proper substrate it is possible to control the direction of easy axis of inclusions' magnetization moment between in-plane and out-of-plane; the latter is important in view of potential applications in spintronic devices.

  15. Structural and optical properties of InGaN–GaN nanowire heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Limbach, F.; Gotschke, T.; Stoica, T.; Calarco, R.; Sutter, E.; Ciston, J.; Cusco, R.; Artus, L.; Kremling, S.; Ho?fling, S.; Worschech, L.; Gru?tzmacher, D.

    2011-01-01

    InGaN/GaN nanowire (NW) heterostructures grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied in comparison to their GaN and InGaN counterparts. The InGaN/GaN heterostructure NWs are composed of a GaN NW, a thin InGaN shell, and a multifaceted InGaN cap wrapping the top part of the GaN NW. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images taken from different parts of a InGaN/GaN NW show a wurtzite structure of the GaN core and the epitaxial InGaN shell around it, while additional crystallographic domains are observed whithin the InGaN cap region. Large changes in the lattice parameter along the wire, from pure GaN to higher In concentration demonstrate the successful growth of a complex InGaN/GaN NW heterostructure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these heterostructure NW ensembles show rather broad and intense emission peak at 2.1 eV. However, ?-PL spectra measured on single NWs reveal a reduced broadening of the visible luminescence. The analysis of the longitudinal optical phonon Raman peak position and its shape reveal a variation in the In content between 20% and 30%, in agreement with the values estimated by PL and HRTEM investigations. The reported studies are important for understanding of the growth and properties of NW heterostructures suitable for applications in optoelectronics and photovoltaics.

  16. First-principles studies on molecular beam epitaxy growth of GaAs1-xBix

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Luo, Guangfu; Yang, Shujiang; Li, Jincheng; Arjmand, Mehrdad; Szlufarska, Izabela; Brown, April S.; Kuech, Thomas F.; Morgan, Dane

    2015-07-14

    We investigate the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of GaAs1-xBix film using density functional theory with spin-orbit coupling to understand the growth of this film, especially the mechanisms of Bi incorporation. We study the stable adsorption structures and kinetics of the incident molecules (As? molecule, Ga atom, Bi atom, and Bi? molecule) on the (2 x 1)-Gasub||Bi surface and a proposed q(1 x 1)-Gasub||AsAs surface has a quasi-(1 x 1) As layer above the Ga-terminated GaAs substrate and a randomly oriented As dimer layer on top. We obtain the desorption and diffusion barriers of the adsorbed molecules and also themore »reaction barriers of three key processes related to Bi evolution, namely, Bi incorporation, As/Bi exchange, and Bi clustering. The results help explain the experimentally observed dependence of Bi incorporation on the As/Ga ratio and growth temperature. Furthermore, we find that As? exchange with Bi of the (2 x 1)-Gasub||Bi surface is a key step controlling the kinetics of the Bi incorporation. Finally, we explore two possible methods to enhance the Bi incorporation, namely, replacing the MBE growth mode from codeposition of all fluxes with a sequential deposition of fluxes and applying asymmetric in-plane strain to the substrate.« less

  17. Structural characterization of ZnO films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on sapphire with MgO buffer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pecz, B.; El-Shaer, A.; Bakin, A.; Mofor, A.-C.; Waag, A.; Stoemenos, J. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Institute of Semiconductor Technology, Technical University Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 66, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Physics Department, Aristotle University, University Campus, 54006 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2006-11-15

    The structural characteristics of the ZnO film grown on sapphire substrate using a thin MgO buffer layer were studied using transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution x-ray diffraction. The growth was carried out in a modified plasma-molecular beam epitaxy system. The observed misfit dislocations were well confined at the sapphire overgrown interface exhibiting domain matching epitaxy, where the integral multiples of lattice constants match across the interface. The main extended defects in the ZnO film were the threading dislocations having a mean density of 4x10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}. The formation of the MgO buffer layer as well as the ZnO growth were monitored in situ by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. The very thin {approx}1 nm, MgO buffer layer can partially interdiffuse with the ZnO as well as react with the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate forming an intermediate epitaxial layer having the spinel (MgO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) structure.

  18. Direct imaging of InSb (110)-(1x1) surface grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishima, T. D. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Center for Semiconductor Physics in Nanostructures, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy under a profile imaging condition (HR-profile TEM) was employed to determine the structural model for the InSb(110)-(1x1) relaxation surface grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). HR-profile TEM analyses indicate that the chevron model, which is widely accepted for zinc-blende-type III-V(110)-(1x1) surfaces prepared by cleavage, is also applicable to the InSb(110)-(1x1) surface prepared under an Sb-rich MBE condition. The assignment of atomic species (In or Sb) of InSb(110)-(1x1) surfaces was confirmed based on a HR-profile TEM image that captures the connected facets of InSb(110)-(1x1) and InSb(111)B-(2x2). On the basis of the well-known atomic species of InSb(111)B-(2x2), the atomic species of the InSb(110)-(1x1) surface were deduced straightforwardly: the atoms shifted upward and downward at the topmost layer of the InSb(110)-(1x1) surface are Sb and In, respectively. The atomic arrangements of the InSb(110)-(1x1)-InSb(111)B-(2x2) facet determined by HR-profile TEM may represent the atomic arrangements of zinc-blende-type III-V(331)B surfaces.

  19. The Relationship Between Molecular Gas, HI, and Star Formation in the Low-Mass, Low-Metallicity Magellanic Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jameson, Katherine E; Leroy, Adam K; Meixner, Margaret; Roman-Duval, Julia; Gordon, Karl; Hughes, Annie; Israel, Frank P; Rubio, Monica; Indebetouw, Remy; Madden, Suzanne C; Bot, Caroline; Hony, Sacha; Cormier, Diane; Pellegrini, Eric W; Galametz, Maud; Sonneborn, George

    2015-01-01

    The Magellanic Clouds provide the only laboratory to study the effect of metallicity and galaxy mass on molecular gas and star formation at high (~20 pc) resolution. We use the dust emission from HERITAGE Herschel data to map the molecular gas in the Magellanic Clouds, avoiding the known biases of CO emission as a tracer of H2. Using our dust-based molecular gas estimates, we find molecular gas depletion times of ~0.4 Gyr in the LMC and ~0.6 SMC at 1 kpc scales. These depletion times fall within the range found for normal disk galaxies, but are shorter than the average value, which could be due to recent bursts in star formation. We find no evidence for a strong intrinsic dependence of the molecular gas depletion time on metallicity. We study the relationship between gas and star formation rate across a range in size scales from 20 pc to ~1 kpc, including how the scatter in molecular gas depletion time changes with size scale, and discuss the physical mechanisms driving the relationships. We compare the metal...

  20. Characterization of the Molecular Composition of Secondary Organic Aerosols using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sellon, Rachel Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    mass spectrometry, Analytical Chemistry, 82(19), 7979-7986.mass spectrometry, Analytical Chemistry, 79(21), Altieri, K.of organic compounds, Analytical Chemistry, 35(13), 2146-&.

  1. Structural and optical properties of InGaN–GaN nanowire heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Limbach, F.; Gotschke, T.; Stoica, T.; Calarco, R.; Sutter, E.; Ciston, J.; Cusco, R.; Artus, L.; Kremling, S.; Ho?fling, S.; et al

    2011-01-01

    InGaN/GaN nanowire (NW) heterostructures grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied in comparison to their GaN and InGaN counterparts. The InGaN/GaN heterostructure NWs are composed of a GaN NW, a thin InGaN shell, and a multifaceted InGaN cap wrapping the top part of the GaN NW. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images taken from different parts of a InGaN/GaN NW show a wurtzite structure of the GaN core and the epitaxial InGaN shell around it, while additional crystallographic domains are observed whithin the InGaN cap region. Large changes in the lattice parameter along the wire, from pure GaNmore »to higher In concentration demonstrate the successful growth of a complex InGaN/GaN NW heterostructure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these heterostructure NW ensembles show rather broad and intense emission peak at 2.1 eV. However, ?-PL spectra measured on single NWs reveal a reduced broadening of the visible luminescence. The analysis of the longitudinal optical phonon Raman peak position and its shape reveal a variation in the In content between 20% and 30%, in agreement with the values estimated by PL and HRTEM investigations. The reported studies are important for understanding of the growth and properties of NW heterostructures suitable for applications in optoelectronics and photovoltaics.« less

  2. Enhancement of minority carrier lifetime of GaInP with lateral composition modulation structure grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, K. W.; Ravindran, Sooraj; Kang, S. J.; Hwang, H. Y.; Jho, Y. D.; Park, C. Y.; Jo, Y. R.; Kim, B. J.; Lee, Y. T.

    2014-07-28

    We report the enhancement of the minority carrier lifetime of GaInP with a lateral composition modulated (LCM) structure grown using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The structural and optical properties of the grown samples are studied by transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence, which reveal the formation of vertically aligned bright and dark slabs corresponding to Ga-rich and In-rich GaInP regions, respectively, with good crystal quality. With the decrease of V/III ratio during LCM GaInP growth, it is seen that the band gap of LCM GaInP is reduced, while the PL intensity remains high and is comparable to that of bulk GaInP. We also investigate the minority carrier lifetime of LCM structures made with different flux ratios. It is found that the minority carrier lifetime of LCM GaInP is ?37 times larger than that of bulk GaInP material, due to the spatial separation of electrons and holes by In-rich and Ga-rich regions of the LCM GaInP, respectively. We further demonstrate that the minority carrier lifetime of the grown LCM GaInP structures can easily be tuned by simply adjusting the V/III flux ratio during MBE growth, providing a simple yet powerful technique to tailor the electrical and optical properties at will. The exceptionally high carrier lifetime and the reduced band gap of LCM GaInP make them a highly attractive candidate for forming the top cell of multi-junction solar cells and can enhance their efficiency, and also make them suitable for other optoelectronics devices, such as photodetectors, where longer carrier lifetime is beneficial.

  3. Molecular beam epitaxy of GaNAs alloys with high As content for potential photoanode applications in hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novikov, S. V.; Staddon, C. R.; Foxon, C. T.; Yu, K. M.; Broesler, R.; Hawkridge, M.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Walukiewicz, W.; Denlinger, J.; Demchenko, I.

    2009-10-06

    The authors have succeeded in growing GaN1?xAsx alloys over a large composition range (0 < x < 0.8) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The enhanced incorporation of As was achieved by growing the films with high As{sub 2} flux at low (as low as 100 C) growth temperatures, which is much below the normal GaN growth temperature range. Using x-ray and transmission electron microscopy, they found that the GaNAs alloys with high As content x > 0.17 are amorphous. Optical absorption measurements together with x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy results reveal a continuous gradual decrease in band gap from -3.4 to < 1 eV with increasing As content. The energy gap reaches its minimum of -0.8 eV at x - 0.8. The composition dependence of the band gap of the crystalline GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} alloys follows the prediction of the band anticrossing model (BAC). However, our measured band gap of amorphous GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} with 0.3 < x < 0.8 are larger than that predicted by BAC. The results seem to indicate that for this composition range the amorphous GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} alloys have short-range ordering that resembles random crystalline GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} alloys. They have demonstrated the possibility of the growth of amorphous GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} layers with variable As content on glass substrates

  4. Electrical and photovoltaic properties of CdTe/ZnTe n-i-p junctions grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zielony, E., E-mail: eunika.zielony@pwr.edu.pl; P?aczek-Popko, E.; Racino, A.; Gumienny, Z. [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Olender, K.; Wosi?ski, T.; Karczewski, G.; Chusnutdinow, S. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-06-28

    Preliminary studies have been performed on photoelectrical properties of CdTe/ZnTe n-i-p junctions grown using the molecular beam epitaxy technique. Photovoltaic properties of the cells have been investigated by the measurements of current-voltage (I-V) characteristics under 1-sun illumination. I-V characteristics yield efficiencies of the cells varying from 3.4% to 4.9%. The low efficiency can be due to the presence of electrically active defects. In order to study the origin of defects in CdTe/ZnTe photovoltaic junctions, space charge techniques (C-V and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS)) have been applied. From the C-V measurements, a doping profile was calculated confirming charge accumulation in the i-CdTe layer. The results of the DLTS studies revealed the presence of four traps within a temperature range from 77–420?K. Three of them with activation energies equal to 0.22 eV, 0.45?eV, and 0.78?eV have been ascribed to the hole traps present in the i-CdTe material and their possible origin has been discussed. The fourth, high-temperature DLTS peak observed at ?350?K has been attributed to extended defects as its amplitude and temperature position depends on the value of the filling pulse width. It is assumed that the defects related to the trap are either located in the i-CdTe layer or at the i-CdTe/ZnTe interface. However, it was found that the trap exhibits twofold nature: it behaves as a majority or as a minority trap, depending on the filling pulse height, which is a characteristic feature of recombination centers. This trap is presumably responsible for the low efficiency of the cells.

  5. Facility for low-temperature spin-polarized-scanning tunneling microscopy studies of magnetic/spintronic materials prepared in situ by nitride molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Wang, Kangkang; Liu, Yinghao; Chen, Tianjiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur R.

    2014-04-15

    Based on the interest in, as well as exciting outlook for, nitride semiconductor based structures with regard to electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic applications, it is compelling to investigate these systems using the powerful technique of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), a technique capable of achieving magnetic resolution down to the atomic scale. However, the delicate surfaces of these materials are easily corrupted by in-air transfers, making it unfeasible to study them in stand-alone ultra-high vacuum STM facilities. Therefore, we have carried out the development of a hybrid system including a nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy/pulsed laser epitaxy facility for sample growth combined with a low-temperature, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope system. The custom-designed molecular beam epitaxy growth system supports up to eight sources, including up to seven effusion cells plus a radio frequency nitrogen plasma source, for epitaxially growing a variety of materials, such as nitride semiconductors, magnetic materials, and their hetero-structures, and also incorporating in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction. The growth system also enables integration of pulsed laser epitaxy. The STM unit has a modular design, consisting of an upper body and a lower body. The upper body contains the coarse approach mechanism and the scanner unit, while the lower body accepts molecular beam epitaxy grown samples using compression springs and sample skis. The design of the system employs two stages of vibration isolation as well as a layer of acoustic noise isolation in order to reduce noise during STM measurements. This isolation allows the system to effectively acquire STM data in a typical lab space, which during its construction had no special and highly costly elements included, (such as isolated slabs) which would lower the environmental noise. The design further enables tip exchange and tip coating without breaking vacuum, and convenient visual access to the sample and tip inside a superconducting magnet cryostat. A sample/tip handling system is optimized for both the molecular beam epitaxy growth system and the scanning tunneling microscope system. The sample/tip handing system enables in situ STM studies on epitaxially grown samples, and tip exchange in the superconducting magnet cryostat. The hybrid molecular beam epitaxy and low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy system is capable of growing semiconductor-based hetero-structures with controlled accuracy down to a single atomic-layer and imaging them down to atomic resolution.

  6. Investigation of the effect of intra-molecular interactions on the gas-phase conformation of peptides as probed by ion mobility-mass spectrometry, gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and molecular mechanics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sawyer, Holly Ann

    2006-04-12

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange ion molecule reactions and molecular modeling provide complimentary information and are used here for the characterization of peptide ion structure, including fine...

  7. Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

    2012-10-30

    The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

  8. Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

    2013-07-16

    The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

  9. Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos (Reston, VA); Nemes, Peter (Silver Spring, MD)

    2011-06-21

    The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

  10. Constant Temperature Constrained Molecular Dynamics: The Newton-Euler Inverse Mass Operator Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    the calculation of M -1 in (2) involves a computational cost scaling as N 3. Since the other parts of the calculation generally scale linearly in N, calculation of M -1 can become the dominant cost in the dynamics also examined the optimum mass, Q, determining the time scale (s) for exchange of energy with the heat

  11. Detection of high molecular weight organic tracers in vegetation smoke samples by high-temperature gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elias, V.O.; Simoneit, B.R.T. ); Pereira, A.S.; Cardoso, J.N. ); Cabral, J.A. )

    1999-07-15

    High-temperature high-resolution gas chromatography (HTGC) is an established technique for the separation of complex mixtures of high molecular weight (HMW) compounds which do not elute when analyzed on conventional GC columns. The combination of this technique with mass spectrometry is not so common and application to aerosols is novel. The HTGC and HTGC-MS analyses of smoke samples taken by particle filtration from combustion of different species of plants provided the characterization of various classes of HMW compounds reported to occur for the first time in emissions from biomass burning. Among these components are a series of wax esters with up to 58 carbon numbers, aliphatic hydrocarbons, triglycerides, long chain methyl ketones, alkanols and a series of triterpenyl fatty acid esters which have been characterized as novel natural products. Long chain fatty acids with more than 32 carbon numbers are not present in the smoke samples analyzed. The HMW compounds in smoke samples from the burning of plants from Amazonia indicate the input of directly volatilized natural products in the original plants during their combustion. However, the major organic compounds extracted from smoke consist of a series of lower molecular weight polar components, which are not natural products but the result of the thermal breakdown of cellulose and lignin. In contrast, the HMW natural products may be suitable tracers for specific sources of vegetation combustion because they are emitted as particles without thermal alternation in the smoke and can thus be related directly to the original plant material.

  12. Tracing Embedded Stellar Populations in Clusters and Galaxies using Molecular Emission: Methanol as a Signature of the Low-Mass End of the IMF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristensen, L E

    2015-01-01

    Most low-mass protostars form in clusters, in particular high-mass clusters; however, how low-mass stars form in high-mass clusters and what the mass distribution is, are still open questions both in our own Galaxy and elsewhere. To access the population of forming embedded low-mass protostars observationally, we propose to use molecular outflows as tracers. Because the outflow emission scales with mass, the effective contrast between low-mass protostars and their high-mass cousins is greatly lowered. In particular, maps of methanol emission at 338.4 GHz (J=7_0 - 6_0 A+) in low-mass clusters illustrate that this transition is an excellent probe of the low-mass population. We here present a model of a forming cluster where methanol emission is assigned to every embedded low-mass protostar. The resulting model image of methanol emission is compared to recent ALMA observations toward a high-mass cluster and the similarity is striking: the toy model reproduces observations to better than a factor of two and sugge...

  13. Properties of molecular beam epitaxy grown Eu{sub x}(transition metal){sub y} films (transition metals: Mn, Cr)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balin, K.; Nowak, A.; Gibaud, A.; Szade, J.; Celinski, Z.

    2011-04-01

    The electronic and crystallographic structures, as well as the magnetic properties, of Eu{sub x}(transition metal){sub y} (transition metals: Mn, Cr) thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy were studied. Relative changes of the Eu/Mn and Eu/Cr ratios derived from the XPS lines, as well as x-ray reflectivity, indicate mixing of the Eu/Mn and Eu/Cr layers. Valency transitions from Eu{sup 2+} to Eu{sup 3+} were observed in both systems for most studied stoichiometries. A transition to a magnetically ordered phase was observed at 15 K, 40 K, and 62 K for selected films in the Eu-Mn system, and at 50 K for the film with a Eu/Cr ratio of 0.5.

  14. The relationship between depth-resolved composition and strain relaxation in InAlN and InGaN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiao, Wenyuan; Kong, Wei; Li, Jincheng; Kim, Tong-Ho; Brown, April S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Collar, Kristen [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2013-10-14

    A study of the relationship between strain and the incorporation of group III elements in ternary InGaN and InAlN grown by molecular beam epitaxy is reported. Using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy compositional depth profiles with x-ray diffraction, we are able to find a clear relationship between strain and In incorporation including tensile-strained InAlN which has, to date, not been studied. The results show that fully strained films contain homogeneous indium composition while partially relaxed films have a non-homogeneous indium composition with depth. These results can be interpreted by considering the impurity formation energies of indium in host lattices.

  15. Low density of self-assembled InAs quantum dots grown by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy on InP(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupuy, E.; Regreny, P.; Robach, Y.; Gendry, M.; Chauvin, N.; Tranvouez, E.; Bremond, G.; Bru-Chevallier, C.; Patriarche, G.

    2006-09-18

    The authors report on a postgrowth method to obtain low density InAs/InP(001) quantum dots by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. They used an approach based on the ripening of the InAs sticks, which is triggered by the sample cooling under arsenic overpressure, before InP capping. Atomic force microscopy images show the evolution of InAs islands from sticks oriented along the [1-10] direction to dot-shaped islands with a density that can be reduced to about 2x10{sup 9} dots/cm{sup 2}. Macro- and microphotoluminescence reveal that these diluted InAs dots exhibit a strong spatial confinement and emit in the 1.55 {mu}m range.

  16. Double capping of molecular beam epitaxy grown InAs/InP quantum dots studied by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulloa, J. M.; Koenraad, P. M.; Gapihan, E.; Letoublon, A.; Bertru, N.

    2007-08-13

    Cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy was used to study at the atomic scale the double capping process of self-assembled InAs/InP quantum dots (QDs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a (311)B substrate. The thickness of the first capping layer is found to play a mayor role in determining the final results of the process. For first capping layers up to 3.5 nm, the height of the QDs correspond to the thickness of the first capping layer. Nevertheless, for thicknesses higher than 3.5 nm, a reduction in the dot height compared to the thickness of the first capping layer is observed. These results are interpreted in terms of a transition from a double capping to a classical capping process when the first capping layer is thick enough to completely cover the dots.

  17. Electrical performance of phase change memory cells with Ge{sub 3}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 6} deposited by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boschker, Jos E.; Riechert, Henning; Calarco, Raffaella; Boniardi, Mattia; Redaelli, Andrea

    2015-01-12

    Here, we report on the electrical characterization of phase change memory cells containing a Ge{sub 3}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 6} (GST) alloy grown in its crystalline form by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). It is found that the high temperature growth on the amorphous substrate results in a polycrystalline film exhibiting a rough surface with a grain size of approximately 80–150?nm. A detailed electrical characterization has been performed, including I-V characteristic curves, programming curves, set operation performance, crystallization activation at low temperature, and resistance drift, in order to determine the material related parameters. The results indicate very good alignment of the electrical parameters with the current state-of-the-art GST, deposited by physical vapor deposition. Such alignment enables a possible employment of the MBE deposition technique for chalcogenide materials in the phase change memory technology, thus leading to future studies of as-deposited crystalline chalcogenides as integrated in electrical vehicles.

  18. Growth, steady-state, and time-resolved photoluminescence study of CdTe/MgCdTe double heterostructures on InSb substrates using molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiNezza, Michael J.; Liu, Shi; Kirk, Alexander P.; Zhang, Yong-Hang [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States) [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Zhao, Xin-Hao [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States) [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2013-11-04

    CdTe/MgCdTe double heterostructures (DHs) are grown on InSb substrates using molecular beam epitaxy and reveal strong photoluminescence with over double the intensity of a GaAs/AlGaAs DH with an identical layer structure design grown on GaAs. Time-resolved photoluminescence of the CdTe/MgCdTe DH gives a Shockley-Read-Hall recombination lifetime of 86 ns, which is more than one order of magnitude longer than that of typical polycrystalline CdTe films. These findings indicate that monocrystalline CdTe/MgCdTe DHs effectively reduce surface recombination, have limited nonradiative interface recombination, and are promising for solar cells that could reach power conversion efficiencies similar to that of GaAs.

  19. Tellurium n-type doping of highly mismatched amorphous GaN1-xAsx alloys in plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Novikov, S. V.; Ting, M.; Yu, K. M.; Sarney, W. L.; Martin, R. W.; Svensson, S. P.; Walukiewicz, W.; Foxon, C. T.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we report our study on n-type Te doping of amorphous GaN1-xAsx layers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. We have used a low temperature PbTe source as a source of tellurium. Reproducible and uniform tellurium incorporation in amorphous GaN1-xAsx layers has been successfully achieved with a maximum Te concentration of 9×10²? cm?³. Tellurium incorporation resulted in n-doping of GaN1-xAsx layers with Hall carrier concentrations up to 3×10¹? cm?³ and mobilities of ~1 cm²/V s. The optimal growth temperature window for efficient Te doping of the amorphous GaN1-xAsx layers has been determined.

  20. Infrared reflectivity spectra of gas-source molecular beam epitaxy grown dilute InN{sub x}As{sub 1-x}/InP (001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talwar, Devki N. [Department of Physics, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 975 Oakland Avenue, 56 Weyandt Hall, Indiana, Pennsylvania 15705-1087 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 975 Oakland Avenue, 56 Weyandt Hall, Indiana, Pennsylvania 15705-1087 (United States); Yang, Tzuen-Rong [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 106-11, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 106-11, Taiwan (China); Hsiung Lin, Hao; Chuan Feng, Zhe [Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering and Center for Engineering Material and Advanced Devices National Taiwan University, Taipei 106-17, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering and Center for Engineering Material and Advanced Devices National Taiwan University, Taipei 106-17, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-04

    Vibrational spectra of gas-source molecular beam epitaxy grown dilute InN{sub x}As{sub 1-x}/InP (001) alloys are obtained using a Fourier-transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy. A triply degenerate N{sub As} local vibrational mode of T{sub d}-symmetry is observed near 438 cm{sup -1} corresponding to the In-N bond energy. The analysis of composition dependent infrared reflectivity spectra in InNAs has predicted a two-phonon-mode behavior. In In(Ga)-rich GaInNAs alloys the observed splitting of the N{sub As} local mode into a doublet for the N{sub As}-Ga{sub 1}(In{sub 1})In{sub 3}(Ga{sub 3}) pair-defect of C{sub 3v}-symmetry is consistent with our simulated results based on a sophisticated Green's function theory.

  1. Molecular Gas in Early-type Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alatalo, Katherine Anne

    2012-01-01

    toward the center (first seen in the molecular gas in A+3.4 Molecular Gas Mass . . . . . . .of the molecular gas . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.3 Mass of

  2. CROSSED MOLECULAR BEAM STUDIES OF CHEMILUMINESCENT REACTIONS: F{sub 2} + I{sub 2}, Br{sub 2} and ICl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahler, C.C.; Lee, Y.T.

    1980-05-01

    The chemiluminescent bimolecular halogen-halogen reactions, F{sub 2} + I{sub 2}, Br{sub 2} and ICl, have been studied by the crossed molecular beam technique. Undispersed chemiluminescence was measured as a function of collision energy and, for I{sub 2} + F{sub 2}, as a function of the two beam pressures. Although no spectra were obtained to positively identify the emitters as IF*, ClF* and BrF*, arguments are given to support this identification. The observed reaction thresholds of 4.2 and 5.9 kcal/mole for I{sub 2} + F{sub 2} and ICl + F{sub 2} , respectively, are the same as the threshold energies for production of the stable trihalogens I{sub 2}F and ClF. This coincidence of threshold energies, as well as similar high collision energy behavior, implies that the chemiluminescent reaction proceeds via a stable trihalogen intermediate. This mechanism can explain our results and the results of other workers without resorting to a symmetry forbidden four center reaction mechanism. A threshold of 11.3 kcal/mole was found for Br{sub 2} + F{sub 2} , no threshold for Br{sub 2}F has been previously reported. Laser enhancement of the I{sub 2} + F{sub 2} reaction was attempted, but no enhancement was seen.

  3. Structural anisotropic properties of a-plane GaN epilayers grown on r-plane sapphire by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lotsari, A.; Kehagias, Th.; Katsikini, M.; Arvanitidis, J.; Ves, S.; Komninou, Ph.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Tsiakatouras, G.; Tsagaraki, K.; Georgakilas, A.; Christofilos, D.

    2014-06-07

    Heteroepitaxial non-polar III-Nitride layers may exhibit extensive anisotropy in the surface morphology and the epilayer microstructure along distinct in-plane directions. The structural anisotropy, evidenced by the “M”-shape dependence of the (112{sup ¯}0) x-ray rocking curve widths on the beam azimuth angle, was studied by combining transmission electron microscopy observations, Raman spectroscopy, high resolution x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy in a-plane GaN epilayers grown on r-plane sapphire substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE). The structural anisotropic behavior was attributed quantitatively to the high dislocation densities, particularly the Frank-Shockley partial dislocations that delimit the I{sub 1} intrinsic basal stacking faults, and to the concomitant plastic strain relaxation. On the other hand, isotropic samples exhibited lower dislocation densities and a biaxial residual stress state. For PAMBE growth, the anisotropy was correlated to N-rich (or Ga-poor) conditions on the surface during growth, that result in formation of asymmetric a-plane GaN grains elongated along the c-axis. Such conditions enhance the anisotropy of gallium diffusion on the surface and reduce the GaN nucleation rate.

  4. The molecular emissions and the infall motion in the high-mass young stellar object G8.68-0.37

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhiyuan; Zhu, Ming; Liu, Tie; Peng, Ruisheng; Shengli,; Qin,; Li, Lixin

    2012-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength observational study towards the high-mass young stellar object G8.68-0.37. A single massive gas-and-dust core is observed in the (sub)millimeter continuum and molecular line emissions. We fitted the spectral energy distribution (SED) from the dust continuum emission. The best-fit SED suggests the presence of two components with temperature of $T_{\\rm d}=20$ K and 120 K, respectively. The core has a total mass of up to $1.5\\times10^3$ $M_{\\odot}$ and bolometric luminosity of $2.3\\times10^4 L_{\\odot}$. Both the mass and luminosity are dominated by the cold component ($T_{\\rm d}=20$ K). The molecular lines of C$^{18}$O, C$^{34}$S, DCN, and thermally excited CH$_3$OH are detected in this core. Prominent infall signatures are observed in the $^{12}$CO $(1-0)$ and $(2-1)$. We estimated an infall velocity of 0.45 km s$^{-1}$ and mass infall rate of $7\\times10^{-4} M_{\\odot}$ year$^{-1}$. From the molecular lines, we have found a high DCN abundance and relative abundance ratio to HCN. Th...

  5. Highly Reproducible Laser Beam Scanning Device for an Internal Source Laser Desorption Microprobe Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Jill Rennee; Tremblay, Paul Leland

    2002-03-01

    Traditionally, mass spectrometry has relied on manipulating the sample target to provide scanning capabilities for laser desorption microprobes. This has been problematic for an internal source laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometer (LD-FTMS) because of the high magnetic field (7 Tesla) and geometric constraints of the superconducting magnet bore. To overcome these limitations, we have implemented a unique external laser scanning mechanism for an internal source LD-FTMS. This mechanism provides adjustable resolution enhancement so that the spatial resolution at the target is not limited to that of the stepper motors at the light source (~5 µm/step). The spatial resolution is now limited by the practical optical diffraction limit of the final focusing lens. The scanning mechanism employs a virtual source that is wavelength independent up to the final focusing lens, which can be controlled remotely to account for focal length dependence on wavelength. A binary index provides an automatic alignment feature. The virtual source is located ~9 ft from the sample; therefore, it is completely outside of the vacuum system and beyond the 50 G line of the fringing magnetic field. To eliminate reproducibility problems associated with vacuum pump vibrations, we have taken advantage of the magnetic field inherent to the FTMS to utilize Lenz's law for vibrational dampening. The LD-FTMS microprobe has exceptional reproducibility, which enables successive mapping sequences for depth-profiling studies.

  6. Energy band alignment of atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} on epitaxial (110)Ge grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudait, M. K.; Zhu, Y. [Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Maurya, D.; Priya, S. [Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems (CEHMS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems (CEHMS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2013-03-04

    The band alignment properties of atomic layer HfO{sub 2} film deposited on epitaxial (110)Ge, grown by molecular beam epitaxy, was investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy exhibited a sharp interface between the (110)Ge epilayer and the HfO{sub 2} film. The measured valence band offset value of HfO{sub 2} relative to (110)Ge was 2.28 {+-} 0.05 eV. The extracted conduction band offset value was 2.66 {+-} 0.1 eV using the bandgaps of HfO{sub 2} of 5.61 eV and Ge bandgap of 0.67 eV. These band offset parameters and the interface chemical properties of HfO{sub 2}/(110)Ge system are of tremendous importance for the design of future high hole mobility and low-power Ge-based metal-oxide transistor devices.

  7. Electrical spin injection into InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells: A comparison between MgO tunnel barriers grown by sputtering and molecular beam epitaxy methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barate, P.; Zhang, T. T.; Vidal, M.; Renucci, P.; Marie, X.; Amand, T. [Université de Toulouse, INSA-CNRS-UPS, LPCNO, 135 avenue de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse (France); Liang, S.; Devaux, X.; Hehn, M.; Mangin, S.; Lu, Y., E-mail: yuan.lu@univ-lorraine.fr [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, CNRS-Nancy Université, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Frougier, J.; Jaffrès, H.; George, J. M. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales and Université Paris-Sud 11, 1 avenue A. Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Xu, B.; Wang, Z. [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Zheng, Y. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, UPMC, CNRS UMR 7588, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Tao, B. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, CNRS-Nancy Université, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Han, X. F. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-07-07

    An efficient electrical spin injection into an InGaAs/GaAs quantum well light emitting diode is demonstrated thanks to a CoFeB/MgO spin injector. The textured MgO tunnel barrier is fabricated by two different techniques: sputtering and molecular beam epitaxy. The maximal spin injection efficiency is comparable for both methods. Additionally, the effect of annealing is also investigated for the two types of samples. Both samples show the same trend: an increase of the electroluminescence circular polarization (P{sub c}) with the increase of annealing temperature, followed by a saturation of P{sub c} beyond 350?°C annealing. Since the increase of P{sub c} starts well below the crystallization temperature of the full CoFeB bulk layer, this trend could be mainly due to an improvement of chemical structure at the top CoFeB/MgO interface. This study reveals that the control of CoFeB/MgO interface is essential for an optimal spin injection into semiconductor.

