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1

Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) (Revised) (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides information about Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. NREL has six MBMS systems that researchers and industry partners can use to understand thermochemical biomass conversion and biomass composition recalcitrance.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Molecular-Beam Mass-Spectrometric Analyses of Hydrocarbon Flames.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Laminar flat flame combustion has been studied with molecular-beam mass-spectrometry (MBMS) for a fuel-rich cyclohexane (? = 2.003) flame, a fuel-lean toluene (? = 0.895),… (more)

Gon, Saugata

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Reflection mass spectrometry technique for monitoring and controlling composition during molecular beam epitaxy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a method for on-line accurate monitoring and precise control of molecular beam epitaxial growth of Groups III-III-V or Groups III-V-V layers in an advanced semiconductor device incorporates reflection mass spectrometry. The reflection mass spectrometry is responsive to intentional perturbations in molecular fluxes incident on a substrate by accurately measuring the molecular fluxes reflected from the substrate. The reflected flux is extremely sensitive to the state of the growing surface and the measurements obtained enable control of newly forming surfaces that are dynamically changing as a result of growth.

Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Tsao, J.Y.

1990-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Reflection mass spectrometry technique for monitoring and controlling composition during molecular beam epitaxy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for on-line accurate monitoring and precise control of molecular beam epitaxial growth of Groups III-III-V or Groups III-V-V layers in an advanced semiconductor device incorporates reflection mass spectrometry. The reflection mass spectrometry is responsive to intentional perturbations in molecular fluxes incident on a substrate by accurately measuring the molecular fluxes reflected from the substrate. The reflected flux is extremely sensitive to the state of the growing surface and the measurements obtained enable control of newly forming surfaces that are dynamically changing as a result of growth.

Brennan, Thomas M. (Albuquerque, NM); Hammons, B. Eugene (Tijeras, NM); Tsao, Jeffrey Y. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Molecular beam kinetics  

SciTech Connect

The design of a crossed molecular beam ''supermachine'' for neutral-- neutral collisions is discussed. The universal electron bombardment ionizer, mass filter, and ion detection system of the detector, the supersonic nozzle sources, the differential pumping arrangement for the sources and detector, the time-of-flight detection of scattered products, and the overall configuration of the apparatus are described. The elastic scattering of two systems, CH$sub 4$ + Ar and NH$sub 3$ + Ar, has been measured using the supermachine with two supersonic nozzle sources. The rainbow structure and the interference oscillations are seen in each system. The best fit to the data was found using a Morse--Spline--Van der Waals (MSV) potential. The three potential parameters epsilon, r/sub m/, and $beta$ were found to be 2.20(+-0.04) x 10$sup -14$ ergs, 3.82(+-0.04)A, and 7.05 +- 0.20 for CH$sub 4$ + Ar, and 2.21(+-0.04) x 10$sup - 14$ ergs 3.93 (+-0.05)A, and 8.45 +- 0.30 for NH$sub 3$ + Ar. A new phenomenon in crossed molecular beams of condensation of a molecule on a cluster to form a complex was observed. A bromine molecule condensed on clusters of chlorine (Cl$sub 2$)/sub chi/ and ammonia (NH$sub 3$)/sub chi/. The value of chi for measurements in these experiments ranges from 7 to 40 for chlorine clusters and from 10 to 70 ammonia clusters. (auth)

Behrens, R. Jr.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

14th international symposium on molecular beams  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation & dynamics; and surfaces.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

14th international symposium on molecular beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation dynamics; and surfaces.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Yuan T. Lee's Crossed Molecular Beam Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yuan T. Lee's Crossed Molecular Beam Experiment Yuan T. Lee's Crossed Molecular Beam Experiment Home | Staff | Search | Advisory Committee | User Facilities | Laboratories | Congress | Budget Yuan T. Lee's Crossed Molecular Beam Experiment http://web.archive.org/web/20000902074635/www.er.doe.gov/production/bes/YuanLee_Exp.html (1 of 4)4/7/2006 2:46:13 PM Yuan T. Lee's Crossed Molecular Beam Experiment The above illustration was drawn by Professor Yuan T. Lee, who shared the 1986 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. It shows the design for his crossed molecular beam experiment described in the story beginning on page 27 of "Basic Energy Sciences: Summary of Accomplishments" (DOE/ER-0455P, May 1990); the story is also copied below. The purpose of this experiment was to study the chemical reaction of sodium atoms with oxygen molecules. In the experiment, a beam of sodium atoms (green,

9

Catalytic Steam Reforming of Gasifier Tars: On-Line Monitoring of Tars with a Transportable Molecular-Beam Mass Spectrometer; Milestone Completion Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method for evaluating catalytic tar decomposition in real time is presented. The effectiveness of two catalysts are compared. A key technical and economic barrier to commercialization of biomass gasification technologies is the removal of tars that are unavoidably formed in this thermochemical process. Tars contain fuel value; however, they are problematic in gas engines (both reciprocating and turbine) because they condense in the fuel delivery system, forming deposits that negatively affect operation and efficiency. These tars also combust with high luminosity, potentially forming soot particles. The conventional technology for tar removal is wet scrubbing. Although this approach has shown some success, there are significant equipment and operating costs associated with it. In order to prevent the generation of toxic wastewater, the tars must be separated and either disposed as hazardous waste or, preferably, combusted in the gasification plant. A conceptually better approach is catalytic steam reforming of the tars to hydrogen and carbon monoxide (CO), effectively increasing the gasification efficiency and eliminating the problems mentioned above. In FY2000, Battelle Columbus Laboratories attempted to demonstrate integrated gasification-gas turbine operation using catalytic steam reforming of tars. NREL participated in those tests using the transportable molecular-beam mass spectrometer (TMBMS) to monitor the catalytic reactor's performance on-line [10]. Unfortunately, the pilot plant tests encountered operational problems that prevented conclusive determination of the efficacy of the selected catalyst (Battelle's DN34). In FY2001, NREL performed on-site tar steam reforming tests using a slip-stream of hot pyrolysis gas from the Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU), which was directed to a bench-scale fluidized bed reactor system designed expressly for this purpose. Supporting this effort, the TMBMS was employed to provide on-line analysis of the tar conversion. The gas composition changes were monitored by two identical gas chromatographs (GCs), and modified method 5 sampling was performed to obtain gravimetric conversion data. The combination of these analytical techniques provided definitive catalyst performance data, as well as linkage to previous and on-going work elsewhere. Two catalysts were tested: nickel (Ni) on potassium promoted alumina (Sued-Chemie C11-NK), used commercially for naphtha steam reforming, and alumina (Battelle's DN34) claimed to be effective for gasifier tar decomposition. In addition, sand was tested as an inert reference material.

Carpenter, D.; Ratcliff, M.; Dayton, D.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Dudley Herschbach: Chemical Reactions and Molecular Beams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dudley Herschbach: Dudley Herschbach: Chemical Reactions and Molecular Beams Resources with Additional Information Dudley Herschbach Courtesy of Texas A&M University As a co-recipient of the 1986 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 'Dudley Herschbach was cited for "providing a much more detailed understanding of how chemical reactions take place". Using molecular beams, he studied elementary reactions such as K + CH3I and K + Br2, where it became possible to correlate reaction dynamics with the electronic structures of reactants and products. Exchanges proceeded through a persistent complex that lasted for many rotational periods, with product angular distributions reflecting the degree of reagent entanglement. Later this work was extended to H + Cl2, Cl + HI, halogen substitution reactions with vinyl and allyl halides, as well as such systems as Xe + Ar2 → XeAr + Ar. Herschbach has been a pioneer in the measurement and theoretical interpretation of vector properties of reaction dynamics, a field known as "molecular stereodynamics".

11

Molecular beam epitaxy of SrTiO3 with a growth window  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Materials Fundamentals of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (AcademicMolecular beam epitaxy of SrTiO 3 with a growth windowgrowth window in conventional molecular beam epitaxy (MBE)

Stemmer, Susanne

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT A.RASPEREZA DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D­22607#erential luminosity spectrum measurements and beam energy spread on the precision of the Higgs boson mass measurement possible impact of the beam related systematic errors on the Higgs boson mass measurement is discussed

13

Reactive Collisions in Crossed Molecular Beams  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The distribution of velocity vectors of reaction products is discussed with emphasis on the restrictions imposed by the conservation laws. The recoil velocity that carries the products away from the center of mass shows how the energy of reaction is divided between internal excitation and translation. Similarly, the angular distributions, as viewed from the center of mass, reflect the partitioning of the total angular momentum between angular momenta of individual molecules and orbital angular momentum associated with their relative motion. Crossed-beam studies of several reactions of the type M + RI yields R + MI are described, where M = K, Rb, Cs, and R = CH{sub 3}, C{sub 3}H{sub 5}, etc. The results show that most of the energy of reaction goes into internal excitation of the products and that the angular distribution is quite anisotropic, with most of the MI recoiling backward (and R forward) with respect to the incoming K beam. (auth)

Herschbach, D. R.

1962-02-00T23:59:59.000Z

14

Photoelectron spectroscopy of supersonic molecular beams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new technique for performing high resolution molecular photoelectron spectroscopy is described, beginning with its conceptual development, through the construction of a prototypal apparatus, to the initial applications on a particularly favorable molecular system. The distinguishing features of this technique are: (1) the introduction of the sample in the form of a collimated supersonic molecular beam; and (2) the use of an electrostatic deflection energy analyzer which is carefully optimized in terms of sensitivity and resolution. This combination makes it possible to obtain photoelectron spectra at a new level of detail for many small molecules. Three experiments are described which rely on the capability to perform rotationally-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy on the hydrogen molecule and its isotopes. The first is a measurement of the ionic vibrational and rotational spectroscopic constants and the vibrationally-selected photoionization cross sections. The second is a determination of the photoelectron asymmetry parameter, ..beta.., for selected rotational transitions. The third is an investigation of the rotational relaxation in a free jet expansion, using photoelectron spectroscopy as a probe of the rotational state population distributions. In the closing chapter an assessment is made of the successes and limitations of the technique, and an indication is given of areas for further improvement in future spectrometers.

Pollard, J.E.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

A Combined Crossed Molecular Beams and Electronic Structure Study...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Crossed Molecular Beams and Electronic Structure Study on the Gas Phase Formation of Prototype Aromatic and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) Ralf I. Kaiser Dept....

16

Molecular beam surface analysis. 1993 Summary report  

SciTech Connect

The Molecular Beam Surface Analysis (MBSA) program is developing both laboratory-based and potentially field-portable chemical analyses systems taking advantage of new surface analysis technology developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The objective is to develop the means to rapidly detect and identify, with high specificity and high sensitivity, nonvolatile and low volatile organics found in Chemical Weapons (CW) and High Explosives (HE) feedstocks, agents, and decomposition products on surfaces of plants, rocks, paint chips, filters, smears of buildings, vehicles, equipment, etc.. Ideally, the method would involve no sample preparation and no waste generation, and would have the potential for being implemented as a field-portable instrument. In contrast to existing analytical methods that rely on sample volatility, MBSA is optimized for nonvolatile and low volatile compounds. This makes it amenable for rapidly screening field samples for CW agent decomposition products and feedstock chemicals and perhaps actual agents. In its final configuration (benchtop size) it could be operated in a non-laboratory environment (such as an office building) requiring no sample preparation chemistry or chemical supplies. It could also be included in a mobile laboratory used in on-site, ore remote site cooperative surveys, or in a standard laboratory, where it would provide fast screening of samples at minimal cost.

Appelhans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Groenewold, G.S.; Dahl, D.A.; Delmore, J.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

H2S molecular beam passivation of Ge(001)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fundamental issue regarding the introduction of high-mobility Ge channels in CMOS circuits is the electrical passivation of the interface with the high-k gate dielectric. In this paper, we investigate the passivation of p-Ge(001) using molecular H"2S. ... Keywords: H2S, High-µ semiconductors, Molecular beam epitaxy, Passivation

C. Merckling; Y. C. Chang; C. Y. Lu; J. Penaud; M. El-Kazzi; F. Bellenger; G. Brammertz; M. Hong; J. Kwo; M. Meuris; J. Dekoster; M. M. Heyns; M. Caymax

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Yuan T. Lee and Molecular Beam Studies  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

and the spectroscopy of ionic and molecular clusters. Lee was born in Hsinchu, Taiwan, China and as a youth experienced the adversity of WWII and Japanese occupation. At the war's...

19

CROSSED MOLECULAR BEAM STUDIES OF CHEMILUMINESCENT REACTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L , and M. A. D. F1uendy, Chemic 1ecular Beam 12. A. KantrowP. R. Br J • I • I Lawley. Chemic a·l an and 1ey, Chern. I •5) were of brass and chemic Each lens ho 1 der consists of a

Kahler, Carol Cuzens

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Crossed molecular beam studies of atmospheric chemical reaction dynamics  

SciTech Connect

The dynamics of several elementary chemical reactions that are important in atmospheric chemistry are investigated. The reactive scattering of ground state chlorine or bromine atoms with ozone molecules and ground state chlorine atoms with nitrogen dioxide molecules is studied using a crossed molecular beams apparatus with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. The Cl + O{sub 3} {yields} ClO + O{sub 2} reaction has been studied at four collision energies ranging from 6 kcal/mole to 32 kcal/mole. The derived product center-of-mass angular and translational energy distributions show that the reaction has a direct reaction mechanism and that there is a strong repulsion on the exit channel. The ClO product is sideways and forward scattered with respect to the Cl atom, and the translational energy release is large. The Cl atom is most likely to attack the terminal oxygen atom of the ozone molecule. The Br + O{sub 3} {yields} ClO + O{sub 2} reaction has been studied at five collision energies ranging from 5 kcal/mole to 26 kcal/mole. The derived product center-of-mass angular and translational energy distributions are quite similar to those in the Cl + O{sub 3} reaction. The Br + O{sub 3} reaction has a direct reaction mechanism similar to that of the Cl + O{sub 3} reaction. The electronic structure of the ozone molecule seems to play the central role in determining the reaction mechanism in atomic radical reactions with the ozone molecule. The Cl + NO{sub 2} {yields} ClO + NO reaction has been studied at three collision energies ranging from 10.6 kcal/mole to 22.4 kcal/mole. The center-of-mass angular distribution has some forward-backward symmetry, and the product translational energy release is quite large. The reaction proceeds through a short-lived complex whose lifetime is less than one rotational period. The experimental results seem to show that the Cl atom mainly attacks the oxygen atom instead of the nitrogen atom of the NO{sub 2} molecule.

Zhang, Jingsong

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Ultra-sensitive high-precision spectroscopy of a fast molecular ion beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct spectroscopy of a fast molecular ion beam offers many advantages over competing techniques, including the generality of the approach to any molecular ion, the complete elimination of spectral confusion due to neutral molecules, and the mass identification of individual spectral lines. The major challenge is the intrinsic weakness of absorption or dispersion signals resulting from the relatively low number density of ions in the beam. Direct spectroscopy of an ion beam was pioneered by Saykally and co-workers in the late 1980s, but has not been attempted since that time. Here, we present the design and construction of an ion beam spectrometer with several improvements over the Saykally design. The ion beam and its characterization have been improved by adopting recent advances in electrostatic optics, along with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer that can be used simultaneously with optical spectroscopy. As a proof of concept, a noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) setup with a noise equivalent absorption of {approx}2 x 10{sup -11} cm{sup -1} Hz{sup -1/2} has been used to observe several transitions of the Meinel 1-0 band of N{sub 2}{sup +} with linewidths of {approx}120 MHz. An optical frequency comb has been used for absolute frequency calibration of transition frequencies to within {approx}8 MHz. This work represents the first direct spectroscopy of an electronic transition in an ion beam, and also represents a major step toward the development of routine infrared spectroscopy of rotationally cooled molecular ions.

Mills, Andrew A.; Siller, Brian M.; Porambo, Michael W.; Perera, Manori; Kreckel, Holger [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); McCall, Benjamin J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Departments of Physics and Astronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

22

Molecular beams studies of the energetics and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Quantum mechanical effects on the angular distribution of HF products from the F + H/sub 2/ reaction were studied using crossed atomic and molecular beams with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector and time-of-flight velocity analysis. Measurement of the singlet-triplet splitting of CH/sub 2/ from the recoil velocities of fragments from ketene photodissociation in a molecular beam is also reported. Partial center-of-mass angular distributions, and velocity flux contour maps have been derived for individual vibrational states of the HF product from the F + H/sub 2/ reaction at collision energies of 2 and 3 kcal/mole. The center-of-mass distributions were obtained by analysis of laboratory angular and time-of-flight measurements of the reactive scattering. The results are consistent with recent three dimensional quantum mechanical scattering calculations, which predict that resonance effects should appear in the product angular distributions in this energy range. The photofragmentation of ketene in a molecular beam was used to measure the singlet-triplet splitting in CH/sub 2/. A rare gas halide excimer laser operating at 351 nm (XeF) and 308 nm (XeCl) dissociated the ketene. Time-of-flight measurements of the fragment velocities allowed determination of the energetics of the dissociation. The /sup 1/A/sub 1/ - /sup 3/B/sub 1/ splitting in CH/sub 2/ was found to be 8.5 +- 0.8 kcal/mole. This agrees with many experimental results, but not with the value of 19.5 kcal/mole derived from recent photodetachment experiments on CH/sub 2//sup -/.

Hayden, C.C.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Reactions of carbon atoms using crossed pulsed molecular beams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of efficient carbon atom sources was carried out concurrently with studying reactions 1--3, and we already have intriguing results concerning these reactions, even though the development phase is still in progress. Our goals are to study reactions of carbon atoms with hydrogen, hydrogen chloride, and nitrous oxide include correlations between the energy distributions of the fragments, branching ratios, and kinetic energy dependences. These studies will provide prototypical examples of insertion and abstraction reaction dynamics. We also hope to accomplish the development of laser ablation as a reliable and versatile source of radicals for pulsed molecular beam studies. 4 refs.

Reisler, H.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Chemical nature of the passivation layer depending on the oxidizing agent in Gd2O3/GeO2/Ge stacks grown by molecular beam deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Ge-based metal oxide semiconductor technology, the insertion of a passivation layer seems to be crucial in unpinning the Fermi level at the interface and in reducing the amount of interface defects. GeO"2 was obtained by atomic oxygen (AO), molecular ... Keywords: Gadolinium oxide, Germanium, Molecular beam deposition, Passivation layer, Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry

A. Lamperti; S. Baldovino; A. Molle; M. Fanciulli

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Cerenkov emission induced by external beam radiation stimulates molecular fluorescence  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Cerenkov emission is induced when a charged particle moves faster than the speed of light in a given medium. Both x-ray photons and electrons produce optical Cerenkov photons in everyday radiation therapy of tissue; yet, this phenomenon has never been fully documented. This study quantifies the emissions and also demonstrates that the Cerenkov emission can excite a fluorophore, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), embedded in biological phantoms. Methods: In this study, Cerenkov emission induced by radiation from a clinical linear accelerator is investigated. Biological mimicking phantoms were irradiated with x-ray photons, with energies of 6 or 18 MV, or electrons at energies 6, 9, 12, 15, or 18 MeV. The Cerenkov emission and the induced molecular fluorescence were detected by a camera or a spectrometer equipped with a fiber optic cable. Results: It is shown that both x-ray photons and electrons, at MeV energies, produce optical Cerenkov photons in tissue mimicking media. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Cerenkov emission can excite a fluorophore, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), embedded in biological phantoms. Conclusions: The results here indicate that molecular fluorescence monitoring during external beam radiotherapy is possible.

Axelsson, Johan; Davis, Scott C.; Gladstone, David J.; Pogue, Brian W. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766 (United States); Thayer School of Engineering and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

On the theory of energy distributions of products of molecular beam reactions involving transient complexes*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the theory of energy distributions of products of molecular beam reactions involving transient October 1974) Theoretical energy distributions of reaction products in molecular beam systems for the energy distributions of the products when 1 > j and j > l. I. INTRODUCTION In recent years illuminating

Marcus, Rudolph A.

27

Photoluminescence study of GaAs films on Si(100) grown by atomic hydrogen-assisted molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: atomic hydrogen-mediated epitaxy, lattice-mismatched heteroepitaxy, minority carrier lifetime, molecular beam epitaxy, photoluminescence decay, solar cells

Yoshitaka Okada; Shigeru Ohta; Akio Kawabata; Hirofumi Shimomura; Mitsuo Kawabe

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Internal Energy Dependence of Molecular Condensation Coefficients Determined from Molecular Beam Surface Scattering Experiments  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

An experiment was performed which confirms the existence of an internal mode dependence of molecular sticking probabilities for collisions of molecules with a cold surface. The scattering of a velocity selected effusive beam of CCl{sub 4} from a 90 K CC1{sub 4} ice surface has been studied at five translational velocities and for two different internal temperatures. At a surface temperature of 90 K (approx. 99% sticking probability) a four fold increase in reflected intensity was observed for the internally excited (560 K) CC1{sub 4} relative to the room temperature (298 K) CC1{sub 4} at a translational velocity of 2.5 X 10{sup 4} cm/sec. For a surface temperature of 90 K all angular distributions were found to peak 15{sup 0} superspecularly independent of incident velocity.

Sibener, S. J.; Lee, Y. T.

1978-05-00T23:59:59.000Z

29

Molecular Ion Beam Transportation for Low Energy Ion Implantation  

SciTech Connect

A joint research and development of steady state intense boron ion sources for 100's of electron-volt ion implanters has been in progress for the past five years. Current density limitation associated with extracting and transporting low energy ion beams result in lower beam currents that in turn adversely affects the process throughput. The transport channel with electrostatic lenses for decaborane (B{sub 10}H{sub 14}) and carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) ion beams transportation was developed and investigated. The significant increase of ion beam intensity at the beam transport channel output is demonstrated. The transport channel simulation, construction and experimental results of ion beam transportation are presented.

Kulevoy, T. V.; Kropachev, G. N.; Seleznev, D. N.; Yakushin, P. E.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Kozlov, A. V.; Koshelev, V. A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow, 117218 (Russian Federation); Hershcovitch, A.; Johnson, B. M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Gushenets, V. I.; Oks, E. M. [High Current Electronics Institute Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Polozov, S. M. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow, 115409 (Russian Federation); Poole, H. J. [PVI, Oxnard, California 93031-5023 (United States)

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

30

Fabrication of precision high quality facets on molecular beam epitaxy material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fabricating mirrored vertical surfaces on semiconductor layered material grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Low energy chemically assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) is employed to prepare mirrored vertical surfaces on MBE-grown III-V materials under unusually low concentrations of oxygen in evacuated etching atmospheres of chlorine and xenon ion beams. UV-stabilized smooth-surfaced photoresist materials contribute to highly vertical, high quality mirrored surfaces during the etching.

Petersen, Holly E. (Tracy, CA); Goward, William D. (Antioch, CA); Dijaili, Sol P. (Moraga, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Si(001):B gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy: Boron surface segregation and its effect on film growth kinetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of disilane (Si2H6) rather than silane (SiH4) for Si 001 gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy GS

Spila, Timothy P.

32

Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

1989-02-00T23:59:59.000Z

33

Molecular beam studies of hot atom chemical reactions: Reactive scattering of energetic deuterium atoms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H/sub 2/ /minus/> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ /minus/> C/sub 2/HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible. 18 refs., 9 figs.

Continetti, R.E.; Balko, B.A.; Lee, Y.T.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Crossed molecular beams study of O({sup 1}D) reactions with H{sub 2} molecules  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reaction dynamics of O({sup 1}D) atoms with H{sub 2} molecules was reinvestigated using the crossed molecular beams technique with pulsed beams. The O({sup 1}D) beam was generated by photodissociating O{sub 3} molecules at 248 nm. Time-of-flight spectra and the laboratory angular distribution of the OH products were measured. The derived OH product center-of-mass flux-velocity contour diagram shows more backward scattered intensity with respect to the O({sup 1}D) beam. In contrast to previous studies which show that the insertion mechanism is the dominant process, our results indicate that the contribution from the collinear approach of the O({sup 1}D) atom to the H{sub 2} molecule on the first excited state potential energy surface is significant and the energy barrier for the collinear approach is therefore minimal. Despite the increased time resolution in this experiment, no vibrational structure in the OH product time-of-flight spectra was resolved. This is in agreement with LIF studies, which have shown that the rotational distributions of the OH products in all vibrational states are broad and highly inverted.

Miau, T.T.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Low-temperature grown graphene films by using molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complete graphene film is prepared by depositing carbon atoms directly on Cu foils in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber at 300 Degree-Sign C. The Raman spectrum of the film has indicated that high-quality few-layer graphene is obtained. With back-gated transistor architecture, the characteristic current modulation of graphene transistors is observed. Following the similar growth procedure, graphitization is observed at room temperature, which is consistent with the molecular dynamics simulations of graphene growth.

Lin, Meng-Yu [Institute of Electronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Guo, Wei-Ching; Wang, Pro-Yao [Institute of Optoelectronic Sciences, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Meng-Hsun [College of Photonics, National Chiao-Tung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Liu, Te-Huan; Chang, Chien-Cheng [Institute of Applied Mechanics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Pao, Chun-Wei; Lin, Shih-Yen [Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Si-Chen [Institute of Electronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

36

Molecular chemistry and the missing mass problem in PNe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detections of molecular lines, mainly from H2$ and CO, reveal molecular material in planetary nebulae. Observations of a variety of molecules suggest that the molecular composition in these objects differs from that found in interstellar clouds or in circumstellar envelopes. The success of the models, which are mostly devoted to explain molecular densities in specific planetary nebulae, is still partial, however. The present study aims at identifying the influence of stellar and nebular properties on the molecular composition of planetary nebulae by means of chemical models. A comparison of theoretical results with those derived from the observations may provide clues to the conditions that favor the presence of a particular molecule. A self-consistent photoionization numerical code was adapted to simulate cold molecular regions beyond the ionized zone. The code was used to obtain a grid of models and the resulting column densities are compared with those inferred from observations. Our models show that the i...

Kimura, Rafael K; Aleman, Isabel; 10.1051/0004-6361/201118429

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Crossed Molecular Beam Studies and Dynamics of Decomposition of Chemically Activated Radicals  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The power of the crossed molecular beams method in the investigation of the dynamics of chemical reactions lies mainly in the direct observation of the consequences of single collisions of well controlled reactant molecules. The primary experimental observations which provide information on reaction dynamics are the measurements of angular and velocity distributions of reaction products.

Lee, Y. T.

1973-09-00T23:59:59.000Z

38

Molecular beam epitaxy passivation studies of Ge and III-V semiconductors for advanced CMOS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future CMOS technologies will require the use of substrate material with a very high mobility in order to fulfil the performance requirements. Therefore, combination of Ge p-MOS with n-MOS devices made out of high mobility III/V compounds, such as GaAs, ... Keywords: High mobility semiconductors, Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), Passivation

C. Merckling; J. Penaud; D. Kohen; F. Bellenger; A. Alian; G. Brammertz; M. El-Kazzi; M. Houssa; J. Dekoster; M. Caymax; M. Meuris; M. M. Heyns

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Production of a slit skimmer for use in cold supersonic molecular beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cold molecular beams generated by skimming pulsed supersonic gas expansions normally employ conical skimmers. The use of slit shaped skimmers instead of conical skimmers can afford significant signal enhancements. At this time, however, slit shaped skimmers are not available commercially. We describe a straightforward method for producing functional slit skimmers.

Subramanian, Ranga; Sulkes, Mark [Department of Chemistry, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Molecular-beam, laser-rf, double-resonance studies of calcium monohalide radicals  

SciTech Connect

The molecular-beam, laser-rf, double-resonance technique has been described a number of times. In essence, the occurrence of a radiofrequency (rf) transition in the electronic ground state of the molecule under study is detected by an increase in the laser-induced fluorescence of the molecular beam when the rf is on resonance. The technique makes it possible to measure small energy splittings (normally spin-rotational or hyperfine) in the electronic ground state of a molecule to an absolute precision of 1 kHz. The sensitivity of the technique is high because even a very small increase in fluorescence can be easily seen if the rf is swept repeatedly and digital data-handling techniques are used. The technique is useful for ionic as well as for neutral atoms and molecules.

Childs, W.J.; Cok, D.R.; Goodman, L.S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Simple and inexpensive time-of-flight charge-to-mass analyzer for ion beam source characterization  

SciTech Connect

We describe the design, electronics, and test results of a simple and low-cost time-of-flight ion charge-to-mass analyzer that is suitable for ion source characterization. The method selects a short-time sample of the beam whose charge-to-mass composition is then separated according to ion velocity and detected by a remote Faraday cup. The analyzer is a detachable device that has been used for rapid analysis of charge-to-mass composition of ion beams accelerated by voltages of up to about 100 kV.

Gushenets, V. I.; Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Vintizenko, L. G.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Oztarhan, A.; Brown, I. G. [High Current Electronics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 2/3 Akademichesky Avenue, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Ege University, Bornova-Izmir 35100 (Turkey); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Site-controlled Ag nanocrystals grown by molecular beam epitaxy-Towards plasmonic integration technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate site-controlled growth of epitaxial Ag nanocrystals on patterned GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy with high degree of long-range uniformity. The alignment is based on lithographically defined holes in which position controlled InAs quantum dots are grown. The Ag nanocrystals self-align preferentially on top of the InAs quantum dots. No such ordering is observed in the absence of InAs quantum dots, proving that the ordering is strain-driven. The presented technique facilitates the placement of active plasmonic nanostructures at arbitrarily defined positions enabling their integration into complex devices and plasmonic circuits.

Urbanczyk, Adam [COBRA Research Institute on Communication Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Noetzel, Richard [Institute for Systems based on Optoelectronics and Microtechnology (ISOM), ETSI Telecommunication, Technical University of Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Demonstration of molecular beam epitaxy and a semiconducting band structure for I-Mn-V compounds  

SciTech Connect

Our ab initio theory calculations predict a semiconducting band structure of I-Mn-V compounds. We demonstrate on LiMnAs that high-quality materials with group-I alkali metals in the crystal structure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Optical measurements on the LiMnAs epilayers are consistent with the theoretical electronic structure. Our calculations also reproduce earlier reports of high antiferromagnetic ordering temperature and predict large, spin-orbit-coupling-induced magnetic anisotropy effects. We propose a strategy for employing antiferromagnetic semiconductors in high-temperature semiconductor spintronics.

Jungwirth, T. [Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i., Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53 Praha 6 (Czech Republic); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Novak, V.; Cukr, M.; Zemek, J. [Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i., Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53 Praha 6 (Czech Republic); Marti, X.; Horodyska, P.; Nemec, P.; Holy, V. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Maca, F.; Shick, A. B.; Masek, J.; Kuzel, P. [Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Nemec, I. [Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Hlavova 2030, 128 40 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Gallagher, B. L.; Campion, R. P.; Foxon, C. T. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Wunderlich, J. [Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i., Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53 Praha 6 (Czech Republic); Hitachi Cambridge Laboratory, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Graphene growth by molecular beam epitaxy on the carbon-face of SiC  

SciTech Connect

Graphene layers have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on the (0001) C-face of SiC and have been characterized by atomic force microscopy, low energy electron diffraction (LEED), and UV photoelectron spectroscopy. Contrary to the graphitization process, the step-terrace structure of SiC is fully preserved during the MBE growth. LEED patterns show multiple orientation domains which are characteristic of graphene on SiC (0001), indicating non-Bernal rotated graphene planes. Well-defined Dirac cones, typical of single-layer graphene, have been observed in the valence band for few graphene layers by synchrotron spectroscopy, confirming the electronic decoupling of graphene layers.

Moreau, E.; Godey, S.; Ferrer, F. J.; Vignaud, D.; Wallart, X. [IEMN, UMR CNRS 8520, Avenue Poincare, P.O. Box 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex (France); Avila, J.; Asensio, M. C. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L'Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin-BP 48, 91192 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Bournel, F.; Gallet, J.-J. [LCPM, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, UMR CNRS 7614, 75231 Paris Cedex (France)

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

45

A portable molecular beam epitaxy system for in situ x-ray investigations at synchrotron beamlines  

SciTech Connect

A portable synchrotron molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system is designed and applied for in situ investigations. The growth chamber is equipped with all the standard MBE components such as effusion cells with shutters, main shutter, cooling shroud, manipulator, reflection high energy electron diffraction setup, and pressure gauges. The characteristic feature of the system is the beryllium windows which are used for in situ x-ray measurements. An UHV sample transfer case allows in vacuo transfer of samples prepared elsewhere. We describe the system design and demonstrate its performance by investigating the annealing process of buried InGaAs self-organized quantum dots.

Slobodskyy, T. [Institute for Synchrotron Radiation, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Institut fuer Angewandte Physik und Zentrum fuer Mikrostrukturforschung, Jungiusstrasse 11, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Schroth, P.; Grigoriev, D.; Minkevich, A. A.; Baumbach, T. [Institute for Synchrotron Radiation, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Hu, D. Z.; Schaadt, D. M. [Institute for Applied Physics/DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute for Energy Research and Physical Technologies, Technical University Clausthal, Am Stollen 19B, 38640 Goslar (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Radiation environment simulations at the Tevatron, studies of the beam profile and measurement of the Bc meson mass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The description of a computer simulation of the CDF detector at Fermilab and the adjacent accelerator parts is detailed, with MARS calculations of the radiation background in various elements of the model due to the collision of beams and machine-related losses. Three components of beam halo formation are simulated for the determination of the principal source of radiation background in CDF due to beam losses. The effect of a collimator as a protection for the detector is studied. The simulation results are compared with data taken by a CDF group. Studies of a 150 GeV Tevatron proton beam are performed to investigate the transverse diffusion growth and distribution. A technique of collimator scan is used to scrape the beam under various experimental conditions, and computer programs are written for the beam reconstruction. An average beam halo growth speed is given and the potential of beam tail reconstruction using the collimator scan is evaluated. A particle physics analysis is conducted in order to detect the B{sub c} {yields} J/{psi}{pi} decay signal with the CDF Run II detector in 360 pb{sup -1} of data. The cut variables and an optimization method to determine their values are presented along with a criterion for the detection threshold of the signal. The mass of the B{sub c} meson is measured with an evaluation of the significance of the signal.

Nicolas, Ludovic Y.; /Glasgow U.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Effects of growth temperature on Mg-doped GaN grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

The hole concentration p in Mg-doped GaN films grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy depends strongly on the growth temperature T{sub GR}. At T{sub GR}=760 Degree-Sign C, GaN:Mg films showed a hole concentration of p=1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} for [Mg]=4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}, while at T{sub GR}=840 Degree-Sign C, p=4.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} for [Mg]=7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. Post-growth annealing did not increase p. The sample grown at 760 Degree-Sign C exhibited a low resistivity of 0.7 {Omega}cm. The mobility for all the samples was around 3-7 cm{sup 2}/V s. Temperature-dependent Hall measurements and secondary ion mass spectroscopy suggest that the samples grown at T{sub GR}>760 Degree-Sign C are compensated by an intrinsic donor rather than hydrogen.

Hurni, Christophe A.; Lang, Jordan R.; Burke, Peter G.; Speck, James S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, 93106-5050 California (United States)

2012-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

48

Intense terahertz emission from molecular beam epitaxy-grown GaAs/GaSb(001)  

SciTech Connect

Intense terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave emission was observed in undoped GaAs thin films deposited on (100) n-GaSb substrates via molecular beam epitaxy. GaAs/n-GaSb heterostructures were found to be viable THz sources having signal amplitude 75% that of bulk p-InAs. The GaAs films were grown by interruption method during the growth initiation and using various metamorphic buffer layers. Reciprocal space maps revealed that the GaAs epilayers are tensile relaxed. Defects at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb interface were confirmed by scanning electron microscope images. Band calculations were performed to infer the depletion region and electric field at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb and the air-GaAs interfaces. However, the resulting band calculations were found to be insufficient to explain the THz emission. The enhanced THz emission is currently attributed to a piezoelectric field induced by incoherent strain and defects.

Sadia, Cyril P.; Laganapan, Aleena Maria; Agatha Tumanguil, Mae; Estacio, Elmer; Somintac, Armando; Salvador, Arnel [National Institute of Physics, University of the Philippines Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines); Que, Christopher T. [Physics Department, De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Avenue, Manila 1004 (Philippines); Yamamoto, Kohji; Tani, Masahiko [Research Center for Development of Far-Infrared Region, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Molecular beam epitaxy of SrTiO{sub 3} with a growth window  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many complex oxides with only nonvolatile constituents do not have a wide growth window in conventional molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) approaches, which makes it difficult to obtain stoichiometric films. Here it is shown that a growth window in which the stoichiometry is self-regulating can be achieved for SrTiO{sub 3} films by using a hybrid MBE approach that uses a volatile metal-organic source for Ti, titanium tetra isopropoxide (TTIP). The growth window widens and shifts to higher TTIP/Sr flux ratios with increasing temperature, showing that it is related to the desorption of the volatile TTIP. We demonstrate stoichiometric, highly perfect, insulating SrTiO{sub 3} films. The approach can be adapted for the growth of other complex oxides that previously were believed to have no wide MBE growth window.

Jalan, Bharat; Moetakef, Pouya; Stemmer, Susanne [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States)

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

50

Fe-doped InN layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Iron(Fe)-doped InN (InN:Fe) layers have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy. It is found that Fe-doping leads to drastic increase of residual electron concentration, which is different from the semi-insulating property of Fe-doped GaN. However, this heavy n-type doping cannot be fully explained by doped Fe-concentration ([Fe]). Further analysis shows that more unintentionally doped impurities such as hydrogen and oxygen are incorporated with increasing [Fe] and the surface is degraded with high density pits, which probably are the main reasons for electron generation and mobility reduction. Photoluminescence of InN is gradually quenched by Fe-doping. This work shows that Fe-doping is one of good choices to control electron density in InN.

Wang Xinqiang; Liu Shitao; Ma Dingyu; Zheng Xiantong; Chen Guang; Xu Fujun; Tang Ning; Shen Bo [State Key Laboratory of Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang Peng; Cao Xingzhong; Wang Baoyi [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analysis Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Huang Sen; Chen, Kevin J. [Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong); Zhou Shengqiang [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), 01314 Dresden (Germany); Yoshikawa, Akihiko [Center for SMART Green Innovation Research, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan)

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

51

High electron mobility in Ga(In)NAs films grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the highest mobility values above 2000 cm{sup 2}/Vs in Si doped GaNAs film grown by molecular beam epitaxy. To understand the feature of the origin which limits the electron mobility in GaNAs, temperature dependences of mobility were measured for high mobility GaNAs and referential low mobility GaInNAs. Temperature dependent mobility for high mobility GaNAs is similar to the GaAs case, while that for low mobility GaInNAs shows large decrease in lower temperature region. The electron mobility of high quality GaNAs can be explained by intrinsic limiting factor of random alloy scattering and extrinsic factor of ionized impurity scattering.

Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Monirul Islam, Muhammad; Okada, Yoshitaka [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST), The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Inagaki, Makoto [Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8511, Aichi (Japan); Yamaguchi, Masafumi [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST), The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8511, Aichi (Japan)

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

52

Mechanism of Charge Transport in Cobalt and Iron Phthalocyanine Thin Films Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc), iron phthalocyanine (FePc) and their composite (CoPc-FePc) films have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies showed that composite films has better structural ordering compared to individual CoPc and FePc films. The temperature dependence of resistivity (in the temperature range 25 K- 100 K) showed that composite films are metallic, while individual CoPc and FePc films are in the critical regime of metal-to-insulator (M-I) transition The composite films show very high mobility of 110 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} at room temperature i.e. nearly two order of magnitude higher compared to pure CoPc and FePc films.

Kumar, Arvind; Samanta, Soumen; Singh, Ajay; Debnath, A. K.; Aswal, D. K.; Gupta, S. K. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

53

Limit on electron neutrino mass from observation of the beta decay of molecular tritium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the most sensitive upper limit set on the mass of the electron antineutrino. The upper limit of 9.4 eV (95% confidence level) was obtained from a study of the shape of the beta decay spectrum of free molecular tritium. Achieving such a level of sensitivity required precise determinations of all processes that modify the shape of the observed spectrum. This result is in clear disagreement with a reported value for the mass of 26(5) eV. 30 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Wilkerson, J.F.; Bowles, T.J.; Friar, J.L.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Stephenson, G.J. Jr.; Wark, D.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Knapp, D.A. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Growth of p-type and n-type m-plane GaN by molecular beam epitaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cm ?3 corresponding to p-type ?lm conductivi- ties as highOF APPLIED PHYSICS 100, 063707 ?2006? Growth of p-type andn-type m-plane GaN by molecular beam epitaxy M. McLaurin, a?

