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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) (Revised) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides information about Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. NREL has six MBMS systems that researchers and industry partners can use to understand thermochemical biomass conversion and biomass composition recalcitrance.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

The effect of cluster formation on mass separation in binary molecular beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of cluster formation on mass separation in binary molecular beams Wei Li,a) M. J composition of a skimmed supersonic binary molecular beam originally consisting of a 20% neon/80% xenon. © 2000 American Institute of Physics. S0021-9606 00 01806-7 I. INTRODUCTION Supersonic molecular beam

Sibener, Steven

3

Molecular beam mass spectrometric characterization of biomass pyrolysis products for fuels and chemicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Converting biomass feedstocks to fuels and chemicals requires rapid characterization of the wide variety of possible feedstocks. The combination of pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (Py-MBMS) and multivariate statistical analysis offers a unique capability for characterizing these feedstocks. Herbaceous and woody biomass feedstocks that were harvested at different periods were used in this study. The pyrolysis mass spectral data were acquired in real time on the MBMS, and multivariate statistical analysis (factor analysis) was used to analyze and classify Py-MBMS data into compound classes. The effect of harvest times on the thermal conversion of these feedstocks was assessed from these data. Apart from sericea lespedeza, the influence of harvest time on the pyrolysis products of the various feedstocks was insignificant. For sericea lespedeza, samples harvested before plant defoliation were significantly different from those harvested after defoliation. The defoliated plant samples had higher carbohydrate-derived pyrolysis products than the samples obtained from the foliated plant. Additionally, char yields from the defoliated plant samples were lower than those from the foliated plant samples.

Agblevor, F.A.; Davis, M.F.; Evans, R.J. [National Renewal Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Rapid characterization of lignocellulosic feedstocks for fuels and chemicals: Molecular beam mass spectrometric approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rapid characterization of biomass feedstocks has a pivotal role in the development of biomass energy because of the large number of samples that must be analyzed due to the diversity of biomass feedstocks and the significant differences in the chemical and physical properties of these feedstocks. Several biomass feedstocks (herbaceous, woody, and agricultural residues) were screened for the effects of storage, season of harvest, geographic location, clonal, and species variation on the pyrolysis products of the feed stocks. For herbaceous species such as sericea lespedeza, the season of harvest had a significant effect on the pyrolysis products. Effects of clonal variation on the composition of hybrid poplar feedstocks was easily discerned with the molecular beam mass spectrometric analysis. The effect of geographic location on the poplar clones pyrolysis products was minimal. However in the case of switchgrass, varietal influence on the pyrolysis products was minimal, but where the plant was grown had a strong influence on the pyrolysis products of the feedstock. Significant differences because of species variation could also be shown from the pyrolysis products of various biomass feedstocks. The influence of storage time on biomass samples stored outside in the open could also be discerned from the pyrolysis products of the feedstocks. The differences noted in the pyrolysis products of the feedstocks were noted for samples which were significantly degraded during storage either through the action of microflora or weathering.

Agblevor, F.A.; Davis, M.F. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

REVIEW ARTICLE Taming molecular beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW ARTICLE Taming molecular beams The motion of neutral molecules in a beam can be manipulated time-varying fields can be used to decelerate or accelerate beams of molecules to any desired velocity. We review the possibilities that this molecular-beam technology offers, ranging from ultrahigh

Loss, Daniel

6

Molecular Beam Kinetics | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8Mistakes to AvoidKinetics Molecular Beam Kinetics

7

Effusive molecular beam-sampled Knudsen flow reactor coupled to vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization mass spectrometry using an external free radical source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new apparatus using vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization mass spectrometry (VUV SPIMS) of an effusive molecular beam emanating from a Knudsen flow reactor is described. It was designed to study free radical-molecule kinetics over a significant temperature range (300–630 K). Its salient features are: (1) external free radical source, (2) counterpropagating molecular beam and diffuse VUV photon beam meeting in a crossed-beam ion source of a quadrupole mass spectrometer with perpendicular ion extraction, (3) analog detection of the photocurrent of the free radical molecular cation, and (4) possibility of detecting both free radicals and closed shell species in the same apparatus and under identical reaction conditions owing to the presence of photoelectrons generated by the photoelectric effect of the used VUV-photons. The measured thermal molecular beam-to-background ratio was 6.35 ± 0.39 for Ar and 10.86 ± 1.59 for i-C{sub 4}H{sub 10} at 300 K, a factor of 2.52 and 1.50 smaller, respectively, than predicted from basic gas-dynamic considerations. Operating parameters as well as the performance of key elements of the instrument are presented and discussed. Coupled to an external free radical source a steady-state specific exit flow of 1.6 × 10{sup 11} and 5.0 × 10{sup 11} molecule s{sup ?1} cm{sup ?3} of C{sub 2}H{sub 5}{sup •} (ethyl) and t-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}{sup •} (t-butyl) free radicals have been detected using VUV SPIMS at their molecular ion m/z 29 and 57, respectively, at 300 K.

Leplat, N.; Rossi, M. J. [Laboratory of Atmospheric Chemistry (LAC), Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)] [Laboratory of Atmospheric Chemistry (LAC), Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Molecular Beam Epitaxy, Multi-source | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

beam epitaxy, is examined using a combination... Self-corrected Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy For Atom Flux Measurements In Molecular Beam Epitaxy. A...

9

Molecular Beam Epitaxy | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8Mistakes to Avoid MistakesResponseModernMolecular

10

Testing atomic mass models with radioactive beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significantly increased yields of new or poorly characterized exotic isotopes that lie far from beta-decay stability can be expected when radioactive beams are used to produce these nuclides. Measurements of the masses of these new species are very important. Such measurements are motivated by the general tendency of mass models to diverge from one another upon excursions from the line of beta-stability. Therefore in these regions (where atomic mass data are presently nonexistent or sparse) the models can be tested rigorously to highlight the features that affect the quality of their short-range and long-range extrapolation properties. Selection of systems to study can be guided, in part, by a desire to probe those mass regions where distinctions among mass models are most apparent and where yields of exotic isotopes, produced via radioactive beams, can be optimized. Identification of models in such regions that have good predictive properties will aid materially in guiding the selection of additional experiments which ultimately will provide expansion of the atomic mass database for further refinement of the mass models. 6 refs., 5 figs.

Haustein, P.E.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Physics with fast molecular-ion beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fast (MeV) molecular-ion beams provide a unique source of energetic projectile nuclei which are correlated in space and time. The recognition of this property has prompted several recent investigations of various aspects of the interactions of these ions with matter. High-resolution measurements on the fragments resulting from these interactions have already yielded a wealth of new information on such diverse topics as plasma oscillations in solids and stereochemical structures of molecular ions as well as a variety of atomic collision phenomena. The general features of several such experiments will be discussed and recent results will be presented.

Kanter, E.P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Counting molecular-beam grown graphene layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used the ratio of the integrated intensity of graphene's Raman G peak to that of the silicon substrate's first-order optical phonon peak, accurately to determine the number of graphene layers across our molecular-beam (MB) grown graphene films. We find that these results agree well both, with those from our own exfoliated single and few-layer graphene flakes, and with the results of Koh et al.[ACS Nano 5, 269 (2011)]. We hence distinguish regions of single-, bi-, tri-, four-layer, etc., graphene, consecutively, as we scan coarsely across our MB-grown graphene. This is the first, but crucial, step to being able to grow, by such molecular-beam-techniques, a specified number of large-area graphene layers, to order.

Plaut, Annette S. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Wurstbauer, Ulrich [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Pinczuk, Aron [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States) [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Garcia, Jorge M. [MBE Lab, IMM-Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM-CSIC), Madrid, E-28760 (Spain)] [MBE Lab, IMM-Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM-CSIC), Madrid, E-28760 (Spain); Pfeiffer, Loren N. [Electrical Engineering Department, Princeton University, New Jersey 08544 (United States)] [Electrical Engineering Department, Princeton University, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

13

BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT A.RASPEREZA DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D­22607#erential luminosity spectrum measurements and beam energy spread on the precision of the Higgs boson mass measurement possible impact of the beam related systematic errors on the Higgs boson mass measurement is discussed

14

Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose of this research project is two-fold: (1) to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions which are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photo chemical processes which play an important role in many macroscopic processes and (2) to determine the energetics of polyatomic free radicals using microscopic experimental methods. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment translational energy and angular distributions using unique molecular beam apparati designed for these purposes.

Lee, Y.T.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT A.RASPEREZA DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 and differential luminosity spectrum measurements and beam energy spread on the precision of the Higgs boson mass such as Higgs boson mass, decay branching fractions and production rate. However, most of these studies did

16

Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

Lee, Y.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

Lee, Yuan T.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Multiple-ion-beam time-of-flight mass spectrometer Andreas Rohrbacher and Robert E. Continettia)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/ionization and the molecular ions of two different proteins myoglobin and lysozyme , created by matrix assisted laser,7 and matrix assisted desorption and ionization MALDI 8­11 have become avail- able to allow the mass the samples with a robot- driven capillary,15 a scanning ion beam,16 or spatial resolu- tion was achieved

Continetti, Robert E.

19

Apparatus and methods for continuous beam fourier transform mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A continuous beam Fourier transform mass spectrometer in which a sample of ions to be analyzed is trapped in a trapping field, and the ions in the range of the mass-to-charge ratios to be analyzed are excited at their characteristic frequencies of motion by a continuous excitation signal. The excited ions in resonant motions generate real or image currents continuously which can be detected and processed to provide a mass spectrum.

McLuckey, Scott A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goeringer, Douglas E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Crossed molecular beam studies of atmospheric chemical reaction dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamics of several elementary chemical reactions that are important in atmospheric chemistry are investigated. The reactive scattering of ground state chlorine or bromine atoms with ozone molecules and ground state chlorine atoms with nitrogen dioxide molecules is studied using a crossed molecular beams apparatus with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. The Cl + O{sub 3} {yields} ClO + O{sub 2} reaction has been studied at four collision energies ranging from 6 kcal/mole to 32 kcal/mole. The derived product center-of-mass angular and translational energy distributions show that the reaction has a direct reaction mechanism and that there is a strong repulsion on the exit channel. The ClO product is sideways and forward scattered with respect to the Cl atom, and the translational energy release is large. The Cl atom is most likely to attack the terminal oxygen atom of the ozone molecule. The Br + O{sub 3} {yields} ClO + O{sub 2} reaction has been studied at five collision energies ranging from 5 kcal/mole to 26 kcal/mole. The derived product center-of-mass angular and translational energy distributions are quite similar to those in the Cl + O{sub 3} reaction. The Br + O{sub 3} reaction has a direct reaction mechanism similar to that of the Cl + O{sub 3} reaction. The electronic structure of the ozone molecule seems to play the central role in determining the reaction mechanism in atomic radical reactions with the ozone molecule. The Cl + NO{sub 2} {yields} ClO + NO reaction has been studied at three collision energies ranging from 10.6 kcal/mole to 22.4 kcal/mole. The center-of-mass angular distribution has some forward-backward symmetry, and the product translational energy release is quite large. The reaction proceeds through a short-lived complex whose lifetime is less than one rotational period. The experimental results seem to show that the Cl atom mainly attacks the oxygen atom instead of the nitrogen atom of the NO{sub 2} molecule.

Zhang, Jingsong

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

DYNAMICS OF INFRARED MULTIPHOTON DISSOCIATION OF SF6 BY MOLECULAR BEAM METHOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

molecular beam apparatus has been adapted to study the dynamics of excitationdynamics of molecular decomposition and the degree of vibrational excitation,

Grant, E.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Opportunistic Mass Measurements at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technique for measuring mass differences has been developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) that requires no specialized equipment. Mass differences are measured as position differences between known and unknown-mass isobars, dispersed at the image of the energy-analyzing magnet following the 25MV tandem post-accelerator, and identified by an energy-loss measurement. The technique has been demonstrated on neutron-rich 77 79Cu and 83 86Ge isotopes produced using the isotope separator online (ISOL) method with the 238U(p,fission) reaction, where a mass accuracy of 500 keV was achieved. These nuclides are well suited to the measurement technique, as they readily migrate out of the production target and to the ion source and comprise the most neutron-rich elements of the isobarically mixed beam. Because modest precision mass values can be obtained with only a few tens of counts of the nuclide of interest among orders of magnitude more of the isobaric neighbors closer to stability, the sensitivity of this technique makes it appropriate for initial mass measurements far from stability.

Hausladen, Paul [ORNL; Beene, James R [ORNL; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn} [ORNL; Larochelle, Y [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Liang, J Felix [ORNL; Mueller, Paul Edward [ORNL; Shapira, Dan [ORNL; Stracener, Daniel W [ORNL; Thomas, J. S. [Rutgers University; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL; Wollnik, Hermann [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Note: A helical velocity selector for continuous molecular beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on a modern realization of the classic helical velocity selector for gas phase particle beams. The device operates stably under high vacuum conditions at rotational frequencies limited only by commercial dc motor capabilities. Tuning the rotational frequency allows selective scanning over a broad velocity band. The width of the selected velocity distributions at full-width-half-maximum is as narrow as a few percent of the selected mean velocity and independent of the rotational speed of the selector. The selector generates low vibrational noise amplitudes comparable to mechanically damped state-of-the-art turbo-molecular pumps and is therefore compatible with vibration sensitive experiments like molecule interferometry.

Szewc, Carola; Collier, James D.; Ulbricht, Hendrik [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Mass spectrometer with electron source for reducing space charge effects in sample beam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mass spectrometer includes an ion source which generates a beam including positive ions, a sampling interface which extracts a portion of the beam from the ion source to form a sample beam that travels along a path and has an excess of positive ions over at least part of the path, thereby causing space charge effects to occur in the sample beam due to the excess of positive ions in the sample beam, an electron source which adds electrons to the sample beam to reduce space charge repulsion between the positive ions in the sample beam, thereby reducing the space charge effects in the sample beam and producing a sample beam having reduced space charge effects, and a mass analyzer which analyzes the sample beam having reduced space charge effects.

Houk, Robert S.; Praphairaksit, Narong

2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

25

Controlled oxygen doping of GaN using plasma assisted molecular-beam epitaxy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Controlled oxygen doping of GaN using plasma assisted molecular-beam epitaxy A. J. Ptak, L. J-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy to study the dependence of oxygen incorporation on polarity and oxygen partial pressure. Oxygen incorporates at a rate ten times faster on nitrogen-polar GaN than on the Ga polarity

Myers, Tom

26

Cerenkov emission induced by external beam radiation stimulates molecular fluorescence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Cerenkov emission is induced when a charged particle moves faster than the speed of light in a given medium. Both x-ray photons and electrons produce optical Cerenkov photons in everyday radiation therapy of tissue; yet, this phenomenon has never been fully documented. This study quantifies the emissions and also demonstrates that the Cerenkov emission can excite a fluorophore, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), embedded in biological phantoms. Methods: In this study, Cerenkov emission induced by radiation from a clinical linear accelerator is investigated. Biological mimicking phantoms were irradiated with x-ray photons, with energies of 6 or 18 MV, or electrons at energies 6, 9, 12, 15, or 18 MeV. The Cerenkov emission and the induced molecular fluorescence were detected by a camera or a spectrometer equipped with a fiber optic cable. Results: It is shown that both x-ray photons and electrons, at MeV energies, produce optical Cerenkov photons in tissue mimicking media. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Cerenkov emission can excite a fluorophore, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), embedded in biological phantoms. Conclusions: The results here indicate that molecular fluorescence monitoring during external beam radiotherapy is possible.

Axelsson, Johan; Davis, Scott C.; Gladstone, David J.; Pogue, Brian W. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766 (United States); Thayer School of Engineering and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries in deeply virtual Compton scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal cross section asymmetries with respect to charge and longitudinal polarization of the lepton beam is studiedfor hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons. The observed beam-charge and beam-helicity asymmetries are attributed to the interference between the Bethe-Heitler and deeply virtual Compton scattering processes. For various nuclei, the asymmetries are extracted for both coherent and incoherent-enriched regions, which involve different (combinations of) generalized parton distributions. For both regions, the asymmetries are compared to those for a free proton, and no nuclear-mass dependence is found.

The HERMES collaboration; A. Airapetian

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

28

Dynamics of Ion Beam Stimulated Surface Mass Transport to Nanopores David P. Hoogerheide1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics of Ion Beam Stimulated Surface Mass Transport to Nanopores David P. Hoogerheide1 membrane, from the substrate side, by rastering a 10-nm diameter, 50 keV gallium ion beam produced by a FEI We explore the ion beam-induced dynamics of the formation of large features at the edges of nanopores

29

E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted molecular beam Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10.1103PhysRevLett.98.103201 PACS numbers: 39.10.+j, 03.75.Be Atomic and molecular beams have... as well as fundamental physics and precision tests 3. The highest brightness...

30

Quantum state specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highly efficient preparation of molecules in a specific rovibrationally excited state for gas/surface reactivity measurements is achieved in a molecular beam using tunable infrared (IR) radiation from a single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (cw-OPO). We demonstrate that with appropriate focusing of the IR radiation, molecules in the molecular beam crossing the fixed frequency IR field experience a Doppler tuning that can be adjusted to achieve complete population inversion of a two-level system by rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). A room temperature pyroelectric detector is used to monitor the excited fraction in the molecular beam and the population inversion is detected and quantified using IR bleaching by a second IR-OPO. The second OPO is also used for complete population transfer to an overtone or combination vibration via double resonance excitation using two spatially separated RAP processes.

Chadwick, Helen, E-mail: helen.chadwick@epfl.ch; Hundt, P. Morten; Reijzen, Maarten E. van; Yoder, Bruce L.; Beck, Rainer D. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Moléculaire, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland)] [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Moléculaire, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland)

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

31

Production of pulsed, mass-selected beams of metal and semiconductor clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the development of a beam line for mass-selected metal and semiconductor clusters. The cluster source combines the principles of plasma sputtering and gas condensation. Both techniques together allow to produce clusters in a wide size range. With the aid of a time-of-flight system, small clusters (i.e., Cu{sub n}{sup +}, n<100) are selected and pure beams containing only one cluster size are provided. For large clusters (containing several thousands of atoms), a beam with a narrow size distribution is obtained. A 90 deg. quadrupole deviator is used to separate charged clusters from neutral ones.

Kamalou, Omar; Rangama, Jimmy; Ramillon, Jean-Marc; Guinement, Patrick; Huber, Bernd A. [CIMAP, CEA-CNRS-ENSICaen-UCBN, Bv. Henry Becquerel (B.P. 5133), F-14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Mass Spectral Molecular Networking of Living Microbial Colonies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrating the governing chemistry with the genomics and phenotypes of microbial colonies has been a "holy grail" in microbiology. This work describes a highly sensitive, broadly applicable, and costeffective approach that allows metabolic profiling of live microbial colonies directly from a Petri dish without any sample preparation. Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (MS), combined with alignment of MS data and molecular networking, enabled monitoring of metabolite production from live microbial colonies from diverse bacterial genera, including Bacillus subtilis, Streptomyces coelicolor, Mycobacterium smegmatis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This work demonstrates that, by using these tools to visualize small molecular changes within bacterial interactions, insights can be gained into bacterial developmental processes as a result of the improved organization of MS/MS data. To validate this experimental platform, metabolic profiling was performed on Pseudomonas sp. SH-C52, which protects sugar beet plants from infections by specific soil-borne fungi [R. Mendes et al. (2011) Science 332:1097–1100]. The antifungal effect of strain SHC52 was attributed to thanamycin, a predicted lipopeptide encoded by a nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene cluster. Our technology, in combination with our recently developed peptidogenomics strategy, enabled the detection and partial characterization of thanamycin and showed that it is amonochlorinated lipopeptide that belongs to the syringomycin family of antifungal agents. In conclusion, the platform presented here provides a significant advancement in our ability to understand the spatiotemporal dynamics of metabolite production in live microbial colonies and communities.

Watrous, Jeramie D.; Roach, Patrick J.; Alexandrov, Theodore; Heath, Brandi S.; Yang, Jane Y.; Kersten, Roland; vander Voort, Menno; Pogliano, Kit; Gross, Harald; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; Moore, Bradley S.; Laskin, Julia; Bandeira, Nuno; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

33

/II sifu reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements of low temperature surface cleaning for Si molecular beam epitaxy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/II sifu reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements of low temperature surface cleaning for Si molecular beam epitaxy Shouleh Nikzad, Selmer S. Wong, Channing C. Ahn, Aimee L. Smith molecular beam epitaxy system, using reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy, in conjunction

Atwater, Harry

34

Non-adiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics of supersonic beam epitaxy of silicon carbide at room temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-adiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics of supersonic beam epitaxy of silicon carbide at room-adiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics of supersonic beam epitaxy of silicon carbide at room temperature Simone film crystal growth of silicon carbide (SiC), a semiconductor syn- thesized to replace silicon in harsh

Alfè, Dario

35

Mass Resolving Power Requirement for Molecular Formula Determination of Fossil Oils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of molecular formulas of the components is reviewed. The resolving power required for overlapping compoundMass Resolving Power Requirement for Molecular Formula Determination of Fossil Oils Chang Samuel Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Ultrahigh-resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass

Weston, Ken

36

Photodissociation of cyclic compounds in a molecular beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A discussion on the dynamics and kinematics of photofragmentation-translational spectroscopy is presented, and the results are applied to experimental studies of four cyclic compounds: hexahydro-1,3,5- trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), s-tetrazine (ST), cyclohexene, (CHN), and 1,4-cyclohexadiene (CHDN). In infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) of RDX, the dominant primary channel is concerted triple fission to produce three CH/sub 2/N/sub 2/O/sub 2/ fragments which subsequently undergo secondary dissociation. Concerted reactions predominate over simple bond rupture not only in the number of channels, but also in the amount of products. Following /sup 1/B/sub 3u/ reverse arrow /sup 1/A/sub g/ (S/sub 1/ reverse arrow S/sub 0/) or /sup 1/B/sub 2u/ reverse arrow /sup 1/A/sub g/ (248 nm) excitation, ST reverts to the highly vibrationally excited ground electronic state through internal conversion (IC), and then decomposes into 2HCN + N/sub 2/ via concerted triple dissociation. The asymptotic angles between the N/sub 2/ and HCN groups from the center-of-mass of ST are 117.2/degree/ and 114.4/degree/ for S/sub 1/ reverse arrow S/sub 0/ and 248 nm excitation respectively.

Zhao, Xinsheng

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

High performance double pulse doped pseudomorphic AlGaAs/InGaAs transistors grown by molecular-beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Double pulse doped AlGaAs/InGaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors have been grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on GaAs substrates. Hall mobilities in excess of 7100 cm{sup 2}/V s at 300 K and 25000 cm{sup 2}/V s at 77 K are obtained with a sheet density of 3 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}2}. Photoluminescence measurements indicate that two electronic subbands are occupied, and the subband energies are determined. The doping pulses are resolved in secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements. Using a double recess process, transistors have been fabricated that have produced state of the art microwave performance. At 10 GHz a 1.2 mm device has simultaneously achieved a power added efficiency of 70%, output power of 0.97 W, and gain of 10 dB. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Hoke, W.E.; Lyman, P.S.; Labossier, W.H.; Brierley, S.K.; Hendriks, H.T.; Shanfield, S.R.; Aucoin, L.M.; Kazior, T.E. [Raytheon Research Division, Lexington, MA (United States)] [Raytheon Research Division, Lexington, MA (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

(In,Mn)As quantum dots: Molecular-beam epitaxy and optical properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Self-assembled (In,Mn)As quantum dots are synthesized by molecular-beam epitaxy on GaAs (001) substrates. The experimental results obtained by transmission electron microscopy show that doping of the central part of the quantum dots with Mn does not bring about the formation of structural defects. The optical properties of the samples, including those in external magnetic fields, are studied.

Bouravleuv, A. D., E-mail: bour@mail.ioffe.ru; Nevedomskii, V. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Ubyivovk, E. V. [St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation)] [St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Sapega, V. F. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Khrebtov, A. I. [St. Petersburg Academic University, Nanotechnology Research and Education Centre (Russian Federation)] [St. Petersburg Academic University, Nanotechnology Research and Education Centre (Russian Federation); Samsonenko, Yu. B.; Cirlin, G. E.; Ustinov, V. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of GaAs on (631) Oriented Substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we report the study of the homoepitaxial growth of GaAs on (631) oriented substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). We observed the spontaneous formation of a high density of large scale features on the surface. The hilly like features are elongated towards the [-5, 9, 3] direction. We show the dependence of these structures with the growth conditions and we present the possibility of to create quantum wires structures on this surface.

Cruz Hernandez, Esteban; Rojas Ramirez, Juan-Salvador; Contreras Hernandez, Rocio; Lopez Lopez, Maximo [Physics Department, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apartado Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F., 07000 (Mexico); Pulzara Mora, Alvaro [Universidad Nacional de Colombia - Sede Manizales, A. A. 127 (Colombia); Mendez Garcia, Victor H. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Av. Karakorum 1470, Lomas 4a Seccion, C.P. 78210, San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

40

Growth of InGaAsP by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molecular beam epitaxy has been used to grow good quality films of InGaAsP on InP substrates. The films have been characterized using infrared absorption, electroreflectance, x-ray diffraction, reflection electron diffraction, and Hall measurements. Lattice matching was achieved and room-temperature mobilities up to 4600 cm/sup 2/ V/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ were measured.

Holah, G.D.; Eisele, F.L.; Meeks, E.L.; Cox, N.W.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Assessment of molecular effects on neutrino mass measurements from tritium beta decay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The beta decay of molecular tritium currently provides the highest sensitivity in laboratory-based neutrino mass measurements. The upcoming Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment will improve the sensitivity to 0.2 eV, making a percent-level quantitative understanding of molecular effects essential. The modern theoretical calculations available for neutrino-mass experiments agree with spectroscopic data. Moreover, when neutrino-mass experiments performed in the 1980s with gaseous tritium are re-evaluated using these modern calculations, the extracted neutrino mass-squared values are consistent with zero instead of being significantly negative. On the other hand, the calculated molecular final-state branching ratios are in tension with dissociation experiments performed in the 1950s. We re-examine the theory of the final-state spectrum of molecular tritium decay and its effect on the determination of the neutrino mass, with an emphasis on the role of the vibrational- and rotational-state distribution i...

Bodine, L I; Robertson, R G H

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Synchrotron based mass spectrometry to investigate the molecular properties of mineral-organic associations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil organic matter (OM) is important because its decay drives life processes in the biosphere. Analysis of organic compounds in geological systems is difficult because of their intimate association with mineral surfaces. To date there is no procedure capable of quantitatively separating organic from mineral phases without creating artifacts or mass loss. Therefore, analytical techniques that can (a) generate information about both organic and mineral phases simultaneously and (b) allow the examination of predetermined high-interest regions of the sample as opposed to conventional bulk analytical techniques are valuable. Laser Desorption Synchrotron Postionization (synchrotron-LDPI) mass spectrometry is introduced as a novel analytical tool to characterize the molecular properties of organic compounds in mineral-organic samples from terrestrial systems, and it is demonstrated that when combined with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), can provide complementary information on mineral composition. Mass spectrometry along a decomposition gradient in density fractions, verifies the consistency of our results with bulk analytical techniques. We further demonstrate that by changing laser and photoionization energies, variations in molecular stability of organic compounds associated with mineral surfaces can be determined. The combination of synchrotron-LDPI and SIMS shows that the energetic conditions involved in desorption and ionization of organic matter may be a greater determinant of mass spectral signatures than the inherent molecular structure of the organic compounds investigated. The latter has implications for molecular models of natural organic matter that are based on mass spectrometric information.

Liu, Suet Yi; Kleber, Markus; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Nico, Peter; Keiluweit, Marco; Ahmed, Musahid

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Mass Spectral Molecular Networking of Living Microbial Colonies. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale Landscape PrintSurveyMary K. Gaillard,movesMass

44

Germanium diffusion during HfO{sub 2} growth on Ge by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors study the Ge diffusion during HfO{sub 2} growth by molecular beam epitaxy on differently in situ prepared germanium substrates and at different growth temperatures. While HfO{sub 2} layers grown directly on Ge do not show any germanium contamination, oxygen rich interfacial layers such as GeO{sub x} or GeO{sub x}N{sub y} partly dissolve into the HfO{sub 2} layer, giving rise to high Ge contamination (from 1% to 10%). The use of nitridated interfacial layers does not prevent Ge diffusion into the HfO{sub 2} during the growth process because of the high oxygen content present in the nitridated germanium layer.

Ferrari, S.; Spiga, S.; Wiemer, C.; Fanciulli, M.; Dimoulas, A. [Laboratorio MDM-INFM-CNR, Via Olivetti, 2 Agrate Brianza, Milano 20041 (Italy); MBE Laboratory, Institute of Materials Science, DEMOKRITOS National Center for Scientific Research, 153 10 Athens (Greece)

2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

45

Molecular-beam epitaxial growth of boron-doped GaAs films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GaAs films doped with boron in the 10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3} range were grown by solid source molecular-beam epitaxy. Lattice contractions were observed in x-ray double crystal spectra. Substitutional boron concentrations up to 1.7x10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3} were obtained with narrow x-ray linewidths and specular surface morphology. For a given boron flux, the substitutional concentration was dependent on growth temperature. P-type conductivity due to boron incorporation was measured in the films with hole concentration reaching 1x10{sup 19} cm{sup {minus}3}. The lattice contractions exhibited good thermal stability for rapid thermal anneals. 10 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Hoke, W.E.; Lemonias, P.J.; Weir, D.G. [Raytheon Research Division, Lexington, MA (United States)] [and others] [Raytheon Research Division, Lexington, MA (United States); and others

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Lattice constant and substitutional composition of GeSn alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single crystal epitaxial Ge{sub 1?x}Sn{sub x} alloys with atomic fractions of tin up to x = 0.145 were grown by solid source molecular beam epitaxy on Ge (001) substrates. The Ge{sub 1?x}Sn{sub x} alloys formed high quality, coherent, strained layers at growth temperatures below 250 °C, as shown by high resolution X-ray diffraction. The amount of Sn that was on lattice sites, as determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channeling, was found to be above 90% substitutional in all alloys. The degree of strain and the dependence of the effective unstrained bulk lattice constant of Ge{sub 1?x}Sn{sub x} alloys versus the composition of Sn have been determined.