  8. Electronic structure, morphology and emission polarization of enhanced symmetry InAs quantum-dot-like structures grown on InP substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mary?ski, A.; S?k, G.; Musia?, A.; Andrzejewski, J.; Misiewicz, J.; Gilfert, C.; Reithmaier, J. P.; Capua, A.; Karni, O.; Gready, D.; Eisenstein, G.; Atiya, G.; Kaplan, W. D.; Kölling, S.

    2013-09-07

    The optical and structural properties of a new kind of InAs/InGaAlAs/InP quantum dot (QD)-like objects grown by molecular beam epitaxy have been investigated. These nanostructures were found to have significantly more symmetrical shapes compared to the commonly obtained dash-like geometries typical of this material system. The enhanced symmetry has been achieved due to the use of an As{sub 2} source and the consequent shorter migration length of the indium atoms. Structural studies based on a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) provided detailed information on both the structure and composition distribution within an individual nanostructure. However, it was not possible to determine the lateral aspect ratio from STEM or APT. To verify the in-plane geometry, electronic structure calculations, including the energy levels and transition oscillator strength for the QDs have been performed using an eight-band k·p model and realistic system parameters. The results of calculations were compared to measured polarization-resolved photoluminescence data. On the basis of measured degree of linear polarization of the surface emission, the in-plane shape of the QDs has been assessed proving a substantial increase in lateral symmetry. This results in quantum-dot rather than quantum-dash like properties, consistent with expectations based on the growth conditions and the structural data.

  9. Photoconduction efficiencies and dynamics in GaN nanowires grown by chemical vapor deposition and molecular beam epitaxy: A comparison study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, R. S. [Graduate Institute of Applied Science and Technology, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Tsai, H. Y. [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Huang, Y. S. [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Chen, Y. T. [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, L. C. [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, K. H. [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2012-09-10

    The normalized gains, which determines the intrinsic photoconduction (PC) efficiencies, have been defined and compared for the gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires (NWs) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). By excluding the contributions of experimental parameters and under the same light intensity, the CVD-grown GaN NWs exhibit the normalized gain which is near two orders of magnitude higher than that of the MBE-ones. The temperature-dependent time-resolved photocurrent measurement further indicates that the higher photoconduction efficiency in the CVD-GaN NWs is originated from the longer carrier lifetime induced by the higher barrier height ({phi}{sub B} = 160 {+-} 30 mV) of surface band bending. In addition, the experimentally estimated barrier height at 20 {+-} 2 mV for the MBE-GaN NWs, which is much lower than the theoretical value, is inferred to be resulted from the lower density of charged surface states on the non-polar side walls.

  10. Improved Performance of GaInNAs Solar Cells Grown by Molecular-Beam Epitaxy Using Increased Growth Rate Instead of Surfactants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ptak, A. J.; France, R.; Jiang, C. S.; Romero, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    GaInNAs is potentially useful for increasing the conversion efficiency of multijunction solar cells if low photocurrents and photovoltages can be increased. Wide-depletion width devices generate significant photocurrents using an n-i-p structure grown by molecular-beam epitaxy, but these wide depletion widths are only realized in a region of parameter space that leads to rough surface morphologies. Surfactants are effective at reducing the surface roughness, but lead to increased defect densities and changes in the net acceptor or donor concentration. Here, we show that increasing the growth rate of GaInNAs solar cells leads to smooth surfaces without the use of a surfactant, even at high In compositions and substrate temperatures. No degradation in material quality is observed when increasing the growth rate from 1.5 to 3.0 {micro}m/h, but a shunt resistance does appear for the high-growth-rate samples. This shunt is attributed to increased spitting of the Ga cell, leading to an increase in the oval defect density, at the higher effusion cell temperatures used to achieve high growth rates. As with the case of Bi in GaInNAs, increased growth rates also appear to increase the net donor concentration, but it is not clear if these effects have the same cause.

  11. Effect of Ag addition to L1{sub 0} FePt and L1{sub 0} FePd films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokuoka, Y.; Seto, Y.; Kato, T.; Iwata, S.

    2014-05-07

    L1{sub 0} ordered FePt-Ag (5?nm) and FePd-Ag (5?nm) films were grown on MgO (001) substrate at temperatures of 250–400?°C by using molecular beam epitaxy method, and their crystal and surface structures, perpendicular magnetic anisotropies and Curie temperatures were investigated. In the case of FePt-Ag, Ag addition with the amount of 10–20 at.?% was effective to promote L1{sub 0} ordering and granular growth, resulting in the increase of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and coercivity of the FePt-Ag films. On the other hand, in the case of FePd-Ag, Ag addition changed the surface morphology from island to continuous film associated with the reductions of its coercivity and perpendicular anisotropy. The variations of lattice constants and Curie temperature with Ag addition were significantly different between FePt-Ag and FePd-Ag. For FePd-Ag, the c and a axes lattice spacings and Curie temperature gradually changed with increasing Ag content, while they unchanged for FePt-Ag. These results suggest the possibility of the formation of FePdAg alloy in FePd-Ag, while Ag segregation in FePt-Ag.

  12. Compact hydrogen/helium isotope mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM); McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Scime, Earl E. (Morgantown, WV)

    1996-01-01

    The compact hydrogen and helium isotope mass spectrometer of the present invention combines low mass-resolution ion mass spectrometry and beam-foil interaction technology to unambiguously detect and quantify deuterium (D), tritium (T), hydrogen molecule (H.sub.2, HD, D.sub.2, HT, DT, and T.sub.2), .sup.3 He, and .sup.4 He concentrations and concentration variations. The spectrometer provides real-time, high sensitivity, and high accuracy measurements. Currently, no fieldable D or molecular speciation detectors exist. Furthermore, the present spectrometer has a significant advantage over traditional T detectors: no confusion of the measurements by other beta-emitters, and complete separation of atomic and molecular species of equivalent atomic mass (e.g., HD and .sup.3 He).

  13. High-energy accelerator for beams of heavy ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Ronald L. (La Grange, IL); Arnold, Richard C. (Chicago, IL)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for accelerating heavy ions to high energies and directing the accelerated ions at a target comprises a source of singly ionized heavy ions of an element or compound of greater than 100 atomic mass units, means for accelerating the heavy ions, a storage ring for accumulating the accelerated heavy ions and switching means for switching the heavy ions from the storage ring to strike a target substantially simultaneously from a plurality of directions. In a particular embodiment the heavy ion that is accelerated is singly ionized hydrogen iodide. After acceleration, if the beam is of molecular ions, the ions are dissociated to leave an accelerated singly ionized atomic ion in a beam. Extraction of the beam may be accomplished by stripping all the electrons from the atomic ion to switch the beam from the storage ring by bending it in magnetic field of the storage ring.

  14. Molecular Characterization of Organosulfates in Organic Aerosols from Shanghai and Los Angeles Urban Areas by Nanospray-Desorption Electrospray Ionization High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Shikang; Lu, Xiaohui; Levac, Nicole A.; Bateman, Adam P.; Nguyen, Tran B.; Bones, David L.; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Yang, Xin

    2014-08-21

    Aerosol samples collected in the urban areas of Shanghai and Los Angeles were analyzed by nanospray-desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano-DESI MS) with high mass resolution (m/?m=100,000). Solvent mixtures of acetonitrile/water and acetonitrile/toluene were used to extract and ionize polar and non-polar compounds, respectively. A diverse mixture of oxygenated hydrocarbons, organosulfates, organonitrates, and organics with reduced nitrogen were detected in the Los Angeles sample. Majority of the organics in the Shanghai sample were detected as organosulfates. The dominant organosulfates in the two samples have distinctly different molecular characteristics. Specifically, organosulfates in the Los Angeles sample were dominated by isoprene- or monoterpene-derived products, while organosulfates of yet unknown origin in the Shanghai sample had distinctive characteristics of long aliphatic carbon chains and low degree of oxidation and unsaturation. The use of acetonitrile/toluene solvent facilitated identification of this type of organosulfates, suggesting they could be missed in previous studies relying on sample extraction using common polar solvents. The high molecular weight and low degree of unsaturation and oxidization of the organosulfates detected in the Shanghai sample suggest that they may act as surfactants, and plausibly affect the surface tension and hygroscopicity of the atmospheric particulate matter. We propose that direct esterification of carbonyl or hydroxyl compounds by sulfates or sulfuric acid in liquid phase could be the formation pathway of these special organosulfates. Long-chain alkanes from vehicle emissions might be their precursors.

  15. Interface Film Resistivities for Heat and Mass TransferssIntegral Relations Verified by Non-equilibrium Molecular Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjelstrup, Signe

    Interface Film Resistivities for Heat and Mass TransferssIntegral Relations Verified by Non; In Final Form: July 6, 2006 Integral relations that predict interface film transfer coefficients) the interface film, where transport processes are driven by jumps in temperature and chemical potential; and (3

  16. GAS KINEMATICS AND THE DRAGGED MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE HIGH-MASS MOLECULAR OUTFLOW SOURCE G192.16-3.84: AN SMA VIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Hauyu Baobab; Ho, Paul T. P. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Qiu Keping [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang Qizhou [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai, (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciencies, C5p 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    We report Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of polarized 0.88 mm thermal dust emission and various molecular line transitions toward the early B-type (L{sub *} {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} L{sub Sun }) star-forming region G192.16-3.84 (IRAS 05553+1631). The peak of the continuum Stokes-I emission coincides with a hot rotating disk/envelope (SO{sub 2} rotational temperature T{sub rot}{sup SO{sub 2}}{approx}84{sup +18}{sub -13} K), with a north-south velocity gradient. Joint analysis of the rotation curve traced by HCO{sup +} 4-3 and SO{sub 2} 19{sub 1,19}-18{sub 0,18} suggests that the dense molecular gas is undergoing a spinning-up rotation, marginally bound by the gravitational force of an enclosed mass M{sub *+gas+dust} {approx} 11.2-25.2 M{sub Sun }. Perpendicular to the rotational plane, a {approx}>100/cos (i) km s{sup -1} (i {approx} 63 Degree-Sign ) high velocity molecular jet and a {approx}15-20 km s{sup -1} expanding biconical cavity were revealed in the CO 3-2 emission. The polarization percentage of the 0.88 mm continuum emission decreases toward the central rotating disk/envelope. The polarization angle in the inner {approx}2'' (0.015 pc) disk/envelope is perpendicular to the plane of the rotation. The magnetic field lines, which are predominantly in the toroidal direction along the disk plane, are likely to be dragged by the gravitationally accelerated rotation.

  17. High external quantum efficiency and fill-factor InGaN/GaN heterojunction solar cells grown by NH3-based molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lang, J. R.; Neufeld, C. J.; Hurni, C. A.; Cruz, S. C.; Matioli, E.; Mishra, U. K.; Speck, J. S.

    2011-04-01

    High external quantum efficiency (EQE) p-i-n heterojunction solar cellsgrown by NH3 -based molecular beam epitaxy are presented. EQE values including optical losses are greater than 50% with fill-factors over 72% when illuminated with a 1 sun AM0 spectrum. Optical absorptionmeasurements in conjunction with EQE measurements indicate an internal quantum efficiency greater than 90% for the InGaN absorbing layer. By adjusting the thickness of the top p-type GaN window contact layer, it is shown that the short-wavelength (<365 nm) quantum efficiency is limited by the minority carrier diffusion length in highly Mg-doped p-GaN.

  18. Two-dimensional weak anti-localization in Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film grown on Si(111)-(7 Multiplication-Sign 7) surface by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Anupam; Guchhait, Samaresh; Sonde, Sushant; Dey, Rik; Pramanik, Tanmoy; Rai, Amritesh; Movva, Hema C. P.; Banerjee, Sanjay K. [Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States)] [Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States); Colombo, Luigi [Texas Instruments, 12500 TI Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75266 (United States)] [Texas Instruments, 12500 TI Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75266 (United States)

    2013-04-22

    We report on low temperature transport studies of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} topological insulator thin films grown on Si(111)-(7 Multiplication-Sign 7) surface by molecular beam epitaxy. A sharp increase in the magnetoresistance with magnetic field at low temperature indicates the existence of weak anti-localization. The measured weak anti-localization effect agrees well with the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka model, and the extracted phase coherence length shows a power-law dependence with temperature indicating the existence of a two-dimensional system. An insulating ground state has also been observed at low temperature showing a logarithmic divergence of the resistance that appears to be the influence of electron-electron interaction in a two-dimensional system.

  19. BEAM PROPAGATOR

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003691MLTPL00 Beam Propagator for Weather Radars, Modules 1 and 2  http://www.exelisvis.com/ProductsServices/IDL.aspx 

  20. Effects of Ion Beam on Nanoindentation Characteristics of Glassy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; BRAZIL; CARBON; CARBONIZATION; CHAINS; GOLD; HARDNESS; HEAT TREATMENTS; ION BEAMS; MODIFICATIONS; OXYGEN; RECOMBINATION; RESINS; SILICON; TAIL...

  1. Structure and magnetism in strained Ge{sub 1-x-y}Sn{sub x}Mn{sub y} films grown on Ge(001) by low temperature molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prestat, E. [INAC, SP2M, CEA and Universite Joseph Fourier, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Laboratorium fuer Elektronenmikroskopie, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Barski, A.; Bellet-Amalric, E.; Morel, R.; Tainoff, D.; Jain, A.; Porret, C.; Bayle-Guillemaud, P.; Jamet, M. [INAC, SP2M, CEA and Universite Joseph Fourier, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Jacquot, J.-F. [INAC, SCIB, CEA and Universite Joseph Fourier, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2013-07-01

    In this letter, we study the structural and magnetic properties of Ge{sub 1-x-y}Sn{sub x}Mn{sub y} films grown on Ge(001) by low temperature molecular beam epitaxy using X-ray diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and superconducting quantum interference device. Like in Mn doped Ge films, Mn atoms diffuse during the growth and aggregate into vertically aligned Mn-rich nanocolumns of a few nanometers in diameter. Transmission electron microscopy observations in plane view clearly indicate that the Sn incorporation is not uniform with concentration in Mn rich vertical nanocolumns lower than the detection limit of electron energy loss spectroscopy. The matrix exhibits a GeSn solid solution while there is a Sn-rich GeSn shell around GeMn nanocolumns. The magnetization in Ge{sub 1-x-y}Sn{sub x}Mn{sub y} layers is higher than in Ge{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x} films. This magnetic moment enhancement in Ge{sub 1-x-y}Sn{sub x}Mn{sub y} is probably related to the modification of the electronic structure of Mn atoms in the nanocolumns by the Sn-rich shell, which is formed around the nanocolumns.

  2. Investigation of high hole mobility In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb/Al{sub 0.91}Ga{sub 0.09}Sb quantum well structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Juan; Xing, Jun-Liang; Xiang, Wei; Wang, Guo-Wei; Xu, Ying-Qiang; Ren, Zheng-Wei; Niu, Zhi-Chuan

    2014-02-03

    Modulation-doped In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb/Al{sub 0.91}Ga{sub 0.09}Sb quantum-well (QW) structures were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy studies show high crystalline quality and smooth surface morphology. X-ray diffraction investigations confirm 1.94% compressive strain within In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb channel. High room temperature hole mobility with high sheet density of 1000 cm{sup 2}/Vs, 0.877?×?10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2}, and 965 cm{sup 2}/Vs, 1.112?×?10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2} were obtained with different doping concentrations. Temperature dependent Hall measurements show different scattering mechanisms on hole mobility at different temperature range. The sheet hole density keeps almost constantly from 300?K to 77?K. This study shows great potential of In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb/Al{sub 0.91}Ga{sub 0.09}Sb QW for high-hole-mobility device applications.

  3. Polarization induced hole doping in graded Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (x = 0.7 {approx} 1) layer grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Shibin; Zhang, Ting; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Yajie; Wang, Zhiming; Wu, Zhiming; Chen, Zhi; Jiang, Yadong [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu 610054 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2013-02-11

    Polarization induced hole doping on the order of {approx}10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} is achieved in linearly graded Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (x = 0.7 {approx} 1) layer grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Graded Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N and conventional Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}N layers grown on AlN are beryllium (Be) doped via epitaxial growth. The hole concentration in graded Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N:Be (x = 0.7 {approx} 1) layers demonstrates that polarization generates hole charges from Be dopant. The Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}N layer is not conductive owing to the absence of carriers generated from the Be dopant without the inducement of polarization. Polarization doping provides an approach to high efficiency p-type doping in high Al composition AlGaN.

  4. Beam History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  5. Beam Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  6. Beam Status

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery ActTools toBadging, Badge OfficeBeam Request ToBeam

  7. Beams 92: Proceedings. Volume 2, Ion beams, electron beams, diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosher, D.; Cooperstein, G. [eds.] [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [eds.; Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics. Ion beam papers; electron beam papers; and these papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  8. Structural and band alignment properties of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on epitaxial Ge grown on (100), (110), and (111)A GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudait, M. K.; Zhu, Y.; Maurya, D.; Priya, S.; Patra, P. K.; Ma, A. W. K.; Aphale, A.; Macwan, I.

    2013-04-07

    Structural and band alignment properties of atomic layer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide film deposited on crystallographically oriented epitaxial Ge grown in-situ on (100), (110), and (111)A GaAs substrates using two separate molecular beam epitaxy chambers were investigated using cross-sectional transmission microscopy (TEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). High-resolution triple axis x-ray measurement demonstrated pseudomorphic and high-quality Ge epitaxial layer on crystallographically oriented GaAs substrates. The cross-sectional TEM exhibited a sharp interface between the Ge epilayer and each orientation of the GaAs substrate as well as the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film and the Ge epilayer. The extracted valence band offset, {Delta}E{sub v}, values of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} relative to (100), (110), and (111) Ge orientations using XPS measurement were 3.17 eV, 3.34 eV, and 3.10 eV, respectively. Using XPS data, variations in {Delta}E{sub v} related to the crystallographic orientation were {Delta}E{sub V}(110)Ge>{Delta}E{sub V}(100)Ge{>=}{Delta}E{sub V}(111)Ge and the conduction band offset, {Delta}E{sub c}, related to the crystallographic orientation was {Delta}E{sub c}(111)Ge>{Delta}E{sub c}(110)Ge>{Delta}E{sub c}(100)Ge using the measured {Delta}E{sub v}, bandgap of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in each orientation, and well-known Ge bandgap of 0.67 eV. These band offset parameters are important for future application of Ge-based p- and n-channel metal-oxide field-effect transistor design.

  9. Center for Beam Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01

    UV Laser Ionization and Electron Beam Diagnostics for Plasmaradiation based electron beam diagnostics, fast beamdiagnostic instru- mentation for electron and photon beams

  10. Center for Beam Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01

    1231 (1990). "Relativistic Klystron Version of the Two-BeamDesign of a Relativiatic Klystron Two-Beam AcceleratorSource for a Relativistic Klystron Two- Beam Accelerator" (

  11. CONTINUOUS EXTRACTED BEAM IN THE AGS FAST EXTERNAL BEAM LINE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GLENN,J.W.; TSOUPAS,N.; BROWN,K.A.; BIRYUKOV,V.M.

    2001-06-18

    A method to split off a few percent of the 6 x 10{sup 13} AGS beam delivered to the Slow External Beam (SEB) lines and send it down the Fast External Beam line (FEB) has been developed. The mission is to feed a counter experiment off the FEB that directly measures the neutrino mass using the muon storage ring. The use of normal thin septum splitters would have an excessive loss overhead and been optically difficult. The AGS Slow Extraction uses a third integer resonance with sextuple strength so the resonance width is a few percent of the beam width. This results in a low density tail which will be clipped by a bent crystal and deflected into the FEB channel. This clipping off of the tail should reduce losses in the SEB transport line. Details of modeled orbits, particle distribution and extraction trajectories into and out off the crystal will be given.

  12. Method of deposition by molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chalmers, S.A.; Killeen, K.P.; Lear, K.L.

    1995-01-10

    A method is described for reproducibly controlling layer thickness and varying layer composition in an MBE deposition process. In particular, the present invention includes epitaxially depositing a plurality of layers of material on a substrate with a plurality of growth cycles whereby the average of the instantaneous growth rates for each growth cycle and from one growth cycle to the next remains substantially constant as a function of time. 9 figures.

  13. A molecular beam optical study of YCC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xin, J.; Marr, A.J.; Steimle, T.C.

    1996-12-31

    A weak signal near 13395 cm{sup -1} in the low resolution laser induced fluorescence spectra of the laser ablated Y/ethylene supersonic expansion products was noted by Simard. He speculated that it may be due to yttrium dicarbide. Following up on this suggestion, the authors have detected by medium resolution LIF three red degraded bands at 12895 cm{sup -1}, 13395 cm{sup -1} and 13896 cm{sup -1} which is attributed to YCC. The resolved LIF spectra for the 12895 cm{sup -1} and 13395 cm{sup -1} band systems produce strong Stokes progressions with the features separated by approximately 560 cm{sup -1}. These are tentatively assigned to the Y-CC ground state stretching. Additional weaker features are also observed. The high resolution LIF spectrum of the 12895 cm{sup -1} band system was recorded. Attempts to model the spectrum as a A{sup 4} A{sub 1}-X{sup 2}A{sub 1} transition suggested by a recent ab initio calculation are being made. Progress on the analysis will be presented.

  14. Yuan T. Lee's Crossed Molecular Beam Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  15. Dudley Herschbach: Chemical Reactions and Molecular Beams

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

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  16. Yuan T. Lee and Molecular Beam Studies

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministrationTechnicalTechnicalScience.gov App Find scienceWebsiteSubatomicYuan T.

  17. Center for Beam Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01

    Krishnagopal of CAT, Indore, India, we are also developing aon Beam Physics at CAT, Indore, India and Telecourse on Beam

  18. Neutral Beam Excitation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  19. Beam History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  20. Beam Schedule

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. Beam Status

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  2. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popple, Richard A. Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify arrangements equivalent to equiangular geometries but using fewer beams. Furthermore, SBA provides the value of the objective function as the number of beams is increased, allowing the planner to select the minimal beam number that achieves the clinical goals. The method is simple to implement and could readily be incorporated into an existing optimization system.

  3. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  4. Ion-beam and electron-beam irradiation of synthetic britholite S. Utsunomiya a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utsunomiya, Satoshi

    Ion-beam and electron-beam irradiation of synthetic britholite S. Utsunomiya a , S. Yudintsev b , L ). The sequence of increasing Tc correlates with the mass of the incident ion; whereas, the ratio of electronic to nuclear stopping power (ENSP) is inversely correlated with Tc. Electron irradiations were conducted

  5. Colliding Crystalline Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, J.

    2008-01-01

    6] J. Wei, et ai, Crystalline Beams and Related Issues,LABORATORY Colliding Crystalline Beams Jie Wei and A.M.CBP Note-262 Colliding Crystalline Beams* Jie Wei Brookhaven

  6. The influence of electron beam irradiation on the chemical and structural properties of medical grade Polyurethane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Sukyoung

    2015-01-01

    Thermo plastic polyurethane (TPU) provides excellent bio-compatibility, flexibility and good irradiation resistance; however, extremely high irradiation doses can alter the structure and function of macromolecules, resulting in oxidation, chain scission and cross-linking. In this study, the effects of e-beam irradiation on the medical grade thermo plastic polyurethane were studied. The changes in the chain length and their distribution as well as the changes in molecular structure were studied. The GPC (Gel Permeation Chromatography) results show that the oxidative decomposition is followed by a decrease in molecular mass together with an increase in polydispersity. This indicates a very inhomogeneous degradation, which is a consequence of the specific course and of the intensity of oxidative degradation. This was confirmed by means of mechanical property measurements. Overall, this study demonstrated that the medical grade TPU was affected by radiation exposure, particularly at high irradiation doses.

  7. Neutral beam dump with cathodic arc titanium gettering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smirnov, A.; Korepanov, S. A.; Putvinski, S.; Krivenko, A. S.; Murakhtin, S. V.; Savkin, V. Ya.

    2011-03-15

    An incomplete neutral beam capture can degrade the plasma performance in neutral beam driven plasma machines. The beam dumps mitigating the shine-through beam recycling must entrap and retain large particle loads while maintaining the beam-exposed surfaces clean of the residual impurities. The cathodic arc gettering, which provides high evaporation rate coupled with a fast time response, is a powerful and versatile technique for depositing clean getter films in vacuum. A compact neutral beam dump utilizing the titanium arc gettering was developed for a field-reversed configuration plasma sustained by 1 MW, 20-40 keV neutral hydrogen beams. The titanium evaporator features a new improved design. The beam dump is capable of handling large pulsed gas loads, has a high sorption capacity, and is robust and reliable. With the beam particle flux density of 5 x 10{sup 17} H/(cm{sup 2}s) sustained for 3-10 ms, the beam recycling coefficient, defined as twice the ratio of the hydrogen molecular flux leaving the beam dump to the incident flux of high-energy neutral atoms, is {approx}0.7. The use of the beam dump allows us to significantly reduce the recycling of the shine-through neutral beam as well as to improve the vacuum conditions in the machine.

  8. Electron Beam Lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandini, Giulio

    Electron Beam Lithography Marco Salerno #12;Outline · general lithographic concepts · EBL www.cnf.cornell.edu/SPIEBook/SPIE1.HTM #12;Typical Electron Beam Column Zeiss GeminiTM column Types of Electron Beam Columns · no e- cross over no Boersch-effect (additional energy spread) · beam booster

  9. BEAMS: Curiosity | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BEAMS: Curiosity January 9, 2013 BEAMS, Becoming Excited About Math and Science, is one of our education programs. In particular, it is the only one in which I participate with...

  10. Beam Dynamics for ARIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl August Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-10-14

    Beam dynamics issues are assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention is paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. It is concluded that a radiographic quality beam will be produced possible if engineering standards and construction details are equivalent to those on the present radiography accelerators at Los Alamos.

  11. Mapping Molecular Space with Mass Spectrometry /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Don Duy

    2013-01-01

    L & Oliveira AC (2009) Microalgae as a raw material forP (2010) Biofuels from microalgae—A review of technologiesThe tide turns towards microalgae. Current research aims to

  12. Inferring the composition of super-Jupiter mass companions of pulsars with radio line spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Alak

    2015-01-01

    We propose using radio line spectroscopy to detect molecular absorption lines (such as OH at 1.6-1.7 GHz) before and after the total eclipse of black widow (BW) and other short orbital period binary pulsars with low mass companions. The companion in such a binary may be ablated away by energetic particles and high energy radiation produced by the pulsar wind. The observations will probe the eclipsing wind being ablated by the pulsar and constrain the nature of the companion and its surroundings. Maser emission from the interstellar medium stimulated by a pulsar beam might also be detected from the intrabinary medium. The short temporal resolution allowed by the millisecond pulsars can probe this medium with the high angular resolution of the pulsar beam.

  13. Measurement of product alignment in beam-gas chemiluminescent reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measurement of product alignment in beam-gas chemiluminescent reactions Michael G. Prisant, Charles the product rotational alignment in the center of mass frame from polarization measurements of the chemiluminescent atom-diatom exchange reaction A + BC-.AB* + C under beam-gas conditions. The degree of product

  14. Neutralization principles for the Extraction and Transport of Ion Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riege, H

    2000-01-01

    The strict application of conventional extraction techniques of ion beams from a plasma source is characterized by a natural intensity limit determined by space charge.The extracted current may be enhanced far beyond this limit by neutralizing the space charge of the extracted ions in the first extraction gap of the source with electrons injected from the opposite side. The transverse and longitudinal emittances of a neutralized ion beam, hence its brightness, are preserved. Results of beam compensation experiments, which have been carried out with a laser ion source, are resumed for proposing a general scheme of neutralizing ion sources and their adjacent low-energy beam transport channels with electron beams. Many technical applications of high-mass ion beam neutralization technology may be identified: the enhancement of ion source output for injection into high-intensity, low-and high-energy accelerators, or ion thrusters in space technology, for the neutral beams needed for plasma heating of magnetic conf...

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF EMITTANCE ANALYSIS SOFTWARE FOR ION BEAM CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padilla, M. J.; Liu, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Transverse beam emittance is a crucial property of charged particle beams that describes their angular and spatial spread. It is a fi gure of merit frequently used to determine the quality of ion beams, the compatibility of an ion beam with a given beam transport system, and the ability to suppress neighboring isotopes at on-line mass separator facilities. Generally a high quality beam is characterized by a small emittance. In order to determine and improve the quality of ion beams used at the Holifi eld Radioactive Ion beam Facility (HRIBF) for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics research, the emittances of the ion beams are measured at the off-line Ion Source Test Facilities. In this project, emittance analysis software was developed to perform various data processing tasks for noise reduction, to evaluate root-mean-square emittance, Twiss parameters, and area emittance of different beam fractions. The software also provides 2D and 3D graphical views of the emittance data, beam profi les, emittance contours, and RMS. Noise exclusion is essential for accurate determination of beam emittance values. A Self-Consistent, Unbiased Elliptical Exclusion (SCUBEEx) method is employed. Numerical data analysis techniques such as interpolation and nonlinear fi tting are also incorporated into the software. The software will provide a simplifi ed, fast tool for comprehensive emittance analysis. The main functions of the software package have been completed. In preliminary tests with experimental emittance data, the analysis results using the software were shown to be accurate.

  16. Multiple species beam production on laser ion source for electron beam ion source in Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekine, M., E-mail: sekine.m.ae@m.titech.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Ikeda, S. [Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan) [Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Department of Energy Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Hayashizaki, N. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan)] [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)] [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Extracted ion beams from the test laser ion source (LIS) were transported through a test beam transport line which is almost identical to the actual primary beam transport in the current electron beam ion source apparatus. The tested species were C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Cu, Ag, Ta, and Au. The all measured beam currents fulfilled the requirements. However, in the case of light mass ions, the recorded emittance shapes have larger aberrations and the RMS values are higher than 0.06 ??mm?mrad, which is the design goal. Since we have margin to enhance the beam current, if we then allow some beam losses at the injection point, the number of the single charged ions within the acceptance can be supplied. For heaver ions like Ag, Ta, and Au, the LIS showed very good performance.

  17. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flatter and Faster: Transition Metal Dichalcogendies at the Molecular Foundry (Part II) Brain Imaging and Optical Manipulation Active Nanointerfaces for Electrochemistry SAXS-WAXS...

  18. Temperature dependence of ion-beam mixing in crystalline and amorphous germanium isotope multilayer structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radek, M.; Bracht, H., E-mail: bracht@uni-muenster.de [Institute of Materials Physics, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, 48149 Münster (Germany); Posselt, M.; Liedke, B.; Schmidt, B. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany); Bougeard, D. [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, 93040 Regensburg (Germany)

    2014-01-14

    Self-atom mixing induced by 310 keV gallium (Ga) ion implantation in crystalline and preamorphized germanium (Ge) at temperatures between 164 K and 623 K and a dose of 1?×?10{sup 15}?cm{sup ?2} is investigated using isotopic multilayer structures of alternating {sup 70}Ge and {sup nat}Ge layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The distribution of the implanted Ga atoms and the ion-beam induced depth-dependent self-atom mixing was determined by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry. Three different temperature regimes of self-atom mixing, i.e., low-, intermediate-, and high-temperature regimes are observed. At temperatures up to 423 K, the mixing is independent of the initial structure, whereas at 523?K, the intermixing of the preamorphized Ge structure is about twice as high as that of crystalline Ge. At 623?K, the intermixing of the initially amorphous Ge structure is strongly reduced and approaches the mixing of the crystalline material. The temperature dependence of ion-beam mixing is described by competitive amorphization and recrystallization processes.

  19. {sup 18}Ne production for the Beta beams project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodák, Rastislav [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, CTU in Prague, Horská 3/22a, CZ-12800 Prague (Czech Republic); Mendonça, Tania M. [IFIMUP and IN - Institute of Nanosciences and Nanotechnologies, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto, Portugal and CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Swaziland); Stora, Thierry [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2013-12-30

    Intense relativistic (anti)neutrino beams are an unique tool required to study fundamental properties of neutrinos such as neutrino oscillation parameters, as well as their Majorana or Dirac nature, the lepton number conservation hypothesis and the absolute neutrino mass scale. Such beams originate from acceleration of ?-decaying radioactive ions (“Beta beams”). A molten fluoride salt target has been developed for the production of the required rates of low-Q baseline isotope {sup 18}Ne for the Beta beams project. The prototyped unit has been tested on-line at ISOLDE-CERN. In this contribution an overview of the prototyping and on-line tests is presented.