McLaurin, M; Mates, T E; Wu, F; Speck, J S

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Adsorption of iso-/n-butane on an Anatase Thin Film: A Molecular Beam Scattering and TDS Study  

SciTech Connect

Binding energies and adsorption probabilities have been determined for n/iso-butane adsorption on an anatase thin film grown on SrTiO3(001) by means of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and molecular beam scattering. The sample has been characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Auger electrons spectroscopy (AES).

Goering, J.; Kadossov, E.; Burghaus, Uwe; Yu, Zhongqing; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

The control of size and areal density of InAs self-assembled quantum dots in selective area molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs (001) surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of InAs quantum dots (QDs) on GaAs (001) substrates by selective area molecular beam epitaxy (SA-MBE) with dielectric mask is investigated. The GaAs polycrystals on the mask, which is formed during growth due to low GaAs selectivity between ... Keywords: InAs quantum dots, Molecular beam epitaxy, Selective area epitaxy

J. C. Lin; P. W. Fry; R. A. Hogg; M. Hopkinson; I. M. Ross; A. G. Cullis; R. S. Kolodka; A. I. Tartakovskii; M. S. Skolnick

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Electrical properties and interfacial chemical environments of in situ atomic layer deposited Al2O3 on freshly molecular beam epitaxy grown GaAs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interfacial chemical analyses and electrical characterization of in situ atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al"2O"3 on freshly molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown n- and p- GaAs (001) with a (4x6) surface reconstruction are performed. The capacitance-voltage ... Keywords: Atomic layer deposition, III-V compound semiconductor, Molecular beam epitaxy

Y. H. Chang; M. L. Huang; P. Chang; C. A. Lin; Y. J. Chu; B. R. Chen; C. L. Hsu; J. Kwo; T. W. Pi; M. Hong

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Usage of antimony segregation for selective doping of Si in molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

An original approach to selective doping of Si by antimony (Sb) in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is proposed and verified experimentally. This approach is based on controllable utilization of the effect of Sb segregation. In particular, the sharp dependence of Sb segregation on growth temperature in the range of 300-550 deg. C is exploited. The growth temperature variations between the kinetically limited and maximum segregation regimes are suggested to be utilized in order to obtain selectively doped structures with abrupt doping profiles. It is demonstrated that the proposed technique allows formation of selectively doped Si:Sb layers, including delta ({delta}-)doped layers in which Sb concentrations can be varied from 5 x 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. The obtained doped structures are shown to have a high crystalline quality and the short-term growth interruptions, which are needed to change the substrate temperature, do not lead to any significant accumulation of background impurities in grown samples. Realization of the proposed approach requires neither too low (<300 deg. C), nor too high (>600 deg. C) growth temperatures or any special equipment for the MBE machines.

Yurasov, D. V.; Drozdov, M. N.; Murel, A. V.; Shaleev, M. V.; Novikov, A. V. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures Russian Academy of Sciences, 603950, Nizhny Novgorod, GSP-105 (Russian Federation); Zakharov, N. D. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle/Saale (Germany)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

NO-assisted molecular-beam epitaxial growth of nitrogen substituted EuO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have investigated a method for substituting oxygen with nitrogen in EuO thin films, which is based on molecular beam epitaxy distillation with NO gas as the oxidizer. By varying the NO gas pressure, we produce crystalline, epitaxial EuO{sub 1-x}N{sub x} films with good control over the films' nitrogen concentration. In situ x-ray photoemission spectroscopy reveals that nitrogen substitution is connected to the formation Eu{sup 3+}4f{sup 6} and a corresponding decrease in the number of Eu{sup 2+}4f{sup 7}, indicating that nitrogen is being incorporated in its 3{sup -} oxidation state. While small amounts of Eu{sup 3+} in over-oxidized Eu{sub 1-{delta}}O thin films lead to a drastic suppression of the ferromagnetism, the formation of Eu{sup 3+} in EuO{sub 1-x}N{sub x} still allows the ferromagnetic phase to exist with an unaffected T{sub c}, thus providing an ideal model system to study the interplay between the magnetic f{sup 7} (J = 7/2) and the non-magnetic f{sup 6} (J = 0) states close to the Fermi level.

Wicks, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Altendorf, S. G.; Caspers, C.; Kierspel, H.; Sutarto, R. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany); Tjeng, L. H. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Damascelli, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Quantum Matter Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada)

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

60

Lattice-registered growth of GaSb on Si (211) with molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A GaSb film was grown on a Si(211) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy indicating full lattice relaxation as well as full lattice registration and dislocation-free growth in the plane perpendicular to the [01 - 1]-direction. Heteroepitaxy of GaSb on a Si(211) substrate is dominated by numerous first order and multiple higher order micro-twins. The atomic-resolved structural study of GaSb films by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy reveals that slight tilt, along with twinning, favors the lattice registry to Si(211) substrates. Preferential bonding of impinging Ga and Sb atoms at the interface due to two distinctive bonding sites on the Si(211) surface enables growth that is sublattice-ordered and free of anti-phase boundaries. The role of the substrate orientation on the strain distribution of GaSb epilayers is further elucidated by investigating the local change in the lattice parameter using the geometric phase analysis method and hence effectiveness of the lattice tilting in reducing the interfacial strain was confirmed further.

Hosseini Vajargah, S.; Botton, G. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Ghanad-Tavakoli, S. [Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Preston, J. S.; Kleiman, R. N. [Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Deep traps in nonpolar m-plane GaN grown by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep level defects in nonpolar m-plane GaN grown by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy were characterized using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and deep level optical spectroscopy (DLOS) and compared with polar c-plane GaN that was grown simultaneously in the same growth run. Significant differences in both the levels present and their concentrations were observed upon comparison of both growth orientations. DLTS revealed electron traps with activation energies of 0.14 eV, 0.20 eV, and 0.66 eV in the m-plane material, with concentrations that were {approx}10-50 x higher than traps of similar activation energies in the c-plane material. Likewise, DLOS measurements showed {approx}20 x higher concentrations of both a C{sub N} acceptor-like state at E{sub C} - 3.26 eV, which correlates with a high background carbon concentration observed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy for the m-plane material [A. Armstrong, A. R. Arehart, B. Moran, S. P. DenBaars, U. K. Mishra, J. S. Speck, and S. A. Ringel, Appl. Phys. Lett. 84, 374 (2004)], and the V{sub Ga}-related state level at E{sub C} - 2.49 eV, which is consistent with an enhanced yellow luminescence observed by photoluminescence. The findings suggest a strong impact of growth dynamics on the incorporation of impurities and electrically active native point defects as a function of GaN growth plane polarity.

Zhang, Z.; Arehart, A. R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Hurni, C. A.; Speck, J. S. [Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States); Yang, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Myers, R. C.; Ringel, S. A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

62

Molecular Characterization of Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds in Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although nitrogen-containing organic compounds (NOC) are important components of atmospheric aerosols, little is known about their chemical compositions. Here we present detailed characterization of the NOC constituents of biomass burning aerosol (BBA) samples using high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS). Accurate mass measurements combined with MS/MS fragmentation experiments of selected ions were used to assign molecular structures to individual NOC species. Our results indicate that N-heterocyclic alkaloid compounds - species naturally produced by plants and living organisms - comprise a substantial fraction of NOC in BBA samples collected from test burns of five biomass fuels. High abundance of alkaloids in test burns of ponderosa pine - a widespread tree in the western U.S. areas frequently affected by large scale fires - suggests that N-heterocyclic alkaloids in BBA can play a significant role in dry and wet deposition of fixed nitrogen in this region.

Laskin, Alexander; Smith, Jeffrey S.; Laskin, Julia

2009-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

63

Metalorganic molecular beam epitaxial growth of semi-insulating GaInAsP (? g =1.05?? m ): Fe optical waveguides for integrated photonic devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Irondoping of InP and GaInAsP (? g =1.05?? m ) layers grown by metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy was studied using elemental sourcematerial in combination with a conventional effusion cell. This study was aimed at the creation of semi-insulating optical waveguides under growth conditions compatible with selective area growth. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements revealed a reproducible and homogeneous incorporation behavior of the irondopant in the materials investigated. Resistivities in excess of 10 9 ??? cm were obtained for both compositions at medium doping levels. GaInAsP/InP waveguide structures grown at 485?° C —the minimum temperature necessary for selective deposition—exhibited averaged resistivities of 5×10 7 ??? cm in combination with optical losses of 2.5±0.5? dB/cm .

H. Künzel; P. Albrecht; S. Ebert; R. Gibis; P. Harde; R. Kaiser; H. Kizuki; S. Malchow

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Beam Purification by Photodetachment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion beam purity is of crucial importance to many basic and applied studies. Selective photodetachment has been proposed to suppress unwanted species in negative ion beams while preserving the intensity of the species of interest. A highly efficient technique based on photodetachment in a gas-filled radio frequency quadrupole ion cooler has been demonstrated. In off-line experiments with stable ions, up to 104 times suppression of the isobar contaminants in a number of interesting radioactive negative ion beams has been demonstrated. For selected species, this technique promises experimental possibilities in studies on exotic nuclei, accelerator mass spectrometry, and fundamental properties of negative atomic and molecular ions.

Liu, Yuan [ORNL; Beene, James R [ORNL; Havener, Charles C [ORNL; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn} [ORNL; Andersson, P. [University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Lindahl, A. O. [University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Hanstorp, D. [University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Forstner, Dr. Oliver [University of Vienna, Austria; Gottwald, T. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Molecular Characterization of Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical characterizations of atmospheric aerosols is a serious analytical challenge because of the complexity of particulate matter analyte composed of a large number of compounds with a wide range of molecular structures, physico-chemical properties, and reactivity. In this study chemical composition of biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) samples is characterized by high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS). Accurate mass measurement combined with Kendrick analysis allowed us to assign elemental composition for hundreds of compounds in the range of m/z values of 50-1000. ESI/MS spectra of different BBOA samples contain a variety of distinct, sample specific, characteristic peaks that can be used as unique markers for different types of biofuels. Our results indicate that a significant number of high-MW organic compounds in BBOA samples are highly oxidized polar species that can be efficiently detected using ESI/MS but are difficult to observe using the conventional GCMS analysis of aerosol samples. The average O:C ratios obtained for each of the BBOA samples studied in this work are in a strikingly good agreement with the previously reported values obtained using STXM/NEXAFS. The degree of unsaturation of detected organic compounds shows a clear decrease with increase in the molecular weight of the anyalyte molecules. The decrease is particularly pronounced for the samples containing a large number of CH2-based homologous series.

Smith, Jeffrey S.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

66

Deposition of hetero-epitaxial In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

Highly oriented thin film In{sub 2}O{sub 3} was heteroepitaxially grown on optically polished (100) plane of single crystalline yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrate using Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). Full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of X-ray rocking-curve showed 0.08{degree} for In{sub 2}O{sub 3} 200 nm thick layers indicating that excellent uniformity orientation compared with the heteroepitaxially-grown In{sub 2}O{sub 3} epitaxially deposited by the conventional methods such as electron-beam (e-beam) evaporation or sputtering method. The minimum yield ({chi}{sub min}) of the MBE grown in In{sub 2}O{sub 3} film of Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) was also extremely small value 3.1%, implying the very high crystallinity.

Taga, N.; Maekawa, M. [Asahi Glass Co., Ltd., Yokohama (Japan). Research Center; Shigesato, Y.; Yasui, I. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Inst. of Industrial Science; Haynes, T.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Solid State Div.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Growth of SrTiO{sub 3}(110) film by oxide molecular beam epitaxy with feedback control  

SciTech Connect

By controlling the growth of complex oxide films with atomic precision, emergent phenomena and fascinating properties have been discovered, and even been manipulated. With oxide molecular beam epitaxy (OMBE) we grow high-quality SrTiO{sub 3}(110) films by evaporating Sr and Ti metals with separate controls of the open/close timing of the shutters. The incident electron beam angle of the reflective high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is adjusted to make the (01) beam sensitive to surface chemical concentration. By monitoring such an intensity, we tune the shutter timing to synchronize the evaporation amount of Sr and Ti in real-time. The intensity is further used as a feedback control signal for automatic growth optimization to fully compensate the possible fluctuation of the source flux rates upon extended growth. A 22 nm-thick film is obtained with the precision of metal cation stoichiometry better than 0.5%.

Feng Jiagui; Yang Fang; Yang Yang; Gu Lin; Guo Jiandong [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed-Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang Zhiming [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed-Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10/134, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Zhang Jiandi [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70808 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Ultra-low resistance ohmic contacts to GaN with high Si doping concentrations grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ti/Al/Ni/Au ohmic contacts were formed on heavily doped n{sup +} metal-polar GaN samples with various Si doping concentrations grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The contact resistivity (R{sub C}) and sheet resistance (R{sub sh}) as a function of corresponding GaN free carrier concentration (n) were measured. Very low R{sub C} values (electron mobility transistors.

Afroz Faria, Faiza; Guo Jia; Zhao Pei; Li Guowang; Kumar Kandaswamy, Prem; Wistey, Mark; Xing Huili; Jena, Debdeep [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

69

Fundamental studies of the plasma extraction and ion beam formation processes in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

The fundamental and practical aspects are described for extracting ions from atmospheric pressure plasma sources into an analytical mass spectrometer. Methodologies and basic concepts of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are emphasized in the discussion, including ion source, sampling interface, supersonic expansion, slumming process, ion optics and beam focusing, and vacuum considerations. Some new developments and innovative designs are introduced. The plasma extraction process in ICP-MS was investigated by Langmuir measurements in the region between the skimmer and first ion lens. Electron temperature (T{sub e}) is in the range 2000--11000 K and changes with probe position inside an aerosol gas flow. Electron density (n{sub e}) is in the range 10{sup 8}--10{sup 10} {sup {minus}cm }at the skimmer tip and drops abruptly to 10{sup 6}--10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}3} near the skimmer tip and drops abruptly to 10{sup 6}--10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}3} downstream further behind the skimmer. Electron density in the beam leaving the skimmer also depends on water loading and on the presence and mass of matrix elements. Axially resolved distributions of electron number-density and electron temperature were obtained to characterize the ion beam at a variety of plasma operating conditions. The electron density dropped by a factor of 101 along the centerline between the sampler and skimmer cones in the first stage and continued to drop by factors of 10{sup 4}--10{sup 5} downstream of skimmer to the entrance of ion lens. The electron density in the beam expansion behind sampler cone exhibited a 1/z{sup 2} intensity fall-off (z is the axial position). An second beam expansion originated from the skimmer entrance, and the beam flow underwent with another 1/z{sup 2} fall-off behind the skimmer. Skimmer interactions play an important role in plasma extraction in the ICP-MS instrument.

Niu, Hongsen

1995-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

70

Compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a time-of-flight mass spectrometer developed for measuring the parameters of a pulsed hydrogen beam. The duration of an electron-beam current pulse in the ionizer of the mass spectrometer can be varied within 2-20 usec, the pulse electron current is 0.6 mA, and the electron energy is 250 eV. The time resolution of the mass spectrometer is determined by the repetition period of the electron-beam current pulses and is 40 usec. The mass spectrometer has 100% transmission in the direction of motion of molecular-beam particles. The dimension of the mass spectrometer is 7 cm in this direction. The mass resolution is sufficient for determination of the composition of the hydrogen beam.

Belov, A.S.; Kubalov, S.A.; Kuzik, V.F.; Yakushev, V.P.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Molecular fountain.  

SciTech Connect

A molecular fountain directs slowly moving molecules against gravity to further slow them to translational energies that they can be trapped and studied. If the molecules are initially slow enough they will return some time later to the position from which they were launched. Because this round trip time can be on the order of a second a single molecule can be observed for times sufficient to perform Hz level spectroscopy. The goal of this LDRD proposal was to construct a novel Molecular Fountain apparatus capable of producing dilute samples of molecules at near zero temperatures in well-defined user-selectable, quantum states. The slowly moving molecules used in this research are produced by the previously developed Kinematic Cooling technique, which uses a crossed atomic and molecular beam apparatus to generate single rotational level molecular samples moving slowly in the laboratory reference frame. The Kinematic Cooling technique produces cold molecules from a supersonic molecular beam via single collisions with a supersonic atomic beam. A single collision of an atom with a molecule occurring at the correct energy and relative velocity can cause a small fraction of the molecules to move very slowly vertically against gravity in the laboratory. These slowly moving molecules are captured by an electrostatic hexapole guiding field that both orients and focuses the molecules. The molecules are focused into the ionization region of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and are ionized by laser radiation. The new molecular fountain apparatus was built utilizing a new design for molecular beam apparatus that has allowed us to miniaturize the apparatus. This new design minimizes the volumes and surface area of the machine allowing smaller pumps to maintain the necessary background pressures needed for these experiments.

Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Surface morphologies of homoepitaxial ZnO on Zn- and O-polar substrates by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

Homoepitaxial ZnO layers are grown on Zn-polar (0001) and O-polar (0001) surfaces of single crystal ZnO substrates by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. It is found that the growth conditions to obtain smooth surfaces are significantly different for the two surface polarities. For growth on Zn-polar surface, moderate temperature (650 deg. C) and highly O-rich condition (low Zn/O{sub 2}) are required, while high temperature (1000-1050 deg. C) and Zn-rich condition (high Zn/O{sub 2} ratio) are essential for growth on O-polar surfaces.

Xu Huaizhe; Ohtani, K.; Yamao, M.; Ohno, H. [Laboratory for Nanoelectronics and Spintronics, Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2006-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

73

Insights in High-Temperature Superconductivity from the Study of Films and Heterostructures Synthesized by Molecular Beam Epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using molecular beam epitaxy, we synthesize atomically smooth thin films, multilayers and superlattices of cuprate high-temperature superconductors (HTS). Such heterostructures enable novel experiments that probe the basicphysics of HTS. For example, we have established that HTS and antiferromagnetic phases separate on Ångstrom scale, while the pseudo-gap state apparently mixes with HTS over an anomalously large length scale ('Giant Proximity Effect'). Here, we briefly review our most recent experiments on such films and superlattices. The new results include an unambiguous demonstration of strong coupling of in-plane charge excitations to out-of-plane lattice vibrations and the discovery of interface HTS.

Bozovic,I.

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

74

Molecular-beam epitaxy and robust superconductivity of stoichiometric FeSe crystalline films on bilayer graphene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on molecular beam epitaxy growth of stoichiometric and superconducting FeSe crystalline thin films on double-layer graphene. Layer-by-layer growth of high-quality films has been achieved in a well-controlled manner by using Se-rich condition, which allow us to investigate the thickness-dependent superconductivity of FeSe. In situ low-temperature scanning tunneling spectra reveal that the local superconducting gap in the quasiparticle density of states is visible down to two triple layers for the minimum measurement temperature of 2.2 K, and that the transition temperature T{sub c} scales inversely with film thickness.

Song Canli; Jiang Yeping; Xue Qikun [State Key Laboratory for Surface Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); State Key Laboratory for Low-Dimensional Quantum Physics, Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang Yilin; Li Zhi; Wang Lili; He Ke; Ma Xucun [State Key Laboratory for Surface Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Chen Xi [State Key Laboratory for Low-Dimensional Quantum Physics, Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Chemical differentiation in regions of high mass star formation II. Molecular multiline and dust continuum studies of selected objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of this study is to investigate systematic chemical differentiation of molecules in regions of high mass star formation. We observed five prominent sites of high mass star formation in HCN, HNC, HCO+, their isotopes, C18O, C34S and some other molecular lines, for some sources both at 3 and 1.3 mm and in continuum at 1.3 mm. Taking into account earlier obtained data for N2H+ we derive molecular abundances and physical parameters of the sources (mass, density, ionization fraction, etc.). The kinetic temperature is estimated from CH3C2H observations. Then we analyze correlations between molecular abundances and physical parameters and discuss chemical models applicable to these species. The typical physical parameters for the sources in our sample are the following: kinetic temperature in the range ~ 30-50 K (it is systematically higher than that obtained from ammonia observations and is rather close to dust temperature), masses from tens to hundreds solar masses, gas densities ~ 10^5 cm^{-3}, ionization...

Zinchenko, I; Pirogov, L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

High-quality epitaxial CoFe/Si(111) heterostructures fabricated by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate atomically controlled heterojunctions consisting of ferromagnetic CoFe alloys and silicon (Si) using low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy with a good atomic matching at the (111) plane. The saturation magnetization of the CoFe layers grown reaches {approx}85% of the value of bulk samples reported so far, and can be systematically controlled by tuning the ratio of Co to Fe, indicating that the silicidation reactions between CoFe and Si are suppressed and the heterojunctions are very high quality. We find that the Schottky barrier height of the high-quality CoFe/Si(111) junctions is unexpectedly low compared to the previous data for other metal/Si ones, implying the reduction in the Fermi-level-pinning effect. We can expand the available high-quality ferromagnet/Si heterostructures in the field of Si-based spintronics.

Maeda, Y.; Yamada, S.; Ando, Y.; Yamane, K.; Miyao, M. [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Hamaya, K. [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Sanbancho, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

77

High temperature step-flow growth of gallium phosphide by molecular beam epitaxy and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Post-growth surface morphologies of high-temperature homoepitaxial GaP films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) have been studied. Smooth, stepped surface morphologies of MBE-grown layers, measured by atomic force microscopy, were found for a wide range of substrate temperatures and P{sub 2}:Ga flux ratios. A MOCVD-based growth study performed under similar conditions to MBE-grown samples shows a nearly identical smooth, step-flow surface morphology, presenting a convergence of growth conditions for the two different methods. The additional understanding of GaP epitaxy gained from this study will impact its use in applications that include GaP-based device technologies, III-V metamorphic buffers, and III-V materials integration with silicon.

Ratcliff, C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Grassman, T. J.; Ringel, S. A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Institute for Materials Research, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Carlin, J. A. [Institute for Materials Research, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

78

Growth of AlN/SiC/AlN quantum wells on Si(111) by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

AlN/SiC/AlN quantum well structures have been grown on Si(111) by molecular beam epitaxy at 700 deg. C. The microstructure is single-crystal wurtzite AlN and cubic SiC with stacking sequence disorder. Depth profiles taken by Auger electron spectroscopy indicate that the ratio of Si to C is about 5:4. Layers with lower carbon content exhibit regions with five-fold superstructures. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms the presence of Al-N and Si-C bonds. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of a low-temperature synthesis route for epitaxial SiC and AlN/SiC heterostructures on Si.

Cheng Yana [Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); Beresford, Roderic [School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

79

CdSe/CdTe type-II superlattices grown on GaSb (001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

CdSe/CdTe superlattices are grown on GaSb substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. X-ray diffraction measurements and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images indicate high crystalline quality. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements show the effective bandgap varies with the superlattice layer thicknesses and confirm the CdSe/CdTe heterostructure has a type-II band edge alignment. The valence band offset between unstrained CdTe and CdSe is determined as 0.63 {+-} 0.06 eV by fitting the measured PL peak positions using the envelope function approximation and the Kronig-Penney model. These results suggest that CdSe/CdTe superlattices are promising candidates for multi-junction solar cells and other optoelectronic devices based on GaSb substrates.

Li Jingjing; Liu Shi; Wang Shumin; Ding Ding; Johnson, Shane R.; Zhang Yonghang [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Liu Xinyu; Furdyna, Jacek K. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Smith, David J. [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

80

Mg doping of GaN grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under nitrogen-rich conditions  

SciTech Connect

Acceptor doping of GaN with Mg during plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, under N-rich conditions and a relatively high growth temperature of 740 deg. C, was investigated. The p-doping level steadily increases with increasing Mg flux. The highest doping level achieved, determined from Hall measurements, is 2.1x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. The corresponding doping efficiency and hole mobility are approx4.9% and 3.7 cm{sup 2}/V s at room temperature. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence measurements confirm good crystalline and optical quality of the Mg-doped layers. An InGaN/GaN quantum dot light emitting diode (lambda{sub peak}=529 nm) with p-GaN contact layers grown under N-rich condition exhibits a low series resistance of 9.8 OMEGA.

Zhang Meng; Bhattacharya, Pallab; Guo Wei; Banerjee, Animesh [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Solid-State Electronics Laboratory, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

2010-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

Molecular beam epitaxy-grown wurtzite MgS thin films for solar-blind ultra-violet detection  

SciTech Connect

Molecular beam epitaxy grown MgS on GaAs(111)B substrate was resulted in wurtzite phase, as demonstrated by detailed structural characterizations. Phenomenological arguments were used to account for why wurtzite phase is preferred over zincblende phase or its most stable rocksalt phase. Results of photoresponse and reflectance measurements performed on wurtzite MgS photodiodes suggest a direct bandgap at around 5.1 eV. Their response peaks at 245 nm with quantum efficiency of 9.9% and enjoys rejection of more than three orders at 320 nm and close to five orders at longer wavelengths, proving the photodiodes highly competitive in solar-blind ultraviolet detection.

Lai, Y. H.; He, Q. L. [Nano Science and Nano Technology Program, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, HKSAR, People's Republic of China (China) [Nano Science and Nano Technology Program, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, HKSAR, People's Republic of China (China); Department of Physics and William Mong Institute of Nano Science and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, HKSAR, People's Republic of China (China); Cheung, W. Y.; Lok, S. K.; Wong, K. S.; Sou, I. K. [Department of Physics and William Mong Institute of Nano Science and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, HKSAR, People's Republic of China (China)] [Department of Physics and William Mong Institute of Nano Science and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, HKSAR, People's Republic of China (China); Ho, S. K. [Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macau, People's Republic of China (China)] [Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macau, People's Republic of China (China); Tam, K. W. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, University of Macau, Macau, People's Republic of China (China)] [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, University of Macau, Macau, People's Republic of China (China)

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

82

Effect of in-situ oxygen on the electronic properties of graphene grown by carbon molecular beam epitaxy grown  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report that graphene grown by molecular beam epitaxy from solid carbon (CMBE) on (0001) SiC in the presence of unintentional oxygen exhibits a small bandgap on the order of tens of meV. The presence of bandgaps is confirmed by temperature dependent Hall effect and resistivity measurements. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements suggest that oxygen incorporates into the SiC substrate in the form of O-Si-C and not into the graphene as graphene oxide or some other species. The effect is independent of the carrier type of the graphene. Temperature dependent transport measurements show the presence of hopping conduction in the resistivity and a concurrent disappearance of the Hall voltage. Interactions between the graphene layers and the oxidized substrate are believed to be responsible for the bandgap.

Park, Jeongho; Mitchel, W. C.; Back, Tyson C. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate (AFRL/RXPS), Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433-7707 (United States); Elhamri, Said [Department of Physics, University of Dayton, Dayton, Ohio 45469 (United States)

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

83

Molecular beam epitaxy growth of PbSe on Si (211) using a ZnTe buffer layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report the results of successful growth of single crystalline PbSe on Si (211) substrates with ZnTe as a buffer layer by molecular beam epitaxy. Single crystalline PbSe with (511) orientation was achieved on ZnTe/Si (211), as evidenced by RHEED patterns indicative of 2 dimensional (2D) growth, x ray diffraction rocking curves with a full width at half maximum as low as 153 arc sec and mobility as large as 1.1x10{sup 4}cm{sup 2}V{sup -1}s{sup -1} at 77 K. Cross hatch patterns were found on the PbSe(511) surface in Nomarski filtered microscope images suggesting the presence of a surface thermal strain relaxation mechanism, which was confirmed by Fourier transformed high resolution transmission electron microscope images.

Wang, X. J.; Chang, Y.; Hou, Y. B.; Becker, C. R.; Kodama, R.; Aqariden, F.; Sivananthan, S. [Microphysics Laboratory, Physics Department, University of Illinois at Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Microphysics Laboratory, Physics Department, University of Illinois at Chicago, Illinois 60607 and Physics Department and Quantum Functional Semiconductor Research Center, Dongguk University 3-26, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Microphysics Laboratory, Physics Department, University of Illinois at Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); EPIR Technologies, Bolingbrook, Illinois 60440 (United States); Microphysics Laboratory, Physics Department, University of Illinois at Chicago, Illinois 60607 and EPIR Technologies, Bolingbrook, Illinois 60440 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

Growth of high Bi concentration GaAs{sub 1-x}Bi{sub x} by molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The incorporation of Bi is investigated in the molecular beam epitaxy growth of GaAs{sub 1-x}Bi{sub x}. Bi content increases rapidly as the As{sub 2}:Ga flux ratio is lowered to 0.5 and then saturates for lower flux ratios. Growth under Ga and Bi rich conditions shows that Bi content increases strongly with decreasing temperature. A model is proposed where Bi from a wetting layer incorporates through attachment to Ga-terminated surface sites. The weak Ga-Bi bond can be broken thermally, ejecting Bi back into the wetting layer. Highly crystalline films with up to 22% Bi were grown at temperatures as low as 200 Degree-Sign C.

Lewis, R. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, V6T 1Z1 Vancouver (Canada); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Victoria, V8W 3P6 Victoria (Canada); Masnadi-Shirazi, M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Victoria, V8W 3P6 Victoria (Canada); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia, V6T 1Z4 Vancouver (Canada); Tiedje, T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Victoria, V8W 3P6 Victoria (Canada)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

85

Intrinsic ultrathin topological insulators grown via molecular beam epitaxy characterized by in-situ angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate the capability of growing high quality ultrathin (10 or fewer quintuple layers) films of the topological insulators Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} using molecular beam epitaxy. Unlike previous growth techniques, which often pin the Fermi energy in the conduction band for ultrathin samples, our samples remain intrinsic bulk insulators. We characterize these films using in-situ angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy, which is a direct probe of bandstructure, and ex-situ atomic force microscopy. We find that the conduction band lies above the Fermi energy, indicating bulk insulating behavior with only the surface states crossing the Fermi energy. The use of a thermal cracker allows for more stoichiometric flux rates during growth, while still creating intrinsically doped films, paving the way for future improvements in growth of topological insulators.

Lee, J. J.; Vishik, I. M.; Ma, Y.; Shen, Z. X. [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Schmitt, F. T.; Moore, R. G. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

86

GaAs structures with InAs and As quantum dots produced in a single molecular beam epitaxy process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Epitaxial GaAs layers containing InAs semiconductor quantum dots and As metal quantum dots are grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The InAs quantum dots are formed by the Stranskii-Krastanow mechanism, whereas the As quantum dots are self-assembled in the GaAs layer grown at low temperature with a large As excess. The microstructure of the samples is studied by transmission electron microscopy. It is established that the As metal quantum dots formed in the immediate vicinity of the InAs semiconductor quantum dots are larger in size than the As quantum dots formed far from the InAs quantum dots. This is apparently due to the effect of strain fields of the InAs quantum dots upon the self-assembling of As quantum dots. Another phenomenon apparently associated with local strains around the InAs quantum dots is the formation of V-like defects (stacking faults) during the overgrowth of the InAs quantum dots with the GaAs layer by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy. Such defects have a profound effect on the self-assembling of As quantum dots. Specifically, on high-temperature annealing needed for the formation of large-sized As quantum dots by Ostwald ripening, the V-like defects bring about the dissolution of the As quantum dots in the vicinity of the defects. In this case, excess arsenic most probably diffuses towards the open surface of the sample via the channels of accelerated diffusion in the planes of stacking faults.

Nevedomskii, V. N., E-mail: nevedom@mail.ioffe.ru; Bert, N. A.; Chaldyshev, V. V., E-mail: Chald@gvg.ioffe.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Preobrazhenskii, V. V.; Putyato, M. A.; Semyagin, B. R. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Division (Russian Federation)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Molecular Beam Dumps as Tracers of Hadronic Cosmic Ray Sources: the Case of SNR IC443  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The gamma-ray & neutrino visibility of cosmic ray (CR) accelerators will be dramatically increased by the presence of molecular material abutting such sites due to the increased probability of pion production -- and, in the case of neutral pions, subsequent gamma-decay. This was recognized by Pinkau, Montmerle, and Black & Fazio, and others in the 1970's. In an effort to examine the long-standing -- but unproven -- conjecture that galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) are indeed the sites of nucleonic CR acceleration to Hartman et al.,1999), and molecular clouds, at low Galactic latitudes (|b|0) mm wavelength data from the compilation of Dame, Hartmann & Thaddeus (2001), at the best estimates of the various SNR distances. We outline the overall correlative study and examine the interesting case of SNR IC443, a likely accelerator of CR nuclei.

Yousaf M. Butt; Diego F. Torres; Jorge A. Combi; Thomas M. Dame; Gustavo E. Romero

2002-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

88

Molecular beam deposition of LaAlO3 on silicon for sub-22nm CMOS technological nodes: Towards a perfect control of the oxide/silicon heterointerface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work reports on the development of thin amorphous LaAlO"3 (LAO) layers on Si(001) for their integration as gate oxide in sub-22nm CMOS technologies. The crucial influence of the Si surface preparation is highlighted and an optimized surface preparation ... Keywords: Amorphous high-? dielectrics, Interfacial layer, LaAlO3, Molecular beam epitaxy, Surface preparation

S. Pelloquin; L. Becerra; G. Saint-Girons; C. Plossu; N. Baboux; D. Albertini; G. Grenet; G. Hollinger

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Self-organized GaAs patterns on misoriented GaAs (111)B substrates using dilute nitrides by molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, the growth of patterned surfaces is being used to demonstrate the site control of the three-dimensional nanostructures, and in particular quantum dots. Nevertheless the pre-patterning techniques show some disadvantages. In this work, we report ... Keywords: Dilute nitrides, InAs, Molecular beam epitaxy, Patterned surface, Quantum dots

R. Gargallo; J. Miguel-Sánchez; Á. Guzmán; U. Jahn; E. Muñoz

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

91

Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

High-efficiency cross-beam magnetic electron-impact source for improved miniature Mattauch-Herzog mass spectrometer performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a newly designed cross-beam magnetic electron-impact ion source (CBM-EI). We demonstrate its superiority in comparison with a conventional source (CB-EI) when used with a commercial miniature sector-field-type, non-scanning mass spectrometer featuring Mattauch-Herzog geometry (MH-MS) and a permanent sector-field magnet. This paper clearly shows the value of the CBM-EI for enhancing MH-MS sensitivity. Unlike secondary electron-multiplier type detectors, the pixelated detector (IonCCD Trade-Mark-Sign ) used in the commercial MH-MS has no gain. The MH-MS/IonCCD system is therefore challenged to compete with time-of-flight and quadrupole MS systems due to their higher ion transmissions and detector gains. Using the new CBM-EI, we demonstrate an instrument sensitivity increase of 20-fold to 100-fold relative to the CB-EI-equipped instrument. This remarkable signal increase by the simple addition of the magnet assembly arises from the magnet-induced gyromotion of the thermionic electrons, which vastly increases the effective path length of the electrons through the ionization region, and the collimated nature of the electron flux, which optimizes the ion transmission through the 100-{mu}m object slit of the MH-MS. Some or all of the realized sensitivity increase may be exchanged for an increase in resolution and/or mass range through the use of a narrower object slit, or for a reduction in ion-source pressure to limit quenching. The CBM-EI should facilitate development of a differentially pumped ion source to extend the lifetime of the filament, especially in otherwise intractable applications associated with oxidizing and corrosive samples.

Hadjar, O.; Fowler, W. K. [OI Analytical/CMS Field Products, 2148 Pelham Parkway, Bldg. 400, Pelham, Alabama 35124 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Molecular Beam Dumps as Tracers of Hadronic Cosmic Ray Sources the Case of SNR IC443  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The gamma-ray & neutrino visibility of cosmic ray (CR) accelerators will be dramatically increased by the presence of molecular material abutting such sites due to the increased probability of pion production -- and, in the case of neutral pions, subsequent gamma-decay. This was recognized by Pinkau, Montmerle, and Black & Fazio, and others in the 1970's. In an effort to examine the long-standing -- but unproven -- conjecture that galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) are indeed the sites of nucleonic CR acceleration to 0) mm wavelength data from the compilation of Dame, Hartmann & Thaddeus (2001), at the best estimates of the various SNR distances. We outline the overall correlative study and examine the interesting case of SNR IC443, a likely accelerator of CR nuclei.

Butt, Y M; Combi, J A; Dame, T M; Romero, G E; Butt, Yousaf M.; Torres, Diego F.; Combi, Jorge A.; Dame, Thomas; Romero, Gustavo E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Magnetic properties of MnSb inclusions formed in GaSb matrix directly during molecular beam epitaxial growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite of intensive search for the proper semiconductor base materials for spintronic devices working at room temperature no appropriate material based on ferromagnetic semiconductors has been found so far. We demonstrate that the phase segregated system with MnSb hexagonal inclusions inside the GaSb matrix, formed directly during the molecular beam epitaxial growth reveals the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature and is a good candidate for exploitation in spintronics. Furthermore, the MnSb inclusions with only one crystalline structure were identified in this GaMn:MnSb granular material. The SQUID magnetometry confirmed that this material exhibits ferromagnetic like behavior starting from helium up to room temperature. Moreover, the magnetic anisotropy was found which was present also at room temperature, and it was proved that by choosing a proper substrate it is possible to control the direction of easy axis of inclusions' magnetization moment between in-plane and out-of-plane; the latter is important in view of potential applications in spintronic devices.

Lawniczak-Jablonska, Krystyna; Wolska, Anna; Klepka, Marcin T.; Kret, Slawomir; Kurowska, Boguslawa; Kowalski, Bogdan J. [Institute of Physics PAS, al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Gosk, Jacek [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Twardowski, Andrzej; Wasik, Dariusz; Kwiatkowski, Adam [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Sadowski, Janusz [Institute of Physics PAS, al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); MAX-Lab, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Piezoelectric InAs (211)B quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy: Structural and optical properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structural and optical properties of piezoelectric (211)B InAs nanostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy are systematically investigated as a function of the various growth parameters. Depending on the specific growth conditions, we show that the InAs nanostructures take the form of a quantum dot (QD) or a quantum dash, their height ranges between 2 and 20 nm, and their density varies from a few times 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} all the way up to a few times 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}. The (211)B QDs are characterized by large aspect ratios, which are compatible with a truncated pyramid morphology. By analyzing the QD emission spectrum, we conclude that only small size QDs, with heights less than 3 nm, are optically active. This is consistent with high resolution transmission electron microscopy observations showing that large QDs contain misfit dislocations, whereas small QDs are dislocation-free. The formation of a two-dimensional wetting layer is observed optically, and its thickness is determined to be between 0.30 and 0.39 nm. Finally, the large blueshift in the QD emission observed with increasing excitation power represents a clear evidence of the strong built-in piezoelectric field present in these dots.

Dialynas, G. E. [Department of Physics, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Kalliakos, S.; Xenogianni, C. [Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Androulidaki, M. [Microelectronics Research Group, IESL-FORTH, P.O. Box 1385, 71110 Heraklion (Greece); Kehagias, T.; Komninou, P. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Savvidis, P. G.; Pelekanos, N. T. [Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Microelectronics Research Group, IESL-FORTH, P.O. Box 1385, 71110 Heraklion (Greece); Hatzopoulos, Z. [Department of Physics, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Microelectronics Research Group, IESL-FORTH, P.O. Box 1385, 71110 Heraklion (Greece)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Compositional Analysis of the High Molecular Weight Ethylene Oxide Propylene Oxide Copolymer by MALDI Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The composition of narrow distribution poly ethylene oxide-propylene oxide copolymer (Mw ~ 8700 Da) was studied using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. The ethylene oxide-propylene oxide copolymer produced oligomers separated by 14 Da. The average resolving power over the entire spectrum was 28,000. Approximately 448 isotopically resolved peaks representing about 56 oligomers are identified. Although agreement between experimental and calculated isotopic distributions was strong, the compositional assignment was difficult. This is due to the large number of possible isobaric components. The purpose of this research is to resolve and study the composition of high mass copolymer such as ethylene oxide-propylene oxide.