Bhargava, Nupur; Coppinger, Matthew; Prakash Gupta, Jay; Kolodzey, James [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Wielunski, Leszek [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

47

Intense terahertz emission from molecular beam epitaxy-grown GaAs/GaSb(001)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intense terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave emission was observed in undoped GaAs thin films deposited on (100) n-GaSb substrates via molecular beam epitaxy. GaAs/n-GaSb heterostructures were found to be viable THz sources having signal amplitude 75% that of bulk p-InAs. The GaAs films were grown by interruption method during the growth initiation and using various metamorphic buffer layers. Reciprocal space maps revealed that the GaAs epilayers are tensile relaxed. Defects at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb interface were confirmed by scanning electron microscope images. Band calculations were performed to infer the depletion region and electric field at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb and the air-GaAs interfaces. However, the resulting band calculations were found to be insufficient to explain the THz emission. The enhanced THz emission is currently attributed to a piezoelectric field induced by incoherent strain and defects.

Sadia, Cyril P.; Laganapan, Aleena Maria; Agatha Tumanguil, Mae; Estacio, Elmer; Somintac, Armando; Salvador, Arnel [National Institute of Physics, University of the Philippines Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines); Que, Christopher T. [Physics Department, De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Avenue, Manila 1004 (Philippines); Yamamoto, Kohji; Tani, Masahiko [Research Center for Development of Far-Infrared Region, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Real-time reflectance-difference spectroscopy of GaAs molecular beam epitaxy homoepitaxial growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on real time-resolved Reflectance-difference (RD) spectroscopy of GaAs(001) grown by molecular beam epitaxy, with a time-resolution of 500 ms per spectrum within the 2.3–4.0 eV photon energy range. Through the analysis of transient RD spectra we demonstrated that RD line shapes are comprised of two components with different physical origins and determined their evolution during growth. Such components were ascribed to the subsurface strain induced by surface reconstruction and to surface stoichiometry. Results reported in this paper render RD spectroscopy as a powerful tool for the study of fundamental processes during the epitaxial growth of zincblende semiconductors.

Lastras-Martínez, A., E-mail: alm@cactus.iico.uaslp.mx, E-mail: alastras@gmail.com; Ortega-Gallegos, J.; Guevara-Macías, L. E.; Nuñez-Olvera, O.; Balderas-Navarro, R. E.; Lastras-Martínez, L. F. [Instituto de Investigación en Comunicación Optica, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Alvaro Obregón 64, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78000 (Mexico); Lastras-Montaño, L. A. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Lastras-Montaño, M. A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

GaNAsP: An intermediate band semiconductor grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dilute nitride GaNAsP thin films were grown via a GaAsP metamorphic buffer on GaP(100) substrate with gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. The compositions of this III-V-V-V compound were determined by channeling Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and nuclear reaction analysis. Photoreflectance shows two distinctive transitions from the valence band to the split conduction bands due to N incorporation. Photoluminescence and optical absorption show the fundamental bandgap of Ga(N)AsP is largely tailored by the small amount of N. The observed multiband characteristics and the bandgap tunability of GaNAsP are two merits that fit into the intermediate-band solar cell roadmap, and GaNAsP of high crystal quality provides a strong candidate for intermediate band solar cell materials.

Kuang, Y. J. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Yu, K. M.; Walukiewicz, W. [Electronic Materials Program, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Electronic Materials Program, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kudrawiec, R. [Electronic Materials Program, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Electronic Materials Program, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze, Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Luce, A. V. [Electronic Materials Program, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Electronic Materials Program, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Ting, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Tu, C. W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

50

Antimony segregation in stressed SiGe heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of the growth temperature, composition, and elastic strains in separate layers on the segregation of antimony are studied experimentally for stressed SiGe structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. It is established that the growth conditions and parameters of the structures exert an interrelated influence on the segregation of Sb: the degree of the influence of the composition and elastic stresses in the SiGe layers on Sb segregation depends on the growth temperature. It is shown that usage of a method previously proposed by us for the selective doping of silicon structures with consideration for the obtained dependences of Sb segregation on the growth conditions and parameters of the SiGe layers makes it possible to form SiGe structures selectively doped with antimony.

Drozdov, M. N.; Novikov, A. V.; Yurasov, D. V., E-mail: Inquisitor@ipm.sci.nnov.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Infrared electroluminescence from GeSn heterojunction diodes grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infrared electroluminescence was observed from GeSn/Ge p-n heterojunction diodes with 8% Sn, grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The GeSn layers were boron doped, compressively strained, and pseudomorphic on Ge substrates. Spectral measurements indicated an emission peak at 0.57 eV, about 50 meV wide, increasing in intensity with applied pulsed current, and with reducing device temperatures. The total integrated emitted power from a single edge facet was 54 {mu}W at an applied peak current of 100 mA at 100 K. These results suggest that GeSn-based materials maybe useful for practical light emitting diodes operating in the infrared wavelength range near 2 {mu}m.

Gupta, Jay Prakash; Bhargava, Nupur; Kim, Sangcheol; Kolodzey, James [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Adam, Thomas [Nanofab, University of Albany, SUNY, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)] [Nanofab, University of Albany, SUNY, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

52

Assessment of molecular effects on neutrino mass measurements from tritium beta decay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The beta decay of molecular tritium currently provides the highest sensitivity in laboratory-based neutrino mass measurements. The upcoming Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment will improve the sensitivity to 0.2 eV, making a percent-level quantitative understanding of molecular effects essential. The modern theoretical calculations available for neutrino-mass experiments agree with spectroscopic data. Moreover, when neutrino-mass experiments performed in the 1980s with gaseous tritium are re-evaluated using these modern calculations, the extracted neutrino mass-squared values are consistent with zero instead of being significantly negative. On the other hand, the calculated molecular final-state branching ratios are in tension with dissociation experiments performed in the 1950s. We re-examine the theory of the final-state spectrum of molecular tritium decay and its effect on the determination of the neutrino mass, with an emphasis on the role of the vibrational- and rotational-state distribution in the ground electronic state. General features can be reproduced quantitatively from considerations of kinematics and zero-point motion. We summarize the status of validation efforts and suggest means for resolving the apparent discrepancy in dissociation rates.

L. I. Bodine; D. S. Parno; R. G. H. Robertson

2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

53

Positron annihilation studies of defects in molecular beam epitaxy grown III-V layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A summary of recent positron annihilation experiments on molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown III-V layers is Presented. Variable energy positron beam measurements on Al{sub 0.32}Ga{sub 0.68}As undoped and Si doped have been completed. Positron trapping at a open volume defect in Al{sub 0.32}Ga{sub 0.68}:Si for temperatures from 300 to 25 K in the dark was observed. The positron trap was lost after 1.3 eV illumination at 25K. These results indicate an open volume defect is associated with the local structure of the deep donor state of the DX center. Stability of MBE GaAs to thermal annealing war, investigated over the temperature range of 230 to 700{degrees}C, Proximity wafer furnace anneals in flowing argon were used, Samples grown above 450{degrees}C were shown to be stable but for sample below this temperature an anneal induced vacancy related defect was produced for anneals between 400 and 500{degrees}C. The nature of the defect was shown to be different for material grown at 350 and 230{degrees}C. Activation energies of 2.5 eV to 2.3 eV were obtained from isochronal anneal experiments for samples grown at 350 and 230{degrees}C, respectively.

Umlor, M.T.; Keeble, D.J. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Asoka-Kumar, P.; Lynn, K.G. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Cooke, P.W. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Eatontown, NJ (United States). Fort Monmouth Operation

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Molecular Beam and Surface Science Studies of Heterogeneous Reaction Kinetics Including Combustion Dynamics. Final Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program examined the heterogeneous reaction kinetics and reaction dynamics of surface chemical processes which are of direct relevance to efficient energy production, condensed phase reactions, and mateials growth including nanoscience objectives. We have had several notable scientific and technical successes. Illustrative highlights include: (1) a thorough study of how one can efficiently produce synthesis gas (SynGas) at relatively low Rh(111) catalyst temperatures via the reaction CH{sub4}+1/2 O{sub2} {r_arrow} CO+2H{sub2}. In these studies methane activation is accomplished utilizing high-kinetic energy reagents generated via supersonic molecular beams, (2) experiments which have incisively probed the partial oxidation chemistry of adsorbed 1- and 2- butene on Rh and ice, as well as partial oxidation of propene on Au; (3) investigation of structural changes which occur to the reconstructed (23x{radical}3)-Au(111) surface upon exposure to atomic oxygen, (4) a combined experimental and theoretical examination of the fundamental atomic-level rules which govern defect minimization during the formation of self-organizing stepped nanostructures, (5) the use of these relatively defect-free nanotemplates for growing silicon nanowires having atomically-dimensioned widths, (6) a combined scanning probe and atomic beam scattering study of how the presence of self-assembling organic overlayers interact with metallic supports substrates - this work hs led to revision of the currently held view of how such adsorbates reconfigure surface structure at the atomic level, (7) an inelastic He atom scattering study in which we examined the effect of chain length on the low-energy vibrations of alkanethiol striped phase self-assembled monolayers on Au(111), yielding information on the forces that govern interfacial self-assembly, (8) a study of the vibrational properties of disordered films of SF{sub6} adsorbed on Au(111), and (9) a study of the activated chemistry and photochemistry of NO on NiO/Ni. Innovative STM and molecular beam instrumentation has been fabricated to enable this program.

Sibener, S. J.

2006-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

55

A Comparison of Magnesium and Beryllium Acceptors in GaN Grown by rf-Plasma Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Comparison of Magnesium and Beryllium Acceptors in GaN Grown by rf-Plasma Assisted Molecular Beam Evans and Associates, Sunnyvale, CA 94086 ABSTRACT Step-doped structures of both magnesium and beryllium activation energy of approximately 100 meV. INTRODUCTION While magnesium is currently the most

Myers, Tom

56

Radiation environment simulations at the Tevatron, studies of the beam profile and measurement of the Bc meson mass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The description of a computer simulation of the CDF detector at Fermilab and the adjacent accelerator parts is detailed, with MARS calculations of the radiation background in various elements of the model due to the collision of beams and machine-related losses. Three components of beam halo formation are simulated for the determination of the principal source of radiation background in CDF due to beam losses. The effect of a collimator as a protection for the detector is studied. The simulation results are compared with data taken by a CDF group. Studies of a 150 GeV Tevatron proton beam are performed to investigate the transverse diffusion growth and distribution. A technique of collimator scan is used to scrape the beam under various experimental conditions, and computer programs are written for the beam reconstruction. An average beam halo growth speed is given and the potential of beam tail reconstruction using the collimator scan is evaluated. A particle physics analysis is conducted in order to detect the B{sub c} {yields} J/{psi}{pi} decay signal with the CDF Run II detector in 360 pb{sup -1} of data. The cut variables and an optimization method to determine their values are presented along with a criterion for the detection threshold of the signal. The mass of the B{sub c} meson is measured with an evaluation of the significance of the signal.

Nicolas, Ludovic Y.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Method for Characterization of Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids in Atmospheric Aerosols Using Ion Chromatography Mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spectrometry (ESI-MS).17-19 ESI has the advantage of being compatible with polar mobile phases, and softMethod for Characterization of Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids in Atmospheric Aerosols Using Ion Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Lacey C. Brent,* Jessica L. Reiner, Russell R. Dickerson, and Lane C. Sander

Dickerson, Russell R.

58

Constant Asphaltene Molecular and Nanoaggregate Mass in a Gravitationally Segregated Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constant Asphaltene Molecular and Nanoaggregate Mass in a Gravitationally Segregated Reservoir are typically enriched in asphaltenes. Equations of state capable of modeling these gradients have numerous or aggregates in the crude oil. Here, we explore the impact of gravity in segregating asphaltenes of different

Zare, Richard N.

59

Coherent growth of superconducting TiN thin films by plasma enhanced molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated the formation of titanium nitride (TiN) thin films on (001) MgO substrates by molecular beam epitaxy and radio frequency acitvated nitrogen plasma. Although cubic TiN is stabile over a wide temperature range, superconducting TiN films are exclusively obtained when the substrate temperature exceeds 710 Degree-Sign C. TiN films grown at 720 Degree-Sign C show a high residual resistivity ratio of approximately 11 and the superconducting transition temperature (T{sub c}) is well above 5 K. Superconductivity has been confirmed also by magnetiztion measurements. In addition, we determined the upper critical magnetic field ({mu}{sub 0}H{sub c2}) as well as the corresponding coherence length ({xi}{sub GL}) by transport measurements under high magnetic fields. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy data revealed full in plane coherency to the substrate as well as a low defect density in the film, in agreement with a mean-free path length Script-Small-L Almost-Equal-To 106 nm, which is estimated from the residual resistivity value. The observations of reflection high energy electron diffraction intensity oscillations during the growth, distinct Laue fringes around the main Bragg peaks, and higher order diffraction spots in the reciprocal space map suggest the full controlability of the thickness of high quality superconducting TiN thin films.

Krockenberger, Yoshiharu; Karimoto, Shin-ichi; Yamamoto, Hideki; Semba, Kouich [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Lattice-registered growth of GaSb on Si (211) with molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A GaSb film was grown on a Si(211) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy indicating full lattice relaxation as well as full lattice registration and dislocation-free growth in the plane perpendicular to the [01 - 1]-direction. Heteroepitaxy of GaSb on a Si(211) substrate is dominated by numerous first order and multiple higher order micro-twins. The atomic-resolved structural study of GaSb films by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy reveals that slight tilt, along with twinning, favors the lattice registry to Si(211) substrates. Preferential bonding of impinging Ga and Sb atoms at the interface due to two distinctive bonding sites on the Si(211) surface enables growth that is sublattice-ordered and free of anti-phase boundaries. The role of the substrate orientation on the strain distribution of GaSb epilayers is further elucidated by investigating the local change in the lattice parameter using the geometric phase analysis method and hence effectiveness of the lattice tilting in reducing the interfacial strain was confirmed further.

Hosseini Vajargah, S.; Botton, G. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Ghanad-Tavakoli, S. [Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Preston, J. S.; Kleiman, R. N. [Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ARE MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS AROUND HIGH-MASS STARS DRIVEN BY IONIZATION FEEDBACK?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation of massive stars exceeding 10 M {sub Sun} usually results in large-scale molecular outflows. Numerical simulations, including ionization, of the formation of such stars show evidence for ionization-driven molecular outflows. Here we examine whether the outflows seen in these models reproduce the observations. We compute synthetic ALMA and CARMA maps of CO emission lines of the outflows, and compare their signatures to existing single-dish and interferometric data. We find that the ionization-driven models can only reproduce weak outflows around high-mass star-forming regions. We argue that expanding H II regions probably do not represent the dominant mechanism for driving observed outflows. We suggest instead that observed outflows are driven by the collective action of the outflows from the many lower-mass stars that inevitably form around young massive stars in a cluster.

Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S. [Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Zentrum fuer Astronomie, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Klaassen, Pamela D. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States); Banerjee, Robi, E-mail: tpeters@physik.uzh.ch [Hamburger Sternwarte, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

62

Dependence of the Mg-related acceptor ionization energy with the acceptor concentration in p-type GaN layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hall effect and capacitance-voltage C(V) measurements were performed on p-type GaN:Mg layers grown on GaN templates by molecular beam epitaxy with a high range of Mg-doping concentrations. The free hole density and the effective dopant concentration N{sub A}-N{sub D} as a function of magnesium incorporation measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy clearly reveal both a magnesium doping efficiency up to 90% and a strong dependence of the acceptor ionization energy Ea with the acceptor concentration N{sub A}. These experimental observations highlight an isolated acceptor binding energy of 245{+-}25 meV compatible, at high acceptor concentration, with the achievement of p-type GaN:Mg layers with a hole concentration at room temperature close to 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}.

Brochen, Stephane; Brault, Julien; Chenot, Sebastien; Dussaigne, Amelie; Leroux, Mathieu; Damilano, Benjamin [CNRS-CRHEA, Rue Bernard Gregory, F-06560 Valbonne (France)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Self-corrected Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy For Atom Flux Measurements In Molecular Beam Epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device (CCD) detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ a non-resonant line or a resonant line with lower absorbance from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

Du, Yingge; Droubay, Timothy C.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Li, Guosheng; Chambers, Scott A.

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

64

Impact of substrate temperature on the incorporation of carbon-related defects and mechanism for semi-insulating behavior in GaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B 22, 1145 ?2004?. A. Armstrong, A. R. Arehart, D. Green, U.San Diego, 1992?. A. Armstrong, A. R. Arehart, and S. A.molecular beam epitaxy A. Armstrong Department of Electrical

Armstrong, A; Poblenz, C; Green, D S; Mishra, U K; Speck, J S; Ringel, S A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Molecular-beam epitaxy growth of strontium thiogallate T. Yang, B. K. Wagner, M. Chaichimansour, W. Park, Z. L. Wang,a)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular-beam epitaxy growth of strontium thiogallate T. Yang, B. K. Wagner, M. Chaichimansour, W-beam epitaxy growth and characterization of cerium doped strontium thiogallate SrGa2S4:Ce thin film phosphors growth of cerium doped strontium thiogallate on quartz substrates was first reported in 1994.3 Here we

Wang, Zhong L.

66

Fundamental studies of the plasma extraction and ion beam formation processes in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fundamental and practical aspects are described for extracting ions from atmospheric pressure plasma sources into an analytical mass spectrometer. Methodologies and basic concepts of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are emphasized in the discussion, including ion source, sampling interface, supersonic expansion, slumming process, ion optics and beam focusing, and vacuum considerations. Some new developments and innovative designs are introduced. The plasma extraction process in ICP-MS was investigated by Langmuir measurements in the region between the skimmer and first ion lens. Electron temperature (T{sub e}) is in the range 2000--11000 K and changes with probe position inside an aerosol gas flow. Electron density (n{sub e}) is in the range 10{sup 8}--10{sup 10} {sup {minus}cm }at the skimmer tip and drops abruptly to 10{sup 6}--10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}3} near the skimmer tip and drops abruptly to 10{sup 6}--10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}3} downstream further behind the skimmer. Electron density in the beam leaving the skimmer also depends on water loading and on the presence and mass of matrix elements. Axially resolved distributions of electron number-density and electron temperature were obtained to characterize the ion beam at a variety of plasma operating conditions. The electron density dropped by a factor of 101 along the centerline between the sampler and skimmer cones in the first stage and continued to drop by factors of 10{sup 4}--10{sup 5} downstream of skimmer to the entrance of ion lens. The electron density in the beam expansion behind sampler cone exhibited a 1/z{sup 2} intensity fall-off (z is the axial position). An second beam expansion originated from the skimmer entrance, and the beam flow underwent with another 1/z{sup 2} fall-off behind the skimmer. Skimmer interactions play an important role in plasma extraction in the ICP-MS instrument.

Niu, Hongsen

1995-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

67

Physical properties and band structure of reactive molecular beam epitaxy grown oxygen engineered HfO{sub 2{+-}x}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have conducted a detailed thin film growth structure of oxygen engineered monoclinic HfO{sub 2{+-}x} grown by reactive molecular beam epitaxy. The oxidation conditions induce a switching between (111) and (002) texture of hafnium oxide. The band gap of oxygen deficient hafnia decreases with increasing amount of oxygen vacancies by more than 1 eV. For high oxygen vacancy concentrations, defect bands form inside the band gap that induce optical transitions and p-type conductivity. The resistivity changes by several orders of magnitude as a function of oxidation conditions. Oxygen vacancies do not give rise to ferromagnetic behavior.

Hildebrandt, Erwin; Kurian, Jose; Alff, Lambert [Institute of Materials Science, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Residual and nitrogen doping of homoepitaxial nonpolar m-plane ZnO films grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the homoepitaxial growth by molecular beam epitaxy of high quality nonpolar m-plane ZnO and ZnO:N films over a large temperature range. The nonintentionally doped ZnO layers exhibit a residual doping as low as {approx}10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}. Despite an effective incorporation of nitrogen, p-type doping was not achieved, ZnO:N films becoming insulating. The high purity of the layers and their low residual n-type doping evidence compensation mechanisms in ZnO:N films.

Taienoff, D.; Deparis, C.; Teisseire, M.; Morhain, C. [Centre de Recherche sur l'Hetero-Epitaxie et ses Applications, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CRHEA-CNRS), Rue B. Gregory, F-06560 Valbonne Sophia Antipolis (France); Al-Khalfioui, M.; Vinter, B.; Chauveau, J.-M. [Centre de Recherche sur l'Hetero-Epitaxie et ses Applications, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CRHEA-CNRS), Rue B. Gregory, F-06560 Valbonne Sophia Antipolis (France); Universite de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Parc Valrose F-06103 Nice (France)

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

69

Chirped-pulse manipulated carrier dynamics in low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaAs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chirped pulse controlled carrier dynamics in low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaAs are investigated by degenerate pump-probe technique. Varying the chirped condition of excited pulse from negative to positive increases the carrier relaxation time so as to modify the dispersion and reshape current pulse in time domain. The spectral dependence of carrier dynamics is analytically derived and explained by Shockley-Read Hall model. This observation enables the new feasibility of controlling carrier dynamics in ultrafast optical devices via the chirped pulse excitations.

Lee, Chao-Kuei, E-mail: chuckcklee@yahoo.com [Department of Photonics, National Sun-Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80400, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yuan-Yao [Department of Electrical Engineering, Institute of Photonics Technologies, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Lin, Sung-Hui [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Lin, Gong-Ru [Department of Electrical Engineering, Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Roosevelt Road, Sec. 4, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Pan, Ci-Ling [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Tsing Hwa University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

70

Optical properties of strain-free AlN nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The optical properties of catalyst-free AlN nanowires grown on Si substrates by molecular beam epitaxy were investigated. Such nanowires are nearly free of strain, with strong free exciton emission measured at room temperature. The photoluminescence intensity is significantly enhanced, compared to previously reported AlN epilayer. Moreover, the presence of phonon replicas with an energy separation of ?100?meV was identified to be associated with the surface-optical phonon rather than the commonly reported longitudinal-optical phonon, which is further supported by the micro-Raman scattering experiments.

Wang, Q.; Zhao, S.; Connie, A. T.; Shih, I.; Mi, Z., E-mail: zetian.mi@mcgill.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, 3480 University Street, Montreal, Quebec H3A 0E9 (Canada); Gonzalez, T.; Andrews, M. P. [Department of Chemistry, McGill University, 801 Sherbrooke St West, Montreal, Quebec H3A 0B8 (Canada); Du, X. Z.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

71

Inhomogeneous Si-doping of gold-seeded InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated in situ Si doping of InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy from gold seeds. The effectiveness of n-type doping is confirmed by electrical measurements showing an increase of the electron density with the Si flux. We also observe an increase of the electron density along the nanowires from the tip to the base, attributed to the dopant incorporation on the nanowire facets whereas no detectable incorporation occurs through the seed. Furthermore, the Si incorporation strongly influences the lateral growth of the nanowires without giving rise to significant tapering, revealing the complex interplay between axial and lateral growth.

Rolland, Chloe; Coinon, Christophe; Wallart, Xavier; Leturcq, Renaud [Institute of Electronics Microelectronics and Nanotechnology, UMR CNRS 8520, ISEN Department, Avenue Poincare, CS60069, 59652 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex (France)] [Institute of Electronics Microelectronics and Nanotechnology, UMR CNRS 8520, ISEN Department, Avenue Poincare, CS60069, 59652 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex (France); Caroff, Philippe [Institute of Electronics Microelectronics and Nanotechnology, UMR CNRS 8520, ISEN Department, Avenue Poincare, CS60069, 59652 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex (France) [Institute of Electronics Microelectronics and Nanotechnology, UMR CNRS 8520, ISEN Department, Avenue Poincare, CS60069, 59652 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex (France); Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

72

Non-adiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics of supersonic beam epitaxy of silicon carbide at room temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we investigate the processes leading to the room-temperature growth of silicon carbide thin films by supersonic molecular beam epitaxy technique. We present experimental data showing that the collision of fullerene on a silicon surface induces strong chemical-physical perturbations and, for sufficient velocity, disruption of molecular bonds, and cage breaking with formation of nanostructures with different stoichiometric character. We show that in these out-of-equilibrium conditions, it is necessary to go beyond the standard implementations of density functional theory, as ab initio methods based on the Born-Oppenheimer approximation fail to capture the excited-state dynamics. In particular, we analyse the Si-C{sub 60} collision within the non-adiabatic nuclear dynamics framework, where stochastic hops occur between adiabatic surfaces calculated with time-dependent density functional theory. This theoretical description of the C{sub 60} impact on the Si surface is in good agreement with our experimental findings.

Taioli, Simone [Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Computational Science, FBK-Center for Materials and Microsystems and University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Department of Chemistry, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Garberoglio, Giovanni [Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Computational Science, FBK-Center for Materials and Microsystems and University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Simonucci, Stefano [Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Computational Science, FBK-Center for Materials and Microsystems and University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Camerino, Camerino (Italy); Beccara, Silvio a [Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Computational Science, FBK-Center for Materials and Microsystems and University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Aversa, Lucrezia [Institute of Materials for Electronics and Magnetism, IMEM-CNR, Trento (Italy); Nardi, Marco [Institute of Materials for Electronics and Magnetism, IMEM-CNR, Trento (Italy); Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Verucchi, Roberto [Institute of Materials for Electronics and Magnetism, FBK-CNR, Trento (Italy); Iannotta, Salvatore [Institute of Materials for Electronics and Magnetism, IMEM-CNR, Parma (Italy); Dapor, Maurizio [Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Computational Science, FBK-Center for Materials and Microsystems and University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Department of Materials Engineering and Industrial Technologies, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova (Italy); and others

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

73

Molecular Inventories and Chemical Evolution of Low-mass Protostellar Envelopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents the first substantial study of the chemistry of the envelopes around a sample of 18 low-mass pre- and protostellar objects for which physical properties have previously been derived from radiative transfer modeling of their dust continuum emission. Single-dish line observations of 24 transitions of 9 molecular species (not counting isotopes) including HCO+, N2H+, CS, SO, SO2, HCN, HNC, HC3N and CN are reported. The line intensities are used to constrain the molecular abundances by comparison to Monte Carlo radiative transfer modeling of the line strengths. An empirical chemical network is constructed on the basis of correlations between the abundances of various species. For example, it is seen that the HCO+ and CO abundances are linearly correlated, both increasing with decreasing envelope mass. Species such as CS, SO and HCN show no trend with envelope mass. In particular no trend is seen between ``evolutionary stage'' of the objects and the abundances of the main sulfur- or nitrogen-containing species. Among the nitrogen-bearing species abundances of CN, HNC and HC3N are found to be closely correlated, which can be understood from considerations of the chemical network. The CS/SO abundance ratio is found to correlate with the abundances of CN and HC3N, which may reflect a dependence on the atomic carbon abundance. An anti-correlation is found between the deuteration of HCO+ and HCN, reflecting different temperature dependences for gas-phase deuteration mechanisms. The abundances are compared to other protostellar environments. In particular it is found that the abundances in the cold outer envelope of the previously studied class 0 protostar IRAS16293-2422 are in good agreement with the average abundances for the presented sample of class 0 objects.

J. K. Jorgensen; F. L. Schoeier; E. F. van Dishoeck

2003-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

74

A precise Higgs mass measurement at the ILC and test beam data analyses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Higgs boson mass measurement, while the cross section could be measured to 5%; if we make some assumptions about the Higgs boson's decay, for example a Standard Model Higgs boson with a dominant invisible

Boyer, Edmond

75

Intrinsic ultrathin topological insulators grown via molecular beam epitaxy characterized by in-situ angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate the capability of growing high quality ultrathin (10 or fewer quintuple layers) films of the topological insulators Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} using molecular beam epitaxy. Unlike previous growth techniques, which often pin the Fermi energy in the conduction band for ultrathin samples, our samples remain intrinsic bulk insulators. We characterize these films using in-situ angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy, which is a direct probe of bandstructure, and ex-situ atomic force microscopy. We find that the conduction band lies above the Fermi energy, indicating bulk insulating behavior with only the surface states crossing the Fermi energy. The use of a thermal cracker allows for more stoichiometric flux rates during growth, while still creating intrinsically doped films, paving the way for future improvements in growth of topological insulators.

Lee, J. J.; Vishik, I. M.; Ma, Y.; Shen, Z. X. [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Schmitt, F. T.; Moore, R. G. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

76

Spinel-structured metal oxide on a substrate and method of making same by molecular beam epitaxy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making a spinel-structured metal oxide on a substrate by molecular beam epitaxy, comprising the step of supplying activated oxygen, a first metal atom flux, and at least one other metal atom flux to the surface of the substrate, wherein the metal atom fluxes are individually controlled at the substrate so as to grow the spinel-structured metal oxide on the substrate and the metal oxide is substantially in a thermodynamically stable state during the growth of the metal oxide. A particular embodiment of the present invention encompasses a method of making a spinel-structured binary ferrite, including Co ferrite, without the need of a post-growth anneal to obtain the desired equilibrium state.

Chambers, Scott A.

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

77

CdSe/CdTe type-II superlattices grown on GaSb (001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CdSe/CdTe superlattices are grown on GaSb substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. X-ray diffraction measurements and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images indicate high crystalline quality. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements show the effective bandgap varies with the superlattice layer thicknesses and confirm the CdSe/CdTe heterostructure has a type-II band edge alignment. The valence band offset between unstrained CdTe and CdSe is determined as 0.63 {+-} 0.06 eV by fitting the measured PL peak positions using the envelope function approximation and the Kronig-Penney model. These results suggest that CdSe/CdTe superlattices are promising candidates for multi-junction solar cells and other optoelectronic devices based on GaSb substrates.

Li Jingjing; Liu Shi; Wang Shumin; Ding Ding; Johnson, Shane R.; Zhang Yonghang [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Liu Xinyu; Furdyna, Jacek K. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Smith, David J. [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

78

Molecular beam epitaxy-grown wurtzite MgS thin films for solar-blind ultra-violet detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molecular beam epitaxy grown MgS on GaAs(111)B substrate was resulted in wurtzite phase, as demonstrated by detailed structural characterizations. Phenomenological arguments were used to account for why wurtzite phase is preferred over zincblende phase or its most stable rocksalt phase. Results of photoresponse and reflectance measurements performed on wurtzite MgS photodiodes suggest a direct bandgap at around 5.1 eV. Their response peaks at 245 nm with quantum efficiency of 9.9% and enjoys rejection of more than three orders at 320 nm and close to five orders at longer wavelengths, proving the photodiodes highly competitive in solar-blind ultraviolet detection.