  20. Electron beam enhanced surface modification for making highly resolved structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pitts, John R. (Golden, CO)

    1986-01-01

    A method for forming high resolution submicron structures on a substrate is provided by direct writing with a submicron electron beam in a partial pressure of a selected gas phase characterized by the ability to dissociate under the beam into a stable gaseous leaving group and a reactant fragment that combines with the substrate material under beam energy to form at least a surface compound. Variations of the method provide semiconductor device regions on doped silicon substrates, interconnect lines between active sites, three dimensional electronic chip structures, electron beam and optical read mass storage devices that may include color differentiated data areas, and resist areas for use with selective etching techniques.

  1. Bioheat and Mass Transfer Educational Initiatives for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    warm-blooded organisims, freezing, unique systems CCNY Weinbaum Ugrad cell and tissue transport notes fluid and molecular transport Cornell Datta Ugrad heat and mass fundamentals Datta fluid mech Duke Fan Ugrad biofluid and mass transport Illinois Chato bioheat and mass transfer Chato chapter

  2. BEAM DYNAMICS STUDIES FOR THE SPIRAL-2 PROJECT J-L. Biarrotte#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    this construction phase: freezing of the low-energy beam transport lines of the injector, consolidation of the mass of freezing the layout of the injector low-energy beam transport lines, as is shown in Figure 1, superconducting linac, and high-energy beam transport lines (HEBTs). The injector includes two ECR sources (one

  3. Methods of Beam Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    of Optical Stochastic Cooling", presented at PAC, (1995).1991). Hangst, J. , "Laser Cooling of a Stored Ion Beam - ATheorem and Phase Space Cooling", Proceedings of the

  4. Center for Beam Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01

    presented at APS Division of Plasma Physics, Denver,of Division of Physics of Beams of APS, InternationalLinear Colliders," APS New Directions in High Energy Physics

  5. Piezoelectric energy harvester having planform-tapered interdigitated beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kellogg, Rick A. (Tijeras, NM); Sumali, Hartono (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-05-24

    Embodiments of energy harvesters have a plurality of piezoelectric planform-tapered, interdigitated cantilevered beams anchored to a common frame. The plurality of beams can be arranged as two or more sets of beams with each set sharing a common sense mass affixed to their free ends. Each set thus defined being capable of motion independent of any other set of beams. Each beam can comprise a unimorph or bimorph piezoelectric configuration bonded to a conductive or non-conductive supporting layer and provided with electrical contacts to the active piezoelectric elements for collecting strain induced charge (i.e. energy). The beams are planform tapered along the entirety or a portion of their length thereby increasing the effective stress level and power output of each piezoelectric element, and are interdigitated by sets to increase the power output per unit volume of a harvester thus produced.

  6. Continuous guided beams of slow and internally cold polar molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommer, Christian; Motsch, Michael; Pohle, Sebastian; Bayerl, Josef; Pinkse, Pepijn W H; Rempe, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    We describe the combination of buffer-gas cooling with electrostatic velocity filtering to produce a high-flux continuous guided beam of internally cold and slow polar molecules. In a previous paper (L.D. van Buuren et al., arXiv:0806.2523v1) we presented results on density and state purity for guided beams of ammonia and formaldehyde using an optimized set-up. Here we describe in more detail the technical aspects of the cryogenic source, its operation, and the optimization experiments that we performed to obtain best performance. The versatility of the source is demonstrated by the production of guided beams of different molecular species.

  7. Dynamics of CN+alkane reactions by crossed-beam dc slice imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Cunshun; Li Wen; Estillore, Armando D.; Suits, Arthur G.

    2008-08-21

    The hydrogen atom abstraction reactions of CN (X {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}) with alkanes have been studied using the crossed molecular beam technique with dc slice ion imaging at collision energies of 7.5 and 10.8 kcal/mol. The product alkyl radical images were obtained via single photon ionization at 157 nm for the reactions of CN (X {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}) with n-butane, n-pentane, n-hexane, and cyclohexane. From analysis of the images, we obtained the center-of-mass frame product angular distributions and translational energy distributions directly. The results indicate that the products are largely backscattered and that most of the available energy ({approx}80%-85%) goes to the internal energy of the products. The reaction dynamics is discussed in light of recent kinetics data, theoretical calculations, and results for related halogen and oxygen atom reactions.

  8. Method and apparatus for measuring the momentum, energy, power, and power density profile of intense particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gammel, George M. (Merrick, NY); Kugel, Henry W. (Somerset, NJ)

    1992-10-06

    A method and apparatus for determining the power, momentum, energy, and power density profile of high momentum mass flow. Small probe projectiles of appropriate size, shape and composition are propelled through an intense particle beam at equal intervals along an axis perpendicular to the beam direction. Probe projectiles are deflected by collisions with beam particles. The net beam-induced deflection of each projectile is measured after it passes through the intense particle beam into an array of suitable detectors.

  9. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1994-02-15

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus is described. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 7 figures.

  10. Beam Diagnostics for FACET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, S.Z.; Hogan, M.J.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to about 20 {micro}m long and focussed to about 10 {micro}m wide. Characterization of the beam-plasma interaction requires complete knowledge of the incoming beam parameters on a pulse-to-pulse basis. FACET diagnostics include Beam Position Monitors, Toroidal current monitors, X-ray and Cerenkov based energy spectrometers, optical transition radiation (OTR) profile monitors and coherent transition radiation (CTR) bunch length measurement systems. The compliment of beam diagnostics and their expected performance are reviewed. Beam diagnostic measurements not only provide valuable insights to the running and tuning of the accelerator but also are crucial for the PWFA experiments in particular. Beam diagnostic devices are being set up at FACET and will be ready for beam commissioning in summer 2011.

  11. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1993-12-28

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 11 figures.

  12. First Beam to FACET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, R.; Clarke, C.; Colocho, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.; Kalsi, S.; Lipkowitz, N.; Nelson, J.; Phinney, N.; Schuh, P.; Sheppard, J.; Smith, H.; Smith, T.; Stanek, M.; Turner, J.; Warren, J.; Weathersby, S.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    The SLAC 3km linear electron accelerator has been reconfigured to provide a beam of electrons to the new Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) while simultaneously providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). On June 23, 2011, the first electron beam was transported through this new facility. Commissioning of FACET is in progress. On June 23, 2011, an electron beam was successfully transported through the new FACET system to a dump in Sector 20 in the linac tunnel. This was achieved while the last third of the linac, operating from the same control room, but with a separate injector system, was providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), demonstrating that concurrent operation of the two facilities is practical. With the initial checkout of the new transport line essentially complete, attention is now turning toward compressing the electron bunches longitudinally and focusing them transversely to support a variety of accelerator science experiments.

  13. Production of a beam of highly vibrationally excited CO using perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartels, Nils

    An intense molecular beam of CO (X[superscript 1]?[superscript +]) in high vibrational states (v = 17, 18) was produced by a new approach that we call PUMP – PUMP – PERTURB and DUMP. The basic idea is to access high ...

  14. STOCHASTIC COOLING OF BUNCHED BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bisognano, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    March 11-13, 1981 STOCHASTIC COOLING OF BUNCHED BEAMS J.J.W-7406-BW-48 STOCHASTIC COOLING OF BUNCHED BEAMS* J.J.longitudinal stochastic cooling of bunched particle beams.

  15. B13+: Photodriven Molecular Wankel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jin; Sergeeva, Alina P.; Sparta, Manuel; Alexandrova, Anastassia N.

    2012-07-09

    Synthetic molecular motors that are capable of delivering controlled movement upon energy input are one of the key building blocks in nanomachinery. The major energy sources of molecular motors are from chemical reactions, photon beams, or electric current, which are converted into mechanical forces through the excitation of the electronic states of the molecule. The energy scale of the electronic excitation is normally two orders of magnitude larger than the molecular vibrational frequencies. To reduce the heat dissipation and increase the energy utilization efficiency, a motor running purely on the electronic ground-state (GS) potential energy surfaces is highly desirable.

  16. MULTIMEGAWATT NEUTRAL BEAMS FOR TOKAMAKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkel, W.B.

    2010-01-01

    NEUTRAL BEAMS FOR TOKAMAKS Wulf B. Kunkel March 1979NEUTRAL BEAMS FOR TOKAMAKS* Wulf 6. Kunkel AV « tract Mostit seems probable that tokamaks will achieve "scientific"

  17. Challenges in Accelerator Beam Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendt, M.

    2009-12-01

    The challenges in beam instrumentation and diagnostics for present and future particle accelerator projects are presented. A few examples for advanced hadron and lepton beam diagnostics are given.

  18. Simulations of beam-beam and beam-wire interactions in RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyung J.; Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab; Abreu, Natalia P.; Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven

    2009-02-01

    The beam-beam interaction is one of the dominant sources of emittance growth and luminosity lifetime deterioration. A current carrying wire has been proposed to compensate long-range beam-beam effects in the LHC and strong localized long-range beam-beam effects are experimentally investigated in the RHIC collider. Tune shift, beam transfer function, and beam loss rate are measured in dedicated experiments. In this paper, they report on simulations to study the effect of beam-wire interactions based on diffusive apertures, beam loss rates, and beam transfer function using a parallelized weak-strong beam simulation code (BBSIMC). The simulation results are compared with measurements performed in RHIC during 2007 and 2008.

  19. Electron Beam for LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mieczyslaw Witold Krasny

    2004-05-13

    A method of delivering a monochromatic electron beam to the LHC interaction points is proposed. In this method, heavy ions are used as carriers of the projectile electrons. Acceleration, storage and collision-stability aspects of such a hybrid beam is discussed and a new beam-cooling method is presented. This discussion is followed by a proposal of the Parasitic Ion-Electron collider at LHC (PIE@LHC). The PIE@LHC provides an opportunity, for the present LHC detectors, to enlarge the scope of their research program by including the program of electron-proton and electron-nucleuscollisions with minor machine and detector investments.

  20. LEDA BEAM DIAGNOSTICS INSTRUMENTATION: BEAM POSITION MONITORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. BARR; ET AL

    2000-05-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) facility located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) accelerates protons to an energy of 6.7-MeV and current of 100-mA operating in either a pulsed or cw mode. Of key importance to the commissioning and operations effort is the Beam Position Monitor system (BPM). The LEDA BPM system uses five micro-stripline beam position monitors processed by log ratio processing electronics with data acquisition via a series of custom TMS32OC40 Digital Signal Processing (DSP) boards. Of special interest to this paper is the operation of the system, the log ratio processing, and the system calibration technique. This paper will also cover the DSP system operations and their interaction with the main accelerator control system.

  1. BEAMing up for detection and quantification of rare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    for producing the water-in-oil emulsions used for BEAMing (Supplementary Figs. 1 and 2 online). In the third, water-in-oil emulsions are formed in which single DNA molecules within each aqueous compartment Comprehensive Cancer Center, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and Department of Pharmacology and Molecular

  2. Heavy Oil Upgrading from Electron Beam (E-Beam) Irradiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Daegil

    2011-02-22

    to upgrade. This thesis demonstrates that electron beam (E-Beam) heavy oil upgrading, which uses unique features of E-Beam irradiation, may be used to improve conventional heavy oil upgrading. E-Beam processing lowers the thermal energy requirements and could...

  3. Focused ion beam system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Gough, Richard A. (Kensington, CA); Ji, Qing (Berkeley, CA); Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 .mu.m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 .mu.m or less.

  4. Focused ion beam system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.; Gough, R.A.; Ji, Q.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1999-08-31

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 {mu}m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 m or less. 13 figs.

  5. LHC Beam Loss Monitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arauzo-Garcia, A; Ferioli, G; Gschwendtner, E

    2001-01-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a beam loss system will be installed for a continuous surveillance of particle losses. These beam particles deposit their energy in the super-conducting coils leading to temperature increase, possible magnet quenches and damages. Detailed simulations have shown that a set of six detectors outside the cryostats of the quadrupole magnets in the regular arc cells are needed to completely diagnose the expected beam losses and hence protect the magnets. To characterize the quench levels different loss rates are identified. In order to cover all possible quench scenarios the dynamic range of the beam loss monitors has to be matched to the simulated loss rates. For that purpose different detector systems (PIN-diodes and ionization chambers) are compared.

  6. Beam! Magic! | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with all the changes, the accelerator can be made to work. Beam Since my first serious introduction to nuclear and particle physics - when I worked for a few weeks one summer at...

  7. Beam/seam alignment control for electron beam welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burkhardt, Jr., James H. (Knoxville, TN); Henry, J. James (Oak Ridge, TN); Davenport, Clyde M. (Knoxville, TN)

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a dynamic beam/seam alignment control system for electron beam welds utilizing video apparatus. The system includes automatic control of workpiece illumination, near infrared illumination of the workpiece to limit the range of illumination and camera sensitivity adjustment, curve fitting of seam position data to obtain an accurate measure of beam/seam alignment, and automatic beam detection and calculation of the threshold beam level from the peak beam level of the preceding video line to locate the beam or seam edges.

  8. Inverse time-of-flight spectrometer for beam plasma research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yushkov, Yu. G., E-mail: yuyushkov@gmail.com; Zolotukhin, D. B.; Tyunkov, A. V. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, 40 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Oks, E. M. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, 40 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3, Akademichesky Ave., Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Savkin, K. P. [Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3, Akademichesky Ave., Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-15

    The paper describes the design and principle of operation of an inverse time-of-flight spectrometer for research in the plasma produced by an electron beam in the forevacuum pressure range (5–20 Pa). In the spectrometer, the deflecting plates as well as the drift tube and the primary ion beam measuring system are at high potential with respect to ground. This provides the possibility to measure the mass-charge constitution of the plasma created by a continuous electron beam with a current of up to 300 mA and electron energy of up to 20 keV at forevacuum pressures in the chamber placed at ground potential. Research results on the mass-charge state of the beam plasma are presented and analyzed.

  9. Laser Desorption Single-Photon Ionization of Asphaltenes: Mass Range, Compound Sensitivity, and Matrix Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    Laser Desorption Single-Photon Ionization of Asphaltenes: Mass Range, Compound Sensitivity and flow assurance. Laser desorption single-photon ionization mass spectrometry (LDSPI-MS) has emerged, such as their molecular mass distribution and dominant molecular architecture.1,6-11 Laser mass spectrometry, including

  10. Photon beam position monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuzay, T.M.; Shu, D.

    1995-02-07

    A photon beam position monitor is disclosed for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade ''shadowing''. Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation. 18 figs.

  11. Biosensors combine the high selectivity and sensitivity of molecular recognition processes of biologi-cal macromolecules with a transducer. The increase in mass by the recognition process can in princi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turova, Varvara

    Biosensors combine the high selectivity and sensitivity of molecular recognition processes. Keywords: biosensor, linear electro-elasticity, multi-layer structure, fluid-structure interaction, finite for Sensors and Actuators Modeling and Simulation Wave Propagation in Biosensors K.-H. Hoffmann N. Botkin, M

  12. Single element laser beam shaper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shukui (Yorktown, VA); Michelle D. Shinn (Newport News, VA)

    2005-09-13

    A single lens laser beam shaper for converting laser beams from any spatial profile to a flat-top or uniform spatial profile. The laser beam shaper includes a lens having two aspheric surfaces. The beam shaper significantly simplifies the overall structure in comparison with conventional 2-element systems and therefore provides great ease in alignment and reduction of cost.

  13. Fast-ion-beam photoelectron spectrometer K. A. Hanold, C. R. Sherwood, M. C. Garner, and R. E. Continetti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Continetti, Robert E.

    Fast-ion-beam photoelectron spectrometer K. A. Hanold, C. R. Sherwood, M. C. Garner, and R. E) A high-collection-efficiency fast-ion-beam photoelectron spectrometer is described. In a straight time of the photoelectron laboratory energy to center-of-mass energy. The fast-ion-beam photoelectron spectrometer is used

  14. Beam Characterizations at Femtosecond Electron Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rimjaem, S.; Jinamoon, V.; Kangrang, M.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Saisut, J.; Thongbai, C.; Vilaithong, T.; Rhodes, M.W.; Wichaisirimongkol, P.; Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC

    2006-03-17

    The SURIYA project at the Fast Neutron Research Facility (FNRF) has been established and is being commissioning to generate femtosecond (fs) electron bunches. Theses short bunches are produced by a system consisting of an S-band thermionic cathode RF-gun, an alpha magnet (a-magnet) serving as a magnetic bunch compressor, and a SLAC-type linear accelerator (linac). The characteristics of its major components and the beam characterizations as well as the preliminary experimental results will be presented and discussed in this paper.

  15. LHC beam-beam compensation studies at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer,W.; Abreu, N.; Calaga, R.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Luo, Y.; Montag, C.

    2009-05-04

    Long-range and head-on beam-beam effects are expected to limit the LHC performance with design parameters. To mitigate long-range effects current carrying wires parallel to the beam were proposed. Two such wires are installed in RHIC where they allow studying the effect of strong long-range beam-beam effects, as well as the compensation of a single long-range interaction. The tests provide benchmark data for simulations and analytical treatments. To reduce the head-on beam-beam effect electron lenses were proposed for both the LHC and RHIC. We present the experimental long-range beam-beam program and report on head-on compensations studies at RHIC, which are based on simulations.

  16. Beam-beam study of ERL based eRHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, Y; Ptitsyn, V

    2014-01-01

    Beam-beam effects in eRHIC, the proposed ERL-based Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) at BNL, have several unique features distinguishing them from those in hadron-colliders and lepton-colliders. Taking the advantage of the fact that the electron beam is used only once, we expect the luminosity to be 10 times greater than for the ring-ring collision scheme with similar parameters. However, without instituting proper treatments, the quality of electron and hadron beams can undergo degradation or even beam loss, driven by the beam-beam interactions. We will discuss the harmful effects, including the disruption and mismatch effect of the electron beam, the kink instability and the noise heating of the ion beam and the possible countermeasures.

  17. ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Zvi I.; Kuczewski A.; Altinbas, Z.; Beavis, D.; Belomestnykh,; Dai, J. et al

    2012-07-01

    The Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory is building a high-brightness 500 mA capable Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) as one of its main R&D thrusts towards eRHIC, the polarized electron - hadron collider as an upgrade of the operating RHIC facility. The ERL is in final assembly stages, with injection commisioning starting in October 2012. The objective of this ERL is to serve as a platform for R&D into high current ERL, in particular issues of halo generation and control, Higher-Order Mode (HOM) issues, coherent emissions for the beam and high-brightness, high-power beam generation and preservation. The R&D ERL features a superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photoccathode served with a load-lock cathode delivery system, a highly damped 5-cell accelerating cavity, a highly flexible single-pass loop and a comprehensive system of beam instrumentation. In this ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter article we will describe the ERL in a degree of detail that is not usually found in regular publications. We will discuss the various systems of the ERL, following the electrons from the photocathode to the beam dump, cover the control system, machine protection etc and summarize with the status of the ERL systems.

  18. The Low-Energy State of Circulating Stored Ion Beams: Crystalline Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, J.

    2008-01-01

    Proc. of the Workshop on Crystalline Ion Beams, Werheim,Critical Temperatures for Crystalline Beams", Proc. of theCirculating Stored Ion Beams: Crystalline Beams J. Wei, X. -

  19. Beam Physics at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Lyndon R

    2003-01-01

    The design of the Large Hadron Collider incorporates the accumulated knowledge obtained from previous generations of hadron colliders. Among the well known effects limiting machine performance are intrabeam scattering, the beam-beam interaction and stability against collective motion. Simulations and recent experiments in the SPS have shown that the electron cloud effect observed in the B-factories will be present both in the LHC and in its injector. All of these phenomena are discussed together with the measure taken in the machine design to overcome them.

  20. Attenuation of Beaming Oscillations Near Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Coleman Miller

    2000-07-17

    Observations with RXTE have revealed kilohertz quasi-periodic brightness oscillations (QPOs) from nearly twenty different neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). These frequencies often appear as a pair of kilohertz QPOs in a given power density spectrum. In many models the higher-frequency of these QPOs is a beaming oscillation at the frequency of a nearly circular orbit at some radius near the neutron star. In such models it is expected that there will also be beaming oscillations at the stellar spin frequency and at overtones of the orbital frequency, but no strong QPOs have been detected at these frequencies. We therefore examine the processes that can attenuate beaming oscillations near neutron stars, and in doing so extend the work on this subject that was initiated by the discovery of lower-frequency QPOs from LMXBs. Among our main results are (1)in a spherical scattering cloud, all overtones of rotationally modulated beaming oscillations are attenuated strongly, not just the even harmonics, and (2)it is possible to have a relatively high-amplitude modulation near the star at, e.g., the stellar spin frequency, even if no peak at that frequency is detectable in a power density spectrum taken at infinity. We discuss the application of these results to modeling of kilohertz QPOs.

  1. Ultrahigh vacuum and low-temperature cleaning of oxide surfaces using a low-concentration ozone beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, A. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Graziosi, P.; Bergenti, I.; Dediu, A. [CNR – ISMN, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche – Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati, v. Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Prezioso, M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Harold Frank Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Yamauchi, Y., E-mail: yamauchi.yasushi@nims.go.jp [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    We present a novel method of delivering a low-concentration (<15%) ozone beam to an ultra-high vacuum environment for the purpose of cleaning and dosing experimental samples through oxidation processing. The system described is safe, low-cost, and practical and overcomes the limitations of ozone transport in the molecular flow environment of high or ultrahigh vacuum whilst circumventing the use of pure ozone gas which is potentially highly explosive. The effectiveness of this method in removing surface contamination is demonstrated through comparison of high-temperature annealing of a simple oxide (MgO) in ozone and oxygen environments as monitored using quadrupole mass spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. Additionally, we demonstrate the potential of ozone for obtaining clean complex oxide surfaces without the need for high-temperature annealing which may significantly alter surface structure.

  2. Electron beam dynamics for the ISIS bremsstrahlung beam generation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Block, Robert E. (Robert Edward)

    2011-01-01

    An electron beam transport system was designed for use in the Bremsstrahlung Beam Generation System of the Integrated Stand-off Inspection System (ISIS). The purpose of this electron transport system was to provide for ...

  3. Quark Masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasser, Juerg

    2005-10-26

    In my talk, I reviewed some basic aspects of quark masses: what do they mean, how can they be determined, what is our present knowledge on them. The talk was addressed to non specialists in the field, and so is this write up.

  4. Molecular Dynameomics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework uses concrete7Modifications for Public CommentDynameomics Molecular

  5. Colliding beams of light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Ivanov

    2002-12-28

    The stationary gravitational field of two identical counter-moving beams of pure radiation is found in full generality. The solution depends on an arbitrary function and a parameter which sets the scale of the energy density. Some of its properties are studied. Previous particular solutions are derived as subcases.

  6. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, J.B.

    1997-08-12

    An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

  7. Beam current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuchnir, M.; Mills, F.E.

    1984-09-28

    A current sensor for measuring the dc component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivities in the nano-ampere range.

  8. Mass Chain Evaluation for A=95

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, S.K.; Sonzogni, A.; Basu, Swapan Kr.; Mukherjee, Gopal; Sonzogni, A. A.

    2011-08-01

    A full evaluation of the mass chain A = 95 has been done in the ENSDF format taking into account all the available data until June 2009. Excited states populated by in-beam nuclear reactions and by radioactive decay have been considered. The 'evp' editor, developed at the NNDC, has been used for the evaluation. This mass chain was last evaluated in 1993. Many new and improved data were reported since then. A total of 13 nuclei have been evaluated.

  9. Reactions of carbon atoms in pulsed molecular beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reisler, H. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research program consists of a broad scope of experiments designed to unravel the chemistry of atomic carbon in its two spin states, P and D, by using well-controlled initial conditions and state-resolved detection of products. Prerequisite to the proposed studies (and the reason why so little is known about carbon atom reactions), is the development of clean sources of carbon atoms. Therefore, in parallel with the studies of its chemistry and reaction dynamics, the authors continuously explore new, state-specific and efficient ways of producing atomic carbon. In the current program, C({sup 3}P) is produced via laser ablation of graphite, and three areas of study are being pursued: (i) exothermic reactions with small inorganic molecules (e.g., O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}) that can proceed via multiple pathways; (ii) the influence of vibrational and translational energy on endothermic reactions involving H-containing reactants that yield CH products (e.g., H{sub 2}O H{sub 2}CO); (iii) reactions of C({sup 3}P) with free radicals (e.g., HCO, CH{sub 3}O). In addition, the authors plan to develop a source of C({sup 1}D) atoms by exploiting the pyrolysis of diazotetrazole and its salts in the ablation source. Another important goal involves collaboration with theoreticians in order to obtain relevant potential energy surfaces, rationalize the experimental results and predict the roles of translational and vibrational energies.

  10. Organic molecular beam deposition: Growth studies beyond the first monolayer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schreiber, Frank

    epitaxial relations, surface and inter- face energies, growth modes, correlation functions, dynamic scaling), subject of the present contribution, it is generally agreed that the structural definition is important impact on the functional properties, understanding the structure formation, i.e., the growth process

  11. MOLECULAR BEAM PHOTOIONIZATION AND GAS-SURFACE SCATTERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceyer, S.T.

    2010-01-01

    valve. (P) Bearing mounting block. (R) Main chamber titaniumthe main scattering chamber and to mount the bearings ontoC) Load bearing. (D) Ring. (E) Main chamber wall. (F)

  12. CROSSED MOLECULAR BEAM STUDIES OF UN-IMOLECULAR REACTION DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buss, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    and velocity distributions provide another probe of the reactionreaction. Measurement of the angular and velocityin the IC1 reaction. The product velocity distributions are

  13. The Cooling of Particle Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01

    67, 15. Hangst, J "Laser Cooling of a Stored Ion Beam - ATheorem an.d Phase Space Cooling", Proceedings of theWorkshop on Beam Cooling and Related Topics, Montreaux, CERN

  14. Hadron beams session-summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, K.M. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120, USA (US))

    1989-05-05

    The status of presently operating polarized beams at Fermilab, the AGS, and KEK is discussed. Other schemes such as Siberian Snakes and self-polarization of a beam in situ are briefly analyzed.(AIP)

  15. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daly, T.P.; Moses, E.I.; Patterson, R.W.; Sawicki, R.H.

    1994-08-09

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse using one or more delay loops is disclosed. The delay loops have a partially reflective beam splitter and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors arranged such that the laser beam pulse enters into the delay loop through the beam splitter and circulates therein along a delay loop length defined by the mirrors. As the laser beam pulse circulates within the delay loop a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse strikes the beam splitter. The laser beam pulse is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses. The delay loops are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses using additive waveform synthesis. 8 figs.

  16. Synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry study of intermediates in fuel-rich 1,2-dimethoxyethane flame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Z. K.; Han, D. L.; Li, S. F.; Li, Y. Y.; Yuan, T.

    2009-04-21

    Intermediates in a fuel-rich premixed laminar 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) flame are studied by molecular beam mass spectrometry combined with tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization. About 30 intermediate species are identified in the present work, and their mole fraction profiles are evaluated. The experimental results show that the formations of intermediates, both hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons, are closely linked to the structure of fuel, which is consistent with the previous reports. Species produced from H atom abstraction and beta scission of DME usually have much higher concentrations than others. The oxygen atoms in DME are considered to act as partitions of the primary intermediates; therefore farther reactions among these primary intermediates are difficult to occur, resulting in absence of most large intermediate species.

  17. Nanofabrication using focused ion beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latif, Adnan

    Focused ion beam (FIB) technique uses a focused beam of ions to scan the surface of a specimen, analogous to the way scanning electron microscope (SEM) utilizes electrons. Recent developments in the FIB technology have led to beam spot size below...

  18. Excitation of kinetic Alfvén waves by fast electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, L.; Wu, D. J.; Zhao, G. Q. [Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing (China); Tang, J. F. [Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory, CAS, Urumqi 830011 (China); Huang, J., E-mail: clvslc214@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: djwu@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: gqzhao@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: jftang@xao.ac.cn, E-mail: huangj@bao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2014-09-20

    Energetic electron beams, which are ubiquitous in a large variety of active phenomena in space and astrophysical plasmas, are one of the most important sources that drive plasma instabilities. In this paper, taking account of the return-current effect of fast electron beams, kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) instability driven by a fast electron beam is investigated in a finite-? plasma of Q < ? < 1 (where ? is the kinetic-to-magnetic pressure ratio and Q ? m{sub e} /m{sub i} is the mass ratio of electrons to ions). The results show that the kinetic resonant interaction of beam electrons is the driving source for KAW instability, unlike the case driven by a fast ion beam, where both the kinetic resonant interaction of beam ions and the return-current are the driving source for the KAW instability. KAW instability has a nonzero growth rate in the range of the perpendicular wave number, 0beam v{sub b} , and the most favorable beam velocity occurs between 8v{sub A} < v{sub b} < 10v{sub A} . On the other hand, the excited KAWs are weakly dispersive with k ? {sub i} < 1 and have the maximum growth rate at relatively low perpendicular wave numbers in the range 0.3beam velocity v{sub b} < 10v{sub A} . A possible application to the upward electron beams in the terrestrial magnetosphere is briefly discussed.

  19. Recent advances of strong-strong beam-beam simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiang, Ji; Furman, Miguel A.; Ryne, Robert D.; Fischer, Wolfram; Ohmi,Kazuhito

    2004-09-15

    In this paper, we report on recent advances in strong-strong beam-beam simulation. Numerical methods used in the calculation of the beam-beam forces are reviewed. A new computational method to solve the Poisson equation on nonuniform grid is presented. This method reduces the computational cost by a half compared with the standard FFT based method on uniform grid. It is also more accurate than the standard method for a colliding beam with low transverse aspect ratio. In applications, we present the study of coherent modes with multi-bunch, multi-collision beam-beam interactions at RHIC. We also present the strong-strong simulation of the luminosity evolution at KEKB with and without finite crossing angle.

  20. Cryogenic Beam Loss Monitors for the Superconducting Magnets of the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartosik, MR; Sapinski, M; Kurfuerst, C; Griesmayer, E; Eremin, V; Verbitskaya, E

    2014-01-01

    The Beam Loss Monitor detectors close to the interaction points of the Large Hadron Collider are currently located outside the cryostat, far from the superconducting coils of the magnets. In addition to their sensitivity to lost beam particles, they also detect particles coming from the experimental collisions, which do not contribute significantly to the heat deposition in the superconducting coils. In the future, with beams of higher energy and brightness resulting in higher luminosity, distinguishing between these interaction products and dangerous quench-provoking beam losses from the primary proton beams will be challenging. The system can be optimised by locating beam loss monitors as close as possible to the superconducting coils, inside the cold mass in a superfluid helium environment, at 1.9 K. The dose then measured by such Cryogenic Beam Loss Monitors would more precisely correspond to the real dose deposited in the coil. The candidates under investigation for such detectors are based on p+-n-n+ si...

  1. HIGHLY COMPRESSED ION BEAMS FOR HIGH ENERGY DENSITY SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    HIGHLY COMPRESSED ION BEAMS FOR HIGH ENERGY DENSITY SCIENCE A. Friedman1,2 , J.J.Barnard1,2 , R Energy Density regimes required for Inertial Fu- sion Energy and other applications. An interim goal we are pursuing, low to medium mass ions with energies just above the Bragg peak are directed onto

  2. Ion beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Ian G. (1088 Woodside Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); Galvin, James (2 Commodore #276, Emeryville, CA 94608)

    1987-01-01

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam.

  3. Ion beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.

    1987-12-22

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam. 10 figs.

  4. Stationary nonlinear Airy beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lotti, A.; Faccio, D.; Couairon, A.; Papazoglou, D. G.; Panagiotopoulos, P.; Tzortzakis, S.; Abdollahpour, D.

    2011-08-15

    We demonstrate the existence of an additional class of stationary accelerating Airy wave forms that exist in the presence of third-order (Kerr) nonlinearity and nonlinear losses. Numerical simulations and experiments, in agreement with the analytical model, highlight how these stationary solutions sustain the nonlinear evolution of Airy beams. The generic nature of the Airy solution allows extension of these results to other settings, and a variety of applications are suggested.

  5. Proton beam therapy facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  6. Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, Bradley R. (Brentwood, CA); Talley, Chad E. (Brentwood, CA)

    2008-06-10

    Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) having polymer features wherein the size, shape and position are predetermined can be fabricated using an xy piezo stage mounted on an inverted microscope and a laser. Using an AMF controller, a solution containing polymer precursors and a photo initiator are positioned on the xy piezo and hit with a laser beam. The thickness of the polymeric features can be varied from a few nanometers to over a micron.