Houshia, Orwa Jaber

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Gas-phase and Solution-phase Peptide Conformations Studied by Ion Mobility-mass Spectrometry and Molecular Dynamics Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separates ions on the basis of ion-neutral collision cross-sections (CCS, [omega]), which are determined by the geometry or conformation of the ions. The size-based IM separation can be extended to distinguish conformers that have different shapes in cases where shape differences influence the accessible surface area of the molecule. In recent years, IM has rapidly evolved as a structural characterization technique, which has applied on various structural biology problems. In this work, IMS is combined with molecular dynamics simulation (MDS), specially the integrated tempering sampling molecular dynamics simulation (ITS-MDS) to explore the gas-phase conformation space of two molecular systems (i) protonated tryptophan zipper 1 (trpzip1) ions and its six derivatives (ii) alkali metal ion (Na, K and Cs) adducts of gramicidin A (GA). The structural distributions obtained from ITS-MDS are compared well with results obtained from matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-ion mobility-mass spectrometry (MALDI-IM-MS) for trpzip 1 series and electrospray ionization-ion mobility-mass spectrometry (ESI-IM-MS) for alkali metal ion adducts of GA. Furthermore, the solvent dependence on conformational preferences of the GA dimer is investigated using a combination of mass spectrometry techniques, viz. ESI-IM-MS and hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX)-MS, and MDS. The IM experiments reveal three distinct gramicidin A species, detected as the sodium ion adduct ions, [2GA + 2Na]²?, and the equilibrium abundances of the dimer ions varies with solvent polarity. The solution phase conformations are assigned as the parallel and anti-parallel [beta]-helix dimer, and the anti-parallel dimer is the preferred conformation in non-polar organic solvent. The calculated CCS profiles by ITS-MDS agree very well with the experimentally measured CCS profiles, which underscore the utility of the method for determining candidate structures as well as the relative abundances of the candidate structures. The benefit of combining ion mobility measurements with solution-phase H/D exchange is allowing identifications and detail analysis of the solution-phase subgroup conformations, which cannot be uncovered by one method alone.

Chen, Liuxi

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Electron scattering mechanisms in GZO films grown on a-sapphire substrates by plasma-enhanced molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the mechanisms governing electron transport using a comprehensive set of ZnO layers heavily doped with Ga (GZO) grown by plasma-enhanced molecular-beam epitaxy on a-plane sapphire substrates with varying oxygen-to-metal ratios and Ga fluxes. The analyses were conducted by temperature dependent Hall measurements which were supported by microstructural investigations as well. Highly degenerate GZO layers with n > 5 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} grown under metal-rich conditions (reactive oxygen-to-metal ratio mobility in the temperature range from 15 to 330 K and the grain-boundary scattering governed by quantum-mechanical tunnelling is negligible. However, due to the polar nature of ZnO having high crystalline quality, polar optical phonon scattering cannot be neglected for temperatures above 150 K, because it further reduces mobility although its effect is still substantially weaker than the ionized impurity scattering even at room temperature (RT). Analysis of transport measurements and sample microstructures by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy led to a correlation between the grain sizes in these layers and mobility even for samples with a carrier concentration in the upper 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} range. In contrast, electron transport in GZO layers grown under oxygen-rich conditions (reactive oxygen-to-metal ratio >1), which have inclined grain boundaries and relatively smaller grain sizes of 10-20 nm by x-ray diffraction, is mainly limited by compensation caused by acceptor-type point-defect complexes, presumably (Ga{sub Zn}-V{sub Zn}), and scattering on grain boundaries. The GZO layers with n mobility but with much higher RT mobility values compared to the samples grown under oxygen-rich conditions [34 vs. 7.5 cm{sup 2}/V{center_dot}s]. Properties of GZO layers grown under different conditions clearly indicate that to achieve highly conductive GZO, metal-rich conditions instead of oxygen-rich conditions have to be used.

Liu, H. Y.; Avrutin, V.; Izyumskaya, N.; Oezguer, Ue.; Morkoc, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Yankovich, A. B.; Kvit, A. V.; Voyles, P. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Measurement of beam energy spectrum and impurity content in high-power neutral beam injectors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy spectrum and impurity content of a high-power neutral beam are measured by implanting the beam into high-purity silicon crystals. The depth distribution of the beam particles is then measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS); the penetration depth is a function of the incident particle energy. This is one of the few measurement techniques that can determine neutral beam energy components directly. From the results, percentages of atomic and molecular ions in the source plasma can be inferred. Use of deuterium as the source gas provides insight into the role of residual hydrogen in the ion source and accelerating grids and in the SIMS analysis. The principal impurities are carbon and oxygen. Preliminary data indicate that carbon can originate from both methane and carbon monoxide, while oxygen can come from molecular oxygen, carbon monoxide, and water. Results are given and future plans are discussed.

Langley, R.A.; Ryan, P.M.; Tsai, C.C.; Menon, M.M.; Botnick, E.M.; Magee, C.W.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Strong room-temperature ferromagnetism of high-quality lightly Mn-doped ZnO grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strong room-temperature ferromagnetism is demonstrated in single crystalline Mn-doped ZnO grown by molecular beam epitaxy. With a low Mn concentration of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}, Mn-doped ZnO films exhibited room-temperature ferromagnetism with a coercivity field larger than 200 Oe, a large saturation moment of 6 {mu}{sub B}/ion, and a large residue moment that is {approx}70% of the saturation magnetization. Isolated ions with long range carrier mediated spin-spin coupling may be responsible for the intrinsic ferromagnetism.

Zuo Zheng; Zhou Huimei; Olmedo, Mario J.; Kong Jieying; Liu Jianlin [Quantum Structures Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California - Riverside, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Beyermann, Ward P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California - Riverside, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Zheng Jianguo [Laboratory for Electron and X-ray Instrumentation, California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, University of California - Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Xin Yan [NHMFL, Florida State University, 1800 E. Paul Dirac Dr., Tallahassee, Florida 32310-3706 (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Hyperfine and spin--rotational structure of CaBr X /sup 2/. sigma. (v = 0) by molecular-beam laser-rf double resonance  

SciTech Connect

The molecular-beam, laser--rf, double-resonance technique has been used to make high-precision measurements of the spin--rotation and hyperfine interactions in the X /sup 2/..sigma.. (v = 0) electronic ground state of Ca/sup 79/Br and Ca/sup 81/Br. The spin--rotation interaction is found to have a strong N dependence. The Frosch--Foley magnetic hyperfine parameters b and c and the electric--quadrupole hfs parameter eqQ are determined for both molecules.

Childs, W.J.; Cok, D.R.; Goodman, G.L.; Goodman, L.S.

1981-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Band gap tunability of molecular beam epitaxy grown lateral composition modulated GaInP structures by controlling V/III flux ratio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lateral composition modulated (LCM) GaInP structures were grown on (001) GaAs substrate by molecular beam epitaxy with different V/III flux ratios. Band gap of LCM structures could be tuned from 1.93 eV to 1.83 eV by decreasing flux ratio while maintaining the same photoluminescence intensity, enhanced light absorption, and widened absorption spectrum. It is shown that for band gap tuning of LCM structures, flux ratio adjustment is a more viable method compared to growth temperature adjustment.

Park, K. W. [School of Information and Communications, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Park, C. Y. [Micro Systems Laboratory, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Yongin 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y. T. [School of Information and Communications, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Photonics and Applied Physics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

103

Beam purification by photodetachment (invited)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion beam purity is of crucial importance to many basic and applied studies in nuclear science. Selective photodetachment has been proposed to suppress unwanted species in negative ion beams while preserving the intensity of the species of interest. A highly efficient technique based on photodetachment in a gas-filled radio frequency quadrupole ion cooler has been demonstrated. In off-line experiments with stable ions, up to 10{sup 4} times suppression of the isobar contaminants in a number of interesting radioactive negative ion beams has been demonstrated. For selected species, this technique promises new experimental possibilities in studies on exotic nuclei, accelerator mass spectrometry, and fundamental properties of negative atomic and molecular ions.

Liu, Y.; Beene, J. R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Havener, C. C. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Andersson, P.; Forstner, O. [Vera Laboratory, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Wien, AT-1090 Wien (Austria); Gottwald, T.; Wendt, K. [Institute of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Hanstorp, D.; Lindahl, A. O. [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

Epitaxial growth of MgO and Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions on (100)-Si by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

Epitaxial growth of MgO barrier on Si is of technological importance due to the symmetry filtering effect of the MgO barrier in conjunction with bcc-ferromagnets. We study the epitaxial growth of MgO on (100)-Si by molecular beam epitaxy. MgO matches Si with 4:3 cell ratio, which renders Fe to be 45 deg. rotated relative to Si, in sharp contrast to the direct epitaxial growth of Fe on Si. The compressive strains from Si lead to the formation of small angle grain boundaries in MgO below 5 nm, and also affect the transport characteristics of Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions formed on top.

Miao, G. X.; Veenhuizen, M. J. van; Moodera, J. S. [Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Chang, J. Y. [Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Center for Spintronics Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Thiel, K.; Seibt, M.; Eilers, G.; Muenzenberg, M. [IV.Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Goettingen, Goettingen 37073 (Germany)

2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

105

Growth and photoluminescence of self-catalyzed GaP/GaNP core/shell nanowires on Si(111) by gas source molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report a study on self-catalyzed GaP/GaNP core/shell nanowires (NWs) grown on Si(111) by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. Scanning electron microscopy images show that vertical and uniform GaP NWs and GaP/GaNP core/shell NWs are grown on Si(111). The density ranges from {approx}1 x 10{sup 7} to {approx}5 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} across the substrate. Typical diameters are {approx}110 nm for GaP NWs and {approx}220 nm for GaP/GaNP NWs. Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) signal from the GaP/GaNP core/shell NWs confirms that N is incorporated in the shell and the average N content is {approx}0.9%. The PL low-energy tail is significantly reduced, compared to bulk GaNP.

Kuang, Y. J. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Sukrittanon, S. [Graduate Program of Material Science and Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Li, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Tu, C. W. [Graduate Program of Material Science and Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

High external quantum efficiency and fill-factor InGaN/GaN heterojunction solar cells grown by NH{sub 3}-based molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

High external quantum efficiency (EQE) p-i-n heterojunction solar cells grown by NH{sub 3}-based molecular beam epitaxy are presented. EQE values including optical losses are greater than 50% with fill-factors over 72% when illuminated with a 1 sun AM0 spectrum. Optical absorption measurements in conjunction with EQE measurements indicate an internal quantum efficiency greater than 90% for the InGaN absorbing layer. By adjusting the thickness of the top p-type GaN window contact layer, it is shown that the short-wavelength (<365 nm) quantum efficiency is limited by the minority carrier diffusion length in highly Mg-doped p-GaN.

Lang, J. R.; Hurni, C. A.; Cruz, S. C.; Matioli, E.; Speck, J. S. [Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Neufeld, C. J.; Mishra, U. K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

107

High-T{sub c} and high-J{sub c} SmFeAs(O,F) films on fluoride substrates grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

Superconducting thin films of SmFeAs(O,F) were prepared by molecular beam epitaxy on fluoride substrates. In our process, F-free SmFeAsO films were grown first, and F was subsequently introduced to the films by diffusion from an overlayer of SmF{sub 3}. By this simple process, record high T{sub c}, namely, T{sub c}{sup on} (T{sub c}{sup end}) = 57.8 K (56.4 K) was obtained in a film on CaF{sub 2}. Furthermore, the films on CaF{sub 2} showed high critical current density over 1 MA/cm{sup 2} in the self-field at 5 K. The correlation between superconductivity and epitaxial strain in SmFeAs(O,F) films is discussed.

Ueda, Shinya; Takeda, Soichiro; Takano, Shiro; Naito, Michio [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); TRIP, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Yamamoto, Akiyasu [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

108

Step-flow anisotropy of the m-plane GaN (1100) grown under nitrogen-rich conditions by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The homoepitaxial growth of m-plane (1100) GaN was investigated by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under nitrogen-rich conditions. The surface morphologies as a function of sample miscut were studied, providing evidence for a strong growth anisotropy that is a consequence of the anisotropy of Ga adatom diffusion barriers on the m-plane surface recently calculated ab initio[Lymperakis and Neugebauer, Phys. Rev. B 79, 241308(R) (2009)]. We found that substrate miscut toward [0001] implies a step flow toward while substrate miscut toward [0001] causes formation of atomic steps either perpendicular or parallel to the [0001] direction, under N-rich conditions at 730 deg C. We describe the growth conditions for achieving atomically flat m-plane GaN layers with parallel atomic steps.

Sawicka, Marta; Siekacz, Marcin; Skierbiszewski, Czeslaw [Institute of High Pressure Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Sokolowska 29/37, PL-01-142 Warszawa (Poland); TopGaN Ltd., Sokolowska 29/37, PL-01-142 Warszawa (Poland); Turski, Henryk; Krysko, Marcin; DziePcielewski, Igor; Grzegory, Izabella [Institute of High Pressure Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Sokolowska 29/37, PL-01-142 Warszawa (Poland); Smalc-Koziorowska, Julita [Institute of High Pressure Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Sokolowska 29/37, PL-01-142 Warszawa (Poland); TopGaN Ltd., Sokolowska 29/37, PL-01-142 Warszawa (Poland); Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Material Science and Engineering, Woloska 141, PL-02-507 Warszawa (Poland)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Molecular beam epitaxy growth of exchange-biased PtMn/NiFe bilayers with a spontaneously ordered PtMn layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the direct epitaxial growth of equiatomic ordered antiferromagnetic PtMn layers by molecular beam epitaxy. Such layers are used in giant magnetoresistance spin valve sensors as the antiferromagnetic pinning layer. Structural characterization and phase identification confirmed the spontaneous formation of the chemically ordered face-centered-tetragonal (L1{sub 0}) phase of PtMn with about 87.4% ordering. Based on the antiferromagnetic PtMn layer, we prepared exchange-biased PtMn/NiFe bilayers with various PtMn thicknesses. The exchange anisotropy field of the bilayer with NiFe grown on PtMn stabilizes at about 50 Oe beyond a PtMn thickness of 15 nm. Although the exchange anisotropy field is small compared to that of the polycrystalline system, the antiferromagnetic domain structure is stable over repetitive external magnetic field cycling and no training effect is observed.

Choi, Y. S.; Petford-Long, A. K.; Ward, R. C. C.; Fan, R.; Goff, J. P.; Hase, T. P. A. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Durham, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Role of adsorption kinetics in the low-temperature Si growth by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy: In situ observations and detailed modeling of the growth  

SciTech Connect

The growth rate and surface hydrogen coverage during Si gas-source molecular beam epitaxy using disilane have been obtained as functions of both the growth temperature and the source-gas pressure. The activation energy of the low-temperature (<600{sup o}C) growth rate was found to increase with the source-gas pressure, indicating a contribution by the adsorption process in these low-temperature growth kinetics. Several growth models have been constructed based on the results, among which the two-site/four-site-adsorption model [M. Suemitsu Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., Part 236, L625 (1997)] showed the best fit to both the growth rate and the hydrogen coverage. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

Murata, Takeshi; Nakazawa, Hideki; Tsukidate, Yoshikazu; Suemitsu, Maki

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

111

Properties of molecular beam epitaxy grown Eu{sub x}(transition metal){sub y} films (transition metals: Mn, Cr)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electronic and crystallographic structures, as well as the magnetic properties, of Eu{sub x}(transition metal){sub y} (transition metals: Mn, Cr) thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy were studied. Relative changes of the Eu/Mn and Eu/Cr ratios derived from the XPS lines, as well as x-ray reflectivity, indicate mixing of the Eu/Mn and Eu/Cr layers. Valency transitions from Eu{sup 2+} to Eu{sup 3+} were observed in both systems for most studied stoichiometries. A transition to a magnetically ordered phase was observed at 15 K, 40 K, and 62 K for selected films in the Eu-Mn system, and at 50 K for the film with a Eu/Cr ratio of 0.5.

Balin, K. [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice, 40-007 (Poland); Center for Magnetism and Magnetic Nanostructures, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918 (United States); Nowak, A. [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice, 40-007 (Poland); Laboratoire de Physique de l'Etat Condense, University du Maine, Le Mans Cedex, 72085 (France); Gibaud, A. [Laboratoire de Physique de l'Etat Condense, University du Maine, Le Mans Cedex, 72085 (France); Szade, J. [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice, 40-007 (Poland); Celinski, Z. [Center for Magnetism and Magnetic Nanostructures, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918 (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Clarification of enhanced ferromagnetism in Be-codoped InMnP fabricated using Mn/InP:Be bilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The p-type InMnP:Be epilayers were prepared by the sequential growth of Mn/InP:Be bilayers using molecular-beam-epitaxy and the subsequent in-situ annealing at 200-300 deg. C. In triple-axis x-ray diffraction patterns, the samples revealed a shoulder peak indicative of intrinsic InMnP. The ferromagnetic transition in InMnP:Be was observed to occur at the elevated temperature of {approx}140 K, and the ferromagnetic spin-domains clearly appeared in magnetic force microscopy images. The improved ferromagnetic properties are attributed to the increased p-d hybridation due to high p-type conductivity of InMnP:Be (p {approx} 10{sup 20 }cm{sup -3}). The results suggest that enhanced ferromagnetism can be effectively obtained from Be-codoped InMnP.

Shon, Yoon; Lee, Sejoon; Taek Yoon, Im; Jeon, H. C.; Lee, D. J.; Kang, T. W. [Quantum-functional Semiconductor Research Center, Dongguk University-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Song, J. D. [Center for Spintronics Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Chong S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, D. Y. [Department of Semiconductor Science, Dongguk University-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Park, C. S. [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

113

Formation behavior of Be{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O alloys grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

We report the phase formation behavior of Be{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O alloys grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. We find the alloy with low- and high-Be contents could be obtained by alloying BeO into ZnO films. X-ray diffraction measurements shows the c lattice constant value shrinks, and room temperature absorption shows the energy band-gap widens after Be incorporated. However, the alloy with intermediate Be composition are unstable and segregated into low- and high-Be contents BeZnO alloys. We demonstrate the phase segregation of Be{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O alloys with intermediate Be composition resulted from large internal strain induced by large lattice mismatch between BeO and ZnO.

Chen, Mingming; Zhu, Yuan; Su, Longxing; Zhang, Quanlin; Chen, Anqi; Ji, Xu; Xiang, Rong; Gui, Xuchun; Wu, Tianzhun [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Pan, Bicai [Department of Physics and Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)] [Department of Physics and Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Tang, Zikang [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Department of Physics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

114

Molecular beam epitaxy of InAlN lattice-matched to GaN with homogeneous composition using ammonia as nitrogen source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

InAlN lattice-matched to GaN was grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using ammonia as the nitrogen source. The alloy composition, growth conditions, and strain coherence of the InAlN were verified by high resolution x-ray diffraction {omega}-2{theta} scans and reciprocal space maps. Scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy of the InAlN revealed the absence of lateral composition modulation that was observed in the films grown by plasma-assisted MBE. InAlN/AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with smooth surfaces were fabricated with electron mobilities exceeding 1600 cm{sup 2}/Vs and sheet resistances below 244 {Omega}/sq.

Wong, Man Hoi; Wu Feng; Hurni, Christophe A.; Choi, Soojeong; Speck, James S.; Mishra, Umesh K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

115

High electron mobility through the edge states in random networks of c-axis oriented wedge-shaped GaN nanowalls grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transport and optical properties of random networks of c-axis oriented wedge-shaped GaN nanowalls grown spontaneously on c-plane sapphire substrates through molecular beam epitaxy are investigated. Our study suggests a one dimensional confinement of carriers at the top edges of these connected nanowalls, which results in a blue shift of the band edge luminescence, a reduction of the exciton-phonon coupling, and an enhancement of the exciton binding energy. Not only that, the yellow luminescence in these samples is found to be completely suppressed even at room temperature. All these changes are highly desirable for the enhancement of the luminescence efficiency of the material. More interestingly, the electron mobility through the network is found to be significantly higher than that is typically observed for GaN epitaxial films. This dramatic improvement is attributed to the transport of electrons through the edge states formed at the top edges of the nanowalls.

Bhasker, H. P.; Dhar, S.; Sain, A. [Physics Department, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Kesaria, Manoj; Shivaprasad, S. M. [International Centre for Material Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560064 (India)

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

116

Effect of AlN buffer layer properties on the morphology and polarity of GaN nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

Low-temperature AlN buffer layers grown via plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on Si (111) were found to significantly affect the subsequent growth morphology of GaN nanowires. The AlN buffer layers exhibited nanowire-like columnar protrusions, with their size, shape, and tilt determined by the AlN V/III flux ratio. GaN nanowires were frequently observed to adopt the structural characteristics of the underlying AlN columns, including the size and the degree of tilt. Piezoresponse force microscopy and polarity-sensitive etching indicate that the AlN films and the protruding columns have a mixed crystallographic polarity. Convergent beam electron diffraction indicates that GaN nanowires are Ga-polar, suggesting that Al-polar columns are nanowire nucleation sites for Ga-polar nanowires. GaN nanowires of low density could be grown on AlN buffers that were predominantly N-polar with isolated Al-polar columns, indicating a high growth rate for Ga-polar nanowires and suppressed growth of N-polar nanowires under typical growth conditions. AlN buffer layers grown under slightly N-rich conditions (V/III flux ratio = 1.0 to 1.3) were found to provide a favorable growth surface for low-density, coalescence-free nanowires.

Brubaker, Matt D. [Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); DARPA Center for Integrated Micro/Nano-Electromechanical Transducers (iMINT), University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Levin, Igor; Davydov, Albert V. [Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Rourke, Devin M.; Sanford, Norman A.; Bertness, Kris A. [Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Bright, Victor M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); DARPA Center for Integrated Micro/Nano-Electromechanical Transducers (iMINT), University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Compact hydrogen/helium isotope mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The compact hydrogen and helium isotope mass spectrometer of the present invention combines low mass-resolution ion mass spectrometry and beam-foil interaction technology to unambiguously detect and quantify deuterium (D), tritium (T), hydrogen molecule (H.sub.2, HD, D.sub.2, HT, DT, and T.sub.2), .sup.3 He, and .sup.4 He concentrations and concentration variations. The spectrometer provides real-time, high sensitivity, and high accuracy measurements. Currently, no fieldable D or molecular speciation detectors exist. Furthermore, the present spectrometer has a significant advantage over traditional T detectors: no confusion of the measurements by other beta-emitters, and complete separation of atomic and molecular species of equivalent atomic mass (e.g., HD and .sup.3 He).

Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM); McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Scime, Earl E. (Morgantown, WV)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Beam History  

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119

Mass Transport Properties of LiD-U Mixtures from Orbital Free Molecular Dynamics Simulations and a Pressure-Matching Mixing Rule  

SciTech Connect

Mass transport properties for LiD-U mixtures were calculated using a pressure matching mixture rule for the mixing of LiD and of U properties simulated with Orbital Free Molecular Dynamics (OFMD). The mixing rule was checked against benchmark OFMD simulations for the fully interacting three-component (Li, D, U) system. To obtain transport coefficients for LiD-U mixtures of different (LiD){sub x}U{sub (1-x)} compositions as functions of temperature and mixture density is a tedious task. Quantum molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can be employed, as in the case LiD or U. However, due to the presence of the heavy constituent U, such simulations proceed so slowly that only a limited number of numerical data points in the (x, {rho}, T) phase space can be obtained. To finesse this difficulty, transport coefficients for a mixture can be obtained using a pressure-matching mixing rule discussed. For both LiD and U, the corresponding transport coefficients were obtained earlier from quantum molecular dynamics simulations. In these simulations, the quantum behavior of the electrons was represented using an orbital free (OF) version of density functional theory, and ions were advanced in time using classical molecular dynamics. The total pressure of the system, P = nk{sub B}T/V + P{sub e}, is the sum of the ideal gas pressure of the ions plus the electron pressure. The mass self-diffusion coefficient for species {alpha}, D{sub {alpha}}, the mutual diffusion coefficient for species {alpha} and {beta}, D{alpha}{beta}, and the shear viscosity, {eta}, are computed from the appropriate autocorrelation function. The details of similar QMD calculations on LiH are described in Ref. [1] for 0.5 eV < T < 3 eV, and in Ref. [2] for 2 eV < T < 6 eV.

Burakovsky, Leonid [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kress, Joel D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Collins, Lee A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

LaAlO{sub 3}/Si capacitors: Comparison of different molecular beam deposition conditions and their impact on electrical properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of the structural and electrical properties of amorphous LaAlO{sub 3} (LAO)/Si thin films fabricated by molecular beam deposition (MBD) is presented. Two substrate preparation procedures have been explored namely a high temperature substrate preparation technique-leading to a step and terraces surface morphology-and a chemical HF-based surface cleaning. The LAO deposition conditions were improved by introducing atomic plasma-prepared oxygen instead of classical molecular O{sub 2} in the chamber. An Au/Ni stack was used as the top electrode for its electrical characteristics. The physico-chemical properties (surface topography, thickness homogeneity, LAO/Si interface quality) and electrical performance (capacitance and current versus voltage and TunA current topography) of the samples were systematically evaluated. Deposition conditions (substrate temperature of 550 Degree-Sign C, oxygen partial pressure settled at 10{sup -6} Torr, and 550 W of power applied to the O{sub 2} plasma) and post-depositions treatments were investigated to optimize the dielectric constant ({kappa}) and leakage currents density (J{sub Gate} at Double-Vertical-Line V{sub Gate} Double-Vertical-Line = Double-Vertical-Line V{sub FB}- 1 Double-Vertical-Line ). In the best reproducible conditions, we obtained a LAO/Si layer with a dielectric constant of 16, an equivalent oxide thickness of 8.7 A, and J{sub Gate} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -2}A/cm{sup 2}. This confirms the importance of LaAlO{sub 3} as an alternative high-{kappa} for ITRS sub-22 nm technology node.

Pelloquin, Sylvain; Baboux, Nicolas; Albertini, David; Hourani, Waeel; Plossu, Carole [Lyon Institute of Nanotechnologies (INL), INSA de Lyon, UMR CNRS 5270, 7 avenue Jean Capelle, Villeurbanne F-69621 (France); Saint-Girons, Guillaume; Penuelas, Jose; Grenet, Genevieve; Hollinger, Guy [Lyon Institute of Nanotechnologies (INL), Ecole Centrale de Lyon, UMR CNRS 5270, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, Ecully F-69134 (France)

2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

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121

Shape transitions and island nucleation for Si/Ge molecular beam epitaxy on stripe-patterned Si (001) substrate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Si and Ge growth on the stripe patterned Si (001) substrates is studied using scanning tunneling microscopy. During Si buffer growth, the stripe morphology rapidly evolves from multifaceted ''U'' to ''V''-shaped forms. This involves successive transitions between different low energy (11n) side facets, where n continuously decreases from n=3 to 20. Ge growth on such stripes induces the formation of a pronounced side wall ripple structure when the Ge thickness exceeds three monolayers. This ripple structure consists of alternating (105) microfacets oriented perpendicularly to the stripes. Depending of the side wall geometry, Ge nanoislands subsequently nucleate either on the side walls or at the bottom of grooves. The latter only occurs for ''V''-shaped stripes, where the side wall ripples extend all the way from the top to the bottom of the grooves, allowing efficient downward mass transport. For multifaceted ''U'' stripes, the side wall ripples are interrupted by steeper side wall segments such that mounds and subsequently, pyramids and domes grow on the side walls instead of at the bottom of the grooves. The island shapes strongly depend on their position on the pattern topography, which also affects the critical coverage for island nucleation as well as for the transition from pyramids to domes. The mechanisms for nucleation at different positions are clarified by detailed analysis and the role of kinetic as well as energetic factors identified.

Sanduijav, B.; Chen, G.; Springholz, G. [Institut fuer Halbleiter- und Festkoerperphysik, Johannes Kepler University, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Matei, D. [Institut fuer Halbleiter- und Festkoerperphysik, Johannes Kepler University, A-4040 Linz (Austria); National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, RO-077125 Bucharest (Romania)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Electric-dipole moment of CaF by molecular-beam, laser-rf, double-resonance study of Stark splittings  

SciTech Connect

The electronic structure of diatomic molecules is much more complex for open-shell sytems (radicals) than for the normal closed-shell systems, and the development of an adequate theoretical understanding will require a substantial upgrading of experimental knowledge in both quality and quantity. The alkaline-earth monohalide family of radicals, with only a single electron outside closed-shell cores, would appear to be a logical starting point for such studies, and there has been a great increase in work in this area in the last few years in spite of the special difficulties of working with free radicals. As the work of measuring the vibrational and rotational structure of the electronic states has become more complete, attention has turned to study of the much weaker spin-rotation and hyperfine interactions. Within the last three years, these interactions have been studied systematically at high precision in the calcium monohalide family with the molecular-beam, laser-rf double-resonance technique. The same method has now been modified and extended to make possible measurement of the electric-dipole moments of these molecules through observation of the Stark splittings of radiofrequency transitions. It is hoped that when considered together, the several types of data will make it possible to understand the ground-state electronic wave functions of these molecules at least qualitatively. 2 figures.

Childs, W.J.; Goodman, L.S.; Nielsen, U.; Pfeufer, V.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Indium and impurity incorporation in InGaN films on polar, nonpolar, and semipolar GaN orientations grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

The effects of NH{sub 3} flow, group III flux, and substrate growth temperature on indium incorporation and surface morphology have been investigated for bulk InGaN films grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy. The incorporation of unintentional impurity elements (H, C, O) in InGaN films was studied as a function of growth temperature for growth on polar (0001) GaN on sapphire templates, nonpolar (1010) bulk GaN, and semipolar (1122), (2021) bulk GaN substrates. Enhanced indium incorporation was observed on both (1010) and (2021) surfaces relative to c-plane, while reduced indium incorporation was observed on (1122) for co-loaded conditions. Indium incorporation was observed to increase with decreasing growth temperature for all planes, while being relatively unaffected by the group III flux rates for a 1:1 Ga:In ratio. Indium incorporation was found to increase at the expense of a decreased growth rate for higher ammonia flows; however, smooth surface morphology was consistently observed for growth on semipolar orientations. Increased concentrations of oxygen and hydrogen were observed on semipolar and nonpolar orientations with a clear trend of increased hydrogen incorporation with indium content.

Browne, David A.; Young, Erin C.; Lang, Jordan R.; Hurni, Christophe A.; Speck, James S. [Materials Department, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Optical, magnetic, and transport behaviors of Ge{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te ferromagnetic semiconductors grown by molecular-beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

The optical, magnetic, and transport behaviors of Ge{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te (x=0.24 and 0.55) grown by solid-source molecular-beam epitaxy are investigated. X-ray diffraction shows that Ge{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te crystallizes in rocksalt structure. The temperature-dependent magnetization (M-T) for x=0.55 sample gives a Curie paramagnetic temperature of {theta}{sub p}{approx}180 K, which is consistent with the temperature-dependent resistivity {rho}(T) measurement. Anomalous Hall effect is clearly observed in the samples and can be attributed to extrinsic skew scattering based on the scaling relationship of {rho}{sub xy}{proportional_to}{rho}{sub xx}{sup 1.06}. The magnetoresistance of Ge{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te is isotropic and displays a clear hysterestic loop at low temperature, which resembles that of giant-magnetoresistance granular system in solids.

Chen, W. Q.; Bi, J. F.; Teo, K. L.; Liew, T.; Chong, T. C. [Information Storage Materials Laboratory, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576, Singapore and Data Storage Institute, 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Lim, S. T.; Sim, C. H. [Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 28 Medical Drive, Singapore 117456 (Singapore)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Photoconduction efficiencies and dynamics in GaN nanowires grown by chemical vapor deposition and molecular beam epitaxy: A comparison study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The normalized gains, which determines the intrinsic photoconduction (PC) efficiencies, have been defined and compared for the gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires (NWs) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). By excluding the contributions of experimental parameters and under the same light intensity, the CVD-grown GaN NWs exhibit the normalized gain which is near two orders of magnitude higher than that of the MBE-ones. The temperature-dependent time-resolved photocurrent measurement further indicates that the higher photoconduction efficiency in the CVD-GaN NWs is originated from the longer carrier lifetime induced by the higher barrier height ({phi}{sub B} = 160 {+-} 30 mV) of surface band bending. In addition, the experimentally estimated barrier height at 20 {+-} 2 mV for the MBE-GaN NWs, which is much lower than the theoretical value, is inferred to be resulted from the lower density of charged surface states on the non-polar side walls.

Chen, R. S. [Graduate Institute of Applied Science and Technology, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Tsai, H. Y. [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Huang, Y. S. [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Chen, Y. T. [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, L. C. [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, K. H. [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

Strain relaxation in GaN/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N superlattices grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated the misfit relaxation process in GaN/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (x = 0.1, 0.3, 0.44) superlattices (SL) deposited by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The SLs under consideration were designed to achieve intersubband absorption in the mid-infrared spectral range. We have considered the case of growth on GaN (tensile stress) and on AlGaN (compressive stress) buffer layers, both deposited on GaN-on-sapphire templates. Using GaN buffer layers, the SL remains almost pseudomorphic for x = 0.1, 0.3, with edge-type threading dislocation densities below 9 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} to 2 x 10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}. Increasing the Al mole fraction to 0.44, we observe an enhancement of misfit relaxation resulting in dislocation densities above 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}. In the case of growth on AlGaN, strain relaxation is systematically stronger, with the corresponding increase in the dislocation density. In addition to the average relaxation trend of the SL, in situ measurements indicate a periodic fluctuation of the in-plane lattice parameter, which is explained by the different elastic response of the GaN and AlGaN surfaces to the Ga excess at the growth front. The results are compared with GaN/AlN SLs designed for near-infrared intersubband absorption.

Kotsar, Y.; Bellet-Amalric, E.; Das, A.; Monroy, E. [CEA-Grenoble, INAC/SP2M/NPSC, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Doisneau, B. [SIMaP, Grenoble INP, Domaine Universitaire, BP 75, 38402 Saint Martin d'Heres (France); Sarigiannidou, E. [LMGP, Grenoble INP, 3 Parvis Louis Neel, BP 257, 38016 Grenoble cedex 1 (France)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Molecular Foundry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

See the Foundry's full equipment list See the Foundry's full equipment list Nanofabrication Capabilities & Tools Major Capabilities: Instruments and Labs Zeiss Crossbeam 1540 EsB The Molecular Foundry Zeiss Cross-beam is one of the most versatile lithographic and inspection tools allowing fabrication of complex prototypes for nanoelectronics, nano-optical antenna, modifying scanning probe tips, rapid electrical contacting and many other applications. The 1500XB Cross Beam combines the Gemini field emission column (FESEM) with the Orsay Physics focused ion beam (FIB). In addition, the instrument offers a multi-channel gas injection system to allow ion and electron beam induced deposition (IBID and EBID) and chemically assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE). The tool can be used for lithographic patterning of materials or

128

The use of a high intensity neutrino beam from the ESS proton linac for measurement of neutrino CP violation and mass hierarchy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is proposed to complement the ESS proton linac with equipment that would enable the production, concurrently with the production of the planned ESS beam used for neutron production, of a 5 MW beam of 10$^{23}$ 2.5 GeV protons per year in microsecond short pulses to produce a neutrino Super Beam, and to install a megaton underground water Cherenkov detector in a mine to detect $\

E. Baussan; M. Dracos; T. Ekelof; E. Fernandez Martinez; H. Ohman; N. Vassilopoulos

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

129

Beam History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beam History Print Beamline History Request Form To request a beam current histograph from the ALS storage ring beam histograph database, select the year, month, and day, then...

130

Influence of V/III growth flux ratio on trap states in m-plane GaN grown by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and deep level optical spectroscopy (DLOS) were utilized to investigate the behavior of deep states in m-plane, n-type GaN grown by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy (NH{sub 3}-MBE) as a function of systematically varied V/III growth flux ratios. Levels were detected at E{sub C} - 0.14 eV, E{sub C} - 0.21 eV, E{sub C} - 0.26 eV, E{sub C} - 0.62 eV, E{sub C} - 0.67 eV, E{sub C} - 2.65 eV, and E{sub C} - 3.31 eV, with the concentrations of several traps exhibiting systematic dependencies on V/III ratio. The DLTS spectra are dominated by traps at E{sub C} - 0.14 eV and E{sub C} - 0.67 eV, whose concentrations decreased monotonically with increasing V/III ratio and decreasing oxygen impurity concentration, and by a trap at E{sub C} - 0.21 eV that revealed no dependence of its concentration on growth conditions, suggestive of different physical origins. Higher concentrations of deeper trap states detected by DLOS with activation energies of E{sub C} - 2.65 eV and E{sub C} - 3.31 eV in each sample did not display measureable sensitivity to the intentionally varied V/III ratio, necessitating further study on reducing these deep traps through growth optimization for maximizing material quality of NH{sub 3}-MBE grown m-plane GaN.

Zhang, Z.; Arehart, A. R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Hurni, C. A.; Speck, J. S. [Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States); Ringel, S. A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Institute for Materials Research, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

131

Structural, morphological, and magnetic characterization of In{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we present a method to order low temperature (LT) self-assembled ferromagnetic In{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As quantum dots (QDs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The ordered In{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As QDs were grown on top of a non-magnetic In{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}As/GaAs(100) QDs multi-layered structure. The modulation of the chemical potential, due to the stacking, provides a nucleation center for the LT In{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As QDs. For particular conditions, such as surface morphology and growth conditions, the In{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As QDs align along lines like chains. This work also reports the characterization of QDs grown on plain GaAs(100) substrates, as well as of the ordered structures, as function of Mn content and growth temperature. The substitutional Mn incorporation in the InAs lattice and the conditions for obtaining coherent and incoherent structures are discussed from comparison between Raman spectroscopy and x-ray analysis. Ferromagnetic behavior was observed for all structures at 2 K. We found that the magnetic moment axis changes from [110] in In{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As over GaAs to [1-10] for the ordered In{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As grown over GaAs template.

Ferri, F. A.; Marega, E. Jr. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos 13560-970, SP (Brazil); Coelho, L. N. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Brasilia, Brasilia 70919-970, DF (Brazil); Kunets, V. P.; Salamo, G. J. [Department of Physics, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Strain control of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structures on silicon (111) by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the use of plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy of AlGaN/GaN-based high electron mobility transistor structures grown on 4 in. Si (111) substrates. In situ measurements of wafer curvature during growth proved to be a very powerful method to analyze the buffer layer's thickness dependent strain. The Ga/N ratio at the beginning of growth of the GaN buffer layer is the critical parameter to control the compressive strain of the entire grown structure. An engineered amount of compressive strain must be designed into the structure to perfectly compensate for the tensile strain caused by differences in the thermal expansion coefficient between the epi-layer and substrate during sample cool down from growth temperatures. A maximum film thickness of 4.2 {mu}m was achieved without the formation of any cracks and a negligible bow of the wafers below 10 {mu}m. Measurement of the as-grown wafers revealed depth profiles of the charge carrier concentration comparable to values achieved on SiC substrates and mobility values of the two dimensional electron gas in the range 1230 to 1350 cm{sup 2}/Vs at a charge carrier concentration of 6.5-7 10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2}. First results on processed wafers with 2 {mu}m thick buffer layer indicate very promising results with a resistance of the buffer, measured on 200 {mu}m long contacts with 15 {mu}m pitch, in the range of R > 10{sup 9}{Omega} at 100 V and breakdown voltages up to 550 V.

Aidam, Rolf; Diwo, Elke; Rollbuehler, Nicola; Kirste, Lutz; Benkhelifa, Fouad [Fraunhofer-Institute for Applied Solid State Physics, Tullastrasse 72, 79108 Freiburg (Germany)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

High-energy accelerator for beams of heavy ions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for accelerating heavy ions to high energies and directing the accelerated ions at a target comprises a source of singly ionized heavy ions of an element or compound of greater than 100 atomic mass units, means for accelerating the heavy ions, a storage ring for accumulating the accelerated heavy ions and switching means for switching the heavy ions from the storage ring to strike a target substantially simultaneously from a plurality of directions. In a particular embodiment the heavy ion that is accelerated is singly ionized hydrogen iodide. After acceleration, if the beam is of molecular ions, the ions are dissociated to leave an accelerated singly ionized atomic ion in a beam. Extraction of the beam may be accomplished by stripping all the electrons from the atomic ion to switch the beam from the storage ring by bending it in magnetic field of the storage ring.