Lai, Y. H.; He, Q. L. [Nano Science and Nano Technology Program, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, HKSAR, People's Republic of China (China) [Nano Science and Nano Technology Program, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, HKSAR, People's Republic of China (China); Department of Physics and William Mong Institute of Nano Science and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, HKSAR, People's Republic of China (China); Cheung, W. Y.; Lok, S. K.; Wong, K. S.; Sou, I. K. [Department of Physics and William Mong Institute of Nano Science and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, HKSAR, People's Republic of China (China)] [Department of Physics and William Mong Institute of Nano Science and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, HKSAR, People's Republic of China (China); Ho, S. K. [Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macau, People's Republic of China (China)] [Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macau, People's Republic of China (China); Tam, K. W. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, University of Macau, Macau, People's Republic of China (China)] [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, University of Macau, Macau, People's Republic of China (China)

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

79

Mg doping of GaN grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under nitrogen-rich conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acceptor doping of GaN with Mg during plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, under N-rich conditions and a relatively high growth temperature of 740 deg. C, was investigated. The p-doping level steadily increases with increasing Mg flux. The highest doping level achieved, determined from Hall measurements, is 2.1x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. The corresponding doping efficiency and hole mobility are approx4.9% and 3.7 cm{sup 2}/V s at room temperature. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence measurements confirm good crystalline and optical quality of the Mg-doped layers. An InGaN/GaN quantum dot light emitting diode (lambda{sub peak}=529 nm) with p-GaN contact layers grown under N-rich condition exhibits a low series resistance of 9.8 OMEGA.

Zhang Meng; Bhattacharya, Pallab; Guo Wei; Banerjee, Animesh [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Solid-State Electronics Laboratory, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

2010-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

80

Rapid silicon outdiffusion from SiC substrates during molecular-beam epitaxial growth of AlGaN/GaN/AlN transistor structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AlGaN/GaN/AlN transistor structures were grown onto SiC substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy. Under aluminum-rich growth conditions for the AlN nucleation layer, undesirable n-type conduction is observed near the GaN/AlN interface for even thick (>1000 A) AlN layers. Silicon is identified as the unwanted dopant from secondary-ion mass spectroscopy measurements. Atomic force microscopy surface maps reveal free aluminum metal on AlN surfaces grown under modest aluminum-rich conditions. It is proposed that rapid silicon migration is caused by molten aluminum reacting with the SiC substrate resulting in dissolved silicon that rapidly migrates through the growing AlN layer. This behavior is significantly reduced using a growth flux ratio of aluminum to reactive nitrogen close to unity. The resulting buffer leakage current of the GaN high electron mobility transistor structure is reduced by more than four orders of magnitude.

Hoke, W.E.; Torabi, A.; Mosca, J.J.; Hallock, R.B.; Kennedy, T.D. [Raytheon RF Components, 362 Lowell Street, Andover, Massachusetts 01810 (United States)

2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Molecular characterization of organic aerosol using nanospray desorption/ electrospray ionization mass spectrometry: CalNex 2010 field study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, USA c Chemical and Materials Sciences molecular species were detected in the mass range of 50e400 m/z using positive mode ESI of aerosol samples in the 0.18e0.32 mm size range. Our analysis focused on identification of two main groups: compounds

Goldstein, Allen

82

Investigation of the evolution of single domain ,,111...B CdTe films by molecular beam epitaxy on miscut ,,001...Si substrate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigation of the evolution of single domain ,,111...B CdTe films by molecular beam epitaxy; accepted for publication 22 July 1998 A comprehensive view of the microstructure of 111 B CdTe films grown and scanning transmission electron microscopy. It is found that in the initial growth stage, CdTe nucleates

Pennycook, Steve

83

Crossed Molecular Beam Studies of Phenyl Radical Reactions with Propene and 2-Butene Daniel R. Albert, Michael A. Todt and H. Floyd Davis*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cornell University Ithaca, New York 14853 Abstract The reaction of phenyl radicals with propene has been studied at collision energies of 84 and 108 kJ/mol using the crossed molecular beams technique decreases as the collision energy increases. However, we find at both collision energies that the formation

Davis, H. Floyd

84

Growth of GaN on SiC(0001) by Molecular Beam Epitaxy C. D. LEE (a), ASHUTOSH SAGAR (a), R. M. FEENSTRA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

]. Silicon carbide has a much better lattice match to GaN (3.4%), and has gained in popularity in recent years as a substrate for both molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of Ga where a transition between streaky and spotty behavior occurs in the reflection high energy electron

Feenstra, Randall

85

Hexagonal Growth Spirals on GaN Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy: Kinetics vs Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prepared, Ga-polar GaN(0001) templates. The surface morphology was studied using reflection high-energy-edge energy of 0.26 eV/Ã?. They suggest that local conditions at step edges dominate the growth. 1 conducted ex situ using AFM. Desorption mass spectrometry (DMS) was used to measure the GaN growth rate. Our

Cohen, Philip I.

86

New electric quadrupole transitions of K2 observed in a pulsed molecular beam: The 1 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-of-flight mass spectrometer. Since K has two naturally occurring iso- topes 39 K, 93.26%; 41 K, 6.73% , K2 has, which are allowed by electric quadrupole radiation. © 2000 American Institute of Physics. S0021-9606 00, be- cause the intensity for magnetic dipole radiation is about 10 5 times smaller

Kim, Bongsoo

87

Molecular line intensities as measures of cloud masses - II. Conversion factors for specific galaxy types  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present theoretically-established values of the CO-to-H2 and C-to-H2 conversion factors that may be used to estimate the gas masses of external galaxies. We consider four distinct galaxy types, represented by M51, NGC 6946, M82 and SMC N27. The physical parameters that best represent the conditions within the molecular clouds in each of the galaxy types are estimated using a chi^2 analysis of several observed atomic fine structure and CO rotational lines. This analysis is explored over a wide range of density, radiation field, extinction, and other relevant parameters. Using these estimated physical conditions in methods that we have previously established, CO-to-H2 conversion factors are then computed for CO transitions up to J=9-8. For the conventional CO(1-0) transition, the computed conversion factor varies significantly below and above the canonical value for the Milky Way in the four galaxy types considered. Since atomic carbon emission is now frequently used as a probe of external galaxies, we also present, for the first time, the C-to-H2 conversion factor for this emission in the four galaxy types considered.

T. A. Bell; S. Viti; D. A. Williams

2007-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

88

Stoichiometric, nonstoichiometric, and locally nonstoichiometric SrTiO{sub 3} films grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SrTiO{sub 3} films were grown by reactive molecular beam epitaxy to have varying degrees of both global and local cationic nonstoichiometries (with stoichiometry defined as a 1:1 ratio of Sr:Ti). Slight global excesses of Sr and Ti resulted in two-fold reconstructions in the reflection high-energy electron diffraction patterns along the [110] and [100] azimuths, respectively. Larger global nonstoichiometries (2:1 and 1:2 ratios) were also accommodated into the film's crystalline structure and affected the long-range crystalline order as observed in the x-ray diffraction patterns, both of which were related to the parent perovskite pattern. Local nonstoichiometries were introduced by depositing multiple monolayers (MLs) (from 2 to 33) of SrO and TiO{sub 2} in an alternating fashion, while maintaining the global SrTiO{sub 3} stoichiometry. These layered structures of SrO and TiO{sub 2} blocks inter-reacted during growth to form highly crystalline epitaxial SrTiO{sub 3}. Films grown in this manner with blocks thicker than 8 MLs were fully relaxed and, when the block thicknesses ranged between 8 and 10 MLs, the full widths at half maxima of 2{theta} peaks were narrower than the standard SrTiO{sub 3} films having blocks 1 ML thick.

Fisher, P.; Du, H.; Skowronski, M.; Salvador, P. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Maksimov, O. [Electro-Optics Center, Pennsylvania State University, Freeport, Pennsylvania 16229 (United States); Weng, X. [Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Direct imaging of InSb (110)-(1x1) surface grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-resolution transmission electron microscopy under a profile imaging condition (HR-profile TEM) was employed to determine the structural model for the InSb(110)-(1x1) relaxation surface grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). HR-profile TEM analyses indicate that the chevron model, which is widely accepted for zinc-blende-type III-V(110)-(1x1) surfaces prepared by cleavage, is also applicable to the InSb(110)-(1x1) surface prepared under an Sb-rich MBE condition. The assignment of atomic species (In or Sb) of InSb(110)-(1x1) surfaces was confirmed based on a HR-profile TEM image that captures the connected facets of InSb(110)-(1x1) and InSb(111)B-(2x2). On the basis of the well-known atomic species of InSb(111)B-(2x2), the atomic species of the InSb(110)-(1x1) surface were deduced straightforwardly: the atoms shifted upward and downward at the topmost layer of the InSb(110)-(1x1) surface are Sb and In, respectively. The atomic arrangements of the InSb(110)-(1x1)-InSb(111)B-(2x2) facet determined by HR-profile TEM may represent the atomic arrangements of zinc-blende-type III-V(331)B surfaces.

Mishima, T. D. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Center for Semiconductor Physics in Nanostructures, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Characteristics of AlN/GaN nanowire Bragg mirror grown on (001) silicon by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GaN nanowires containing AlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) heterostructures have been grown on (001) silicon substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. A peak reflectance of 70% with normal incidence at 560 nm is derived from angle resolved reflectance measurements on the as-grown nanowire DBR array. The measured peak reflectance wavelength is significantly blue-shifted from the ideal calculated value. The discrepancy is explained by investigating the reflectance of the nanoscale DBRs with a finite difference time domain technique. Ensemble nanowire microcavities with In{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}N nanowires clad by AlN/GaN DBRs have also been characterized. Room temperature emission from the microcavity exhibits considerable linewidth narrowing compared to that measured for unclad In{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}N nanowires. The resonant emission is characterized by a peak wavelength and linewidth of 575 nm and 39 nm, respectively.

Heo, Junseok; Bhattacharya, Pallab [Center for Photonics and Multiscale Nanomaterials, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)] [Center for Photonics and Multiscale Nanomaterials, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States); Zhou, Zifan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Michigan-Dearborn, Dearborn, Michigan 48128 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Michigan-Dearborn, Dearborn, Michigan 48128 (United States); Guo, Wei [Microsystems Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Microsystems Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Ooi, Boon S. [Photonics Laboratory, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)] [Photonics Laboratory, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

91

Electrical properties of scandium nitride epitaxial films grown on (100) magnesium oxide substrates by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scandium nitride (ScN) films were grown on (100) MgO single crystals by a molecular beam epitaxy method. The effects of growth conditions, including [Sc]/[N] ratio, growth temperature, and nitrogen radical state, on the electrical properties of the ScN films were studied. The ScN films comprised many small columnar grains. Hall coefficient measurements confirmed that the ScN films were highly degenerate n-type semiconductors and that the carrier concentration of the ScN films was sensitive to the growth temperature and the nitrogen radical states during the film growth. The carrier concentrations of the ScN films ranged from 10{sup 19}–10{sup 21} cm{sup ?3} while the Hall mobilities ranged from 50–130 cm{sup 2}·V{sup ?1}·s{sup ?1} for undoped films. The temperature-dependent Hall coefficient measurements showed that the carrier concentration is nearly independent of temperature, indicating that the change in resistivity with temperature is explained by a change in the Hall mobility. The temperature-dependence of the Hall mobility was strongly affected by the growth conditions.

Ohgaki, Takeshi; Watanabe, Ken; Adachi, Yutaka; Sakaguchi, Isao; Hishita, Shunichi; Ohashi, Naoki; Haneda, Hajime [Environment and Energy Materials Research Division, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)] [Environment and Energy Materials Research Division, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

2013-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

92

Critical thickness and strain relaxation in molecular beam epitaxy-grown SrTiO{sub 3} films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the study of the critical thickness and the strain relaxation in epitaxial SrTiO{sub 3} film grown on (La{sub 0.3}Sr{sub 0.7})(Al{sub 0.65}Ta{sub 0.35})O{sub 3} (001) (LSAT) substrate using the hybrid molecular beam epitaxy approach. No change in the film's lattice parameter (both the in-plane and the out-of-plane) was observed up to a film thickness of 180 nm, which is in sharp contrast to the theoretical critical thickness of ?12 nm calculated using the equilibrium theory of strain relaxation. For film thicknesses greater than 180 nm, the out-of-plane lattice parameter was found to decrease hyperbolically in an excellent agreement with the relaxation via forming misfit dislocations. Possible mechanisms are discussed by which the elastic strain energy can be accommodated prior to forming misfit dislocations leading to such anomalously large critical thickness.

Wang, Tianqi; Ganguly, Koustav; Marshall, Patrick; Xu, Peng; Jalan, Bharat [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)] [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

93

Structural and optical properties of InGaN–GaN nanowire heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

InGaN/GaN nanowire (NW) heterostructures grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied in comparison to their GaN and InGaN counterparts. The InGaN/GaN heterostructure NWs are composed of a GaN NW, a thin InGaN shell, and a multifaceted InGaN cap wrapping the top part of the GaN NW. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images taken from different parts of a InGaN/GaN NW show a wurtzite structure of the GaN core and the epitaxial InGaN shell around it, while additional crystallographic domains are observed whithin the InGaN cap region. Large changes in the lattice parameter along the wire, from pure GaN to higher In concentration demonstrate the successful growth of a complex InGaN/GaN NW heterostructure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these heterostructure NW ensembles show rather broad and intense emission peak at 2.1 eV. However, ?-PL spectra measured on single NWs reveal a reduced broadening of the visible luminescence. The analysis of the longitudinal optical phonon Raman peak position and its shape reveal a variation in the In content between 20% and 30%, in agreement with the values estimated by PL and HRTEM investigations. The reported studies are important for understanding of the growth and properties of NW heterostructures suitable for applications in optoelectronics and photovoltaics.

Limbach, F. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Research Centre Jülich GmbH and JARA-FIT Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Gotschke, T. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Research Centre Jülich GmbH and JARA-FIT Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Stoica, T. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Research Centre Jülich GmbH and JARA-FIT Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Calarco, R. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Research Centre Jülich GmbH and JARA-FIT Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Sutter, E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Ciston, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Cusco, R. [Consell Superior d'Investigacions Cientifiques (CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Artus, L. [Consell Superior d'Investigacions Cientifiques (CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Kremling, S. [Univ. Wurzburg, Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen Research Centre Complex Matter Systems, Wurzburg (Germany); Hofling, S. [Univ. Wurzburg, Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen Research Centre Complex Matter Systems, Wurzburg (Germany); Worschech, L. [Univ. Wurzburg, Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen Research Centre Complex Matter Systems, Wurzburg (Germany); Grutzmacher, D. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Research Centre Jülich GmbH and JARA-FIT Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany)

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

94

Crystal orientation mechanism of ZnTe epilayers formed on different orientations of sapphire substrates by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrooptic effect in ZnTe has recently attracted research attention, and various device structures using ZnTe have been explored. For application to practical terahertz wave detector devices based on ZnTe thin films, sapphire substrates are preferred because they enable the optical path alignment to be simplified. ZnTe/sapphire heterostructures were focused upon, and ZnTe epilayers were prepared on highly mismatched sapphire substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Epitaxial relationships between the ZnTe thin films and the sapphire substrates with their various orientations were investigated using an X-ray diffraction pole figure method. (0001) c-plane, (1-102) r-plane, (1-100) m-plane, and (11-20) a-plane oriented sapphire substrates were used in this study. The epitaxial relationship between ZnTe and c-plane sapphire was found to be (111) ZnTe//(0001) sapphire with an in-plane orientation relationship of [?211] ZnTe//[1-100] sapphire. It was found that the (211)-plane ZnTe layer was grown on the m-plane of the sapphire substrates, and the (100)-plane ZnTe layer was grown on the r-plane sapphire. When the sapphire substrates were inclined from the c-plane towards the m-axis direction, the orientation of the ZnTe thin films was then tilted from the (111)-plane to the (211)-plane. The c-plane of the sapphire substrates governs the formation of the (111) ZnTe domain and the ZnTe epilayer orientation. These crystallographic features were also related to the atom arrangements of ZnTe and sapphire.

Nakasu, T., E-mail: n-taizo.nakasu@asagi.waseda.jp; Yamashita, S.; Aiba, T.; Hattori, S.; Sun, W.; Taguri, K.; Kazami, F. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Bioscience, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Kobayashi, M. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Bioscience, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Kagami Memorial Research Institute for Materials and Technology, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-0051 (Japan)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

95

Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

Vertes, Akos (Reston, VA); Nemes, Peter (Silver Spring, MD)

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

96

Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

97

Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

98

Molecular Beam Epitaxy | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

temperature monitored by a two-color pyrometer andor thermocouple In situ optical (atomic absorption) and reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) probes for...

99

Time-Resolved Molecular Characterization of Limonene/Ozone Aerosol using High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molecular composition of limonene/O3 secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was investigated using high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS) as a function of reaction time. SOA was generated by ozonation of D-limonene in a reaction chamber and sampled at different time intervals using a cascade impactor. The SOA samples were extracted into acetonitrile and analyzed using a HR-ESI-MS instrument with a resolving power of 100,000 (m/?m). The resulting mass spectra provided detailed information about the extent of oxidation inferred from the O:C ratios, double bond equivalency (DBE) factors, and aromaticity indexes (AI) in hundreds of identified individual SOA species.

Bateman, Adam P.; Nizkorodov, Serguei; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

100

Erbium-doped transparent glass ceramic optical Characterization using mass spectroscopy and molecular dynamics modeling.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Erbium-doped transparent glass ceramic optical fibres: Characterization using mass spectroscopy) doped silica-based optical fibres with transparent glass ceramic (TGC) core were fabricated through properties of the erbium ions embedded within the phospho-silicate DNP. These results permit to get more

Boyer, Edmond

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101

Donor and acceptor levels in ZnO homoepitaxial thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy and doped with plasma-activated nitrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deep level transient spectroscopy of both majority and minority carrier traps is performed in a n-type, nitrogen doped homoepitaxial ZnO layer grown on a m-plane by molecular beam epitaxy. Deep levels, most of them being not detected in undoped ZnO, lie close to the band edges with ionization energies in the range 0.12-0.60 eV. The two hole traps with largest capture cross sections are likely acceptors, 0.19 and 0.48 eV from the valence band edge, able to be ionized below room temperature. These results are compared with theoretical predictions and other experimental data.

Muret, Pierre [Departement Nanosciences, Institut Neel, CNRS, BP166, 38042 Grenoble and Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Tainoff, Dimitri; Morhain, Christian [Centre de Recherche sur l'HeteroEpitaxie et ses Applications, rue Bernard Gregory, CNRS, 06500 Valbonne (France); Chauveau, Jean-Michel [Centre de Recherche sur l'HeteroEpitaxie et ses Applications, rue Bernard Gregory, CNRS, 06500 Valbonne (France); Universite de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Parc Valrose F-06103 Nice (France)

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

102

Molecular Characterization of Organic Aerosols Using Nanospray Desorption/Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (Nano-DESI) combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR/MS) is a promising approach for detailed chemical characterization of atmospheric organic aerosol (OA) collected in laboratory and field experiments. In Nano-DESI analyte is desorbed into a solvent bridge formed between two capillaries and the analysis surface, which enables fast and efficient characterization of OA collected on substrates without special sample preparation. Stable signals achieved using Nano-DESI make it possible to obtain high-quality HR/MS data using only a small amount of material (<10 ng). Furthermore, Nano-DESI enables efficient detection of chemically labile compounds in OA, which is important for understanding chemical aging phenomena.

Roach, Patrick J.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Molecular Gas in Early-type Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

toward the center (first seen in the molecular gas in A+3.4 Molecular Gas Mass . . . . . . .of the molecular gas . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.3 Mass of

Alatalo, Katherine Anne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Domain formation due to surface steps in topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films grown on Si (111) by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atomic structure of topological insulators Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films on Si (111) substrates grown in van der Waals mode by molecular beam epitaxy has been investigated by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Besides single and multiple quintuple layer (QL) steps, which are typical for the step-flow mode of growth, a number of 0.4 QL steps is observed. We determine that these steps originate from single steps at the substrate surface causing domain boundaries in the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} film. Due to the peculiar structure of these domain boundaries the domains are stable and penetrate throughout the entire film.

Borisova, S.; Kampmeier, J.; Mussler, G.; Grützmacher, D. [Peter Grünberg Institute-9, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich 52425 (Germany) [Peter Grünberg Institute-9, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich 52425 (Germany); Jülich Aachen Research Alliance, Fundamentals of Future Information Technologies, Jülich 52425 (Germany); Luysberg, M. [Peter Grünberg Institute-5 and Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich 52425 (Germany)] [Peter Grünberg Institute-5 and Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich 52425 (Germany)

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

105

Growth, steady-state, and time-resolved photoluminescence study of CdTe/MgCdTe double heterostructures on InSb substrates using molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CdTe/MgCdTe double heterostructures (DHs) are grown on InSb substrates using molecular beam epitaxy and reveal strong photoluminescence with over double the intensity of a GaAs/AlGaAs DH with an identical layer structure design grown on GaAs. Time-resolved photoluminescence of the CdTe/MgCdTe DH gives a Shockley-Read-Hall recombination lifetime of 86 ns, which is more than one order of magnitude longer than that of typical polycrystalline CdTe films. These findings indicate that monocrystalline CdTe/MgCdTe DHs effectively reduce surface recombination, have limited nonradiative interface recombination, and are promising for solar cells that could reach power conversion efficiencies similar to that of GaAs.

DiNezza, Michael J.; Liu, Shi; Kirk, Alexander P.; Zhang, Yong-Hang [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States) [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Zhao, Xin-Hao [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States) [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

106

Dislocation reduction via selective-area growth of InN accompanied by lateral growth by rf-plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the selective-area growth (SAG) of InN by rf-plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy using molybdenum (Mo)-mask-patterned sapphire (0001) substrates, which resulted in the formation of regularly arranged N-polar InN microcrystals. Transmission electron microscopy observation confirmed that the laterally grown side areas were nearly dislocation-free, although many threading dislocations (10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}) were generated at the InN/sapphire interface and propagated into the center of the InN microcrystals along the crystal c-axis. The laterally grown InN microcrystals exhibited narrow near-IR emission spectra with a peak photon energy of 0.627 eV and a linewidth of 39 meV at room temperature.

Kamimura, Jumpei [Department of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 330-0012 (Japan); Kishino, Katsumi; Kikuchi, Akihiko [Department of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 330-0012 (Japan); Sophia Nanotechnology Research Center, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)

2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

107

Molecular-beam epitaxial growth and characterization of inverted, pulse-doped AlGaAs/InGaAs transistor structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inverted, pulse-doped AlGaAs/InGaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor structures were grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. Growth conditions were optimized to improve the quality of the selectively doped AlGaAs layer and to minimize dopant diffusion into the InGaAs channel. The sheet densities and mobilities of the inverted structure were found to be essentially equivalent to those obtained with the normal structure. Shubnikov-de Haas measurements exhibited strong oscillations in the magnetoresistance and plateaus in the Hall resistance. Four optical transitions from the lowest bound electron and hole quantum well states were observed in room-temperature photoluminescence spectra. 15 refs., 4 figs.

Hoke, W.E.; Lyman, P.S.; Brierley, S.K. [Raytheon Research Division, Lexington, MA (United States)] [and others] [Raytheon Research Division, Lexington, MA (United States); and others

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

In-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry for real time composition control of Hg{sub 1{minus}x}Cd{sub x}Te grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spectral ellipsometry (SE) was applied to in situ composition control of Hg{sub 1{minus}x}Cd{sub x}Te grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and the impact of surface topography of the Hg{sub 1{minus}x}Cd{sub x}Te layers on the accuracy of SE was investigated. Of particular importance is the presence of surface defects, such as voids in MBE-Hg{sub 1{minus}x}Cd{sub x}Te layers. While dislocations do not have any significant impact on the dielectric functions, the experimental data in this work show that MBE-Hg{sub 1{minus}x}Cd{sub x}Te samples having the same composition, but different void densities, have different effective dielectric functions.

Dat, R.; Aqariden, F.; Chandra, D.; Shih, H.D. [Raytheon TI Systems, Sensors and Infrared Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Duncan, W.M. [Texas Instruments Inc., Dallas, TX (United States). Components and Materials Research Center

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

Growth and phase transition characteristics of pure M-phase VO{sub 2} epitaxial film prepared by oxide molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

VO{sub 2} epitaxial film with large size has been prepared by oxide-molecular beam epitaxy method on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0001) substrate. The VO{sub 2} film shows a perfect crystal orientation, uniformity, and distinct metal-insulator phase transition (MIT) characteristics. It is observed that the MIT character is closely associated with the crystal defects such as oxygen vacancies. By controlling the growth condition, the MIT temperature can be tuned through modifying the content of oxygen vacancies. The role of the oxygen vacancies on the phase transition behavior of this VO{sub 2} film is discussed in the framework of the hybridization theory and the valence state of vanadium.

Fan, L. L.; Chen, S.; Wu, Y. F.; Chen, F. H.; Chu, W. S.; Chen, X.; Zou, C. W. [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China)] [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Wu, Z. Y. [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China) [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100049 (China)

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

110

A series of layered intergrowth phases grown by molecular beam epitaxy: Sr{sub m}TiO{sub 2+m}(m=1-5)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sr{sub m}TiO{sub 2+m} phases having one TiO{sub 2} layer sandwiched between m SrO layers were grown using molecular beam epitaxy. The out-of-plane (in-plane) lattice parameters determined by x-ray diffraction were c(a)=9.14 A (3.78 A), 23.55 A (3.75 A), and 14.60 A (3.75 A) for Sr{sub 3}TiO{sub 5}, Sr{sub 4}TiO{sub 6}, and Sr{sub 5}TiO{sub 7}, respectively. Both lattice parameters change abruptly on going from the m=2 Ruddlesden-Popper phase to m=3 phase, indicating a significant change in the bond lengths (or strain states) on transitioning from the known members to the higher order members of this structural family. Electron microscopy confirmed the artificially layered structures.

Fisher, P.; Wang, S.; Skowronski, M.; Salvador, P. A.; Snyder, M.; Maksimov, O. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Electro-Optics Center, Pennsylvania State University, Freeport, Pennsylvania 16229 (United States)

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

111

Structural properties of SrO thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on LaAlO{sub 3} substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SrO films were grown on LaAlO{sub 3} substrates by molecular beam epitaxy and characterized using reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The evolution of the RHEED pattern is discussed as a function of film thickness. 500 A thick SrO films were relaxed and exhibited RHEED patterns indicative of an atomically smooth surface having uniform terrace heights. Films had the epitaxial relationship (001){sub SrO}(parallel sign)(001){sub LaAlO{sub 3}}; [010]{sub SrO}(parallel sign)[110]{sub LaAlO{sub 3}}. This 45 deg. in-plane rotation minimizes mismatch and leads to films of high crystalline quality, as verified by Kikuchi lines in the RHEED patterns and narrow rocking curves of the (002) XRD peak.

Maksimov, O.; Heydemann, V. D.; Fisher, P.; Skowronski, M.; Salvador, P. A. [Electro-Optics Center, Pennsylvania State University, Freeport, Pennsylvania 16229 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

2006-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

112

Formation behavior of Be{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O alloys grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the phase formation behavior of Be{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O alloys grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. We find the alloy with low- and high-Be contents could be obtained by alloying BeO into ZnO films. X-ray diffraction measurements shows the c lattice constant value shrinks, and room temperature absorption shows the energy band-gap widens after Be incorporated. However, the alloy with intermediate Be composition are unstable and segregated into low- and high-Be contents BeZnO alloys. We demonstrate the phase segregation of Be{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O alloys with intermediate Be composition resulted from large internal strain induced by large lattice mismatch between BeO and ZnO.

Chen, Mingming; Zhu, Yuan; Su, Longxing; Zhang, Quanlin; Chen, Anqi; Ji, Xu; Xiang, Rong; Gui, Xuchun; Wu, Tianzhun [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Pan, Bicai [Department of Physics and Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)] [Department of Physics and Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Tang, Zikang [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Department of Physics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

113

Quasibound levels and shape resonances of /sup 39/K/sub 2/(B /sup 1/Pi/sub u/) crossed laser-molecular beam studies and analytical interpretation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quasibound levels and shape resonances in the (B /sup 1/Pi/sub u/ -X /sup 1/..sigma../sup +//sub g/) band system of /sup 39/K/sub 2/ have been recorded by crossed laser-molecular beam techniques. Using optical--optical double resonance, individual rovibrational levels (v'' = 15--18, J'' = 3--25) of the K/sub 2/ state are prepared by Franck--Condon pumping (FCP) in a supersonic nozzle beam. Excitation into quasibound levels below and above the (B /sup 1/Pi/sub u/) state barrier is detected as molecular and atomic (K4 /sup 2/P/sub 3//sub ///sub 2/..-->..4 /sup 2/S/sub 1//sub ///sub 2/ only) fluorescence. The resonance transition frequencies and shapes are measured and the results are used (a) to determine the scattering resonance energies, widths, and lifetimes; (b) to compare them with values obtained by a ''maximum internal amplitude'' approach (R. J. LeRoy and R. B. Bernstein, J. Chem. Phys. 54, 5114 (1971)); and (c) to check the agreement with exact calculations of the B state potential using the ''inverted perturbation approach (IPA).'' The bound and quasibound part of the B /sup 1/Pi/sub u/ state including the locus (R = 8.08 +- 0.05 A) of the barrier maximum (298 +- 8 cm/sup -1/ above the adiabatic dissociation limit) is found in excellent agreement with previous results. The shape resonances are not highly sensitive to the long-range interatomic forces, here the repulsive dipole--dipole resonance interaction.

Heinze, J.; Kowalczyk, P.; Engelke, F.