  7. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMission MissionModelingModified

  8. Future Directions of Structural Mass Spectrometry using Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J Kiselar; M Chance

    2011-12-31

    Hydroxyl radical protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry has been developed over the last decade and has matured to a powerful method for analyzing protein structure and dynamics. It has been successfully applied in the analysis of protein structure, protein folding, protein dynamics, and protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. Using synchrotron radiolysis, exposure of proteins to a 'white' X-ray beam for milliseconds provides sufficient oxidative modification to surface amino acid side chains, which can be easily detected and quantified by mass spectrometry. Thus, conformational changes in proteins or protein complexes can be examined using a time-resolved approach, which would be a valuable method for the study of macromolecular dynamics. In this review, we describe a new application of hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to probe the time evolution of the calcium-dependent conformational changes of gelsolin on the millisecond timescale. The data suggest a cooperative transition as multiple sites in different molecular subdomains have similar rates of conformational change. These findings demonstrate that time-resolved protein footprinting is suitable for studies of protein dynamics that occur over periods ranging from milliseconds to seconds. In this review, we also show how the structural resolution and sensitivity of the technology can be improved as well. The hydroxyl radical varies in its reactivity to different side chains by over two orders of magnitude, thus oxidation of amino acid side chains of lower reactivity are more rarely observed in such experiments. Here we demonstrate that the selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based method can be utilized for quantification of oxidized species, improving the signal-to-noise ratio. This expansion of the set of oxidized residues of lower reactivity will improve the overall structural resolution of the technique. This approach is also suggested as a basis for developing hypothesis-driven structural mass spectrometry experiments.

  9. Nondestructive Damage Detection in General Beams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dincal, Selcuk

    2010-12-08

    is to provide NDE methodologies that simultaneously identify the location, the extent, and the severity of damage in general beams. By general beams, we mean beyond Euler-Bernoulli beams (i.e. slender beams) to deep beams and stubby beams whose response may...

  10. Beam/Jet Trajectories April 1, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Beam/Jet Trajectories April 1, 2009 #12;Hg Jet Target Geometry Solenoid Axis Hg Jet Proton Beam BEAM CROSS rJET Previous results: Radius 5mm, beam =67mrad crossing = 33mrad #12;Optimized Target Energy, GeV Optimized Target Radius #12;Beam Angle and Jet/Beam Crossing Angle 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140

  11. Physics with Rare Isotope Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Segel, Ralph E. [Northwestern University] [Northwestern University

    2013-11-08

    Using stable and radioactive beams provided by ATLAS nuclear reactions of special interest in astrophysics have been studied with emphasis on breakout from the hot CNO cycle to the rp-process. The masses of nuclear fragments provided by a strong fission source have been measured in order to help trace the path of the r process. 8Li ions produced by the d(7Li,8Li)n reaction have been trapped and the electrons and alphas emitted in the ensuing beta-decay measured. The neutrino directions were therefore determined, which leads to a measurement of the electron-neutrino correlation. The energies and kinematics are such that a sensitive search for any tensor admixture could be performed and an upper limit of 0.6% was placed on any such admixture. Earlier work on the electromagnetic form factors of the proton was extended. Graduate students were active participants in all of these eperiments, which formed the basis for six PhD theses.

  12. Undergraduate Programs BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dellaire, Graham

    Undergraduate Programs in BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Dalhousie University 5850 College Street.............................................................................................................................. 3 1. Biochemistry Degree Programs .............................................................................................................. 4 Minor in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

  13. Undergraduate Programs BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dellaire, Graham

    Undergraduate Programs in BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Dalhousie University 9B1 - 5850 College........................................................................................................................................................ 3 1. Biochemistry Degree Programs ............................................................................................................................. 5 Minor in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

  14. Undergraduate Programs BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dellaire, Graham

    Undergraduate Programs in BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Dalhousie University 5850 College Street ............................................................................................................................. 3 1. Biochemistry Degree Programs .............................................................................................................. 4 Minor in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

  15. Fast beam studies of free radical photodissociation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neumark, D.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The authors have developed a novel technique for studying the photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals. In these experiments, radicals are generated by laser photodetachment of a fast (6-8 keV) mass-selected negative ion beam. The resulting radicals are photodissociated with a second laser, and the photofragments are collected and detected with high efficiency using a microchannel plate detector. The overall process is: ABC{sup -} {yields} ABC + e{sup -} {yields} A + BC, AB + C. Two types of fragment detection schemes are used. To map out the photodissociation cross-section of the radical, the photodissociation laser is scanned and the total photofragment yield is measured as a function of wavelength. In other experiments, the photodissociation frequency is fixed and the photofragment masses, kinetic energy release, and scattering angle is determined for each photodissociation event.

  16. Plasma-beam traps and radiofrequency quadrupole beam coolers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maggiore, M., E-mail: mario.maggiore@lnl.infn.it; Cavenago, M.; Comunian, M.; Chirulotto, F.; Galatà, A.; De Lazzari, M.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Stark, S. [INFN-LNL, viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy)] [INFN-LNL, viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Caruso, A.; Longhitano, A. [INFN-LNS, via S. Sofia 54, 95123 Catania (Italy)] [INFN-LNS, via S. Sofia 54, 95123 Catania (Italy); Cavaliere, F.; Maero, G.; Paroli, B.; Pozzoli, R.; Romé, M. [INFN Sezione di Milano and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)] [INFN Sezione di Milano and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    Two linear trap devices for particle beam manipulation (including emittance reduction, cooling, control of instabilities, dust dynamics, and non-neutral plasmas) are here presented, namely, a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) beam cooler and a compact Penning trap with a dust injector. Both beam dynamics studies by means of dedicated codes including the interaction of the ions with a buffer gas (up to 3 Pa pressure), and the electromagnetic design of the RFQ beam cooler are reported. The compact multipurpose Penning trap is aimed to the study of multispecies charged particle samples, primarily electron beams interacting with a background gas and/or a micrometric dust contaminant. Using a 0.9 T solenoid and an electrode stack where both static and RF electric fields can be applied, both beam transport and confinement operations will be available. The design of the apparatus is presented.

  17. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pikin, Alexander Alessi, James G. Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-09

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  18. Ion Beam Materials Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeat Pumps Heat PumpsfacilityviaGasforVendors »Ion Beam

  19. The ELENA Beam Diagnostics Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tranquille, G

    2013-01-01

    The Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) to be built at CERN is aimed at substantially increasing the number of antiprotons to the low energy antiproton physics community. It will be a small machine which will decelerate low intensity beams (electron cooler to avoid beam losses during the deceleration and to significantly reduce beam phase space at extraction. To measure the beam parameters from the extraction point of the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), through the ELENA ring and all the way to the experiments, many systems will be needed to ensure that the desired beam characteristics are obtained. Particular attention needs to be paid to the performance of the electron cooler which depends on reliable instrumentation in order to efficiently cool the antiprotons. This contribution will present the different monitors that have been proposed to measure the various beam parameters as well as some of the developments going on to further improve th...

  20. The Gas Flow from the Gas Attenuator to the Beam Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryutov, D.D.

    2010-12-03

    The gas leak from the gas attenuator to the main beam line of the Linac Coherent Light Source has been evaluated, with the effect of the Knudsen molecular beam included. It has been found that the gas leak from the gas attenuator of the present design, with nitrogen as a working gas, does not exceed 10{sup -5} torr x l/s even at the highest pressure in the main attenuation cell (20 torr).

  1. Electron beam diagnostic for space charge measurement of an ion beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01

    Electron beam diagnostic for space charge measurement of annon-perturbing electron beam diagnostic system for measuringnon intercepting electron beam diagnostic system consists of

  2. Electron-beam diagnostic for space-charge measurement of an ion beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01

    76, 023301 (2005) Electron-beam diagnostic for space-chargenonperturbing electron-beam diagnostic system for measuring8. (Color online). Electron-beam diagnostic, as installed in

  3. Electron beam diagnostic for space charge measurement of an ion beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01

    Electron beam diagnostic for space charge measurement of anAbstract A non-perturbing electron beam diagnostic systemlow energy, low current electron beam is swept transversely

  4. Electron-beam diagnostic for space-charge measurement of an ion beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01

    76, 023301 (2005) Electron-beam diagnostic for space-charge2005) A nonperturbing electron-beam diagnostic system forlow energy, low current electron beam is swept transversely

  5. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, D.R.; Alford, W.J.; Gruetzner, J.K.

    1999-08-10

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed. 21 figs.

  6. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, Daniel R. (17 Eric Alan Lane, Tijeras, NM 87059); Alford, W. J. (3455 Tahoe, N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Gruetzner, James K. (9407 Shoehone, N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed.

  7. Broad-band beam buncher

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, David A. (Walnut Creek, CA); Flood, William S. (Berkeley, CA); Arthur, Allan A. (Martinez, CA); Voelker, Ferdinand (Orinda, CA)

    1986-01-01

    A broad-band beam buncher is disclosed, comprising an evacuated housing, an electron gun therein for producing an electron beam, a buncher cavity having entrance and exit openings through which the beam is directed, grids across such openings, a source providing a positive DC voltage between the cavity and the electron gun, a drift tube through which the electron beam travels in passing through such cavity, grids across the ends of such drift tube, gaps being provided between the drift tube grids and the entrance and exit grids, a modulator for supplying an ultrahigh frequency modulating signal to the drift tube for producing velocity modulation of the electrons in the beam, a drift space in the housing through which the velocity modulated electron beam travels and in which the beam is bunched, and a discharge opening from such drift tube and having a grid across such opening through which the bunched electron beam is discharged into an accelerator or the like. The buncher cavity and the drift tube may be arranged to constitute an extension of a coaxial transmission line which is employed to deliver the modulating signal from a signal source. The extended transmission line may be terminated in its characteristic impedance to afford a broad-band response and the device as a whole designed to effect broad-band beam coupling, so as to minimize variations of the output across the response band.

  8. RadiaBeam PPT template

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    718 to 316 SS) Applications in nuclear (fission and fusion) and concentrated solar power components (DOE Nuclear Energy Phase III (DE-SC0011826)) RadiaBeam-led...

  9. Accelerators, Beams And Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators And Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

    2011-10-24

    Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

  10. Vacuum ultraviolet mass-analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy of methylcyclohexane in the supersonic jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sang Kyu

    Vacuum ultraviolet mass-analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy of methylcyclohexane t Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectrum of supersonically cooled the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser source is particu- larly useful for molecular systems with no stable

  11. Properties of Inconel 625 Mesh Structures Grown by Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    List III, Frederick Alyious [ORNL; Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL; Lowe, Larry E [ORNL; Sames, William J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Relationships between electron beam parameters (beam current, beam speed, and beam focus) and physical properties (mass, diameter, elastic modulus, and yield strength) have been investigated for Inconel 625 mesh cubes fabricated using an additive manufacturing technology based on electron beam melting. The elastic modulus and yield strength of the mesh cubes have been systematically varied by approximately a factor of ten by changing the electron beam parameters. Simple models have been used to understand better these relationships. Structural anisotropies of the mesh associated with the layered build architecture have been observed and may contribute, along with microstructural anisotropies, to the anisotropic mechanical properties of the mesh. Knowledge of this kind is likely applicable to other metal and alloy systems and is essential to rapidly realize the full potential of this burgeoning technology.

  12. Tuning the beam: a physics perspective on beam diagnostic instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gulley, Mark S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    In a nutshell, the role of a beam diagnostic measurement is to provide information needed to get a particle beam from Point A (injection point) to Point B (a target) in a useable condition, with 'useable' meaning the right energy and size and with acceptable losses. Specifications and performance requirements of diagnostics are based on the physics of the particle beam to be measured, with typical customers of beam parameter measurements being the accelerator operators and accelerator physicists. This tutorial will be a physics-oriented discussion of the interplay between tuning evolutions and the beam diagnostics systems that support the machine tune. This will include the differences between developing a tune and maintaining a tune, among other things. Practical longitudinal and transverse tuning issues and techniques from a variety of proton and electron machines will also be discussed.

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of GaAs Molecular Beam Epitaxy D. A. Murdick,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904, USA 2 Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PH, UK ABSTRACT The vapor deposition of epitaxial GaAs and (Ga,Mn)As thin films during far-temperature growth of Ga0.94Mn0.06As and the Mn clustering trends in as-grown films. INTRODUCTION GaAs is widely used

  14. Scaling relations for molecular gas in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardcastle, Martin

    Scaling relations for molecular gas in the Large Magellanic Cloud By A r t o H e i kk i l ¨a e (virial mass versus CO luminosity, luminosity versus size, linewidth versus size) for molecular clouds in the 30 Dor and N 159 regions in the Large Magel­ lanic Cloud. The analysis is based on CO J = 1 ! 0

  15. Measurements of aperture and beam lifetime using movable beam scrapers in Indus-2 electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Ghodke, A. D.; Karnewar, A. K.; Holikatti, A. C.; Yadav, S.; Puntambekar, T. A.; Singh, G.; Singh, P.

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, the measurements of vertical and horizontal aperture which are available for stable beam motion in Indus-2 at beam energy 2.5 GeV using movable beam scrapers are presented. These beam scrapers are installed in one of the long straight sections in the ring. With the movement of beam scrapers towards the beam centre, the beam lifetime is measured. The beam lifetime data obtained from the movement of vertical and horizontal beam scrapers are analyzed. The contribution of beam loss due to beam-gas scattering (vacuum lifetime) and electron-electron scattering within a beam bunch (Touschek lifetime) is separated from the measured beam lifetime at different positions of the beam scrapers. Vertical and horizontal beam sizes at scrapers location are estimated from the scraper movement towards the beam centre in quantum lifetime limit and their values closely agree with measured value obtained using X-ray diagnostic beamline.

  16. Molecular Superbubbles and Outflows from Starburst Galaxy NGC 2146

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An-Li Tsai; Satoki Matsushita; Kouichiro Nakanishi; Kotaro Kohno; Ryohei Kawabe; Tatsuya Inui; Hironori Matsumoto; Takeshi G. Tsuru; Alison B. Peck; Andrea Tarchi

    2009-11-24

    We present results from a deep (1 sigma = 5.7 mJy beam^{-1} per 20.8 km s^{-1} velocity channel) ^{12}CO(1-0) interferometric observation of the central 60" region of the nearby edge-on starburst galaxy NGC 2146 observed with the Nobeyama Millimeter Array (NMA). Two diffuse expanding molecular superbubbles and one molecular outflow are successfully detected. One molecular superbubble, with a size of ~1 kpc and an expansion velocity of ~50 km s^{-1}, is located below the galactic disk; a second molecular superbubble, this time with a size of ~700 pc and an expansion velocity of ~35 km s^{-1}, is also seen in the position-velocity diagram; the molecular outflow is located above the galactic disk with an extent ~2 kpc, expanding with a velocity of up to ~200 km s^{-1}. The molecular outflow has an arc-like structure, and is located at the front edge of the soft X-ray outflow. In addition, the kinetic energy (~3E55 erg) and the pressure (~1 E-12 \\pm 1 dyne cm ^{-2}) of the molecular outflow is comparable to or smaller than that of the hot thermal plasma, suggesting that the hot plasma pushes the molecular gas out from the galactic disk. Inside the ~1 kpc size molecular superbubble, diffuse soft X-ray emission seems to exist. But since the superbubble lies behind the inclined galactic disk, it is largely absorbed by the molecular gas.

  17. Design and operational characteristics of a cast steel mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blantocas, Gene Q.; Ramos, Henry J.; Wada, Motoi

    2004-09-01

    A cast steel magnetic sector mass analyzer is developed for studies of hydrogen and helium ion beams generated by a gas discharge compact ion source. The optimum induced magnetic flux density of 3500 G made it possible to scan the whole spectrum of hydrogen and helium ion species. Analysis of beam characteristics shows that the mass spectrometer sensitivity, and resolving power are approximately inversely proportional. The resolution is enhanced at higher pressures and lower current discharges. In contrast, the instrument sensitivity increased at higher current discharges and decreased at higher pressures. Calculations of the ultimate resolving power with reference to analyzer dimensions yield a numerical value of 30. System anomaly in the form of spherical aberrations was also analyzed using the paraxial beam envelope equation. Beam divergence is most significant at high discharge conditions where angular spread reaches an upper limit of 8.6 deg.

  18. Broad-band beam buncher

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, D.A.; Flood, W.S.; Arthur, A.A.; Voelker, F.

    1984-03-20

    A broad-band beam bunther is disclosed, comprising an evacuated housing, an electron gun therein for producing an electron beam, a buncher cavity having entrance and exit openings through which the beam is directed, grids across such openings, a source providing a positive DC voltage between the cavity and the electron gun, a drift tube through which the electron beam travels in passing through such cavity, grids across the ends of such drift tube, gaps being provided between the drift tube grids and the entrance and exit grids, a modulator for supplying an ultrahigh frequency modulating signal to the drift tube for producing velocity modulation of the electrons in the beam, a drift space in the housing through which the velocity modulated electron beam travels and in which the beam is bunched, and a discharge opening from such drift tube and having a grid across such opening through which the bunched electron beam is discharged into an accelerator or the like. The buncher cavity and the drift tube may be arranged to constitute an extension of a coaxial transmission line which is employed to deliver the modulating signal from a signal source. The extended transmission line may be terminated in its characteristic impedance to afford a broad-

  19. Laser acceleration of ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Egorova; A. V. Filatov; A. V. Prozorkevich; S. A. Smolyansky; D. B. Blaschke; M. Chubaryan

    2007-02-01

    We consider methods of charged particle acceleration by means of high-intensity lasers. As an application we discuss a laser booster for heavy ion beams provided, e.g. by the Dubna nuclotron. Simple estimates show that a cascade of crossed laser beams would be necessary to provide additional acceleration to gold ions of the order of GeV/nucleon.

  20. Cancer Therapy with Particle Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    Cancer Therapy with Particle Beams #12;· The potential to use high energy particle beams to treat many types of cancer has been known even before their creation. · The availability of these treatments to be used in medicine, specifically for the treatment of certain cancers. His paper was published when

  1. Studies of beam dynamics in relativistic klystron two-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lidia, Steven M.

    1999-11-01

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) based upon free-electron lasers (FELs) or relativistic klystrons (RK-TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band ({approximately}8-12 GHz) through Ka band ({approximately} 30-35 GHz) frequency regions. Provided that further prototyping shows stable beam propagation with minimal current loss and production of good quality, high-power rf fields, this technology is compatible with current schemes for electron-positron colliders in the multi-TeV center-of-mass scale. A new method of simulating the beam dynamics in accelerators of this type has been developed in this dissertation. There are three main components to this simulation. The first is a tracking algorithm to generate nonlinear transfer maps for pushing noninteracting particles through the external fields. The second component is a 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) algorithm that solves a set of Helmholtz equations for the self-fields, including the conducting boundary condition, and generates impulses that are interleaved with the nonlinear maps by means of a split-operation algorithm. The Helmholtz equations are solved by a multi-grid algorithm. The third component is an equivalent circuit equation solver that advances the modal rf cavity fields in time due to excitation by the modulated beam. The RTA project is described, and the simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed. A beamline design is presented that will generate nearly 1.2 GW of power from 40 input, gain, and output rv cavities over a 10 m distance. The simulations show that beam current losses are acceptable, and that longitudinal and transverse focusing techniques are sufficient capable of maintaining a high degree of beam quality along the entire beamline. Additional experimental efforts are also described.

  2. Ion source for high-precision mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Todd, P.J.; McKown, H.S.; Smith, D.H.

    1982-04-26

    The invention is directed to a method for increasing the precision of positive-ion relative abundance measurements conducted in a sector mass spectrometer having an ion source for directing a beam of positive ions onto a collimating slit. The method comprises incorporating in the source an electrostatic lens assembly for providing a positive-ion beam of circular cross section for collimation by the slit. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  3. Delivering High IntensityDelivering High Intensity Proton Beam:Proton Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    11 Delivering High IntensityDelivering High Intensity Proton Beam:Proton Beam: Lessons for the NextFACT08NuFACT08 ­­ 4 July4 July S. ChildressS. Childress ­­ Proton BeamsProton Beams 22 Presentation OutlinePresentation Outline Key Proton Beam ConsiderationsKey Proton Beam Considerations The First

  4. Multifragmentation at the balance energy of mass asymmetric colliding nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supriya Goyal

    2011-06-20

    Using the quantum molecular dynamics model, we study the role of mass asymmetry of colliding nuclei on the fragmentation at the balance energy and on its mass dependence. The study is done by keeping the total mass of the system fixed as 40, 80, 160, and 240 and by varying the mass asymmetry of the ($\\eta$ = $\\frac{A_{T}-A_{P}}{A_{T}+A_{P}}$; where $A_{T}$ and $A_{P}$ are the masses of the target and projectile, respectively) reaction from 0.1 to 0.7. Our results clearly indicate a sizeable effect of the mass asymmetry on the multiplicity of various fragments. The mass asymmetry dependence of various fragments is found to increase with increase in total system mass (except for heavy mass fragments). Similar to symmetric reactions, a power law system mass dependence of various fragment multiplicities is also found to exit for large asymmetries.

  5. Advanced Light Source Beam Position Monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinkson, J.

    2011-01-01

    diagnostic ports, EPM pickups, photon stops, vacuum pumps, and the electron beamElectron beam position monitors (BPM) are installed throughout the accelerator and constitute the major part of accelerator beam diagnostics.

  6. Laser beam alignment apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruhn, Charles R. (Martinez, CA); Hammond, Robert B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an apparatus and method for laser beam alignment. Thermoelectric properties of a disc in a laser beam path are used to provide an indication of beam alignment and/or automatic laser alignment.

  7. Beam Beam Simulation Studies for NLC And SLC2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, K.A.; Chen, P.; Irwin, J.; Zimmermann, F.; /SLAC

    2010-05-27

    We apply and modify the computer codes CAIN(P.Chen, G.Horton-Smith, T.Ohgaki, A.W.Weidemann, K.Yokoya, contributed to Workshop on Gamma-Gamma Colliders, Berkeley, CA, March 28-31, 1994; SLAC-PUB-6583.) and GUINEAPIG(D.Schulte (DESY), unpublished.) to make detailed studies of the beam-beam interaction in the SLAC design for a future linear collider (NLC), as well as to the proposed SLC2000 project. Using realistic beam distributions, we present simulations related to the tuning and optimization of luminosity in SLC2000 and NLC.

  8. Coherent instabilities of a relativistic bunched beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chao, A.W.

    1982-06-01

    A charge-particle beam contained in an accelerator vacuum chamber interacts electromagnetically with its environment to create a wake field. This field than acts back on the beam, perturbing the particle motion. If the beam intensity is high enough, this beam-environment interaction may lead to an instability and to subsequent beam loss. The beam and its environment form a dynamical system, and it is this system that will be studied. 84 references.

  9. Distribution of Circumstellar Disk Masses in the Young Cluster NGC 2024

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Eisner; John M. Carpenter

    2003-08-15

    We determine the distribution of circumstellar disk masses in the young (~0.3 Myr) cluster NGC 2024 by imaging a 2.5'x2.5' region in 3mm continuum emission to an RMS noise level of ~0.75 mJy/beam with the Owens Valley Millimeter Array. The mosaic encompasses 147 K-band sources as well as the molecular ridge seen previously in dust continuum emission. We detect 10 point-like sources in 3mm continuum emission above the level of 5-sigma within the unit gain region of the mosaic. One of these sources corresponds to the near-IR source IRS 2, an early B-type star. Two other sources are tentatively associated with low-mass near-IR cluster members, and the remaining 7 sources have no K-band counterparts. Assuming the millimeter continuum point sources represent emission from circumstellar disks and/or envelopes, then ~6% of the total population (infrared and millimeter sources) in the NGC 2024 mosaic has a circumstellar mass in excess of ~0.06 solar masses. We obtain further constraints on the average circumstellar disk mass by considering the mean millimeter continuum flux observed toward a sample of 140 K-band sources that likely have stellar masses <1-2 Msun. While none of these sources are detected individually above the 3-sigma limit of ~0.035 Msun, the ensemble of sources are detected in the mean at the 5-sigma level with a mean disk mass of ~0.005 Msun. Compared to the older (~2 Myr) cluster IC 348, NGC 2024 contains a higher frequency of massive disks/envelopes and has a higher mean disk mass by a factor of 2.5 +/- 1.3 among K-band sources, suggesting that the mean circumstellar mass is decreasing with cluster age. We also compare the results for the NGC 2024 and IC 348 clusters to those for the lower-density Taurus star forming region.

  10. Formation of the diphenyl molecule in the crossed beam reaction of phenyl radicals with benzene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Fangtong; Gu Xibin; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2008-02-28

    The chemical dynamics to form the D5-diphenyl molecule, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}C{sub 6}D{sub 5}, via the neutral-neutral reaction of phenyl radicals (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}) with D6-benzene (C{sub 6}D{sub 6}), was investigated in a crossed molecular beams experiment at a collision energy of 185 kJ mol{sup -1}. The laboratory angular distribution and time-of-flight spectra of the C{sub 6}H{sub 5}C{sub 6}D{sub 5} product were recorded at mass to charge m/z of 159. Forward-convolution fitting of our data reveals that the reaction dynamics are governed by an initial addition of the phenyl radical to the {pi} electron density of the D6-benzene molecule yielding a short-lived C{sub 6}H{sub 5}C{sub 6}D{sub 6} collision complex. The latter undergoes atomic deuterium elimination via a tight exit transition state located about 30 kJ mol{sup -1} above the separated reactants; the overall reaction to form D5-diphenyl from phenyl and D6-benzene was found to be weakly exoergic. The explicit identification of the D5-biphenyl molecules suggests that in high temperature combustion flames, a diphenyl molecule can be formed via a single collision event between a phenyl radical and a benzene molecule.

  11. Adaptive Optics Imaging of IRAS 18276-1431: a bipolar pre-planetary nebula with circumstellar "searchlight beams" and "arcs"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contreras, C S; Sahai, R; De Paz, A G; Morris, M

    2006-01-01

    We present high-angular resolution images of the post-AGB nebula IRAS18276-1431 (also known as OH17.7-2.0) obtained with the Keck II Adaptive Optics (AO) system in its Natural Guide Star (NGS) mode in the Kp, Lp, and Ms near-infrared bands. We also present supporting optical F606W and F814W HST images as well as interferometric observations of the 12CO(J=1-0), 13CO(J=1-0), and 2.6mm continuum emission with OVRO. The envelope of IRAS18276-1431 displays a clear bipolar morphology in our optical and NIR images with two lobes separated by a dark waist and surrounded by a faint 4.5"x3.4" halo. Our Kp-band image reveals two pairs of radial ``searchlight beams'' emerging from the nebula center and several intersecting, arc-like features. From our CO data we derive a mass of M>0.38[D/3kpc]^2 Msun and an expansion velocity v_exp=17km/s for the molecular envelope. The density in the halo follows a radial power-law proportional to r^-3, which is consistent with a mass-loss rate increasing with time. Analysis of the NIR ...

  12. Interfacial Engineering of Molecular Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelton, Steven Wade

    2014-01-01

    Engineering of Molecular Photovoltaics by Steven WadeEngineering of Molecular Photovoltaics Copyright © 2014 byEngineering of Molecular Photovoltaics by Steven Wade

  13. Alight a beam and beaming light: A theme with variations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chattopadhyay, S. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California94720 (United States)] [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California94720 (United States)

    1998-05-01

    The interaction of light (coherent and incoherent) with charged particle beams is explored in various configurations: incoherent scattering of coherent light (laser) from an incoherent particle beam (high temperature), coherent scattering of coherent light (laser) from a {open_quotes}cold{close_quotes} (bunched) beam, femtosecond generation of particle and light beams via {open_quotes}optical slicing{close_quotes} and Thomson/Compton scattering techniques, etc. The domains of ultrashort temporal duration (femtoseconds) as well as ultrashort wavelengths (x rays and shorter), with varying degrees of coherence, are explored. The relevance to a few critical areas of research in the natural sciences, e.g., ultrafast material, chemical and biological processes, protein folding, particle phase space cooling, etc. are touched upon. All the processes discussed involve proper interpretation and understanding of coherent states of matter and radiation, as well as the quality and quantity of information and energy embedded in them. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, J.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1996-07-09

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: (1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and (2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1,000 {micro}m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 {micro}m diameter of laser drilling. 5 figs.

  15. Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W. (Pleasanton, CA); O'Brien, Dennis W. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: 1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and 2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1000 .mu.m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 .mu.m diameter of laser drilling.

  16. Thermal stresses in laminated beams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcano, Victor Manuel

    1983-01-01

    Stresses Acting on a Section of the Laminated Beam -------- 15 5. Loading Geometry and Material Characteristics of the Test Problem 21 6. Simply-Supported Beam with a Sinusoidal Load--------- 30 7. Shear Stress Distribution for a Simply- Supported... 24. Normal Stress Distribution for a Cantilever Laminated Beam, T-Z sinzx/L --------------- 58 m. i 25. Axial Stress Distribution for a Cantilever Laminated Bearq, T-T (2z/8+1) 2 mi 27. Normal Stress Distribution for ("/L) ? ---- 6O 2 a...

  17. Sheet Beam Klystron Instability Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bane, K.L.F.; Jensen, A.; Li, Z.; Stupakov, G.; Adolphsen, C.; /SLAC

    2009-05-08

    Using the principle of energy balance we develop a 2D theory for calculating growth rates of instability in a two-cavity model of a sheet beam klystron. An important ingredient is a TE-like mode in the gap that also gives a longitudinal kick to the beam. When compared with a self-consistent particle-in-cell calculation, with sheet beam klystron-type parameters, agreement is quite good up to half the design current, 65 A; at full current, however, other, current-dependent effects come in and the results deviate significantly.

  18. All Beams 2013.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TA I N P A T TSorbents forCO 2PAliceMarkovitz AboutMass

  19. Hydrodynamical Simulations of Molecular Dynamics in Supersonic Turbulent Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) = R (T ; n; f) D (T ; n; f) ; (1d) where n is the hydrogen nuclei density, e is the internal energy analyse PDFs of density for the volume, mass, molec- ular mass and the energy distribution over the range density and f is the molecular hydrogen abundance (i.e. n(H 2 ) = fn). We consider the gas as a mixture

  20. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garnett, Robert W. (Los Alamos, NM); Dobelbower, M. Christian (Toledo, OH)

    1995-01-01

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location.

  1. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garnett, R.W.; Dobelbower, M.C.

    1995-11-21

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location. 26 figs.

  2. Confined energy distribution for charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jason, Andrew J. (Los Alamos, NM); Blind, Barbara (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A charged particle beam is formed to a relatively larger area beam which is well-contained and has a beam area which relatively uniformly deposits energy over a beam target. Linear optics receive an accelerator beam and output a first beam with a first waist defined by a relatively small size in a first dimension normal to a second dimension. Nonlinear optics, such as an octupole magnet, are located about the first waist and output a second beam having a phase-space distribution which folds the beam edges along the second dimension toward the beam core to develop a well-contained beam and a relatively uniform particle intensity across the beam core. The beam may then be expanded along the second dimension to form the uniform ribbon beam at a selected distance from the nonlinear optics. Alternately, the beam may be passed through a second set of nonlinear optics to fold the beam edges in the first dimension. The beam may then be uniformly expanded along the first and second dimensions to form a well-contained, two-dimensional beam for illuminating a two-dimensional target with a relatively uniform energy deposition.

  3. Neon Ion Beam Lithography (NIBL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winston, Donald

    Existing techniques for electron- and ion-beam lithography, routinely employed for nanoscale device fabrication and mask/mold prototyping, do not simultaneously achieve efficient (low fluence) exposure and high resolution. ...

  4. A multi beam proton accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolya, S N

    2015-01-01

    The article considers a proton accelerator containing seven independent beams arranged on the accelerator radius. The current in each beam is one hundred milliamps. The initial part of the accelerator consists of shielded spiral waveguides assembled in the common screen. The frequency of the acceleration: three hundred megahertz, high-frequency power twenty-five megawatts, the length of the accelerator six meters. After reaching the proton energy of six megaelektronvolts the protons using lenses with the azimuthal magnetic field are collected in one beam. Further beam acceleration is performed in the array of superconducting cavities tuned to the frequency one and three tenths gigahertz. The acceleration rate is equal to twenty megavolt per meter, the high-frequency power consumption fifteen megawatts per meter.

  5. Quantum fluctuations in beam dynamics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K.-J.

    1998-06-04

    Quantum effects could become important for particle and photon beams used in high-luminosity and high brightness applications in the current and next generation accelerators and radiation sources. This paper is a review of some of these effects.

  6. Neutron beam testing of triblades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalak, Sarah E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, Andrew J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Storlie, Curtis B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rust, William N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Modl, David G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quinn, Heather M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Blanchard, Sean P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manuzzato, Andrea [UNIV DEGLI STUDI DI PADOVA ITALY

    2011-01-31

    PowerXCell 8i processors and Opterons in four IBM Triblades were tested at LANSCE. The hazard rate when the beam was aimed at the Opterons was higher than when it was aimed at the Cell processors.

  7. Center for Beam Physics, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities.

  8. The Fermilab neutrino beam program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rameika, Regina A.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    This talk presents an overview of the Fermilab Neutrino Beam Program. Results from completed experiments as well as the status and outlook for current experiments is given. Emphasis is given to current activities towards planning for a future program.