Martin, Ronald L. (La Grange, IL); Arnold, Richard C. (Chicago, IL)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

PHOTOELECTRON PHOTOION MOLECULAR BEAM SPECTROSCOPY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phase Experimental Station at SSRL A. B. C. D. Introductionmass spectrometer used at SSRL. The photon baam ia comingon the 8° (1-2) line at SSRL after passing through a 1500 A

Trevor, Dennis J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Molecular Foundry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

See the Foundry's full equipment list See the Foundry's full equipment list Organic and Macromolecular Synthesis Capabilities & Tools Major Instruments and Capabilities AB SCIEX TF4800 MALDI TOF-TOF Mass Spectrometer This instrument is the tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer systems, providing the excellent level of molecular mass coverage in the range of molecular masses 500 and 150,000 Da, high throughput, and confidence in both qualitative and quantitative analyses. The analyzer combines all of the advantages of MALDI in a flexible, easy-to-use, ultra-high-performance mass spectrometer with all the advanced capabilities of software. On-axis laser provides high sensitivity to identify and quantitate low-abundance compounds in complex samples. High-resolution precursor ion selection lets

136

Deep levels in a-plane, high Mg-content Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O epitaxial layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep level defects in n-type unintentionally doped a-plane Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O, grown by molecular beam epitaxy on r-plane sapphire were fully characterized using deep level optical spectroscopy (DLOS) and related methods. Four compositions of Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O were examined with x = 0.31, 0.44, 0.52, and 0.56 together with a control ZnO sample. DLOS measurements revealed the presence of five deep levels in each Mg-containing sample, having energy levels of E{sub c} - 1.4 eV, 2.1 eV, 2.6 V, and E{sub v} + 0.3 eV and 0.6 eV. For all Mg compositions, the activation energies of the first three states were constant with respect to the conduction band edge, whereas the latter two revealed constant activation energies with respect to the valence band edge. In contrast to the ternary materials, only three levels, at E{sub c} - 2.1 eV, E{sub v} + 0.3 eV, and 0.6 eV, were observed for the ZnO control sample in this systematically grown series of samples. Substantially higher concentrations of the deep levels at E{sub v} + 0.3 eV and E{sub c} - 2.1 eV were observed in ZnO compared to the Mg alloyed samples. Moreover, there is a general invariance of trap concentration of the E{sub v} + 0.3 eV and 0.6 eV levels on Mg content, while at least and order of magnitude dependency of the E{sub c} - 1.4 eV and E{sub c} - 2.6 eV levels in Mg alloyed samples.

Guer, Emre [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Atatuerk University, Erzurum 25240 (Turkey); 205 Dreese Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2015 Neil Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1272 (United States); Tabares, G.; Hierro, A. [Dpto. Ingenieria Electronica and ISOM, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Arehart, A.; Ringel, S. A. [205 Dreese Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, 2015 Neil Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1272 (United States); Chauveau, J. M. [CRHEA-CNRS, 06560 Valbonne (France); University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, ParcValrose, 06102 Nice Cedex 2 (France)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Molecular beam epitaxy growth of high quality p-doped SnS van der Waals epitaxy on a graphene buffer layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the systematic investigation of optoelectronic properties of tin (IV) sulfide (SnS) van der Waals epitaxies (vdWEs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) technique. Energy band simulation using commercial CASTEP code indicates that SnS has an indirect bandgap of size 0.982 eV. Furthermore, our simulation shows that elemental Cu can be used as a p-type dopant for the material. Growth of high quality SnS thin films is accomplished by MBE technique using graphene as the buffer layer. We observed significant reduction in the rocking curve FWHM over the existing published values. Crystallite size in the range of 2-3 {mu}m is observed which is also significantly better than the existing results. Measurement of the absorption coefficient, {alpha}, is performed using a Hitachi U-4100 Spectrophotometer system which demonstrate large values of {alpha} of the order of 10{sup 4} cm{sup -1}. Sharp cutoff in the values of {alpha}, as a function of energy, is observed for the films grown using a graphene buffer layer indicating low concentration of localized states in the bandgap. Cu-doping is achieved by co-evaporation technique. It is demonstrated that the hole concentration of the films can be controlled between 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} and 5 x 10{sup 17}cm{sup -3} by varying the temperature of the Cu K-cell. Hole mobility as high as 81 cm{sup 2}V{sup -1}s{sup -1} is observed for SnS films on graphene/GaAs(100) substrates. The improvements in the physical properties of the films are attributed to the unique layered structure and chemically saturated bonds at the surface for both SnS and the graphene buffer layer. Consequently, the interaction between the SnS thin films and the graphene buffer layer is dominated by van der Waals force and structural defects at the interface, such as dangling bonds or dislocations, are substantially reduced.

Wang, W.; Leung, K. K.; Fong, W. K.; Wang, S. F.; Surya, C. [Department of Electronic and Information Engineering and Photonics Research Centre, Hong Kong Polytechnic University (Hong Kong); Hui, Y. Y.; Lau, S. P. [Department of Applied Physics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University (Hong Kong); Chen, Z.; Shi, L. J.; Cao, C. B. [Research Center of Materials Science, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Heat and mass transfer in a gas in a capillary induced by light with nonuniform intensity distribution over the beam cross section  

SciTech Connect

An analysis is presented of the heat and drift fluxes induced by velocity-selective light absorption in a single-component gas in a capillary tube. The light intensity distribution across the beam is assumed to have a Gaussian profile. Kinetic equations are solved numerically to calculate flux profiles and kinetic coefficients quantifying the contributions of surface and collisional mechanisms to light-induced transfer as functions of the Knudsen number, the ratio of the rate of radiative decay of the exited level and intermolecular collision frequency, accommodation coefficient, and the ratio of the tube radius to the light beam radius.

Chernyak, V. G., E-mail: vladimir.chernyak@usu.ru; Polikarpov, A. P., E-mail: alexey.polikarpov@usu.ru [Ural State University (Russian Federation)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Hyperfine structure of the X /sup 2/. sigma. /sup +/ ground state of Ca /sup 35/Cl and Ca /sup 37/Cl by molecular-beam, laser-rf double resonance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hyperfine structure of the X /sup 2/..sigma../sup +/ state of Ca /sup 35/Cl and Ca /sup 37/Cl, unresolved in previous studies, has been investigated in detail by the molecular-beam, laser-rf, double-resonance technique. Results for the spin-rotation interaction and the dipole and quadrupole hfs constants are given in the form of Dunham coefficients so that the N'' and v'' dependence of each constant can be explicitly exhibited. The results, after dividing out the purely nuclear effects, fall between the corresponding values for CaF and CaBr, as expected.

Childs, W.J.; Cok, D.R.; Goodman, L.S.

1982-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Coincidence Measurements of Core-Excited Molecules and Clusters Using TOF Fragment-Mass Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

In order to investigate photo-induced processes and dynamics of photochemical reactions involving molecular complexes and clusters in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray region, a cluster beam-photoreactive scattering apparatus has been designed and constructed at the HiSOR facility in Hiroshima University. The apparatus has a basic arrangement of a cluster beam source and a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer, where it was designed to give strong cluster beam intensity enough to perform a variety of photoelectron and photoion coincidence measurements. Here, we present spectroscopic and coincidence measurements of the photo-induced processes of atomic and molecular clusters in the soft X-ray region to make a fundamental assessment for the present cluster beam-photoreactive scattering apparatus.

Tabayashi, Kiyohiko [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center (HSRC), Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan); Maruyama, Tomoe [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Tanaka, Kenichiro; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki [Department of Physical Science, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center (HSRC), Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan)

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Investigation of the effect of intra-molecular interactions on the gas-phase conformation of peptides as probed by ion mobility-mass spectrometry, gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and molecular mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange ion molecule reactions and molecular modeling provide complimentary information and are used here for the characterization of peptide ion structure, including fine structure detail (i.e., cation-? interactions, ?-turns, and charge solvation interactions). IM-MS experiments performed on tyrosine containing tripeptides show that the collision cross-sections of sodiated, potassiated and doubly sodiated species of gly-gly-tyr are smaller than that of the protonated species, while the cesiated and doubly cesiated species are larger. Conversely, all of the alkali-adducted species of try-gly-gly have collision cross-sections that are larger than that of the protonated species. The protonated and alkali metal ion adducted (Na+, K+ and Cs+) species of bradykinin and bradykinin fragments 1-5, 1-6, 1-7, 1-8, 2-7, 5-9 and 2-9 were also studied using IM-MS and the alkali metal ion adducts of these species were found to have cross-sections very close to those of the protonated species. Additionally, multiple peak features observed in the ATDs of protonated bradykinin fragments 1-5, 1-6 and 1-7 are conserved upon alkali metal ion adduction. It was observed from gas-phase H/D ion molecule reactions that alkali adducted species exchange slower and to a lesser extent than protonated species in the tyrosine- and arginine-containing peptides. Experimental and computational results are discussed in terms of peptide ion structure, specifically the intra-molecular interactions present how those interactions change upon alkali salt adduction, as well as with the sequence of the peptide. Additionally, IM-MS data suggests the presence of a compact conformation of bradykinin fragment 1-5 (RPPGF) when starting from organic solvent conditions. As water is added stepwise to methanolic solutions, a more extended conformation is populated. When the starting solution is composed of ?90% water, two distinct mobility profiles are observed as well as a shoulder, indicating the presence of three gas-phase conformations for RPPGF. Gas-phase H/D exchange of [M+H]+ ions prepared from aqueous solvents show a bi-exponential decay, whereas samples prepared from organic solvents show a single exponential decay. The effect of solvent on gas-phase peptide ion structure, i.e., solution-phase memory effects, is discussed and gas-phase structures are compared to know solution-phase structures.

Sawyer, Holly Ann

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Airfoil sampling of a pulsed Laval beam with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry: Application to low--temperature kinetics and product detection  

SciTech Connect

A new pulsed Laval nozzle apparatus with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron photoionization quadrupole mass spectrometry is constructed to study low-temperature radicalneutralchemical reactions of importance for modeling the atmosphere of Titan and the outer planets. A design for the sampling geometry of a pulsed Laval nozzle expansion has beendeveloped that operates successfully for the determination of rate coefficients by time-resolved mass spectrometry. The new concept employs airfoil sampling of the collimated expansion withexcellent sampling throughput. Time-resolved profiles of the high Mach number gas flow obtained by photoionization signals show that perturbation of the collimated expansion by theairfoil is negligible. The reaction of C2H with C2H2 is studied at 70 K as a proof-of-principle result for both low-temperature rate coefficient measurements and product identification basedon the photoionization spectrum of the reaction product versus VUV photon energy. This approach can be used to provide new insights into reaction mechanisms occurring at kinetic ratesclose to the collision-determined limit.

Soorkia, Satchin; Liu, Chen-Lin; Savee, John D.; Ferrell, Sarah J.; Leone, Stephen R.; Wilson, Kevin R.

2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

143

Optical properties of a-plane (Al, Ga)N/GaN multiple quantum wells grown on strain engineered Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O layers by molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonpolar (1120) Al{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (1120) Zn{sub 0.74}Mg{sub 0.26}O templates on r-plane sapphire substrates. The quantum wells exhibit well-resolved photoluminescence peaks in the ultra-violet region, and no sign of quantum confined Stark effect is observed in the complete multiple quantum well series. The results agree well with flat band quantum well calculations. Furthermore, we show that the MQW structures are strongly polarized along the [0001] direction. The origin of the polarization is discussed in terms of the strain anisotropy dependence of the exciton optical oscillator strengths.

Xia, Y.; Vinter, B.; Chauveau, J.-M. [CRHEA-CNRS, Rue Bernard Gregory, 06560 Valbonne (France); University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, 06103 Nice (France); Brault, J.; Nemoz, M.; Teisseire, M.; Leroux, M. [CRHEA-CNRS, Rue Bernard Gregory, 06560 Valbonne (France)

2011-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

144

High quality ultrathin Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} films on CaF{sub 2} and CaF{sub 2}/Si by molecular beam epitaxy with a radio frequency cracker cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report a method to fabricate high quality Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} thin films using molecular beam epitaxy with a radio frequency cracker cell as an atomic selenium source. With Se-to-Bi ratios close to exact stoichiometry, optimal layer-by-layer growth of high quality Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} thin films with smooth surfaces has been achieved on CaF{sub 2}(111) substrates and Si(111) substrates with a thin epitaxial CaF{sub 2} buffer layer (CaF{sub 2}/Si). Transport measurements show a characteristic weak-antilocalization magnetoresistance in all the films, with the emergence of a weak-localization contribution in the ultrathin film limit. Quantum oscillations, attributed to the topological surface states have been observed, including in films grown on CaF{sub 2}/Si.

Zhang Li; Dolev, Merav [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Hammond, Robert [Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Liu Min [Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Palevski, Alexander [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Kapitulnik, Aharon [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

145

X-ray magnetic circular dichroism of ferromagnetic Co{sub 4}N epitaxial films on SrTiO{sub 3}(001) substrates grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

5-nm thick Co{sub 4}N layers capped with 3-nm thick Au layers were grown epitaxially on SrTiO{sub 3}(001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy using solid Co and a radio-frequency NH{sub 3} plasma. Spin and orbital magnetic moments of the Co{sub 4}N layers were estimated using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements at 300 K. The site-averaged Co 3d spin magnetic moment is evaluated to be about 1.4 {mu}{sub B}, which is smaller than that predicted theoretically (1.58 {mu}{sub B}). The element-specific XMCD intensities for the Co L{sub 3} edge and N K edge show that the magnetic moment is induced at the N atoms.

Ito, Keita; Harada, Kazunori; Toko, Kaoru; Suemasu, Takashi [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Ye, Mao; Kimura, Akio [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Takeda, Yukiharu; Saitoh, Yuji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Akinaga, Hiro [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan)

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

146

Two-dimensional weak anti-localization in Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film grown on Si(111)-(7 Multiplication-Sign 7) surface by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

We report on low temperature transport studies of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} topological insulator thin films grown on Si(111)-(7 Multiplication-Sign 7) surface by molecular beam epitaxy. A sharp increase in the magnetoresistance with magnetic field at low temperature indicates the existence of weak anti-localization. The measured weak anti-localization effect agrees well with the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka model, and the extracted phase coherence length shows a power-law dependence with temperature indicating the existence of a two-dimensional system. An insulating ground state has also been observed at low temperature showing a logarithmic divergence of the resistance that appears to be the influence of electron-electron interaction in a two-dimensional system.

Roy, Anupam; Guchhait, Samaresh; Sonde, Sushant; Dey, Rik; Pramanik, Tanmoy; Rai, Amritesh; Movva, Hema C. P.; Banerjee, Sanjay K. [Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States)] [Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States); Colombo, Luigi [Texas Instruments, 12500 TI Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75266 (United States)] [Texas Instruments, 12500 TI Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75266 (United States)

2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

147

Growth study of nonpolar Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O epitaxial films on a-plane bulk ZnO by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonpolar Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O epitaxial films were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on a-plane ZnO substrates. A smooth surface morphology was accomplished under oxygen-rich growth conditions. The benefits of the use of ZnO substrates on the structural properties are reflected by a low-density of threading dislocations. Furthermore, no indications for the generation of basal plane stacking faults are found. The pseudomorphic growth on a-plane ZnO substrates efficiently locks the epitaxial Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O films to the wurtzite structure up to x = 0.25. The Mg concentration is not constant and increases with larger thickness. The optical properties reflect the influence of alloy disorder.

Laumer, Bernhard [Walter Schottky Institut and Physics Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 4, 85748 Garching (Germany); I. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Schuster, Fabian; Stutzmann, Martin [Walter Schottky Institut and Physics Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 4, 85748 Garching (Germany); Bergmaier, Andreas; Dollinger, Guenther [Universitaet der Bundeswehr Muenchen, Fakultaet fuer Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Vogel, Stephen; Gries, Katharina I.; Volz, Kerstin [Philipps-Universitaet, Material Sciences Center-Structure and Technology Research Laboratory and Faculty of Physics, Hans-Meerwein-Strasse, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Eickhoff, Martin [I. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, 35392 Giessen (Germany)

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

148

Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 Topological Insulators on GaAs (111) Substrates: A Potential Route to Fabricate Topological Insulator p-n Junction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High quality Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 topological insulators films were epitaxially grown on GaAs (111) substrate using solid source molecular beam epitaxy. Their growth and behavior on both vicinal and non-vicinal GaAs (111) substrates were investigated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is found that non-vicinal GaAs (111) substrate is better than a vicinal substrate to provide high quality Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 films. Hall and magnetoresistance measurements indicate that p type Sb2Te3 and n type Bi2Te3 topological insulator films can be directly grown on a GaAs (111) substrate, which may pave a way to fabricate topological insulator p-n junction on the same substrate, compatible with the fabrication process of present semiconductor optoelectronic devices.

Zhaoquan Zeng; Timothy A. Morgan; Dongsheng Fan; Chen Li; Yusuke Hirono; Xian Hu; Yanfei Zhao; Joon Sue Lee; Zhiming M. Wang; Jian Wang; Shuiqing Yu; Michael E. Hawkridge; Mourad Benamara; Gregory J. Salamo

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

149

Application of hydrogenation to low-temperature cleaning of the Si(001) surface in the processes of molecular-beam epitaxy: Investigation by scanning tunneling microscopy, reflected high-energy electron diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural properties of the clean Si(001) surface obtained as a result of low-temperature (470-650 Degree-Sign C) pre-growth annealings of silicon wafers in a molecular-beam epitaxy chamber have been investigated. To decrease the cleaning temperature, a silicon surface was hydrogenated in the process of a preliminary chemical treatment in HF and NH{sub 4}F aqueous solutions. It has been shown that smooth surfaces composed of wide terraces separated by monoatomic steps can be obtained by dehydrogenation at the temperatures Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 600 Degree-Sign C, whereas clean surfaces obtained at the temperatures clean surfaces on the temperature of hydrogen thermal desorption and the process of the preliminary chemical treatment. The frequency of detachment/attachment of Si dimers from/to the steps and effect of the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier on ad-dimer migration across steps have been found to be the most probable factors determining a degree of the resultant surface roughness.

Arapkina, L. V.; Krylova, L. A.; Chizh, K. V.; Chapnin, V. A.; Uvarov, O. V.; Yuryev, V. A. [A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Molecular beam epitaxial growth of metamorphic AlInSb/GaInSb high-electron-mobility-transistor structures on GaAs substrates for low power and high frequency applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on molecular beam epitaxial growth of AlInSb/GaInSb metamorphic high-electron-mobility-transistor structures for low power, high frequency applications on 4 in. GaAs substrates. The structures consist of a Ga{sub 0.4}In{sub 0.6}Sb channel embedded in Al{sub 0.4}In{sub 0.6}Sb barrier layers which are grown on top of an insulating metamorphic buffer, which is based on the linear exchange of Ga versus In and a subsequent exchange of As versus Sb. Precise control of group V fluxes and substrate temperature in the Al{sub 0.4}In{sub 0.6}As{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} buffer is essential to achieve high quality device structures. Good morphological properties were achieved demonstrated by the appearance of crosshatching and root mean square roughness values of 2.0 nm. Buffer isolation is found to be >100 k{Omega}/{open_square} for optimized growth conditions. Hall measurements at room temperature reveal electron densities of 2.8x10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} in the channel at mobility values of 21.000 cm{sup 2}/V s for single-sided Te volume doping and 5.4x10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} and 17.000 cm{sup 2}/V s for double-sided Te {delta}-doping, respectively.

Loesch, R.; Aidam, R.; Kirste, L.; Leuther, A. [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid-State Physics (IAF), Tullastrasse 72, 79108 Freiburg (Germany)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Method of deposition by molecular beam epitaxy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for reproducibly controlling layer thickness and varying layer composition in an MBE deposition process. In particular, the present invention includes epitaxially depositing a plurality of layers of material on a substrate with a plurality of growth cycles whereby the average of the instantaneous growth rates for each growth cycle and from one growth cycle to the next remains substantially constant as a function of time.

Chalmers, Scott A. (Albuquerque, NM); Killeen, Kevin P. (Albuquerque, NM); Lear, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Ion optical design of a collinear laser-negative ion beam apparatus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An apparatus for photodetachment studies on atomic and molecular negative ions of medium up to heavy mass (M {approx_equal} 500) has been designed and constructed. Laser and ion beams are merged in the apparatus in a collinear geometry and atoms, neutral molecules and negative ions are detected in the forward direction. The ion optical design and the components used to optimize the mass resolution and the transmission through the extended field-free interaction region are described. A 90 deg. sector field magnet with 50 cm bending radius in combination with two slits is used for mass dispersion providing a resolution of M/{Delta}M congruent with 800 for molecular ions and M/{Delta}M congruent with 400 for atomic ions. The difference in mass resolution for atomic and molecular ions is attributed to different energy distributions of the sputtered ions. With 1 mm slits, transmission from the source through the interaction region to the final ion detector was determined to be about 0.14%.

Diehl, C.; Wendt, K. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Lindahl, A. O.; Andersson, P.; Hanstorp, D. [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

BEAM LINE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BEAM LINE BEAM LINE 45 W ILHELM ROENTGEN'S INITIAL DISCOVERY of X-radiation in 1895 led immediately to practical applications in medicine. Over the next few decades X rays proved to be an invaluable tool for the investigation of the micro-world of the atom and the development of the quantum theory of matter. Almost a century later, telescopes designed to detect X-radiation are indispensable for understanding the structure and evolution of the macro-world of stars, galaxies, and the Universe as a whole. The X-Ray Universe by WALLACE H. TUCKER X-ray images of the Universe are strikingly different from the usual visible-light images. 46 SUMMER 1995 did not think: I investigated." Undeterred by NASA's rejection of a proposal to search for cosmic X-radiation, Giacconi persuaded the

154

Accelerator beam profile analyzer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A beam profile analyzer employing sector or quadrant plates each servo controlled to outline the edge of a beam.

Godel, Julius B. (Bayport, NY); Guillaume, Marcel (Grivegnee, BE); Lambrecht, Richard M. (East Quogue, NY); Withnell, Ronald (East Setauket, NY)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Proposal of physics with exotic beams at Oak Ridge  

SciTech Connect

A facility to produce proton-rich radioactive beams for nuclear structure and astrophysics experiments is proposed. This Oak Ridge Exotic Beam (OREB) facility is based on two existing accelerators. Beams of mass up to 80 can be accelerated to energies of about 5 MeV/nucleon. It will provide opportunities to study new areas in nuclear physics and astrophysics that are not available with the use of stable beams. 3 figs.

Lee, I-Yang.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

3D Molecular Bioimaging Mass Spectrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ion images as a function of increasing depth during dynamic SIMS sputtering of ... used which in turn allows for higher sputtering rates, faster analysis ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

157

Negative mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some physical aspects of negative mass are examined. Several unusual properties, such as the ability of negative mass to penetrate any armor, are analyzed. Other surprising effects include the bizarre system of negative mass chasing positive pass, naked singularities and the violation of cosmic censorship, wormholes, and quantum mechanical results as well. In addition, a brief look into the implications for strings is given.

Richard T Hammond

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

158

Simple beam profile monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An inexpensive beam profile monitor is based on the well proven rotating wire method. The monitor can display beam position and shape in real time for particle beams of most energies and beam currents up to 200{mu}A. Beam shape, position cross-section and other parameters are displayed on a computer screen.

Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B. [ASD Inc. Garden Bay, BC (Canada); Best Theratronics Ltd Ottawa Ontario (Canada); PharmaSpect Ltd., Burnaby BC (Canada)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

159

Dc slice imaging, crossed beam reaction of chlorine radical with butane.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? We present an investigation of the reaction dynamics of Cl radicals with Butane using crossed molecular beams, at two collision energies: ~ 6.5 and… (more)

Abdul ghani, Tarek Oussama

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Relativistic electron beam generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

1975-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

NK Muon Beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NK Muon Beam will be a modified version of the existing NT beam line. The decision to employ a modified version of the NT beam line was made based on considerations of cost and availability of the beam line. Preliminary studies considered use of other beam lines, e.g., the NW beam line, and even of moving the bubble chamber with its superconducting coils but were rejected for reasons such as cost, personnel limitations, and potential conflicts with other users.

Koizumi, G.

1988-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

162

Magnetismo Molecular (Molecular Magentism)  

SciTech Connect

The new synthesis processes in chemistry open a new world of research, new and surprising materials never before found in nature can now be synthesized and, as a wonderful result, observed a series of physical phenomena never before imagined. Among these are many new materials the molecular magnets, the subject of this book and magnetic properties that are often reflections of the quantum behavior of these materials. Aside from the wonderful experience of exploring something new, the theoretical models that describe the behavior these magnetic materials are, in most cases, soluble analytically, which allows us to know in detail the physical mechanisms governing these materials. Still, the academic interest in parallel this subject, these materials have a number of properties that are promising to be used in technological devices, such as in computers quantum magnetic recording, magnetocaloric effect, spintronics and many other devices. This volume will journey through the world of molecular magnets, from the structural description of these materials to state of the art research.

Reis, Mario S [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brasil; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F [ORNL

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Power beaming: Mission enabling for lunar exploration  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores several beam power concepts proposed for powering either lunar base or rover vehicles. At present, power requirements to support lunar exploration activity are met by integral self-contained power system designs. To provide requisite energy flexibility for human expansion into space, an innovative approach to replace on-board self-contained power systems is needed. Power beaming provides an alternative approach to supplying power that would ensure increased mission flexibility while reducing total mass launched into space. Providing power to the moon presents significant design challenges because of the duration of the lunar night. Power beaming provides an alternative to solar photovoltaic systems coupled with battery storage, radioisotope thermoelectric generation, and surface nuclear power. The Synthesis Group describes power beaming as a technology supporting lunar exploration. In this analysis beam power designs are compared to conventional power generation methods.

Bamberger, J.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Mass Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST maintains the national standard for mass in the form of the prototype kilogram (K20) and provides services to support the parts of the national ...

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

165

fehlende Masse  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

beim radioaktiven Zerfall mit der fehlenden Masse?" Zur Erinnerung: wenn Uran in Thorium und ein alpha Teilchen zerfllt, dann gehen 0.0046 u (Masseneinheiten) der...

166

Molecular Foundry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The People of the Molecular Foundry In addition to state-of-the-art instrumentation, Users at the Molecular Foundry benefit from the unique in-house expertise of its researchers....

167

Beam instrumentation for an ISOL test stand  

SciTech Connect

TRIUMF is constructing a test bed for the first stages of the proposed TISAC accelerated radioactive beam facility. The authors will present the requirements for the diagnostic system for this test stand and describe the design and development work underway. Scintillators, beamstops and a Faraday Cup have been tested using stable, mass analyzed, 12 keV beams of ions from mass 14 to 132. The design of a linear drive, with 10 {micro}m resolution, for scanning wires and slits has begun.

Mackenzie, G.H.; Dombsky, M.; Rawnsley, W.; Stanford, G.; Yin, Y. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Novikov, A. [INR, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

SUMMARY OF BEAM BEAM OBSERVATIONS DURING STORES IN RHIC.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During stores, the beam-beam interaction has a significant impact on the beam and luminosity lifetimes in RHIC. This was observed in heavy ion, and even more pronounced in proton collisions. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. In addition, RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. Coherent beam-beam modes were observed, and suppressed by tune changes. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made during stores so far.

FISCHER,W.

2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

169

Molecular Foundry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Molecular Foundry The Molecular Foundry Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Road Building 67 Berkeley, CA 94720 Screen reader users: click here for plain HTML Go to Google Maps Home Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, CA Loading... Map Sat Ter Did you mean a different: Did you mean a different: Did you mean a different: Add Destination - Show options Hide options Get Directions Note: Public transit coverage may not be available in this area. Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, CA A Molecular Foundry 67 Cyclotron Rd, Berkeley, CA ‎ foundry.lbl.gov 3 reviews · "Berkeley Lab. About the Foundry. What is the Molecular Foundry? Research Themes; Foundry Careers; Media Gallery; Other User Facilities external link; Contact Us" - lbl.gov Directions Search nearby more See all 14 results for Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, CA

170

$\\{Q\\bar{q}\\}\\{\\bar{Q}^{(')}q\\}$ molecular states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Masses for $\\{Q\\bar{q}\\}\\{\\bar{Q}^{(')}q\\}$ molecular states are systematically studied in QCD sum rules. The interpolating currents representing the related molecular states are proposed. Technically, contributions of the operators up to dimension six are included in operator product expansion (OPE). Mass spectra for molecular states with $\\{Q\\bar{q}\\}\\{\\bar{Q}^{(')}q\\}$ configurations are obtained.

Zhang, Jian-Rong

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Tevatron beam-beam compensation project progress  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we report the progress of the Tevatron Beam-Beam Compensation (BBC) project [1]. Electron beam induced proton and antiproton tuneshifts have been reported in [2], suppression of an antiproton emittance growth has been observed, too [1]. Currently, the first electron lens (TEL1) is in operational use as the Tevatron DC beam cleaner. We have made a lot of the upgrades to improve its stability [3]. The 2nd Tevatron electron lens (TEL2) is under the final phase of development and preparation for installation in the Tevatron.

Shiltsev, V.; Zhang, X.L.; Kuznetsov, G.; Pfeffer, H.; Saewert, G.; /Fermilab; Zimmermann, F.; /CERN; Tiunov, M.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Bishofberger, K.; /UCLA; Bogdanov, I.; Kashtanov, E.; Kozub, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tkachenko, L.; /Serpukhov, IHEP

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

ION BEAM COLLIMATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for defining a beam of high energy particles wherein the means for defining the beam in the horizontal and vertical dimension are separately adjustable and the defining members are internally cooled. In general, the device comprises a mounting block having a central opening through which the beam is projected, means for rotatably supporting two pairs of beam- forming members, passages in each member for the flow of coolant; the beam- forming members being insulated from each other and the block, and each having an end projecting into the opening. The beam-forming members are adjustable and may be cooperatively positioned to define the beam passing between the end of the members. To assist in projecting and defining the beam, the member ends have individual means connected thereto for indicating the amount of charge collected thereon due to beam interception.

Langsdorf, A.S. Jr.

1957-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

173

High brilliance negative ion and neutral beam source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high brilliance mass selected (Z-selected) negative ion and neutral beam source having good energy resolution. The source is based upon laser resonance ionization of atoms or molecules in a small gaseous medium followed by charge exchange through an alkali oven. The source is capable of producing microampere beams of an extremely wide variety of negative ions, and milliampere beams when operated in the pulsed mode.

Compton, R.N.

1990-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

174

Beam position monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for determining the position of an x-ray beam relative to a desired beam axis where the apparatus is positioned along the beam path so that a thin metal foil target intersects the x-ray beam generating fluorescent radiation. A PIN diode array is positioned so that a portion of the fluorescent radiation is intercepted by the array resulting in a series of electrical signals from the PIN diodes making up the array. The signals are then analyzed and the position of the x-ray beam is determined relative to the desired beam path.

Alkire, Randy W.; Rosenbaum, Gerold; Evans, Gwyndaf

2000-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

175

Molecular Foundry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEMINARS ARCHIVE The Molecular Foundry regularly offers seminars and events that feature compelling research and information for those who investigate at the nanoscale. Seminars...

176

Molecular Foundry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EVENTS ARCHIVE The Molecular Foundry regularly offers seminars and events that feature compelling research and information for those who investigate at the nanoscale. Seminars...

177

Molecular Foundry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

efficient energy storage and conversion. Electron donors and acceptors at interfaces Molecular level design and synthesis has created tailor-made electron donors and acceptors...

178

Molecular Foundry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Careers Information about current openings at the Molecular Foundry and complete application information is available from LBNL Human Resources. Please follow the application...

179

Molecular Foundry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Future, Atom by Atom Organized into six interdependent research Facilities, The Molecular Foundry, along with Berkeley Lab's additional User programs and affiliated research...

180

Molecular Foundry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sign-Up (Resource Database) Weekly Seminars Users' Executive Committee (UEC) The Molecular Foundry Users' Association is composed of all Foundry Users. Upon beginning work on...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Molecular Foundry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Code of Conduct Conflict Resolution Beginning your project Access to the Molecular Foundry is free of charge for approved, non-proprietary research. (Proprietary...

182

Molecular Foundry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEMINARS The Molecular Foundry regularly offers seminars and events that feature compelling research and information for those who investigate at the nanoscale. Seminars occur on...

183

HERSCHEL MEASUREMENTS OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN IN ORION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report observations of three rotational transitions of molecular oxygen (O{sub 2}) in emission from the H{sub 2} Peak 1 position of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen in Orion. We observed the 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz lines using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared on the Herschel Space Observatory, having velocities of 11 km s{sup -1} to 12 km s{sup -1} and widths of 3 km s{sup -1}. The beam-averaged column density is N(O{sub 2}) = 6.5 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, and assuming that the source has an equal beam-filling factor for all transitions (beam widths 44, 28, and 19''), the relative line intensities imply a kinetic temperature between 65 K and 120 K. The fractional abundance of O{sub 2} relative to H{sub 2} is (0.3-7.3) x 10{sup -6}. The unusual velocity suggests an association with a {approx}5'' diameter source, denoted Peak A, the Western Clump, or MF4. The mass of this source is {approx}10 M{sub sun} and the dust temperature is {>=}150 K. Our preferred explanation of the enhanced O{sub 2} abundance is that dust grains in this region are sufficiently warm (T {>=} 100 K) to desorb water ice and thus keep a significant fraction of elemental oxygen in the gas phase, with a significant fraction as O{sub 2}. For this small source, the line ratios require a temperature {>=}180 K. The inferred O{sub 2} column density {approx_equal}5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} can be produced in Peak A, having N(H{sub 2}) {approx_equal} 4 x 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}. An alternative mechanism is a low-velocity (10-15 km s{sup -1}) C-shock, which can produce N(O{sub 2}) up to 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}.

Goldsmith, Paul F.; Chen, Jo-Hsin; Li Di [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Liseau, Rene; Black, John H. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 92 Onsala (Sweden); Bell, Tom A. [Centro de Astrobiologia, CSIC-INTA, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Hollenbach, David [SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Kaufman, Michael J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Lis, Dariusz C. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Melnick, Gary [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 66, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Neufeld, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Pagani, Laurent; Encrenaz, Pierre [LERMA and UMR8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, 61 Av. de l'Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France); Snell, Ronald [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Benz, Arnold O.; Bruderer, Simon [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Bergin, Edwin [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Caselli, Paola [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Caux, Emmanuel [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Falgarone, Edith, E-mail: Paul.F.Goldsmith@jpl.nasa.gov [LRA/LERMA, CNRS, UMR8112, Observatoire de Paris and Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

2011-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

184

Molecular Dynamics Method in Microscale Heat Transfer Shigeo Maruyama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Molecular Dynamics Method in Microscale Heat Transfer Shigeo Maruyama Department of Mechanical://www.photon.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp/~maruyama/ 1. INTRODUCTION Molecular level understandings are becoming more important and molecular based to take account of nuclei in size of molecular clusters. The effect of the surfactant on the heat and mass

Maruyama, Shigeo

185

Erosion of a-C:D Thin Films by Low Energy D+, D2+, and D3+ Ion Beam Irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report measurements of total C sputtering yields for room temperature a-C:D thin films irrradiated by equal velocity D{sup +}, D{sub 2}{sup +}, and D{sub 3}{sup +} beams in the energy range 30-200 eV/D. The C sputtering yields were deduced from crater volumes determined from 2-D ellipsometry scans, the known thin film C density, and the measured total number of incident D particles during the beam exposures. While our results for incident D{sub 3}{sup +} ions are in good agreement with mass loss measurements for D{sub 3}{sup +}, our results for D{sub 2}{sup +} and D{sup +} incident ions fall systematically below the D{sub 3}{sup +} results, indicating a significant molecular size effect. A molecular size effect has been previously found for CD{sub 4} production during low energy impact of same velocity D{sup +}, D{sub 2}{sup +}, and D{sub 3}{sup +} ions incident on ATJ graphite, which, however, was smaller in magnitude. The ellipsometry-based total C sputtering yields are compared with recently deduced total C production yields based on a mass spectroscopy approach.

Meyer, Fred W [ORNL; Harris, Peter R [ORNL; Zhang, Hengda [ORNL; Jacob, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching, Germany; Schwarz-Selinger, T. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching, Germany; Von Toussaint, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching, Germany

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Beam injection into RHIC  

SciTech Connect

During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Electron beam device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent pertains to an electron beam device in which a hollow target is symmetrically irradiated by a high energy, pulsed electron beam about its periphery and wherein the outer portion of the target has a thickness slightly greater than required to absorb the electron beam pulse energy. (auth)

Beckner, E.H.; Clauser, M.J.

1975-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

188

Noise reduction in negative-ion quadrupole mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) system having an ion source, quadrupole mass filter, and ion collector/recorder system. A weak, transverse magnetic field and an electron collector are disposed between the quadrupole and ion collector. When operated in negative ion mode, the ion source produces a beam of primarily negatively-charged particles from a sample, including electrons as well as ions. The beam passes through the quadrupole and enters the magnetic field, where the electrons are deflected away from the beam path to the electron collector. The negative ions pass undeflected to the ion collector where they are detected and recorded as a mass spectrum.

Chastagner, P.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

BEAM CONTROL PROBE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A probe is described for intercepting a desired portion of a beam of charged particles and for indicating the spatial disposition of the beam. The disclosed probe assembly includes a pair of pivotally mounted vanes moveable into a single plane with adjacent edges joining and a calibrated mechanical arrangement for pivoting the vancs apart. When the probe is disposed in the path of a charged particle beam, the vanes may be adjusted according to the beam current received in each vane to ascertain the dimension of the beam.

Chesterman, A.W.

1959-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

190

EUROv Super Beam Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutrino Super Beams use conventional techniques to significantly increase the neutrino beam intensity compared to the present neutrino facilities. An essential part of these facilities is an intense proton driver producing a beam power higher than a MW. The protons hit a target able to accept the high proton beam intensity. The produced charged particles are focused by a system of magnetic horns towards the experiment detectors. The main challenge of these projects is to deal with the high beam intensity for many years. New high power neutrino facilities could be build at CERN profiting from an eventual construction of a high power proton driver. The European FP7 Design Study EUROv, among other neutrino beams, studies this Super Beam possibility. This paper will give the latest developments in this direction.

Dracos, Marcos [IPHC, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3, F-67037 Strasbourg (France)

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

191

Molecular nanocomposites.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of this project are to understand the fundamental principles that govern the formation and function of novel nanoscale and nanocomposite materials. Specific scientific issues being addressed include: design and synthesis of complex molecular precursors with controlled architectures, controlled synthesis of nanoclusters and nanoparticles, development of robust two or three-dimensionally ordered nanocomposite materials with integrated functionalities that can respond to internal or external stimuli through specific molecular interactions or phase transitions, fundamental understanding of molecular self-assembly mechanisms on multiple length scales, and fundamental understanding of transport, electronic, optical, magnetic, catalytic and photocatalytic properties derived from the nanoscale phenomena and unique surface and interfacial chemistry for DOE's energy mission.

Voigt, James A.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Mass Finishing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8 Operating conditions for mass finishing...Brass screw-machine parts Aluminum oxide or granite 6.4-19 0.25-0.75 [MathExpression] -6 Light matte or bright Light cutting (a) Brass stampings or screws (b) Limestone 3.2-13 0.13-0.50 2-6 Bright (a) Submerged tumbling is used for fragile and precision parts. (b) Screw-machine parts...

193

Molecular Foundry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is equipped with a variety of tools to aid in work with biomolecules, microbes, molecular biology techniques and cell culture. These tools include: a BioFlo fermentor (14 L),...

194

Strong-strong beam-beam simulation on parallel computer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The beam-beam interaction puts a strong limit on the luminosity of the high energy storage ring colliders. At the interaction points, the electromagnetic fields generated by one beam focus or defocus the opposite beam. This can cause beam blowup and a reduction of luminosity. An accurate simulation of the beam-beam interaction is needed to help optimize the luminosity in high energy colliders.