1988-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Distance Restraints from Crosslinking Mass Spectrometry: Mining a Molecular Dynamics Simulation Database to Evaluate Lysine-Lysine Distances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrative structural biology models the structures of protein complexes that are intractable by classical structural methods (because of extreme size, dynamics, or heterogeneity) by combining computational structural modeling with data from experimental methods. One such method is chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (XL-MS), in which cross-linked peptides, derived from a covalently cross-linked protein complex and identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, pinpoint protein residues close in three-dimensional space. The commonly used lysine-reactive N-hydroxysuccinimide ester reagents disuccinimidylsuberate (DSS) and bis(sulfosuccinimidyl)suberate (BS3) have a linker arm that is 11.4 Å long when fully extended. However, XL-MS studies on proteins of known structure frequently report cross-links that exceed this distance. Typically, a tolerance of ~3 Å is added to the theoretical maximum to account for this observation, with little justification for the value chosen. We used the Dynameomics database, a repository of high-quality molecular dynamics simulations of 807 proteins representative of all protein folds, to investigate the change in lysine-lysine distances resulting from native-state dynamics on the time-scale of tens of nanoseconds. We conclude that observed cross-links are consistent with a protein structure if the distance between cross-linked lysine N? atoms is less than the cross-linker length plus 11.3 Å. For DSS or BS3, this corresponds to a C? to C? distance of 30.4 Å. This analysis provides a theoretical basis for the widespread practice of adding a tolerance to the crosslinker length when comparing XL-MS results to structures, and indicates the appropriate values of an XLMS derived distance constraint to use in structural modeling.

Merkley, Eric D.; Rysavy, Steven; Kahraman, Abdullah; Hafen, Ryan P.; Daggett, Valerie; Adkins, Joshua N.

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

115

Compact hydrogen/helium isotope mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The compact hydrogen and helium isotope mass spectrometer of the present invention combines low mass-resolution ion mass spectrometry and beam-foil interaction technology to unambiguously detect and quantify deuterium (D), tritium (T), hydrogen molecule (H.sub.2, HD, D.sub.2, HT, DT, and T.sub.2), .sup.3 He, and .sup.4 He concentrations and concentration variations. The spectrometer provides real-time, high sensitivity, and high accuracy measurements. Currently, no fieldable D or molecular speciation detectors exist. Furthermore, the present spectrometer has a significant advantage over traditional T detectors: no confusion of the measurements by other beta-emitters, and complete separation of atomic and molecular species of equivalent atomic mass (e.g., HD and .sup.3 He).

Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM); McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Scime, Earl E. (Morgantown, WV)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Design of an ultrahigh vacuum transfer mechanism to interconnect an oxide molecular beam epitaxy growth chamber and an x-ray photoemission spectroscopy analysis system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We designed a mechanism and the accompanying sample holders to transfer between a VEECO 930 oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and a PHI Versa Probe X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) chamber within a multiple station growth, processing, and analysis system through ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). The mechanism consists of four parts: (1) a platen compatible with the MBE growth stage, (2) a platen compatible with the XPS analysis stage, (3) a sample coupon that is transferred between the two platens, and (4) the accompanying UHV transfer line. The mechanism offers a robust design that enables transfer back and forth between the growth chamber and the analysis chamber, and yet is flexible enough to allow transfer between standard sample holders for thin film growth and masked sample holders for making electrical contacts and Schottky junctions, all without breaking vacuum. We used this mechanism to transfer a barium strontium titanate thin film into the XPS analysis chamber and performed XPS measurements before and after exposing the sample to the air. After air exposure, a thin overlayer of carbon was found to form and a significant shift ({approx}1 eV) in the core level binding energies was observed.

Rutkowski, M. M.; Zeng Zhaoquan [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); McNicholas, K. M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Brillson, L. J. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Energy band alignment of atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} on epitaxial (110)Ge grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The band alignment properties of atomic layer HfO{sub 2} film deposited on epitaxial (110)Ge, grown by molecular beam epitaxy, was investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy exhibited a sharp interface between the (110)Ge epilayer and the HfO{sub 2} film. The measured valence band offset value of HfO{sub 2} relative to (110)Ge was 2.28 {+-} 0.05 eV. The extracted conduction band offset value was 2.66 {+-} 0.1 eV using the bandgaps of HfO{sub 2} of 5.61 eV and Ge bandgap of 0.67 eV. These band offset parameters and the interface chemical properties of HfO{sub 2}/(110)Ge system are of tremendous importance for the design of future high hole mobility and low-power Ge-based metal-oxide transistor devices.

Hudait, M. K.; Zhu, Y. [Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Maurya, D.; Priya, S. [Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems (CEHMS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems (CEHMS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

118

Interfacial structure and defect analysis of nonpolar ZnO films grown on R-plane sapphire by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interfacial relationship and the microstructure of nonpolar (11-20) ZnO films epitaxially grown on (1-102) R-plane sapphire by molecular beam epitaxy are investigated by transmission electron microscopy. The already-reported epitaxial relationships [1-100]{sub ZnO} parallel [11-20]{sub sapphire} and <0001>{sub ZnO} parallel [-1101]{sub sapphire} are confirmed, and we have determined the orientation of the Zn-O (cation-anion) bond along [0001]{sub ZnO} in the films as being uniquely defined with respect to a reference surface Al-O bond on the sapphire substrate. The microstructure of the films is dominated by the presence of I{sub 1} basal stacking faults [density=(1-2)x10{sup 5} cm{sup -1}] and related partial dislocations [density=(4-7)x10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}]. It is shown that I{sub 1} basal stacking faults correspond to dissociated perfect dislocations, either c or a+c type.

Vennegues, P.; Korytov, M.; Deparis, C.; Zuniga-Perez, J.; Morhain, C. [Centre de Recherche sur l'Hetero-Epitaxie et ses Applications, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, CRHEA-CNRS, Rue Bernard Gregory, Sophia Antipolis, 06560 Valbonne (France); Chauveau, J. M. [Centre de Recherche sur l'Hetero-Epitaxie et ses Applications, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, CRHEA-CNRS, Rue Bernard Gregory, Sophia Antipolis, 06560 Valbonne (France); Physics Department, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Parc Valrose 06103 Nice (France)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Electric-dipole moment of CaF by molecular-beam, laser-rf, double-resonance study of Stark splittings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electronic structure of diatomic molecules is much more complex for open-shell sytems (radicals) than for the normal closed-shell systems, and the development of an adequate theoretical understanding will require a substantial upgrading of experimental knowledge in both quality and quantity. The alkaline-earth monohalide family of radicals, with only a single electron outside closed-shell cores, would appear to be a logical starting point for such studies, and there has been a great increase in work in this area in the last few years in spite of the special difficulties of working with free radicals. As the work of measuring the vibrational and rotational structure of the electronic states has become more complete, attention has turned to study of the much weaker spin-rotation and hyperfine interactions. Within the last three years, these interactions have been studied systematically at high precision in the calcium monohalide family with the molecular-beam, laser-rf double-resonance technique. The same method has now been modified and extended to make possible measurement of the electric-dipole moments of these molecules through observation of the Stark splittings of radiofrequency transitions. It is hoped that when considered together, the several types of data will make it possible to understand the ground-state electronic wave functions of these molecules at least qualitatively. 2 figures.

Childs, W.J.; Goodman, L.S.; Nielsen, U.; Pfeufer, V.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Electrical spin injection into InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells: A comparison between MgO tunnel barriers grown by sputtering and molecular beam epitaxy methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An efficient electrical spin injection into an InGaAs/GaAs quantum well light emitting diode is demonstrated thanks to a CoFeB/MgO spin injector. The textured MgO tunnel barrier is fabricated by two different techniques: sputtering and molecular beam epitaxy. The maximal spin injection efficiency is comparable for both methods. Additionally, the effect of annealing is also investigated for the two types of samples. Both samples show the same trend: an increase of the electroluminescence circular polarization (P{sub c}) with the increase of annealing temperature, followed by a saturation of P{sub c} beyond 350?°C annealing. Since the increase of P{sub c} starts well below the crystallization temperature of the full CoFeB bulk layer, this trend could be mainly due to an improvement of chemical structure at the top CoFeB/MgO interface. This study reveals that the control of CoFeB/MgO interface is essential for an optimal spin injection into semiconductor.

Barate, P.; Zhang, T. T.; Vidal, M.; Renucci, P.; Marie, X.; Amand, T. [Université de Toulouse, INSA-CNRS-UPS, LPCNO, 135 avenue de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse (France); Liang, S.; Devaux, X.; Hehn, M.; Mangin, S.; Lu, Y., E-mail: yuan.lu@univ-lorraine.fr [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, CNRS-Nancy Université, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Frougier, J.; Jaffrès, H.; George, J. M. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales and Université Paris-Sud 11, 1 avenue A. Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Xu, B.; Wang, Z. [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Zheng, Y. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, UPMC, CNRS UMR 7588, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Tao, B. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, CNRS-Nancy Université, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Han, X. F. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China)

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Study of Gd-doped Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films: Molecular beam epitaxy growth and magnetic properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incorporation of magnetic dopants into topological insulators to break time-reversal symmetry is a prerequisite for observing the quantum anomalous Hall (QAHE) effect and other novel magnetoelectric phenomena. GdBiTe{sub 3} with a Gd:Bi ratio of 1:1 is a proposed QAHE system, however, the reported solubility limit for Gd doping into Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} bulk crystals is between ?0.01 and 0.05. We present a magnetic study of molecular beam epitaxy grown (Gd{sub x}Bi{sub 1–x}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films with a high Gd concentration, up to x ? 0.3. Magnetometry reveals that the films are paramagnetic down to 1.5?K. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the Gd M{sub 4,5} edge at 1.5?K reveals a saturation field of ?6?T, and a slow decay of the magnetic moment with temperature up to 200?K. The Gd{sup 3+} ions, which are substitutional on Bi sites in the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} lattice, exhibit a large atomic moment of ?7??{sub B}, as determined by bulk-sensitive superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry. Surface oxidation and the formation of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} lead to a reduced moment of ?4??{sub B} as determined by surface-sensitive x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Their large atomic moment makes these films suitable for incorporation into heterostructures, where interface polarization effects can lead to the formation of magnetic order within the topological insulators.

Harrison, S. E.; Huo, Y.; Harris, J. S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Collins-McIntyre, L. J.; Hesjedal, T., E-mail: Thorsten.Hesjedal@physics.ox.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Li, S. [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Baker, A. A. [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Magnetic Spectroscopy Group, Diamond Light Source, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Shelford, L. R.; Laan, G. van der [Magnetic Spectroscopy Group, Diamond Light Source, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Pushp, A.; Parkin, S. S. P. [IBM Almaden Research Center, 650 Harry Road, San Jose, California 95120 (United States); Arenholz, E. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

122

The use the a high intensity neutrino beam from the ESS proton linac for measurement of neutrino CP violation and mass hierarchy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is proposed to complement the ESS proton linac with equipment that would enable the production, concurrently with the production of the planned ESS beam used for neutron production, of a 5 MW beam of 10$^{23}$ 2.5 GeV protons per year in microsecond short pulses to produce a neutrino Super Beam, and to install a megaton underground water Cherenkov detector in a mine to detect $\

Baussan, E; Ekelof, T; Martinez, E Fernandez; Ohman, H; Vassilopoulos, N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

The use of a high intensity neutrino beam from the ESS proton linac for measurement of neutrino CP violation and mass hierarchy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is proposed to complement the ESS proton linac with equipment that would enable the production, concurrently with the production of the planned ESS beam used for neutron production, of a 5 MW beam of 10$^{23}$ 2.5 GeV protons per year in microsecond short pulses to produce a neutrino Super Beam, and to install a megaton underground water Cherenkov detector in a mine to detect $\

E. Baussan; M. Dracos; T. Ekelof; E. Fernandez Martinez; H. Ohman; N. Vassilopoulos

2013-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

124

Molecular Characterization of Organosulfates in Organic Aerosols from Shanghai and Los Angeles Urban Areas by Nanospray-Desorption Electrospray Ionization High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerosol samples collected in the urban areas of Shanghai and Los Angeles were analyzed by nanospray-desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano-DESI MS) with high mass resolution (m/?m=100,000). Solvent mixtures of acetonitrile/water and acetonitrile/toluene were used to extract and ionize polar and non-polar compounds, respectively. A diverse mixture of oxygenated hydrocarbons, organosulfates, organonitrates, and organics with reduced nitrogen were detected in the Los Angeles sample. Majority of the organics in the Shanghai sample were detected as organosulfates. The dominant organosulfates in the two samples have distinctly different molecular characteristics. Specifically, organosulfates in the Los Angeles sample were dominated by isoprene- or monoterpene-derived products, while organosulfates of yet unknown origin in the Shanghai sample had distinctive characteristics of long aliphatic carbon chains and low degree of oxidation and unsaturation. The use of acetonitrile/toluene solvent facilitated identification of this type of organosulfates, suggesting they could be missed in previous studies relying on sample extraction using common polar solvents. The high molecular weight and low degree of unsaturation and oxidization of the organosulfates detected in the Shanghai sample suggest that they may act as surfactants, and plausibly affect the surface tension and hygroscopicity of the atmospheric particulate matter. We propose that direct esterification of carbonyl or hydroxyl compounds by sulfates or sulfuric acid in liquid phase could be the formation pathway of these special organosulfates. Long-chain alkanes from vehicle emissions might be their precursors.

Tao, Shikang; Lu, Xiaohui; Levac, Nicole A.; Bateman, Adam P.; Nguyen, Tran B.; Bones, David L.; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Yang, Xin

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

125

Isotherm parameters and intraparticle mass transfer kinetics on molecularly imprinted polymers in acetonitrile/buffer mobile phases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The equilibrium isotherm and the intraparticle mass transfer kinetics of the enantiomers of the template were investigated on an Fmoc-L-tryptophan (Fmoc-L-Trp) imprinted polymer at different pHs and water concentrations in acetonitrile/aqueous buffer mobile phases. The equilibrium isotherm data were measured using frontal analysis at 25 {+-} 2 C. The adsorption energy distribution was found to be trimodal, with narrow modes. Consistent with this distribution, the adsorption data were modeled using a tri-Langmuir isotherm equation and the best estimates of the isotherm parameters were determined. The intraparticle mass transfer parameters were derived by comparing the profiles of experimental overloaded bands and the profiles calculated using the isotherm model and the lumped pore diffusion (POR) model of chromatography. These results showed that different adsorption and mass transfer mechanisms exist in mobile phases made of acetonitrile/aqueous buffer and of acetonitrile/acetic acid solutions.

Kim, Hyunjung [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kaczmarski, Krzysztof [University of Tennessee and Rzeszow University of Technology, Poland; Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Colliding neutrino beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From several neutrino oscillation experiments, we understand now that neutrinos have mass. However, we really don't know what mechanism is responsible for producing this neutrino mass. Current or planned neutrino experiments utilize neutrino beams and long-baseline detectors to explore flavor mixing but do not address the question of the origin of neutrino mass. In order to answer that question, neutrino interactions need to be explored at much higher energies. This paper outlines a program to explore neutrinos and their interactions with various particles through a series of experiments involving colliding neutrino beams.

Reinhard Schwienhorst

2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

127

Are Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen Depth...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen Depth Profiling Using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry? Are Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen...

128

Deep levels in a-plane, high Mg-content Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O epitaxial layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deep level defects in n-type unintentionally doped a-plane Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O, grown by molecular beam epitaxy on r-plane sapphire were fully characterized using deep level optical spectroscopy (DLOS) and related methods. Four compositions of Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O were examined with x = 0.31, 0.44, 0.52, and 0.56 together with a control ZnO sample. DLOS measurements revealed the presence of five deep levels in each Mg-containing sample, having energy levels of E{sub c} - 1.4 eV, 2.1 eV, 2.6 V, and E{sub v} + 0.3 eV and 0.6 eV. For all Mg compositions, the activation energies of the first three states were constant with respect to the conduction band edge, whereas the latter two revealed constant activation energies with respect to the valence band edge. In contrast to the ternary materials, only three levels, at E{sub c} - 2.1 eV, E{sub v} + 0.3 eV, and 0.6 eV, were observed for the ZnO control sample in this systematically grown series of samples. Substantially higher concentrations of the deep levels at E{sub v} + 0.3 eV and E{sub c} - 2.1 eV were observed in ZnO compared to the Mg alloyed samples. Moreover, there is a general invariance of trap concentration of the E{sub v} + 0.3 eV and 0.6 eV levels on Mg content, while at least and order of magnitude dependency of the E{sub c} - 1.4 eV and E{sub c} - 2.6 eV levels in Mg alloyed samples.

Guer, Emre [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Atatuerk University, Erzurum 25240 (Turkey); 205 Dreese Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2015 Neil Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1272 (United States); Tabares, G.; Hierro, A. [Dpto. Ingenieria Electronica and ISOM, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Arehart, A.; Ringel, S. A. [205 Dreese Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, 2015 Neil Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1272 (United States); Chauveau, J. M. [CRHEA-CNRS, 06560 Valbonne (France); University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, ParcValrose, 06102 Nice Cedex 2 (France)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Effects of anthropogenic activities on the molecular composition of urban organic aerosols: an ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Chemistry, Aarhus University, Aarhus, DK-8000, Denmark 11 4Department of Analytical Chemistry, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, S12, BE-9000 12 Ghent, Belgium 13 5Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, BE-14... ). 95 The objective of the current study is to apply nanoESI UHRMS to determine the molecular 96 composition of urban PM2.5 (particles with ?2.5µm). Aerosol samples were collected at the 97 industrial site in Cork Ireland during summer with the aim...

Kourtchev, I.; O'Connor, I. P.; Giorio, C.; Fuller, S.; Kristenen, K.; Maenhaut, W.; Wenger, J. C.; Sodeau, J. R.; Glasius, M.; Kalberer, M.

2014-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

130

Metallic beam development for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University (MSU) will accelerate a primary ion beam to energies beyond 200 MeV/u using a superconducting RF linac and will reach a maximum beam power of 400 kW on the fragmentation target. The beam intensity needed from the ECR ion source is expected to be between 0.4 and 0.5 emA for most medium mass to heavy mass elements. Adding to the challenge of reaching the required intensity, an expanded list of primary beams of interest has been established based on the production rate and the number of isotope beams that could be produced with FRIB. We report here on the development done for some of the beam in the list including mercury (natural), molybdenum ({sup 98}Mo), and selenium ({sup 82}Ser)

Machicoane, Guillaume, E-mail: machicoa@nscl.msu.edu; Cole, Dallas; Leitner, Daniela; Neben, Derek; Tobos, Larry [Facility for Rare Isotope Beam, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)] [Facility for Rare Isotope Beam, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Herschel Key Program, "Dust, Ice, and Gas In Time" (DIGIT): the origin of molecular and atomic emission in low-mass protostars in Taurus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Six low-mass embedded sources (L1489, L1551-IRS5, TMR1, TMC1-A, L1527, and TMC1) in Taurus have been observed with Herschel-PACS to cover the full spectrum from 50 to 210 $\\mu$m as part of the Herschel key program, "Dust, Ice, and Gas In Time (DIGIT)". The relatively low intensity of the interstellar radiation field surrounding Taurus minimizes contamination of the [C II] emission associated with the sources by diffuse emission from the cloud surface, allowing study of the [C II] emission from the source. In several sources, the [C II] emission is distributed along the outflow, as is the [O I] emission. The atomic line luminosities correlate well with each other, as do the molecular lines, but the atomic and molecular lines correlate poorly. The relative contribution of CO to the total gas cooling is constant at $\\sim$30 %, while the cooling fraction by H$_2$O varies from source to source, suggesting different shock properties resulting in different photodissociation levels of H$_2$O. The gas with a power-law...

Lee, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Seokho; Evans, Neal J; Green, Joel D

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Crossed Molecular Beams Study on the Formation of Vinylacetylene in Titan's Atmosphere Fangtong Zhang, Yong Seol Kim, and Ralf I. Kaiser*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), was investigated at a collision energy of 20.6 ( 0.4 kJ mol-1 utilizing the crossed-beams technique. Combined such as Titan's atmosphere via the neutral-neutral reaction of ethynyl radicals with ubiquitous ethylene and their role in the build-

Kaiser, Ralf I.

133

Probing Molecular Associations of Field-Collected and Laboratory-Generated SOA with Nano-DESI High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerosol samples from the 2010 CalNex field study in Bakersfield (BF) and Los Angeles (LA) were analyzed using positive mode nanospray-desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano-DESI-MS). Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced in a photochemical chamber by photooxidation of diesel (DSL) fuel and isoprene (ISO) under humid, high-NOx conditions, was analyzed for comparison. Three groups of organic compounds with zero, one, or two nitrogen atoms in their molecular formulas (0N, 1N, 2N) were compared in detail. The composition of ambient SOA exhibited greater overlap with DSL than with ISO. The overlap of the chamber experiments with the BF data was relatively consistent throughout the day while the overlap with LA data increased significantly in the noon-6pm sample, consistent with the SOA plume arriving from downtown Los Angeles. BF samples were more oxidized, contained more organic nitrogen, and had more overlap with the chamber data compared to LA samples. The addition of gaseous ammonia (NH3) to the DSL experiment was necessary to generate many of the 2N compounds observed in BF. This analysis demonstrates that DSL and ISO were important sources but cannot account for all of the observed ambient compounds indicating that other sources of organics were also likely important.

O'Brien, Rachel E.; Nguyen, Tran B.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Hayes, Patrick L.; Liu, Shang; Jimenez, Jose L.; Russell, Lynn M.; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Goldstein, Allen H.

2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

134

Structural properties of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} topological insulators grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs(001) substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin films of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} have been grown on deoxidized GaAs(001) substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy established the highly parallel nature of the Te(Se)-Bi-Te(Se)-Bi-Te(Se) quintuple layers deposited on the slightly wavy GaAs substrate surface and the different crystal symmetries of the two materials. Raman mapping confirmed the presence of the strong characteristic peaks reported previously for these materials in bulk form. The overall quality of these films reveals the potential of combining topological insulators with ferromagnetic semiconductors for future applications.

Liu, X.; Leiner, J.; Dobrowolska, M.; Furdyna, J. K. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Smith, D. J. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Fan, J. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Zhang, Y.-H. [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Cao, H.; Chen, Y. P. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Kirby, B. J. [Center for Neutron Research, NIST, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

135

Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 Topological Insulators on GaAs (111) Substrates: A Potential Route to Fabricate Topological Insulator p-n Junction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High quality Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 topological insulators films were epitaxially grown on GaAs (111) substrate using solid source molecular beam epitaxy. Their growth and behavior on both vicinal and non-vicinal GaAs (111) substrates were investigated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is found that non-vicinal GaAs (111) substrate is better than a vicinal substrate to provide high quality Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 films. Hall and magnetoresistance measurements indicate that p type Sb2Te3 and n type Bi2Te3 topological insulator films can be directly grown on a GaAs (111) substrate, which may pave a way to fabricate topological insulator p-n junction on the same substrate, compatible with the fabrication process of present semiconductor optoelectronic devices.

Zhaoquan Zeng; Timothy A. Morgan; Dongsheng Fan; Chen Li; Yusuke Hirono; Xian Hu; Yanfei Zhao; Joon Sue Lee; Zhiming M. Wang; Jian Wang; Shuiqing Yu; Michael E. Hawkridge; Mourad Benamara; Gregory J. Salamo

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

136

Optical properties of a-plane (Al, Ga)N/GaN multiple quantum wells grown on strain engineered Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O layers by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonpolar (1120) Al{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (1120) Zn{sub 0.74}Mg{sub 0.26}O templates on r-plane sapphire substrates. The quantum wells exhibit well-resolved photoluminescence peaks in the ultra-violet region, and no sign of quantum confined Stark effect is observed in the complete multiple quantum well series. The results agree well with flat band quantum well calculations. Furthermore, we show that the MQW structures are strongly polarized along the [0001] direction. The origin of the polarization is discussed in terms of the strain anisotropy dependence of the exciton optical oscillator strengths.

Xia, Y.; Vinter, B.; Chauveau, J.-M. [CRHEA-CNRS, Rue Bernard Gregory, 06560 Valbonne (France); University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, 06103 Nice (France); Brault, J.; Nemoz, M.; Teisseire, M.; Leroux, M. [CRHEA-CNRS, Rue Bernard Gregory, 06560 Valbonne (France)

2011-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

137

Low energy beta-beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main goal of a beta-beam facility is to determine the possible existence of CP violation in the lepton sector, the value of the third neutrino mixing angle and the mass hierarchy. Here we argue that a much broader physics case can be covered since the beta-beam concept can also be used to establish a low energy beta-beam facility. We discuss that the availability of neutrino beams in the 100 MeV energy range offers a unique opportunity to perform neutrino scattering experiments of interest for nuclear physics, for the study of fundamental interactions and of core-collapse supernova physics.

Cristina Volpe

2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

138

Airfoil sampling of a pulsed Laval beam with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry: Application to low--temperature kinetics and product detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new pulsed Laval nozzle apparatus with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron photoionization quadrupole mass spectrometry is constructed to study low-temperature radicalneutralchemical reactions of importance for modeling the atmosphere of Titan and the outer planets. A design for the sampling geometry of a pulsed Laval nozzle expansion has beendeveloped that operates successfully for the determination of rate coefficients by time-resolved mass spectrometry. The new concept employs airfoil sampling of the collimated expansion withexcellent sampling throughput. Time-resolved profiles of the high Mach number gas flow obtained by photoionization signals show that perturbation of the collimated expansion by theairfoil is negligible. The reaction of C2H with C2H2 is studied at 70 K as a proof-of-principle result for both low-temperature rate coefficient measurements and product identification basedon the photoionization spectrum of the reaction product versus VUV photon energy. This approach can be used to provide new insights into reaction mechanisms occurring at kinetic ratesclose to the collision-determined limit.

Soorkia, Satchin; Liu, Chen-Lin; Savee, John D.; Ferrell, Sarah J.; Leone, Stephen R.; Wilson, Kevin R.

2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

139

Molecular Characterization of Biomass Burning Aerosols Using...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Molecular Characterization of Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Abstract: Chemical...

140

Steric effects in molecular adsorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a molecular beam surface scattering experiment with preferentially orientated NO on Ag(111) are given. In adsorption molecules oriented with the O end towards the surface have a larger trapping probability.

Tenner, M.G.; Kuipers, E.W.; Kleyn, A.W.; Stolte, S.

1988-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Adsorption of iso-/n-butane on an Anatase Thin Film: A Molecular...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

iso-n-butane on an Anatase Thin Film: A Molecular Beam Scattering and TDS Study. Adsorption of iso-n-butane on an Anatase Thin Film: A Molecular Beam Scattering and TDS Study....

142

Beam History  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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143

Beams 92: Proceedings. Volume 2, Ion beams, electron beams, diagnostics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains papers on the following topics. Ion beam papers; electron beam papers; and these papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

Mosher, D.; Cooperstein, G. [eds.] [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [eds.; Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

analytical mass spectrometry: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

analytical methods for solving a variety of molecular structure problems. Among high. Extension of mass spectrometry to the analysis of high molecular weight materials,...

145

Probing Molecular Associations of Field-Collected and Laboratory...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Molecular Associations of Field-Collected and Laboratory-Generated SOA with Nano-DESI High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Probing Molecular Associations of Field-Collected and...

146

Accelerator beam profile analyzer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A beam profile analyzer employing sector or quadrant plates each servo controlled to outline the edge of a beam.

Godel, Julius B. (Bayport, NY); Guillaume, Marcel (Grivegnee, BE); Lambrecht, Richard M. (East Quogue, NY); Withnell, Ronald (East Setauket, NY)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

CROSSED MOLECULAR BEAM STUDIES OF CHEMILUMINESCENT REACTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dimensions Effusive - Quasi Effusive Source Diameter of Nozzle .015 inch (.038 em) Distance to collision zone (no skimmer or spacer) .

Kahler, Carol Cuzens

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Yuan T. Lee and Molecular Beam Studies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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149

Yuan T. Lee's Crossed Molecular Beam Experiment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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150

Dudley Herschbach: Chemical Reactions and Molecular Beams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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151

Molecular Beam Epitaxy, Multi-source | EMSL  

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152

Beam History  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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153

Beam History  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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154

Beam Transport  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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155

Beam Status  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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156

Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify arrangements equivalent to equiangular geometries but using fewer beams. Furthermore, SBA provides the value of the objective function as the number of beams is increased, allowing the planner to select the minimal beam number that achieves the clinical goals. The method is simple to implement and could readily be incorporated into an existing optimization system.

Popple, Richard A., E-mail: rpopple@uabmc.edu; Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Beam-Bem interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In high energy storage-ring colliders, the nonlinear effect arising from beam-beam interactions is a major source that leads to the emittance growth, the reduction of beam life time, and limits the collider luminosity. In this paper, two models of beam-beam interactions are introduced, which are weak-strong and strong-strong beam-beam interactions. In addition, space-charge model is introduced.

Kim, Hyung Jin; /Fermilab

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Molecular Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application of High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Molecular Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application of High Resolution Mass...

159

E-Print Network 3.0 - atlas combined beam Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Charged-particle multiplicities ... Source: Titov, Anatoly - Laboratory of Molecular Beams, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute Collection: Physics 2 ATLAS ATLAS ATLAS ATLAS...

160

Molecular Characterization of Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds in Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Molecular Characterization of Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds in Biomass Burning...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

X-ray beam finder  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

Gilbert, H.W.

1983-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

162

Wave mechanics of a two-wire atomic beam splitter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider the problem of an atomic beam propagating quantum mechanically through an atom beam splitter. Casting the problem in an adiabatic representation (in the spirit of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation in molecular physics) sheds light on explicit effects due to nonadiabatic passage of the atoms through the splitter region. We are thus able to probe the fully three-dimensional structure of the beam splitter, gathering quantitative information about mode mixing, splitting ratios, and reflection and transmission probabilities.

Bortolotti, Daniele C.E.; Bohn, John L. [JILA and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440 (United States)

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

High speed x-ray beam chopper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fast, economical, and compact x-ray beam chopper with a small mass and a small moment of inertia whose rotation can be synchronized and phase locked to an electronic signal from an x-ray source and be monitored by a light beam is disclosed. X-ray bursts shorter than 2.5 microseconds have been produced with a jitter time of less than 3 ns.