  9. Single-Beam Coherent Raman Spectroscopy and Microscopy via Spectral Notch Shaping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Ori; Grinvald, Eran; Silberberg, Yaron

    2010-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is one of the key techniques in the study of vibrational modes and molecular structures. In Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) spectroscopy, a molecular vibrational spectrum is resolved via the third-order nonlinear interaction of pump, Stokes and probe photons, typically using a complex experimental setup with multiple beams and laser sources. Although CARS has become a widespread technique for label-free chemical imaging and detection of contaminants, its multi-source, multi-beam experimental implementation is challenging. In this work we present a simple and easily implementable scheme for performing single-beam CARS spectroscopy and microscopy using a single femtosecond pulse, shaped by a tunable narrowband notch filter. As a substitute for multiple sources, the single broadband pulse simultaneously provides the pump, Stokes and probe photons, exciting a broad band of vibrational levels. High spectroscopic resolution is obtained by utilizing a tunable spectral notch, shaped wi...

  10. Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasma Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matlis, N. H.

    2011-01-01

    Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasmadiagnostic techniques [2]. While the field of electron beam

  11. Electron beam diagnostic for profiling high power beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W. (Danville, CA); Palmer, Todd A. (Livermore, CA); Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA)

    2008-03-25

    A system for characterizing high power electron beams at power levels of 10 kW and above is described. This system is comprised of a slit disk assembly having a multitude of radial slits, a conducting disk with the same number of radial slits located below the slit disk assembly, a Faraday cup assembly located below the conducting disk, and a start-stop target located proximate the slit disk assembly. In order to keep the system from over-heating during use, a heat sink is placed in close proximity to the components discussed above, and an active cooling system, using water, for example, can be integrated into the heat sink. During use, the high power beam is initially directed onto a start-stop target and after reaching its full power is translated around the slit disk assembly, wherein the beam enters the radial slits and the conducting disk radial slits and is detected at the Faraday cup assembly. A trigger probe assembly can also be integrated into the system in order to aid in the determination of the proper orientation of the beam during reconstruction. After passing over each of the slits, the beam is then rapidly translated back to the start-stop target to minimize the amount of time that the high power beam comes in contact with the slit disk assembly. The data obtained by the system is then transferred into a computer system, where a computer tomography algorithm is used to reconstruct the power density distribution of the beam.

  12. Ultra High Mass Range Mass Spectrometer System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2005-12-06

    Applicant's present invention comprises mass spectrometer systems that operate in a mass range from 1 to 10.sup.16 DA. The mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system comprising an aerodynamic lens system, a reverse jet being a gas flux generated in an annulus moving in a reverse direction and a multipole ion guide; a digital ion trap; and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises a quadrupole mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system having a quadrupole mass filter and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises an inlet system for use with a mass spectrometer system, a method for slowing energetic particles using an inlet system. Applicant's present invention also comprises a detector device and a method for detecting high mass charged particles.

  13. Molecular design of extractants | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStress Molecular Mimicry ofMolecular

  14. Overview of Light-Ion Beam Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, William T.

    2006-01-01

    measurements using various dosimeters. Discussions of theseamong ion-beam centers • Dosimeter calibrations • Do you

  15. Eigenvalues of an axially loaded cantilever beam with an eccentric end rigid body

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lajimi, S Amir Mousavi

    2014-01-01

    An analytical form of the characteristic equation for a vertically mounted cantilever beam with an end rigid body is obtained and solved for the eigenvalues of the structure. The effect of the weight of the structure is taken into consideration by estimating the load as a function of the length of the beam. The mass, rotary inertia and eccentricity of the end rigid body are demonstrated to considerably affect the eigenvalues of the structure.

  16. Probing the Short Range Spin Dependent Interactions by Polarized $^{3}He$ Atom Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Yan

    2014-09-16

    Experiments using polarized $^{3}He$ atom beams to search for short range spin dependent forces are proposed. High intensity, high polarization, small beam size $^{3}He$ atom beams have been successfully produced and used in surface science researches. By incorporating background reduction designs as combination shielding by $\\mu$-metal and superconductor and double beam pathes, the precision of spin rotation angle per unit length could be improved by a factor of $\\sim10^{4}$. By this precision, in combination with using a high density and low magnetic susceptibility sample source mass,and reversing one beam path if necessary, sensitivities on three different types of spin dependent interactions could be possibly improved by as much as $\\sim10^{2}$ to $\\sim10^{8}$ over the current experiments at the millimeter range.

  17. Fourier-space generation of abruptly autofocusing beams and optical bottle beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhigang

    Fourier-space generation of abruptly autofocusing beams and optical bottle beams Ioannis Chremmos,1) Airy beam can be generated by Fourier-transforming an appropriately apodized Bessel beam whose radial distance of the Fourier- transforming lens, it is possible to generate AAF beams with one or two foci

  18. The production and use of radioactive nuclear beams at the Bevalac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krebs, G.F.; Alonso, J.R.; Feinberg, B.; Kalnins, J.G.

    1991-10-01

    Using the fragmentation process, radioactive nuclear beams (RNB) are routinely produced at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Bevalac. Three beam lines are operational for production and transport of RNB: (1) a line for use in the radiotherapy treatment program (A {congruent} 20 amu), (2) a line for low mass (A {congruent} 20 amu) nuclear science studies and (3) a line for medium mass (A {congruent} 50 amu) nuclear science studies. A fourth beam line is under construction that will allow higher mass RNB (A {congruent} 100 amu) to be transmitted to the Bevalac`s Heavy Ion Superconducting Spectrometer. Characteristics of RNB production and transport efficiency are described along with the RNB experimental program at the Bevalac.

  19. The production and use of radioactive nuclear beams at the Bevalac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krebs, G.F.; Alonso, J.R.; Feinberg, B.; Kalnins, J.G.

    1991-10-01

    Using the fragmentation process, radioactive nuclear beams (RNB) are routinely produced at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac. Three beam lines are operational for production and transport of RNB: (1) a line for use in the radiotherapy treatment program (A {congruent} 20 amu), (2) a line for low mass (A {congruent} 20 amu) nuclear science studies and (3) a line for medium mass (A {congruent} 50 amu) nuclear science studies. A fourth beam line is under construction that will allow higher mass RNB (A {congruent} 100 amu) to be transmitted to the Bevalac's Heavy Ion Superconducting Spectrometer. Characteristics of RNB production and transport efficiency are described along with the RNB experimental program at the Bevalac.

  20. Reaction dynamics of OH{sup +}({sup 3}{sigma}{sup -})+C{sub 2}H{sub 2} studied with crossed beams and density functional theory calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Li; Martin, Courtney; Farrar, James M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2006-10-07

    The reactions between OH{sup +}({sup 3}{sigma}{sup -}) and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} have been studied using crossed ion and molecular beams and density functional theory calculations. Both charge transfer and proton transfer channels are observed. Products formed by carbon-carbon bond cleavage analogous to those formed in the isoelectronic O({sup 3}P)+C{sub 2}H{sub 2} reaction, e.g., {sup 3}CH{sub 2}+HCO{sup +}, are not observed. The center of mass flux distributions of both product ions at three different energies are highly asymmetric, with maxima close to the velocity and direction of the precursor acetylene beam, characteristic of direct reactions. The internal energy distributions of the charge transfer products are independent of collision energy and are peaked at the reaction exothermicity, inconsistent with either the existence of favorable Franck-Condon factors or energy resonance. In proton transfer, almost the entire reaction exothermicity is transformed into product internal excitation, consistent with mixed energy release in which the proton is transferred with both the breaking and forming bonds extended. Most of the incremental translational energy in the two higher-energy experiments appears in product translational energy, providing an example of induced repulsive energy release.

  1. Electron beam ion source and electron beam ion trap (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, Reinard [Scientific Software Service, Kapellenweg 2a, D-63571 Gelnhausen (Germany); Kester, Oliver [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) and its trap variant [electron beam ion trap (EBIT)] celebrated their 40th and 20th anniversary, respectively, at the EBIS/T Symposium 2007 in Heidelberg. These technologically challenging sources of highly charged ions have seen a broad development in many countries over the last decades. In contrast to most other ion sources the recipe of improvement was not ''sorcery'' but a clear understanding of the physical laws and obeying the technological constraints. This review will report important achievements of the past as well as promising developments in the future.

  2. Mass spectrometric immunoassay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Randall W (Phoenix, AZ); Williams, Peter (Phoenix, AZ); Krone, Jennifer Reeve (Granbury, TX)

    2007-12-04

    Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

  3. Studies of beam dynamics in relativistic klystron two-beam accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lidia, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    Yu. Lett, Relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator. Phys.S.M. Lidia et al. Relativistic klystron two-beam acceleratorPlasma Set. , Relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator. [

  4. Part I 7-Minute Questions 1. A tennis ball of mass m is held just above a basketball of mass M ! m and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yavuz, Deniz

    does the tennis ball rebound? 2. A copper wire has length L, mass M, cross sectional area A, and Young, but the center point is fixed in space. a. Find the quantum mechanically allowed energy levels of this rigid rotor. b. What are the degeneracies of the energy levels? 6. A beam of particles of mass µ and momentum

  5. Physics Opportunities with Meson Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briscoe, William J; Haberzettl, Helmut; Manley, D Mark; Naruki, Megumi; Strakovsky, Igor I; Swanson, Eric S

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, meson photo- and electro-production data of unprecedented quality and quantity have been measured at electromagnetic facilities worldwide. By contrast, the meson-beam data for the same hadronic final states are mostly outdated and largely of poor quality, or even nonexistent, and thus provide inadequate input to help interpret, analyze, and exploit the full potential of the new electromagnetic data. To reap the full benefit of the high-precision electromagnetic data, new high-statistics data from measurements with meson beams, with good angle and energy coverage for a wide range of reactions, are critically needed to advance our knowledge in baryon and meson spectroscopy and other related areas of hadron physics. To address this situation, a state of-the-art meson-beam facility needs to be constructed. The present paper summarizes unresolved issues in hadron physics and outlines the vast opportunities and advances that only become possible with such a facility.

  6. Physics Opportunities with Meson Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William J. Briscoe; Michael Döring; Helmut Haberzettl; D. Mark Manley; Megumi Naruki; Igor I. Strakovsky; Eric S. Swanson

    2015-03-26

    Over the past two decades, meson photo- and electro-production data of unprecedented quality and quantity have been measured at electromagnetic facilities worldwide. By contrast, the meson-beam data for the same hadronic final states are mostly outdated and largely of poor quality, or even nonexistent, and thus provide inadequate input to help interpret, analyze, and exploit the full potential of the new electromagnetic data. To reap the full benefit of the high-precision electromagnetic data, new high-statistics data from measurements with meson beams, with good angle and energy coverage for a wide range of reactions, are critically needed to advance our knowledge in baryon and meson spectroscopy and other related areas of hadron physics. To address this situation, a state of-the-art meson-beam facility needs to be constructed. The present paper summarizes unresolved issues in hadron physics and outlines the vast opportunities and advances that only become possible with such a facility.

  7. REQUIREMENTS AND GUIDELINES FOR NSLS EXPERIMENTAL BEAM LINE VACUUM SYSTEMS-REVISION B.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FOERSTER,C.

    1999-05-01

    Typical beam lines are comprised of an assembly of vacuum valves and shutters referred to as a ''front end'', optical elements to monochromatize, focus and split the photon beam, and an experimental area where a target sample is placed into the photon beam and data from the interaction is detected and recorded. Windows are used to separate sections of beam lines that are not compatible with storage ring ultra high vacuum. Some experimental beam lines share a common vacuum with storage rings. Sections of beam lines are only allowed to vent up to atmospheric pressure using pure nitrogen gas after a vacuum barrier is established to protect ring vacuum. The front end may only be bled up when there is no current in the machine. This is especially true on the VUV storage ring where for most experiments, windows are not used. For the shorter wavelength, more energetic photons of the x-ray ring, beryllium windows are used at various beam line locations so that the monochromator, mirror box or sample chamber may be used in a helium atmosphere or rough vacuum. The window separates ring vacuum from the environment of the downstream beam line components. The stored beam lifetime in the storage rings and the maintenance of desirable reflection properties of optical surfaces depend upon hydrocarbon-free, ultra-high vacuum systems. Storage ring vacuum systems will operate at pressures of {approximately} 1 x 10{sup {minus}10} Torr without beam and {approximately} 1 x 10{sup {minus}9} Torr with beam. Systems are free of hydrocarbons in the sense that no pumps, valves, etc. containing organics are used. Components are all-metal, chemically cleaned and bakeable. To the extent that beam lines share a common vacuum with the storage ring, the same criteria will hold for beam line components. The design philosophy for NSLS beam lines is to use all-metal, hydrocarbon-free front end components and recommend that experimenters use this approach for common vacuum hardware downstream of front ends. O-ring-sealed valves, if used, are not permitted upstream of the monochromator exit aperture. It will be the responsibility of users to demonstrate that their experiment will not degrade the pressure or quality of the storage ring vacuum. As a matter of operating policy, all beam lines will be monitored for prescribed pressure and the contribution of high mass gases to this pressure each time a beam line has been opened to ring vacuum.

  8. Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, Kim

    cell with a monopolar spindle shows a gradient of Aurora B phosphorylation spreading outward from; molecular immunology; protein structure, dynamics and folding; enzymology; regulation of metabolism; RNA

  9. Molecular Phylogenetics (Hannes Luz)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spang, Rainer

    Molecular Phylogenetics (Hannes Luz) Contents: · Phylogenetic Trees, basic notions · A character Berlin, 2007) · Martin Vingron, Hannes Luz, Jens Stoye, Lecture notes on 'Al- gorithms for Phylogenetic

  10. Mass wasting on the submarine Lomonosov Ridge, central Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristoffersen, Yngve

    ) made from nuclear submarine Hawkbill (SCICEX). Bathymetry is derived from multi-beam measurements madeMass wasting on the submarine Lomonosov Ridge, central Arctic Ocean Yngve Kristoffersen a,, Bernard particulate matter in the water column accumulate as a uniform drape on submarine plateaus and ridges

  11. Formulation of a Mesoscopic Electron Beam Splitter with Application in Semiconductor Based Quantum Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Shanker; D. Bhowmik; T. K. Bhattacharya

    2010-12-09

    We aim to analytically arrive at a beam splitter formulation for electron waves. The electron beam splitter is an essential component of quantum logical devices. To arrive at the beam splitter structure, the electrons are treated as waves, i.e. we assume the transport to be ballistic. Ballistic electrons are electrons that travel over such short distances that their phase coherence is maintained. For mesoscopic devices with size smaller than the mean free path, the phase relaxation length and the Fermi wavelength of electrons in the medium, the transport can be considered to be coherent and hence ballistic. In such a case the electron motion can be completely described by the Schrodinger's wave equation with an effective mass assigned to the electron. To design a beam splitter, we draw inspiration from an electromagnetic beam splitter, where the Maxwell's equations (and subsequently the Helmholtz equation) are used to describe the splitting of light across a thin slab of dielectric material. The parameters of the media and the thickness of the slab can be manipulated to achieve a 50-50 beam splitter. We wish to achieve a similar 50-50 beam splitting for the electron wave. Using an analogy between the scalar Helmholtz equation and the Schrodinger's equation for a ballistic electron, we arrive at this desired beam splitter structure for the electron.

  12. Shimmed electron beam welding process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Ganjiang (Clifton Park, NY); Nowak, Daniel Anthony (Alplaus, NY); Murphy, John Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A modified electron beam welding process effects welding of joints between superalloy materials by inserting a weldable shim in the joint and heating the superalloy materials with an electron beam. The process insures a full penetration of joints with a consistent percentage of filler material and thereby improves fatigue life of the joint by three to four times as compared with the prior art. The process also allows variable shim thickness and joint fit-up gaps to provide increased flexibility for manufacturing when joining complex airfoil structures and the like.

  13. Total cyanide mass measurement with micro-ion selective electrode for determination of specific activity of carbon-11 cyanide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shea, Colleen; Alexoff, David L.; Kim, Dohyun; Hoque, Ruma; Schueller, Michael J.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Qu, Wenchao

    2015-04-25

    In this study, we aim to directly measure the specific activity (SA) of the carbon-11 cyanide ([11C]CN¯) produced by our in-house built automated [11C]HCN production system and to identify the major sources of 12C-cyanide (12CN¯). The [11C]CN¯ is produced from [11C]CO2, which is generated by the 14N(p,?)11C nuclear reaction using a cyclotron. Direct measurement of cyanide concentrations was accomplished using a relatively inexpensive, and easy to use ion selective electrode (ISE) which offered an appropriate range of sensitivity for detecting mass. Multiple components of the [11C]HCN production system were isolated in order to determine their relative contributions to 12CN¯ mass. It was determined that the system gases were responsible for approximately 30% of the mass, and that the molecular sieve/nickel furnace unit contributed approximately 70% of the mass. Beam on target (33 µA for 1 and 10 min) did not contribute significantly to the mass. Additionally, we compared the SA of our [11C]HCN precursor determined using the ISE to the SA of our current [11C]CN¯ derived radiotracers determined by HPLC to assure there was no significant difference between the two methods. These results are the first reported use of an ion selective electrode to determine the SA of no-carrier-added cyanide ion, and clearly show that it is a valuable, inexpensive and readily available tool suitable for this purpose.

  14. Total cyanide mass measurement with micro-ion selective electrode for determination of specific activity of carbon-11 cyanide

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shea, Colleen; Alexoff, David L.; Kim, Dohyun; Hoque, Ruma; Schueller, Michael J.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Qu, Wenchao

    2015-04-25

    In this study, we aim to directly measure the specific activity (SA) of the carbon-11 cyanide ([11C]CN¯) produced by our in-house built automated [11C]HCN production system and to identify the major sources of 12C-cyanide (12CN¯). The [11C]CN¯ is produced from [11C]CO2, which is generated by the 14N(p,?)11C nuclear reaction using a cyclotron. Direct measurement of cyanide concentrations was accomplished using a relatively inexpensive, and easy to use ion selective electrode (ISE) which offered an appropriate range of sensitivity for detecting mass. Multiple components of the [11C]HCN production system were isolated in order to determine their relative contributions to 12CN¯ mass.more »It was determined that the system gases were responsible for approximately 30% of the mass, and that the molecular sieve/nickel furnace unit contributed approximately 70% of the mass. Beam on target (33 µA for 1 and 10 min) did not contribute significantly to the mass. Additionally, we compared the SA of our [11C]HCN precursor determined using the ISE to the SA of our current [11C]CN¯ derived radiotracers determined by HPLC to assure there was no significant difference between the two methods. These results are the first reported use of an ion selective electrode to determine the SA of no-carrier-added cyanide ion, and clearly show that it is a valuable, inexpensive and readily available tool suitable for this purpose.« less

  15. State-to-state dynamics of molecular energy transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentry, W.R.; Giese, C.F. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this research program is to elucidate the elementary dynamical mechanisms of vibrational and rotational energy transfer between molecules, at a quantum-state resolved level of detail. Molecular beam techniques are used to isolate individual molecular collisions, and to control the kinetic energy of collision. Lasers are used both to prepare specific quantum states prior to collision by stimulated-emission pumping (SEP), and to measure the distribution of quantum states in the collision products by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The results are interpreted in terms of dynamical models, which may be cast in a classical, semiclassical or quantum mechanical framework, as appropriate.

  16. Size, effect of flexible proof mass on the mechanical behavior of micron-scale cantilevers for energy harvesting appications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, M.; Hong, S.; Miller, D. J.; Dugundji, J.; Wardle, B. L. (Materials Science Division); (MIT)

    2011-12-15

    Mechanical behavior of micron-scale cantilevers with a distributed, flexible proof mass is investigated to understand proof mass size effects on the performance of microelectromechanical system energy harvesters. Single-crystal silicon beams with proof masses of various lengths were fabricated using focused ion beam milling and tested using atomic force microscopy. Comparison of three different modeling results with measured data reveals that a 'two-beam' method has the most accurate predictive capability in terms of both resonant frequency and strain. Accurate strain prediction is essential because energy harvested scales with strain squared and maximum strain will be a design limit in fatigue.

  17. EMITTANCE COMPENSATION FOR MAGNETIZED BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KEWISCH,J.; CHANG, X.

    2007-06-25

    Emittance compensation is a well established technique for minimizing the emittance of an electron beam from a RF photo-cathode gun. Longitudinal slices of a bunch have a small emittance, but due to the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch and time dependent RF fields they are not focused in the same way, so that the direction of their phase ellipses diverges in phase space and the projected emittance is much larger. Emittance compensation reverses the divergence. At the location where the slopes of the phase ellipses coincide the beam is accelerated, so that the space charge forces are reduced. A recipe for emittance compensation is given in. For magnetized beams (where the angular momentum is non-zero) such emittance compensation is not sufficient because variations in the slice radius lead to variations in the angular speed and therefore to an increase of emittance in the rotating game. We describe a method and tools for a compensation that includes the beam magnetization.

  18. High energy laser beam dump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halpin, John (Tracy, CA)

    2004-09-14

    The laser beam dump is positioned in a housing. An absorbing glass plate means is operatively connected to the housing. A heat sync means for extracting heat from the absorbing glass plate means is operatively connected to the housing and operatively connected to the absorbing glass plate means.

  19. Vibrating wires for beam diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arutunian, S G; Wittenburg, Kay

    2015-01-01

    A new approach to the technique of scanning by wires is developed. Novelty of the method is that the wire heating quantity is used as a source of information about the number of interacting particles. To increase the accuracy and sensitivity of measurements the wire heating measurement is regenerated as a change of wire natural oscillations frequency. By the rigid fixing of the wire ends on the base an unprecedented sensitivity of the frequency to the temperature and to the corresponding flux of colliding particles. The range of used frequencies (tens of kHz) and speed of processes of heat transfer limit the speed characteristics of proposed scanning method, however, the high sensitivity make it a perspective one for investigation of beam halo and weak beam scanning. Traditional beam profile monitors generally focus on the beam core and loose sensitivity in the halo region where a large dynamic range of detection is necessary. The scanning by a vibrating wire can be also successfully used in profiling and det...

  20. Collective Dynamics and Coherent Diagnostics of Microbunched Relativistic Electron Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinelli, Agostino

    2012-01-01

    Brightness Relativistic Electron Beams for Free-Electrona Thermal Relativistic Electron Beam: Eigenvalue/Eigenmodemicrobunching in the electron beam. The microbunched

  1. Electron Beam Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, Kei

    2012-01-01

    Electron Beam Charge Diagnostics for Laser PlasmaElectron beams were sent to the various charge diagnosticselectron spectrometer [27] before sending the e-beam to charge diagnostics,

  2. Water in the envelopes and disks around young high-mass stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floris van der Tak; Malcolm Walmsley; Fabrice Herpin; Cecilia Ceccarelli

    2005-10-21

    Single-dish spectra and interferometric maps of (sub)mm lines of H2O-18 and HDO are used to study the chemistry of water in eight regions of high-mass star formation. The spectra indicate HDO excitation temperatures of ~110 K and column densities in an 11'' beam of ~2x10^14 cm^-2 for HDO and ~2x10^17 cm^-2 for H2O, with the N(HDO)/N(H2O) ratio increasing with decreasing temperature. Simultaneous observations of CH3OH and SO2 indicate that 20-50% of the single-dish line flux arises in the molecular outflows of these objects. The outflow contribution to the H2O-18 and HDO emission is estimated to be 10-20%. Radiative transfer models indicate that the water abundance is low (~10^-6) outside a critical radius corresponding to a temperature in the protostellar envelope of ~100 K, and `jumps' to H2O/H2 ~ 10^-4 inside this radius. This value corresponds to the observed abundance of solid water and together with the derived HDO/H2O abundance ratios of ~1/1000 suggests that the origin of the observed water is evaporation of grain mantles. This idea is confirmed in the case of AFGL 2591 by interferometer observations of HDO, H2O-18 and SO2 lines, which reveal compact (~800 AU) emission with a systematic velocity gradient. This size is similar to that of the 1.3 mm continuum towards AFGL 2591, from which we estimate a mass of ~0.8 M0, or ~5% of the mass of the central star. We speculate that we may be observing a circumstellar disk in an almost face-on orientation.

  3. Molecular Hydrogen in Infrared Cirrus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristen Gillmon; J. Michael Shull

    2005-07-25

    We combine data from our recent FUSE survey of interstellar molecular hydrogen absorption toward 50 high-latitude AGN with COBE-corrected IRAS 100 micron emission maps to study the correlation of infrared cirrus with H2. A plot of the H2 column density vs. IR cirrus intensity shows the same transition in molecular fraction, f_H2, as seen with total hydrogen column density, N_H. This transition is usually attributed to H2 self-shielding, and it suggests that many diffuse cirrus clouds contain H2 in significant fractions, f_H2 = 1-30%. These clouds cover approximately 50% of the northern sky at latitudes b > 30 degrees, at temperature-corrected 100 micron intensities D_100 > 1.5 MJy/sr. The sheetlike cirrus clouds, with hydrogen densities n_H > 30 cm^-3, may be compressed by dynamical processes at the disk-halo interface, and they are conducive to H2 formation on grain surfaces. Exploiting the correlation between N(H2) and 100 micron intensity, we estimate that cirrus clouds at b > 30 contain approximately 3000 M_sun in H2. Extrapolated over the inner Milky Way, the cirrus may contain 10^7 M_sun of H2 and 10^8 M_sun in total gas mass. If elevated to 100 pc, their gravitational potential energy is ~10^53 erg.

  4. Collimation Studies with Hollow Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stancari, G.; Annala, G.; Johnson, T.R.; Saewert, G.W.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.A.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    Recent experimental studies at the Fermilab Tevatron collider have shown that magnetically confined hollow electron beams can act as a new kind of collimator for high-intensity beams in storage rings. In a hollow electron beam collimator, electrons enclose the circulating beam. Their electric charge kicks halo particles transversely. If their distribution is axially symmetric, the beam core is unaffected. This device is complementary to conventional two-stage collimation systems: the electron beam can be placed arbitrarily close to the circulating beam; and particle removal is smooth, so that the device is a diffusion enhancer rather than a hard aperture limitation. The concept was tested in the Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the existing electron lenses. We describe some of the technical aspects of hollow-beam scraping and the results of recent measurements.

  5. Radioactive beam production at the Bevalac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, J.R.; Feinberg, B.; Kalnins, J.G.; Krebs, G.F.; McMahan, M.A.; Tanihata, I.

    1989-10-01

    At the Bevalac radioactive beams are routinely produced by the fragmentation process. The effectiveness of this process with respect to the secondary beam's emittance, intensity and energy spread depends critically on the nuclear reaction kinematics and the magnitude of the incident beam energy. When this beam energy significantly exceeds the energies of the nuclear reaction process, many of the qualities of the incident beam can be passed on to the secondary beam. Factors affecting secondary beam quality are discussed along with techniques for isolating and purifying a specific reaction product. The on-going radioactive beam program at the Bevalac is used as an example with applications, present performance and plans for the future. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Electron Beam--21st Century Food Technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vestal, Andy

    2003-03-07

    This publication explains electron beam irradiation technology to consumers, industry professionals and government officials. Electron beam irradiation is a method of treating food and other products for pathogens that ...

  7. Autogenerator of beams of charged particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler, R.J.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Miller, R.M.; Shope, S.L.; Smith, D.L.

    1983-10-31

    An autogenerating apparatus provides secondary intense relativistic current beam pulses in response to an injected beam pulse. One or more electromagnetic energy storage devices are provided in conjunction with gaps along a beam propagation path for the injected beam pulse. For injected beam pulses which are no longer than double the transit time of electromagnetic waves within the storage devices (which may be resonant cavities), distinct secondary beam pulses are generated by each of the energy storage devices. The beam propagation path, together with the one or more gaps provided therein, operates as a pulse forming transmission line cavity, in which the separate cavities associated with the gaps provide delays for electromagnetic waves generated at the gaps. After doubly traversing the cavity, the electromagnetic waves cause the gap to generate the secondary beam pulses, which are thus delayed by a time interval equal to the double transit time for the induced wave within the cavity.

  8. Autogenerator of beams of charged particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler, Richard J. (Albuquerque, NM); Mazarakis, Michael G. (Albuquerque, NM); Miller, Robert B. (Albuquerque, NM); Shope, Steven L. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, David L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01

    An autogenerating apparatus provides secondary intense relativistic current beam pulses in response to an injected beam pulse. One or more electromagnetic energy storage devices are provided in conjunction with gaps along a beam propagation path for the injected beam pulse. For injected beam pulses which are no longer than double the transit time of electromagnetic waves within the storage devices (which may be resonant cavities), distinct secondary beam pulses are generated by each of the energy storage devices. The beam propagation path, together with the one or more gaps provided therein, operates as a pulse forming transmission line cavity, in which the separate cavities associated with the gaps provide delays for electromagnetic waves generated at the gaps. After doubly traversing the cavity, the electromagnetic waves cause the gap to generate the secondary beam pulses, which are thus delayed by a time interval equal to the double transit time for the induced wave within the cavity.

  9. Electron beam exposure mechanisms in hydrogen silsesquioxane investigated by vibrational spectroscopy and in-situ electron beam induced desorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olynick, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    Electron beam exposure mechanisms in hydrogen silsesquioxanespectroscopy and in-situ electron beam induced desorption.Infrared) and electron beam desorption spectroscopy (EBDS).

  10. The NuMI Neutrino Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Adamson; K. Anderson; M. Andrews; R. Andrews; I. Anghel; D. Augustine; A. Aurisano; S. Avvakumov; D. S. Ayres; B. Baller; B. Barish; G. Barr; W. L. Barrett; R. H. Bernstein; J. Biggs; M. Bishai; A. Blake; V. Bocean; G. J. Bock; D. J. Boehnlein; D. Bogert; K. Bourkland; S. V. Cao; C. M. Castromonte; S. Childress; B. C. Choudhary; J. A. B. Coelho; J. H. Cobb; L. Corwin; D. Crane; J. P. Cravens; D. Cronin-Hennessy; R. J. Ducar; J. K. de Jong; A. V. Devan; N. E. Devenish; M. V. Diwan; A. R. Erwin; C. O. Escobar; J. J. Evans; E. Falk; G. J. Feldman; T. H. Fields; R. Ford; M. V. Frohne; H. R. Gallagher; V. Garkusha; R. A. Gomes; M. C. Goodman; P. Gouffon; N. Graf; R. Gran; N. Grossman; K. Grzelak; A. Habig; S. R. Hahn; D. Harding; D. Harris; P. G. Harris; J. Hartnell; R. Hatcher; S. Hays; K. Heller; A. Holin; J. Huang; J. Hylen; A. Ibrahim; D. Indurthy; G. M. Irwin; Z. Isvan; D. E. Jaffe; C. James; D. Jensen; J. Johnstone; T. Kafka; S. M. S. Kasahara; G. Koizumi; S. Kopp; M. Kordosky; A. Kreymer; K. Lang; C. Laughton; G. Lefeuvre; J. Ling; P. J. Litchfield; L. Loiacono; P. Lucas; W. A. Mann; A. Marchionni; M. L. Marshak; N. Mayer; C. McGivern; M. M. Medeiros; R. Mehdiyev; J. R. Meier; M. D. Messier; D. G. Michael; R. H. Milburn; J. L. Miller; W. H. Miller; S. R. Mishra; S. Moed Sher; C. D. Moore; J. Morfin; L. Mualem; S. Mufson; S. Murgia; M. Murtagh; J. Musser; D. Naples; J. K. Nelson; H. B. Newman; R. J. Nichol; J. A. Nowak; J. O Connor; W. P. Oliver; M. Olsen; M. Orchanian; S. Osprey; R. B. Pahlka; J. Paley; A. Para; R. B. Patterson; T. Patzak; Z. Pavlovic; G. Pawloski; A. Perch; E. A. Peterson; D. A. Petyt; M. M. Pfutzner; S. Phan-Budd; R. K. Plunkett; N. Poonthottathil; P. Prieto; D. Pushka; X. Qiu; A. Radovic; R. A. Rameika; J. Ratchford; B. Rebel; R. Reilly; C. Rosenfeld; H. A. Rubin; K. Ruddick; M. C. Sanchez; N. Saoulidou; L. Sauer; J. Schneps; D. Schoo; A. Schreckenberger; P. Schreiner; P. Shanahan; R. Sharma; W. Smart; C. Smith; A. Sousa; A. Stefanik; N. Tagg; R. L. Talaga; G. Tassotto; J. Thomas; J. Thompson; M. A. Thomson; X. Tian; A. Timmons; D. Tinsley; S. C. Tognini; R. Toner; D. Torretta; I. Trostin; G. Tzanakos; J. Urheim; P. Vahle; K. Vaziri; E. Villegas; B. Viren; G. Vogel; R. C. Webber; A. Weber; R. C. Webb; A. Wehmann; C. White; L. Whitehead; L. H. Whitehead; S. G. Wojcicki; M. L. Wong-Squires; T. Yang; F. X. Yumiceva; V. Zarucheisky; R. Zwaska

    2015-07-29

    This paper describes the hardware and operations of the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam at Fermilab. It elaborates on the design considerations for the beam as a whole and for individual elements. The most important design details of individual components are described. Beam monitoring systems and procedures, including the tuning and alignment of the beam and NuMI long-term performance, are also discussed.