Qiang, Ji

2004-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

195

Beam-Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Gas and Thermal Photon Scattering in the NLC Main Linac as a Source of Beam Halo P. Tenenbaum LCC-Note-0051 12-JAN-2001 Abstract Scattering of primary beam electrons off of residual gas molecules or blackbody radiation photons in the NLC main linac has been identified as a potential source of beam haloes which must be collimated in the beam delivery system. We consider the contributions from four scat- tering mechanisms: inelastic thermal-photon scattering, elastic beam-gas (Coulomb) scattering inelastic beam-gas (Bremsstrahlung) scattering, and atomic-electron scattering. In each case we develop the formalism necessary to estimate the backgrounds generated in the main linac, and determine the expected number of off-energy or large-amplitude particles from each process, assuming a main linac injection energy of 8 GeV and extraction energy of 500 GeV. 1 Introduction The

196

Particle beam injection system  

SciTech Connect

This invention provides a poloidal divertor for stacking counterstreaming ion beams to provide high intensity colliding beams. To this end, method and apparatus are provided that inject high energy, high velocity, ordered, atomic deuterium and tritium beams into a lower energy, toroidal, thermal equilibrium, neutral, target plasma column that is magnetically confined along an endless magnetic axis in a strong restoring force magnetic field having helical field lines to produce counterstreaming deuteron and triton beams that are received bent, stacked and transported along the endless axis, while a poloidal divertor removes thermal ions and electrons all along the axis to increase the density of the counterstreaming ion beams and the reaction products resulting therefrom. By balancing the stacking and removal, colliding, strong focused particle beams, reaction products and reactions are produced that convert one form of energy into another form of energy.

Jassby, Daniel L. (Princeton, NJ); Kulsrud, Russell M. (Princeton, NJ)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Ion Beam Materials Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities » Facilities » Ion Beam Materials Lab Ion Beam Materials Lab A new research frontier awaits! Our door is open and we thrive on mutually beneficial partnerships, collaborations that drive innovations and new technologies. April 12, 2012 Ion Beam Danfysik Implanter High Voltage Terminal. Contact Yongqiang Wang (505) 665-1596 Email Devoted to the characterization and modification of surfaces through the use of ion beams The Ion Beam Materials Laboratory (IBML) is a Los Alamos National Laboratory resource devoted to the characterization and modification of surfaces through the use of ion beams. The IBML provides and operates the core facilities, while supporting the design and implementation of specific apparati needed for experiments requested by users of the facility. The result is a facility with

198

Piezoelectric energy harvester having planform-tapered interdigitated beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Embodiments of energy harvesters have a plurality of piezoelectric planform-tapered, interdigitated cantilevered beams anchored to a common frame. The plurality of beams can be arranged as two or more sets of beams with each set sharing a common sense mass affixed to their free ends. Each set thus defined being capable of motion independent of any other set of beams. Each beam can comprise a unimorph or bimorph piezoelectric configuration bonded to a conductive or non-conductive supporting layer and provided with electrical contacts to the active piezoelectric elements for collecting strain induced charge (i.e. energy). The beams are planform tapered along the entirety or a portion of their length thereby increasing the effective stress level and power output of each piezoelectric element, and are interdigitated by sets to increase the power output per unit volume of a harvester thus produced.

Kellogg, Rick A. (Tijeras, NM); Sumali, Hartono (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

199

Method and apparatus for measuring the momentum, energy, power, and power density profile of intense particle beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining the power, momentum, energy, and power density profile of high momentum mass flow. Small probe projectiles of appropriate size, shape and composition are propelled through an intense particle beam at equal intervals along an axis perpendicular to the beam direction. Probe projectiles are deflected by collisions with beam particles. The net beam-induced deflection of each projectile is measured after it passes through the intense particle beam into an array of suitable detectors.

Gammel, George M. (Merrick, NY); Kugel, Henry W. (Somerset, NJ)

1992-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

200

Method and apparatus for measuring the momentum, energy, power, and power density profile of intense particle beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining the power, momentum, energy, and power density profile for high momentum mass flow. Small probe projectiles of appropriate size, shape and composition are propelled through an intense particle beam at equal intervals along an axis perpendicular to the beam direction. Probe projectiles are deflected by collisions with beam particles. The net beam-induced deflection of each projectile is measured after it passes through the intense particle beam into an array of suitable detectors.

Gammel, G.M.; Kugel, H.W.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Dynamics of CN+alkane reactions by crossed-beam dc slice imaging  

SciTech Connect

The hydrogen atom abstraction reactions of CN (X {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}) with alkanes have been studied using the crossed molecular beam technique with dc slice ion imaging at collision energies of 7.5 and 10.8 kcal/mol. The product alkyl radical images were obtained via single photon ionization at 157 nm for the reactions of CN (X {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}) with n-butane, n-pentane, n-hexane, and cyclohexane. From analysis of the images, we obtained the center-of-mass frame product angular distributions and translational energy distributions directly. The results indicate that the products are largely backscattered and that most of the available energy ({approx}80%-85%) goes to the internal energy of the products. The reaction dynamics is discussed in light of recent kinetics data, theoretical calculations, and results for related halogen and oxygen atom reactions.

Huang Cunshun; Li Wen; Estillore, Armando D.; Suits, Arthur G. [Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)

2008-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

202

Broad beam ion implanter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

BEAMS Crossword Puzzle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

puzzle with words from the BEAMS Vocabulary List. Download this Activity Lab Pages Puzzle Puzzle Puzzle (cont) Puzzle (cont) Sample AnswersAnswer Key Ansewr Key Ansewr Key...

204

Electron Beam Melting (EBM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 18, 2011 ... Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Electron Beam Melting (EBM) I Sponsored by: MS&T Organization Program Organizers: Ian D. Harris, EWI; ...

205

Electron Beam Melting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012 ... Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Electron Beam Melting Program Organizers: Ian Harris, EWI; Ola Harrysson, North Carolina State University; ...

206

Design and development of an ultrafine particle reflection-time-of-flight mass spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary motivation for the research is to study the effect of small particles on global climate. The study can also help to understand the dynamics involved with gas to particle conversion, which is being debated to be a rich source for atmospheric aerosol. However, the most important use would be to study health effects, since small particles easily diffuse into the lungs, with seemingly little physiological filtration mechanism. The research work involves the design, development and characterization of a single-ultrafine-particle mass spectrometer. The instrument aerodynamically size selects fine and ultrafine aerosol particles (size range 20 nm-1 []m), with a constant Stokes number, and focuses them into a vacuum chamber. This is achieved by changing the upstream pressure of the inlet, which changes aerodynamic drag experienced by the particle. After its entry into the chamber, the particle is ablated by a high power excimer laser, which produces ions from the original molecular constituents. Reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometry is utilized to analyze the ions, and thus the chemical composition of the particle that was hit. The present work is aimed to overcome the shortcomings of previous instruments, while allowing for increased portability. The instrument is designed, fabricated and experimentally characterized. The first phase involves analysis of the particle beam generated by the inlet. An atomizer generates aerosols from a solution of 5% oleic acid and ethanol. The polydisperse aerosol is passed through a differential mobility analyzer to make a monodisperse mixture, which is transmitted through the inlet. The monodisperse particle beam is intercepted by glass slides, and the spot sizes are indicative of the beam shape and width at the slide positions. A theoretical analysis of the fluid flow field and particle trajectory is developed to correlate with the experimental results. The second phase involves calibration of the mass spectra, and measuring some particulate composition from the laboratory room air.

Das, Rishiraj

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Molecular Foundry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Berkeley Lab Berkeley Lab A-Z Index Phone Book Jobs Search DOE Berkeley Lab Berkeley Lab A-Z Index Phone Book Jobs Search DOE About the Foundry What is the Molecular Foundry? Research Themes Foundry Careers Media Gallery Other User Facilities external link Contact Us Go News & Highlights Users People Facilities Imaging and Manipulation Nanofabrication Theory Inorganic Biological Organic NCEM external link Seminars & Events Publications The Molecular Foundry is a Department of Energy-funded nanoscience research facility that provides users from around the world with access to cutting-edge expertise and instrumentation in a collaborative, multidisciplinary environment. Call for Proposals: The next deadline for standard proposals is Through March 31, 2014 Find out more information about becoming a Molecular Foundry facilities User. 2013 Annual User Meeting Postponed - Date TBD

208

Laser beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 11 figures.

Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

209

Laser beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect).

Warner, Bruce E. (Livermore, CA); Duncan, David B. (Auburn, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Laser beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus is described. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 7 figures.

Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Laser beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect).

Warner, Bruce E. (Livermore, CA); Duncan, David B. (Auburn, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Beam Diagnostics for FACET  

SciTech Connect

FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to about 20 {micro}m long and focussed to about 10 {micro}m wide. Characterization of the beam-plasma interaction requires complete knowledge of the incoming beam parameters on a pulse-to-pulse basis. FACET diagnostics include Beam Position Monitors, Toroidal current monitors, X-ray and Cerenkov based energy spectrometers, optical transition radiation (OTR) profile monitors and coherent transition radiation (CTR) bunch length measurement systems. The compliment of beam diagnostics and their expected performance are reviewed. Beam diagnostic measurements not only provide valuable insights to the running and tuning of the accelerator but also are crucial for the PWFA experiments in particular. Beam diagnostic devices are being set up at FACET and will be ready for beam commissioning in summer 2011.

Li, S.Z.; Hogan, M.J.; /SLAC

2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

213

Impacts of anisotropic lattice relaxation on crystal mosaicity and luminescence spectra of m-plane Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N films grown on m-plane freestanding GaN substrates by NH{sub 3} source molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

In-plane anisotropic lattice relaxation was correlated with the crystal mosaicity and luminescence spectra for m-plane Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N films grown on a freestanding GaN substrate by NH{sub 3}-source molecular beam epitaxy. The homoepitaxial GaN film exhibited A- and B-excitonic emissions at 8 K, which obeyed the polarization selection rules. For Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N overlayers, the m-plane tilt mosaic along c-axis was the same as the substrate as far as coherent growth was maintained (x{<=}0.25). However, it became more severe than along the a-axis for lattice-relaxed films (x{>=}0.52). The results are explained in terms of anisotropic lattice and thermal mismatches between the film and the substrate. Nonetheless, all the Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N films exhibited a near-band-edge emission peak and considerably weak deep emission at room temperature.

Hoshi, T.; Hazu, K.; Ohshita, K.; Kagaya, M.; Onuma, T.; Chichibu, S. F. [CANTech, Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Fujito, K. [Optoelectronics Laboratory, Mitsubishi Chemical Corporation, 1000 Higashi-Mamiana, Ushiku 300-1295 (Japan); Namita, H. [Mitsubishi Chemical Group Science and Technology Research Center, Inc., 8-3-1 Chuo, Ami, Inashiki 300-0332 (Japan)

2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

214

Laser beam alignment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plurality of pivotal reflectors direct a high-power laser beam onto a workpiece, and a rotatable reflector is movable to a position wherein it intercepts the beam and deflects a major portion thereof away from its normal path, the remainder of the beam passing to the pivotal reflectors through an aperture in the rotating reflector. A plurality of targets are movable to positions intercepting the path of light traveling to the pivotal reflectors, and a preliminary adjustment of the latter is made by use of a low-power laser beam reflected from the rotating reflector, after which the same targets are used to make a final adjustment of the pivotal reflectors with the portion of the high-power laser beam passed through the rotating reflector.

Kasner, William H. (11686 Althea Dr., Pittsburgh, PA 15235); Racki, Daniel J. (712 Union Cemetery Rd., Greensburg, PA 15601); Swenson, Clark E. (228 Scott Dr., Monroeville, PA 15146)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Beam director design report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A design and fabrication effort for a beam director is documented. The conceptual design provides for the beam to pass first through a bending and focusing system (or ''achromat''), through a second achromat, through an air-to-vacuum interface (the ''beam window''), and finally through the vernier steering system. Following an initial concept study for a beam director, a prototype permanent magnet 30/sup 0/ beam-bending achromat and prototype vernier steering magnet were designed and built. In volume II, copies are included of the funding instruments, requests for quotations, purchase orders, a complete set of as-built drawings, magnetic measurement reports, the concept design report, and the final report on the design and fabrication project. (LEW)

Younger, F.C.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

First Beam to FACET  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SLAC 3km linear electron accelerator has been reconfigured to provide a beam of electrons to the new Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) while simultaneously providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). On June 23, 2011, the first electron beam was transported through this new facility. Commissioning of FACET is in progress. On June 23, 2011, an electron beam was successfully transported through the new FACET system to a dump in Sector 20 in the linac tunnel. This was achieved while the last third of the linac, operating from the same control room, but with a separate injector system, was providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), demonstrating that concurrent operation of the two facilities is practical. With the initial checkout of the new transport line essentially complete, attention is now turning toward compressing the electron bunches longitudinally and focusing them transversely to support a variety of accelerator science experiments.

Erickson, R.; Clarke, C.; Colocho, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.; Kalsi, S.; Lipkowitz, N.; Nelson, J.; Phinney, N.; Schuh, P.; Sheppard, J.; Smith, H.; Smith, T.; Stanek, M.; Turner, J.; Warren, J.; Weathersby, S.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

217

B13+: Photodriven Molecular Wankel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthetic molecular motors that are capable of delivering controlled movement upon energy input are one of the key building blocks in nanomachinery. The major energy sources of molecular motors are from chemical reactions, photon beams, or electric current, which are converted into mechanical forces through the excitation of the electronic states of the molecule. The energy scale of the electronic excitation is normally two orders of magnitude larger than the molecular vibrational frequencies. To reduce the heat dissipation and increase the energy utilization efficiency, a motor running purely on the electronic ground-state (GS) potential energy surfaces is highly desirable.

Zhang, Jin; Sergeeva, Alina P.; Sparta, Manuel; Alexandrova, Anastassia N.

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

218

SPEAR3 Beam Line Availability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beam Line Support | Floor Support | Administrative Support SPEAR3 Beam Line Availability Beam Line BL Type Technique(s) Status 1-4 X-ray Small and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering Open...

219

Electron and laser beam welding  

SciTech Connect

This book contains 22 selections. Some of the titles are: Laser welding of chandelles to the plates of the sommier employed in the nuclear power plant core; Electron beam welding of hobbing cutters; Sealing welds in electron beam welding of thick metals; Development and application of high power electron beam welding; Electron beam welding of dissimilar metals (niobium, molybdenum, porous tungsten-molybdenum); Status of electron beam welding in the United States of America; and Electron and laser beam welding in Japan.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Seven Channel Multi-collector Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new magnetic sector mass spectrometer that utilizes seven full-sized discrete dynode electron multipliers operating simultaneously has been designed, constructed and is in preliminary testing. The instrument utilizes a newly developed ion dispersion lens that enables the mass dispersed individual isotope beams to be separated sufficiently (35 mm) to allow a full-sized discrete dynode pulse counting multiplier to be used for each beam. The ion dispersion lens is a two element electrostatic 90 degree sector device that causes the beam-to-beam dispersion to increase faster than the intra-beam dispersion. Each multiplier is contained in an isolated case with a deflector/condenser lens at the entrance. A 9-sample filament cartridge is mounted on a micro-manipulator two-axis stage that enables adjustment of the filament position with 10 micron resolution within the ion lens. Results of initial testing with actinides will be presented.

Anthony D. Appelhans

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Challenges in Accelerator Beam Instrumentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The challenges in beam instrumentation and diagnostics for present and future particle accelerator projects are presented. A few examples for advanced hadron and lepton beam diagnostics are given.

Wendt, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Challenges in Accelerator Beam Instrumentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The challenges in beam instrumentation and diagnostics for present and future particle accelerator projects are presented. A few examples for advanced hadron and lepton beam diagnostics are given.

Wendt, M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Frontiers of Particle Beam Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low Emittance e--e+ Beams, Brookhaven National Laboratory,Island, NY, October 1988, Brookhaven National Laboratory,Low Emittance e--e+ Beams, Brookhaven National Laboratory,

Sessler, Andrew M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It didn't find the Higgs boson as we all but predicted it would, but the aging atom smasher at Fermi

225

NEWTON's Molecular Biology Videos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Biology Videos Do you have a great molecular biology video? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Videos: University of Berkeley - Molecular Biology Lectures University...

226

Simulations of beam-beam and beam-wire interactions in RHIC  

SciTech Connect

The beam-beam interaction is one of the dominant sources of emittance growth and luminosity lifetime deterioration. A current carrying wire has been proposed to compensate long-range beam-beam effects in the LHC and strong localized long-range beam-beam effects are experimentally investigated in the RHIC collider. Tune shift, beam transfer function, and beam loss rate are measured in dedicated experiments. In this paper, they report on simulations to study the effect of beam-wire interactions based on diffusive apertures, beam loss rates, and beam transfer function using a parallelized weak-strong beam simulation code (BBSIMC). The simulation results are compared with measurements performed in RHIC during 2007 and 2008.

Kim, Hyung J.; Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab; Abreu, Natalia P.; Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Simulation study of beam-beam effects in ion beams with large space charge tuneshift  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During low-energy operations with gold-gold collisions at 3.85 GeV beam energy, significant beam lifetime reductions have been observed due to the beam-beam interaction in the presence of large space charge tuneshifts. These beam-beam tuneshift parameters were about an order of magnitude smaller than during regular high energy operations. To get a better understanding of this effect, simulations have been performed. Recent results are presented.

Montag C.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

228

Neutral particle beam intensity controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

Dagenhart, W.K.

1984-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

229

Courses on Beam Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beam Physics Beam Physics The following is an incomplete listing of course available for beam physics. United States Particle Accelerator School The US Particle Accelerator School provides educational programs in the field of beams and their associated accelerator technologies not otherwise available to the community of science and technology. Joint Universities Accelerator School Each year JUAS provides a foundation course on accelerator physics and associated technologies. The US-CERN-Japan-Russia Joint Accelerator School The purpose of the US-CERN-Japan-Russia joint school is to better our relations by working together on an advanced topical course every two years, alternating between the U.S., western Europe, Japan and Russia. The last set of courses focused on the frontiers of accelerator technology in

230

1996 Beam Instrumentation Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1996 Beam Instrumentation Workshop BIW '96 logo The Advanced Photon Source (APS) Argonne National Laboratory May 6-9, 1996 Dear Colleague: It is my pleasure to invite you to the...

231

BNL | ATF Beam Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beam Schedule (pdf) Beam Schedule (pdf) Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 22 1/2 Holiday Holiday 28 January Holiday 4 5 Maintenance 11 12 Maintenance 18 19 Holiday AE52 - DWFA (Euclid), BL2 25 February AE52 - DWFA (Euclid), BL2 1 2 AE50 - PWFA in QNR (UCLA), BL2 8 9 AE50 - PWFA in QNR (UCLA), BL2 15 16 Holiday AE50 - PWFA in QNR (UCLA), BL2 22 March 1 2 AE53 - Nonlinear Compton (UCLA) 8 9 AE53 - Nonlinear Compton (UCLA) 15 16 AE53 - Nonlinear Compton (UCLA) 22 23 29 Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday User operations (E-beam in use) Ions - Ion generation User operations (laser in use) PWFA - Plasma Wakefield Acceleration User operations (E-beam and laser in use)

232

Intense ion beam generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for producing intense megavolt ion beams are disclosed. In one embodiment, a reflex triode-type pulsed ion accelerator is described which produces ion pulses of more than 5 kiloamperes current with a peak energy of 3 MeV. In other embodiments, the device is constructed so as to focus the beam of ions for high concentration and ease of extraction, and magnetic insulation is provided to increase the efficiency of operation.

Humphries, Jr., Stanley (Ithaca, NY); Sudan, Ravindra N. (Ithaca, NY)

1977-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

233

Beam/seam alignment control for electron beam welding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a dynamic beam/seam alignment control system for electron beam welds utilizing video apparatus. The system includes automatic control of workpiece illumination, near infrared illumination of the workpiece to limit the range of illumination and camera sensitivity adjustment, curve fitting of seam position data to obtain an accurate measure of beam/seam alignment, and automatic beam detection and calculation of the threshold beam level from the peak beam level of the preceding video line to locate the beam or seam edges.

Burkhardt, Jr., James H. (Knoxville, TN); Henry, J. James (Oak Ridge, TN); Davenport, Clyde M. (Knoxville, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Small Spot, Brighter Beam  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Spot, Brighter Beam Small Spot, Brighter Beam Small Spot, Brighter Beam Print Do you notice the brighter beam? During the most recent shutdown, all of the corrector magnets were replaced with sextupoles, reducing the horizontal emittance and increasing beam brightness. "This is part of ongoing improvement to keep the ALS on the cutting edge," says Alastair MacDowell, a beamline scientist on Beamline 12.2.2. The brightness has increased by a factor of about three in the storage ring. Beamlines on superbend or center-bend magnets will see the most noticeable increase in brightness, but the horizontal beam size and divergence have been substantially reduced at all beamlines. "We are starting to approach the resolution of many beamlines. Therefore, not every beamline will be able to resolve the full improvement," says Christoph Steier, project leader of the brightness upgrade. Though superbend and center-bend magnet source sizes are reduced by roughly a factor of three, "measured improvements so far range from a factor of 2-2.5," Steier says. He and MacDowell agree that the beamline optics are likely the limiting factor in resolving the full improvement at the beamlines.

235

Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H{sup -} beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batygin, Yuri K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gonzales, Fermin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kutac, Vincent G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Molecular Phylogeny Reconstruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Phylogeny Reconstruction Sudhir Kumar, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, USA Alan Filipski, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, USA Molecular phylogenetics deals with the inference molecular data. By modelling patterns of molecular change in protein and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA

Kumar, Sudhir

237

SIMULATION STUDY OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL LASER COOLING SCHEMES FOR FAST STORED BEAMS  

SciTech Connect

Molecular dynamics (MD) approach is employed to study laser cooling of fast circulating beams in a storage ring. The authors compare several three-dimensional (3D) cooling methods, examining achievable minimum beam temperature. In particular, the stress is put upon the three coupling schemes, i.e. the dispersion-coupling scheme, the coupling-cavity scheme, and the tapered cooling scheme. The authors show that beam temperatures much lower than the currently achievable level could be reached with these schemes.

KIHARA,T.; OKAMOTO,H.; IWASHITA,Y.; OIDE,K.; LAMANNA,G.; WEI,J.

1998-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

238

Measurement of the Higgs Boson Mass with a Linear e+e- Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The potential of a linear e+e- collider operated at a centre-of-mass energy of 350 GeV is studied for the measurement of the Higgs boson mass. An integrated luminosity of 500 fb-1 is assumed. For Higgs boson masses of 120, 150 and 180 GeV the uncertainty on the Higgs boson mass measurement is estimated to be 40, 65 and 70 MeV, respectively. The effects of beam related systematics, namely a bias in the beam energy measurement, the beam energy spread and the luminosity spectrum due to beamstrahlung, on the precision of the Higgs boson mass measurement are investigated. In order to keep the systematic uncertainty on the Higgs boson mass well below the level of the statistical error, the beam energy measurement must be controlled with a relative precision better than 10-4.

P. Garcia-Abia; W. Lohmann; A. Raspereza

2005-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

239

Single element laser beam shaper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single lens laser beam shaper for converting laser beams from any spatial profile to a flat-top or uniform spatial profile. The laser beam shaper includes a lens having two aspheric surfaces. The beam shaper significantly simplifies the overall structure in comparison with conventional 2-element systems and therefore provides great ease in alignment and reduction of cost.

Zhang, Shukui (Yorktown, VA); Michelle D. Shinn (Newport News, VA)

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

240

Electron Beam Powder Bed Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Materials, Processes and Applications for Additive Manufacturing : Electron Beam Powder Bed Processes Program Organizers: Andrzej ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

From Molecular Computing to Molecular Programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From Molecular Computing to Molecular Programming Masami Hagiya Graduate School of Science of the Japanese Molecular Computer Project, and foresee the future of the #12;eld. In addition to describing the major achievements of the project, Suyama's Dynamic Programming Molecular Computer and Sakamoto

Hagiya, Masami

242

Beam Characterizations at Femtosecond Electron Beam Facility  

SciTech Connect

The SURIYA project at the Fast Neutron Research Facility (FNRF) has been established and is being commissioning to generate femtosecond (fs) electron bunches. Theses short bunches are produced by a system consisting of an S-band thermionic cathode RF-gun, an alpha magnet (a-magnet) serving as a magnetic bunch compressor, and a SLAC-type linear accelerator (linac). The characteristics of its major components and the beam characterizations as well as the preliminary experimental results will be presented and discussed in this paper.

Rimjaem, S.; Jinamoon, V.; Kangrang, M.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Saisut, J.; Thongbai, C.; Vilaithong, T.; Rhodes, M.W.; Wichaisirimongkol, P.; /Chiang Mai U.; Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

243

ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter  

SciTech Connect

The Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory is building a high-brightness 500 mA capable Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) as one of its main R&D thrusts towards eRHIC, the polarized electron - hadron collider as an upgrade of the operating RHIC facility. The ERL is in final assembly stages, with injection commisioning starting in October 2012. The objective of this ERL is to serve as a platform for R&D into high current ERL, in particular issues of halo generation and control, Higher-Order Mode (HOM) issues, coherent emissions for the beam and high-brightness, high-power beam generation and preservation. The R&D ERL features a superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photoccathode served with a load-lock cathode delivery system, a highly damped 5-cell accelerating cavity, a highly flexible single-pass loop and a comprehensive system of beam instrumentation. In this ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter article we will describe the ERL in a degree of detail that is not usually found in regular publications. We will discuss the various systems of the ERL, following the electrons from the photocathode to the beam dump, cover the control system, machine protection etc and summarize with the status of the ERL systems.

Ben-Zvi I.; Kuczewski A.; Altinbas, Z.; Beavis, D.; Belomestnykh,; Dai, J. et al

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Booster gold beam injection efficiency and beam loss  

SciTech Connect

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the BNL requires the AGS to provide gold beam with the intensity of 10{sup 9} ions per bunch. Over the years, the Tandem Van de Graaff has provided steadily increasing intensity of gold ion beams to the AGS Booster. However, the gold ion beam injection efficiency at the Booster has been found to decrease with the rising intensity of injected beams. As the result, for Tandem beams of the highest intensity, the Booster late intensity is lower than with slightly lower intensity Tandem beam. In this article, the authors present two experiments associated with the Booster injection efficiency and beam intensity. One experiment looks at the Booster injection efficiency by adjusting the Tandem beam intensity, and another looks at the beam life time while scraping the beam in the Booster. The studies suggest that the gold beam injection efficiency at the AGS Booster is related to the beam loss in the ring, rather than the intensity of injected beam or circulating beam.

Zhang, S.Y.; Ahrens, L.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Research, Oxide Molecular Beam Epitaxy Group, Condensed Matter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is the nature of the superconducting transition? What is the role of charge stripes (if any) in the HTS state? What is the nature of the overdoped metallic state - a...

246

Publications, Oxide Molecular Beam Epitaxy Group, Condensed Matter Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications In Press M. P. M. Dean, G. Dellea, R. S. Springell, F. Yakhou-Harris, K. Kummer, N. B. Brookes, X. Liu, Y. Sun, J. Strle, T. Schmitt, L. Braicovich, G. Ghiringhelli, I. Bozovic and J. P. Hill. "Persistence of magnetic excitations in La2-xSrxCuOP4 from the undoped insulator to the heavily overdoped non-superconducting metal." Nature Materials (Submitted 2013). In press. J. Wu, O. Pelleg, G. Logvenov, A. T. Bollinger, Y. Sun, G. S. Boebinger, M. Vanevic, Z. Radovic and I. Bozovic. "Anomalous (in)dependence of interface superconductivity on carrier density." Nature Materials (Submitted 2012). In press. G. Dubuis, A. T. Bollinger, D. Pavuna and I. Bozovic. "On Field Effect Studies and Superconductor-Insulator Transition in High-Tc Cuprates."

247

Laboratories, Oxide Molecular Beam Epitaxy Group, Condensed Matter Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratories: Photo Tour Laboratories: Photo Tour MBE Laboratory MBE Laboratory MBE Chamber MBE Chamber Temperature Controllers MBE Computers and Servers Pneumatic Hoses Transport between MBE Laboratory and Nano-Lithography Laboratory Backside of MBE chamber during growth, lit by Nano-Lithography Laboratory Nano-Lithography Laboratory Processing Chamber Laminar Flow Hood Mask Aligner Profilometer Probe Station Wire Bonder X-Ray Diffraction and Chemistry Laboratory X-Ray Diffraction System X-Ray Diffraction System X-Ray Diffraction System Chemistry Laboratory Chemistry Laboratory Mutual Inductance, Transport and Field Effect Laboratory Field Effect Measurement system Liquid Helium-4 Dipstick for Mutual Inductance Transport Measurement System COMBI Hall Effect, COMBI Transport and Mutual Inductance Measurements Laboratory

248

Applied Super Conductor Group, Oxide Molecular Beam Epitaxy Group,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AEMG Homepage AEMG Homepage Site Details Homepage Research Publications Presentations Facilities How to Contact Us Other Information Basic Energy Sciences Directorate Links BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Advanced Energy Materials Group Applied Superconductivity The applied superconductivity research (past funded by DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability) is related to modernization of the U.S. power grid. One direction of the modernization is replacement of normal metal (copper, aluminum) transmission lines with High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cables. Our group concentrates its effort on studying fundamental thermodynamics of nucleation and texture development of thick YBCO layers. High-performance YBCO layer is a critical element of modern second generation (2G) HTS wire.

249

CROSSED MOLECULAR BEAM STUDIES OF UN-IMOLECULAR REACTION DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

released in carbon-chlorine bond formation to redistributeIn the reaction of chlorine and fluorine atoms with vinylthe reaction of The reaction chlorine atoms with 1, 2 and 3-

Buss, R.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Oxide Molecular Beam Epitaxy Group, Condensed Matter Physics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(right) and U.S. Under Secretary of Science Raymond L. Orbach (middle) visiting the MBE lab, 2 June 2006. Left: Ivan Bozovic. Back row: BNL Director Sam Aronson (right) and...

251

Visitors, Oxide Molecular Beam Epitaxy Group, Condensed Matter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University) Mar 23 2009 Prof. Efthimios Liarokapis (Nat. Technical University, Athens, Greece) Mar 22 2009 to Mar 4 2009 Dr. Scott Riggs, Zac Stegen and Jon Kemper (Florida State...

252

Collaborations, Oxide Molecular Beam Epitaxy Group, Condensed Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collaborations Collaborations Collaborations at BNL Experiment COBRA X-ray crystallography Researchers Dr. Ron Pindak, Dr. Hua Zhou (NSLS), Dr. Yitzak Yacobi (Technion, Israel) Object of Study The atomic structure of interfaces in M-I bilayers Experiment High-resolution electron microscopy Researchers Dr. Yimei Zhu (CMPMS) Object of Study The atomic structure of HTS heterostructures; bi-crystal grain boundaries Experiment Synchrotron X-ray crystallography Researchers Dr. John Hill (CMPMS) Object of Study Spin excitation spectrum in ultrathin LSCO layers Experiment Ultrafast electron diffraction Researchers Dr. Xijie Wang (NSLS) Object of Study Photo-induced lattice expansion Collaborations in the United States Experiment Resonant soft X-ray scattering (SXRS) Researchers Prof. Peter Abbamonte, Dr. Serban Smadici (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

253

Crossed beam studies of full and half collisions. [F + H/sub 2/(D/sub 2/)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of two experiments performed on a new very high resolution crossed molecular beams apparatus are discussed. The first experiment, photofragmentation of methyl iodide, is deconvoluted to yield vibrational state distributions for the recoiling methyl fragment. These distributions are then analyzed in terms of half-collision models and Franck-Condon factors. The second experiment, a full-collision example, is the reaction of F atoms with H/sub 2/ and D/sub 2/. Laboratory angular and velocity distributions for both systems are obtained at several energies. Center-of-mass product distributions are calculated and discussed in terms of recently predicted state dependent resonance phenomena for the reaction. The design of the new apparatus is also discussed.

Sparks, R.K.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Molecular Foundry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Theory of Nanostructured Materials Theory of Nanostructured Materials The Theory of Nanostructured Materials Facility at the Molecular Foundry is focused on expanding our understanding of materials at the nanoscale. Our research connects the structural and dynamical properties of materials to their functions, such as electrical conductivity and storage, light-harvesting for electricity and fuel, or gas separation and sequestration. We develop and employ a broad range of tools, including advanced electronic-structure theory, excited-state methods, model Hamiltonians, and statistical mechanical models. This combination of approaches reveals how materials behave at the nanoscale, in pursuit of materials and devices that meet global energy and sustainability needs. Electronic structure of complex materials and interfaces for energy

255

GAS PHASE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this research is the understanding of elementary chemical and physical processes important in the combustion of fossil fuels. Interest centers on reactions involving short-lived chemical intermediates and their properties. High-resolution, high-sensitivity, laser absorption methods are augmented by high temperature flow-tube reaction kinetics studies with mass-spectrometric sampling. These experiments provide information on the energy levels, structures and reactivity of molecular free radical species and, in turn, provide new tools for the study of energy flow and chemical bond cleavage in the radicals in chemical systems. The experimental work is supported by theoretical and computational work using time-dependent quantum wavepacket calculations that provide insights into energy flow between the vibrational modes of the molecule. The work of group members Fockenberg and Muckerman is described in separate abstracts of this volume.

SEARS,T.J.; HALL,G.E.; PRESES,J.M.; WESTON,R.E.,JR.

1999-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

256

Gas Phase Molecular Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this research is the understanding of elementary chemical and physical processes important in the combustion of fossil fuels. Interest centers on reactions involving short-lived chemical intermediates and their properties. High-resolution high-sensitivity laser absorption methods are augmented by high temperature flow-tube reaction kinetics studies with mass spectrometric sampling. These experiments provide information on the energy levels, structures and reactivity of molecular flee radical species and, in turn, provide new tools for the study of energy flow and chemical bond cleavage in the radicals in chemical systems. The experimental work is supported by theoretical and computational work using time-dependent quantum wavepacket calculations that provide insights into energy flow between the vibrational modes of the molecule.

Hall, G.E.; Prrese, J.M.; Sears, T.J.; Weston, R.E.

1999-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

257

Beam-Based Alignment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

One: One: Single-Bunch Comparative Study of Three Algorithms Peter Tenenbaum LCC-Note-0013 17-February-1999 Abstract We describe the results of a series of simulation studies of beam-based alignment of the NLC main linacs using the program LIAR. Three algorithms for alignment of quadrupoles and girders are consid- ered: the algorithm used in the ZDR, the ZDR algorithm combined with a post-alignment MICADO operation, and an algorithm which requires no steering dipoles but requires twice as many alignment segments per linac as the ZDR algorithm. The third algorithm appears to be the most robust, based on convergence time, required quad mover step sizes, and variation in extracted beam emittance as a function of BNS profile. We also study the effect of structure BPM resolution and ATL misalignments during the alignment process. 1 Introduction Beam-based alignment and steering of the

258

Colliding Crystalline Beams  

SciTech Connect

Crystalline Beams* are an ordered state of an ensemble of ions, circulating in a storage ring, with very small velocity fluctuations. They can be obtained from ordinary warm ion beams with the application of powerful cooling techniques (stochastic, electron, laser, ...). Depending on the focussing properties and dimensions of the storage ring, and on the ion beam density, several ground states are possible. All of them can be visualized as a bundle of n{sub s} symmetrically distributed, parallel strings. The longitudinal ion separation {lambda} is the same for all strings. The minimum temperature that can be achieved depends on die background noise of the cooling technique used. It is required for stability that the vibration amplitude of the ions is only a fraction of the separation {lambda}.

Haffmans, A.F.; Maletic, D.; Ruggiero, A.G.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

BOOSTER GOLD BEAM INJECTION EFFICIENCY AND BEAM LOSS  

SciTech Connect

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the BNL requires the AGS to provide Gold beam with the intensity of 10{sup 9} ions per bunch. Over the years, the Tandem Van de Graaff has provided steadily increasing intensity of gold ion beams to the AGS Booster. However, the gold beam injection efficiency at the Booster has been found to decrease with the rising intensity of injected beams. As the result, for Tandem beams of the highest intensity, the Booster late intensity is lower than with slightly lower intensity Tandem beam. In this article, the authors present two experiments associated with the Booster injection efficiency and beam intensity. One experiment looks at the Booster injection efficiency by adjusting the Tandem beam intensity, and another looks at the beam life time while scraping the beam in the Booster. The studies suggest that the gold beam injection efficiency at the AGS Booster is related to the beam loss in the ring, rather than the intensity of injected beam or circulating beam. A close look at the effect of the lost gold ion at the Booster injection leads to the prediction that the lost gold ion creates large number of positive ions, and even larger number of electrons. The lost gold beam is also expected to create large numbers of neutral particles. In 1998 heavy ion run, the production of positive ions and electrons due to the lost gold beam has been observed. Also the high vacuum pressure due to the beam loss, presumably because of the neutral particles it created, has been measured. These results will be reported elsewhere.

ZHANG,S.Y.; AHRENS,L.A.

1998-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

260

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Silicon-based transistors are well-understood, basic components of contemporary electronic technology. In contrast, there is growing need for the development of electronic devices based on organic polymer materials. Organic field-effect transistors (FETs) are ideal for special applications that require large areas, light weight, and structural flexibility. They also have the advantage of being easy to mass-produce at very low cost. However, even though this class of devices is finding a growing number of applications, electronic processes in organic materials are still not well understood. A group of researchers from the University of California and the ALS has succeeded in probing the intrinsic electronic properties of the charge carriers in organic FETs using infrared spectromicroscopy. The results of their study could help in the future development of sensors, large-area displays, and other plastic electronic components.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Emerging Technologies in Mass Spectrometry Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) as an analytical tool for bio-molecular and bio-medical research targets, accurate compound localization and identification. In terms of dedicated instrumentation, this translates into the demand for more detail in the image dimension (spatial resolution) and in the spectral dimension (mass resolution and accuracy), preferably combined in one instrument. At the same time, large area biological tissue samples require fast acquisition schemes, instrument automation and a robust data infrastructure. This review discusses the analytical capabilities of an "ideal" MSI instrument for bio-molecular and bio-medical molecular imaging. The analytical attributes of such an ideal system are contrasted with technological and methodological challenges in MSI. In particular, innovative instrumentation for high spatial resolution imaging in combination with high sample throughput is discussed. Detector technology that targets various shortcomings of conventional imaging detector systems is hig...

Jungmann, Julia H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Beam specie analyzer for intense neutral beams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three-channel neutral particle energy analyzer has been fabricated and calibrated for H/sup 0/ particles. H/sup 0/ with energies 3.5-55 keV was passed through a N/sub 2/ gas cell maintained at charge equilibrium pressures. H/sup +/ ions formed by stripping collisions were energy analyzed by a 45/sup 0/, parabolic, electrostatic analyzer and detected by three Faraday cups spaced to intercept the full-, half-, and third-energy beam components. The conversion efficiency of the analyzer system increased from 0.11 at 3.5 keV to 0.54 at 55 keV with an accuracy of +- 3%.

Barnett, C.F.; Ray, J.A.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Electron beam dynamics for the ISIS bremsstrahlung beam generation system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An electron beam transport system was designed for use in the Bremsstrahlung Beam Generation System of the Integrated Stand-off Inspection System (ISIS). The purpose of this electron transport system was to provide for ...

Block, Robert E. (Robert Edward)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

High-Performance Mass Spectrometry Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HPMSF Overview HPMSF Overview Section 2-4-1 High-Performance Mass Spectrometry Facility The High-Performance Mass Spectrometry Facility (HPMSF) provides state-of-the-art mass spectrometry (MS) and separations instrumentation that has been refined for leading-edge analysis of biological problems with a primary emphasis on proteomics. Challenging research in proteomics, cell signaling, cellular molecular machines, and high-molecular weight systems receive the highest priority for access to the facility. Current research activities in the HPMSF include proteomic analyses of whole cell lysates, analyses of organic macro-molecules and protein complexes, quantification using isotopically labeled growth media, targeted proteomics analyses of subcellular fractions, and nucleic acid analysis of

265

Beam current sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A current sensor for measuring the dc component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivities in the nano-ampere range.

Kuchnir, M.; Mills, F.E.

1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

266

Beam current sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A current sensor for measuring the DC component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivites in the nano-ampere range.

Kuchnir, Moyses (Elmhurst, IL); Mills, Frederick E. (Elburn, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Molecular Biology DEGREE PROGRAMME  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BSc (Hons) Molecular Biology DEGREE PROGRAMME GUIDE 2013-2014 #12;BSc (Hons) Molecular Biology - Year 2 - Year 3 - Year 4 Introduction Molecular biology aims to understand living systems by focusing on the molecular components upon which they are built. Molecular biology is one of great successes of 20th century

Siddharthan, Advaith

268

Positive and Negative Ion Beam Merging System for Neutral Beam ...  

APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Semiconductor manufacturing; Low- and medium-energy ion implantation; Fusion plasma systems requiring neutral beam ...

269

Neutral particle beam intensity controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

Dagenhart, William K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The chemistry of high-mass star formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews the chemistry of star-forming regions, with an emphasis on the formation of high-mass stars. We first outline the basic molecular processes in dense clouds, their implementation in chemical models, and techniques to measure molecular abundances. Then, recent observational, theoretical and laboratory developments are reviewed on the subjects of hot molecular cores, cosmic-ray ionization, depletion and deuteration, and oxygen chemistry. The paper concludes with a summary of outstanding problems and future opportunities.

Floris F. S. van der Tak

2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

271

Ion source for high-precision mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is directed to a method for increasing the precision of positive-ion relative abundance measurements conducted in a sector mass spectrometer having an ion source for directing a beam of positive ions onto a collimating slit. The method comprises incorporating in the source an electrostatic lens assembly for providing a positive-ion beam of circular cross section for collimation by the slit.

Todd, Peter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); McKown, Henry S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Smith, David H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Beam experiments towards high-intensity beams in RHIC  

SciTech Connect

Proton bunch intensities in RHIC are planned to be increased from 2 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch to increase the luminosity, together with head-on beam-beam compensation using electron lenses. To study the feasibility of the intensity increase, beam experiments are being performed. Recent experimental results are presented.

Montag C.; Ahrens, L.; Brennan, J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Mernick, K.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

273

Focused ion beam direct fabrication of micro-optical elements: features compared with laser beam and electron beam direct writing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three types of focused ion beam machine: focused ion beam milling (FIB milling), focused ion beam lithography (FIB lithography), and focused ion beam direct deposition (FIB deposition), are described in detail to compare ...

Fu, Yongqi

274

Dependence of the Photon Beam Characteristics on Electron Beam Parameters in Third Generation Synchrotron Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dependence of the Photon Beam Characteristics on Electron Beam Parameters in Third Generation Synchrotron Light Sources

Ivanyan, M I; Tsakanov, V M

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Physics with Rare Isotope Beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using stable and radioactive beams provided by ATLAS nuclear reactions of special interest in astrophysics have been studied with emphasis on breakout from the hot CNO cycle to the rp-process. The masses of nuclear fragments provided by a strong fission source have been measured in order to help trace the path of the r process. 8Li ions produced by the d(7Li,8Li)n reaction have been trapped and the electrons and alphas emitted in the ensuing beta-decay measured. The neutrino directions were therefore determined, which leads to a measurement of the electron-neutrino correlation. The energies and kinematics are such that a sensitive search for any tensor admixture could be performed and an upper limit of 0.6% was placed on any such admixture. Earlier work on the electromagnetic form factors of the proton was extended. Graduate students were active participants in all of these eperiments, which formed the basis for six PhD theses.

Segel, Ralph E. [Northwestern University

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

276

The Molecular Foundry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PEOPLE JOB OPPORTUNITIES USER'S ASSOCIATION CONTACT US Foundry Intranet DOE Basic Energy Sciences User Facilities Molecular Foundry Seminar "Tuning Phonons in Molecular...

277

NEWTON's Molecular Biology Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Biology Archive: Loading Most Recent Molecular Biology Questions: Cytoplasm pH DNA Extract and Cold Alcohol Albino Gene Loci Male Development Candy and Bacteria Revisited...

278

Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers Time-of-flight mass spectrometer comprising a first drift region and a second drift region enclosed within an evacuation chamber. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers Time-of-flight mass spectrometer comprising a first drift region and a second drift region enclosed within an evacuation chamber; a means of introducing an analyte of interest into the first drift region; a pulsed ionization source which produces molecular ions from said analyte of interest; a first foil positioned between the first drift region and the second drift region, which dissociates said molecular ions into constituent

279

Beam-stack search: Integrating backtracking with beam search  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a method for transforming beam search into a complete search algorithm that is guaranteed to find an optimal solution. Called beam-stack search, the algorithm uses a new data structure, called a beam stack, that makes it possible to integrate systematic backtracking with beam search. The resulting search algorithm is an anytime algorithm that finds a good, sub-optimal solution quickly, like beam search, and then backtracks and continues to find improved solutions until convergence to an optimal solution. We describe a memory-efficient implementation of beam-stack search, called divide-and-conquer beam-stack search, as well as an iterative-deepening version of the algorithm. The approach is applied to domain-independent STRIPS planning, and computational results show its advantages.

Rong Zhou; Eric A. Hansen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The Growth of Ice Crystals by Molecular Diffusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mass transfer of water molecules by diffusion onto ice particles is best described by their Sherwood number (Sh), a dimensionless quantity, which combines molecular and convective effects and depends on the airflow as represented by the ...

Hyun Youk; Roland List; Theophilus Ola

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Thermal conductivity of mass-graded graphene flakes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this letter we investigate thermal conductions in mass-graded graphene flakes by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. It shows mass-graded graphene flakes reveal no thermal rectification effect in thermal conduction process. Dependences of thermal conductivity upon the heat fluxes and the mass gradients are studied. It is found that thermal conductivity would be dramatically decreased by increasing the mass gradients. We also discuss the influence of thermal curvatures and thermal expansions upon the thermal conduction process in mass-graded graphene flakes.

Cheh, Jigger

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Mercury's Protoplanetary Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Major element fractionation among chondrites has been discussed for decades as ratios relative to Si or Mg. Recently, by expressing ratios relative to Fe, I discovered a new relationship admitting the possibility that ordinary chondrite meteorites are derived from two components, a relatively oxidized and undifferentiated, primitive component and a somewhat differentiated, planetary component, with oxidation state like the highly reduced enstatite chondrites, which I suggested was identical to Mercury's complement of lost elements. Here, on the basis of that relationship, I derive expressions, as a function of the mass of planet Mercury and the mass of its core, to estimate the mass of Mercury's lost elements, the mass of Mercury's alloy and rock protoplanetary core, and the mass of Mercury's gaseous protoplanet. Although Mercury's mass is well known, its core mass is not, being widely believed to be in the range of 70-80 percent of the planet mass. For a core mass of 75 percent, the mass of Mercury's lost elements is about 1.32 times the mass of Mercury, the mass of the alloy and rock protoplanetary core is about 2.32 times the mass of Mercury, and the mass of the gaseous protoplanet of Mercury is about 700 times the mass of Mercury. Circumstantial evidence is presented in support of the supposition that Mercury's lost elements is identical to the planetary component of ordinary chondrite formation.

J. Marvin Herndon

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Laser beam guard clamps  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A quick insert and release laser beam guard panel clamping apparatus having a base plate mountable on an optical table, a first jaw affixed to the base plate, and a spring-loaded second jaw slidably carried by the base plate to exert a clamping force. The first and second jaws each having a face acutely angled relative to the other face to form a V-shaped, open channel mouth, which enables wedge-action jaw separation by and subsequent clamping of a laser beam guard panel inserted through the open channel mouth. Preferably, the clamping apparatus also includes a support structure having an open slot aperture which is positioned over and parallel with the open channel mouth.

Dickson, Richard K. (Stockton, CA)

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

284

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-5 1-5 Nov. 10, 2008 Nov. 11, 2008 Nov. 12, 2008 Nov. 13, 2008 Nov. 14, 2008 Nov. 15, 2008 Nov. 16, 2008 DOWN FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI BEAM LINE 7-1 Nov. 10, 2008 Nov. 11, 2008 Nov. 12, 2008 Nov. 13, 2008 Nov. 14, 2008 Nov. 15, 2008 Nov. 16, 2008 DOWN FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI

285

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-5 1-5 Nov. 05, 2007 Nov. 06, 2007 Nov. 07, 2007 Nov. 08, 2007 Nov. 09, 2007 Nov. 10, 2007 Nov. 11, 2007 Unscheduled FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI BEAM LINE 7-1 Nov. 05, 2007 Nov. 06, 2007 Nov. 07, 2007 Nov. 08, 2007 Nov. 09, 2007 Nov. 10, 2007 Nov. 11, 2007 Unscheduled FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI

286

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Mar. 15, 2004 Mar. 16, 2004 Mar. 17, 2004 Mar. 18, 2004 Mar. 19, 2004 Mar. 20, 2004 Mar. 21, 2004 DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN BEAM LINE 1-5 Mar. 15, 2004 Mar. 16, 2004 Mar. 17, 2004 Mar. 18, 2004 Mar. 19, 2004 Mar. 20, 2004 Mar. 21, 2004 DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN

287

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5-1 5-1 Nov. 28, 2005 Nov. 29, 2005 Nov. 30, 2005 Dec. 01, 2005 Dec. 02, 2005 Dec. 03, 2005 Dec. 04, 2005 MA FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI BEAM LINE 5-2 Nov. 28, 2005 Nov. 29, 2005 Nov. 30, 2005 Dec. 01, 2005 Dec. 02, 2005 Dec. 03, 2005 Dec. 04, 2005 MA FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI

288

Ion beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam.

Brown, Ian G. (1088 Woodside Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); Galvin, James (2 Commodore #276, Emeryville, CA 94608)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Ion beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam. 10 figs.

Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.

1987-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

290

Relativistic electron beam device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A design is given for an electron beam device for irradiating spherical hydrogen isotope bearing targets. The accelerator, which includes hollow cathodes facing each other, injects an anode plasma between the cathodes and produces an approximately 10 nanosecond, megajoule pulse between the anode plasma and the cathodes. Targets may be repetitively positioned within the plasma between the cathodes, and accelerator diode arrangement permits materials to survive operation in a fusion power source. (auth)

Freeman, J.R.; Poukey, J.W.; Shope, S.L.; Yonas, G.

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Stationary nonlinear Airy beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate the existence of an additional class of stationary accelerating Airy wave forms that exist in the presence of third-order (Kerr) nonlinearity and nonlinear losses. Numerical simulations and experiments, in agreement with the analytical model, highlight how these stationary solutions sustain the nonlinear evolution of Airy beams. The generic nature of the Airy solution allows extension of these results to other settings, and a variety of applications are suggested.

Lotti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Matematica, Universita del'Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, I-22100 Como (Italy); Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Faccio, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Matematica, Universita del'Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, I-22100 Como (Italy); School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, SUPA, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Couairon, A. [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Papazoglou, D. G. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas (FORTH), P.O. Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion (Greece); Materials Science and Technology Department, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece); Panagiotopoulos, P.; Tzortzakis, S. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas (FORTH), P.O. Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion (Greece); Abdollahpour, D. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas (FORTH), P.O. Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion (Greece); Physics Department, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

edited1_TopQuarkMass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CALCULATE THE TOP QUARK MASS CALCULATE THE TOP QUARK MASS TEACHER NOTES DESCRIPTION Students use momentum conservation, energy conservation and two-dimensional vector addition to calculate the mass of the heaviest of the six known quarks. They gather data from data plots from the DØ experiment at Fermilab. The events were chosen carefully; all of the decay products moved in a plane perpendicular to the beam. This makes the vector addition much simpler. STANDARDS National Science Education Standards (U.S. National Research Council) * Physical Science Content Standard B: As a result of this activity . . . students should develop an understanding of: o Conservation of energy and increase in disorder. o Interactions in energy and matter. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Students will know and be able to:

293

Mass Spectrometer for High Molecular Weight Ions and Charged Particles  

APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Biotechnology ; Structural biology ; Materials science studies of nanoparticles ; ADVANTAGES:

294

Higgs Recoil Mass and Higgs-Strahlung Cross-Section Study for the ILD LOI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This proceeding summarizes the Higgs recoil mass and Higgs-strahlung cross-section study done for the Letter of Intent (LOI) of the International Large Detector (ILD) Concept. Assuming a Higgs mass of 120 GeV, working at 250 GeV center of mass energy with beam parameters RDR250 and beam polarization, this full simulation study predicts that, the ILD detector can achieve 37 MeV precision on the Higgs mass measurement and 3.3% on the cross-section measurement from the muon channel, while 83 MeV and 4.9% from the electron channel, if we have 250 inverse fb integrated luminosity.

Hengne Li

2010-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

295

Beam-Beam Interaction Simulations with Guinea Pig  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 SLAC-TN-03-070 September 2003 Beam-Beam Interaction Simulations with Guinea Pig C. Sramek, T. O. Raubenheimer, A. Seryi, M. Woods, J. Yu Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford University Stanford, CA Abstract: At the interaction point of a particle accelerator, various phenomena occur that are known as beam-beam effects. Incident bunches of electrons (or positrons) experience strong electromagnetic fields from the opposing bunches, which leads to electron deflection, beamstrahlung and the creation of electron/positron pairs and hadrons due to two-photon exchange. In addition, the beams experience a "pinch effect" which focuses each beam and results in either a reduction or expansion of their vertical size. Finally, if a

296

BEAM HALO FORMATION IN HIGH-INTENSITY BEAMS.  

SciTech Connect

Studies of beam halo became unavoidable feature of high-intensity machines where uncontrolled beam loss should be kept to extremely small level. For a well controlled stable beam such a loss is typically associated with the low density halo surrounding beam core. In order to minimize uncontrolled beam loss or improve performance of an accelerator, it is very important to understand what are the sources of halo formation in a specific machine of interest. The dominant mechanisms are, in fact, different in linear accelerators, circular machines or Energy Recovering Linacs (ERL). In this paper, we summarize basic mechanisms of halo formation in high-intensity beams and discuss their application to various types of accelerators of interest, such as linacs, rings and ERL.

FEDOTOV, A.V.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

297

A low energy beam transport system for proton beam  

SciTech Connect

A low energy beam transport (LEBT) system has been built for a compact pulsed hadron source (CPHS) at Tsinghua University in China. The LEBT, consisting of two solenoids and three short-drift sections, transports a pulsed proton beam of 60 mA of energy of 50 keV to the entrance of a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ). Measurement has shown a normalized RMS beam emittance less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad at the end of the LEBT. Beam simulations were carried out to compare with the measurement and are in good agreement. Based on the successful CPHS LEBT development, a new LEBT for a China ADS projector has been designed. The features of the new design, including a beam chopper and beam simulations of the LEBT are presented and discussed along with CPHS LEBT development in this article.

Yang, Y. [Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhang, Z. M.; Wu, Q.; Zhang, W. H.; Ma, H. Y.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Liu, Z. W.; He, Y.; Zhao, H. W.; Xie, D. Z. [Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Theoretical Mass Spectrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Mass spectrometry is an important technique in analytical chemistry, essential in areas including drug development, criminal ... Facilities/Tools Used: ...

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

299

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Mar. 15, 2004 Mar. 16, 2004 Mar. 17, 2004 Mar. 18, 2004 Mar. 19, 2004 Mar. 20, 2004 Mar. 21, 2004 DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN BEAM LINE 9-1 Mar. 15, 2004 Mar. 16, 2004 Mar. 17, 2004 Mar. 18, 2004 Mar. 19, 2004 Mar. 20, 2004 Mar. 21, 2004 Unscheduled CHANGE/8837 A.COHE 8837 A.COHEN 8837 A.COHEN 8837 A.COHEN 8837 A.COHEN 8837 A.COHEN

300

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-4 1-4 Oct. 30, 2006 Oct. 31, 2006 Nov. 01, 2006 Nov. 02, 2006 Nov. 03, 2006 Nov. 04, 2006 Nov. 05, 2006 DOWN Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled BEAM LINE 2-1 Oct. 30, 2006 Oct. 31, 2006 Nov. 01, 2006 Nov. 02, 2006 Nov. 03, 2006 Nov. 04, 2006 Nov. 05, 2006 DOWN 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

Precision Absolute Beam Current Measurement of Low Power Electron Beam  

SciTech Connect

Precise measurements of low power CW electron beam current for the Jefferson Lab Nuclear Physics program have been performed using a Tungsten calorimeter. This paper describes the rationale for the choice of the calorimeter technique, as well as the design and calibration of the device. The calorimeter is in use presently to provide a 1% absolute current measurement of CW electron beam with 50 to 500 nA of average beam current and 1-3 GeV beam energy. Results from these recent measurements will also be presented.

Ali, M. M.; Bevins, M. E.; Degtiarenko, P.; Freyberger, A.; Krafft, G. A.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Elbow mass flow meter  

SciTech Connect

Elbow mass flow meter. The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity.

McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); Ortiz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey -- III. Characterizing Physical Properties of Massive Star-Forming Regions in the Gemini OB1 Molecular Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the 1.1 millimeter Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) observations of the Gemini OB1 molecular cloud complex, and targeted ammonia observations of the BGPS sources. When paired with molecular spectroscopy of a dense gas tracer, millimeter observations yield physical properties such as masses, radii, mean densities, kinetic temperatures and line widths. We detect 34 distinct BGPS sources above 5-sigma=0.37 Jy/beam with corresponding 5-sigma detections in the ammonia (1,1) transition. Eight of the objects show water maser emission (20%). We find a mean millimeter source FWHM of 1.12 pc, and a mean kinetic temperature of 20 K for the sample of 34 BGPS sources. The observed ammonia line widths are dominated by non-thermal motions, typically found to be a few times the thermal sound speed expected for the derived kinetic temperature. We calculate the mass for each source from the millimeter flux assuming the sources are isothermal and find a mean isothermal mass within a 120" aperture of 230 +/- 180 s...

Dunham, Miranda K; Evans, Neal J; Cyganowski, Claudia J; Aguirre, James; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Bradley, Eric Todd; Dowell, Darren; Drosback, Meredith; Ginsburg, Adam; Glenn, Jason; Harvey, Paul; Merello, Manuel; Schlingman, Wayne; Shirley, Yancy L; Stringfellow, Guy S; Walawender, Josh; Williams, Jonathan P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Magnetically operated beam dump for dumping high power beams in a neutral beamline  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of this invention to provide a beam dump system for a neutral beam generator which lowers the time-averaged power density of the beam dump impingement surface. Another object of this invention is to provide a beam dump system for a neutral particle beam based on reionization and subsequent magnetic beam position modulation of the beam onto a beam dump surface to lower the time-averaged power density of the beam dump ion impingement surface.

Dagenhart, W.K.

1984-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

305

LANL: Ion Beam Materials Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ion Beam Materials Laboratory (IBML) is a Los Ion Beam Materials Laboratory (IBML) is a Los Alamos National Laboratory resource devoted to materi- als research through the use of ion beams. Current major research areas include surface characterization through ion beam analysis techniques, surface modification and materials synthesis through ion implantation technology, and radiation damage stud- ies in gases, liquids, and solids. The laboratory's core is a 3.2 MV tandem ion accelerator and a 200 kV ion implanter together with several beam lines. Attached to each beam line is a series of experimental stations that support various research programs. The operation of IBML and its interactions with users are organized around core facilities and experimental stations. The IBML provides and operates the core facilities as well as supports

306

Beam-line cryopump  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A cryopumping module using metallic surfaces at liquid helium temperature for condensation of hydrogen and deuterium gas has been constructed. This pump, a prototype of four units which will provide pumping for the Livermore 200 kV test stand, will be used to verify the concept and establish engineering parameters. Upon completion of engineering tests and evaluation the pump will be installed in an operating beam line. The design point pumping capacity is 80,000 liters per second for hydrogen and deuterium at 10$sup -4$ torr based on sticking coefficients of 0.15 and 0.25, respectively. Both the liquid helium temperature pumping surface and the liquid nitrogen temperature radiation shields are constructed of quilted double wall cylindrical shells. The pumping shell dimensions are 1.5 meters dia. x 0.6 meters long. Cryogen circulation is convection current driven in both cases. Liquid helium is supplied from an overhead Dewar through bayonet coupling. In the 200 kV beam line, pumping modules will be supplied via transfer lines from a central Dewar. Voltage standoff will be accomplished in the transfer lines. (auth)

Duffy, T.J.; Oddon, L.D.

1975-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

307

Beam emittance measurements at Fermilab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We give short overview of various beam emittance measurement methods, currently applied at different machine locations for the Run II collider physics program at Fermilab. All these methods are based on beam profile measurements, and we give some examples of the related instrumentation techniques. At the end we introduce a multi-megawatt proton source project, currently under investigation at Fermilab, with respect to the beam instrumentation challenges.

Wendt, Manfred; Eddy, Nathan; Hu, Martin; Scarpine, Victor; Syphers, Mike; Tassotto, Gianni; Thurman-Keup, Randy; Yang, Ming-Jen; Zagel, James; /Fermilab

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

A pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To develop a flexible pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy. Dose distributions were calculated using the newly developed pencil beam algorithm and validated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods. Methods: The algorithm was based on the established theory of fluence weighted elemental pencil beam (PB) kernels. Using a new real-time splitting approach, a minimization routine selects the optimal shape for each sub-beam. Dose depositions along the beam path were determined using a look-up table (LUT). Data for LUT generation were derived from MC simulations in water using GATE 6.1. For materials other than water, dose depositions were calculated by the algorithm using water-equivalent depth scaling. Lateral beam spreading caused by multiple scattering has been accounted for by implementing a non-local scattering formula developed by Gottschalk. A new nuclear correction was modelled using a Voigt function and implemented by a LUT approach. Validation simulations have been performed using a phantom filled with homogeneous materials or heterogeneous slabs of up to 3 cm. The beams were incident perpendicular to the phantoms surface with initial particle energies ranging from 50 to 250 MeV/A with a total number of 10{sup 7} ions per beam. For comparison a special evaluation software was developed calculating the gamma indices for dose distributions. Results: In homogeneous phantoms, maximum range deviations between PB and MC of less than 1.1% and differences in the width of the distal energy falloff of the Bragg-Peak from 80% to 20% of less than 0.1 mm were found. Heterogeneous phantoms using layered slabs satisfied a {gamma}-index criterion of 2%/2mm of the local value except for some single voxels. For more complex phantoms using laterally arranged bone-air slabs, the {gamma}-index criterion was exceeded in some areas giving a maximum {gamma}-index of 1.75 and 4.9% of the voxels showed {gamma}-index values larger than one. The calculation precision of the presented algorithm was considered to be sufficient for clinical practice. Although only data for helium beams was presented, the performance of the pencil beam algorithm for proton beams was comparable. Conclusions: The pencil beam algorithm developed for helium ions presents a suitable tool for dose calculations. Its calculation speed was evaluated to be similar to other published pencil beam algorithms. The flexible design allows easy customization of measured depth-dose distributions and use of varying beam profiles, thus making it a promising candidate for integration into future treatment planning systems. Current work in progress deals with RBE effects of helium ions to complete the model.

Fuchs, Hermann; Stroebele, Julia; Schreiner, Thomas; Hirtl, Albert; Georg, Dietmar [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria) and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna (Austria) and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); PEG MedAustron, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria) and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Broad-band beam buncher  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A broad-band beam buncher is disclosed, comprising an evacuated housing, an electron gun therein for producing an electron beam, a buncher cavity having entrance and exit openings through which the beam is directed, grids across such openings, a source providing a positive DC voltage between the cavity and the electron gun, a drift tube through which the electron beam travels in passing through such cavity, grids across the ends of such drift tube, gaps being provided between the drift tube grids and the entrance and exit grids, a modulator for supplying an ultrahigh frequency modulating signal to the drift tube for producing velocity modulation of the electrons in the beam, a drift space in the housing through which the velocity modulated electron beam travels and in which the beam is bunched, and a discharge opening from such drift tube and having a grid across such opening through which the bunched electron beam is discharged into an accelerator or the like. The buncher cavity and the drift tube may be arranged to constitute an extension of a coaxial transmission line which is employed to deliver the modulating signal from a signal source. The extended transmission line may be terminated in its characteristic impedance to afford a broad-band response and the device as a whole designed to effect broad-band beam coupling, so as to minimize variations of the output across the response band.

Goldberg, David A. (Walnut Creek, CA); Flood, William S. (Berkeley, CA); Arthur, Allan A. (Martinez, CA); Voelker, Ferdinand (Orinda, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Electron Beam Melting (EBM) II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011 ... Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Electron Beam Melting (EBM) II Sponsored by: MS&T Organization Program Organizers: Ian D. Harris, EWI; ...

311

Accelerators, Beams And Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators And Beams  

SciTech Connect

Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

312

Mass Wasting in the Western Galapagos Islands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oceanic island volcanoes such as those in the Hawaiian, Canary and Galapagos Islands are known to become unstable, causing failures of the subaerial and submarine slopes of the volcanic edifices. These mass wasting events appear to be the primary source of destruction and loss of volume of many oceanic islands, but our knowledge of mass wasting is still rudimentary in many seamount and island chains. To better understand mass wasting in the western Galapagos Islands, multi-beam bathymetry and backscatter sidescan sonar images were used to examine topography and acoustic backscatter signatures that are characteristic of mass wasting. Observations show that mass wasting plays an important role in the development of Galapagos volcanoes. While volcanic activity continues to conceal the submarine terrain, the data show that four forms of mass wasting are identified including debris flows, slumps sheets, chaotic slumps, and detached blocks. A total of 23 mass wasting features were found to exist in the western Galapagos Islands, including fourteen debris flows with one that incorporated a set of detached blocks, seven slump sheets, and one chaotic slump. Some of the indentified features have obvious origination zones while the sources of others are not clearly identifiable. Approximately 73 percent of the surveyed coastlines are affected by slumping on the steep upper slopes and ~64 percent are affected by debris flows on the lower slopes. Unlike the giant landslides documented by GLORIA imagery around the Hawaiian Islands, the western Galapagos Islands appear to be characterized by small slump sheets existing along the steep shallow submarine flanks of the island and by debris flows that are flanked by rift zones and extend off the platform. This study indicates that submarine mass wasting is widespread in the western Galapagos, suggesting that the production of small-scale downslope movement is part of the erosive nature of these oceanic volcanic islands.

Hall, Hillary

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

NEUTRAL-BEAM INJECTION  

SciTech Connect

The emphasis in the preceding chapters has been on magnetic confinement of high temperature plasmas. The question of production and heating of such plasmas has been dealt with relatively more briefly. It should not be inferred, however, that these matters must therefore be either trivial or unimportant. A review of the history reveals that in the early days all these aspects of the controlled fusion problem were considered to be on a par, and were tackled simultaneously and with equal vigor. Only the confinement problem turned out to be much more complex than initially anticipated, and richer in challenge to the plasma physicist than the questions of plasma production and heating. On the other hand, the properties of high-temperature plasmas and plasma confinement can only be studied experimentally after the problems of production and of heating to adequate temperatures are solved. It is the purpose of this and the next chapter to supplement the preceding discussions with more detail on two important subjects: neutral-beam injection and radio-frequency heating. These are the major contenders for heating in present and future tokamak and mirror fusion experiments, and even in several proposed reactors. For neutral beams we emphasize here the technology involved, which has undergone a rather remarkable development. The physics of particle and energy deposition in the plasma, and the discussion of the resulting effects on the confined plasma, have been included in previous chapters, and some experimental results are quoted there. Other heating processes of relevance to fusion are mentioned elsewhere in this book, in connection with the experiments where they are used: i.e. ohmic heating, adiabatic compression heating, and alpha-particle heating in Chapter 3 by H.P. Furth; more ohmic heating in Chapter 7, and shock-implosion heating, laser heating, and relativistic-electron beam heating in Chapter 8, both by W. E. Quinn. These methods are relatively straightforward in their physics and their technology, or in any case they are considered to be adequately covered by these other authors.

Kunkel, W.B.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Heavy Oil Upgrading from Electron Beam (E-Beam) Irradiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Society's growing demands for energy results in rapid increase in oil consumption and motivates us to make unconventional resources conventional resources. There are enormous amounts of heavy oil reserves in the world but the lack of cost effective technologies either for extraction, transportation, or refinery upgrading hinders the development of heavy oil reserves. One of the critical problems with heavy oil and bitumen is that they require large amounts of thermal energy and expensive catalysts to upgrade. This thesis demonstrates that electron beam (E-Beam) heavy oil upgrading, which uses unique features of E-Beam irradiation, may be used to improve conventional heavy oil upgrading. E-Beam processing lowers the thermal energy requirements and could sharply reduce the investment in catalysts. The design of the facilities can be simpler and will contribute to lowering the costs of transporting and processing heavy oil and bitumen. E-Beam technology uses the high kinetic energy of fast electrons, which not only transfer their energy but also interact with hydrocarbons to break the heavy molecules with lower thermal energy. In this work, we conducted three major stages to evaluate the applicability of E-Beam for heavy oil upgrading. First, we conducted laboratory experiments to investigate the effects of E-Beam on hydrocarbons. To do so, we used a Van de Graff accelerator, which generates the high kinetic energy of electrons, and a laboratory scale apparatus to investigate extensively how radiation effects hydrocarbons. Second, we studied the energy transfer mechanism of E-Beam upgrading to optimize the process. Third, we conducted a preliminary economic analysis based on energy consumption and compared the economics of E-Beam upgrading with conventional upgrading. The results of our study are very encouraging. From the experiments we found that E-Beam effect on hydrocarbon is significant. We used less thermal energy for distillation of n-hexadecane (n-C16) and naphtha with E-Beam. The results of experiments with asphaltene indicate that E-Beam enhances the decomposition of heavy hydrocarbon molecules and improves the quality of upgraded hydrocarbon. From the study of energy transfer mechanism, we estimated heat loss, fluid movement, and radiation energy distribution during the reaction. The results of our economic evaluation show that E-Beam upgrading appears to be economically feasible in petroleum industry applications. These results indicate significant potential for the application of E-Beam technology throughout the petroleum industry, particularly near production facilities, transportation pipelines, and refining industry.

Yang, Daegil

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Anomalous acid diffusion in a triphenylene molecular resist with melamine crosslinker  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Next generation lithography will require next generation resists. Molecular resists, based on small non-polymeric molecules, promise improvements in line width roughness and resolution control for high resolution lithographic patterns. However, these ... Keywords: Chemical amplification, Electron beam resist, Lithography, Melamine, Molecular resist, Photoacid diffusion, Triphenylene

H. M. Zaid; M. Manickam; J. A. Preece; R. E. Palmer; A. P. G. Robinson

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Tuning the beam: a physics perspective on beam diagnostic instrumentation  

SciTech Connect

In a nutshell, the role of a beam diagnostic measurement is to provide information needed to get a particle beam from Point A (injection point) to Point B (a target) in a useable condition, with 'useable' meaning the right energy and size and with acceptable losses. Specifications and performance requirements of diagnostics are based on the physics of the particle beam to be measured, with typical customers of beam parameter measurements being the accelerator operators and accelerator physicists. This tutorial will be a physics-oriented discussion of the interplay between tuning evolutions and the beam diagnostics systems that support the machine tune. This will include the differences between developing a tune and maintaining a tune, among other things. Practical longitudinal and transverse tuning issues and techniques from a variety of proton and electron machines will also be discussed.

Gulley, Mark S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Molecular gas in nearby elliptical radio galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Powerful radio-AGN are hosted by massive elliptical galaxies which are usually very poor in molecular gas. Nevertheless the central Black Hole (BH) needs molecular gas for the nuclear activity. Thus it is important to study the origin, the distribution and the kinematics of the molecular gas in such objects. We have performed at the IRAM-30m telescope a survey of the CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) emission in the most powerful radio galaxies of the Local Universe, selected only on the basis of their radio continuum fluxes. The main result of that survey is the low content in molecular gas of such galaxies compared to Seyfert galaxies. The median value of the molecular gas mass is 4x10^8 Msun. Moreover, the CO spectra indicate the presence of a central molecular gas disk in some of these radio galaxies. We complemented this survey with photometric data of SPITZER and IRAS fluxes with the purpose to study the dust and its relation with the molecular gas and AGN.

B. Ocana-Flaquer; S. Leon; J. Lim; F. Combes; Dinh-V-Trung

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Molecular gas in nearby elliptical radio galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Powerful radio-AGN are hosted by massive elliptical galaxies which are usually very poor in molecular gas. Nevertheless the central Black Hole (BH) needs molecular gas for the nuclear activity. Thus it is important to study the origin, the distribution and the kinematics of the molecular gas in such objects. We have performed at the IRAM-30m telescope a survey of the CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) emission in the most powerful radio galaxies of the Local Universe, selected only on the basis of their radio continuum fluxes. The main result of that survey is the low content in molecular gas of such galaxies compared to Seyfert galaxies. The median value of the molecular gas mass is 4x10^8 Msun. Moreover, the CO spectra indicate the presence of a central molecular gas disk in some of these radio galaxies. We complemented this survey with photometric data of SPITZER and IRAS fluxes with the purpose to study the dust and its relation with the molecular gas and AGN.

Ocana-Flaquer, B; Lim, J; Combes, F; Dinh-V-Trung,

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5-4 5-4 Nov. 05, 2007 Nov. 06, 2007 Nov. 07, 2007 Nov. 08, 2007 Nov. 09, 2007 Nov. 10, 2007 Nov. 11, 2007 Unscheduled 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU CHANGE/8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU BEAM LINE 8-1 Nov. 05, 2007 Nov. 06, 2007 Nov. 07, 2007 Nov. 08, 2007 Nov. 09, 2007 Nov. 10, 2007 Nov. 11, 2007 8821 D.Brehmer 8821 D.Brehmer 8821 D.Brehmer 3064* S.SUN 3075 M.GARNER 3075 M.GARNER 3075 M.GARNER

320

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2013 Nov. 11, 2013 Nov. 18, 2013 Nov. 25, 2013 4, 2013 Nov. 11, 2013 Nov. 18, 2013 Nov. 25, 2013 Dec. 02, 2013 Dec. 09, 2013 Dec. 16, 2013 Dec. 23, 2013 Dec. 30, 2013 Jan. 06, 2014 Jan. 13, 2014 Jan. 20, 2014 Jan. 27, 2014 Feb. 03, 2014 Back to Table of Contents WEEK OF Nov. 04, 2013 Ops Re-start Nov. 04, 2013 Nov. 05, 2013 Nov. 06, 2013 Nov. 07, 2013 Nov. 08, 2013 Nov. 09, 2013 Nov. 10, 2013 BEAM LINE 5-4 Nov. 04, 2013 Nov. 05, 2013 Nov. 06, 2013 Nov. 07, 2013 Nov. 08, 2013 Nov. 09, 2013 Nov. 10, 2013 DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-4 1-4 Nov. 28, 2005 Nov. 29, 2005 Nov. 30, 2005 Dec. 01, 2005 Dec. 02, 2005 Dec. 03, 2005 Dec. 04, 2005 MA 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE CHANGE/8840 J.POPL 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE BEAM LINE 2-1 Nov. 28, 2005 Nov. 29, 2005 Nov. 30, 2005 Dec. 01, 2005 Dec. 02, 2005 Dec. 03, 2005 Dec. 04, 2005 MA 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON

322

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5-4 5-4 Nov. 15, 2010 Nov. 16, 2010 Nov. 17, 2010 Nov. 18, 2010 Nov. 19, 2010 Nov. 20, 2010 Nov. 21, 2010 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU BEAM LINE 8-1 Nov. 15, 2010 Nov. 16, 2010 Nov. 17, 2010 Nov. 18, 2010 Nov. 19, 2010 Nov. 20, 2010 Nov. 21, 2010 Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled 3269 S.SUN 3269 S.SUN 3269 S.SUN 3269 S.SUN

323

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1, 2002 Nov. 18, 2002 Nov. 25, 2002 Dec. 02, 2002 1, 2002 Nov. 18, 2002 Nov. 25, 2002 Dec. 02, 2002 Dec. 09, 2002 Dec. 16, 2002 Dec. 23, 2002 Dec. 30, 2002 Jan. 06, 2003 Jan. 13, 2003 Jan. 20, 2003 Jan. 27, 2003 Feb. 03, 2003 Feb. 10, 2003 Feb. 17, 2003 Feb. 24, 2003 Mar. 03, 2003 Mar. 10, 2003 Mar. 17, 2003 Mar. 24, 2003 Mar. 31, 2003 Back to Table of Contents WEEK OF Nov. 11, 2002 Nov. 11, 2002 Nov. 12, 2002 Nov. 13, 2002 Nov. 14, 2002 Nov. 15, 2002 Nov. 16, 2002 Nov. 17, 2002 BEAM LINE 1-4 Nov. 11, 2002 Nov. 12, 2002 Nov. 13, 2002 Nov. 14, 2002 Nov. 15, 2002 Nov. 16, 2002 Nov. 17, 2002 Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled

324

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nov. 04, 2013 Nov. 11, 2013 Nov. 18, 2013 Nov. 25, 2013 Nov. 04, 2013 Nov. 11, 2013 Nov. 18, 2013 Nov. 25, 2013 Dec. 02, 2013 Dec. 09, 2013 Dec. 16, 2013 Dec. 23, 2013 Dec. 30, 2013 Jan. 06, 2014 Jan. 13, 2014 Jan. 20, 2014 Jan. 27, 2014 Feb. 03, 2014 Back to Table of Contents WEEK OF Nov. 04, 2013 Ops Re-start Nov. 04, 2013 Nov. 05, 2013 Nov. 06, 2013 Nov. 07, 2013 Nov. 08, 2013 Nov. 09, 2013 Nov. 10, 2013 BEAM LINE 1-4 Nov. 04, 2013 Nov. 05, 2013 Nov. 06, 2013 Nov. 07, 2013 Nov. 08, 2013 Nov. 09, 2013 Nov. 10, 2013 DOWN DOWN DOWN 8891 C.TASSONE 8891 C.TASSONE 8891 C.TASSONE 8891 C.TASSONE

325

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-4 1-4 Nov. 05, 2007 Nov. 06, 2007 Nov. 07, 2007 Nov. 08, 2007 Nov. 09, 2007 Nov. 10, 2007 Nov. 11, 2007 Unscheduled Unscheduled 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY Unscheduled CHANGE/8051 M.TONE 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY Unscheduled 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY BEAM LINE 2-1 Nov. 05, 2007 Nov. 06, 2007 Nov. 07, 2007 Nov. 08, 2007 Nov. 09, 2007 Nov. 10, 2007 Nov. 11, 2007 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 3157* M.MONTERO-CA 3087 L.FUENTES-COB 3087 L.FUENTES-COB

326

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-5 1-5 Nov. 28, 2005 Nov. 29, 2005 Nov. 30, 2005 Dec. 01, 2005 Dec. 02, 2005 Dec. 03, 2005 Dec. 04, 2005 MA 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ BEAM LINE 7-1 Nov. 28, 2005 Nov. 29, 2005 Nov. 30, 2005 Dec. 01, 2005 Dec. 02, 2005 Dec. 03, 2005 Dec. 04, 2005 MA DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN

327

Pulsed electron beam precharger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Florida State University is investigating the concept of pulsed electron beams for fly ash precipitation. This report describes the results and data on three of the subtasks of this project and preliminary work only on the remaining five subtasks. Described are the modification of precharger for pulsed and DC energization of anode; installation of the Q/A measurement system; and modification and installation of pulsed power supply to provide both pulsed and DC energization of the anode. The other tasks include: measurement of the removal efficiency for monodisperse simulated fly ash particles; measurement of particle charge; optimization of pulse energization schedule for maximum removal efficiency; practical assessment of results; and measurement of the removal efficiency for polydisperse test particles. 15 figs., 1 tab. (CK)

Finney, W.C. (ed.); Shelton, W.N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

MOLECULAR GAS IN LUMINOUS GALACTIC NUCLEI N. Z. SCOVILLE AND A. J. BAKER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MOLECULAR GAS IN LUMINOUS GALACTIC NUCLEI N. Z. SCOVILLE AND A. J. BAKER California Institute­wave interferometry has clearly shown the existence of enormous masses (10 9 \\Gamma 10 10 M fi ) of molecular gas. In these systems, molecular gas is an obvious source of fuel for nuclear starbursts and active galactic nuclei (AGN

Baker, Andrew J.

329

Nuclear reaction analysis of hydrogen in SSC beam pipe materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To control the photodesorption of molecular hydrogen, it is advantageous to reduce the amount of hydrogen in candidate SSC beam pipe materials and identify those procedures that: (1) lead to contamination of the beam pipe surface or materials, (2) would reduce the amount of hydrogen on the surface or in the bulk and (3) could be used for in-situ cleaning during Collider assembly or during Collider maintenance. Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) can be used to quantitatively measure the amount of hydrogen on the surface or within half a micron of the surface. The present report discusses data that has been obtained for candidate SSC beam pipe materials (Nitronix 40 Stainless Steel, Nitronix 40 SS coated with electrodeposited copper (Silvex process)), oxygen-free high conductivity copper (Hitachi 101 OFHC) and several miscellaneous samples. The work demonstrates the potential of the technique for characterizing the hydrogen concentration of accelerator beam pipe materials, for assisting in the development of better vacuum system materials for TeV-scale accelerators, and for the development of better beam pipe construction or maintenance procedures for future accelerator projects.