McPherson, Armon (Oswego, IL); Mills, Dennis M. (Naperville, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

HNCO in molecular clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a survey of 18 molecular clouds, HNCO J/sub K/-1K1..-->..J'/sub K/'-1K'1 = 5/sub 05/..-->..4/sub 05/ and 4/sub 04/..-->..3/sub 03/ emission was etected in seven clouds, and possibly in one other. Emission in these transitions originates in high-density regions (n> or approx. =10/sup 6/ cm/sup -3/). The molecule's excitation requirements allow us to derive limits to excitation temperatures an optical depths. We discuss the possibility of clumping with respect to the beam and compare our results with data from other molecular species. The HNCO emission from Sgr A is an ordder of magnitude larger than the other detected sources as is the ratio ..delta..T +- /sub A/(HNCO 5/sub 05/..-->..4/sub 04/)/..delta..T +- /sub A/(C/sup 18/O 1..-->..0). HNCO is probably a constituent of most molecular clouds.

Jackson, J.M.; Armstrong, J.T.; Barrett, A.H.

1984-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Neutral beam dump with cathodic arc titanium gettering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An incomplete neutral beam capture can degrade the plasma performance in neutral beam driven plasma machines. The beam dumps mitigating the shine-through beam recycling must entrap and retain large particle loads while maintaining the beam-exposed surfaces clean of the residual impurities. The cathodic arc gettering, which provides high evaporation rate coupled with a fast time response, is a powerful and versatile technique for depositing clean getter films in vacuum. A compact neutral beam dump utilizing the titanium arc gettering was developed for a field-reversed configuration plasma sustained by 1 MW, 20-40 keV neutral hydrogen beams. The titanium evaporator features a new improved design. The beam dump is capable of handling large pulsed gas loads, has a high sorption capacity, and is robust and reliable. With the beam particle flux density of 5 x 10{sup 17} H/(cm{sup 2}s) sustained for 3-10 ms, the beam recycling coefficient, defined as twice the ratio of the hydrogen molecular flux leaving the beam dump to the incident flux of high-energy neutral atoms, is {approx}0.7. The use of the beam dump allows us to significantly reduce the recycling of the shine-through neutral beam as well as to improve the vacuum conditions in the machine.

Smirnov, A.; Korepanov, S. A.; Putvinski, S. [Tri Alpha Energy Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Krivenko, A. S.; Murakhtin, S. V.; Savkin, V. Ya. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Vacuum-Ultraviolet Photoionization and Mass Spectrometric Characterization of Lignin Monomers Coniferyl and Sinapyl Alcohols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fragmentation mechanisms of monolignols under various energetic processes are studied with jet-cooled thermal desorption molecular beam (TDMB) mass spectrometry (MS), 25 keV Bi3+ secondary ion MS (SIMS), synchrotron vacuum-ultraviolet secondary neutral MS (VUV-SNMS) and theoretical methods. Experimental and calculated appearance energies of fragments observed in TDMB MS indicate that the coniferyl alcohol photoionization mass spectra contain the molecular parent and several dissociative photoionization products. Similar results obtained for sinapyl alcohol are also discussed briefly. Ionization energies of 7.60 eV ? 0.05 eV for coniferyl alcohol and<7.4 eV for both sinapyl and dihydrosinapyl alcohols are determined. The positive ion SIMS spectrum of coniferyl alcohol shares few characteristic peaks (m/z = 137 and 151) with the TDMB mass spectra, shows extensive fragmentation, and does not exhibit clear molecular parent signals. VUV-SNMS spectra, on the other hand, are dominated by the parent ion and main fragments also present in the TDMB spectra. Molecular fragmentation in VUV-SNMS spectra can be reduced by increasing the extraction delay time. Some features resembling the SIMS spectra are also observed in the desorbed neutral products. The monolignol VUV-SNMS peaks shared with the TDMB mass spectra suggest that dissociative photoionization of ion-sputtered neutral molecules predominate in the VUV-SNMS mass spectra, despite the extra internal energy imparted in the initial ion impact. The potential applications of these results to imaging mass spectrometry of bio-molecules are discussed.

Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Zhou, Jia; Kostko, Oleg; Golan, Amir; Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid

2011-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

167

Magnetismo Molecular (Molecular Magentism)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new synthesis processes in chemistry open a new world of research, new and surprising materials never before found in nature can now be synthesized and, as a wonderful result, observed a series of physical phenomena never before imagined. Among these are many new materials the molecular magnets, the subject of this book and magnetic properties that are often reflections of the quantum behavior of these materials. Aside from the wonderful experience of exploring something new, the theoretical models that describe the behavior these magnetic materials are, in most cases, soluble analytically, which allows us to know in detail the physical mechanisms governing these materials. Still, the academic interest in parallel this subject, these materials have a number of properties that are promising to be used in technological devices, such as in computers quantum magnetic recording, magnetocaloric effect, spintronics and many other devices. This volume will journey through the world of molecular magnets, from the structural description of these materials to state of the art research.

Reis, Mario S [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brasil; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F [ORNL

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Mapping Molecular Space with Mass Spectrometry /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L & Owende P (2010) Biofuels from microalgae—A review of2009) Microalgae as a raw material for biofuels production.microalgae. Current research aims to produce traditional biofuels

Nguyen, Don Duy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Mapping Molecular Space with Mass Spectrometry /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

microalgae. Current research aims to produce traditional biofuels from algae, but their potential to generate sustainable energy

Nguyen, Don Duy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Mapping Molecular Space with Mass Spectrometry /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L & Oliveira AC (2009) Microalgae as a raw material forP (2010) Biofuels from microalgae—A review of technologiesThe tide turns towards microalgae. Current research aims to

Nguyen, Don Duy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

Lazerson, Samuel

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

172

A TALE OF TWO BEAMS: GAUSSIAN BEAMS AND BESSEL BEAMS ROBERT L. NOWACK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A TALE OF TWO BEAMS: GAUSSIAN BEAMS AND BESSEL BEAMS ROBERT L. NOWACK Abstract. An overview is given of two types of focused beams, Gaussian beams and Bessel beams. First I describe some of the basic properties of Gaussian beams in homogeneous media which stay collimated over a certain distance range after

Nowack, Robert L.

173

Beam Dynamics for ARIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beam dynamics issues are assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention is paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. It is concluded that a radiographic quality beam will be produced possible if engineering standards and construction details are equivalent to those on the present radiography accelerators at Los Alamos.

Ekdahl, Carl

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Radiation Sources External Beam and Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Sources External Beam and Isotopes J. Daniel Bourland, PhD Professor Department of Radiation Oncology Departments of Physics and Biomedical Engineering Wake Forest School of Medicine Winston Radiation · Photons: electromagnetic radiation, no mass, E = h · X rays: origins are from atomic energy

175

ATA beam director experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes beam director elements for an experiment at the Advanced Test Accelerator. The elements described include a vernier magnet for beam aiming, an achromat magnet, and an isolation system for the beam interface. These components are built at small scale for concept testing. (JDH)

Lee, E.P.; Younger, F.C.; Cruz, G.E.; Nolting, E.

1986-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

176

2012 MOLECULAR AND IONIC CLUSTERS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JANUARY 29 - FEBRUARY 3, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gordon Research Conference on 'Molecular and Ionic Clusters' focuses on clusters, which are the initial molecular species found in gases when condensation begins to occur. Condensation can take place solely from molecules interacting with each other, mostly at low temperatures, or when molecules condense around charged particles (electrons, protons, metal cations, molecular ions), producing ion molecule clusters. These clusters provide models for solvation, allow a pristine look at geometric as well as electronic structures of molecular complexes or matter in general, their interaction with radiation, their reactivity, their thermodynamic properties and, in particular, the related dynamics. This conference focuses on new ways to make clusters composed of different kinds of molecules, new experimental techniques to investigate the properties of the clusters and new theoretical methods with which to calculate the structures, dynamical motions and energetics of the clusters. Some of the main experimental methods employed include molecular beams, mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy (from infrared to XUV; in the frequency as well as the time domain) and photoelectron spectroscopy. Techniques include laser absorption spectroscopy, laser induced fluorescence, resonance enhanced photoionization, mass-selected photodissociation, photofragment imaging, ZEKE photoelectron spectroscopy, etc. From the theoretical side, this conference highlights work on potential surfaces and measurable properties of the clusters. The close ties between experiment, theory and computation have been a hallmark of the Gordon Research Conference on Molecular and Ionic Clusters. In the 2012 meeting, we plan to have sessions that will focus on topics including: (1) The use of cluster studies to probe fundamental phenomena; (2) Finite size effects on structure and thermodynamics; (3) Intermolecular forces and cooperative effects; (4) Molecular clusters as models for solvation; and (5) Studies of clusters at XUV light sources.

Anne McCoy

2012-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

177

Neutral beam monitoring  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus for monitoring characteristics of a high energy neutral beam. A neutral beam is generated by passing accelerated ions through a walled cell containing a low energy neutral gas, such that charge exchange neutralizes the high energy ion beam. The neutral beam is monitored by detecting the current flowing through the cell wall produced by low energy ions which drift to the wall after the charge exchange. By segmenting the wall into radial and longitudinal segments various beam conditions are further identified.

Fink, Joel H. (Livermore, CA)

1981-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

178

HERSCHEL MEASUREMENTS OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN IN ORION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report observations of three rotational transitions of molecular oxygen (O{sub 2}) in emission from the H{sub 2} Peak 1 position of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen in Orion. We observed the 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz lines using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared on the Herschel Space Observatory, having velocities of 11 km s{sup -1} to 12 km s{sup -1} and widths of 3 km s{sup -1}. The beam-averaged column density is N(O{sub 2}) = 6.5 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, and assuming that the source has an equal beam-filling factor for all transitions (beam widths 44, 28, and 19''), the relative line intensities imply a kinetic temperature between 65 K and 120 K. The fractional abundance of O{sub 2} relative to H{sub 2} is (0.3-7.3) x 10{sup -6}. The unusual velocity suggests an association with a {approx}5'' diameter source, denoted Peak A, the Western Clump, or MF4. The mass of this source is {approx}10 M{sub sun} and the dust temperature is {>=}150 K. Our preferred explanation of the enhanced O{sub 2} abundance is that dust grains in this region are sufficiently warm (T {>=} 100 K) to desorb water ice and thus keep a significant fraction of elemental oxygen in the gas phase, with a significant fraction as O{sub 2}. For this small source, the line ratios require a temperature {>=}180 K. The inferred O{sub 2} column density {approx_equal}5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} can be produced in Peak A, having N(H{sub 2}) {approx_equal} 4 x 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}. An alternative mechanism is a low-velocity (10-15 km s{sup -1}) C-shock, which can produce N(O{sub 2}) up to 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}.

Goldsmith, Paul F.; Chen, Jo-Hsin; Li Di [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Liseau, Rene; Black, John H. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 92 Onsala (Sweden); Bell, Tom A. [Centro de Astrobiologia, CSIC-INTA, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Hollenbach, David [SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Kaufman, Michael J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Lis, Dariusz C. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Melnick, Gary [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 66, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Neufeld, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Pagani, Laurent; Encrenaz, Pierre [LERMA and UMR8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, 61 Av. de l'Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France); Snell, Ronald [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Benz, Arnold O.; Bruderer, Simon [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Bergin, Edwin [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Caselli, Paola [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Caux, Emmanuel [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Falgarone, Edith, E-mail: Paul.F.Goldsmith@jpl.nasa.gov [LRA/LERMA, CNRS, UMR8112, Observatoire de Paris and Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

2011-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

179

Temperature dependence of ion-beam mixing in crystalline and amorphous germanium isotope multilayer structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Self-atom mixing induced by 310 keV gallium (Ga) ion implantation in crystalline and preamorphized germanium (Ge) at temperatures between 164 K and 623 K and a dose of 1?×?10{sup 15}?cm{sup ?2} is investigated using isotopic multilayer structures of alternating {sup 70}Ge and {sup nat}Ge layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The distribution of the implanted Ga atoms and the ion-beam induced depth-dependent self-atom mixing was determined by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry. Three different temperature regimes of self-atom mixing, i.e., low-, intermediate-, and high-temperature regimes are observed. At temperatures up to 423 K, the mixing is independent of the initial structure, whereas at 523?K, the intermixing of the preamorphized Ge structure is about twice as high as that of crystalline Ge. At 623?K, the intermixing of the initially amorphous Ge structure is strongly reduced and approaches the mixing of the crystalline material. The temperature dependence of ion-beam mixing is described by competitive amorphization and recrystallization processes.

Radek, M.; Bracht, H., E-mail: bracht@uni-muenster.de [Institute of Materials Physics, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, 48149 Münster (Germany); Posselt, M.; Liedke, B.; Schmidt, B. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany); Bougeard, D. [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, 93040 Regensburg (Germany)

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

180

{sup 18}Ne production for the Beta beams project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intense relativistic (anti)neutrino beams are an unique tool required to study fundamental properties of neutrinos such as neutrino oscillation parameters, as well as their Majorana or Dirac nature, the lepton number conservation hypothesis and the absolute neutrino mass scale. Such beams originate from acceleration of ?-decaying radioactive ions (“Beta beams”). A molten fluoride salt target has been developed for the production of the required rates of low-Q baseline isotope {sup 18}Ne for the Beta beams project. The prototyped unit has been tested on-line at ISOLDE-CERN. In this contribution an overview of the prototyping and on-line tests is presented.

Hodák, Rastislav [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, CTU in Prague, Horská 3/22a, CZ-12800 Prague (Czech Republic); Mendonça, Tania M. [IFIMUP and IN - Institute of Nanosciences and Nanotechnologies, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto, Portugal and CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Swaziland); Stora, Thierry [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

LBNL-46223, CBP Note 350 BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR SEPARATED BEAMS IN THE LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-46223, CBP Note 350 BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR SEPARATED BEAMS IN THE LHC M. A. Furman, W. C. Turner, Center for Beam Physics, LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Abstract We present beam-beam simulation of simulations: (a) to as- sess undesirable effects from LBNL's luminosity monitor- ing scheme for the LHC [2

Furman, Miguel

182

LBNL-45363, CBP Note 333 BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR SEPARATED BEAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-45363, CBP Note 333 BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR SEPARATED BEAMS Miguel A. Furman, Center for Beam Physics, LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720 Abstract We present beam-beam simulation results from a strong undesirable effects from LBNL's sweeping lumi- nosity monitoring scheme for the LHC [1], and (b) to assess

Furman, Miguel

183

Born-Oppenheimer approximation for mass scaling of cold-collision properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Asymptotic levels of the A {sup 1}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +} state of the two isotopomers {sup 39}K{sub 2} and {sup 39}K{sup 41}K up to the dissociation limit are investigated with a Doppler-free high resolution laser-spectroscopic experiment in a molecular beam. The observed level structure can be reproduced correctly only if a mass dependent correction term is introduced for the interaction potential. The applied relative correction in the depth of the potential is 10{sup -6}, which is in the order of magnitude expected for corrections of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. A similar change in ground state potentials might lead to significant changes of mass-scaled properties describing cold collisions like the s-wave scattering length.

Falke, Stephan; Tiemann, Eberhard; Lisdat, Christian [Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Welfengarten 1, 30167 Hannover (Germany)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Broad beam ion implanter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Small beam nonparaxiality arrests selffocusing of optical beams Gadi Fibich  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Small beam nonparaxiality arrests self­focusing of optical beams Gadi Fibich Department­focusing in the presence of small beam nonparaxiality is derived. Analysis of this equation shows that nonparaxiality remains small as the beam propa­ gates. Nevertheless, nonparaxiality arrests self­focusing when the beam

Soatto, Stefano

186

Piezoelectric energy harvester having planform-tapered interdigitated beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Embodiments of energy harvesters have a plurality of piezoelectric planform-tapered, interdigitated cantilevered beams anchored to a common frame. The plurality of beams can be arranged as two or more sets of beams with each set sharing a common sense mass affixed to their free ends. Each set thus defined being capable of motion independent of any other set of beams. Each beam can comprise a unimorph or bimorph piezoelectric configuration bonded to a conductive or non-conductive supporting layer and provided with electrical contacts to the active piezoelectric elements for collecting strain induced charge (i.e. energy). The beams are planform tapered along the entirety or a portion of their length thereby increasing the effective stress level and power output of each piezoelectric element, and are interdigitated by sets to increase the power output per unit volume of a harvester thus produced.

Kellogg, Rick A. (Tijeras, NM); Sumali, Hartono (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

187

Pyrolysis of Organic Molecules Relevant to Combustion as Monitored by Photoionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Small Molecules by Flash Pyrolysis, University ofapproach of coupling flash pyrolysis of the compound ofZhang, Chairperson Flash pyrolysis coupled to molecular beam

Weber, Kevin Howard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Method and apparatus for measuring the momentum, energy, power, and power density profile of intense particle beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for determining the power, momentum, energy, and power density profile of high momentum mass flow. Small probe projectiles of appropriate size, shape and composition are propelled through an intense particle beam at equal intervals along an axis perpendicular to the beam direction. Probe projectiles are deflected by collisions with beam particles. The net beam-induced deflection of each projectile is measured after it passes through the intense particle beam into an array of suitable detectors.

Gammel, George M. (Merrick, NY); Kugel, Henry W. (Somerset, NJ)

1992-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

189

Laser beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 11 figures.

Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

190

Laser beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus is described. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 7 figures.

Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Neutrino Factories and Beta Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a Neutrino Factory Based on Muon Beams,” Proc. 2001 ParticleMD. [19] C. Rubbia et al. , “Beam Cooling with Ionisationthe required unstable ion beams has recently been suggested

Zisman, Michael S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Molecular beam epitaxial growth of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} topological insulators on GaAs (111) substrates: a potential route to fabricate topological insulator p-n junction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High quality Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} topological insulators films were epitaxially grown on GaAs (111) substrate using solid source molecular beam epitaxy. Their growth and behavior on both vicinal and non-vicinal GaAs (111) substrates were investigated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is found that non-vicinal GaAs (111) substrate is better than a vicinal substrate to provide high quality Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} films. Hall and magnetoresistance measurements indicate that p type Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and n type Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} topological insulator films can be directly grown on a GaAs (111) substrate, which may pave a way to fabricate topological insulator p-n junction on the same substrate, compatible with the fabrication process of present semiconductor optoelectronic devices.

Zeng, Zhaoquan; Morgan, Timothy A.; Li, Chen; Hirono, Yusuke; Hu, Xian; Hawkridge, Michael E.; Benamara, Mourad; Salamo, Gregory J. [Arkansas Institute for Nanoscale Material Sciences and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States)] [Arkansas Institute for Nanoscale Material Sciences and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Fan, Dongsheng; Yu, Shuiqing [Arkansas Institute for Nanoscale Material Sciences and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States) [Arkansas Institute for Nanoscale Material Sciences and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Zhao, Yanfei [International Center for Quantum Materials, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China)] [International Center for Quantum Materials, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China); Lee, Joon Sue [The Center for Nanoscale Science and Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)] [The Center for Nanoscale Science and Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Wang, Jian [International Center for Quantum Materials, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China) [International Center for Quantum Materials, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China); The Center for Nanoscale Science and Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Wang, Zhiming M. [Arkansas Institute for Nanoscale Material Sciences and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States) [Arkansas Institute for Nanoscale Material Sciences and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Engineering Research Center for Semiconductor Integrated Technology, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100083 (China)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

Growth and characterization of dilute nitride GaN{sub x}P{sub 1?x} nanowires and GaN{sub x}P{sub 1?x}/GaN{sub y}P{sub 1?y} core/shell nanowires on Si (111) by gas source molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have demonstrated self-catalyzed GaN{sub x}P{sub 1?x} and GaN{sub x}P{sub 1?x}/GaN{sub y}P{sub 1?y} core/shell nanowire growth by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. The growth window for GaN{sub x}P{sub 1?x} nanowires was observed to be comparable to that of GaP nanowires (?585?°C to ?615?°C). Transmission electron microscopy showed a mixture of cubic zincblende phase and hexagonal wurtzite phase along the [111] growth direction in GaN{sub x}P{sub 1?x} nanowires. A temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) study performed on GaN{sub x}P{sub 1?x}/GaN{sub y}P{sub 1?y} core/shell nanowires exhibited an S-shape dependence of the PL peaks. This suggests that at low temperature, the emission stems from N-related localized states below the conduction band edge in the shell, while at high temperature, the emission stems from band-to-band transition in the shell as well as recombination in the GaN{sub x}P{sub 1?x} core.

Sukrittanon, S. [Graduate Program of Material Science and Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92037 (United States); Kuang, Y. J. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92037 (United States); Dobrovolsky, A.; Chen, W. M.; Buyanova, I. A. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Kang, Won-Mo; Kim, Bong-Joong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Ja-Soon [Department of Electronic Engineering, LED-IT Fusion Technology Research Center, Yeungnam University, Daegu 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Tu, C. W. [Graduate Program of Material Science and Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92037 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92037 (United States)

2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

194

Simulations of beam-beam and beam-wire interactions in RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The beam-beam interaction is one of the dominant sources of emittance growth and luminosity lifetime deterioration. A current carrying wire has been proposed to compensate long-range beam-beam effects in the LHC and strong localized long-range beam-beam effects are experimentally investigated in the RHIC collider. Tune shift, beam transfer function, and beam loss rate are measured in dedicated experiments. In this paper, they report on simulations to study the effect of beam-wire interactions based on diffusive apertures, beam loss rates, and beam transfer function using a parallelized weak-strong beam simulation code (BBSIMC). The simulation results are compared with measurements performed in RHIC during 2007 and 2008.

Kim, Hyung J.; Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab; Abreu, Natalia P.; Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Beta-beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beta-beams is a new concept for the production of intense and pure neutrino beams. It is at the basis of a proposed neutrino facility, whose main goal is to explore the possible existence of CP violation in the lepton sector. Here we briefly review the original scenario and the low energy beta-beam. This option would offer a unique opportunity to perform neutrino interaction studies of interest for particle physics, astrophysics and nuclear physics. Other proposed scenarios for the search of CP violation are mentioned.

C. Volpe

2008-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

196

Inverse time-of-flight spectrometer for beam plasma research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper describes the design and principle of operation of an inverse time-of-flight spectrometer for research in the plasma produced by an electron beam in the forevacuum pressure range (5–20 Pa). In the spectrometer, the deflecting plates as well as the drift tube and the primary ion beam measuring system are at high potential with respect to ground. This provides the possibility to measure the mass-charge constitution of the plasma created by a continuous electron beam with a current of up to 300 mA and electron energy of up to 20 keV at forevacuum pressures in the chamber placed at ground potential. Research results on the mass-charge state of the beam plasma are presented and analyzed.

Yushkov, Yu. G., E-mail: yuyushkov@gmail.com; Zolotukhin, D. B.; Tyunkov, A. V. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, 40 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Oks, E. M. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, 40 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3, Akademichesky Ave., Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Savkin, K. P. [Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3, Akademichesky Ave., Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

Neutral particle beam intensity controller  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

Dagenhart, W.K.

1984-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

198

Pulsed ion beam source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

Greenly, John B. (Lansing, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Negligible Sample Heating from Synchrotron Infrared Beam Michael C. Martina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Negligible Sample Heating from Synchrotron Infrared Beam Michael C. Martina , Nelly M. Tsvetkovab of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California at Davis, USA Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is one can now obtain diffraction-limited spot sizes with high signal intensity in an infrared microscope

200

Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H{sup -} beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batygin, Yuri K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gonzales, Fermin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kutac, Vincent G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Photon beam position monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photon beam position monitor is disclosed for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade ''shadowing''. Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation. 18 figs.

Kuzay, T.M.; Shu, D.

1995-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

202

Molecular Gas Reservoir in low-z Powerful Radio Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a survey for molecular gas in 3C radio galaxies at redshifts z gas masses in the range 10^7--10^9 Msun. The remainder had typical upper limits in molecular gas masses of ~10^8 Msun.

Jeremy Lim; Stephane Leon; Francoise Combes; Dinh-V-Trung

2002-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

203

Single element laser beam shaper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single lens laser beam shaper for converting laser beams from any spatial profile to a flat-top or uniform spatial profile. The laser beam shaper includes a lens having two aspheric surfaces. The beam shaper significantly simplifies the overall structure in comparison with conventional 2-element systems and therefore provides great ease in alignment and reduction of cost.

Zhang, Shukui (Yorktown, VA); Michelle D. Shinn (Newport News, VA)

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

204

Supercritical Helium Cooling of the LHC Beam Screens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cold mass of the LHC superconducting magnets, operating in pressurised superfluid helium at 1.9 K, must be shielded from the dynamic heat loads induced by the circulating particle beams, by means of beam screens maintained at higher temperature. The beam screens are cooled between 5 and 20 K by forced flow of weakly supercritical helium, a solution which avoids two-phase flow in the long, narr ow cooling channels, but still presents a potential risk of thermohydraulic instabilities. This problem has been studied by theoretical modelling and experiments performed on a full-scale dedicated te st loop.

Hatchadourian, E; Tavian, L

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Light beam frequency comb generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A light beam frequency comb generator uses an acousto-optic modulator to generate a plurality of light beams with frequencies which are uniformly separated and possess common noise and drift characteristics. A well collimated monochromatic input light beam is passed through this modulator to produce a set of both frequency shifted and unshifted optical beams. An optical system directs one or more frequency shifted beams along a path which is parallel to the path of the input light beam such that the frequency shifted beams are made incident on the modulator proximate to but separated from the point of incidence of the input light beam. After the beam is thus returned to and passed through the modulator repeatedly, a plurality of mutually parallel beams are generated which are frequency-shifted different numbers of times and possess common noise and drift characteristics.

Priatko, Gordon J. (Cupertino, CA); Kaskey, Jeffrey A. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Mass Chain Evaluation for A=95  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A full evaluation of the mass chain A = 95 has been done in the ENSDF format taking into account all the available data until June 2009. Excited states populated by in-beam nuclear reactions and by radioactive decay have been considered. The 'evp' editor, developed at the NNDC, has been used for the evaluation. This mass chain was last evaluated in 1993. Many new and improved data were reported since then. A total of 13 nuclei have been evaluated.

Basu, S.K.; Sonzogni, A.; Basu, Swapan Kr.; Mukherjee, Gopal; Sonzogni, A. A.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory is building a high-brightness 500 mA capable Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) as one of its main R&D thrusts towards eRHIC, the polarized electron - hadron collider as an upgrade of the operating RHIC facility. The ERL is in final assembly stages, with injection commisioning starting in October 2012. The objective of this ERL is to serve as a platform for R&D into high current ERL, in particular issues of halo generation and control, Higher-Order Mode (HOM) issues, coherent emissions for the beam and high-brightness, high-power beam generation and preservation. The R&D ERL features a superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photoccathode served with a load-lock cathode delivery system, a highly damped 5-cell accelerating cavity, a highly flexible single-pass loop and a comprehensive system of beam instrumentation. In this ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter article we will describe the ERL in a degree of detail that is not usually found in regular publications. We will discuss the various systems of the ERL, following the electrons from the photocathode to the beam dump, cover the control system, machine protection etc and summarize with the status of the ERL systems.

Ben-Zvi I.; Kuczewski A.; Altinbas, Z.; Beavis, D.; Belomestnykh,; Dai, J. et al

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Low interfacial trap density and sub-nm equivalent oxide thickness in In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As (001) metal-oxide-semiconductor devices using molecular beam deposited HfO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as gate dielectrics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the passivation of In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As (001) surface by molecular beam epitaxy techniques. After growth of strained In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As on InP (001) substrate, HfO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} high-{kappa} oxide stacks have been deposited in-situ after surface reconstruction engineering. Excellent capacitance-voltage characteristics have been demonstrated along with low gate leakage currents. The interfacial density of states (D{sub it}) of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As interface have been revealed by conductance measurement, indicating a downward D{sub it} profile from the energy close to the valence band (medium 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}eV{sup -1}) towards that close to the conduction band (10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}eV{sup -1}). The low D{sub it}'s are in good agreement with the high Fermi-level movement efficiency of greater than 80%. Moreover, excellent scalability of the HfO{sub 2} has been demonstrated as evidenced by the good dependence of capacitance oxide thickness on the HfO{sub 2} thickness (dielectric constant of HfO{sub 2}{approx}20) and the remained low D{sub it}'s due to the thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivation layer. The sample with HfO{sub 2} (3.4 nm)/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (1.2 nm) as the gate dielectrics has exhibited an equivalent oxide thickness of {approx}0.93 nm.

Chu, L. K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Merckling, C.; Dekoster, J.; Caymax, M. [Interuniversity Microelectronics Center (IMEC vzw), 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Alian, A.; Heyns, M. [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Interuniversity Microelectronics Center (IMEC vzw), 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Kwo, J. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Hong, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

209

Beam Profile Monitor With Accurate Horizontal And Vertical Beam Profiles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A widely used scanner device that rotates a single helically shaped wire probe in and out of a particle beam at different beamline positions to give a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is modified by the addition of a second wire probe. As a result, a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a first beamline position, and a second pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a second beamline position. The simple modification not only provides more accurate beam profiles, but also provides a measurement of the beam divergence and quality in a single compact device.

Havener, Charles C [Knoxville, TN; Al-Rejoub, Riad [Oak Ridge, TN

2005-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

210

Grazing incidence beam expander  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Beam Stability Complaint Form  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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212

Evaluation and Compensation of Detector Solenoid Effects on Disrupted Beam in the ILC 14 mrad Extraction Line  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents calculations of detector solenoid effects on disrupted primary beam in the ILC 14 mrad extraction line. Particle tracking simulations are performed for evaluation of primary beam loss along the line as well as of beam distribution and polarization at Compton Interaction Point. The calculations are done both without and with solenoid compensation. The results are obtained for the baseline ILC energy of 500 GeV center-of-mass and three options of beam parameters.

Toprek, Dragan; /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

213

Non-Paraxial Accelerating Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the spatially accelerating solutions of the Maxwell equations. Such non-paraxial beams accelerate in a circular trajectory, thus generalizing the concept of Airy beams. For both TE and TM polarizations, the beams exhibit shape-preserving bending with sub-wavelength features, and the Poynting vector of the main lobe displays a turn of more than 90 degrees. We show that these accelerating beams are self-healing, analyze their properties, and compare to the paraxial Airy beams. Finally, we present the new family of periodic accelerating beams which can be constructed from our solutions.