  11. The NuMI Neutrino Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamson, P; Andrews, M; Andrews, R; Anghel, I; Augustine, D; Aurisano, A; Avvakumov, S; Ayres, D S; Baller, B; Barish, B; Barr, G; Barrett, W L; Bernstein, R H; Biggs, J; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bocean, V; Bock, G J; Boehnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Bourkland, K; Cao, S V; Castromonte, C M; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Coelho, J A B; Cobb, J H; Corwin, L; Crane, D; Cravens, J P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Ducar, R J; de Jong, J K; Devan, A V; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Erwin, A R; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Fields, T H; Ford, R; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Garkusha, V; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grossman, N; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Hahn, S R; Harding, D; Harris, D; Harris, P G; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Hays, S; Heller, K; Holin, A; Huang, J; Hylen, J; Ibrahim, A; Indurthy, D; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jensen, D; Johnstone, J; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Laughton, C; Lefeuvre, G; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Loiacono, L; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marchionni, A; Marshak, M L; Mayer, N; McGivern, C; Medeiros, M M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Michael, D G; Milburn, R H; Miller, J L; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Sher, S Moed; Moore, C D; Morfin, J; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Murgia, S; Murtagh, M; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nowak, J A; Connor, J O; Oliver, W P; Olsen, M; Orchanian, M; Osprey, S; Pahlka, R B; Paley, J; Para, A; Patterson, R B; Patzak, T; Pavlovic, Z; Pawloski, G; Perch, A; Peterson, E A; Petyt, D A; Pfutzner, M; Phan-Budd, S; Plunkett, R K; Poonthottathil, N; Prieto, P; Pushka, D; Qiu, X; Radovic, A; Rameika, R A; Ratchford, J; Rebel, B; Reilly, R; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Ruddick, K; Sanchez, M C; Saoulidou, N; Sauer, L; Schneps, J; Schoo, D; Schreckenberger, A; Schreiner, P; Shanahan, P; Sharma, R; Smart, W; Smith, C; Sousa, A; Stefanik, A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Tassotto, G; Thomas, J; Thompson, J; Thomson, M A; Tian, X; Timmons, A; Tinsley, D; Tognini, S C; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Trostin, I; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Vaziri, K; Villegas, E; Viren, B; Vogel, G; Webber, R C; Weber, A; Webb, R C; Wehmann, A; White, C; Whitehead, L; Whitehead, L H; Wojcicki, S G; Wong-Squires, M L; Yang, T; Yumiceva, F X; Zarucheisky, V; Zwaska, R

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the hardware and operations of the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam at Fermilab. It elaborates on the design considerations for the beam as a whole and for individual elements. The most important design details of individual components are described. Beam monitoring systems and procedures, including the tuning and alignment of the beam and NuMI long-term performance, are also discussed.

  12. Beam instability studies for the SSC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, W.

    1994-09-01

    Beam instability studies of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) during the period 1989--1993 are briefly reviewed in this paper. Various topics are covered: single bunch and multi-bunch, single beam and beam-beam, parasitic heating and active feedback, etc. Although the SSC will not be built, many of the results obtained from these studies remain as useful references to the accelerator community.

  13. The NuMI Neutrino Beam

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamson, P.; Anderson, K.; Andrews, M.; Andrews, R.; Anghel, I.; Augustine, D.; Aurisano, A.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D. S.; Baller, B.; et al

    2015-10-20

    Our paper describes the hardware and operations of the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam at Fermilab. It elaborates on the design considerations for the beam as a whole and for individual elements. The most important part of our design details pertaining to individual components is described. Beam monitoring systems and procedures, including the tuning and alignment of the beam and NuMI long-term performance, are also discussed.

  14. Maskless, resistless ion beam lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Qing

    2003-03-10

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices are scaled down, in order to achieve higher levels of integration, optical lithography will no longer be sufficient for the needs of the semiconductor industry. Alternative next-generation lithography (NGL) approaches, such as extreme ultra-violet (EUV), X-ray, electron-beam, and ion projection lithography face some challenging issues with complicated mask technology and low throughput. Among the four major alternative NGL approaches, ion beam lithography is the only one that can provide both maskless and resistless patterning. As such, it can potentially make nano-fabrication much simpler. This thesis investigates a focused ion beam system for maskless, resistless patterning that can be made practical for high-volume production. In order to achieve maskless, resistless patterning, the ion source must be able to produce a variety of ion species. The compact FIB system being developed uses a multicusp plasma ion source, which can generate ion beams of various elements, such as O{sub 2}{sup +}, BF{sub 2}{sup +}, P{sup +} etc., for surface modification and doping applications. With optimized source condition, around 85% of BF{sub 2}{sup +}, over 90% of O{sub 2}{sup +} and P{sup +} have been achieved. The brightness of the multicusp-plasma ion source is a key issue for its application to maskless ion beam lithography. It can be substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. Measured brightness of 2 keV He{sup +} beam is as high as 440 A/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} Sr, which represents a 30x improvement over prior work. Direct patterning of Si thin film using a focused O{sub 2}{sup +} ion beam has been investigated. A thin surface oxide film can be selectively formed using 3 keV O{sub 2}{sup +} ions with the dose of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The oxide can then serve as a hard mask for patterning of the Si film. The process flow and the experimental results for directly patterned poly-Si features are presented. The formation of shallow pn-junctions in bulk silicon wafers by scanning focused P{sup +} beam implantation at 5 keV is also presented. With implantation dose of around 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, the electron concentration is about 2.5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and electron mobility is around 200 cm{sup 2}/V{center_dot}s. To demonstrate the suitability of scanning FIB lithography for the manufacture of integrated circuit devices, SOI MOSFET fabrication using the maskless, resistless ion beam lithography is demonstrated. An array of microcolumns can be built by stacking multi-aperture electrode and insulator layers. Because the multicusp plasma source can achieve uniform ion density over a large area, it can be used in conjunction with the array of microcolumns, for massively parallel FIB processing to achieve reasonable exposure throughput.

  15. Molecular Gas in Elliptical Galaxies: Distribution and Kinematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. M. Young

    2002-05-10

    I present interferometric images (approx. 7" resolution) of CO emission in five elliptical galaxies and nondetections in two others. These data double the number of elliptical galaxies whose CO emission has been fully mapped. The sample galaxies have 10^8 to 5x10^9 solar masses of molecular gas distributed in mostly symmetric rotating disks with diameters of 2 to 12 kpc. Four out of the five molecular disks show remarkable alignment with the optical major axes of their host galaxies. The molecular masses are a few percent of the total dynamical masses which are implied if the gas is on circular orbits. If the molecular gas forms stars, it will make rotationally supported stellar disks which will be very similar in character to the stellar disks now known to be present in many ellipticals. Comparison of stellar kinematics to gas kinematics in NGC 4476 implies that the molecular gas did not come from internal stellar mass loss because the specific angular momentum of the gas is about three times larger than that of the stars.

  16. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); Ortiz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1994-01-01

    Elbow mass flow meter. The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity.

  17. Policy Issues for Retail Beamed Power Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electric power on Earth is transmitted using wired power transmission systems. In this system, electricalPolicy Issues for Retail Beamed Power Transmission Girish Chowdhary, Rajeev Gadre, Narayanan solar electric power using retail delivery of beamed power. Recent advances in power beaming have made

  18. Maps of the Molecular Emission Around 18 Evolved Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Z. Stanek; G. R. Knapp; K. Young; T. G. Phillips

    1994-12-02

    We present maps at $20''$ resolution of the molecular emission around 18 evolved stars (14~asymptotic giant branch stars, one supergiant, two proto-planetary nebulae and one planetary nebula), mostly in the $^{12}$CO(3-2) line. Almost all molecular envelopes appear to be at least marginally resolved at this resolution. A substantial fraction of the molecular envelopes show clear deviations from spherical symmetry in the form of elliptical or bipolar envelopes. This indicates that there is a need to implement non-spherical mass loss in current scenarios of the late stages of stellar evolution, in particular on the asymptotic giant branch.

  19. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print Wednesday, 27 April 2005 00:00 In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the...

  20. Molecular heat pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dvira Segal; Abraham Nitzan

    2005-10-11

    We propose a novel molecular device that pumps heat against a thermal gradient. The system consists of a molecular element connecting two thermal reservoirs that are characterized by different spectral properties. The pumping action is achieved by applying an external force that periodically modulates molecular levels. This modulation affects periodic oscillations of the internal temperature of the molecule and the strength of its coupling to each reservoir resulting in a net heat flow in the desired direction. The heat flow is examined in the slow and fast modulation limits and for different modulation waveforms, thus making it possible to optimize the device performance.

  1. Stability of Single Particle Motion with Head-On Beam-Beam Compensation in the RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo,Y.; Fischer, W.; Abreu, N.

    2008-05-01

    To compensate the large tune shift and tune spread generated by the head-on beam-beam interactions in the polarized proton run in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we proposed a low energy electron beam with a Gaussian transverse profiles to collide head-on with the proton beam. In this article, with a weak-strong beam-beam interaction model, we investigate the stability of single particle motion in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation. Tune footprints, tune diffusion, Lyapunov exponents, and 10{sup 6} turn dynamic apertures are calculated and compared between the cases without and with beam-beam compensation. A tune scan is performed and the possibility of increasing the bunch intensity is studied. The cause of tune footprint foldings is discussed, and the tune diffusion and Lyapunov exponent analysis are compared.

  2. Beam collimation at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2003-08-12

    Operational and accidental beam losses in hadron colliders can have a serious impact on machine and detector performance, resulting in effects ranging from minor to catastrophic. Principles and realization are described for a reliable beam collimation system required to sustain favorable background conditions in the collider detectors, provide quench stability of superconducting magnets, minimize irradiation of accelerator equipment, maintain operational reliability over the life of the machine, and reduce the impact of radiation on personnel and the environment. Based on detailed Monte-Carlo simulations, such a system has been designed and incorporated in the Tevatron collider. Its performance, comparison to measurements and possible ways to further improve the collimation efficiency are described in detail. Specifics of the collimation systems designed for the SSC, LHC, VLHC, and HERA colliders are discussed.

  3. Neutron beam testing of triblades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalak, Sarah E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, Andrew J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Storlie, Curtis B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rust, William N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Modl, David G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quinn, Heather M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Blanchard, Sean P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manuzzato, Andrea [UNIV DEGLI STUDI DI PADOVA ITALY

    2010-12-16

    Four IBM Triblades were tested in the Irradiation of Chips and Electronics facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Triblades include two dual-core Opteron processors and four PowerXCell 8i (Cell) processors. The Triblades were tested in their field configuration while running different applications, with the beam aimed at the Cell processor or the Opteron running the application. Testing focused on the Cell processors, which were tested while running five different applications and an idle condition. While neither application nor Triblade was statistically important in predicting the hazard rate, the hazard rate when the beam was aimed at the Opterons was significantly higher than when it was aimed at the Cell processors. In addition, four Cell blades (one in each Triblade) suffered voltage shorts, leading to their inoperability. The hardware tested is the same as that in the Roadrunner supercomputer.

  4. Oxygen ion-beam microlithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsuo, Y.S.

    1991-08-20

    A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used. 5 figures.

  5. Center for Beam Physics, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Center for Beam Physics is a multi-disciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. At the heart of the Center`s mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation and focusing of energy. Dedicated to exploring the frontiers of the physics of (and with) particle and photon beams, its primary mission is to promote the science and technology of the production, manipulation, storage and control systems of charged particles and photons. The Center serves this mission via conceptual studies, theoretical and experimental research, design and development, institutional project involvement, external collaborations, association with industry and technology transfer. This roster provides a glimpse at the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up this team and a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1993.

  6. Beam intensity upgrade at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchionni, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01

    The performance of the Fermilab proton accelerator complex is reviewed. The coming into operation of the NuMI neutrino line and the implementation of slip-stacking to increase the anti-proton production rate has pushed the total beam intensity in the Main Injector up to {approx} 3 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse. A maximum beam power of 270 kW has been delivered on the NuMI target during the first year of operation. A plan is in place to increase it to 350 kW, in parallel with the operation of the Collider program. As more machines of the Fermilab complex become available with the termination of the Collider operation, a set of upgrades are being planned to reach first 700 kW and then 1.2 MW by reducing the Main Injector cycle time and by implementing proton stacking.

  7. Beam Cooling with ionisation losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Rubbia; A. Ferrari; Y. Kadi; V. Vlachoudis

    2006-02-03

    A novel type of particle "cooling", called Ionization Cooling, is applicable to slow (v of the order of 0.1c) ions stored in a small ring. The many traversals through a thin foil enhance the nuclear reaction probability, in a steady configuration in which ionisation losses are recovered at each turn by a RF-cavity. For a uniform target "foil" the longitudinal momentum spread diverges exponentially since faster (slower) particles ionise less (more) than the average. In order to "cool" also longitudinally, a chromaticity has to be introduced with a wedge shaped "foil". Multiple scattering and straggling are then "cooled" in all three dimensions, with a method similar to the one of synchrotron cooling, but valid for low energy ions. Particles then stably circulate in the beam indefinitely, until they undergo for instance nuclear processes in the thin target foil. This new method is under consideration for the nuclear production of a few MeV/A ion beams. Simple reactions, for instance Li 7 + D Li 8 + p, are more favourably exploited with the heavier ion colliding against a gas-jet D2 target. Kinematics is generally very favourable, with emission angles in a narrow angular cone and a relatively concentrated outgoing energy spectrum which allows an efficient collection as a neutral gas in a tiny volume with a technology at high temperatures perfected at ISOLDE. It is however of a much more general applicability. The method appears capable of producing a "table top" storage ring with an accumulation rate in excess of 10**14 Li-8 radioactive ion/s for possible use for radioactive beams for physics studies (for example for beta-beams) or for therapy.

  8. Electron beam generation in Tevatron electron lenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Solyak, N.; Tiunov, M.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2006-08-01

    New type of high perveance electron guns with convex cathode has been developed. Three guns described in this article are built to provide transverse electron current density distributions needed for Electron Lenses for beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron collider. The current distribution can be controlled either by the gun geometry or by voltage on a special control electrode located near cathode. We present the designs of the guns and report results of beam measurements on the test bench. Because of their high current density and low transverse temperature of electrons, electron guns of this type can be used in electron cooling and beam-beam compensation devices.

  9. W-Band Sheet Beam Klystron Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheitrum, G.; Caryotakis, G.; Burke, A.; Jensen, A.; Jongewaard, E.a Krasnykh, A.; Neubauer, M.; Phillips, R.; Rauenbuehler, K.; /SLAC

    2011-11-11

    Sheet beam devices provide important advantages for very high power, narrow bandwidth RF sources like accelerator klystrons [1]. Reduced current density and increased surface area result in increased power capabi1ity, reduced magnetic fields for focusing and reduced cathode loading. These advantages are offset by increased complexity, beam formation and transport issues and potential for mode competition in the ovennoded cavities and drift tube. This paper will describe the design issues encountered in developing a 100 kW peak and 2 kW average power sheet beam k1ystron at W-band including beam formation, beam transport, circuit design, circuit fabrication and mode competition.

  10. Fresnel diffraction patterns as accelerating beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yiqi; Zheng, Huaibin; Wu, Zhenkun; Li, Yuanyuan; Lu, Keqing; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that beams originating from Fresnel diffraction patterns are self-accelerating in free space. In addition to accelerating and self-healing, they also exhibit parabolic deceleration property, which is in stark contrast to other accelerating beams. We find that the trajectory of Fresnel paraxial accelerating beams is similar to that of nonparaxial Weber beams. Decelerating and accelerating regions are separated by a critical propagation distance, at which no acceleration is present. During deceleration, the Fresnel diffraction beams undergo self-smoothing, in which oscillations of the diffracted waves gradually focus and smooth out at the critical distance.

  11. Adapting High Brightness Relativistic Electron Beams for Ultrafast Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scoby, Cheyne Matthew

    2012-01-01

    111 Transverse electron beamfemtosecond relativistic electron beams . . Organization offields of a relativistic electron beam. Phys. Rev. Lett. ,

  12. Scattering apodizer for laser beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Summers, M.A.; Hagen, W.F.; Boyd, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    A method is disclosed for apodizing a laser beam to smooth out the production of diffraction peaks due to optical discontinuities in the path of the laser beam, such method comprising introduction of a pattern of scattering elements for reducing the peak intensity in the region of such optical discontinuities, such pattern having smoothly tapering boundaries in which the distribution density of the scattering elements is tapered gradually to produce small gradients in the distribution density, such pattern of scattering elements being effective to reduce and smooth out the diffraction effects which would otherwise be produced. The apodizer pattern may be produced by selectively blasting a surface of a transparent member with fine abrasive particles to produce a multitude of minute pits. In one embodiment, a scattering apodizer pattern is employed to overcome diffraction patterns in a multiple element crystal array for harmonic conversion of a laser beam. The interstices and the supporting grid between the crystal elements are obscured by the gradually tapered apodizer pattern of scattering elements.

  13. Scattering apodizer for laser beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Summers, Mark A. (Livermore, CA); Hagen, Wilhelm F. (Livermore, CA); Boyd, Robert D. (Livermore, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A method is disclosed for apodizing a laser beam to smooth out the production of diffraction peaks due to optical discontinuities in the path of the laser beam, such method comprising introduction of a pattern of scattering elements for reducing the peak intensity in the region of such optical discontinuities, such pattern having smoothly tapering boundaries in which the distribution density of the scattering elements is tapered gradually to produce small gradients in the distribution density, such pattern of scattering elements being effective to reduce and smooth out the diffraction effects which would otherwise be produced. The apodizer pattern may be produced by selectively blasting a surface of a transparent member with fine abrasive particles to produce a multitude of minute pits. In one embodiment, a scattering apodizer pattern is employed to overcome diffraction patterns in a multiple element crystal array for harmonic conversion of a laser beam. The interstices and the supporting grid between the crystal elements are obscured by the gradually tapered apodizer pattern of scattering elements.

  14. Molecular Cell Short Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Nils G.

    '' is the most critical and challenging ques- tion in any murder story, even if it plays out on the molec- ular of an unsolved molecular murder mystery is found in the seemingly simple RNA backbone transesterification

  15. Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 23 Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering ISSN 1865-5025 Volume 6 Number 1 Cel. Mol. Bioeng. (2013,2 and ANATOLY B. KOLOMEISKY 2 1 Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA; and 2

  16. 1 Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    1 Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE GRADUATE Master's program · Master of Science in the field of molecular biochemistry and bioinformatics (http://bulletin.gwu.edu/arts-sciences/ biochemistry-molecular-medicine/ms) FACULTY University Professor F. Murad Professors P. Berg, V. Hu, A. Kumar

  17. Generation of low-divergence laser beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-09-14

    Apparatus for transforming a conventional beam of coherent light, having a Gaussian energy distribution and relatively high divergence, into a beam in which the energy distribution approximates a single, non-zero-order Bessel function and which therefore has much lower divergence. The apparatus comprises a zone plate having transmitting and reflecting zones defined by the pattern of light interference produced by the combination of a beam of coherent light with a Gaussian energy distribution and one having such a Bessel distribution. The interference pattern between the two beams is a concentric array of multiple annuli, and is preferably recorded as a hologram. The hologram is then used to form the transmitting and reflecting zones by photo-etching portions of a reflecting layer deposited on a plate made of a transmitting material. A Bessel beam, containing approximately 50% of the energy of the incident beam, is produced by passing a Gaussian beam through such a Bessel zone plate. The reflected beam, also containing approximately 50% of the incident beam energy and having a Bessel energy distribution, can be redirected in the same direction and parallel to the transmitted beam. Alternatively, a filter similar to the Bessel zone plate can be placed within the resonator cavity of a conventional laser system having a front mirror and a rear mirror, preferably axially aligned with the mirrors and just inside the front mirror to generate Bessel energy distribution light beams at the laser source. 11 figures.

  18. Particle beam injector system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guethlein, Gary

    2013-06-18

    Methods and devices enable coupling of a charged particle beam to a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. Coupling of the charged particle beam is accomplished, at least in-part, by relying on of sensitivity of the input phase space acceptance of the radio frequency quadrupole to the angle of the input charged particle beam. A first electric field across a beam deflector deflects the particle beam at an angle that is beyond the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole. By momentarily reversing or reducing the established electric field, a narrow portion of the charged particle beam is deflected at an angle within the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole. In another configuration, beam is directed at an angle within the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole by the first electric field and is deflected beyond the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole due to the second electric field.

  19. Beam Echoes in the CERN SPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brüning, Oliver Sim; Ruggiero, F; Scandale, Walter; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Stellfeld, D

    1998-01-01

    Longitudinal echo signals have been produced in the CERN SPS by exciting a proton beam at 120~GeV/c with two short RF pulses separated by a suitable time-delay. The aim of the experiments was to confirm the analytical predictions for beam echoes in the SPS and to probe the applicability of beam echoes for a measurement of the energy distribution and diffusion coefficients in the accelerator. We summarise here the results obtained with bunched and un-bunched beams. For an un-bunched beam, the excitation frequencies are at different harmonics of the revolution frequency and result in an echo response at the difference frequency of the two RF kicks. For the case of a bunched beam, the RF kicks are adjusted to excite the quadrupole mode of the bunch motion and the beam echo response can also be observed as a quadrupole mode.

  20. Direct analysis of samples by mass spectrometry: From elements to bio-molecules using laser ablation inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perdian, David C.

    2009-08-19

    Mass spectrometric methods that are able to analyze solid samples or biological materials with little or no sample preparation are invaluable to science as well as society. Fundamental research that has discovered experimental and instrumental parameters that inhibit fractionation effects that occur during the quantification of elemental species in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is described. Research that determines the effectiveness of novel laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric methods for the molecular analysis of biological tissues at atmospheric pressure and at high spatial resolution is also described. A spatial resolution is achieved that is able to analyze samples at the single cell level.

  1. Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, M.L.; Davis, J.C.

    1993-02-23

    Apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample is disclosed. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and [sup 3]He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

  2. Impact of individual nuclear masses on r-process abundances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mumpower, M. R.; Surman, R.; Fang, D. -L.; Beard, M.; Möller, P.; Kawano, T.; Aprahamian, A.

    2015-09-15

    We have performed for the first time a comprehensive study of the sensitivity of r-process nucleosynthesis to individual nuclear masses across the chart of nuclides. Using the latest version (2012) of the Finite-Range Droplet Model, we consider mass variations of ±0.5 MeV and propagate each mass change to all affected quantities, including Q values, reaction rates, and branching ratios. We find such mass variations can result in up to an order of magnitude local change in the final abundance pattern produced in an r-process simulation. As a result, we identify key nuclei whose masses have a substantial impact on abundancemore »predictions for hot, cold, and neutron star merger r-process scenarios and could be measured at future radioactive beam facilities.« less

  3. Femtosecond laser ablation-based mass spectrometry. An ideal tool for stoichiometric analysis of thin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    LaHaye, Nicole L.; Kurian, Jose; Diwakar, Prasoon K.; Alff, Lambert; Harilal, Sivanandan S.

    2015-08-19

    An accurate and routinely available method for stoichiometric analysis of thin films is a desideratum of modern materials science where a material’s properties depend sensitively on elemental composition. We thoroughly investigated femtosecond laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (fs-LA-ICP-MS) as an analytical technique for determination of the stoichiometry of thin films down to the nanometer scale. The use of femtosecond laser ablation allows for precise removal of material with high spatial and depth resolution that can be coupled to an ICP-MS to obtain elemental and isotopic information. We used molecular beam epitaxy-grown thin films of LaPd(x)Sb2 and T´-La2CuO4 to demonstrate themore »capacity of fs-LA-ICP-MS for stoichiometric analysis and the spatial and depth resolution of the technique. Here we demonstrate that the stoichiometric information of thin films with a thickness of ~10 nm or lower can be determined. Furthermore, our results indicate that fs-LA-ICP-MS provides precise information on the thin film-substrate interface and is able to detect the interdiffusion of cations.« less

  4. BIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Transmission Suite Vertical Transmission Suite Materials Testing Lab Materials Research Lab Wet Lab Concrete and switching surges 800kV DC insulation and breakdown tests 300kV AC testing 300 kV Partial discharge detector, 4", 8" & 16" Photometer Ultra Pure water processor Deposition e-beam evaporator Nickel DC plating

  5. Integral window/photon beam position monitor and beam flux detectors for x-ray beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shu, Deming (Darien, IL); Kuzay, Tuncer M. (Naperville, IL)

    1995-01-01

    A monitor/detector assembly in a synchrotron for either monitoring the position of a photon beam or detecting beam flux may additionally function as a vacuum barrier between the front end and downstream segment of the beamline in the synchrotron. A base flange of the monitor/detector assembly is formed of oxygen free copper with a central opening covered by a window foil that is fused thereon. The window foil is made of man-made materials, such as chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and in certain configurations includes a central opening through which the beams are transmitted. Sensors of low atomic number materials, such as aluminum or beryllium, are laid on the window foil. The configuration of the sensors on the window foil may be varied depending on the function to be performed. A contact plate of insulating material, such as aluminum oxide, is secured to the base flange and is thereby clamped against the sensor on the window foil. The sensor is coupled to external electronic signal processing devices via a gold or silver lead printed onto the contact plate and a copper post screw or alternatively via a copper screw and a copper spring that can be inserted through the contact plate and coupled to the sensors. In an alternate embodiment of the monitor/detector assembly, the sensors are sandwiched between the window foil of chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and a front foil made of similar material.

  6. Apparatus and method of determining molecular weight of large molecules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fuerstenau, S.; Benner, W.H.; Madden, N.M.; Searles, W.

    1998-06-23

    A mass spectrometer determines the mass of multiply charged high molecular weight molecules. This spectrometer utilizes an ion detector which is capable of simultaneously measuring the charge z and transit time of a single ion as it passes through the detector. From this transit time, the velocity of the single ion may then be derived, thus providing the mass-to-charge ratio m/z for a single ion which has been accelerated through a known potential. Given z and m/z, the mass m of the single ion can then be calculated. Electrospray ions with masses in excess of 1 MDa and charge numbers greater than 425 e{sup {minus}} are readily detected. The on-axis single ion detection configuration enables a duty cycle of nearly 100% and extends the practical application of electrospray mass spectrometry to the analysis of very large molecules with relatively inexpensive instrumentation. 14 figs.

  7. Exploiting neutron-rich radioactive ion beams to constrain the symmetry energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Kohley; G. Christian; T. Baumann; P. A. DeYoung; J. E. Finck; N. Frank; M. Jones; J. K. Smith; J. Snyder; A. Spyrou; M. Thoennessen

    2013-10-03

    The Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and 4 Tm Sweeper magnet were used to measure the free neutrons and heavy charged particles from the radioactive ion beam induced 32Mg + 9Be reaction. The fragmentation reaction was simulated with the Constrained Molecular Dynamics model(CoMD), which demonstrated that the of the heavy fragments and free neutron multiplicities were observables sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy at sub-saturation densities. Through comparison of these simulations with the experimental data constraints on the density dependence of the symmetry energy were extracted. The advantage of radioactive ion beams as a probe of the symmetry energy is demonstrated through examination of CoMD calculations for stable and radioactive beam induced reactions.

  8. Effect of the plasma instability on the beam intensity from RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higurashi, Y.; Nakagawa, T.; Kidera, M.; Aihara, T.; Kobayashi, K.; Kase, M.; Goto, A.; Yano, Y. [RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); SAS Ltd., Kita-shinagawa 5-9-11, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo (Japan); RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2006-03-15

    We measured the beam oscillation of RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source for various conditions. In this experiment, the frequency of the beam oscillation increases with increasing the gas pressure and decreases with increasing rf power. The oscillation frequency is strongly dependent on the negative voltage of biased disk, i.e., the frequency increases with increasing the negative voltage. We observed that the frequency is strongly dependent on the mass of ionized gas.

  9. Light Quark Mass Reweighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi Liu; Norman H. Christ; Chulwoo Jung

    2012-06-01

    We present a systematic study of the effectiveness of light quark mass reweighting. This method allows a single lattice QCD ensemble, generated with a specific value of the dynamical light quark mass, to be used to determine results for other, nearby light dynamical quark masses. We study two gauge field ensembles generated with 2+1 flavors of dynamical domain wall fermions with light quark masses m_l=0.02 (m_\\pi=620 MeV) and m_l=0.01 (m_\\pi=420 MeV). We reweight each ensemble to determine results which could be computed directly from the other and check the consistency of the reweighted results with the direct results. The large difference between the 0.02 and 0.01 light quark masses suggests that this is an aggressive application of reweighting as can be seen from fluctuations in the magnitude of the reweighting factor by four orders of magnitude. Never-the-less, a comparison of the reweighed topological charge, average plaquette, residual mass, pion mass, pion decay constant, and scalar correlator between these two ensembles shows agreement well described by the statistical errors. The issues of the effective number of configurations and finite sample size bias are discussed. An examination of the topological charge distribution implies that it is more favorable to reweight from heavier mass to lighter quark mass.

  10. Nuclear Masses in Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christine Weber; Klaus Blaum; Hendrik Schatz

    2008-12-09

    Among all nuclear ground-state properties, atomic masses are highly specific for each particular combination of N and Z and the data obtained apply to a variety of physics topics. One of the most crucial questions to be addressed in mass spectrometry of unstable radionuclides is the one of understanding the processes of element formation in the Universe. To this end, accurate atomic mass values of a large number of exotic nuclei participating in nucleosynthesis are among the key input data in large-scale reaction network calculations. In this paper, a review on the latest achievements in mass spectrometry for nuclear astrophysics is given.

  11. Multiple mass solvers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Jegerlehner

    1997-08-29

    We present a general method to construct multiple mass solvers from standard algorithms. As an example, the BiCGstab-M algorithm is derived.

  12. The DAE?ALUS Project: Rationale and Beam Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose R. Alonso; for the DAE?ALUS Collaboration

    2010-10-05

    Neutrino physics focuses on huge detectors deep underground. The Sanford Lab in South Dakota will build a 300 kiloton water-Cherenkov detector 1500 meters deep for muon neutrino oscillation studies of the mass hierarchy and CP violation. This will be used by the Long Baseline experiment (LBNE) detecting few GeV neutrinos from Fermilab, 1300 km away. The DAE{\\delta}ALUS Collaboration also plans several neutrino-production sites at closer distances up to 20 km from the 300 kT detector, producing muon antineutrinos from stopped pions. The complementarity with LBNE greatly enhances results, and enthusiasm is mounting to do both experiments. DAE{\\delta}ALUS needs 0.8-1 GeV accelerators with mA proton beams. Three sites at 1.5, 8 and 20 km from the 300 kT detector require several accelerators. The cost per machine must be below 1/10 of existing megawatt-class proton machines. Beyond high power and energy, beam parameters are modest. Challenges are reliability, control of beam loss and minimizing activation. Options being studied are: a compact superconducting cyclotron; a ring cyclotron accelerating H2+ (with stripping extraction); and a stacked cyclotron with up to 9 planes sharing the same magnet yoke and rf systems.

  13. Submicro and Nano Structured Porous Materials for the Production of High-Intensity Exotic Radioactive Ion Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandes, Sandrina; Stora, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    ISOLDE, the CERN Isotope Separator On-line DEvice is a unique source of low energy beams of radioactive isotopes - atomic nuclei that have too many or too few neutrons to be stable. The facility is like a small ‘chemical factory’, giving the possibility of changing one element to another, by selecting the atomic mass of the required isotope beam in the mass separator, rather as the ‘alchemists’ once imagined. It produces a total of more than 1000 different isotopes from helium to radium, with half-lives down to milliseconds, by impinging a 1.4 GeV proton beam from the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) onto special targets, yielding a wide variety of atomic fragments. Different components then extract the nuclei and separate them according to mass. The post-accelerator REX (Radioactive beam EXperiment) at ISOLDE accelerates the radioactive beams up to 3 MeV/u for many experiments. A wide international user radioactive ion beam (RIB) community investigates fundamental aspects of nuclear physics, particle...

  14. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A. (Riverside, CA); Beloussov, Alexandre V. (San Bernardino, CA); Bakir, Julide (Alta Loma, CA); Armon, Deganit (Longmeadow, MA); Olsen, Howard B. (Irvine, CA); Salem, Dana (Riverside, CA)

    2010-09-21

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  15. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

    2013-06-25

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  16. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

    2013-12-03

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  17. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A. (Riverside, CA); Beloussov, Alexandre V. (Bernardino, CA); Bakir, Julide (Alta Loma, CA); Armon, Deganit (Redlands, CA); Olsen, Howard B. (Colton, CA); Salem, Dana (Riverside, CA)

    2008-07-08

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  18. Nuclear astrophysics and electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwenk, A.

    2013-11-07

    Electron beams provide important probes and constraints for nuclear astrophysics. This is especially exciting at energies within the regime of chiral effective field theory (EFT), which provides a systematic expansion for nuclear forces and electroweak operators based on quantum chromodynamics. This talk discusses some recent highlights and future directions based on chiral EFT, including nuclear structure and reactions for astrophysics, the neutron skin and constraints for the properties of neutron-rich matter in neutron stars and core-collapse supernovae, and the dark matter response of nuclei.