Ruckman, M.W.; Strongin, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Lanford, W.A. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Size, effect of flexible proof mass on the mechanical behavior of micron-scale cantilevers for energy harvesting appications.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanical behavior of micron-scale cantilevers with a distributed, flexible proof mass is investigated to understand proof mass size effects on the performance of microelectromechanical system energy harvesters. Single-crystal silicon beams with proof masses of various lengths were fabricated using focused ion beam milling and tested using atomic force microscopy. Comparison of three different modeling results with measured data reveals that a 'two-beam' method has the most accurate predictive capability in terms of both resonant frequency and strain. Accurate strain prediction is essential because energy harvested scales with strain squared and maximum strain will be a design limit in fatigue.

Kim, M.; Hong, S.; Miller, D. J.; Dugundji, J.; Wardle, B. L. (Materials Science Division); (MIT)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

REVIEW ARTICLE Molecular Anions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVIEW ARTICLE Molecular Anions Jack Simons Chemistry Department, Henry Eyring Center ReceiVed: February 28, 2008 The experimental and theoretical study of molecular anions has undergone on the experimental front. Theoretical developments on the electronic structure and molecular dynamics fronts now

Simons, Jack

332

Molecular Cell Short Article  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Cell Short Article Nucleosome Organization Affects the Sensitivity of Gene Expression to Promoter Mutations Gil Hornung,1 Moshe Oren,2 and Naama Barkai1,* 1Department of Molecular Genetics 2Department of Molecular Cell Biology Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel *Correspondence: naama

Barkai, Naama

333

Beam line windows at LAMPF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The A-6 main beam-line window at LAMPF separates the vacuum of the main beam line from the isotope production station, proton irradiation ports, and the beam stop, which operate in air. This window must withstand the design beam current of 1 mA at 800 MeV for periods of at least 3000 hours without failure. The window is water cooled and must be strong enough to withstand the 2.1 MPa (300 psig) cooling water pressure, as well as beam-induced thermal stresses. Two designs have been used to meet these goals, a stepped-plate window and a hemispherical window, both made from a precipitation-hardened nickel base alloy, Alloy 718. Calculations of the temperatures and stresses in each of these windows are presented.

Brown, R.D.; Grisham, D.L.; Lambert, J.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

IonBeamMicroFab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ion Beam Manufacture of Microscale Ion Beam Manufacture of Microscale Tools and Components Manufacturing Technologies Sandia Manufacturing Science &Technology's Focused Ion Beam (FIB) laboratory provides an opportunity for research, development and prototyping. Currently, our scientists are devel- oping methods for ion beam sculpting microscale tools, components and devices. This includes shaping of specialty tools such as end-mills, turning tools and indenters. Many of these have been used in ultra-precision machining DOE applications. Additionally, staff are developing the capability to ion mill geo- metrically-complex features and substrates. This includes the ability to sputter predeter- mined curved shapes of various symmetries and periodicities. Capabilities and Expertise * Two custom-built focused ion beam sys-

335

Laser-beam-alignment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plurality of pivotal reflectors direct a high-power laser beam onto a workpiece, and a rotatable reflector is movable to a position wherein it intercepts the beam and deflects a major portion thereof away from its normal path, the remainder of the beam passing to the pivotal reflectors through an aperture in the rotating reflector. A plurality of targets are movable to positions intercepting the path of light traveling to the pivotal reflectors, and a preliminary adjustment of the latter is made by use of a low-power laser beam reflected from the rotating reflector, after which the same targets are used to make a final adjustment of the pivotal reflectors with the portion of the high-power laser beam passed through the rotating reflector. The system was developed to cut the casings of spent nuclear fuel elements into segments as the initial step in recovering usable fuel. (WHK)

Kasner, W.H.; Racki, D.J.; Swenson, C.E.

1982-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

336

Beamed Energy Propulsion: Research Status And Needs--Part 1  

SciTech Connect

One promising solution to the operationally responsive space is the application of remote electromagnetic energy to propel a launch vehicle into orbit. With beamed energy propulsion, one can leave the power source stationary on the ground or space, and direct heat propellant on the spacecraft with a beam from a fixed station. This permits the spacecraft to leave its power source at home, saving significant amounts of mass, greatly improving performance. This concept, which removes the mass penalty of carrying the propulsion energy source on board the vehicle, was first proposed by Arthur Kantrowitz in 1972; he invoked an extremely powerful ground based laser. The same year Michael Minovich suggested a conceptually similar 'in-space' laser rocket system utilizing a remote laser power station. In the late 1980's, Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) funded continuous, double pulse laser and microwave propulsion while Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) funded ablative laser rocket propulsion. Currently AFOSR has been funding the concept initiated by Leik Myrabo, repetitively pulsed laser propulsion, which has been universally perceived, arguably, to be the closest for mid-term applications. This 2-part paper examines the investment strategies in beamed energy propulsion and technical challenges to be overcome. Part 1 presents a world-wide review of beamed energy propulsion research, including both laser and microwave arenas.

Birkan, Mitat [Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Arlington, Virginia, 22203 (United States)

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

337

Molecular oxygen in the rho Ophiuchi cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular oxygen, O2 has been expected historically to be an abundant component of the chemical species in molecular clouds and, as such, an important coolant of the dense interstellar medium. However, a number of attempts from both ground and from space have failed to detect O2 emission. The work described here uses heterodyne spectroscopy from space to search for molecular oxygen in the interstellar medium. The Odin satellite carries a 1.1 m sub-millimeter dish and a dedicated 119 GHz receiver for the ground state line of O2. Starting in 2002, the star forming molecular cloud core rho Oph A was observed with Odin for 34 days during several observing runs. We detect a spectral line at v(LSR) = 3.5 km/s with dv(FWHM) = 1.5 km/s, parameters which are also common to other species associated with rho Ohp A. This feature is identified as the O2 (N_J = 1_1 - 1_0) transition at 118 750.343 MHz. The abundance of molecular oxygen, relative to H2,, is 5E-8 averaged over the Odin beam. This abundance is consistently lower than previously reported upper limits.

B. Larsson; R. Liseau; L. Pagani; P. Bergman; P. Bernath; N. Biver; J. H. Black; R. S. Booth; V. Buat; J. Crovisier; C. L. Curry; M. Dahlgren; P. J. Encrenaz; E. Falgarone; P. A. Feldman; M. Fich; H. G. Flore'n; M. Fredrixon; U. Frisk; G. F. Gahm; M. Gerin; M. Hagstroem; J. Harju; T. Hasegawa; Aa. Hjalmarson; C. Horellou; L. E. B. Johansson; K. Justtanont; A. Klotz; E. Kyroelae; S. Kwok; A. Lecacheux; T. Liljestroem; E. J. Llewellyn; S. Lundin; G. Me'gie; G. F. Mitchell; D. Murtagh; L. H. Nordh; L. -Aa. Nyman; M. Olberg; A. O. H. Olofsson; G. Olofsson; H. Olofsson; G. Persson; R. Plume; H. Rickman; I. Ristorcelli; G. Rydbeck; Aa. Sandqvist; F. v. Sche'ele; G. Serra; S. Torchinsky; N. F. Tothill; K. Volk; T. Wiklind; C. D. Wilson; A. Winnberg; G. Witt

2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

338

Does Information Have Mass?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Does information have mass? This question has been asked many times and there are many answers even on the Internet, including on Yahoo Answers. Usually the answer is "no". Attempts have been made to assess the physical mass of information by estimating the mass of electrons feeding the power-guzzling computers and devices making up the Internet, the result being around 50 gram. Other efforts to calculate the mass of information have assumed that each electron involved in signal transfer carries one bit of information, which makes the corresponding mass to be about 10^-5 gram. We address the fundamental question of minimum mass related to a bit of information from the angles of quantum physics and special relativity. Our results indicate that there are different answers depending on the physical situation, and sometimes the mass can even be negative. We tend to be skeptical about the earlier mass estimations, mentioned above, because our results indicate that the electron's mass does not play a role in any on...

Kish, Laszlo B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Nuclear Masses in Astrophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among all nuclear ground-state properties, atomic masses are highly specific for each particular combination of N and Z and the data obtained apply to a variety of physics topics. One of the most crucial questions to be addressed in mass spectrometry of unstable radionuclides is the one of understanding the processes of element formation in the Universe. To this end, accurate atomic mass values of a large number of exotic nuclei participating in nucleosynthesis are among the key input data in large-scale reaction network calculations. In this paper, a review on the latest achievements in mass spectrometry for nuclear astrophysics is given.

Christine Weber; Klaus Blaum; Hendrik Schatz

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

340

Mass-Loaded Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A key process within astronomy is the exchange of mass, momentum, and energy between diffuse plasmas in many types of astronomical sources (including planetary nebulae, wind-blown bubbles, supernova remnants, starburst superwinds, and the intracluster medium) and dense, embedded clouds or clumps. This transfer affects the large scale flows of the diffuse plasmas as well as the evolution of the clumps. I review our current understanding of mass-injection processes, and examine intermediate-scale structure and the global effect of mass-loading on a flow. I then discuss mass-loading in a variety of diffuse sources.

J. M. Pittard

2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

New aspects of beam-beam interactions in hadron colliders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beam-beam phenomena have until now limited the beam currents and luminosity achievable in the Tevatron. injected proton currents are about ten times larger than the anti-proton currents so beam-beam effects have largely acted on the anti-protons and at all stages of the operational cycle. The effects of the anti-protons on the protons have until now been relatively benign but that may change at higher anti-proton currents. After 36 bunches of protons are injected and placed on the proton helix, anti-protons are injected four bunches at a time. After all bunches are injected, acceleration to top energy takes bout 85 seconds. After reaching flat top, the optics around the interaction regions (IRs) is changed to lower {beta}* from 1.6 m to 0.35 m at B0 and D0. The beams are brought into collision by collapsing the separation bumps around the IPs. During a high energy physics store each bunch experiences two head-on collisions with bunches in the opposing beam and seventy long-range interactions. At all other stages of the operational cycle, each bunch experiences only long-range interactions--seventy two in all. Performance limitations from beam-beam effects until now have been primarily due to these long-range interactions. The anti-proton losses at 150 GeV have decreased during the last year mostly due to better control of the orbits, tunes and chromaticities. During this period proton intensities have increased about 50%, thus anti-proton losses at 150 GeV have not been very dependent on proton intensities. Anti-proton and proton losses on the ramp together with proton losses at 150 GeV are the dominant contributors to the Tevatron inefficiency.

Tanaji Sen

2003-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

342

Laser beam alignment apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure relates to an apparatus and method for laser beam alignment. Thermoelectric properties of a disc in a laser beam path are used to provide an indication of beam alignment and/or automatic laser alignment.

Gruhn, Charles R. (Martinez, CA); Hammond, Robert B. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Results from STAR Beam Energy Scan Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results from the Beam Energy Scan (BES) program conducted recently by STAR experiment at RHIC are presented. The data from Phase-I of the BES program collected in Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energies (\\sqrt{s_{NN}}) of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, and 39 GeV cover a wide range of baryon chemical potential ?\\mu_B (100-400 MeV) in the QCD phase diagram. Several STAR results from the BES Phase-I related to "turn-o?ff" of strongly inter- acting quark-gluon plasma (sQGP) signatures and signals of QCD phase boundary are reported. In addition to this, an outlook is presented for the future BES Phase-II program and a possible ?fixed target program at STAR.

Michal Sumbera

2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

344

PURIFICATION OF IRIDIUM BY ELECTRON BEAM MELTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purification of iridium metal by electron beam melting has been characterized for 48 impurity elements. Chemical analysis was performed by glow discharge mass spectrographic (GDMS) analysis for all elements except carbon, which was analyzed by combustion. The average levels of individual elemental impurities in the starting powder varied from 37 g/g to 0.02 g/g. The impurity elements Li, Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, Tl, Pb, and Bi were not detectable following the purification. No significant change in concentration of the elements Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Re was found. The elements B, C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Ru, Rh, and Pt were partially removed by vaporization during electron beam melting. Langmuir's equation for ideal vaporization into a vacuum was used to calculate for each impurity element the expected ratio of impurity content after melting to that before melting. Equilibrium vapor pressures were calculated using Henry's law, with activity coefficients obtained from published data for the elements Fe, Ti, and Pt. Activity coefficients were estimated from enthalpy data for Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Hf and an ideal solution model was used for the remaining elements. The melt temperature was determined from measured iridium weight loss. Excellent agreement was found between measured and calculated impurity ratios for all impurity elements. The results are consistent with some localized heating of the melt pool due to rastering of the electron beam, with an average vaporization temperature of 3100 K as compared to a temperature of 2965 K calculated for uniform heating of the melt pool. The results are also consistent with ideal mixing in the melt pool.

Ohriner, Evan Keith [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Water in the envelopes and disks around young high-mass stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single-dish spectra and interferometric maps of (sub)mm lines of H2O-18 and HDO are used to study the chemistry of water in eight regions of high-mass star formation. The spectra indicate HDO excitation temperatures of ~110 K and column densities in an 11'' beam of ~2x10^14 cm^-2 for HDO and ~2x10^17 cm^-2 for H2O, with the N(HDO)/N(H2O) ratio increasing with decreasing temperature. Simultaneous observations of CH3OH and SO2 indicate that 20-50% of the single-dish line flux arises in the molecular outflows of these objects. The outflow contribution to the H2O-18 and HDO emission is estimated to be 10-20%. Radiative transfer models indicate that the water abundance is low (~10^-6) outside a critical radius corresponding to a temperature in the protostellar envelope of ~100 K, and `jumps' to H2O/H2 ~ 10^-4 inside this radius. This value corresponds to the observed abundance of solid water and together with the derived HDO/H2O abundance ratios of ~1/1000 suggests that the origin of the observed water is evaporation of grain mantles. This idea is confirmed in the case of AFGL 2591 by interferometer observations of HDO, H2O-18 and SO2 lines, which reveal compact (~800 AU) emission with a systematic velocity gradient. This size is similar to that of the 1.3 mm continuum towards AFGL 2591, from which we estimate a mass of ~0.8 M0, or ~5% of the mass of the central star. We speculate that we may be observing a circumstellar disk in an almost face-on orientation.

Floris van der Tak; Malcolm Walmsley; Fabrice Herpin; Cecilia Ceccarelli

2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

346

LHCb Beam-Gas Imaging Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high resolution of the LHCb vertex detector makes it possible to perform precise measurements of vertices of beam-gas and beam-beam interactions and allows beam parameters such as positions, angles and widths to be determined. Using the directly measured beam properties the novel beam-gas imaging method is applied in LHCb for absolute luminosity determination. In this contribution we briefly describe the method and the preliminary results obtained with May 2010 data.

P. Hopchev

2011-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

347

OBSERVATION OF STRONG - STRONG AND OTHER BEAM - BEAM EFFECTS IN RHIC.  

SciTech Connect

RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. For the first time, coherent beam-beam modes were observed in a bunched beam hadron collider. Other beam-beam effects in RHIC were observed in operation and in dedicated experiments with gold ions, deuterons and protons. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. During ramps unequal radio frequencies in the two rings cause the crossing points to move longitudinally. Thus bunches experience beam-beam interactions only in intervals and the tunes are modulated. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made so far.

Fischer, W; Brennan, J M; Cameron, P; Connolly, R; Montag, C; Peggs, S; Pilat, F; Ptitsyn, V; Tepikian, S; Trbojevic, D

2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

348

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probing Organic Transistors with Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Wednesday, 26 July 2006 00:00 Silicon-based transistors are well-understood, basic components of contemporary electronic technology. In contrast, there is growing need for the development of electronic devices based on organic polymer materials. Organic field-effect transistors (FETs) are ideal for special applications that require large areas, light weight, and structural flexibility. They also have the advantage of being easy to mass-produce at very low cost. However, even though this class of devices is finding a growing number of applications, electronic processes in organic materials are still not well understood. A group of researchers from the University of California and the ALS has succeeded in probing the intrinsic electronic properties of the charge carriers in organic FETs using infrared spectromicroscopy. The results of their study could help in the future development of sensors, large-area displays, and other plastic electronic components.

349

On the Photon Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the case for the photon having a tiny mass compatible with the experimental limits. We go over some possible experimental tests for such a photon mass including the violation of Lorentz symmetry. We point out that such violations may already have been witnessed in tests involving high energy gamma rays from outer space as also ultra high energy cosmic rays.

Burra G. Sidharth

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

350

Thermal masses in leptogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the validity of using thermal masses in the kinematics of final states in the decay rate of heavy neutrinos in leptogenesis calculations. We find that using thermal masses this way is a reasonable approximation, but corrections arise through quantum statistical distribution functions and leptonic quasiparticles.

Kiessig, Clemens P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Elbow mass flow meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity. 3 figs.

McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.; Ortiz, C.A.; Nelson, D.C.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

352

The origin of mass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The origin of mass is one of the deepest mysteries in science. Neutrons and protons, which account for almost all visible mass in the Universe, emerged from a primordial plasma through a cataclysmic phase transition microseconds after the Big Bang. However, ... Keywords: Gordon Bell Prize categories: scalability and time to solution, SC13 proceedings

Peter Boyle, Michael I. Buchoff, Norman Christ, Taku Izubuchi, Chulwoo Jung, Thomas C. Luu, Robert Mawhinney, Chris Schroeder, Ron Soltz, Pavlos Vranas, Joseph Wasem

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Ion Beam Modification of Materials  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Ion Beam Modification of Materials, IBMM 2004, and is published by Elsevier-Science Publishers as a special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods B. The conference series is the major international forum to present and discuss recent research results and future directions in the field of ion beam modification, synthesis and characterization of materials. The first conference in the series was held in Budapest, Hungary, 1978, and subsequent conferences were held every two years at locations around the Globe, most recently in Japan, Brazil, and the Netherlands. The series brings together physicists, materials scientists, and ion beam specialists from all over the world. The official conference language is English. IBMM 2004 was held on September 5-10, 2004. The focus was on materials science involving both basic ion-solid interaction processes and property changes occurring either during or subsequent to ion bombardment and ion beam processing in relation to materials and device applications. Areas of research included Nanostructures, Multiscale Modeling, Patterning of Surfaces, Focused Ion Beams, Defects in Semiconductors, Insulators and Metals, Cluster Beams, Radiation Effects in Materials, Photonic Devices, Ion Implantation, Ion Beams in Biology and Medicine including New Materials, Imaging, and Treatment.

Averback, B; de la Rubia, T D; Felter, T E; Hamza, A V; Rehn, L E

2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

354

Intense low energy positron beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intense positron beams are under development or being considered at several laboratories. Already today a few accelerator based high intensity, low brightness e{sup +} beams exist producing of the order of 10{sup 8} {minus} 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec. Several laboratories are aiming at high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams with intensities greater than 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec and current densities of the order of 10{sup 13} {minus} 10{sup 14} e{sup +} sec{sup {minus}} {sup 1}cm{sup {minus}2}. Intense e{sup +} beams can be realized in two ways (or in a combination thereof) either through a development of more efficient B{sup +} moderators or by increasing the available activity of B{sup +} particles. In this review we shall mainly concentrate on the latter approach. In atomic physics the main trust for these developments is to be able to measure differential and high energy cross-sections in e{sup +} collisions with atoms and molecules. Within solid state physics high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams are in demand in areas such as the re-emission e{sup +} microscope, two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation, low energy e{sup +} diffraction and other fields. Intense e{sup +} beams are also important for the development of positronium beams, as well as exotic experiments such as Bose condensation and Ps liquid studies.

Lynn, K.G.; Jacobsen, F.M.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

Beam-powered lunar rover design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Manned exploration of our nearest neighbors in the solar systems is the primary goal of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). An integral part of any manned lunar or planetary outpost will be a system for manned excursions over the surface of the planet. This report presents a preliminary design for a lunar rover capable of supporting four astronauts on long-duration excursions across the lunar landscape. The distinguishing feature of this rover design is that power is provided to rover via a laser beam from an independent orbiting power satellite. This system design provides very high power availability with minimal mass on the rover vehicle. With this abundance of power, and with a relatively small power-system mass contained in the rover, the vehicle can perform an impressive suite of mission-related activity. The rover might be used as the first outpost for the lunar surface (i.e., a mobile base). A mobile base has the advantage of providing extensive mission activities without the expense of establishing a fixed base. This concept has been referred to as ``Rove First.`` A manned over, powered through a laser beam, has been designed for travel on the lunar surface for round-trip distances in the range of 1000 km, although the actual distance traveled is not crucial since the propulsion system does not rely on energy storage. The life support system can support a 4-person crew for up to 30 days, and ample power is available for mission-related activities. The 8000-kg rover has 30 kW of continuous power available via a laser transmitter located at the Earth-moon L1 libration point, about 50,000 km above the surface of the moon. This rover, which is designed to operate in either day or night conditions, has the flexibility to perform a variety of power-intensive missions. 24 refs.

Dagle, J.E.; Coomes, E.P.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Bamberger, J.A.; Bates, J.M.; Chiu, M.A.; Dodge, R.E.; Wise, J.A.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Beam-powered lunar rover design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Manned exploration of our nearest neighbors in the solar systems is the primary goal of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). An integral part of any manned lunar or planetary outpost will be a system for manned excursions over the surface of the planet. This report presents a preliminary design for a lunar rover capable of supporting four astronauts on long-duration excursions across the lunar landscape. The distinguishing feature of this rover design is that power is provided to rover via a laser beam from an independent orbiting power satellite. This system design provides very high power availability with minimal mass on the rover vehicle. With this abundance of power, and with a relatively small power-system mass contained in the rover, the vehicle can perform an impressive suite of mission-related activity. The rover might be used as the first outpost for the lunar surface (i.e., a mobile base). A mobile base has the advantage of providing extensive mission activities without the expense of establishing a fixed base. This concept has been referred to as Rove First.'' A manned over, powered through a laser beam, has been designed for travel on the lunar surface for round-trip distances in the range of 1000 km, although the actual distance traveled is not crucial since the propulsion system does not rely on energy storage. The life support system can support a 4-person crew for up to 30 days, and ample power is available for mission-related activities. The 8000-kg rover has 30 kW of continuous power available via a laser transmitter located at the Earth-moon L1 libration point, about 50,000 km above the surface of the moon. This rover, which is designed to operate in either day or night conditions, has the flexibility to perform a variety of power-intensive missions. 24 refs.

Dagle, J.E.; Coomes, E.P.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Bamberger, J.A.; Bates, J.M.; Chiu, M.A.; Dodge, R.E.; Wise, J.A.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7-1 7-1 Oct. 26, 2009 Oct. 27, 2009 Oct. 28, 2009 Oct. 29, 2009 Oct. 30, 2009 Oct. 31, 2009 Nov. 01, 2009 CHANGE/8803* C.SMI 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH BEAM LINE 9-1 Oct. 26, 2009 Oct. 27, 2009 Oct. 28, 2009 Oct. 29, 2009 Oct. 30, 2009 Oct. 31, 2009 Nov. 01, 2009 CHANGE/8861* I.MAT 8861* I.MATHEWS 8861* I.MATHEWS 8861* I.MATHEWS 8861* I.MATHEWS 8861* I.MATHEWS 8861* I.MATHEWS

358

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7-1 7-1 Nov. 15, 2010 Nov. 16, 2010 Nov. 17, 2010 Nov. 18, 2010 Nov. 19, 2010 Nov. 20, 2010 Nov. 21, 2010 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 2B87 I.SEVRIOUKOVA 2B87 I.SEVRIOUKOVA 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ MC CHECKOUT/2B87 2B87 I.SEVRIOUKOVA 2B87 I.SEVRIOUKOVA 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 2B87 I.SEVRIOUKOVA 2B87 I.SEVRIOUKOVA 2B87 I.SEVRIOUKOVA BEAM LINE 9-1 Nov. 15, 2010 Nov. 16, 2010 Nov. 17, 2010 Nov. 18, 2010 Nov. 19, 2010 Nov. 20, 2010 Nov. 21, 2010 8866 T.DOUKOV 8866 T.DOUKOV 8866 T.DOUKOV 8866 T.DOUKOV 8866 T.DOUKOV FACI FACI

359

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feb. 14, 2005 Feb. 21, 2005 Feb. 28, 2005 Mar. 07, 2005 Feb. 14, 2005 Feb. 21, 2005 Feb. 28, 2005 Mar. 07, 2005 Mar. 14, 2005 Mar. 21, 2005 Mar. 28, 2005 Apr. 04, 2005 Apr. 11, 2005 Apr. 18, 2005 Apr. 25, 2005 May 02, 2005 May 09, 2005 May 16, 2005 May 23, 2005 May 30, 2005 Jun. 06, 2005 Jun. 13, 2005 Jun. 20, 2005 Jun. 27, 2005 Jul. 04, 2005 Jul. 11, 2005 Jul. 18, 2005 Jul. 25, 2005 Aug. 01, 2005 Back to Table of Contents WEEK OF Feb. 14, 2005 Feb. 14, 2005 Feb. 15, 2005 Feb. 16, 2005 Feb. 17, 2005 Feb. 18, 2005 Feb. 19, 2005 Feb. 20, 2005 BEAM LINE 1-5 Feb. 14, 2005 Feb. 15, 2005 Feb. 16, 2005 Feb. 17, 2005 Feb. 18, 2005 Feb. 19, 2005 Feb. 20, 2005 8858 D.HARRINGTON 8858 D.HARRIN/DOWN 8858 D.HARRINGTON 8858 D.HARRINGTON 8858 D.HARRINGTON 8858 D.HARRINGTON 8858 D.HARRINGTON

360

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1, 2013 Nov. 18, 2013 Nov. 25, 2013 Dec. 02, 2013 1, 2013 Nov. 18, 2013 Nov. 25, 2013 Dec. 02, 2013 Dec. 09, 2013 Dec. 16, 2013 Dec. 23, 2013 Dec. 30, 2013 Jan. 06, 2014 Jan. 13, 2014 Jan. 20, 2014 Jan. 27, 2014 Feb. 03, 2014 Feb. 10, 2014 Feb. 17, 2014 Feb. 24, 2014 Back to Table of Contents WEEK OF Nov. 11, 2013 Nov. 11, 2013 Nov. 12, 2013 Nov. 13, 2013 Nov. 14, 2013 Nov. 15, 2013 Nov. 16, 2013 Nov. 17, 2013 BEAM LINE 7-1 Nov. 11, 2013 Nov. 12, 2013 Nov. 13, 2013 Nov. 14, 2013 Nov. 15, 2013 Nov. 16, 2013 Nov. 17, 2013 8803 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith 4B02 A.Yeh 8050 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith Unscheduled MC CHECKOUT/8050 8050 C.Smith

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

W Transverse Mass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Some Data Analysis Some Data Analysis The Tevatron produces millions of collisions each second in CDF and DZero. The detectors have hardware triggers to decide if a collision is "interesting," that is it contains a candidate event for any one of a number studies. Our dataset contains 48,844 candidate events for a W mass study. There are other datasets to study Z mass, top and b quarks, QCD, etc. Why don't all the W decays give exactly the same mass? Are all these candidates really Ws? What if we chose only some of these data. How would our choice effect the value of the transverse mass? Work with your classmates. Test the data to see what you can learn. Help with data analysis. Record the best estimate of the W transverse mass from your data analysis. Explain which data you used and why. Check with your classmates and explain any differences between your estimate and theirs.

362

THE BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY. III. CHARACTERIZING PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS IN THE GEMINI OB1 MOLECULAR CLOUD  

SciTech Connect

We present the 1.1 mm Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) observations of the Gemini OB1 molecular cloud complex, and targeted NH{sub 3} observations of the BGPS sources. When paired with molecular spectroscopy of a dense gas tracer, millimeter observations yield physical properties such as masses, radii, mean densities, kinetic temperatures, and line widths. We detect 34 distinct BGPS sources above 5{sigma} = 0.37 Jy beam{sup -1} with corresponding 5{sigma} detections in the NH{sub 3}(1,1) transition. Eight of the objects show water maser emission (20%). We find a mean millimeter source FWHM of 1.12 pc and a mean gas kinetic temperature of 20 K for the sample of 34 BGPS sources with detections in the NH{sub 3}(1,1) line. The observed NH{sub 3} line widths are dominated by non-thermal motions, typically found to be a few times the thermal sound speed expected for the derived kinetic temperature. We calculate the mass for each source from the millimeter flux assuming the sources are isothermal and find a mean isothermal mass within a 120'' aperture of 230 {+-} 180 M{sub sun}. We find a total mass of 8400 M{sub sun} for all BGPS sources in the Gemini OB1 molecular cloud, representing 6.5% of the cloud mass. By comparing the millimeter isothermal mass to the virial mass calculated from the NH{sub 3} line widths within a radius equal to the millimeter source size, we find a mean virial parameter (M{sub vir}/M {sub iso}) of 1.0 {+-} 0.9 for the sample. We find mean values for the distributions of column densities of 1.0 x 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} for H{sub 2}, and 3.0 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} for NH{sub 3}, giving a mean NH{sub 3} abundance of 3.0 x 10{sup -8} relative to H{sub 2}. We find volume-averaged densities on the order of 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}. The sizes and densities suggest that in the Gem OB1 region the BGPS is detecting the clumps from which stellar clusters form, rather than smaller, higher density cores where single stars or small multiple systems form.

Dunham, Miranda K.; Evans, Neal J.; Harvey, Paul; Merello, Manuel [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Rosolowsky, Erik [University of British Columbia, Okanagan, 3333 University Way, Kelowna BC V1V 1V7 (Canada); Cyganowski, Claudia J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Aguirre, James [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Ginsburg, Adam; Glenn, Jason; Stringfellow, Guy S. [CASA, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Bradley, Eric Todd [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Boulevard, Orlando, FL 32816-2385 (United States); Dowell, Darren [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91104 (United States); Drosback, Meredith [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Schlingman, Wayne; Shirley, Yancy L. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Walawender, Josh [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 640 N. Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Williams, Jonathan P., E-mail: nordhaus@astro.as.utexas.ed [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2010-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

363

Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: 1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and 2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1000 .mu.m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 .mu.m diameter of laser drilling.

Elmer, John W. (Pleasanton, CA); O' Brien, Dennis W. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Compact Alignment for Diagnostic Laser Beams  

Physicist and optical engineer Mike Rushford developed the laser beam . centering and pointing system. The laser beam . centering and pointing system

365

NIST SURF: Beamline 10: Electron beam imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beamline 10: Electron beam imaging. Description: ... In its unperturbed state, the vertical electron beam size is quite small, in the order of a few 10 µm. ...

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

366

PowerBeam Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PowerBeam, Inc. Place Sunnyvale, California Zip CA 94085 Product PowerBeam holds the patent to a power transmission technology that produces wireless electricity. Coordinates...

367

A high transmission analyzing magnet for intense high charge state beams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The low energy beam transport (LEBT) for VENUS will provide for extraction, mass analysis and transport to the axial injection line for the 88-Inch Cyclotron. The new LEBT was designed from the beginning to handle high intensity beams where space charge forces strongly affect the transmission. The magnet has a unique design with specially shaped poles to apply sextupole correction in both the horizontal and vertical plane.

Leitner, M.; Abbott, S.R.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C.

2002-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

368

MassMass transfer andtransfer and arationstearationste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, temperature, T, and energy, E, are scalars and their gradient is a vector dc/dx or arationste scalars diffusion coefficient D; for species A in medium B : D = DAB 4 erföringo dx dc D dt.A dm m Massöve c cSepa dx dc )DD(m th Irreversible Thermodynamics considers Thermo-diffusion 4 erföringo T T Thermo

Zevenhoven, Ron

369

MEIS: Molecular Environmental & Interface Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

People People BL 11-2 Reports &Publications Model Compound Library SixPACK Glitch Curves MES User Resources & Instrumentation Environmental Remediation Science at SSRL MEIS Home SSRL Stanford EMSI SLAC Beam line resources and instrumentation Fundamental and applied research Why synchrotrons for environmental science? Molecular Environmental Science (MES) research at SSRL focuses on the fundamental interfacial, molecular- and nano-scale processes that control contaminant and nutrient cycling in the biosphere with the goal of elucidating global elemental cycles and anthropogenic influences on the environment. Key areas of investigation include the: (a) Structural chemistry of water and dissolved solutes, (b) Structural chemistry and reactivity of complex natural environmental materials with respect to heavy

370

Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location. 26 figs.

Garnett, R.W.; Dobelbower, M.C.

1995-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

371

Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location.

Garnett, Robert W. (Los Alamos, NM); Dobelbower, M. Christian (Toledo, OH)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample is disclosed. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and .sup.3 He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

Roberts, Mark L. (Livermore, CA); Davis, Jay C. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample is disclosed. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and [sup 3]He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

Roberts, M.L.; Davis, J.C.

1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

374

Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radiofrequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and {sup 3}He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

Roberts, M.L.; Davis, J.C.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Particle beam fusion  

SciTech Connect

Today, in keeping with Sandia Laboratories` designation by the Department of Energy as the lead laboratory for the pulsed power approach to fusion, its efforts include major research activities and the construction of new facilities at its Albuquerque site. Additionally, in its capacity as lead laboratory, Sandia coordinates DOE-supported pulsed power fusion work at other government operated laboratories, with industrial contractors, and universities. The beginning of Sandia`s involvement in developing fusion power was an outgrowth of its contributions to the nation`s nuclear weapon program. The Laboratories` work in the early 1960`s emphasized the use of pulsed radiation environments to test the resistance of US nuclear weapons to enemy nuclear bursts. A careful study of options for fusion power indicated that Sandia`s expertise in the pulsed power field could provide a powerful match to ignite fusion fuel. Although creating test environments is an achieved goal of Sandia`s overall program, this work and other military tasks protected by appropriate security regulations will continue, making full use of the same pulsed power technology and accelerators as the fusion-for-energy program. Major goals of Sandia`s fusion program including the following: (1) complete a particle accelerator to deliver sufficient beam energy for igniting fusion targets; (2) obtain net energy gain, this goal would provide fusion energy output in excess of energy stored in the accelerator; (3) develop a technology base for the repetitive ignition of pellets in a power reactor. After accomplishing these goals, the technology will be introduced to the nation`s commercial sector.

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

Repetitively pumped electron beam device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an apparatus for producing fast, repetitive pulses of controllable length of an electron beam by phased energy storage in a transmission line of length matched to the number of pulses and specific pulse lengths desired. 12 figs.

Schlitt, L.G.

1979-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

377

INSTABILITIES OF RELATIVISTIC PARTICLE BEAMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1965). K. W. Robinson, in SLAC Storage Ring Stumner Study,Beams, a Summary. Report, SLAC-49, L. J. Laslett, V. K.La.slett and A. M. Sessler, in SLAC-49, Sept. 1965 (see Ref.

Sessler, Andrew M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Center for Beam Physics, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Repetitively pumped electron beam device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for producing fast, repetitive pulses of controllable length of an electron beam by phased energy storage in a transmission line of length matched to the number of pulses and specific pulse lengths desired.

Schlitt, Leland G. (Livermore, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

The Fermilab neutrino beam program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This talk presents an overview of the Fermilab Neutrino Beam Program. Results from completed experiments as well as the status and outlook for current experiments is given. Emphasis is given to current activities towards planning for a future program.

Rameika, Regina A.; /Fermilab

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Confined energy distribution for charged particle beams  

SciTech Connect

A charged particle beam is formed to a relatively larger area beam which is well-contained and has a beam area which relatively uniformly deposits energy over a beam target. Linear optics receive an accelerator beam and output a first beam with a first waist defined by a relatively small size in a first dimension normal to a second dimension. Nonlinear optics, such as an octupole magnet, are located about the first waist and output a second beam having a phase-space distribution which folds the beam edges along the second dimension toward the beam core to develop a well-contained beam and a relatively uniform particle intensity across the beam core. The beam may then be expanded along the second dimension to form the uniform ribbon beam at a selected distance from the nonlinear optics. Alternately, the beam may be passed through a second set of nonlinear optics to fold the beam edges in the first dimension. The beam may then be uniformly expanded along the first and second dimensions to form a well-contained, two-dimensional beam for illuminating a two-dimensional target with a relatively uniform energy deposition.

Jason, Andrew J. (Los Alamos, NM); Blind, Barbara (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Gas mass transfer for stratified flows  

SciTech Connect

We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrum integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi}) Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geophysical and chemical engineering literature.

Duffey, R.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hughes, E.D. [CSA Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Gas mass transfer for stratified flows  

SciTech Connect

We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrium integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi})Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geo-physical and chemical engineering literature.

Duffey, R.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hughes, E.D. [CSA, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Beam cooling: Principles and achievements  

SciTech Connect

After a discussion of Liouville's theorem, and its implications for beam cooling, a brief description is given of each of the various methods of beam cooling: stochastic, electron, radiation, laser, ionization, etc. For each, we present the type of particle for which it is appropriate, its range of applicability, and the currently achieved degree of cooling. For each method we also discuss the present applications and, also, possible future developments and further applications.

Mohl, Dieter; Sessler, Andrew M.

2003-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

385

Molecular cloud regulated star formation in galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a numerical implementation of star formation in disk galaxies, in which the conversion of cooling gas to stars in the multiphase interstellar medium is governed by the rate at which molecular clouds are formed and destroyed. In the model, clouds form from thermally unstable ambient gas and get destroyed by feedback from massive stars and thermal conduction. Feedback in the ambient phase cycles gas into a hot galactic fountain or wind. We model the ambient gas hydrodynamically using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). However, we cannot resolve the Jeans mass in the cold and dense molecular gas and, therefore, represent the cloud phase with ballistic particles that coagulate when colliding. We show that this naturally produces a multiphase medium with cold clouds, a warm disk, hot supernova bubbles and a hot, tenuous halo. Our implementation of this model is based on the Gadget N-Body code. We illustrate the model by evolving an isolated Milky Way-like galaxy and study the properties of a disk formed in a rotating spherical collapse. Many observed properties of disk galaxies are reproduced well, including the molecular cloud mass spectrum, the molecular fraction as a function of radius, the Schmidt law, the stellar density profile and the appearance of a galactic fountain.

C. M. Booth; T. Theuns; T. Okamoto

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

386

The Molecular Foundry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL Masthead A-Z Index Berkeley Lab masthead Phone Book Jobs Search The Molecular Foundry Home DOE - Office of Science ABOUT US FACILITIESCAPABILITIES RESEARCH BECOMING A USER...

387

The Molecular Foundry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PEOPLE JOB OPPORTUNITIES USER'S ASSOCIATION CONTACT US Foundry Intranet DOE Basic Energy Sciences User Facilities Molecular Foundry Seminar "Atomic Structure and Applications...

388

The Molecular Foundry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PEOPLE JOB OPPORTUNITIES USER'S ASSOCIATION CONTACT US Foundry Intranet DOE Basic Energy Sciences User Facilities Molecular Foundry Seminar Mineralization at the Organic...

389

The Molecular Foundry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PEOPLE JOB OPPORTUNITIES USER'S ASSOCIATION CONTACT US Foundry Intranet DOE Basic Energy Sciences User Facilities Molecular Foundry Seminar "What Happens to Crystals When...

390

The Molecular Foundry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brett Helms, Berkeley Lab Title: Building Our Understanding of Nanocrystal Surface Structure Using Heterometallic Molecular Beacons Location: 67-3111 Chemla room View the Foundry...

391

A Molecular Simulation Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Enhanced CO2 Adsorption in Ti-exchanged Zirconium Organic Frameworks – A Molecular Simulation Study. Author(s), Ravichandar Babarao ...

392

Turbulent molecular clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stars form within molecular clouds but our understanding of this fundamental process remains hampered by the complexity of the physics that drives their evolution. We review our observational and theoretical knowledge of molecular clouds trying to confront the two approaches wherever possible. After a broad presentation of the cold interstellar medium and molecular clouds, we emphasize the dynamical processes with special focus to turbulence and its impact on cloud evolution. We then review our knowledge of the velocity, density and magnetic fields. We end by openings towards new chemistry models and the links between molecular cloud structure and star--formation rates.