Ido Kaminer; Rivka Bekenstein; Jonathan Nemirovsky; Mordechai Segev

2012-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

214

Electron beam dynamics for the ISIS bremsstrahlung beam generation system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An electron beam transport system was designed for use in the Bremsstrahlung Beam Generation System of the Integrated Stand-off Inspection System (ISIS). The purpose of this electron transport system was to provide for ...

Block, Robert E. (Robert Edward)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Ion-beam technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compilation of figures and diagrams reviews processes for depositing diamond/diamond-like carbon films. Processes addressed are chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD, PACVD, etc.), plasma vapor deposition (plasma sputtering, ion beam sputtering, evaporation, etc.), low-energy ion implantation, and hybrid processes (biased sputtering, IBAD, biased HFCVD, etc.). The tribological performance of coatings produced by different means is discussed.

Fenske, G.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Pulsed ion beam source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

Greenly, J.B.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

217

Colliding beams of light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The stationary gravitational field of two identical counter-moving beams of pure radiation is found in full generality. The solution depends on an arbitrary function and a parameter which sets the scale of the energy density. Some of its properties are studied. Previous particular solutions are derived as subcases.

B. V. Ivanov

2002-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

218

Beam current sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A current sensor for measuring the dc component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivities in the nano-ampere range.

Kuchnir, M.; Mills, F.E.

1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

219

Beam current sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A current sensor for measuring the DC component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivites in the nano-ampere range.

Kuchnir, Moyses (Elmhurst, IL); Mills, Frederick E. (Elburn, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Neutral particle beam intensity controller  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

Dagenhart, William K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Reactions of carbon atoms in pulsed molecular beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program consists of a broad scope of experiments designed to unravel the chemistry of atomic carbon in its two spin states, P and D, by using well-controlled initial conditions and state-resolved detection of products. Prerequisite to the proposed studies (and the reason why so little is known about carbon atom reactions), is the development of clean sources of carbon atoms. Therefore, in parallel with the studies of its chemistry and reaction dynamics, the authors continuously explore new, state-specific and efficient ways of producing atomic carbon. In the current program, C({sup 3}P) is produced via laser ablation of graphite, and three areas of study are being pursued: (i) exothermic reactions with small inorganic molecules (e.g., O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}) that can proceed via multiple pathways; (ii) the influence of vibrational and translational energy on endothermic reactions involving H-containing reactants that yield CH products (e.g., H{sub 2}O H{sub 2}CO); (iii) reactions of C({sup 3}P) with free radicals (e.g., HCO, CH{sub 3}O). In addition, the authors plan to develop a source of C({sup 1}D) atoms by exploiting the pyrolysis of diazotetrazole and its salts in the ablation source. Another important goal involves collaboration with theoreticians in order to obtain relevant potential energy surfaces, rationalize the experimental results and predict the roles of translational and vibrational energies.

Reisler, H. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

MOLECULAR BEAM PHOTOIONIZATION AND GAS-SURFACE SCATTERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on 0.063" dowel pins press fit into the ends of the slideinto the center was press fit into the dividing wall as theID, 0.156" thick) are press fit into the end of the drive

Ceyer, S.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Photochemical Properties, Composition, and Structure in Molecular Beam  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 TheStevenAdministration Album Of FAPAC -ofTheofA

224

Future Directions of Structural Mass Spectrometry using Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydroxyl radical protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry has been developed over the last decade and has matured to a powerful method for analyzing protein structure and dynamics. It has been successfully applied in the analysis of protein structure, protein folding, protein dynamics, and protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. Using synchrotron radiolysis, exposure of proteins to a 'white' X-ray beam for milliseconds provides sufficient oxidative modification to surface amino acid side chains, which can be easily detected and quantified by mass spectrometry. Thus, conformational changes in proteins or protein complexes can be examined using a time-resolved approach, which would be a valuable method for the study of macromolecular dynamics. In this review, we describe a new application of hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to probe the time evolution of the calcium-dependent conformational changes of gelsolin on the millisecond timescale. The data suggest a cooperative transition as multiple sites in different molecular subdomains have similar rates of conformational change. These findings demonstrate that time-resolved protein footprinting is suitable for studies of protein dynamics that occur over periods ranging from milliseconds to seconds. In this review, we also show how the structural resolution and sensitivity of the technology can be improved as well. The hydroxyl radical varies in its reactivity to different side chains by over two orders of magnitude, thus oxidation of amino acid side chains of lower reactivity are more rarely observed in such experiments. Here we demonstrate that the selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based method can be utilized for quantification of oxidized species, improving the signal-to-noise ratio. This expansion of the set of oxidized residues of lower reactivity will improve the overall structural resolution of the technique. This approach is also suggested as a basis for developing hypothesis-driven structural mass spectrometry experiments.

J Kiselar; M Chance

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

HEAVY GOLD CLUSTER BEAMS production and identi cation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This method is based on the acceleration of the clusters to high energy (MeV) and on the measurement, after to select heavy Aun cluster beams for applications at low energy (keV) in mass spectrometry. 1. Introduction, with a multianode detector 7], the number of constituents coming out of the foil. High energy clusters, accelerated

Boyer, Edmond

226

Gaussian Beams Enrique J. Galvez  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gaussian Beams Enrique J. Galvez Department of Physics and Astronomy Colgate University Copyright 2009 #12;ii #12;Contents 1 Fundamental Gaussian Beams 1 1.1 Spherical Wavefront in the Paraxial region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Formal Solution of the Wave Equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.2.1 Beam Spot w

Galvez, Enrique J. "Kiko"

227

Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)! Seminar 4 (UN)!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for compositional analysis of solid surfaces and thin films. When a surface is bombarded by high energy beam! ! Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)! Seminar 4 (UN)! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Author: Nina Kovacic! ___________________________________________________________________________! ABSTRACT! ! Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is an analytical experimental technique, used

Â?umer, Slobodan

228

Recent advances of strong-strong beam-beam simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we report on recent advances in strong-strong beam-beam simulation. Numerical methods used in the calculation of the beam-beam forces are reviewed. A new computational method to solve the Poisson equation on nonuniform grid is presented. This method reduces the computational cost by a half compared with the standard FFT based method on uniform grid. It is also more accurate than the standard method for a colliding beam with low transverse aspect ratio. In applications, we present the study of coherent modes with multi-bunch, multi-collision beam-beam interactions at RHIC. We also present the strong-strong simulation of the luminosity evolution at KEKB with and without finite crossing angle.

Qiang, Ji; Furman, Miguel A.; Ryne, Robert D.; Fischer, Wolfram; Ohmi,Kazuhito

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on the unpolarised proton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries in the hard exclusive leptoproduction of real photons from an unpolarised hydrogen target by a 27.6 GeV lepton beam are extracted from the HERMES data set of 2006-2007 using a missing-mass event selection technique. The asymmetry amplitudes extracted from this data set are more precise than those extracted from the earlier data set of 1996-2005 previously analysed in the same manner by HERMES. The results from the two data sets are compatible with each other. Results from these combined data sets are extracted and constitute the most precise asymmetry amplitude measurements made in the HERMES kinematic region using a missing-mass event selection technique.

Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetissian, A; Avetisyan, E; Blok, H P; Borissov, A; Bowles, J; Bryzgalov, V; Burns, J; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Gabbert, D; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Gavrilov, G; Giordano, F; Gliske, S; Golembiovskaya, M; Hadjidakis, C; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Imazu, Y; Jackson, H E; Jo, H S; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kisselev, A; Kobayashi, N; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhijine, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikás, L; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Lorenzon, W; Ma, B -Q; Mahon, D; Makins, N C R; Manaenkov, S I; Manfré, L; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; de la Ossa, A Martinez; Marukyan, H; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Movsisyan, A; Muccifora, V; Murray, M; Mussgiller, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Y; Nass, A; Nowak, W -D; Pappalardo, L L; Perez-Benito, R; Petrosyan, A; Raithel, M; Reimer, P E; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanftl, F; Schäfer, A; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seitz, B; Shibata, T -A; Shutov, V; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Taroian, S; Terkulov, A; Truty, R; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Van Haarlem, Y; Van Hulse, C; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Vilardi, I; Wang, S; Yaschenko, S; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Yu, W; Zagrebelnyy, V; Zeiler, D; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on the unpolarised proton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries in the hard exclusive leptoproduction of real photons from an unpolarised hydrogen target by a 27.6 GeV lepton beam are extracted from the HERMES data set of 2006-2007 using a missing-mass event selection technique. The asymmetry amplitudes extracted from this data set are more precise than those extracted from the earlier data set of 1996-2005 previously analysed in the same manner by HERMES. The results from the two data sets are compatible with each other. Results from these combined data sets are extracted and constitute the most precise asymmetry amplitude measurements made in the HERMES kinematic region using a missing-mass event selection technique.

The HERMES Collaboration; A. Airapetian; N. Akopov; Z. Akopov; E. C. Aschenauer; W. Augustyniak; R. Avakian; A. Avetissian; E. Avetisyan; H. P. Blok; A. Borissov; J. Bowles; V. Bryzgalov; J. Burns; M. Capiluppi; G. P. Capitani; E. Cisbani; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; P. F. Dalpiaz; W. Deconinck; R. De Leo; L. De Nardo; E. De Sanctis; M. Diefenthaler; P. Di Nezza; M. Düren; M. Ehrenfried; G. Elbakian; F. Ellinghaus; A. Fantoni; L. Felawka; S. Frullani; D. Gabbert; G. Gapienko; V. Gapienko; F. Garibaldi; G. Gavrilov; F. Giordano; S. Gliske; M. Golembiovskaya; C. Hadjidakis; M. Hartig; D. Hasch; M. Hoek; Y. Holler; Y. Imazu; H. E. Jackson; H. S. Jo; R. Kaiser; G. Karyan; T. Keri; E. Kinney; A. Kisselev; N. Kobayashi; V. Korotkov; V. Kozlov; P. Kravchenko; V. G. Krivokhijine; L. Lagamba; L. Lapikás; I. Lehmann; P. Lenisa; W. Lorenzon; B. -Q. Ma; D. Mahon; N. C. R. Makins; S. I. Manaenkov; L. Manfré; Y. Mao; B. Marianski; A. Martinez de la Ossa; H. Marukyan; C. A. Miller; Y. Miyachi; A. Movsisyan; V. Muccifora; M. Murray; A. Mussgiller; E. Nappi; Y. Naryshkin; A. Nass; W. -D. Nowak; L. L. Pappalardo; R. Perez-Benito; A. Petrosyan; M. Raithel; P. E. Reimer; A. R. Reolon; C. Riedl; K. Rith; G. Rosner; A. Rostomyan; J. Rubin; D. Ryckbosch; Y. Salomatin; F. Sanftl; A. Schäfer; G. Schnell; K. P. Schüler; B. Seitz; T. -A. Shibata; V. Shutov; M. Stancari; M. Statera; E. Steffens; J. J. M. Steijger; J. Stewart; S. Taroian; A. Terkulov; R. Truty; A. Trzcinski; M. Tytgat; Y. Van Haarlem; C. Van Hulse; D. Veretennikov; V. Vikhrov; I. Vilardi; S. Wang; S. Yaschenko; Z. Ye; S. Yen; W. Yu; V. Zagrebelnyy; D. Zeiler; B. Zihlmann; P. Zupranski

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

231

Measurement of the Higgs Boson Mass with a Linear e+e- Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential of a linear e+e- collider operated at a centre-of-mass energy of 350 GeV is studied for the measurement of the Higgs boson mass. An integrated luminosity of 500 fb-1 is assumed. For Higgs boson masses of 120, 150 and 180 GeV the uncertainty on the Higgs boson mass measurement is estimated to be 40, 65 and 70 MeV, respectively. The effects of beam related systematics, namely a bias in the beam energy measurement, the beam energy spread and the luminosity spectrum due to beamstrahlung, on the precision of the Higgs boson mass measurement are investigated. In order to keep the systematic uncertainty on the Higgs boson mass well below the level of the statistical error, the beam energy measurement must be controlled with a relative precision better than 10-4.

P. Garcia-Abia; W. Lohmann; A. Raspereza

2005-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

Axion beams at HERA?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If the recently observed anomaly in the PVLAS experiment is due to the axion, then the powerful beams of synchrotron photons, propagating through high magnetic field of the HERA beamline, become strong axion sources. This gives a unique opportunity of detection of the axion-photon interactions by installing a small detector in the HERA tunnel, and to corroborate the axion hypothesis within a few days of running.

K. Piotrzkowski

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

233

Physics with Rare Isotope Beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using stable and radioactive beams provided by ATLAS nuclear reactions of special interest in astrophysics have been studied with emphasis on breakout from the hot CNO cycle to the rp-process. The masses of nuclear fragments provided by a strong fission source have been measured in order to help trace the path of the r process. 8Li ions produced by the d(7Li,8Li)n reaction have been trapped and the electrons and alphas emitted in the ensuing beta-decay measured. The neutrino directions were therefore determined, which leads to a measurement of the electron-neutrino correlation. The energies and kinematics are such that a sensitive search for any tensor admixture could be performed and an upper limit of 0.6% was placed on any such admixture. Earlier work on the electromagnetic form factors of the proton was extended. Graduate students were active participants in all of these eperiments, which formed the basis for six PhD theses.

Segel, Ralph E. [Northwestern University] [Northwestern University

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

234

Molecular Gas in Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Knowledge of the molecular component of the ISM is fundamental to understand star formation. The H2 component appears to dominate the gas mass in the inner parts of galaxies, while the HI component dominates in the outer parts. Observation of the CO and other lines in normal and starburst galaxies have questioned the CO-to-H2 conversion factor, and detection of CO in dwarfs have shown how sensitive the conversion f actor is to metallicity. Our knowledge has made great progress in recent years, because of sensitivity and spatial resolution improvements. Large-scale CO maps of nearby galaxies are now available, which extend our knowledge on global properties, radial gradients, and spiral structure of the molecular ISM. Millimetric interferometers reveal high velocity gradients in galaxy nuclei, and formation of embedded structures, like bars within bars. Galaxy interactions are very effective to enhance gas concentrations and trigger starbursts. Nuclear disks or rings are frequently observed, that concentrate the star formation activity. Since the density of starbursting galaxies is strongly increasing with redshift, the CO lines and the mm dust emission are a privileged tool to follow evolution of galaxies and observe the ISM dynamics at high redshift: they could give an answer about the debated question of the star-formation history, since many massive remote starbursts could be dust-enshrouded.

F. Combes

2000-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

235

Understanding the Poor Resolution from Test Beam RunUnderstanding the Poor Resolution from Test Beam Run 2004 Straw Test beam results2004 Straw Test beam results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Understanding the Poor Resolution from Test Beam RunUnderstanding the Poor Resolution from Test Beam Run aah #12;2 2004 Straw Test beam results2004 Straw Test beam results ! Doc # 3308 v#3 by A. Ledovskoy " Using Data from 2004 Test Beam " Used "triplet" method for beam nominally perpendicular to Straw

236

Nondestructive Damage Detection in General Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to provide NDE methodologies that simultaneously identify the location, the extent, and the severity of damage in general beams. By general beams, we mean beyond Euler-Bernoulli beams (i.e. slender beams) to deep beams and stubby beams whose response may...

Dincal, Selcuk

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

237

Fast beam studies of free radical photodissociation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have developed a novel technique for studying the photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals. In these experiments, radicals are generated by laser photodetachment of a fast (6-8 keV) mass-selected negative ion beam. The resulting radicals are photodissociated with a second laser, and the photofragments are collected and detected with high efficiency using a microchannel plate detector. The overall process is: ABC{sup -} {yields} ABC + e{sup -} {yields} A + BC, AB + C. Two types of fragment detection schemes are used. To map out the photodissociation cross-section of the radical, the photodissociation laser is scanned and the total photofragment yield is measured as a function of wavelength. In other experiments, the photodissociation frequency is fixed and the photofragment masses, kinetic energy release, and scattering angle is determined for each photodissociation event.

Neumark, D.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

A combined beta-beam and electron capture neutrino experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The next generation of long baseline neutrino experiments will aim at determining the value of the unknown mixing angle, theta_{13}, the type of neutrino mass hierarchy and the presence of CP-violation in the lepton sector. Beta-beams and electron capture experiments have been studied as viable candidates for long baseline experiments. They use a very clean electron neutrino beam from the beta-decays or electron capture decays of boosted ions. In the present article we consider an hybrid setup which combines a beta-beam with an electron capture beam by using boosted Ytterbium ions. We study the sensitivity to the CP-violating phase delta and the theta_{13} angle, the CP-discovery potential and the reach to determine the type of neutrino mass hierarchy for this type of long baseline experiment. The analysis is performed for different neutrino beam energies and baselines. Finally, we also discuss how the results would change if a better knowledge of some of the assumed parameters was achieved by the time this experiment could take place.

J. Bernabeu; C. Espinoza; C. Orme; S. Palomares-Ruiz; S. Pascoli

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

239

Neutral Beam Excitation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNational Library of1, 2007Transmission toBeam Excitation of Alfv

240

BEAMS: Curiosity | Jefferson Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program CumulusA t i o nLiquids Reserve2015 BCPthe24-3BEAMS:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Decoding Photosynthesis' Molecular Mysteries  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Decoding Photosynthesis' Molecular Mysteries Decoding the Molecular Mysteries of Photosynthesis Understanding the inner workings of photosynthesis is key to building new man-made...

242

Multifragmentation at the balance energy of mass asymmetric colliding nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the quantum molecular dynamics model, we study the role of mass asymmetry of colliding nuclei on the fragmentation at the balance energy and on its mass dependence. The study is done by keeping the total mass of the system fixed as 40, 80, 160, and 240 and by varying the mass asymmetry of the ($\\eta$ = $\\frac{A_{T}-A_{P}}{A_{T}+A_{P}}$; where $A_{T}$ and $A_{P}$ are the masses of the target and projectile, respectively) reaction from 0.1 to 0.7. Our results clearly indicate a sizeable effect of the mass asymmetry on the multiplicity of various fragments. The mass asymmetry dependence of various fragments is found to increase with increase in total system mass (except for heavy mass fragments). Similar to symmetric reactions, a power law system mass dependence of various fragment multiplicities is also found to exit for large asymmetries.

Supriya Goyal

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

243

The chemistry of high-mass star formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper reviews the chemistry of star-forming regions, with an emphasis on the formation of high-mass stars. We first outline the basic molecular processes in dense clouds, their implementation in chemical models, and techniques to measure molecular abundances. Then, recent observational, theoretical and laboratory developments are reviewed on the subjects of hot molecular cores, cosmic-ray ionization, depletion and deuteration, and oxygen chemistry. The paper concludes with a summary of outstanding problems and future opportunities.

Floris F. S. van der Tak

2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

244

Beam-Induced Backgrounds in the CLIC Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The beam parameters of the proposed CLIC linear electron-positron collider with a centre-of-mass energy of up to 3 TeV will lead to high rates of beam-induced background events. In this note simulation studies of ?? ? hadron interactions and of incoherent electron-positron pair production are presented. The CLIC detector concepts and their optimisation to reduce background occupancies are described. The characteristics of the events are discussed and resulting occupancies and energy deposits, as well as expected levels of both total ionising dose and displacement damage in the detectors are discussed.

Dannheim, D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Particle Detector / Beam Current Transformer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Particle Detector / Beam Current Transformer Analysis December 8, 2009 Harold G. Kirk #12;ShotSignal,A.U. Proton Bunch Number Beam Current Transformer - 17011 0 2 4 6 8 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Integrated Transformer Pump 187829 (au) Probe 196504 (au) Ratios: Beam Current 1.046 SF 1.019 2.9% difference #12;Shot

McDonald, Kirk

246

A pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To develop a flexible pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy. Dose distributions were calculated using the newly developed pencil beam algorithm and validated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods. Methods: The algorithm was based on the established theory of fluence weighted elemental pencil beam (PB) kernels. Using a new real-time splitting approach, a minimization routine selects the optimal shape for each sub-beam. Dose depositions along the beam path were determined using a look-up table (LUT). Data for LUT generation were derived from MC simulations in water using GATE 6.1. For materials other than water, dose depositions were calculated by the algorithm using water-equivalent depth scaling. Lateral beam spreading caused by multiple scattering has been accounted for by implementing a non-local scattering formula developed by Gottschalk. A new nuclear correction was modelled using a Voigt function and implemented by a LUT approach. Validation simulations have been performed using a phantom filled with homogeneous materials or heterogeneous slabs of up to 3 cm. The beams were incident perpendicular to the phantoms surface with initial particle energies ranging from 50 to 250 MeV/A with a total number of 10{sup 7} ions per beam. For comparison a special evaluation software was developed calculating the gamma indices for dose distributions. Results: In homogeneous phantoms, maximum range deviations between PB and MC of less than 1.1% and differences in the width of the distal energy falloff of the Bragg-Peak from 80% to 20% of less than 0.1 mm were found. Heterogeneous phantoms using layered slabs satisfied a {gamma}-index criterion of 2%/2mm of the local value except for some single voxels. For more complex phantoms using laterally arranged bone-air slabs, the {gamma}-index criterion was exceeded in some areas giving a maximum {gamma}-index of 1.75 and 4.9% of the voxels showed {gamma}-index values larger than one. The calculation precision of the presented algorithm was considered to be sufficient for clinical practice. Although only data for helium beams was presented, the performance of the pencil beam algorithm for proton beams was comparable. Conclusions: The pencil beam algorithm developed for helium ions presents a suitable tool for dose calculations. Its calculation speed was evaluated to be similar to other published pencil beam algorithms. The flexible design allows easy customization of measured depth-dose distributions and use of varying beam profiles, thus making it a promising candidate for integration into future treatment planning systems. Current work in progress deals with RBE effects of helium ions to complete the model.

Fuchs, Hermann; Stroebele, Julia; Schreiner, Thomas; Hirtl, Albert; Georg, Dietmar [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria) and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna (Austria) and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); PEG MedAustron, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria) and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

Beam hosing instability in overdense plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transverse stability of the drive beam is critical to plasma wakefield accelerators. A long, relativistic particle beam propagating in an overdense plasma is subject to beam envelope modulation and hosing (centroid displacement) instabilities. Coupled equations for the beam centroid and envelope are derived. The growth rate for beam hosing is examined including return current effects (where the beam radius is of order the plasma skin depth) in the long-beam, strongly-coupled, overdense regime.

Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Gruener, F. J.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

248

The Gas Flow from the Gas Attenuator to the Beam Line  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gas leak from the gas attenuator to the main beam line of the Linac Coherent Light Source has been evaluated, with the effect of the Knudsen molecular beam included. It has been found that the gas leak from the gas attenuator of the present design, with nitrogen as a working gas, does not exceed 10{sup -5} torr x l/s even at the highest pressure in the main attenuation cell (20 torr).

Ryutov, D.D.

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

249

Broad-band beam buncher  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A broad-band beam buncher is disclosed, comprising an evacuated housing, an electron gun therein for producing an electron beam, a buncher cavity having entrance and exit openings through which the beam is directed, grids across such openings, a source providing a positive DC voltage between the cavity and the electron gun, a drift tube through which the electron beam travels in passing through such cavity, grids across the ends of such drift tube, gaps being provided between the drift tube grids and the entrance and exit grids, a modulator for supplying an ultrahigh frequency modulating signal to the drift tube for producing velocity modulation of the electrons in the beam, a drift space in the housing through which the velocity modulated electron beam travels and in which the beam is bunched, and a discharge opening from such drift tube and having a grid across such opening through which the bunched electron beam is discharged into an accelerator or the like. The buncher cavity and the drift tube may be arranged to constitute an extension of a coaxial transmission line which is employed to deliver the modulating signal from a signal source. The extended transmission line may be terminated in its characteristic impedance to afford a broad-band response and the device as a whole designed to effect broad-band beam coupling, so as to minimize variations of the output across the response band.

Goldberg, David A. (Walnut Creek, CA); Flood, William S. (Berkeley, CA); Arthur, Allan A. (Martinez, CA); Voelker, Ferdinand (Orinda, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Properties of Inconel 625 Mesh Structures Grown by Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Relationships between electron beam parameters (beam current, beam speed, and beam focus) and physical properties (mass, diameter, elastic modulus, and yield strength) have been investigated for Inconel 625 mesh cubes fabricated using an additive manufacturing technology based on electron beam melting. The elastic modulus and yield strength of the mesh cubes have been systematically varied by approximately a factor of ten by changing the electron beam parameters. Simple models have been used to understand better these relationships. Structural anisotropies of the mesh associated with the layered build architecture have been observed and may contribute, along with microstructural anisotropies, to the anisotropic mechanical properties of the mesh. Knowledge of this kind is likely applicable to other metal and alloy systems and is essential to rapidly realize the full potential of this burgeoning technology.

List III, Frederick Alyious [ORNL; Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL; Lowe, Larry E [ORNL; Sames, William J [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Ion source for high-precision mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is directed to a method for increasing the precision of positive-ion relative abundance measurements conducted in a sector mass spectrometer having an ion source for directing a beam of positive ions onto a collimating slit. The method comprises incorporating in the source an electrostatic lens assembly for providing a positive-ion beam of circular cross section for collimation by the slit. 2 figures, 3 tables.

Todd, P.J.; McKown, H.S.; Smith, D.H.

1982-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

252

Accelerators, Beams And Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators And Beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

253

Laser acceleration of ion beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider methods of charged particle acceleration by means of high-intensity lasers. As an application we discuss a laser booster for heavy ion beams provided, e.g. by the Dubna nuclotron. Simple estimates show that a cascade of crossed laser beams would be necessary to provide additional acceleration to gold ions of the order of GeV/nucleon.

I. A. Egorova; A. V. Filatov; A. V. Prozorkevich; S. A. Smolyansky; D. B. Blaschke; M. Chubaryan

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Tunable source of terahertz radiation using molecular modulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tunable source of terahertz radiation using molecular modulation D. D. Yavuz* and J. J. Weber a high power and widely tunable coher- ent source of THz radiation remains a very challenging task of terahertz (THz) radiation that is based on Raman down-shifting of an infrared laser beam using highly

Yavuz, Deniz

255

Toward automated beam optics control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have begun a program aiming toward automatic control of charged-particle beam optics using artificial intelligence programming techniques. In developing our prototype, we are working with LISP machines and the KEE expert system shell. Our first goal was to develop a ''mouseable'' representation of a typical beam line. This responds actively to changes entered from the mouse or keyboard, giving an updated display of the beam line itself, its optical properties, and the instrumentation and control devices as seen by the operater. We have incorporated TRANSPORT, written in Fortran but running as a callable procedure in the LISP environment, for simulation of the beam-line optics. This paper describes the experience gained in meeting our first goal and discusses plans to extend the work so that it is usable, in realtime, on an operating beam line. 11 refs.

Silbar, R.R.; Schultz, D.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Simulation of multicomponent evaporation in electron beam melting and refining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental results and a mathematical model are presented to describe differential evaporation rates in electron beam melting of titanium alloys containing aluminum and vanadium. Experiments characterized the evaporation rate of commercially pure titanium, and vapor composition over titanium with up to 6% Al and 4.5% V content as a function of beam power, scan frequency and background pressure. The model is made up of a steady-state heat and mass transport model of a melting hearth and a model of transient thermal and flow behavior near the surface. Activity coefficients for aluminum and vanadium in titanium are roughly estimated by fitting model parameters to experimental results. Based on the ability to vary evaporation rate by 10-15% using scan frequency alone, we discuss the possibility of on-line composition control by means of intelligent manipulation of the electron beam.

Powell, A.; Szekely, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Van Den Avyle, J.; Damkroger, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

The COMPASS Setup for Physics with Hadron Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main characteristics of the COMPASS experimental setup for physics with hadron beams are described. This setup was designed to perform exclusive measurements of processes with several charged and/or neutral particles in the final state. Making use of a large part of the apparatus that was previously built for spin structure studies with a muon beam, it also features a new target system as well as new or upgraded detectors. The hadron setup is able to operate at the high incident hadron flux available at CERN. It is characterised by large angular and momentum coverages, large and nearly flat acceptances, and good two and three-particle mass resolutions. In 2008 and 2009 it was successfully used with positive and negative hadron beams and with liquid hydrogen and solid nuclear targets. This article describes the new and upgraded detectors and auxiliary equipment, outlines the reconstruction procedures used, and summarises the general performance of the setup.

Abbon, Ph.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, M.G.; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E.R.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Buchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Ciliberti, P.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S.U.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Cotte, D.; Crespo, M.L.; Curiel, Q.; Dafni, T.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Desforge, D.; Dinkelbach, A.M.; Donskov, S.V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Durand, D.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; M. Finger jr; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; von Hohenesche, N. du Fresne; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Gatignon, L.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giganon, A.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmuller, S.; Grasso, A.; Gregori, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hahne, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F.H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Hoppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Jorg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuss, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kramer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kuhn, R.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R.P.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G.K.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Menon, G.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Moinester, M.A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.D.; Nunes, Ana Sofia; Olshevsky, A.G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pesaro, G.; Pesaro, V.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Pires, C.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Reymond, J-M.; Rocco, E.; Rossiyskaya, N.S.; Rousse, J.Y.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Rychter, A.; Samartsev, A.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schluter, T.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schonning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Wolbeek, J. ter; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Virius, M.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Weitzel, Q.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Impact load mitigation in sandwich beams using local resonators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic response of sandwich beams with resonators embedded in the cores subjected to impact loads is studied. Using finite element models the effectiveness of various local resonator frequencies under a given impact load is compared to the behavior of an equivalent mass beam. It is shown that addition of appropriately chosen local resonators into the sandwich beam is an effective method of improving its flexural bending behavior under impact loads. The effect of a given local resonance frequency under different impact load durations is also studied. It is demonstrated that the choice of appropriate local resonance frequency depends on the impact duration. Further, by performing transverse impact experiments, the finite element models are verified and the advantage of using internal resonators under impact loading conditions is demonstrated.

Sharma, B

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Excited-Level Lifetimes and Hyperfine-Structure Measurements on Ions using Collinear Laser Ion-Beam Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resolve isotopic beams of Ca+ or Cl+. However, each isotopic mass had a different velocity, and hence Doppler shift, following subsequent acceleration to and within the DSS. Consequently ion isotopes other than the dominant iso- tope had significantly...