  19. Protective laser beam viewing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neil, George R.; Jordan, Kevin Carl

    2012-12-18

    A protective laser beam viewing system or device including a camera selectively sensitive to laser light wavelengths and a viewing screen receiving images from the laser sensitive camera. According to a preferred embodiment of the invention, the camera is worn on the head of the user or incorporated into a goggle-type viewing display so that it is always aimed at the area of viewing interest to the user and the viewing screen is incorporated into a video display worn as goggles over the eyes of the user.

  20. Accelerator dynamics and beam aperture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsa, Z.

    1986-10-01

    We present an analytical method for analyzing accelerator dynamics, including higher order effects of multipoles on the beam. This formalism provides a faster alternative to particle tracking. Simplectic expressions for the emittance and phase describing the dynamical behavior of a particle in a circular accelerator are derived using second order perturbation theory (in the presence of nonlinear elements, e.g., sextupoles, octupoles). These expressions are successfully used to calculate the emittance growth, smear and linear aperture. Our findings compare well with results obtained from tracking programs. In addition perturbation to betatron tune; resonance strengths; stop bandwidth; fixed points; island width; and Chirikov criteria are calculated.

  1. SPEAR3 Beam Line Availability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV 14800Small AngleSNL&BAMnMaySPEAR3Beam

  2. Beam Request - 88-Inch Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery ActTools toBadging, Badge OfficeBeam Request To begin:

  3. Dust Emission from the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Schnee; J. Li; A. A. Goodman; A. I. Sargent

    2008-05-27

    Using far-infrared emission maps taken by IRAS and Spitzer and a near-infrared extinction map derived from 2MASS data, we have made dust temperature and column density maps of the Perseus molecular cloud. We show that the emission from transiently heated very small grains and the big grain dust emissivity vary as a function of extinction and dust temperature, with higher dust emissivities for colder grains. This variable emissivity can not be explained by temperature gradients along the line of sight or by noise in the emission maps, but is consistent with grain growth in the higher density and lower temperature regions. By accounting for the variations in the dust emissivity and VSG emission, we are able to map the temperature and column density of a nearby molecular cloud with better accuracy than has previously been possible.

  4. Properties of a Molecular Cloud in NGC 185

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. M. Young

    2001-07-10

    The dwarf elliptical galaxy NGC 185- the closest early-type galaxy with detectable molecular gas- offers a unique opportunity for high angular resolution studies of the interstellar medium in early-type galaxies. I present interferometric images (17 pc $\\times$ 14 pc resolution) of CO emission from NGC 185. The majority of the molecular gas in NGC 185 is in one resolved cloud, closely associated with dust and an HI structure which may be a photodissociated envelope. The high spatial resolution also reveals a velocity gradient across the cloud, which allows a dynamical mass estimate independent of the H2/CO conversion factor or the virial theorem. The linear sizes, velocity gradients, and dynamical masses of the molecular clouds in NGC 185 and NGC 205, a similar dwarf elliptical, are comparable to those of the largest Galactic giant molecular clouds (GMCs). If the dynamical masses of the clouds are assumed to be good estimates of their true masses, the inferred H2/CO conversion factor in NGC 185 is at least eight times larger than a standard Galactic conversion factor, and the reasons for this difference are not yet understood. In any case, it seems clear that structures similar to Galactic GMCs can form in small elliptical or early type galaxies, even in the absence of spiral density waves.

  5. Gas mass transfer for stratified flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, R.B.; Hughes, E.D.

    1995-06-01

    We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrium integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi})Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geo-physical and chemical engineering literature.

  6. Gas mass transfer for stratified flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, R.B.; Hughes, E.D.

    1995-07-01

    We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrum integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi}) Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geophysical and chemical engineering literature.

  7. Rippled beam free electron laser amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A free electron laser amplifier provides a scalloping annular electron beam that interacts with the axial electric field of a TM.sub.0n mode. A waveguide defines an axial centerline and, a solenoid arranged about the waveguide produces an axial constant magnetic field within the waveguide. An electron beam source outputs a annular electron beam that interacts with the axial magnetic field to have an equilibrium radius and a ripple radius component having a variable radius with a ripple period along the axial centerline. An rf source outputs an axial electric field that propagates within the waveguide coaxial with the electron beam and has a radial mode that interacts at the electron beam at the equilibrium radius component of the electron beam.

  8. Focused electron and ion beam systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Persaud, Arun; Ji, Qing; Jiang, Ximan

    2004-07-27

    An electron beam system is based on a plasma generator in a plasma ion source with an accelerator column. The electrons are extracted from a plasma cathode in a plasma ion source, e.g. a multicusp plasma ion source. The beam can be scanned in both the x and y directions, and the system can be operated with multiple beamlets. A compact focused ion or electron beam system has a plasma ion source and an all-electrostatic beam acceleration and focusing column. The ion source is a small chamber with the plasma produced by radio-frequency (RF) induction discharge. The RF antenna is wound outside the chamber and connected to an RF supply. Ions or electrons can be extracted from the source. A multi-beam system has several sources of different species and an electron beam source.

  9. Virtual mask digital electron beam lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baylor, L.R.; Thomas, C.E.; Voelkl, E.; Moore, J.A.; Simpson, M.L.; Paulus, M.J.

    1999-04-06

    Systems and methods for direct-to-digital holography are described. An apparatus includes a laser; a beamsplitter optically coupled to the laser; a reference beam mirror optically coupled to the beamsplitter; an object optically coupled to the beamsplitter, a focusing lens optically coupled to both the reference beam mirror and the object; and a digital recorder optically coupled to the focusing lens. A reference beam is incident upon the reference beam mirror at a non-normal angle, and the reference beam and an object beam are focused by the focusing lens at a focal plane of the digital recorder to form an image. The systems and methods provide advantages in that computer assisted holographic measurements can be made. 5 figs.

  10. Radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, John (Livermore, CA); Collins, Leland F. (Pleasanton, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Ripon, CA); Micali, James V. (Dublin, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system for measuring the average power of a beam such as a laser beam, including a calorimeter configured to operate over a wide range of coolant flow rates and being cooled by continuously flowing coolant for absorbing light from a laser beam to convert the laser beam energy into heat. The system further includes a flow meter for measuring the coolant flow in the calorimeter and a pair of thermistors for measuring the temperature difference between the coolant inputs and outputs to the calorimeter. The system also includes a microprocessor for processing the measured coolant flow rate and the measured temperature difference to determine the average power of the laser beam.

  11. Virtual mask digital electron beam lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baylor, Larry R. (Farragut, TN); Thomas, Clarence E. (Knoxville, TN); Voelkl, Edgar (Oak Ridge, TN); Moore, James A. (Powell, TN); Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods for direct-to-digital holography are described. An apparatus includes a laser; a beamsplitter optically coupled to the laser; a reference beam mirror optically coupled to the beamsplitter; an object optically coupled to the beamsplitter, a focusing lens optically coupled to both the reference beam mirror and the object; and a digital recorder optically coupled to the focusing lens. A reference beam is incident upon the reference beam mirror at a non-normal angle, and the reference beam and an object beam are focused by the focusing lens at a focal plane of the digital recorder to form an image. The systems and methods provide advantages in that computer assisted holographic measurements can be made.

  12. Gas Chromatography -Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    GCMS - 1 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS OF ETHANOL AND BENZENE IN GASOLINE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;GCMS - 2 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS). The goal of this experiment is to separate the components in a sample of gasoline using Gas Chromatography

  13. The Origins of Mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-07-30

    The Higgs boson was discovered in July of 2012 and is generally understood to be the origin of mass. While those statements are true, they are incomplete. It turns out that the Higgs boson is responsible for only about 2% of the mass of ordinary matter. In this dramatic new video, Dr. Don Lincoln of Fermilab tells us the rest of the story.

  14. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.; Ortiz, C.A.; Nelson, D.C.

    1994-08-16

    The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity. 3 figs.

  15. Seismic mass Top electrode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Michael

    assembly process. For the measurements of the physical dimensions of the seismic mass a micrometer was usedSeismic mass Top electrode Bottom electrode x C1 C2 Chapter 4: The Micromachined Sensing Element supplied by Druck, Ltd., Groby, Leics. The manufacturing process at Druck was still in its experimental

  16. The Origins of Mass

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-07

    The Higgs boson was discovered in July of 2012 and is generally understood to be the origin of mass. While those statements are true, they are incomplete. It turns out that the Higgs boson is responsible for only about 2% of the mass of ordinary matter. In this dramatic new video, Dr. Don Lincoln of Fermilab tells us the rest of the story.

  17. Interfacial Properties of Electron Beam Cured Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberle, C.C.

    1999-12-30

    The objectives of the CRADA are to: Confirm that fiber-resin adhesion is responsible for the observed poor shear properties; Determine the mechanism(s) responsible for poor adhesion between carbon fibers and epoxy resins after e-beam curing; Develop and evaluate resin systems and fiber treatments to improve the properties of e-beam cured, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites; and Develop refined methods for processing e-beam cured, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites.

  18. Flat Beam Generation Kwang-Je Kim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flat Beam Generation Kwang-Je Kim Argonne National Laboratory and The University of Chicago 26th-6, 2002 #12;Flat Beam Generation Beam adapter: Ya. Derbenev Theory: A. Burov, S. Nagaitsev, Ya. Derbenev Colliders TESLA NLC CLIC Q (nc) 3 1.6 0.6 x (mm-mrad) 12 4.5 0.68 y (mm-mrad) 0.03 0.1 0.02 (mm-mrad) 0.6 0

  19. Environmental assessment -- Proposed neutrino beams at the Main Injector project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to build a beamline on the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) site to accommodate an experimental research program in neutrino physics. The proposed action, called Neutrino Beams at the Main Injector (NuMI), is to design, construct, operate and decommission a facility for producing and studying a high flux beam of neutrinos in the energy range of 1 to 40 GeV (1 GeV is one billion or 10{sup 9} electron volts). The proposed facility would initially be dedicated to two experiments, COSMOS (Cosmologically Significant Mass Oscillations) and MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search). The neutrino beam would pass underground from Fermilab to northern Minnesota. A tunnel would not be built in this intervening region because the neutrinos easily pass through the earth, not interacting, similar to the way that light passes through a pane of glass. The beam is pointed towards the MINOS detector in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. Thus, the proposed project also includes construction, operation and decommissioning of the facility located in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota that houses this MINOS detector. This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the DOE`s National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021). This EA documents DOE`s evaluation of potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed construction and operation of NuMI at Fermilab and its far detector facility located in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. Any future use of the facilities on the Fermilab site would require the administrative approval of the Director of Fermilab and would undergo a separate NEPA review. Fermilab is a Federal high-energy physics research laboratory in Batavia, Illinois operated on behalf of the DOE by Universities Research Association, Inc.

  20. Development of high-spatial and high-mass resolution mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) and its application to the study of small metabolites and endogenous molecules of plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jun, Ji Hyun

    2011-11-30

    High-spatial and high-mass resolution laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric (MS) imaging technology was developed for the attainment of MS images of higher quality containing more information on the relevant cellular and molecular biology in unprecedented depth. The distribution of plant metabolites is asymmetric throughout the cells and tissues, and therefore the increase in the spatial resolution was pursued to reveal the localization of plant metabolites at the cellular level by MS imaging. For achieving high-spatial resolution, the laser beam size was reduced by utilizing an optical fiber with small core diameter (25 ?m) in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer. Matrix application was greatly improved using oscillating capillary nebulizer. As a result, single cell level spatial resolution of ~ 12 ?m was achieved. MS imaging at this high spatial resolution was directly applied to a whole Arabidopsis flower and the substructures of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anther were successfully visualized. MS imaging of high spatial resolution was also demonstrated to the secondary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana and a high degree of localization of detected metabolites was successfully unveiled. This was the first MS imaging on the root for molecular species. MS imaging with high mass resolution was also achieved by utilizing the LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the direct identification of the surface metabolites on the Arabidopsis stem and root and differentiation of isobaric ions having the same nominal mass with no need of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS imaging at high-spatial and high-mass resolution was also applied to cer1 mutant of the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to demonstrate its usefulness in biological studies and reveal associated metabolite changes in terms of spatial distribution and/or abundances compared to those of wild-type. The spatial distribution of targeted metabolites, mainly waxes and flavonoids, was systematically explored on various organs, including flowers, leaves, stems, and roots at high spatial resolution of ~ 12-50 ?m and the changes in the abundance level of these metabolites were monitored on the cer1 mutant with respect to the wild-type. This study revealed the metabolic biology of CER1 gene on each individual organ level with very detailed high spatial resolution. The separate MS images of isobaric metabolites, i.e. C29 alkane vs. C28 aldehyde could be constructed on both genotypes from MS imaging at high mass resolution. This allows tracking of abundance changes for those compounds along with the genetic mutation, which is not achievable with low mass resolution mass spectrometry. This study supported previous hypothesis of molecular function of CER1 gene as aldehyde decarbonylase, especially by displaying hyper accumulation of aldehydes and C30 fatty acid and decrease in abundance of alkanes and ketones in several plant organs of cer1 mutant. The scope of analytes was further directed toward internal cell metabolites from the surface metabolites of the plant. MS profiling and imaging of internal cell metabolites were performed on the vibratome section of Arabidopsis leaf. Vibratome sectioning of the leaf was first conducted to remove the surface cuticle layer and it was followed by enzymatic treatment of the section to induce the digestion of primary cell walls, middle lamella, and expose the internal cells underneath to the surface for detection with the laser by LDI-MS. The subsequent MS imaging onto the enzymatically treated vibratome section allowed us to map the distribution of the metabolites in the internal cell layers, linolenic acid (C18:3 FA) and linoleic acid (C18:2 FA). The development of an assay for relative quantification of analytes at the single subcellular/organelle level by LDI-MS imaging was attempted and both plausibility and significant obstacles were seen. As a test system, native plant organelle, chloroplasts isolated from the spinach leaves were used

  1. Raman beam combining for laser brightness enhancement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jay W; Allen, Grahan S; Pax, Paul H; Heebner, John E; Sridharan, Arun K; Rubenchik, Alexander M; Barty, Christopher B.J

    2015-11-05

    An optical source capable of enhanced scaling of pulse energy and brightness utilizes an ensemble of single-aperture fiber lasers as pump sources, with each such fiber laser operating at acceptable pulse energy levels. Beam combining involves stimulated Raman scattering using a Stokes' shifted seed beam, the latter of which is optimized in terms of its temporal and spectral properties. Beams from fiber lasers can thus be combined to attain pulses with peak energies in excess of the fiber laser self-focusing limit of 4 MW while retaining the advantages of a fiber laser system of high average power with good beam quality.

  2. Raman beam combining for laser brightness enhancement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jay W.; Allen, Graham S.; Pax, Paul H.; Heebner, John E.; Sridharan, Arun K.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Barty, Chrisopher B. J.

    2015-10-27

    An optical source capable of enhanced scaling of pulse energy and brightness utilizes an ensemble of single-aperture fiber lasers as pump sources, with each such fiber laser operating at acceptable pulse energy levels. Beam combining involves stimulated Raman scattering using a Stokes' shifted seed beam, the latter of which is optimized in terms of its temporal and spectral properties. Beams from fiber lasers can thus be combined to attain pulses with peak energies in excess of the fiber laser self-focusing limit of 4 MW while retaining the advantages of a fiber laser system of high average power with good beam quality.

  3. PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATORS; BEAM DUMPS; BENDING; CHANNELING...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Channeling through Bent Crystals Mack, Stephanie; Ottawa U. SLAC 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATORS; BEAM DUMPS; BENDING; CHANNELING; CRYSTAL LATTICES; DETECTION; FORTRAN;...

  4. Beam Characterization at the Neutron Radiography Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarah Morgan; Jeffrey King

    2013-01-01

    The quality of a neutron imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This project characterized the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio and image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. Improvement of the existing NRAD MCNP beamline model includes validation of the model’s energy spectrum and the development of enhanced image simulation methods. The image simulation methods predict the radiographic image of an object based on the foil reaction rate data obtained by placing a model of the object in front of the image plane in an MCNP beamline model.

  5. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Dane, Clifford B. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  6. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

    1993-08-24

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  7. Toward CP-even Neutrino Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Fukumi; I. Nakano; H. Nanjo; N. Sasao; S. Sato; M. Yoshimura

    2009-01-20

    The best method of measuring CP violating effect in neutrino oscillation experiments is to construct and use a neutrino beam made of an ideal mixture of $\\bar{\

  8. Focused ion beam source method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Lykke, Keith R. (Gaithersburg, MD); Lill, Thorsten B. (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A focused ion beam having a cross section of submicron diameter, a high ion current, and a narrow energy range is generated from a target comprised of particle source material by laser ablation. The method involves directing a laser beam having a cross section of critical diameter onto the target, producing a cloud of laser ablated particles having unique characteristics, and extracting and focusing a charged particle beam from the laser ablated cloud. The method is especially suited for producing focused ion beams for semiconductor device analysis and modification.

  9. Summary of the LARP Mini-Workshop on Beam-Beam Compensation 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Wolfram; Bruning, Oliver S.; Koutchouk, J.P.; Zimmermann, F.; Sen, T.; Shiltsev, V.; Ohmi, K.; Furman, M.; Cai, Y.; Chao, A.; /SLAC

    2011-11-07

    The LARP Mini-Workshop on Beam-Beam Compensation 2007 was held at SLAC, 2-4 July 2007. It was attended by 33 participants from 10 institutions in Asia, Europe, and America. 26 presentations were given, while more than one third of the time was allocated to discussions. The workshop web site is Ref. [1]. The workshop's main focus was on long-range and head-on beam-beam compensation, with a view towards application in the LHC. Other topics included the beam-beam performance of previous, existing and future circular colliders; beam-beam simulations; new operating modes, theory, and unexplained phenomena. This summary is also published as Ref. [2].

  10. Improvement of Ion-Beam Energy Resolution in a Solenoid-based Radioactive Nuclear Beam Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becchetti, Fred

    Improvement of Ion-Beam Energy Resolution in a Solenoid-based Radioactive Nuclear Beam Facility of Philosophy (Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences) in The University of Michigan 2010 Doctoral

  11. The beam diagnostic instruments in Beijing radioactive ion-beam facilities isotope separator on-line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Y., E-mail: yjma@ciae.ac.cn; Cui, B.; Ma, R.; Tang, B.; Chen, L.; Huang, Q.; Jiang, W. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China)] [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China)

    2014-02-15

    The beam diagnostic instruments for Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facilities Isotope Separator On-Line are introduced [B. Q. Cui, Z. H. Peng, Y. J. Ma, R. G. Ma, B. Tang, T. Zhang, and W. S. Jiang, Nucl. Instrum. Methods 266, 4113 (2008); T. J. Zhang, X. L. Guan, and B. Q. Cui, in Proceedings of APAC 2004, Gyeongju, Korea, 2004, http://www.jacow.org , p. 267]. For low intensity ion beam [30–300 keV/1 pA–10 ?A], the beam profile monitor, the emittance measurement unit, and the analyzing slit will be installed. For the primary proton beam [100 MeV/200 ?A], the beam profile scanner will be installed. For identification of the nuclide, a beam identification unit will be installed. The details of prototype of the beam diagnostic units and some experiment results will be described in this article.

  12. BEAM COUPLING IMPEDANCE STUDIES ON THE LHC FP420 MULTI-POCKET BEAM PIPE PROTOTYPE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The longitudinal impedance is in general related to the electromagnetic power exchange between the beam and its surroundings. Not only the beam stability can be compro- mised, but the power exchange represents a dangerous

  13. Stabilization of three-wave vortex beams in the waveguide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gammal, Arnaldo

    2015-01-01

    We consider two-dimensional (2D) localized vortical modes in the three-wave system with the quadratic ($\\chi ^{(2)}$) nonlinearity, alias nondegenerate second-harmonic-generating system, guided by the isotropic harmonic-oscillator (HO) (alias parabolic) confining potential. In addition to the straightforward realization in optics, the system models mixed atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). The main issue is stability of the vortex modes, which is investigated through computation of instability growth rates for eigenmodes of small perturbations, and by means of direct simulations. The threshold of parametric instability for single-color beams, represented solely by the second harmonic (SH) with zero vorticity, is found in an analytical form with the help of the variational approximation (VA). Trapped states with vorticities $\\left( +1,-1,0\\right) $ in the two fundamental-frequency (FF) components and the SH one [the so-called \\textit{hidden-vorticity} (HV) modes] are completely unstable. Also un...

  14. Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Carol J. (Warrenville, IL)

    1998-01-01

    A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H.sup.- beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H.sup.- beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H.sup.- beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H.sup.- beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H.sup.- beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H.sup.- beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser.

  15. Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnstone, C.J.

    1998-06-02

    A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H{sup {minus}} beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H{sup {minus}} beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H{sup {minus}} beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H{sup {minus}} beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H{sup {minus}} beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H{sup {minus}} beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser. 9 figs.

  16. Molecular Manipulations of Symmetry | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMission MissionModelingModifiedMolecular Manipulations of

  17. Method and apparatus for molecular imaging using X-rays at resonance wavelengths

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapline, Jr., George F. (Alamo, CA)

    1985-01-01

    Holographic X-ray images are produced representing the molecular structure of a microscopic object, such as a living cell, by directing a beam of coherent X-rays upon the object to produce scattering of the X-rays by the object, producing interference on a recording medium between the scattered X-rays from the object and unscattered coherent X-rays and thereby producing holograms on the recording surface, and establishing the wavelength of the coherent X-rays to correspond with a molecular resonance of a constituent of such object and thereby greatly improving the contrast, sensitivity and resolution of the holograms as representations of molecular structures involving such constituent. For example, the coherent X-rays may be adjusted to the molecular resonant absorption line of nitrogen at about 401.3 eV to produce holographic images featuring molecular structures involving nitrogen.

  18. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Joachim [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), IEKP, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-10-06

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  19. Massive Quiescent Cores in Orion. -- II. Core Mass Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, D; Goldsmith, P F; Langer, W D

    2006-01-01

    We have surveyed submillimeter continuum emission from relatively quiescent regions in the Orion molecular cloud to determine how the core mass function in a high mass star forming region compares to the stellar initial mass function. Such studies are important for understanding the evolution of cores to stars, and for comparison to formation processes in high and low mass star forming regions. We used the SHARC II camera on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory telescope to obtain 350 \\micron data having angular resolution of about 9 arcsec, which corresponds to 0.02 pc at the distance of Orion. Our analysis combining dust continuum and spectral line data defines a sample of 51 Orion molecular cores with masses ranging from 0.1 \\Ms to 46 \\Ms and a mean mass of 9.8 \\Ms, which is one order of magnitude higher than the value found in typical low mass star forming regions, such as Taurus. The majority of these cores cannot be supported by thermal pressure or turbulence, and are probably supercritical.They are th...

  20. Cell Reports Molecular Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    Cell Reports Report Molecular Architecture of the Yeast Monopolin Complex Kevin D. Corbett1 report here biochemical characterization of the monopolin complex subunits Mam1 and Hrr25). In these organisms, sister kinetochore co-orientation in meiosis I depends on the Aurora B/Ipl1 kinase, as well

  1. Electron lenses for compensation of beam-beam effects: Tevatron, RHIC, LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    Since previous BEAM'06 workshop a year ago, significant progress has been made in the field of beam-beam compensation (BBC)--it has been experimentally demonstrated that both Tevatron Electron Lenses (TEL) significantly improve proton and luminosity lifetimes in high-luminosity stores. This article summarizes these results and discusses prospects of the BBC in Tevatron, RHIC and LHC.

  2. Mass of Ca-36 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tribble, Robert E.; Cossairt, J. D.; Kenefick, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    VIK W C VO I. UMK 15, 5 UMBER 6 Mass of ~Cat R. E. Tribble, ~ J. D. Cossairt, and R. A. Kenefick Cyclotron Institute and Physics Department, Texas AChM University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 14 October 1976) The ' Ca('He, He)' Ca... reaction has been used to provide the first observation of the nuclide ' Ca. The Q value and mass excess were found to be ?57.58~0.04 and ?6.44+0.04 MeV, respectively. The new mass completes four members of the A = 36 isobaric quintet and hence serves...

  3. Cascaded injection resonator for coherent beam combining of laser arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kireev, Vassili [Sunnyvale, CA; Liu, Yun; Protopopescu, Vladimir [Knoxville, TN; Braiman, Yehuda [Oak Ridge, TN

    2008-10-21

    The invention provides a cascaded injection resonator for coherent beam combining of laser arrays. The resonator comprises a plurality of laser emitters arranged along at least one plane and a beam sampler for reflecting at least a portion of each laser beam that impinges on the beam sampler, the portion of each laser beam from one of the laser emitters being reflected back to another one of the laser emitters to cause a beam to be generated from the other one of the laser emitters to the beam reflector. The beam sampler also transmits a portion of each laser beam to produce a laser output beam such that a plurality of laser output beams of the same frequency are produced. An injection laser beam is directed to a first laser emitter to begin a process of generating and reflecting a laser beam from one laser emitter to another laser emitter in the plurality. A method of practicing the invention is also disclosed.

  4. Tevatron End-of-Run Beam Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valishev, A.; Gu, X.; Miyamoto, R.; White, S.; Schmidt, F.; Qiang, J.; /LBNL

    2012-05-01

    Before the Tevatron Collider Run II ended in September of 2011, a number of specialized beam study periods were dedicated to the experiments on various accelerator physics concepts and effects during the last year of the machine operation. The study topics included collimation with bent crystals and hollow electron beams, diffusion measurements and various aspects of beam-beam interactions. In this report we concentrate on the subject of beam-beam interactions, summarizing the results of beam experiments. The covered topics include offset collisions, coherent beam stability, effect of the bunch-length-to-beta-function ratio, and operation of AC dipole with colliding beams.

  5. Ultra-high-mass mass spectrometry with charge discrimination using cryogenic detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Matthias (Berkeley, CA); Mears, Carl A. (Oakland, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA); Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA)

    1999-01-01

    An ultra-high-mass time-of-flight mass spectrometer using a cryogenic particle detector as an ion detector with charge discriminating capabilities. Cryogenic detectors have the potential for significantly improving the performance and sensitivity of time-of-flight mass spectrometers, and compared to ion multipliers they exhibit superior sensitivity for high-mass, slow-moving macromolecular ions and can be used as "stop" detectors in time-of-flight applications. In addition, their energy resolving capability can be used to measure the charge state of the ions. Charge discrimination is very valuable in all time-of-flight mass spectrometers. Using a cryogenically-cooled Nb-Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 -Nb superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction (STJ) detector operating at 1.3 K as an ion detector in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for large biomolecules it was found that the STJ detector has charge discrimination capabilities. Since the cryogenic STJ detector responds to ion energy and does not rely on secondary electron production, as in the conventionally used microchannel plate (MCP) detectors, the cryogenic detector therefore detects large molecular ions with a velocity-independent efficiency approaching 100%.

  6. Polarization of fast particle beams by collisional pumping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stearns, J. Warren (Castro Valley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA); Pyle, Robert V. (Berkeley, CA); Anderson, L. Wilmer (Madison, WI); Ruby, Lawrence (Berkeley, CA); Schlachter, Alfred S. (Oakland, CA)

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus for highly polarizing a fast beam of particles by collisional pumping, including generating a fast beam of particles, and also generating a thick electron-spin-polarized medium positioned as a target for the beam. The target is made sufficiently thick to allow the beam to interact with the medium to produce collisional pumping whereby the beam becomes highly polarized.

  7. PIA - Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) User...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) User System (ESU) PIA - Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) User System (ESU) PIA - Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory...

  8. Inverse Free Electron Laser Interactions with Sub-Picosecond High Brightness Electron Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moody, Joshua Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Accelerated Electron Beam Spectrum . . . . . . . . . . . .2 High Brightness Electron Beams Produced in thetion of Uniformly Filled Ellipsoidal Electron Beam: Method-

  9. Heavy Hybrid mesons Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Iddir; L. Semlala

    2006-11-25

    We estimate the ground state masses of the heavy hybrid mesons using a phenomenological QCD-type potential. 0^{- -},1^{- -},0^{- +},1^{- +} and 0^{+ -} J^{PC} states are considered.

  10. Metal-mediated molecular machines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howgego, David Christopher

    2013-06-29

    Nature abounds with ingenious nanoscopic machines employed to carry out all of the requisite tasks that collectively contribute to the molecular basis of life. This thesis focuses primarily on a sub-set known as "molecular ...

  11. Versatile secondary beam for the meson area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirk, T.

    1982-03-01

    A new secondary beam design is outlined for the Meson M6 Beamline that combines versatility with economy. The beamline described will transport charged particles of either sign to 800 GeV/c and bring the beam to a focus in one of three potential experimental areas. The plan makes maximal use of existing civil construction.

  12. W-Band Sheet Beam Klystron Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colby, E.R.; Caryotakis, G.; Fowkes, W.R.; /SLAC; Smithe, D.N.; /Mission Res., Newington

    2005-09-12

    With the development of ever higher energy particle accelerators comes the need for compactness and high gradient, which in turn require very high frequency high power rf sources. Recent development work in W-band accelerating techniques has spurred the development of a high-power W-band source. Axisymmetric sources suffer from fundamental power output limitations (P{sub sat} {approx} {lambda}{sup 2}) brought on by the conflicting requirements of small beam sizes and high beam current. The sheet beam klystron allows for an increase in beam current without substantial increase in the beam current density, allowing for reduced cathode current densities and focusing field strengths. Initial simulations of a 20:1 aspect ratio sheet beam/cavity interaction using the 3 dimensional particle-in-cell code Magic3D have demonstrated a 35% beam-power to RF power extraction efficiency. Calculational work and numerical simulations leading to a prototype W-band sheet beam klystron will be presented, together with preliminary cold test structure studies of a proposed RF cavity geometry.

  13. W-band sheet beam klystron simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colby, E.R.; Caryotakis, G.; Fowkes, W.R. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Smithe, D.N. [Mission Research Corporation, 8560 Cinderbed Road, Ste. 700, Newington, Virginia 22122 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    With the development of ever higher energy particle accelerators comes the need for compactness and high gradient, which in turn require very high frequency high power rf sources. Recent development work in W-band accelerating techniques has spurred the development of a high-power W-band source. Axisymmetric sources suffer from fundamental power output limitations (P{sub sat}{approximately}{lambda}{sup 2}) brought on by the conflicting requirements of small beam sizes and high beam current. The sheet beam klystron allows for an increase in beam current without substantial increase in the beam current density, allowing for reduced cathode current densities and focussing field strengths. Initial simulations of a 20:1 aspect ratio sheet beam/cavity interaction using the 3 dimensional particle-in-cell code Magic3D have demonstrated a 35{percent} beam-power to RF power extraction efficiency. Calculational work and numerical simulations leading to a prototype W-band sheet beam klystron will be presented, together with preliminary cold test structure studies of a proposed RF cavity geometry. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. 3-D simulations of multiple beam klystrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smithe, David N.; Bettenhausen, Mike; Ludeking, Larry; Caryotakis, G.; Sprehn, Daryl; Scheitrum, Glenn [Mission Research Corporation, 8560 Cinderbed Rd., Suite 700, Newington, Virginia 22122 (United States); Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    1999-05-07

    The MAGIC3D simulation code is being used to assess the multi-dimensional physics issues relating to the design and operation of multiple beam klystrons. Investigations, to date, include a detailed study of the mode structure of the cavities in the 19-beam hexagonally packed geometry and a study of the velocity spread caused by the cavity mode's field profile. Some attempts to minimize this effect are investigated. Additional simulations have provided quantification of the beam loading Q in a dual input cavity, and optimization of a dual output cavity. An important goal of the simulations is an accurate picture of beam transport along the length of the MBK. We have quantified the magnitude and spatial variation of the beam-line space charge interactions within a cavity gap. Present simulations have demonstrated the transport of the beam through three cavities (the present limits of our simulation size) without difficulty; additional length simulations are expected. We have also examined unbalanced beam-line scenarios, e.g., one beam-line suppressed, and find little disturbance to the transport in individual cavity tests, with results for multiple cavity transport expected.

  15. Shear deflection of composite wood beams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skaggs, Thomas David

    1992-01-01

    properties (E and G) along the length of the beam. Biblis (1965) examined the deflection of small scale solid wood beams of varying span-to- depth (L/d) ratios. Several wood species were studied for the 0. 65" x 0. 65" test specimens. An equation was used...

  16. Beam Pulse Structure and Targets Roger Bennett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Beam Pulse Structure and Targets Roger Bennett Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot jets Thermal shock is not a problem - provided the pulse is short enough. #12;Shock, Pulse Length that there is permanent distortion or failure - shock. Short high intensity beam pulses will give rise to shock

  17. Polymer surface treatment with particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stinnett, Regan W. (1033 Tramway La. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); VanDevender, J. Pace (7604 Lamplighter NE., Albuquerque, NM 87109)

    1999-01-01

    A polymer surface and near surface treatment process produced by irradiation with high energy particle beams. The process is preferably implemented with pulsed ion beams. The process alters the chemical and mechanical properties of the polymer surface in a manner useful for a wide range of commercial applications.