Hennebelle, Patrick

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The Molecular Foundry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seminar Schedule Abstract: The intriguing prospects of molecular electronics, nanotechnology, biomaterials, and the aim to close the gap between synthetic and biological...

394

Educational Molecular Biology Games  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Biology Games Do you have a great game? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Games: Biology Games fom biologyjunction.com Biology Games fom biologyjunction.com...

395

Higgs Mass Calculations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

this sheet now. Help with data analysis Higgs Mass Plot Project Contact: Thomas Jordan - jordant@fnal.gov Web Maintainer: qnet-webmaster@fnal.gov Last Update: August 22,...

396

Solids mass flow determination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for determining the mass flow rate of solids mixed with a transport fluid to form a flowing mixture. A temperature differential is established between the solids and fluid. The temperature of the transport fluid prior to mixing, the temperature of the solids prior to mixing, and the equilibrium temperature of the mixture are monitored and correlated in a heat balance with the heat capacities of the solids and fluid to determine the solids mass flow rate.

Macko, Joseph E. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

W Transverse Mass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transverse Mass Histogram Transverse Mass Histogram Data for 49,844 candidate W events are in an Excel spreadsheet with the following data as shown in the table below: A B C D 1 Run No Event No W TMass GeV/c2 Bins 2 55237 19588 68.71732 3 55237 30799 72.19464 Get the data. Sort the data by ascending mass. Be sure to sort all the data in the first three columns! Make a histogram of the data. Rather than graphing the data as individual points, physicists group the data by mass. They consider the full range of the data and divide it into "bins" of equal range size. A histogram is a graph of the number of events in each bin vs. the bin range. They are looking for a peak in the data where most of the masses fall. This will be the value of the mass as detemined by that dataset, and the width of the distribution is a reflection of the errors in the measurements.

398

Direct e-beam lithography of PDMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the viability of directly exposing thin films of liquid poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) to electron beam (e-beam) irradiation using e-beam lithographic methods for the purpose of creating permanent micro-scale components has been investigated. ... Keywords: Lithography, PDMS, Poly(dimethylsiloxane), e-Beam

J. Bowen; D. Cheneler; A. P. G. Robinson

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

BEAM SCRUBBING FOR RHIC POLARIZED PROTON RUN.  

SciTech Connect

One of the intensity limiting factor of RHIC polarized proton beam is the electron cloud induced pressure rise. A beam scrubbing study shows that with a reasonable period of time of running high intensity 112-bunch proton beam, the pressure rise can be reduced, allowing higher beam intensity.

ZHANG,S.Y.FISCHER,W.HUANG,H.ROSER,T.

2004-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

400

Long Baseline Neutrino Beams and Large Detectors  

SciTech Connect

It is amazing to acknowledge that in roughly 70 years from when the existence of the neutrino was postulated, we are now contemplating investigating the mysteries of this particle (or particles) requiring and utilizing detectors of 300 ktons , distances of 1,000-2,000 kilometers, beam intensities of megawatts and underground depth of 5,000 feet. This evolution has evolved slowly, from the experimental discovery of the neutrino in 1956, to the demonstration that there were two neutrinos in 1962 and three and only three by 1991. The great excitement occurred in the 2000's coming from the study of solar and atmospheric neutrinos in which neutrinos were observed to oscillate and therefore have mass. Although the absolute mass of any of the neutrinos has yet to be determined (the upper limit is less than I electron volt) the difference in this square of these masses has been measured, yielding a value of (2.3 {+-} .2) 10{sup -3} ev{sup 2} for atmospheric neutrinos and (7.6 {+-} .2) 10{sup -5} ev{sup 2} for solar neutrinos. In addition their mixing angles were found to be 45{sup o} for atmospheric neutrinos and 34{sup o} for solar neutrinos. This present state of knowledge on neutrinos is pictorially displayed in Fig. 1. Of course, mixing between flavors had already been observed in the quark sector as exemplified by the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Meskawa Matrix. It was therefore natural to extend this formalism to the lepton sector involving unitary 3 x 3 matrices and one CP violating phase. This is shown in Fig. 2 for the two sectors, quark and leptons including the Jarlskog invariant (J).

Samios,N.P.

2008-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Photoionization of excited molecular states  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rapid advances in laser and detector technologies are making it possible to investigate molecular photophysics and photochemistry in powerful new ways. For example, resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) measurements, in which the total (or the mass selected) ion current is monitored as a function of laser wavelength, have yielded extensive and often novel information on the spectroscopy of the resonant intermediate states. With the addition of photoelectron spectrometry (PES) to analyze the kinetic energy of the ejected electrons, it is possible to determine the branching ratios into different electronic, vibrational, and rotational levels of the product ion and to focus directly on both the dynamics of the multiphoton ionization process and the photoionization of excited state species. In the present paper, we report several REMPI/PES studies of H/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/. The results reflect both the spectroscopy and the dynamics of photoionization of excited molecular states and are discussed in terms of the selection rules for photoionization and the relative probabilities of photoionization from Rydberg and valence states. In some cases, in accordance with the Franck-Condon principle, the results demonstrate that resonant multiphoton ionization through Rydberg states may be a powerful technique for the production of electronic, vibrational, and rotational state selected ions. However, in other cases, systematic departures from Franck-Condon behavior are observed, which reflect the more subtle dynamics of excited state photoionization.

Dehmer, P.M.; Dehmer, J.L.; Pratt, S.T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Molecular Hydrogen in Infrared Cirrus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We combine data from our recent FUSE survey of interstellar molecular hydrogen absorption toward 50 high-latitude AGN with COBE-corrected IRAS 100 micron emission maps to study the correlation of infrared cirrus with H2. A plot of the H2 column density vs. IR cirrus intensity shows the same transition in molecular fraction, f_H2, as seen with total hydrogen column density, N_H. This transition is usually attributed to H2 self-shielding, and it suggests that many diffuse cirrus clouds contain H2 in significant fractions, f_H2 = 1-30%. These clouds cover approximately 50% of the northern sky at latitudes b > 30 degrees, at temperature-corrected 100 micron intensities D_100 > 1.5 MJy/sr. The sheetlike cirrus clouds, with hydrogen densities n_H > 30 cm^-3, may be compressed by dynamical processes at the disk-halo interface, and they are conducive to H2 formation on grain surfaces. Exploiting the correlation between N(H2) and 100 micron intensity, we estimate that cirrus clouds at b > 30 contain approximately 3000 M_sun in H2. Extrapolated over the inner Milky Way, the cirrus may contain 10^7 M_sun of H2 and 10^8 M_sun in total gas mass. If elevated to 100 pc, their gravitational potential energy is ~10^53 erg.

Kristen Gillmon; J. Michael Shull

2005-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

403

INTRA - BEAM SCATTERING MEASUREMENTS IN RHIC.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

RHIC in gold operation shows significant intra-beam scattering due to the high charge state of the stored ions. Intra-beam scattering leads to longitudinal and transverse emittance growth. The longitudinal emittance growth causes debunching in operation; the transverse emittance growth contributes to the reduction of the beam and luminosity lifetimes. The longitudinal and transverse beam growth was measured. Beam growth measurement are compared with computations.

FISCHER,W.; CONNOLLY,R.; TEPIKIAN,S.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.; ZENO,K.

2002-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

404

Molecular models for explosives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Any fundamental understanding of detonations and explosives' behavior requires as a starting point a knowledge of molecular properties. Indeed, there is a sizable literature concerning observed decomposition kinetics, x-ray crystal structures, heats of formation, etc. for explosives. As a result of this extensive experimental work, a large and ever increasing number of observed properties of explosives are available. Given sufficient data, models for the prediction of molecular properties can be developed and calibrated. Nevertheless, many desirable molecular properties can be obtained with considerable effort and, in many cases, experimental measurements are not possible for practical reasons; e.g., bond dissociation energies are very difficult to obtain for explosives. Consequently, theoretical methods for obtaining these properties are quite desirable. In addition, it is oftentimes desired to estimate the properties of unknown molecules. Consequently, methods for the estimation of molecular properties, which might seem quite crude by other standards, can be of considerable practical value. We present in this paper some of our recent efforts at extending and developing molecular models for explosives. These efforts fall into three main areas: Estimation of crystal densities of organic nitrates and perchlorates by an entirely empirical group additivity method; calculation of molecular heats of formation and bond dissociation energies (BDE's) by a semi-empirical molecular orbital method (AM1); and the electronic structure of nitrobenzene as obtained from non-empirical (sometimes called ab initio molecular orbital calculations. 10 refs.

Ritchie, J.P.; Bachrach, S.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Supersonic beam studies of carbon condensation  

SciTech Connect

In the course of the current rage of fascination with how diamond growth may be nucleated and controlled, it is probably wise to consider in some detail the nature of the beast with which diamond growth must compete. The best in this case is the growth graphite either in its perfect crystalline form, or more typically in one of its less flat, often more tortuous morphologies. After all graphite is the most stable form of carbon under moderate pressure conditions, and diamond growth can dominate only as a result of some kinetic trick. Unfortunately, this will have to be a very powerful trick indeed, since it turns out that the kinetics of nucleation and growth of graphitic type objects are sensationally facile. This short paper considers some of the newest evidence of just how formidable this graphitic beast is. Strangely, much of this new evidence has come from the rarified and esoteric environment of supersonic beams and laser spectroscopy. Advances in laser and supersonic molecular beam techniques over the past 5-10 years have produced a flood of new results and insights as to the nature of small clusters. Within the sub-field of strongly bound (non van der Waals) clusters, certainly one of the most active and intellectually exciting areas has been the study of carbon. Although many of these new experiments are still in the process of verification, extension, and further interpretation, a remarkable new picture is beginning to emerge as to some of the dominant processes of carbon condensation and the nature of the (largely graphitic) species involved.

Smalley, R.E. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Beamed Energy Propulsion: Research Status And Needs--Part 2  

SciTech Connect

One promising solution to the operationally responsive space is the application of remote electromagnetic energy to propel a launch vehicle into orbit. With beamed energy propulsion, one can leave the power source stationary on the ground or space, and direct heat propellant on the spacecraft with a beam from a fixed station. This permits the spacecraft to leave its power source at home, saving significant amounts of mass, greatly improving performance. This concept, which removes the mass penalty of carrying the propulsion energy source on board the vehicle, was first proposed by Arthur Kantrowitz in 1972; he invoked an extremely powerful ground based laser. The same year Michael Minovich suggested a conceptually similar 'in-space' laser rocket system utilizing a remote laser power station. In the late 1980's, Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) funded continuous, double pulse laser and microwave propulsion while Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) funded ablative laser rocket propulsion. Currently AFOSR has been funding the concept initiated by Leik Myrabo, repetitively pulsed laser propulsion, which has been universally perceived, arguably, to be the closest for mid-term applications. This 2-part paper examines the investment strategies in beamed energy propulsion and technical challenges to be covers Part 2 covers the present research status and needs.

Birkan, Mitat [Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Arlington, Virginia, 22203 (United States)

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

407

Machine and Beam Delivery Updates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MAchine and Beam delivery Updates FY13 MAchine and Beam delivery Updates FY13 Summary of Beam Delivery: FACET Summary Feb_15_22.pdf FACET Summary Feb_15_22.pdf FACET Summary Feb_23_Mar_1.pdf FACET Summary Feb_23_Mar_1.pdf FACET Summary Mar_2_8.pdf FACET Summary Mar_2_8.pdf FACET Summary Mar_9_15.pdf FACET Summary Mar_9_15.pdf FACET Summary Mar_16_22.pdf FACET Summary Mar_16_22.pdf FACET Summary Mar_23_29.pdf FACET Summary Mar_23_29.pdf FACET Summary Mar_30_Apr_5.pdf FACET Summary Mar_30_Apr_5.pdf FACET Summary Apr_6_12.pdf FACET Summary Apr_6_12.pdf FACET Summary Apr_27_May_3.pdf FACET Summary Apr_27_May_3.pdf FACET Summary May_4_10.pdf FACET Summary May_4_10.pdf Emittance Stability in Sector 2_31513.pdf Emittance Stability in Sector 2_31513.pdf FACET beam operations readiness with R56.pdf FACET beam operations readiness with R56.pdf (6/19/2013)

408

Giga-Dalton Mass Spectrometry  

Current techniques to study large bio?molecules using mass spectrometer require fragmentation for the mass?to?charge ratios to be within the working range of the mass spectrometer. Analysis of the data is complex and often requires simulation ...

409

CRC handbook of mass spectra of environmental contaminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook presents a collection of the electron impact mass spectra of 394 commonly encountered environmental pollutants. Each pollutant is examined on a separate page and is presented as a bar graph always starting at M/z = 40. All spectra are determined by analyses of data in EPA data bases. The major fragment ions are correlated with their respective structure. The mass and intensity of the four most intense ions in a spectrum are given. Each spectrum is marked to indicate the origin of the selected fragment ions. The approved name of the Chemical Abstract Service, the common name of the compound, the article number (if any) given in the Merck Index, the CAS Registry Number, the Molecular formula, and the nominal molecular weight of the compound are given for all spectra. All spectra are indexed by common chemical name, CAS Registry Number, exact molecular weight, and intense peaks.

Hites, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Development of high-spatial and high-mass resolution mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) and its application to the study of small metabolites and endogenous molecules of plants  

SciTech Connect

High-spatial and high-mass resolution laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric (MS) imaging technology was developed for the attainment of MS images of higher quality containing more information on the relevant cellular and molecular biology in unprecedented depth. The distribution of plant metabolites is asymmetric throughout the cells and tissues, and therefore the increase in the spatial resolution was pursued to reveal the localization of plant metabolites at the cellular level by MS imaging. For achieving high-spatial resolution, the laser beam size was reduced by utilizing an optical fiber with small core diameter (25 ?m) in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer. Matrix application was greatly improved using oscillating capillary nebulizer. As a result, single cell level spatial resolution of ~ 12 ?m was achieved. MS imaging at this high spatial resolution was directly applied to a whole Arabidopsis flower and the substructures of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anther were successfully visualized. MS imaging of high spatial resolution was also demonstrated to the secondary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana and a high degree of localization of detected metabolites was successfully unveiled. This was the first MS imaging on the root for molecular species. MS imaging with high mass resolution was also achieved by utilizing the LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the direct identification of the surface metabolites on the Arabidopsis stem and root and differentiation of isobaric ions having the same nominal mass with no need of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS imaging at high-spatial and high-mass resolution was also applied to cer1 mutant of the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to demonstrate its usefulness in biological studies and reveal associated metabolite changes in terms of spatial distribution and/or abundances compared to those of wild-type. The spatial distribution of targeted metabolites, mainly waxes and flavonoids, was systematically explored on various organs, including flowers, leaves, stems, and roots at high spatial resolution of ~ 12-50 ?m and the changes in the abundance level of these metabolites were monitored on the cer1 mutant with respect to the wild-type. This study revealed the metabolic biology of CER1 gene on each individual organ level with very detailed high spatial resolution. The separate MS images of isobaric metabolites, i.e. C29 alkane vs. C28 aldehyde could be constructed on both genotypes from MS imaging at high mass resolution. This allows tracking of abundance changes for those compounds along with the genetic mutation, which is not achievable with low mass resolution mass spectrometry. This study supported previous hypothesis of molecular function of CER1 gene as aldehyde decarbonylase, especially by displaying hyper accumulation of aldehydes and C30 fatty acid and decrease in abundance of alkanes and ketones in several plant organs of cer1 mutant. The scope of analytes was further directed toward internal cell metabolites from the surface metabolites of the plant. MS profiling and imaging of internal cell metabolites were performed on the vibratome section of Arabidopsis leaf. Vibratome sectioning of the leaf was first conducted to remove the surface cuticle layer and it was followed by enzymatic treatment of the section to induce the digestion of primary cell walls, middle lamella, and expose the internal cells underneath to the surface for detection with the laser by LDI-MS. The subsequent MS imaging onto the enzymatically treated vibratome section allowed us to map the distribution of the metabolites in the internal cell layers, linolenic acid (C18:3 FA) and linoleic acid (C18:2 FA). The development of an assay for relative quantification of analytes at the single subcellular/organelle level by LDI-MS imaging was attempted and both plausibility and significant obstacles were seen. As a test system, native plant organelle, chloroplasts isolated from the spinach leaves were used

Jun, Ji Hyun

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

411

Apparatus and method of determining molecular weight of large molecules  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer determines the mass of multiply charged high molecular weight molecules. This spectrometer utilizes an ion detector which is capable of simultaneously measuring the charge z and transit time of a single ion as it passes through the detector. From this transit time, the velocity of the single ion may then be derived, thus providing the mass-to-charge ratio m/z for a single ion which has been accelerated through a known potential. Given z and m/z, the mass m of the single ion can then be calculated. Electrospray ions with masses in excess of 1 MDa and charge numbers greater than 425 e.sup.- are readily detected. The on-axis single ion detection configuration enables a duty cycle of nearly 100% and extends the practical application of electrospray mass spectrometry to the analysis of very large molecules with relatively inexpensive instrumentation.

Fuerstenau, Stephen (Montrose, CA); Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA); Madden, Norman (Livermore, CA); Searles, William (Fremont, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

EMSL: Capabilities: Mass Spectrometry Experts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Related EMSL User Projects Mass Spectrometry Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry Proteomics Research Resource for Integrative Biology...

413

AFRD - Center for Beam Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center for Beam Physics Center for Beam Physics Home Organization Outreach and Diversity Highlights Safety Links Intramural Group photo of our staff CBP staff, May 2011 CBP in the News: Read about an innovation in super-precise timing and synchronization; and a look toward the next generation of electron guns with responsiveness and brightness needed by future free-electron lasers such as those in the Next Generation Light Source initiative. Who We Are and What We Do The Center for Beam Physics (CBP) is a resource for meeting the challenges of accelerator science, and a source of many innovative concepts, within the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. We have core expertise in accelerator physics and theory, accelerator modeling using high performance computing, and instrumentation,

414

Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) Shanhu Lee, Kent State University (http://www.personal.kent.edu/~slee19/)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) Shanhu Lee, Kent State University (http ionization mass spectrometry (PTR-CIMS). A typical CIMS instrument can be constructed from an ion source, an ion molecular reactor, and a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Shown below is schematic diagram of a CIMS

Lee, Shan-Hu

415

Photon: history, mass, charge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The talk consists of three parts. ``History'' briefly describes the emergence and evolution of the concept of photon during the first two decades of the 20th century. ``Mass'' gives a short review of the literature on the upper limit of the photon's mass. ``Charge'' is a critical discussion of the existing interpretation of searches for photon charge. Schemes, in which all photons are charged, are grossly inconsistent. A model with three kinds of photons (positive, negative and neutral) seems at first sight to be more consistent, but turns out to have its own serious problems.

L. B. Okun

2006-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

416

Mass and Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last few years heat recovery was under spot and in air conditioning fields usually we use heat recovery by different types of heat exchangers. The heat exchanging between the exhaust air from the building with the fresh air to the building (air to air heat exchanger). In my papers I use (water to air heat exchanger) as a heat recovery and I use the water as a mass recovery. The source of mass and heat recovery is the condensate water which we were dispose and connect it to the drain lines.

Hindawai, S. M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

BEAM DIFFUSION MEASUREMENTS AT RHIC.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During a store, particles from the beam core continually diffuse outwards into the halo through a variety of mechanisms. Understanding the diffusion rate as a function of particle amplitude can help discover which processes are important to halo growth. A collimator can be used to measure the amplitude growth rate as a function of the particle amplitude. In this paper we present results of diffusion measurements performed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with fully stripped gold ions, deuterons, and protons. We compare these results with measurements from previous years, and simulations, and discuss any factors that relate to beam growth in RHIC.

FLILLER,R.P.,IIIDREES,A.GASSNER,D.MCINTYRE,G.PEGGS,S.TRBOJEVIC,D.

2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

418

FEL options for power beaming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The demand for the output power of communication satellites has been increasing exponentially. The satellite power is generated from solar panels which collect the sunlight and convert it to electrical power. The power per satellite is limited due to the limit in the practical size of the solar panel. One way to meet the power demand is to employ multiple satellites (up to 10) per the internationally agreed-upon ``slot`` in the geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO). However, this approach is very expensive due to the high cost of sending a satellite into a GEO orbit. An alternative approach is power beaming, i.e., to illuminate the solar panels with high power, highly-directed laser beams from earth. The power beaming generates more power per satellite for the same area of the solar panel. The minimum optical beam power, interesting for power beaming application, is P{sub L} = 200kW. The wavelength is chosen to be {lambda} = 0.84 {micro}m, so that it is within one of the transmission windows of the air, and at the same time near the peak of the photo-voltaic conversion efficiency of Si, which is the commonly used material for the solar panels. Free electron lasers (FELs) are well suited for the power beaming application because they can provide high power with coherent wavefront, but without high energy density in media. In this article the authors discuss some principal issues, such as the choice of accelerator and electron gun, the choice of beam parameters, radiation hazards, technological availability, and overall efficiency and reliability of the installation. They also attempt to highlight the compromise between the cost of the primary installation, the operation cost, and the choice of technology, and its maturity. They then present several schemes for the accelerator-FEL systems based on RF accelerators. The initial electron beam accelerator up to the energy of a few MeV is more or less common for all these schemes.

Kim, K.J.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Vinokurov, N.A. [Budker Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Shimmed electron beam welding process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A modified electron beam welding process effects welding of joints between superalloy materials by inserting a weldable shim in the joint and heating the superalloy materials with an electron beam. The process insures a full penetration of joints with a consistent percentage of filler material and thereby improves fatigue life of the joint by three to four times as compared with the prior art. The process also allows variable shim thickness and joint fit-up gaps to provide increased flexibility for manufacturing when joining complex airfoil structures and the like.

Feng, Ganjiang (Clifton Park, NY); Nowak, Daniel Anthony (Alplaus, NY); Murphy, John Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Molecular Statics and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Molecular Statics and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Critical Stress for Motion of a/3 Screw Dislocations in a-Ti at Low ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation  

SciTech Connect

A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Warm Water Mass Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Poleward heat transport by the own implies warm Water mass formation, i.e., the retention by the tropical and subtropical ocean of some of its net radiant heat gain. Under what condition net heat retention becomes comparable to latent heat ...

G. T. Csanady

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

A Molecular Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Tale of Two States and More: Modeling of New Generation of Lattice Stability from Zero ... Analysis of Nano Fluid Using CFD-A Hybrid Approach for Cooling Purpose ... Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Grain Boundary Free Energy and

424

A Molecular Dynamic Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Tale of Two States and More: Modeling of New Generation of Lattice Stability from Zero ... Analysis of Nano Fluid Using CFD-A Hybrid Approach for Cooling Purpose ... Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Grain Boundary Free Energy and

425

Beam heating of target foils  

SciTech Connect

A target rotator, built to reduce the effects of beam spot heating, is fully adjustable, holds three targets, is chamber independent, and takes up limited space. The expected temperature rise in the target is calculated from the Stefan--Boltzmann law. (PMA)

Corwin, W.C.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Method for calibrating mass spectrometers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method whereby a mass spectra generated by a mass spectrometer is calibrated by shifting the parameters used by the spectrometer to assign masses to the spectra in a manner which reconciles the signal of ions within the spectra having equal mass but differing charge states, or by reconciling ions having known differences in mass to relative values consistent with those known differences. In this manner, the mass spectrometer is calibrated without the need for standards while allowing the generation of a highly accurate mass spectra by the instrument.

Anderson, Gordon A [Benton City, WA; Brands, Michael D [Richland, WA; Bruce, James E [Schwenksville, PA; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

2002-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

427

Twisted mass finite volume effects  

SciTech Connect

We calculate finite-volume effects on the pion masses and decay constant in twisted mass lattice QCD at finite lattice spacing. We show that the lighter neutral pion in twisted mass lattice QCD gives rise to finite-volume effects that are exponentially enhanced when compared to those arising from the heavier charged pions. We demonstrate that the recent two flavor twisted mass lattice data can be better fitted when twisted mass effects in finite-volume corrections are taken into account.

Colangelo, Gilberto; Wenger, Urs; Wu, Jackson M. S. [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Subtropical Climatology of Direct Beam Solar Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A climatology of direct beam irradiance has been compiled for Mauna Loa Observatory. A broadband transmittance, calculated from the direct-beam data, has been stratified into clear sky and optically thin and thick cloud regimes; statistics of ...

T. M. Thompson; S. K. Cox

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

APPARATUS FOR ELECTRON BEAM HEATING CONTROL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved electron beam welding or melting apparatus is designed which utilizes a high voltage rectifier operating below its temperature saturation region to decrease variations in electron beam current which normally result from the gas generated in such apparatus. (AEC)

Jones, W.H.; Reece, J.B.

1962-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

430

Enhanced laser beam coupling to a plasma  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Density perturbations are induced in a heated plasma by means of a pair of oppositely directed, polarized laser beams of the same frequency. The wavelength of the density perturbations is equal to one half the wavelength of the laser beams. A third laser beam is linearly polarized and directed at the perturbed plasma along a line that is perpendicular to the direction of the two opposed beams. The electric field of the third beam is oriented to lie in the plane containing the three beams. The frequency of the third beam is chosen to cause it to interact resonantly with the plasma density perturbations, thereby efficiently coupling the energy of the third beam to the plasma.

Steiger, Arno D. (Pleasanton, CA); Woods, Cornelius H. (Livermore, CA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

IMPACT simulation and the SNS linac beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dynamics studies of the SNS linac systems were performedIMPACT SIMULATION AND THE SNS LINAC BEAM * Y. Zhang 1 , J.tracking simulations for the SNS linac beam dynamics studies

Zhang, Y.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Autogenerator of beams of charged particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An autogenerating apparatus provides secondary intense relativistic current beam pulses in response to an injected beam pulse. One or more electromagnetic energy storage devices are provided in conjunction with gaps along a beam propagation path for the injected beam pulse. For injected beam pulses which are no longer than double the transit time of electromagnetic waves within the storage devices (which may be resonant cavities), distinct secondary beam pulses are generated by each of the energy storage devices. The beam propagation path, together with the one or more gaps provided therein, operates as a pulse forming transmission line cavity, in which the separate cavities associated with the gaps provide delays for electromagnetic waves generated at the gaps. After doubly traversing the cavity, the electromagnetic waves cause the gap to generate the secondary beam pulses, which are thus delayed by a time interval equal to the double transit time for the induced wave within the cavity.

Adler, R.J.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Miller, R.M.; Shope, S.L.; Smith, D.L.

1983-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

433

Molecular Programming Pseudo-code Representation to Molecular Electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research paper is proposing the idea of pseudo code representation to molecular programming used in designing molecular electronics devices. Already the schematic representation of logical gates like AND, OR, NOT etc.from molecular diodes or resonant tunneling diode are available. This paper is setting a generic pseudo code model so that various logic gates can be formulated. These molecular diodes have designed from organic molecules or Bio-molecules. Our focus is on to give a scenario of molecular computation through molecular programming. We have restricted our study to molecular rectifying diode and logic device as AND gate from organic molecules only.

Pradhan, Manas Ranjan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Mass Market Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

435

Single event mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A means and method for single event time of flight mass spectrometry for analysis of specimen materials. The method of the invention includes pulsing an ion source imposing at least one pulsed ion onto the specimen to produce a corresponding emission of at least one electrically charged particle. The emitted particle is then dissociated into a charged ion component and an uncharged neutral component. The ion and neutral components are then detected. The time of flight of the components are recorded and can be used to analyze the predecessor of the components, and therefore the specimen material. When more than one ion particle is emitted from the specimen per single ion impact, the single event time of flight mass spectrometer described here furnis This invention was made with Government support under Contract No. W-7405-ENG82 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in the invention.

Conzemius, Robert J. (Ames, IA)

1990-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

436

New beam instrumentation in the AGS Booster  

SciTech Connect

The AGS Booster was designed to accelerate beams from 2{times}10{sup 10} polarized protons to 1.5{times}10{sup 13} protons and heavy ions through Au{sup +33}. The range of beam parameters and the high vacuum, and radiation environment presented challenges for the beam instrumentation. Some interesting beam monitors in the Booster and transport lines, will be described. Where available, results will be presented. 21 refs., 7 figs.

Witkover, R.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

LOW ENERGY BEAM PROCESSES IN ELECTRONIC MATERIALS ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LOW ENERGY BEAM PROCESSES IN ELECTRONIC MATERIALS: Session II: Shallow Junction and Low Energy Implantation. Sponsored by: EMPMD Thin ...

438

Electron Beam Melting: The New Directional Solidification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Additive Manufacturing of Metals. Presentation Title, Electron Beam Melting: ...

439

Electron-Beam Irradiation of Solar Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron-Beam Irradiation of Solar Cells. Summary: The Dosimetry Group operates a system capable of performing electron ...

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

440

High intensity uranium beams from the superHILAC and the bevatron: final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two injectors formerly used at the SuperHILAC were a 750-kV air-insulated Cockcroft-Walton (EVE) and a 2.5-MV pressurized HV multiplier (ADAM). The EVE injector can deliver adequate intensities of ions up to mass 40 (argon). The ADAM injector can accelerate ions with lower charge-to-mass ratios, and they can produce beams of heavier ions. The intensity of these beams decreases as the mass number increases, with the lowest practical intensity being achieved with lead beams. Experience with the two existing injectors provided substantial help in defining the general requirements for a new injector which would provide ample beams above mass 40. The requirements for acceptance by the first tank of the SuperHILAC are a particle velocity ..beta.. = 0.0154 (corresponding to an energy of 113 keV/amu) and a charge-to-mass ratio of 0.046 or larger. Present ion source performance dictates an air-insulated Cockcroft-Walton as a pre-accelerator because of its easy accessibility and its good overall reliability. The low charge state ions then receive further acceleration and, if necessary, subsequent stripping to the required charge state before injection into the SuperHILAC. A low-beta linac of the Widereoe type has been built to perform this acceleration. The injector system described consists of a Cockcroft-Walton pre-injector, injection beam lines and isotope analysis, a low-velocity linear accelerator, and SuperHILAC control center modifications.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

ION BEAM FOCUSING MEANS FOR CALUTRON  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion beam focusing arrangement for calutrons is described. It provides a virtual focus of origin for the ion beam so that the ions may be withdrawn from an arc plasma of considerable width providing greater beam current and accuracy. (T.R.H.)

Backus, J.G.

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Ion-beam Plasma Neutralization Interaction Images  

SciTech Connect

Neutralization of the ion beam charge and current is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because the excitation of nonlinear plasma waves may occur. Computer simulation images of plasma neutralization of the ion beam pulse are presented.

Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; S. Klasky; Ronald C. Davidson

2002-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

443

Light modulated electron beam driven radiofrequency emitter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure relates to a light modulated electron beam-driven radiofrequency emitter. Pulses of light impinge on a photoemissive device which generates an electron beam having the pulse characteristics of the light. The electron beam is accelerated through a radiofrequency resonator which produces radiofrequency emission in accordance with the electron, hence, the light pulses.

Wilson, M.T.; Tallerico, P.J.

1979-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

444

Three Dimensional Molecular Imaging for Lignocellulosic Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

components sequestered in the rigid cell walls of plants. A detailed chemical and structural understanding of this pre-enzymatic processing in space and time was the focus of this program. We worked to develop new imaging strategies that produce real-time molecular speciation information in situ; extract sub-surface information about the effects of processing; and follow the spatial and temporal characteristics of the molecular species in the matrix and correlate this complex profile with saccharification. Spatially correlated SIMS and Raman imaging were used to provide high quality, high resolution subcellular images of Miscanthus cross sections. Furthermore, the combination of information from the mass spectrometry and Raman scattering allows specific chemical assignments of observed structures, difficult to assign from either imaging approach alone and lays the foundation for subsequent heterocorrelated imaging experiments targeted at more challenging biological systems, such as the interacting plant-microbe systems relevant to the rhizosphere.

Bohn, Paul W.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

445

Soft Molecular Computing Computer Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soft Molecular Computing Max Garzon Computer Science The University of Memphis Memphis, TN 38152@memphis.edu Abstract Molecular computing (MC) utilizes the complex interaction of biomolecules and molecular biology for computational purposes. Five years later, substantial obstacles remain to bring the potential of molecular

Deaton, Russell J.

446

A new luminescence beam profile monitor for intense proton and heavy ion beams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new luminescence beam profile monitor is realized in the polarized hydrogen gas jet target at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility. In addition to the spin polarization of the proton beam being routinely measured by the hydrogen gas jet, the luminescence produced by beam-hydrogen excitation leads to a strong Balmer series lines emission. A selected hydrogen Balmer line is spectrally filtered and imaged to produce the transverse RHIC proton beam shape with unprecedented details on the RHIC beam profile. Alternatively, when the passage of the high energy RHIC gold ion beam excited only the residual gas molecules in the beam path, sufficient ion beam induced luminescence is produced and the transverse gold ion beam profile is obtained. The measured transverse beam sizes and the calculated emittances provide an independent confirmation of the RHIC beam characteristics and to verify the emittance conservation along the RHIC accelerator. This optical beam diagnostic technique by making use of the beam induced fluorescence from injected or residual gas offers a truly noninvasive particle beam characterization, and provides a visual observation of proton and heavy ion beams. Combined with a longitudinal bunch measurement system, a 3-dimensional spatial particle beam profile can be reconstructed tomographically.

Tsang,T.; Bellavia, S.; Connolly, R.; Gassner, D.; Makdisi, Y.; Russo, T.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Zelenski, A.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Giant Molecular Magnetocapacitance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capacitance of a nanoscale system is usually thought of having two contributions, a classical electrostatic contribution and a quantum contribution dependent on the density of states and/or molecular orbitals close to the Fermi energy. In this letter we demonstrate that in molecular nano-magnets and other magnetic nanoscale systems, the quantum part of the capacitance becomes spin-dependent, and is tunable by an external magnetic field. This molecular magnetocapacitance can be realized using single molecule nano-magnets and/or other nano-structures that have antiferromagnetic ground states. As a proof of principle, first-principles calculation of the nano-magnet [Mn3O(sao)3(O2CMe)(H2O)(py)3] shows that the charging energy of the high-spin state is 260 meV lower than that of the low-spin state, yielding a 6% difference in capacitance. A magnetic field of ~40T can switch the spin state, thus changing the molecular capacitance. A smaller switching field may be achieved using nanostructures with a larger moment. Molecular magnetocapacitance may lead to revolutionary device designs, e.g., by exploiting the Coulomb blockade magnetoresistance whereby a small change in capacitance can lead to a huge change in resistance.

Wu, Yuning [University of Florida, Gainesville; Zhang, Xiaoguang [ORNL; Cheng, Hai-Ping [University of Florida

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Accelerating polarized beams in Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we will examine the totality of equipment, manpower and cost necessary to obtain a polarized proton beam in the Tevatron. We will not, however, be concerned with the acquisition and acceleration of polarized /bar p/ beams. Furthermore we will consider only a planar main ring without overpass, although it is expected that Siberian snake schemes could be made to apply equally well to non-planar machines. In addition to not wanting to tackle here the task of reformulating the theory for a non-planar closed orbit, we also anticipate that as part of the Tevatron upgrade the main ring will in the not too distant future, be replaced by a planar main injector situated in a separate tunnel. 4 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Teng, L.C.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Beam Time Allocation Committee (BAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time Allocation Committee (BAC) Time Allocation Committee (BAC) Charter Purpose: Allocates general user beam time by instrument to promote diverse and high- impact science and a broad-based user community to meet DOE and NSSD goals. Participants: BAC Chair (appointed by NSSD Director), Instrument Group Leaders, User Office Schedule: Tied to proposal calls - expected to meet at least 2 times/year with meetings scheduled about 6 weeks after the proposal call has closed and at least 1 month prior to scheduled operations. Process: 1. Instrument Group Leaders (with group members): a. Confirm feasibility (equipment requirements and instrument capabilities) and safe operations b. Review amount of beam time requested and adjust as needed with consideration for instrument and sample environment availability.

450

Center for Beam Physics, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Center for Beam Physics is a multi-disciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. At the heart of the Center`s mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation and focusing of energy. Dedicated to exploring the frontiers of the physics of (and with) particle and photon beams, its primary mission is to promote the science and technology of the production, manipulation, storage and control systems of charged particles and photons. The Center serves this mission via conceptual studies, theoretical and experimental research, design and development, institutional project involvement, external collaborations, association with industry and technology transfer. This roster provides a glimpse at the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up this team and a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1993.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Strange and charm meson masses from twisted mass lattice QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present first results of a 2+1+1 flavor twisted mass lattice QCD computation of strange and charm meson masses. We focus on D and D_s mesons with spin J = 0,1 and parity P = -,+.

Martin Kalinowski; Marc Wagner

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

452

EMSL: Capabilities: Mass Spectrometry: Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry Additional Information Meet the Mass Spectrometry Experts Related EMSL User Projects Mass Spectrometry Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry Proteomics Research Resource for Integrative Biology Biological and Environmental Research - PNNL Proteomics PNNL's Biological MS Data and Software Distribution Center Mass Spectrometry brochure EMSL is committed to offering state-of-the-art instruments to its users. At a workshop in January of 2008, EMSL mass spectrometry experts joined experts from many universities, private companies, and government institutions and laboratories at a conference held at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee Florida. Workshop participants reviewed the state of the art of high-performance mass spectrometers,

453

TWO POPULATIONS OF MOLECULAR CLOUDS IN THE ANTENNAE GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

Super star clusters-extremely massive clusters found predominately in starburst environments-are essential building blocks in the formation of galaxies and thought to dominate star formation in the high-redshift universe. However, the transformation from molecular gas into these ultracompact star clusters is not well understood. To study this process, we used the Submillimeter Array and the Plateau de Bure Interferometer to obtain high angular resolution ({approx}1.''5 or 160 pc) images of the Antennae overlap region in CO(2-1) to search for the molecular progenitors of the super star clusters. We resolve the molecular gas distribution into a large number of clouds, extending the differential cloud mass function down to a 5{sigma} completeness limit of 3.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }. We identify a distinct break in the mass function around log M{sub mol}/M{sub Sun} Almost-Equal-To 6.5, which separates the molecular clouds into two distinct populations. The smaller, less massive clouds reside in more quiescent areas in the region, while the larger, more massive clouds cluster around regions of intense star formation. A broken power-law fit to the mass function yields slopes of {alpha} = -1.39 {+-} 0.10 and {alpha} = -1.44 {+-} 0.14 for the low- and high-mass cloud population, well matched to the mass function found for super star clusters in the Antennae galaxies. We find large velocity gradients and velocity dispersions at the locations of intense star formation, suggestive of compressive shocks. It is likely that these environmental factors contribute to the formation of the observed massive molecular clouds and super star clusters in the Antennae galaxies.

Wei, Lisa H.; Keto, Eric [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ho, Luis C. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

454

Scattering apodizer for laser beams  

SciTech Connect

A method is disclosed for apodizing a laser beam to smooth out the production of diffraction peaks due to optical discontinuities in the path of the laser beam, such method comprising introduction of a pattern of scattering elements for reducing the peak intensity in the region of such optical discontinuities, such pattern having smoothly tapering boundaries in which the distribution density of the scattering elements is tapered gradually to produce small gradients in the distribution density, such pattern of scattering elements being effective to reduce and smooth out the diffraction effects which would otherwise be produced. The apodizer pattern may be produced by selectively blasting a surface of a transparent member with fine abrasive particles to produce a multitude of minute pits. In one embodiment, a scattering apodizer pattern is employed to overcome diffraction patterns in a multiple element crystal array for harmonic conversion of a laser beam. The interstices and the supporting grid between the crystal elements are obscured by the gradually tapered apodizer pattern of scattering elements.

Summers, Mark A. (Livermore, CA); Hagen, Wilhelm F. (Livermore, CA); Boyd, Robert D. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Scattering apodizer for laser beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for apodizing a laser beam to smooth out the production of diffraction peaks due to optical discontinuities in the path of the laser beam, such method comprising introduction of a pattern of scattering elements for reducing the peak intensity in the region of such optical discontinuities, such pattern having smoothly tapering boundaries in which the distribution density of the scattering elements is tapered gradually to produce small gradients in the distribution density, such pattern of scattering elements being effective to reduce and smooth out the diffraction effects which would otherwise be produced. The apodizer pattern may be produced by selectively blasting a surface of a transparent member with fine abrasive particles to p