Jin, J.; Church, David A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Ultra High Mass Range Mass Spectrometer System  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Applicant's present invention comprises mass spectrometer systems that operate in a mass range from 1 to 10.sup.16 DA. The mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system comprising an aerodynamic lens system, a reverse jet being a gas flux generated in an annulus moving in a reverse direction and a multipole ion guide; a digital ion trap; and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises a quadrupole mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system having a quadrupole mass filter and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises an inlet system for use with a mass spectrometer system, a method for slowing energetic particles using an inlet system. Applicant's present invention also comprises a detector device and a method for detecting high mass charged particles.

Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

AN ADJUSTABLE THICKNESS Li/Be TARGET FOR FRAGMENTATION OF 3-kW HEAVY ION BEAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the target and is carried away by the recirculating liquid lithium loop. It is designed for high power beams in the mass range from oxygen to calcium. Tapered beryllium windows combined with a uniform thickness lithium power of up to 3 kW is currently under construction for use with beams from oxygen to calcium

Harilal, S. S.

262

Electrostatic wire stabilizing a charged particle beam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In combination with a charged particle beam generator and accelerator, apparatus and method are provided for stabilizing a beam of electrically charged particles. A guiding means, disposed within the particle beam, has an electric charge induced upon it by the charged particle beam. Because the sign of the electric charge on the guiding means and the sign of the particle beam are opposite, the particles are attracted toward and cluster around the guiding means to thereby stabilize the particle beam as it travels.

Prono, D.S.; Caporaso, G.J.; Briggs, R.J.

1983-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

263

All Beams 2013.xls  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICE OF RESEARCHThermal Solar Thermal SolarMass (amu) A MeV

264

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Wednesday, 26 July 2006 00:00 Silicon-based transistors are well-understood,...

265

Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method are disclosed for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: (1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and (2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1,000 {micro}m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 {micro}m diameter of laser drilling. 5 figs.

Elmer, J.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

1996-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

266

Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: 1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and 2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1000 .mu.m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 .mu.m diameter of laser drilling.

Elmer, John W. (Pleasanton, CA); O'Brien, Dennis W. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Alight a beam and beaming light: A theme with variations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of light (coherent and incoherent) with charged particle beams is explored in various configurations: incoherent scattering of coherent light (laser) from an incoherent particle beam (high temperature), coherent scattering of coherent light (laser) from a {open_quotes}cold{close_quotes} (bunched) beam, femtosecond generation of particle and light beams via {open_quotes}optical slicing{close_quotes} and Thomson/Compton scattering techniques, etc. The domains of ultrashort temporal duration (femtoseconds) as well as ultrashort wavelengths (x rays and shorter), with varying degrees of coherence, are explored. The relevance to a few critical areas of research in the natural sciences, e.g., ultrafast material, chemical and biological processes, protein folding, particle phase space cooling, etc. are touched upon. All the processes discussed involve proper interpretation and understanding of coherent states of matter and radiation, as well as the quality and quantity of information and energy embedded in them. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

Chattopadhyay, S. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California94720 (United States)] [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California94720 (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Molecular gas in nearby elliptical radio galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Powerful radio-AGN are hosted by massive elliptical galaxies which are usually very poor in molecular gas. Nevertheless the central Black Hole (BH) needs molecular gas for the nuclear activity. Thus it is important to study the origin, the distribution and the kinematics of the molecular gas in such objects. We have performed at the IRAM-30m telescope a survey of the CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) emission in the most powerful radio galaxies of the Local Universe, selected only on the basis of their radio continuum fluxes. The main result of that survey is the low content in molecular gas of such galaxies compared to Seyfert galaxies. The median value of the molecular gas mass is 4x10^8 Msun. Moreover, the CO spectra indicate the presence of a central molecular gas disk in some of these radio galaxies. We complemented this survey with photometric data of SPITZER and IRAS fluxes with the purpose to study the dust and its relation with the molecular gas and AGN.

B. Ocana-Flaquer; S. Leon; J. Lim; F. Combes; Dinh-V-Trung

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

PURIFICATION OF IRIDIUM BY ELECTRON BEAM MELTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purification of iridium metal by electron beam melting has been characterized for 48 impurity elements. Chemical analysis was performed by glow discharge mass spectrographic (GDMS) analysis for all elements except carbon, which was analyzed by combustion. The average levels of individual elemental impurities in the starting powder varied from 37 g/g to 0.02 g/g. The impurity elements Li, Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, Tl, Pb, and Bi were not detectable following the purification. No significant change in concentration of the elements Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Re was found. The elements B, C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Ru, Rh, and Pt were partially removed by vaporization during electron beam melting. Langmuir's equation for ideal vaporization into a vacuum was used to calculate for each impurity element the expected ratio of impurity content after melting to that before melting. Equilibrium vapor pressures were calculated using Henry's law, with activity coefficients obtained from published data for the elements Fe, Ti, and Pt. Activity coefficients were estimated from enthalpy data for Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Hf and an ideal solution model was used for the remaining elements. The melt temperature was determined from measured iridium weight loss. Excellent agreement was found between measured and calculated impurity ratios for all impurity elements. The results are consistent with some localized heating of the melt pool due to rastering of the electron beam, with an average vaporization temperature of 3100 K as compared to a temperature of 2965 K calculated for uniform heating of the melt pool. The results are also consistent with ideal mixing in the melt pool.

Ohriner, Evan Keith [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

MOLECULAR GAS IN LUMINOUS GALACTIC NUCLEI N. Z. SCOVILLE AND A. J. BAKER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MOLECULAR GAS IN LUMINOUS GALACTIC NUCLEI N. Z. SCOVILLE AND A. J. BAKER California Institute­wave interferometry has clearly shown the existence of enormous masses (10 9 \\Gamma 10 10 M fi ) of molecular gas. In these systems, molecular gas is an obvious source of fuel for nuclear starbursts and active galactic nuclei (AGN

Baker, Andrew J.

271

Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location.

Garnett, Robert W. (Los Alamos, NM); Dobelbower, M. Christian (Toledo, OH)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location. 26 figs.

Garnett, R.W.; Dobelbower, M.C.

1995-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

273

Molecular information ratchets   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the emerging aield of molecular machines, a molecular ratchet is a chemical system that allows the positional displacement of a submolecular component of be captured and directionally relea ...

Wilson, Adam Christopher

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

274

Mass spectrometric immunoassay  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

Nelson, Randall W; Williams, Peter; Krone, Jennifer Reeve

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

275

Mass spectrometric immunoassay  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

Nelson, Randall W (Phoenix, AZ); Williams, Peter (Phoenix, AZ); Krone, Jennifer Reeve (Granbury, TX)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

276

Confined energy distribution for charged particle beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A charged particle beam is formed to a relatively larger area beam which is well-contained and has a beam area which relatively uniformly deposits energy over a beam target. Linear optics receive an accelerator beam and output a first beam with a first waist defined by a relatively small size in a first dimension normal to a second dimension. Nonlinear optics, such as an octupole magnet, are located about the first waist and output a second beam having a phase-space distribution which folds the beam edges along the second dimension toward the beam core to develop a well-contained beam and a relatively uniform particle intensity across the beam core. The beam may then be expanded along the second dimension to form the uniform ribbon beam at a selected distance from the nonlinear optics. Alternately, the beam may be passed through a second set of nonlinear optics to fold the beam edges in the first dimension. The beam may then be uniformly expanded along the first and second dimensions to form a well-contained, two-dimensional beam for illuminating a two-dimensional target with a relatively uniform energy deposition.

Jason, Andrew J. (Los Alamos, NM); Blind, Barbara (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Center for Beam Physics, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Neutron beam testing of triblades  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PowerXCell 8i processors and Opterons in four IBM Triblades were tested at LANSCE. The hazard rate when the beam was aimed at the Opterons was higher than when it was aimed at the Cell processors.

Michalak, Sarah E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, Andrew J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Storlie, Curtis B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rust, William N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Modl, David G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quinn, Heather M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Blanchard, Sean P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manuzzato, Andrea [UNIV DEGLI STUDI DI PADOVA ITALY

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

STOCHASTIC COOLING FOR BUNCHED BEAMS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Problems associated with bunched beam stochastic cooling are reviewed. A longitudinal stochastic cooling system for RHIC is under construction and has been partially commissioned. The state of the system and future plans are discussed.

BLASKIEWICZ, M.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

280

Beam bunch feedback  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When the electromagnetic fields that are excited by the passage of a bundle of charged particles persist to act upon bunches that follow, then the motions of the bunches are coupled. This action between bunches circulating on a closed orbit can generate growing patterns of bunch excursions. Such growth can often be suppressed by feedback systems that detect the excursion and apply corrective forces to the bunches. To be addressed herein is feedback that acts on motions of the bunch body centers. In addition to being useful for suppressing the spontaneous growth of coupled-bunch motions, such feedback can be used to damp transients in bunches injected into an accelerator or storage ring; for hadrons which lack strong radiation damping, feedback is needed to avoid emittance growth through decoherence. Motions excited by noise in magnetic fields or accelerating rf can also be reduced by using this feedback. Whether the action is on motions that are transverse to the closed orbit or longitudinal, the arrangement is the same. Bunch position is detected by a pickup and that signal is processed and directed to a kicker that may act upon the same bunch or some other portion of the collective beam pattern. Transverse motion is an oscillation with angular frequency {nu}{perpendicular}{omega}{sub o} where {omega}{sub o} is the orbital frequency 2{pi}{line_integral}o. Longitudinal synchrotron oscillation occurs at frequency {omega} {sub s} = {nu}{sub s}{omega}{sub o}. The former is much more rapid, {nu}{perpendicular} being on the order of 10 while {nu}{sub s} is typically about 10{sup minus 1} to 10 {sup minus 2}.

Lambertson, G.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Single lens laser beam shaper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single lens bullet-shaped laser beam shaper capable of redistributing an arbitrary beam profile into any desired output profile comprising a unitary lens comprising: a convex front input surface defining a focal point and a flat output portion at the focal point; and b) a cylindrical core portion having a flat input surface coincident with the flat output portion of the first input portion at the focal point and a convex rear output surface remote from the convex front input surface.

Liu, Chuyu (Newport News, VA); Zhang, Shukui (Yorktown, VA)

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

282

Search for Lepton Number Violating Charged Current Processes with Neutrino Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new idea to test a class of loop-induced neutrino mass mechanisms by searching for lepton number violating charged current processes with incident of a neutrino beam. The expected rates of these processes are estimated based on some theoretical assumptions. They turn out to be sizable so that detection of such processes could be possible at near detectors in future highly intense neutrino-beam facilities.

Shinya Kanemura; Yoshitaka Kuno; Toshihiko Ota

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

283

Mass Spectral Molecular Networking of Living Microbial Colonies...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Living Microbial Colonies. Abstract: Integrating the governing chemistry with the genomics and phenotypes of microbial colonies has been a "holy grail" in...

284

Electron beam diagnostic for profiling high power beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for characterizing high power electron beams at power levels of 10 kW and above is described. This system is comprised of a slit disk assembly having a multitude of radial slits, a conducting disk with the same number of radial slits located below the slit disk assembly, a Faraday cup assembly located below the conducting disk, and a start-stop target located proximate the slit disk assembly. In order to keep the system from over-heating during use, a heat sink is placed in close proximity to the components discussed above, and an active cooling system, using water, for example, can be integrated into the heat sink. During use, the high power beam is initially directed onto a start-stop target and after reaching its full power is translated around the slit disk assembly, wherein the beam enters the radial slits and the conducting disk radial slits and is detected at the Faraday cup assembly. A trigger probe assembly can also be integrated into the system in order to aid in the determination of the proper orientation of the beam during reconstruction. After passing over each of the slits, the beam is then rapidly translated back to the start-stop target to minimize the amount of time that the high power beam comes in contact with the slit disk assembly. The data obtained by the system is then transferred into a computer system, where a computer tomography algorithm is used to reconstruct the power density distribution of the beam.

Elmer, John W. (Danville, CA); Palmer, Todd A. (Livermore, CA); Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA)

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

285

On the emergence of molecular structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structure of (a{sup {+-}},a{sup {+-}},b{sup {+-}})-type Coulombic systems is characterized by the effective ground-state density of the a-type particles, computed via nonrelativistic quantum mechanics without introduction of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. A structural transition is observed when varying the relative mass of the a- and b-type particles, e.g., between atomic H{sup -} and molecular H{sub 2}{sup +}. The particle-density profile indicates a molecular-type behavior for the positronium ion, Ps{sup -}.

Matyus, Edit; Reiher, Markus [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zuerich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Hutter, Juerg [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Mueller-Herold, Ulrich [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 16, CH-8092 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Characterization of polymeric films subjected to lithium ion beam irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two different polymeric materials that are candidate materials for use as binders for mixed uranium–plutonium oxide nuclear fuel pellets were subjected to Li ion beam irradiation, in order to simulate intense alpha irradiation. The materials (a polyethylene glycol 8000 and a microcrystalline wax) were then analyzed using a combination of mass spectrometry (MS) approaches and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Samples of the irradiated PEG materials were dissolved in H2O and then analyzed using electrospray ionization-MS, which showed the formation of a series of small oligomers in addition to intact large PEG oligomers. The small oligomers were likely formed by radiation-induced homolytic scissions of the C–O and C–C bonds, which furnish radical intermediates that react by radical recombination with Hradical dot and OHradical dot. Surface analysis using SIMS revealed a heterogeneous surface that contained not only PEG-derived polymers, but also hydrocarbon-based entities that are likely surface contaminants. XPS of the irradiated PEG samples indicated the emergence of different carbon species, with peak shifts suggesting the presence of sp2 carbon atoms. Analysis of the paraffinic film using XPS showed the emergence of oxygen on the surface of the sample, and also a broadening and shifting of the C1s peak, demonstrating a change in the chemistry on the surface. The paraffinic film did not dissolve in either H2O or a H2O–methanol solution, and hence the bulk of the material could not be analyzed using electrospray. However a series of oligomers was leached from the bulk material that produced ion series in the ESI-MS analyses that were identified octylphenyl ethoxylate oligomers. Upon Li ion bombardment, these shifted to a lower average molecular weight, but more importantly showed the emergence of three new ion series that are being formed as a result of radiation damage. Surface analysis of the paraffinic polymers using SIMS produced spectra that were wholly dominated by hydrocarbon ion series, and no difference was observed between unirradiated and irradiated samples. The studies demonstrate that for the PEG-based polymers, direct evidence for radiolytic scission can be observed using ESI-MS, and suggests that both radiolytic pathways and efficiencies as a function of dose should be measurable by calibrating instrument response to the small oligomeric degradation products.

Gary S. Groenewold; W. Roger Cannon; Paul A. Lessing; Recep Avci; Muhammedin Deliorman; Mark Wolfenden; Doug W. Akers; J. Keith Jewell

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Dictyostelium discoideum Aggregation Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High resolution imaging mass spectrometry could become a valuable tool for cell and developmental biology, but both, high spatial and mass spectral resolution are needed to enable this. In this report, we employed Bi3 bombardment time-of-flight (Bi3 ToF-SIMS) and C60 bombardment Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance secondary ion mass spectrometry (C60 FTICR-SIMS) to image Dictyostelium discoideum aggregation streams. Nearly 300 lipid species were identified from the aggregation streams. High resolution mass spectrometry imaging (FTICR-SIMS) enabled the generation of multiple molecular ion maps at the nominal mass level and provided good coverage for fatty acyls, prenol lipids, and sterol lipids. The comparison of Bi3 ToF-SIMS and C60 FTICR-SIMS suggested that while the first provides fast, high spatial resolution molecular ion images, the chemical complexity of biological samples warrants the use of high resolution analyzers for accurate ion identification.

Debord, J. Daniel; Smith, Donald F.; Anderton, Christopher R.; Heeren, Ronald M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Gomer, Richard H.; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco A.

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

288

Molecular Gas in nearby Early-Type Powerful Classical Radio Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a survey for molecular gas in nearby powerful radio galaxies. Eight of the eighteen radio galaxies observed were detected with molecular masses in the range 10^7--10^9 Msun, similar to the same survey we performed towards 3C radio galaxies. The upper limits of molecular gas in the remainder are typically of 10^8 Msun, indicating that very few radiogalaxies have molecular gas reservoir with more than 10^9 Msun.

Stephane Leon; Jeremy Lim; Francoise Combes; Dinh-V-Trung

2002-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

289

Nufact 2008 The Beta Beam WP Beta beam R&D status  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nufact 2008 The Beta Beam WP Nufact 08 1 Beta beam R&D status Elena Wildner, CERN on behalf of the Beta Beam Study Group EURISOL/Euronu #12;Nufact 2008 The Beta Beam WP Nufact08Nufact08 Outline Recall, EURISOL Ion Production Loss Management Improvements New Program, EuroNu 2 #12;Nufact 2008 The Beta Beam WP

McDonald, Kirk

290

A Timoshenko beam theory with pressure corrections for layered orthotropic beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Timoshenko beam theory with pressure corrections for layered orthotropic beams Graeme J. Kennedya of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA Abstract A Timoshenko beam theory for layered orthotropic beams and rotation variables that provide the kinematic description of the beam, stress and strain moments used

Papalambros, Panos

291

Molecular electrostatic potentials by systematic molecular fragmentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simple method is presented for estimating the molecular electrostatic potential in and around molecules using systematic molecular fragmentation. This approach estimates the potential directly from the electron density. The accuracy of the method is established for a set of organic molecules and ions. The utility of the approach is demonstrated by estimating the binding energy of a water molecule in an internal cavity in the protein ubiquitin.

Reid, David M.; Collins, Michael A. [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)] [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

292

REQUIREMENTS AND GUIDELINES FOR NSLS EXPERIMENTAL BEAM LINE VACUUM SYSTEMS-REVISION B.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Typical beam lines are comprised of an assembly of vacuum valves and shutters referred to as a ''front end'', optical elements to monochromatize, focus and split the photon beam, and an experimental area where a target sample is placed into the photon beam and data from the interaction is detected and recorded. Windows are used to separate sections of beam lines that are not compatible with storage ring ultra high vacuum. Some experimental beam lines share a common vacuum with storage rings. Sections of beam lines are only allowed to vent up to atmospheric pressure using pure nitrogen gas after a vacuum barrier is established to protect ring vacuum. The front end may only be bled up when there is no current in the machine. This is especially true on the VUV storage ring where for most experiments, windows are not used. For the shorter wavelength, more energetic photons of the x-ray ring, beryllium windows are used at various beam line locations so that the monochromator, mirror box or sample chamber may be used in a helium atmosphere or rough vacuum. The window separates ring vacuum from the environment of the downstream beam line components. The stored beam lifetime in the storage rings and the maintenance of desirable reflection properties of optical surfaces depend upon hydrocarbon-free, ultra-high vacuum systems. Storage ring vacuum systems will operate at pressures of {approximately} 1 x 10{sup {minus}10} Torr without beam and {approximately} 1 x 10{sup {minus}9} Torr with beam. Systems are free of hydrocarbons in the sense that no pumps, valves, etc. containing organics are used. Components are all-metal, chemically cleaned and bakeable. To the extent that beam lines share a common vacuum with the storage ring, the same criteria will hold for beam line components. The design philosophy for NSLS beam lines is to use all-metal, hydrocarbon-free front end components and recommend that experimenters use this approach for common vacuum hardware downstream of front ends. O-ring-sealed valves, if used, are not permitted upstream of the monochromator exit aperture. It will be the responsibility of users to demonstrate that their experiment will not degrade the pressure or quality of the storage ring vacuum. As a matter of operating policy, all beam lines will be monitored for prescribed pressure and the contribution of high mass gases to this pressure each time a beam line has been opened to ring vacuum.

FOERSTER,C.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Physics Opportunities with Meson Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the past two decades, meson photo- and electro-production data of unprecedented quality and quantity have been measured at electromagnetic facilities worldwide. By contrast, the meson-beam data for the same hadronic final states are mostly outdated and largely of poor quality, or even nonexistent, and thus provide inadequate input to help interpret, analyze, and exploit the full potential of the new electromagnetic data. To reap the full benefit of the high-precision electromagnetic data, new high-statistics data from measurements with meson beams, with good angle and energy coverage for a wide range of reactions, are critically needed to advance our knowledge in baryon and meson spectroscopy and other related areas of hadron physics. To address this situation, a state of-the-art meson-beam facility needs to be constructed. The present paper summarizes unresolved issues in hadron physics and outlines the vast opportunities and advances that only become possible with such a facility.

Briscoe, William J; Haberzettl, Helmut; Manley, D Mark; Naruki, Megumi; Strakovsky, Igor I; Swanson, Eric S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Effect of Beam-Beam Interactions on Stability of Coherent Oscillations in a Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to achieve peak luminosity of a muon collider in the 10{sup 34}/cm{sup 2}/s range the number of muons per bunch should be of the order of a few units of 10{sup 12} rendering the beam-beam parameter as high as 0.1 per IP. Such strong beam-beam interaction can be a source of instability if the working point is chosen close to a coherent beam-beam resonance. On the other hand, the beam-beam tunespread can provide a mechanism of suppression of the beam-wall driven instabilities. In this report the coherent instabilities driven by beam-beam and beam-wall interactions are studied with the help of BBSS code for the case of 1.5 TeV c.o.m muon collider.

Alexahin, Y.; /Fermilab; Ohmi, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Survey of Collective Instabilities and Beam-Plasma Interactions in Intense Heavy Ion Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H. Qin, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 4, 104401 (2001). [30] S.Davidson, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 5, 021001 (2002). [31]Channell, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 2, 074401 (1999); [32

Davidson, Ronald C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Elbow mass flow meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Elbow mass flow meter. The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity.

McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); Ortiz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Nonparaxial Mathieu and Weber accelerating beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally nonparaxial Mathieu and Weber accelerating beams, generalizing the concept of previously found accelerating beams. We show that such beams bend into large angles along circular, elliptical or parabolic trajectories but still retain nondiffracting and self-healing capabilities. The circular nonparaxial accelerating beams can be considered as a special case of the Mathieu accelerating beams, while an Airy beam is only a special case of the Weber beams at the paraxial limit. Not only generalized nonparaxial accelerating beams open up many possibilities of beam engineering for applications, but the fundamental concept developed here can be applied to other linear wave systems in nature, ranging from electromagnetic and elastic waves to matter waves.

Peng Zhang; Yi Hu; Tongcang Li; Drake Cannan; Xiaobo Yin; Roberto Morandotti; Zhigang Chen; Xiang Zhang

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

298

Water in the envelopes and disks around young high-mass stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single-dish spectra and interferometric maps of (sub)mm lines of H2O-18 and HDO are used to study the chemistry of water in eight regions of high-mass star formation. The spectra indicate HDO excitation temperatures of ~110 K and column densities in an 11'' beam of ~2x10^14 cm^-2 for HDO and ~2x10^17 cm^-2 for H2O, with the N(HDO)/N(H2O) ratio increasing with decreasing temperature. Simultaneous observations of CH3OH and SO2 indicate that 20-50% of the single-dish line flux arises in the molecular outflows of these objects. The outflow contribution to the H2O-18 and HDO emission is estimated to be 10-20%. Radiative transfer models indicate that the water abundance is low (~10^-6) outside a critical radius corresponding to a temperature in the protostellar envelope of ~100 K, and `jumps' to H2O/H2 ~ 10^-4 inside this radius. This value corresponds to the observed abundance of solid water and together with the derived HDO/H2O abundance ratios of ~1/1000 suggests that the origin of the observed water is evaporation of grain mantles. This idea is confirmed in the case of AFGL 2591 by interferometer observations of HDO, H2O-18 and SO2 lines, which reveal compact (~800 AU) emission with a systematic velocity gradient. This size is similar to that of the 1.3 mm continuum towards AFGL 2591, from which we estimate a mass of ~0.8 M0, or ~5% of the mass of the central star. We speculate that we may be observing a circumstellar disk in an almost face-on orientation.

Floris van der Tak; Malcolm Walmsley; Fabrice Herpin; Cecilia Ceccarelli

2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

299

Finding beam focus errors automatically  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An automated method for finding beam focus errors using an optimization program called COMFORT-PLUS. The steps involved in finding the correction factors using COMFORT-PLUS has been used to find the beam focus errors for two damping rings at the SLAC Linear Collider. The program is to be used as an off-line program to analyze actual measured data for any SLC system. A limitation on the application of this procedure is found to be that it depends on the magnitude of the machine errors. Another is that the program is not totally automated since the user must decide a priori where to look for errors. (LEW)

Lee, M.J.; Clearwater, S.H.; Kleban, S.D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Shimmed electron beam welding process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A modified electron beam welding process effects welding of joints between superalloy materials by inserting a weldable shim in the joint and heating the superalloy materials with an electron beam. The process insures a full penetration of joints with a consistent percentage of filler material and thereby improves fatigue life of the joint by three to four times as compared with the prior art. The process also allows variable shim thickness and joint fit-up gaps to provide increased flexibility for manufacturing when joining complex airfoil structures and the like.

Feng, Ganjiang (Clifton Park, NY); Nowak, Daniel Anthony (Alplaus, NY); Murphy, John Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Hydrodynamic Efficiency of Ablation Propulsion with Pulsed Ion Beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the hydrodynamic efficiency of ablation plasma produced by pulsed ion beam on the basis of the ion beam-target interaction. We used a one-dimensional hydrodynamic fluid compressible to study the physics involved namely an ablation acceleration behavior and analyzed it as a rocketlike model in order to investigate its hydrodynamic variables for propulsion applications. These variables were estimated by the concept of ablation driven implosion in terms of ablated mass fraction, implosion efficiency, and hydrodynamic energy conversion. Herein, the energy conversion efficiency of 17.5% was achieved. In addition, the results show maximum energy efficiency of the ablation process (ablation efficiency) of 67% meaning the efficiency with which pulsed ion beam energy-ablation plasma conversion. The effects of ion beam energy deposition depth to hydrodynamic efficiency were briefly discussed. Further, an evaluation of propulsive force with high specific impulse of 4000s, total impulse of 34mN and momentum to energy ratio in the range of {mu}N/W was also analyzed.

Buttapeng, Chainarong; Yazawa, Masaru; Harada, Nobuhiro [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1, Kamitomioka, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan); Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi [Extreme Energy-Density Research Institute, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1, Kamitomioka, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)

2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

302

Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

State-to-state dynamics of molecular energy transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this research program is to elucidate the elementary dynamical mechanisms of vibrational and rotational energy transfer between molecules, at a quantum-state resolved level of detail. Molecular beam techniques are used to isolate individual molecular collisions, and to control the kinetic energy of collision. Lasers are used both to prepare specific quantum states prior to collision by stimulated-emission pumping (SEP), and to measure the distribution of quantum states in the collision products by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The results are interpreted in terms of dynamical models, which may be cast in a classical, semiclassical or quantum mechanical framework, as appropriate.

Gentry, W.R.; Giese, C.F. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

MOLECULAR AND ATOMIC LINE SURVEYS OF GALAXIES. II. UNBIASED ESTIMATES OF THEIR STAR FORMATION MODE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We make use of our 'minimal' cold interstellar medium emission line model that predicts the molecular and atomic line emission per unit dense, star-forming gas mass to examine the utility of key line ratios in surveys of the so-called star formation 'mode' as traced by {xi}{sub SF} = M{sub dense}(H{sub 2})/M{sub total}(H{sub 2}). We argue that {xi}{sub SF} and its proxies provide very sensitive, extinction-free discriminators of rapid starburst/merger-driven versus secular quiescent/disk-like stellar mass assembly, with the most promising diagnostic to be applied in the near-future being CO J(4 {yields} 3)/ [C I]({sup 3} P{sub 1} {yields} {sup 3} P{sub 0}). These lines are accessible across nearly the full range 0 < z < 2 (thus covering the bulk of galaxy evolution) with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array. In addition to their diagnostic power, another advantage of this combination is the similar observed frequencies ({Delta}{nu}{sub 0} Almost-Equal-To 30 GHz) of the lines, resulting in nearly spatially matched beams for a fixed aperture, thus mitigating the effects of resolution/morphology bias in the interpretation of galaxy-averaged line ratios. Finally, we discuss the capability of deep blind redshift surveys with the high-frequency component of the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) in discovering H{sub 2}-rich galaxies with very low {xi}{sub SF} values. These could be the progenitors of starburst galaxies seen prior to the onset of star formation; such galaxies could be a class of extreme outliers from local (gas surface density)-(star formation rate) scaling laws, which would exclude them from current star formation or stellar-mass-selected samples. Our conservative model suggests that SKA could detect such systems residing at z {approx} 3 at a rate of 20-200 hr{sup -1}.

Papadopoulos, Padelis P. [Max Planck Institute for Radioastronomy, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Geach, James E., E-mail: padelis@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de, E-mail: jimgeach@physics.mcgill.ca [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montreal Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

accidental beam loss: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

interaction of fields induced by the beam with their environment. Beam current transformers as well as beam position monitors are based on this principle. The signals induced...