  18. Mikhail Avilov Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    and Fluid Flow Challenges of the FRIB Primary Beam Dump #12;M. Avilov, May 2014 5th HP Targetry Workshop Challenges Chemical Challenges Radiation Challenges Summary #12; World-leading heavy ion accelerator and amplitude of temperature changes · 60 gpm water flow to provide cooling and gas bubble removal Primary Beam

  19. Emittance growth from electron beam modulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2009-12-01

    In linac ring colliders like MeRHIC and eRHIC a modulation of the electron bunch can lead to a modulation of the beam beam tune shift and steering errors. These modulations can lead to emittance growth. This note presents simple formulas to estimate these effects which generalize some previous results.

  20. Aerodynamic beam generator for large particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brockmann, John E. (Albuquerque, NM); Torczynski, John R. (Albuquerque, NM); Dykhuizen, Ronald C. (Albuquerque, NM); Neiser, Richard A. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Mark F. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A new type of aerodynamic particle beam generator is disclosed. This generator produces a tightly focused beam of large material particles at velocities ranging from a few feet per second to supersonic speeds, depending on the exact configuration and operating conditions. Such generators are of particular interest for use in additive fabrication techniques.

  1. Polymer surface treatment with particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stinnett, R.W.; VanDevender, J.P.

    1999-05-04

    A polymer surface and near surface treatment process produced by irradiation with high energy particle beams is disclosed. The process is preferably implemented with pulsed ion beams. The process alters the chemical and mechanical properties of the polymer surface in a manner useful for a wide range of commercial applications. 16 figs.

  2. Solids mass flow determination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Macko, Joseph E. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the mass flow rate of solids mixed with a transport fluid to form a flowing mixture. A temperature differential is established between the solids and fluid. The temperature of the transport fluid prior to mixing, the temperature of the solids prior to mixing, and the equilibrium temperature of the mixture are monitored and correlated in a heat balance with the heat capacities of the solids and fluid to determine the solids mass flow rate.

  3. Effect of beam limiting aperture and collector potential on multi-element focused ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, Samit; Chowdhury, Abhishek; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2012-02-15

    A compact microwave driven plasma based multi-element focused ion beam system has been developed. In the present work, the effect of reduced beam limiter (BL) aperture on the focused ion beam parameters, such as current and spot size, and a method of controlling beam energy independently by introducing a biased collector at focal point (FP) are investigated. It is found that the location of FP does not change due to the reduction of BL aperture. The location of FP and beam size are found to be weakly dependent on the collector potential in the range from -8 kV to -18 kV.

  4. Chiral specific electron vortex beam spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Yuan; S. M. Lloyd; M. Babiker

    2013-07-29

    Electron vortex beams carry well-defined orbital angular momentum (OAM) about the propagation axis. Such beams are thus characterised by chirality features which make them potentially useful as probes of magnetic and other chiral materials. An analysis of the inelastic processes in which electron vortex beams interact with atoms and which involve OAM exchange is outlined, leading to the multipolar selection rules governing this chiral specific electron vortex beam spectroscopy. Our results show clearly that the selection rules are dependent on the dynamical state and location of the atoms involved. In the most favorable scenario, this form of electron spectroscopy can induce magnetic sublevel transitions which are commonly probed using circularly polarized photon beams.

  5. Beam physics in future electron hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valloni, A; Klein, M; Schulte, D; Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    High-energy electron-hadron collisions could support a rich research programme in particle and nuclear physics. Several future projects are being proposed around the world, in particular eRHIC at BNL, MEIC at TJNAF in the US, and LHeC at CERN in Europe. This paper will highlight some of the accelerator physics issues, and describe related technical developments and challenges for these machines. In particular, optics design and beam dynamics studies are discussed, including longitudinal phase space manipulation, coherent synchrotron radiation, beam-beam kink instability, ion effects, as well as mitigation measures for beam break up and for space-charge induced emittance growth, all of which could limit the machine performance. Finally, first steps are presented towards an LHeC R&D facility, which should investigate relevant beam-physics processes.

  6. Carbon Fiber Damage in Particle Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dehning, B; Kroyer, T; Meyer, M; Sapinski, M

    2011-01-01

    Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in beam wire scanners. The heating of the fiber due to energy loss of the particles travelling through is simulated with Geant4. The heating induced by the beam electromagnetic field is estimated with ANSYS. The heat transfer and sublimation processes are modelled. Due to the model nonlinearity, a numerical approach based on discretization of the wire movement is used to solve it for particular beams. Radiation damage to the fiber is estimated with SRIM. The model is tested with available SPS and LEP data and a dedicated damage test on the SPS beam is performed followed by a post-mortem analysis of the wire remnants. Predictions for the LHC beams are made.

  7. Simulations for CLIC Drive Beam Linac

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avni Aksoy

    2012-02-25

    The Drive Beam Linac of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) has to accelerate an electron beam with 4.2 A up to 2.4 GeV in almost fully-loaded structures. The pulse contains about 70000 bunches, one in every second rf bucket, and has a length of 140 $\\mu$s. The beam stability along the beamline is of concern for such a high current and pulse length. We present different options for the lattice of the linac based on FODO, triplet and doublet cells and compare the transverse instability for each lattice including the effects of beam jitter, alignment and beam-based correction. Additionally longitudinal stability is discussed for different bunch compressors using FODO type of lattice.

  8. Plans for Neutrino Super Beams in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dracos, Marcos

    2010-01-01

    Neutrino Super Beams use conventional techniques to increase the neutrino beam intensity compared to the present neutrino facilities. The first part of these facilities consists of an intense proton driver producing a beam higher than a MW power. The protons hit a target able to afford the high proton beam intensity. The produced charged particles are focused by a system of magnetic horns towards the experiment detectors. The main challenge of these projects is to produce elements able to resist to the high beam intensity for many years. New high power neutrino facilities could be build at CERN profiting from the LHC upgrades. For this reason, the initial design of these upgrades has to include the possibility to go to high power facilities.

  9. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Insect Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Insect Molecular Biology 03/21/2014 POSITION: Research Associate LOCATION in entomology, biochemistry, molecular biology and/or toxicology; extensive research experience in entomology, biochemistry, cell biology and/or molecular biology; excellent organizational, and written and interpersonal

  10. Broadband microwave burst produced by electron beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. T. Altyntsev; G. D. Fleishman; G. -L. Huang; V. F. Melnikov

    2007-12-16

    Theoretical and experimental study of fast electron beams attracts a lot of attention in the astrophysics and laboratory. In the case of solar flares the problem of reliable beam detection and diagnostics is of exceptional importance. This paper explores the fact that the electron beams moving oblique to the magnetic field or along the field with some angular scatter around the beam propagation direction can generate microwave continuum bursts via gyrosynchrotron mechanism. The characteristics of the microwave bursts produced by beams differ from those in case of isotropic or loss-cone distributions, which suggests a new tool for quantitative diagnostics of the beams in the solar corona. To demonstrate the potentiality of this tool, we analyze here a radio burst occurred during an impulsive flare 1B/M6.7 on 10 March 2001 (AR 9368, N27W42). Based on detailed analysis of the spectral, temporal, and spatial relationships, we obtained firm evidence that the microwave continuum burst is produced by electron beams. For the first time we developed and applied a new forward fitting algorithm based on exact gyrosynchrotron formulae and employing both the total power and polarization measurements to solve the inverse problem of the beam diagnostics. We found that the burst is generated by a oblique beam in a region of reasonably strong magnetic field ($\\sim 200-300$ G) and the burst is observed at a quasi-transverse viewing angle. We found that the life time of the emitting electrons in the radio source is relatively short, $\\tau_l \\approx 0.5$ s, consistent with a single reflection of the electrons from a magnetic mirror at the foot point with the stronger magnetic field. We discuss the implications of these findings for the electron acceleration in flares and for beam diagnostics.

  11. Weak-strong simulation on head-on beam-beam compensation in the RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo,Y.; Fischer, W.; McIntosh, E.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Abreu, N.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Montag, C.

    2009-05-04

    In the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beams collide in the two interaction points IP6 and IP8. To further increase the bunch intensity above 2 x 10{sup 11} or further reduce the transverse emittance in polarized proton operation, there will not be enough tune space between the current working area [2/3, 7/10] to hold the beam-beam generated tune spread. We proposed a low energy DC electron beam (e-lens) with similar Gaussian transverse profiles to collide with the proton beam at IP10. Early studies have shown that e-lens does reduce the proton-proton beam-beam tune spread. In this article, we carried out numerical simulation to investigate the effects of the head-on beam-beam effect on the proton's colliding beam lifetime and emittance growth. The preliminary results including scans of compensation strength, phase advances between IP8 and IP10, electron beam transverse sizes are presented. In these studies, the particle loss in the multi-particle simulation is used for the comparison between different conditions.

  12. INFLUENCE OF MASS ON DISPLACEMENT THRESHOLD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Selby, A.; Nandipati, Giridhar; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-12-30

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the effect of mass on displacement threshold energy in Cr, Mo, Fe and W. For each interatomic potential, the mass of the atoms is varied among those metals for a total of 16 combinations. The average threshold energy over all crystal directions is calculated within the irreducible crystal directions using appropriate weighting factors. The weighting factors account for the different number of equivalent directions among the grid points and the different solid angle coverage of each grid point. The grid points are constructed with a Miller index increment of 1/24 for a total of 325 points. For each direction, 10 simulations each with a different primary-knock-on atom are performed. The results show that for each interatomic potential, the average threshold energy is insensitive to the mass; i.e., the values are the same within the standard error. In the future, the effect of mass on high-energy cascades for a given interatomic potential will be investigated.

  13. SUPERGIANT SHELLS AND MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMATION IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawson, J. R.; Dickey, John M.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Wong, T.; Hughes, A.; Fukui, Y.; Kawamura, A.

    2013-01-20

    We investigate the influence of large-scale stellar feedback on the formation of molecular clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Examining the relationship between H I and {sup 12}CO(J = 1-0) in supergiant shells (SGSs), we find that the molecular fraction in the total volume occupied by SGSs is not enhanced with respect to the rest of the LMC disk. However, the majority of objects ({approx}70% by mass) are more molecular than their local surroundings, implying that the presence of a supergiant shell does on average have a positive effect on the molecular gas fraction. Averaged over the full SGS sample, our results suggest that {approx}12%-25% of the molecular mass in supergiant shell systems was formed as a direct result of the stellar feedback that created the shells. This corresponds to {approx}4%-11% of the total molecular mass of the galaxy. These figures are an approximate lower limit to the total contribution of stellar feedback to molecular cloud formation in the LMC, and constitute one of the first quantitative measurements of feedback-triggered molecular cloud formation in a galactic system.

  14. A non-invasive beam profile monitor for charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tzoganis, Vasilis, E-mail: vasileios.tzoganis@cockcroft.ac.uk [Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Sci-Tech, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); RIKEN Nishina Centre, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Welsch, Carsten P. [Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Sci-Tech, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-19

    Non-interceptive beam profile monitors are highly desirable in almost all particle accelerators. Such techniques are especially valuable in applications where real time monitoring of the beam properties is required while beam preservation and minimal influence on the vacuum are of the greatest importance. This applies to many kinds of accelerators such as high energy machines where the normal diagnostics cannot withstand the beam's power, medical machines where treatment time is valuable and cannot be allocated to diagnostics and also low energy, low intensity accelerators where the beam's properties are difficult to measure. This paper presents the design of a gas-jet based beam profile monitor which was developed and commissioned at the Cockcroft Institute and can operate in a very large background pressure range from 10{sup ?7} down to below 10{sup ?11} millibars. The functioning principle of the monitor is described and the first experimental results obtained using a 5?keV electron beam are discussed.

  15. Optics of ion beams for the neutral beam injection system on HL-2A Tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, G. Q.; Lei, G. J.; Cao, J. Y.; Duan, X. R.

    2012-07-15

    The ion beam optics for the neutral beam injection system on HL-2A Tokomak is studied by two- dimensional numerical simulation program firstly, where the emitting surface is taken at 100 Debye lengths from the plasma electrode. The mathematical formulation, computation techniques are described. Typical ion orbits, equipotential contours, and emittance diagram are shown. For a fixed geometry electrode, the effect of plasma density, plasma potential and plasma electron temperature on ion beam optics is examined, and the calculation reliability is confirmed by experimental results. In order to improve ion beam optics, the application of a small pre-acceleration voltage ({approx}100 V) between the plasma electrode and the arc discharge anode is reasonable, and a lower plasma electron temperature is desired. The results allow optimization of the ion beam optics in the neutral beam injection system on HL-2A Tokomak and provide guidelines for designing future neutral beam injection system on HL-2M Tokomak.

  16. In-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kugel, H.W.; Kaita, R.

    1983-09-26

    Objects of the present invention are provided for a particle beam having a full energy component at least as great as 25 keV, which is directed onto a beamstop target, such that Rutherford backscattering, preferably near-surface backscattering occurs. The geometry, material composition and impurity concentration of the beam stop are predetermined, using any suitable conventional technique. The energy-yield characteristic response of backscattered particles is measured over a range of angles using a fast ion electrostatic analyzer having a microchannel plate array at its focal plane. The knee of the resulting yield curve, on a plot of yield versus energy, is analyzed to determine the energy species components of various beam particles having the same mass.

  17. Fully 3D Multiple Beam Dynamics Processes Simulation for the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, E.; Amundson, J.; Spentzouris, P; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab

    2010-06-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron has been, until 2010, the premier high-energy physics collider in the world. The data collected over the last decade by high-energy physics experiments running at the Tevatron have been analyzed to make important measurements in fundamental areas such as B meson masses and flavor oscillation, searches for the Higgs boson, and supersymmetry. Collecting these data at the limits of detectability has required the Tevatron to operate reliably at high beam intensities to maximize the number of collisions to analyze. This impressive achievement has been assisted by the use of HPC resources and software provided through the SciDAC program. This paper describes the enhancements to the BeamBeam3d code to realistically simulate the Tevatron, the validation of these simulations, and the improvement in equipment reliability and personal safety achieved with the aid of simulations.

  18. The 2011 Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nesbitt, David J.

    2011-07-11

    The Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference focuses on all aspects of molecular collisions--experimental & theoretical studies of elastic, inelastic, & reactive encounters involving atoms, molecules, ions, clusters, & surfaces--as well as half collisions--photodissociation, photo-induced reaction, & photodesorption. The scientific program for the meeting in 2011 included exciting advances in both the core & multidisciplinary forefronts of the study of molecular collision processes. Following the format of the 2009 meeting, we also invited sessions in special topics that involve interfacial dynamics, novel emerging spectroscopies, chemical dynamics in atmospheric, combustion & interstellar environments, as well as a session devoted to theoretical & experimental advances in ultracold molecular samples. Researchers working inside & outside the traditional core topics of the meeting are encouraged to join the conference. We invite contributions of work that seeks understanding of how inter & intra-molecular forces determine the dynamics of the phenomena under study. In addition to invited oral sessions & contributed poster sessions, the scientific program included a formal session consisting of five contributed talks selected from the submitted poster abstracts. The DMC has distinguished itself by having the Herschbach Medal Symposium as part of the meeting format. This tradition of the Herschbach Medal was first started in the 2007 meeting chaired by David Chandler, based on a generous donation of funds & artwork design by Professor Dudley Herschbach himself. There are two such awards made, one for experimental & one for theoretical contributions to the field of Molecular Collision Dynamics, broadly defined. The symposium is always held on the last night of the meeting & has the awardees are asked to deliver an invited lecture on their work. The 2011 Herschbach Medal was dedicated to the contributions of two long standing leaders in Chemical Physics, Professor Yuan T. Lee & Professor George Schatz. Professor Lee’s research has been based on the development & use of advanced chemical kinetics & molecular beams to investigate & manipulate the behavior of fundamental chemical reactions. Lee’s work has been recognized by many awards, including the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1986, as well as Sloan Fellow, Dreyfus Scholar, Fellowship in the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, Fellowship in the American Physical Society, Guggenheim Fellow, Member National Academy of Sciences, Member Academia Sinica, E.O. Lawrence Award, Miller Professor, Berkeley, Fairchild Distinguished Scholar, Harrison Howe Award, Peter Debye Award, & the National Medal of Science. Lee also has served as the President of the Academia Sinica in Taiwan (ROC). Professor Schatz’s research group is interested in using theory & computation to describe physical phenomena in a broad range of applications relevant to chemistry, physics, biology & engineering. Among the types of applications that we interested are: optical properties of nanoparticles & nanoparticle assemblies; using theory to model polymer properties; DNA structure, thermodynamics & dynamics; modeling self assembly & nanopatterning; & gas phase reaction dynamics. Among his many awards & distinctions have been appointment as an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow, Camille & Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar, the Fresenius Award, Fellow of the American Physical Society, the Max Planck Research Award, Fellowship in the American Association for the Advancement of Science, & election to the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Sciences & the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. Dr Schatz is also lauded for his highly successful work as Editor for the Journal of Physical Chemistry. We requested $10,000 from DOE in support of this meeting. The money was distributed widely among the student & post doctoral fellows & some used to attract the very best scientists in the field. The organizers were committed to encouraging women & minorities as well as encourage the field of Chemical Physics in scientific

  19. Two-beam detuned-cavity electron accelerator structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Y.; Hirshfield, J. L. [Beam Physics Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Beam Physics Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States) and Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    Progress has been made in the theory, development, cavity design and optimization, beam dynamics study, beam transport design, and hardware construction for studies of a detuned two-beam electron accelerator structure.

  20. UNDULATOR-BASED LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR ELECTRON BEAM DIAGNOSTIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakeman, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR ELECTRON BEAM DIAGNOSTIC* M.S.quasi-monoenergetic electron beams with energies up to 1high-peak- current, electron beams are ideal for driving a

  1. AN INTENSE NON-RELATIVISTIC CESIUM ION BEAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampel, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Cesium Injector Electron Beam Probe The Diagnostic Tank and2.3, the diagnostic tank containing the electron beam probe,An electron beam probe was developed as the major diagnostic

  2. Intense Ion Beam for Warm Dense Matter Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heimbucher, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Apertured beam measurements with electron cloud diagnosticsdiagnostic to measure beam induced gas desorption, ionization, and electronon the electron cloud diagnostics for the 45-mA beam and the

  3. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubel, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    A. Hakim, R¨ bel et al. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of399, 1976. R¨ bel et al. Automatic Beam Path Analysis ofAutomatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wake?eld Particle

  4. Role Model and Activity Volunteers Needed to Help with BEAMS...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Model and Activity Volunteers Needed to Help with BEAMS - Jefferson Lab's Science and Math Outreach Program for Students B.E.A.M.S. BEAMS students learn about energy transfer,...

  5. Improvements to TITAN's Mass Measurement and Decay Spectroscopy Capabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Lascar; A. A. Kwiatkowski; U. Chowdhury; A. Finlay; A. T. Gallant; M. Good; R. Klawitter; B. Kootte; K. G. Leach; A. Lennarz; E. Leistenschneider; B. E. Schultz; R. Schupp; D. A. Short; C. Andreoiu; J. Dilling; G. Gwinner

    2015-08-27

    The study of nuclei farther from the valley of $\\beta$-stability goes hand-in-hand with shorter-lived nuclei produced in smaller abundances than their more stable counterparts. The measurement, to high precision, of nuclear masses therefore requires innovations in technique in order to keep up. TRIUMF's Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN) facility deploys three ion traps, with a fourth in the commissioning phase, to perform and support Penning trap mass spectrometry and in-trap decay spectroscopy on some of the shortest-lived nuclei ever studied. We report on recent advances and updates to the TITAN facility since the 2012 EMIS Conference. TITAN's charge breeding capabilities have been improved and in-trap decay spectroscopy can be performed in TITAN's electron beam ion trap (EBIT). Higher charge states can improve the precision of mass measurements, reduce the beam-time requirements for a given measurement, improve beam purity and opens the door to access, via in-trap decay and recapture, isotopes not available from the ISOL method. This was recently demonstrated during TITAN's mass measurement of $^{30}$Al. The EBIT's decay spectroscopy setup was commissioned with a successful branching ratio and half-life measurement of $^{124}$Cs. Charge breeding in the EBIT increases the energy spread of the ion bunch sent to the Penning trap for mass measurement so a new Cooler Penning Trap (CPET), which aims to cool highly charge ions with an electron plasma, is undergoing online commissioning. Already, CPET has demonstrated the trapping and self-cooling of a room-temperature electron plasma which was stored for several minutes. A new detector has been installed inside the CPET magnetic field which will allow for in-magnet charged particle detection.

  6. Buckling of microtubules: An insight by molecular and continuum mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jin; Meguid, S. A.

    2014-10-27

    The molecular structural mechanics method has been extended to investigate the buckling of microtubules (MTs) with various configurations. The results indicate that for relative short MTs the shear deformation effect, rather than the nonlocal effect, is mainly responsible for the limitation of their widely used Euler beam description and the observed length-dependence of their bending stiffness. In addition, the configuration effect of MTs is also studied and considered as an explanation for the large scattering of the critical buckling force and bending stiffness observed in existing experiments. This configuration effect is also found to mainly originate from the geometry of the MTs and is mainly determined by the protofilament number.

  7. Electron beam exposure mechanisms in hydrogen silsesquioxane investigated by vibrational spectroscopy and in-situ electron beam induced desorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olynick, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory, Molecular Foundry, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley CAwas performed at the Molecular Foundry, Lawrence BerkeleyLaboratory, Molecular Foundry, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley CA

  8. Beam diagnostics and beam handling systems; Proceedings of the Meeting, Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany, Sept. 21, 22, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sona, A.

    1989-01-01

    Papers on beam diagnostics and beam handling systems are presented, including topics such as matrials processing with laser radiation, diagnostics of high-power laser beams, beam quality evaluation of a high power fast axial flow CO2 laser, diffractive devices in beam handling, and intensity profiling UV laser beams. Other topics include optical fiber Nd-YAG laser beam delivery systems, a flexible fiber cable for 1 kW CW YAG laser radiation transmission, an optical fiber multiplexer for industrial Nd:YAG lasers, linking laser and handling systems in multistation operation, a noncontact capacitive control system for laser cutting machines, and robotics for beam manipulations. Additional subjects include active optics for high power lasers, beam delivery and shaping on heat treating applications, optics for shaping and focusing industrial CO2 lasers, reshaping annular laser beams with conical reflectors, increasing the flexibility of beam integrating multifaceted mirrors, and the definition and use of the principal planes for Gaussian beams.

  9. BEAM TEST of the ATLAS SILICON DETECTOR MODULES with BINARY READOUT in the CERN H8 BEAM in 1996 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BEAM TEST of the ATLAS SILICON DETECTOR MODULES with BINARY READOUT in the CERN H8 BEAM in 1996 1 F, Spain, 21 Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA ABSTRACT Results are reported from a beam test

  10. Molecular Structure of Water at Gold Electrodes Revealed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStress Molecular Mimicry of SUMO byMolecular

  11. Molecular clocks control mutation rate in human cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStress Molecular Mimicry ofMolecular clocks

  12. Molecular-Frame Angular Distributions of Resonant Auger Electrons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStress Molecular MimicryMolecular-Frame Angular

  13. Molecular-Frame Angular Distributions of Resonant Auger Electrons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStress Molecular MimicryMolecular-Frame

  14. Molecular-Frame Angular Distributions of Resonant Auger Electrons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStress MolecularMolecular-Frame Angular

  15. Beam Loading by Distributed Injection of Electrons in a Plasma...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Beam Loading by Distributed Injection of Electrons in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Beam Loading by Distributed...

  16. 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ELECTRON GUNS; BEAM EMITTANCE; CHARGE

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SPACE 430200* -- Particle Accelerators-- Beam Dynamics, Field Calculations, & Ion Optics The evolution of the electron-beam phase space distribution in laser-driven rf guns is...

  17. CRYOPUMP OPERATIONS WITH THE TOKAMAK NEUTRAL BEAM INJECTOR PROTOTYPE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrns, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    OPERATIONS WI i H THE TOKAMAK NEUTRAL-BEAM - INJECTORCRYOPUMP OPERATIONS WITH THE TOKAMAK NEUTRAL BEAM INJECTORPlasma Physics Lab (PPPL) Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (

  18. Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics Authors: Huang,...

  19. Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics You are...

  20. Collective Dynamics and Coherent Diagnostics of Microbunched Relativistic Electron Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinelli, Agostino

    2012-01-01

    in the diagnostic of compressed electron beams and free-imaging and diagnostics of high-brightness electron beamsfor the diagnostics of compressed electron beams, such as

  1. UNDULATOR-BASED LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR ELECTRON BEAM DIAGNOSTIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakeman, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    ACCELERATOR ELECTRON BEAM DIAGNOSTIC* M.S. Bakeman # , W.M.of an undulator-based electron beam diagnostic to be used in

  2. Meso-Scale during Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing Chen,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thermal Properties and Beam-Particle Interaction at Meso-Scale during Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing Chen, Jian ORNL ORNL; Zheng, Lili ORNL ORNL; Feng, Zhili...

  3. Ion beam assisted deposition of thermal barrier coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youchison, Dennis L. (Albuquerque, NM); McDonald, Jimmie M. (Albuquerque, NM); Lutz, Thomas J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gallis, Michail A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-23

    Methods and apparatus for depositing thermal barrier coatings on gas turbine blades and vanes using Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EBPVD) combined with Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD).

  4. Fuel Target Implosion in Ion beam Inertial Confinement Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawata, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    The numerical results for the fuel target implosion are presented in order to clarify the target physics in ion beam inertial fusion. The numerical analyses are performed for a direct-driven ion beam target. In the paper the following issues are studied: the beam obliquely incidence on the target surface, the plasma effect on the beam-stopping power, the beam particle energy, the beam time duration, the target radius, the beam input energy and the non-uniformity effect on the fuel target performance. In this paper the beam ions are protons.

  5. Design of a relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator Prototype

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westenskow, G.

    2008-01-01

    Design of a Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator147 DESIGN OF A RELATIVISTIC KLYSTRON TWO-BEAM ACCELERATORin an Extended Relativistic Klystron," this conference.

  6. Emittance and Phase Space Exchange for Advanced Beam Manipulation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Emittance and Phase Space Exchange for Advanced Beam Manipulation and Diagnostics Alternative chicane-type beam lines are proposed for exact emittance exchange between...

  7. Non-explosive simulated blast loading of composite sandwich beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Antony C.

    2010-01-01

    compression platens (b) stainless steel beam (c) hard rubber136 Figure 103. Stainless steel beam (dimensionsinches, material: stainless steel) .. 137 Figure 104.

  8. Impact parameter dependence of isospin effects on the mass dependence of balance energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakshi Gautam; Aman D Sood

    2010-09-24

    We study the effect of isospin degree of freedom on the balance energy as well as its mass dependence throughout the mass range 48-270 for two sets of isobaric systems with N/Z = 1 and 1.4 using isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (IQMD) model. Our fndings reveal the dominance of Coulomb repulsion in isospin effects on balance energy as well as its mass dependence throughout the range of the colliding geometry.

  9. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasche, George P. (Arlington, VA)

    1988-01-01

    A high-power-density laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems.

  10. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasche, G.P.

    1987-02-20

    A high-power-density-laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems. 25 figs.

  11. Energy-beam-driven rapid fabrication system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keicher, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Atwood, Clinton L. (Albuquerque, NM); Greene, Donald L. (Corrales, NM); Griffith, Michelle L. (Albuquerque, NM); Harwell, Lane D. (Albuquerque, NM); Jeantette, Francisco P. (Albuquerque, NM); Romero, Joseph A. (Albuquerque, NM); Schanwald, Lee P. (Albuquerque, NM); Schmale, David T. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    An energy beam driven rapid fabrication system, in which an energy beam strikes a growth surface to form a molten puddle thereon. Feed powder is then injected into the molten puddle from a converging flow of feed powder. A portion of the feed powder becomes incorporated into the molten puddle, forcing some of the puddle contents to freeze on the growth surface, thereby adding an additional layer of material. By scanning the energy beam and the converging flow of feed powder across the growth surface, complex three-dimensional shapes can be formed, ready or nearly ready for use. Nearly any class of material can be fabricated using this system.

  12. Control and manipulation of electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piot, Philippe; /NICADD, DeKalb /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    The concepts of the advanced accelerators and light source rely on the production of bright electron beams. The rms areas of the beam phase space often need to be tailored to the specific applications. Furthermore, a new class of the forefront research calls for detailed specific distribution such as the particle density in the time coordinate. Several groups are tackling these various challenges and in this report we attempt to give a review of the state-of-the-art of the control and manipulation of the electron beams.

  13. Intense steady state electron beam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hershcovitch, A.; Kovarik, V.J.; Prelec, K.

    1990-07-17

    An intense, steady state, low emittance electron beam generator is formed by operating a hollow cathode discharge plasma source at critical levels in combination with an extraction electrode and a target electrode that are operable to extract a beam of fast primary electrons from the plasma source through a negatively biased grid that is critically operated to repel bulk electrons toward the plasma source while allowing the fast primary electrons to move toward the target in the desired beam that can be successfully transported for relatively large distances, such as one or more meters away from the plasma source. 2 figs.

  14. Scattering of singular beams by subwavelength objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemo, Evyatar; Shamir, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a mounting interest in better methods of measuring nanoscale objects, especially in fields such as nanotechnology, biomedicine, cleantech, and microelectronics. Conventional methods have proved insufficient, due to the classical diffraction limit or slow and complicated measuring procedures. The purpose of this paper is to explore the special characteristics of singular beams with respect to the investigation of subwavelength objects. Singular beams are light beams that contain one or more singularities in their physical parameters, such as phase or polarization. We focus on the three-dimensional interaction between electromagnetic waves and subwavelength objects to extract information about the object from the scattered light patterns.

  15. Injected Beam Dynamics in SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbett, Jeff; Fisher, Alan; Huang, Xiaobiao; Safranek, James; Westerman, Stuart; Cheng, Weixing; Mok, Walter; /Unlisted

    2012-06-21

    For the top-off operation it is important to understand the time evolution of charge injected into the storage ring. The large-amplitude horizontal oscillation quickly filaments and decoheres, and in some cases exhibits non-linear x-y coupling before damping to the stored orbit. Similarly, in the longitudinal dimension, any mismatch in beam arrival time, beam energy or phase-space results in damped, non-linear synchrotron oscillations. In this paper we report on measurements of injection beam dynamics in the transverse and longitudinal planes using turn-by-turn BPMs, a fast-gated, image-intensified CCD camera and a Hamamatsu C5680 streak camera.

  16. Coating thermal noise for arbitrary shaped beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard O'Shaughnessy

    2006-10-13

    Advanced LIGO's sensitivity will be limited by coating noise. Though this noise depends on beam shape, and though nongaussian beams are being seriously considered for advanced LIGO, no published analysis exists to compare the quantitative thermal noise improvement alternate beams offer. In this paper, we derive and discuss a simple integral which completely characterizes the dependence of coating thermal noise on shape. The derivation used applies equally well, with minor modifications, to all other forms of thermal noise in the low-frequency limit.

  17. Fusion Induced by Radioactive Ion Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Liang; C. Signorini

    2005-04-26

    The use of radioactive beams opens a new frontier for fusion studies. The coupling to the continuum can be explored with very loosely bound nuclei. Experiments were performed with beams of nuclei at or near the proton and neutron drip-lines to measure fusion and associated reactions in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. In addition, the fusion yield is predicted to be enhanced in reactions involving very neutron-rich unstable nuclei. Experimental measurements were carried out to investigate if it is feasible to use such beams to produce new heavy elements. The current status of these experimental activities is given in this review.

  18. Photon: history, mass, charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. B. Okun

    2006-02-13

    The talk consists of three parts. ``History'' briefly describes the emergence and evolution of the concept of photon during the first two decades of the 20th century. ``Mass'' gives a short review of the literature on the upper limit of the photon's mass. ``Charge'' is a critical discussion of the existing interpretation of searches for photon charge. Schemes, in which all photons are charged, are grossly inconsistent. A model with three kinds of photons (positive, negative and neutral) seems at first sight to be more consistent, but turns out to have its own serious problems.

  19. Design Study of Longitudinal Dynamics of the Drive Beam in a Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, H.

    2008-01-01

    Westenskow, "Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator As AA. Westenskow, "Relativistic Klystron Research for Two-Beamin a Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator", Proc. 16

  20. Requirements for a New Detector at the South Pole Receiving an Accelerator Neutrino Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Jian

    2011-01-01

    There are recent considerations to increase the photomultiplier density in the IceCube detector array beyond that of DeepCore, which will lead to a lower detection threshold and a huge fiducial mass for the neutrino detection. This initiative is known as "Phased IceCube Next Generation Upgrade" (PINGU). We discuss the possibility to send a neutrino beam from one of the major accelerator laboratories in the Northern hemisphere to such a detector. Such an experiment would be unique in the sense that it would be the only neutrino beam where the baseline crosses the Earth's core. We study the detector requirements for a beta beam, a neutrino factory beam, and a superbeam, where we consider both the cases of small theta_13 and large theta_13, as suggested by the recent T2K hint. We illustrate that a flavor-clean beta beam best suits the requirements of such a detector, in particular, that PINGU may replace a magic baseline detector for small values of theta_13 -- even in the absence of any energy resolution capabi...