306

Combining tissue-phantom ratios to provide a beam-quality specifier for flattening filter free photon beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: There are currently several commercially available radiotherapy treatment units without a flattening filter in the beam line. Unflattened photon beams have an energy and lateral fluence distribution that is different from conventional beams and, thus, their attenuation properties differ. As a consequence, for flattening filter free (FFF) beams, the relationship between the beam-quality specifier TPR{sub 20,10} and the Spencer–Attix restricted water-to-air mass collision stopping-power ratios, (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water}, may have to be refined in order to be used with equivalent accuracy as for beams with a flattening filter. The purpose of this work was twofold. First, to study the relationship between TPR{sub 20,10} and (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water} for FFF beams, where the flattening filter has been replaced by a metal plate as in most clinical FFF beams. Second, to investigate the potential of increasing the accuracy in determining (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water} by adding another beam-quality metric, TPR{sub 10,5}. The relationship between (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water} and %dd(10){sub x} for beams with and without a flattening filter was also included in this study. Methods: A total of 24 realistic photon beams (10 with and 14 without a flattening filter) from three different treatment units have been used to calculate (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water}, TPR{sub 20,10}, and TPR{sub 10,5} using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo package. The relationship between (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water} and the dual beam-quality specifier TPR{sub 20,10} and TPR{sub 10,5} was described by a simple bilinear equation. The relationship between the photon beam-quality specifier %dd(10){sub x} used in the AAPM’s TG-51 dosimetry protocol and (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water} was also investigated for the beams used in this study, by calculating the photon component of the percentage depth dose at 10 cm depth with SSD 100 cm. Results: The calculated (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water} for beams without a flattening filter was 0.3% lower, on average, than for beams with a flattening filter and comparable TPR{sub 20,10}. Using the relationship in IAEA, TRS-398 resulted in a root mean square deviation (RMSD) of 0.0028 with a maximum deviation of 0.0043 (0.39%) from Monte Carlo calculated values. For all beams in this study, the RMSD between the proposed model and the Monte Carlo calculated values was 0.0006 with a maximum deviation of 0.0013 (0.1%). Using an earlier proposed relationship [Xiong and Rogers, Med. Phys. 35, 2104–2109 (2008)] between %dd(10){sub x} and (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water} gave a RMSD of 0.0018 with a maximum deviation of 0.0029 (0.26%) for all beams in this study (compared to RMSD 0.0015 and a maximum deviation of 0.0048 (0.47%) for the relationship used in AAPM TG-51 published by Almond et al. [Med. Phys. 26, 1847–1870 (1999)]). Conclusions: Using TPR{sub 20,10} as a beam-quality specifier, for the flattening filter free beams used in this study, gave a maximum difference of 0.39% between (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water} predicted using IAEA TRS-398 and Monte Carlo calculations. An additional parameter for determining (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water} has been presented. This parameter is easy to measure; it requires only an additional dose measurement at 5 cm depth with SSD 95 cm, and provides information for accurate determination of the (L{sup -}/?){sub air}{sup water} ratio for beams both with and without a flattening filter at the investigated energies.

Dalaryd, Mårten, E-mail: Marten.Dalaryd@med.lu.se; Knöös, Tommy [Department of Clinical Sciences, Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 117, Lund SE-221 00, Sweden and Radiation Physics, Skåne University Hospital, Lund SE-221 85 (Sweden); Ceberg, Crister [Department of Clinical Sciences, Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 117, Lund SE-221 00 (Sweden)

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Molecular Hydrogen in Infrared Cirrus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We combine data from our recent FUSE survey of interstellar molecular hydrogen absorption toward 50 high-latitude AGN with COBE-corrected IRAS 100 micron emission maps to study the correlation of infrared cirrus with H2. A plot of the H2 column density vs. IR cirrus intensity shows the same transition in molecular fraction, f_H2, as seen with total hydrogen column density, N_H. This transition is usually attributed to H2 self-shielding, and it suggests that many diffuse cirrus clouds contain H2 in significant fractions, f_H2 = 1-30%. These clouds cover approximately 50% of the northern sky at latitudes b > 30 degrees, at temperature-corrected 100 micron intensities D_100 > 1.5 MJy/sr. The sheetlike cirrus clouds, with hydrogen densities n_H > 30 cm^-3, may be compressed by dynamical processes at the disk-halo interface, and they are conducive to H2 formation on grain surfaces. Exploiting the correlation between N(H2) and 100 micron intensity, we estimate that cirrus clouds at b > 30 contain approximately 3000 M_sun in H2. Extrapolated over the inner Milky Way, the cirrus may contain 10^7 M_sun of H2 and 10^8 M_sun in total gas mass. If elevated to 100 pc, their gravitational potential energy is ~10^53 erg.

Kristen Gillmon; J. Michael Shull

2005-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

308

ALLSMOG: an APEX Low-redshift Legacy Survey for MOlecular Gas. I - molecular gas scaling relations, and the effect of the CO/H2 conversion factor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present ALLSMOG, the APEX Low-redshift Legacy Survey for MOlecular Gas. ALLSMOG is a survey designed to observe the CO(2-1) emission line with the APEX telescope, in a sample of local galaxies (0.01 conversion factor. We find an increase in the H2/HI mass ratio with stellar mass which closely matches semi-analytic predictions. We find a mean molecular gas fraction for ALLSMOG galaxies of MH2/M* = (0.09 - 0.13),...

Bothwell, M S; Cicone, C; Maiolino, R; Møller, P; Aravena, M; De Breuck, C; Peng, Y; Espada, D; Hodge, J A; Impellizzeri, C M V; Martín, S; Riechers, D; Walter, F

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

On Gaussian Beams Described by Jacobi's Equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gaussian beams describe the amplitude and phase of rays and are widely used to model acoustic propagation. This paper describes four new results in the theory of Gaussian beams. (1) A new version of the ?ervený equations ...

Smith, Steven T.

310

Electron Beam--21st Century Food Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication explains electron beam irradiation technology to consumers, industry professionals and government officials. Electron beam irradiation is a method of treating food and other products for pathogens that might jeopardize food safety....

Vestal, Andy

2003-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

311

Autogenerator of beams of charged particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An autogenerating apparatus provides secondary intense relativistic current beam pulses in response to an injected beam pulse. One or more electromagnetic energy storage devices are provided in conjunction with gaps along a beam propagation path for the injected beam pulse. For injected beam pulses which are no longer than double the transit time of electromagnetic waves within the storage devices (which may be resonant cavities), distinct secondary beam pulses are generated by each of the energy storage devices. The beam propagation path, together with the one or more gaps provided therein, operates as a pulse forming transmission line cavity, in which the separate cavities associated with the gaps provide delays for electromagnetic waves generated at the gaps. After doubly traversing the cavity, the electromagnetic waves cause the gap to generate the secondary beam pulses, which are thus delayed by a time interval equal to the double transit time for the induced wave within the cavity.

Adler, R.J.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Miller, R.M.; Shope, S.L.; Smith, D.L.

1983-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Transport of elliptic intense charged -particle beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transport theory of high-intensity elliptic charged-particle beams is presented. In particular, the halo formation and beam loss problem associated with the high space charge and small-aperture structure is addressed, ...

Zhou, J. (Jing), 1978-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Adaptive phase measurements for narrowband squeezed beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have previously [Phys. Rev. A 65, 043803 (2002)] analyzed adaptive measurements for estimating the continuously varying phase of a coherent beam, and a broadband squeezed beam. A real squeezed beam must have finite photon flux N and hence can be significantly squeezed only over a limited frequency range. In this paper we analyze adaptive phase measurements of this type for a realistic model of a squeezed beam. We show that, provided it is possible to suitably choose the parameters of the beam, a mean-square phase uncertainty scaling as (N/kappa)^{-5/8} is possible, where kappa is the linewidth of the beam resulting from the fluctuating phase. This is an improvement over the (N/kappa)^{-1/2} scaling found previously for coherent beams. In the experimentally realistic case where there is a limit on the maximum squeezing possible, the variance will be reduced below that for coherent beams, though the scaling is unchanged.

Dominic W. Berry; Howard M. Wiseman

2006-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

314

Autogenerator of beams of charged particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An autogenerating apparatus provides secondary intense relativistic current beam pulses in response to an injected beam pulse. One or more electromagnetic energy storage devices are provided in conjunction with gaps along a beam propagation path for the injected beam pulse. For injected beam pulses which are no longer than double the transit time of electromagnetic waves within the storage devices (which may be resonant cavities), distinct secondary beam pulses are generated by each of the energy storage devices. The beam propagation path, together with the one or more gaps provided therein, operates as a pulse forming transmission line cavity, in which the separate cavities associated with the gaps provide delays for electromagnetic waves generated at the gaps. After doubly traversing the cavity, the electromagnetic waves cause the gap to generate the secondary beam pulses, which are thus delayed by a time interval equal to the double transit time for the induced wave within the cavity.

Adler, Richard J. (Albuquerque, NM); Mazarakis, Michael G. (Albuquerque, NM); Miller, Robert B. (Albuquerque, NM); Shope, Steven L. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, David L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Direct analysis of samples by mass spectrometry: From elements to bio-molecules using laser ablation inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass spectrometric methods that are able to analyze solid samples or biological materials with little or no sample preparation are invaluable to science as well as society. Fundamental research that has discovered experimental and instrumental parameters that inhibit fractionation effects that occur during the quantification of elemental species in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is described. Research that determines the effectiveness of novel laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric methods for the molecular analysis of biological tissues at atmospheric pressure and at high spatial resolution is also described. A spatial resolution is achieved that is able to analyze samples at the single cell level.

Perdian, David C.

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

316

Site control technique for quantum dots using electron beam induced deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To develop simple and high throughput sit definition technique for quantum dots (QDs), the electron beam induced deposition (EBID) method was used as desorption guide of phosphorus atoms form InP substrate. As the results one or a few indium (In) droplets (DLs) were created in the carbon grid pattern by thermal annealing at a temperature of 450°C for 10 min in the ultra high vacuum condition. The size of In DLs was larger than QDs, but arsenide DLs by molecular beam in growth chamber emitted wavelength of 1.028?m at 50K by photoluminescence measurement.

Iizuka, Kanji; Jung, JaeHun; Yokota, Hiroshi [Nippon Institute of Technology, 4-1 Gakuendai, Miyashiro, Minami-saitama, Saitama 3458501 (Japan)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Mass Spectrometer | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of strong brown carbon chromophores. Citation: Laskin J, A Laskin, S Nizkorodov, PJ Roach, PA Eckert, MK Gilles, B Wang, HJ Lee, and Q Hu.2014."Molecular Selectivity of Brown...

318

Top quark mass measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The top quark, with its extraordinarily large mass (nearly that of a gold atom), plays a significant role in the phenomenology of EWSB in the Standard Model. In particular, the top quark mass when combined with the W mass constrains the mass of the as yet unobserved Higgs boson. Thus, a precise determination of the mass of the top quark is a principal goal of the CDF and D0 experiments. With the data collected thus far in Runs 1 and 2 of the Tevatron, CDF and D0 have measured the top quark mass in both the lepton+jets and dilepton decay channels using a variety of complementary experimental techniques. The author presents an overview of the most recent of the measurements.

Hill, Christopher S.; /UC, Santa Barbara

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

The study of colliding molecular clumps evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The results of study of the gravitational fragmentation in the interstellar medium (ISM) by clump-clump collisions are presented. We suggest, that collision of clumps, that are subparts of Giant Molecular Clouds (GMC) may be on of the basic mechanism, which result to ISM fragmentation and define the dynamical as well as statistical characteristics (e.g. the mass spectra) of protostellar condensation. In the present paper, we describe our 3D SPH-modeling, in isothermal approximation, of supersonic collisions of two identical clumps with a few variants of initial impact parameters ($\\beta$), that cover the wide range. Our results shown, that at all $\\beta$ in system began intensive fragmentation. The resulting fragments mass function depend from initial impact parameter. The obtained mass spectra have the slopes in a good enough agreement with observational data for our Galaxy -- especially for large impact parameters, which are more realistic as for large clumps ensembles.

S. B. Vinogradov; P. Berczik

2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

320

Physics with energetic radioactive ion beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beams of short-lived, unstable nuclei have opened new dimensions in studies of nuclear structure and reactions. Such beams also provide key information on reactions that take place in our sun and other stars. Status and prospects of the physics with energetic radioactive beams are summarized.

Henning, W.F.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Gaussian beams in inhomogeneous anisotropic layered structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gaussian beams in inhomogeneous anisotropic layered structures Vlastislav Cerven´y 1 ) and Ivan@ig.cas.cz. Summary Gaussian beams concentrated close to rays of high-frequency seismic body waves prop- agating in an inhomogeneous anisotropic layered structure are studied. The amplitude profiles of the Gaussian beam along

Cerveny, Vlastislav

322

A Generalized Vlasov Theory for Composite Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Generalized Vlasov Theory for Composite Beams Wenbin Yu, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace-0150 Abstract A generalized Vlasov theory for composite beams with arbitrary geometric and material sectional properties is developed based on the variational asymptotic beam sectional analysis. Instead of invoking ad

Yu, Wenbin

323

Stability design of long precast concrete beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stability design of long precast concrete beams T. J. Stratford, BA, MEng, C. J. Burgoyne BA, MSc needed for design engineers to check the stability of precast concrete beams when simply supported loads can be determined and how estimates can be made of the eect of imperfections both in the beam

Burgoyne, Chris

324

Lateral stability of long precast concrete beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lateral stability of long precast concrete beams T. J. Stratford, BA, BEng, and C. J. Burgoyne, BA, MSc, CEng, MICE & Modern precast concrete bridge beams are becoming increasingly long and slender, making them more susceptible to buckling failure. This paper shows that once the beam is positioned

Burgoyne, Chris

325

Laser Telecommunication timeLaser beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser Telecommunication Experiment Laser time Laser beam intensity timeLaser beam Laser battery Laser connected to a circuit without a modulator. Bottom graph illustrates what happen when a modulating signal is superimposed to the DC voltage driving the laser Laser beam intensity DC Input voltage DC

La Rosa, Andres H.

326

Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample is disclosed. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and .sup.3 He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

Roberts, Mark L. (Livermore, CA); Davis, Jay C. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample is disclosed. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and [sup 3]He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

Roberts, M.L.; Davis, J.C.

1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

328

Circumbinary Molecular Rings Around Young Stars in Orion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present high angular resolution 1.3 mm continuum, methyl cyanide molecular line, and 7 mm continuum observations made with the Submillimeter Array and the Very Large Array, toward the most highly obscured and southern part of the massive star forming region OMC1S located behind the Orion Nebula. We find two flattened and rotating molecular structures with sizes of a few hundred astronomical units suggestive of circumbinary molecular rings produced by the presence of two stars with very compact circumstellar disks with sizes and separations of about 50 AU, associated with the young stellar objects 139-409 and 134-411. Furthermore, these two circumbinary rotating rings are related to two compact and bright {\\it hot molecular cores}. The dynamic mass of the binary systems obtained from our data are $\\geq$ 4 M$_\\odot$ for 139-409 and $\\geq$ 0.5 M$_\\odot$ for 134-411. This result supports the idea that intermediate-mass stars will form through {\\it circumstellar disks} and jets/outflows, as the low mass stars do. Furthermore, when intermediate-mass stars are in multiple systems they seem to form a circumbinary ring similar to those seen in young, multiple low-mass systems (e.g., GG Tau and UY Aur).

Luis A. Zapata; Paul T. P. Ho; Luis F. Rodriguez; Peter Schilke; Stan Kurtz

2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

329

Annular Vortex Generation for Inertial Fusion Energy Beam-Line Protection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of swirling annular vortex flow inside beam entrance tubes can protect beam-line structural materials in chambers for heavy-ion inertial fusion energy (IFE) applications. An annular wall jet, or vortex tube, is generated by injecting liquid tangent to the inner surface of a tube wall with both axially and azimuthally directed velocity components. A layer of liquid then lines the beam tube wall, which may improve the effectiveness of neutron shielding, and condenses and removes vaporized coolant that may enter the beam tubes. Vortex tubes have been constructed and tested with a thickness of three-tenths the pipe radius. Analysis of the flow is given, along with experimental examples of vortex tube fluid mechanics and an estimate of the layer thickness, based on simple mass conservation considerations.

Pemberton, Steven J.; Abbott, Ryan P.; Peterson, Per F. [University of California (United States)

2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

Nuclear Masses in Astrophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Among all nuclear ground-state properties, atomic masses are highly specific for each particular combination of N and Z and the data obtained apply to a variety of physics topics. One of the most crucial questions to be addressed in mass spectrometry of unstable radionuclides is the one of understanding the processes of element formation in the Universe. To this end, accurate atomic mass values of a large number of exotic nuclei participating in nucleosynthesis are among the key input data in large-scale reaction network calculations. In this paper, a review on the latest achievements in mass spectrometry for nuclear astrophysics is given.

Christine Weber; Klaus Blaum; Hendrik Schatz

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

331

EMSL - Mass Spectrometer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MS) with high mass resolution (m&61636;m100,000). Solvent mixtures of acetonitrilewater and acetonitriletoluene were used to extract and ionize polar and non-polar...

332

BEAM COUPLING IMPEDANCE STUDIES ON THE LHC FP420 MULTI-POCKET BEAM PIPE PROTOTYPE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEAM COUPLING IMPEDANCE STUDIES ON THE LHC FP420 MULTI-POCKET BEAM PIPE PROTOTYPE F. Roncarolo , R LHC beam pipe in which two pockets hosting the detectors introduce an abrupt cross-section variation of the pipe. During the FP420 proposed operation, each station is moved towards the beam as close as 5 mm ( 15

333

VAV Reheat Versus Active Chilled Beams and DOAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Andrey. Don’t Turn Active Beams Into Expensive Diffusers,added costs of the piping and beams for ACBs are simply too1. Simmonds, Peter. To Beam or not To Beam? , Engineered

Stein, Jeff; Taylor, Steven

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Neutron beam testing of triblades  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four IBM Triblades were tested in the Irradiation of Chips and Electronics facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Triblades include two dual-core Opteron processors and four PowerXCell 8i (Cell) processors. The Triblades were tested in their field configuration while running different applications, with the beam aimed at the Cell processor or the Opteron running the application. Testing focused on the Cell processors, which were tested while running five different applications and an idle condition. While neither application nor Triblade was statistically important in predicting the hazard rate, the hazard rate when the beam was aimed at the Opterons was significantly higher than when it was aimed at the Cell processors. In addition, four Cell blades (one in each Triblade) suffered voltage shorts, leading to their inoperability. The hardware tested is the same as that in the Roadrunner supercomputer.

Michalak, Sarah E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, Andrew J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Storlie, Curtis B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rust, William N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Modl, David G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quinn, Heather M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Blanchard, Sean P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manuzzato, Andrea [UNIV DEGLI STUDI DI PADOVA ITALY

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

335

The MICE Muon Beam Line  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at RAL, muons are produced and transported in a dedicated beam line connecting the production point (target) to the cooling channel. We discuss the main features of the beamline, meant to provide muons with momenta between 140 MeV/c and 240 MeV/c and emittances up to 10 mm rad, which is accomplished by means of a diffuser. Matching procedures to the MICE cooling channel are also described. In summer 2010 we performed an intense data taking campaign to finalize the calibration of the MICE Particle Identification (PID) detectors and the understanding of the beam line, which completes the STEPI phase of MICE. We highlight the main results from these data.

Apollonio, Marco [High Energy Physics Group, Department of Physics, Imperial College London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

336

Oxygen ion-beam microlithography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used.

Tsuo, Y. Simon (Lakewood, CO)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Molecular heat pump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a novel molecular device that pumps heat against a thermal gradient. The system consists of a molecular element connecting two thermal reservoirs that are characterized by different spectral properties. The pumping action is achieved by applying an external force that periodically modulates molecular levels. This modulation affects periodic oscillations of the internal temperature of the molecule and the strength of its coupling to each reservoir resulting in a net heat flow in the desired direction. The heat flow is examined in the slow and fast modulation limits and for different modulation waveforms, thus making it possible to optimize the device performance.

Dvira Segal; Abraham Nitzan

2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

338

Accelerated molecular dynamics methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The molecular dynamics method, although extremely powerful for materials simulations, is limited to times scales of roughly one microsecond or less. On longer time scales, dynamical evolution typically consists of infrequent events, which are usually activated processes. This course is focused on understanding infrequent-event dynamics, on methods for characterizing infrequent-event mechanisms and rate constants, and on methods for simulating long time scales in infrequent-event systems, emphasizing the recently developed accelerated molecular dynamics methods (hyperdynamics, parallel replica dynamics, and temperature accelerated dynamics). Some familiarity with basic statistical mechanics and molecular dynamics methods will be assumed.

Perez, Danny [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

339

Carbon Fiber Damage in Accelerator Beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in Beam Wire Scanners. Because of their thermomechanical properties they are very resistant to particle beams. Their strength deteriorates with time due to radiation damage and low-cycle thermal fatigue. In case of high intensity beams this process can accelerate and in extreme cases the fiber is damaged during a single scan. In this work a model describing the fiber temperature, thermionic emission and sublimation is discussed. Results are compared with fiber damage test performed on SPS beam in November 2008. In conclusions the limits of Wire Scanner operation on high intensity beams are drawn.

Sapinski, M; Guerrero, A; Koopman, J; Métral, E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

W-Band Sheet Beam Klystron Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sheet beam devices provide important advantages for very high power, narrow bandwidth RF sources like accelerator klystrons [1]. Reduced current density and increased surface area result in increased power capabi1ity, reduced magnetic fields for focusing and reduced cathode loading. These advantages are offset by increased complexity, beam formation and transport issues and potential for mode competition in the ovennoded cavities and drift tube. This paper will describe the design issues encountered in developing a 100 kW peak and 2 kW average power sheet beam k1ystron at W-band including beam formation, beam transport, circuit design, circuit fabrication and mode competition.

Scheitrum, G.; Caryotakis, G.; Burke, A.; Jensen, A.; Jongewaard, E.a Krasnykh, A.; Neubauer, M.; Phillips, R.; Rauenbuehler, K.; /SLAC

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Electron beam generation in Tevatron electron lenses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New type of high perveance electron guns with convex cathode has been developed. Three guns described in this article are built to provide transverse electron current density distributions needed for Electron Lenses for beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron collider. The current distribution can be controlled either by the gun geometry or by voltage on a special control electrode located near cathode. We present the designs of the guns and report results of beam measurements on the test bench. Because of their high current density and low transverse temperature of electrons, electron guns of this type can be used in electron cooling and beam-beam compensation devices.

Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab; Tiunov, M.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Scattering apodizer for laser beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for apodizing a laser beam to smooth out the production of diffraction peaks due to optical discontinuities in the path of the laser beam, such method comprising introduction of a pattern of scattering elements for reducing the peak intensity in the region of such optical discontinuities, such pattern having smoothly tapering boundaries in which the distribution density of the scattering elements is tapered gradually to produce small gradients in the distribution density, such pattern of scattering elements being effective to reduce and smooth out the diffraction effects which would otherwise be produced. The apodizer pattern may be produced by selectively blasting a surface of a transparent member with fine abrasive particles to produce a multitude of minute pits. In one embodiment, a scattering apodizer pattern is employed to overcome diffraction patterns in a multiple element crystal array for harmonic conversion of a laser beam. The interstices and the supporting grid between the crystal elements are obscured by the gradually tapered apodizer pattern of scattering elements.

Summers, M.A.; Hagen, W.F.; Boyd, R.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Scattering apodizer for laser beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for apodizing a laser beam to smooth out the production of diffraction peaks due to optical discontinuities in the path of the laser beam, such method comprising introduction of a pattern of scattering elements for reducing the peak intensity in the region of such optical discontinuities, such pattern having smoothly tapering boundaries in which the distribution density of the scattering elements is tapered gradually to produce small gradients in the distribution density, such pattern of scattering elements being effective to reduce and smooth out the diffraction effects which would otherwise be produced. The apodizer pattern may be produced by selectively blasting a surface of a transparent member with fine abrasive particles to produce a multitude of minute pits. In one embodiment, a scattering apodizer pattern is employed to overcome diffraction patterns in a multiple element crystal array for harmonic conversion of a laser beam. The interstices and the supporting grid between the crystal elements are obscured by the gradually tapered apodizer pattern of scattering elements.

Summers, Mark A. (Livermore, CA); Hagen, Wilhelm F. (Livermore, CA); Boyd, Robert D. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

mass communication advertising &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mass communication advertising & public relations introduction. Graduate programs in the Department of Mass Communication, Advertising, and Public Relations provide an entry to a wide spectrum of careers in the communication industry. Classes, internships, site visits, and presentations by top professionals offer students

Finzi, Adrien

345

Elbow mass flow meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity. 3 figs.

McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.; Ortiz, C.A.; Nelson, D.C.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

346

The Origins of Mass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Higgs boson was discovered in July of 2012 and is generally understood to be the origin of mass. While those statements are true, they are incomplete. It turns out that the Higgs boson is responsible for only about 2% of the mass of ordinary matter. In this dramatic new video, Dr. Don Lincoln of Fermilab tells us the rest of the story.

Lincoln, Don

2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

Gas Chromatography -Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GCMS - 1 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS OF ETHANOL AND BENZENE IN GASOLINE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;GCMS - 2 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS). The goal of this experiment is to separate the components in a sample of gasoline using Gas Chromatography

Nizkorodov, Sergey

348

The Origins of Mass  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Higgs boson was discovered in July of 2012 and is generally understood to be the origin of mass. While those statements are true, they are incomplete. It turns out that the Higgs boson is responsible for only about 2% of the mass of ordinary matter. In this dramatic new video, Dr. Don Lincoln of Fermilab tells us the rest of the story.

Lincoln, Don

2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

349

Apparatus and method of determining molecular weight of large molecules  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mass spectrometer determines the mass of multiply charged high molecular weight molecules. This spectrometer utilizes an ion detector which is capable of simultaneously measuring the charge z and transit time of a single ion as it passes through the detector. From this transit time, the velocity of the single ion may then be derived, thus providing the mass-to-charge ratio m/z for a single ion which has been accelerated through a known potential. Given z and m/z, the mass m of the single ion can then be calculated. Electrospray ions with masses in excess of 1 MDa and charge numbers greater than 425 e.sup.- are readily detected. The on-axis single ion detection configuration enables a duty cycle of nearly 100% and extends the practical application of electrospray mass spectrometry to the analysis of very large molecules with relatively inexpensive instrumentation.

Fuerstenau, Stephen (Montrose, CA); Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA); Madden, Norman (Livermore, CA); Searles, William (Fremont, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Apparatus and method of determining molecular weight of large molecules  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mass spectrometer determines the mass of multiply charged high molecular weight molecules. This spectrometer utilizes an ion detector which is capable of simultaneously measuring the charge z and transit time of a single ion as it passes through the detector. From this transit time, the velocity of the single ion may then be derived, thus providing the mass-to-charge ratio m/z for a single ion which has been accelerated through a known potential. Given z and m/z, the mass m of the single ion can then be calculated. Electrospray ions with masses in excess of 1 MDa and charge numbers greater than 425 e{sup {minus}} are readily detected. The on-axis single ion detection configuration enables a duty cycle of nearly 100% and extends the practical application of electrospray mass spectrometry to the analysis of very large molecules with relatively inexpensive instrumentation. 14 figs.

Fuerstenau, S.; Benner, W.H.; Madden, N.M.; Searles, W.

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

351

Particle beam injector system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and devices enable coupling of a charged particle beam to a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. Coupling of the charged particle beam is accomplished, at least in-part, by relying on of sensitivity of the input phase space acceptance of the radio frequency quadrupole to the angle of the input charged particle beam. A first electric field across a beam deflector deflects the particle beam at an angle that is beyond the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole. By momentarily reversing or reducing the established electric field, a narrow portion of the charged particle beam is deflected at an angle within the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole. In another configuration, beam is directed at an angle within the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole by the first electric field and is deflected beyond the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole due to the second electric field.

Guethlein, Gary

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

352

Paraxial Light Beams with Angular Momentum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fundamental and applied concepts concerning the ability of light beams to carry a certain mechanical angular momentum with respect to the propagation axis are reviewed and discussed. Following issues are included: Historical reference; Angular momentum of a paraxial beam and its constituents; Spin angular momentum and paradoxes associated with it; Orbital angular momentum; Circularly-spiral beams: examples and methods of generation; Orbital angular momentum and the intensity moments; Symmetry breakdown and decomposition of the orbital angular momentum; Mechanical models of the vortex light beams; Mechanical action of the beam angular momentum; Rotational Doppler effect, its manifestation in the image rotation; Spectrum of helical harmonics and associated problems; Non-collinear rotational Doppler effect; Properties of a beam forcedly rotating around its own axis. Research prospects and ways of practical utilization of optical beams with angular momentum.

A. Bekshaev; M. Soskin; M. Vasnetsov

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

National Centre for Biological Sciences Mass Spectrometry Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Sample Information Number of samples: Sample ID: Concentration: Solubility: Expected mass (Da): Molecular: Protein Peptide Lipid Nucleic acid Others (specify) Analysis Requirement ESI MS, low resolution ESI MS, high resolution LC-ESI MS LC-ESI MS/MS Others (specify) Signature of research supervisor: Signature

Bhalla, Upinder S.

354

Introduction The Sun is a mass of incandescent gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1 Introduction The Sun is a mass of incandescent gas A gigantic nuclear furnace Building that our bodies contain atoms that, like most elements and their isotopes in the Solar System, were part of the molecular cloud from which the Solar System condensed, and were trapped in primitive

Nittler, Larry R.

355

Theory of Molecular Machines. I. Channel Capacity of Molecular Machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theory of Molecular Machines. I. Channel Capacity of Molecular Machines running title: Channel Capacity of Molecular Machines Thomas D. Schneider version = 5.76 of ccmm.tex 2004 Feb 3 Version 5.67 was submitted 1990 December 5 Schneider, T. D. (1991). Theory of molecular machines. I. Channel capacity

Schneider, Thomas D.

356

ALMA RESOLVES 30 DORADUS: SUB-PARSEC MOLECULAR CLOUD STRUCTURE NEAR THE CLOSEST SUPER STAR CLUSTER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present Atacama Large (sub)Millimeter Array observations of 30 Doradus-the highest resolution view of molecular gas in an extragalactic star formation region to date ({approx}0.4 pc Multiplication-Sign 0.6 pc). The 30Dor-10 cloud north of R136 was mapped in {sup 12}CO 2-1, {sup 13}CO 2-1, C{sup 18}O 2-1, 1.3 mm continuum, the H30{alpha} recombination line, and two H{sub 2}CO 3-2 transitions. Most {sup 12}CO emission is associated with small filaments and clumps ({approx}<1 pc, {approx}10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} at the current resolution). Some clumps are associated with protostars, including ''pillars of creation'' photoablated by intense radiation from R136. Emission from molecular clouds is often analyzed by decomposition into approximately beam-sized clumps. Such clumps in 30 Doradus follow similar trends in size, linewidth, and surface density to Milky Way clumps. The 30 Doradus clumps have somewhat larger linewidths for a given size than predicted by Larson's scaling relation, consistent with pressure confinement. They extend to a higher surface density at a given size and linewidth compared to clouds studied at 10 pc resolution. These trends are also true of clumps in Galactic infrared-dark clouds; higher resolution observations of both environments are required. Consistency of clump masses calculated from dust continuum, CO, and the virial theorem reveals that the CO abundance in 30 Doradus clumps is not significantly different from the Large Magellanic Cloud mean, but the dust abundance may be reduced by {approx}2. There are no strong trends in clump properties with distance from R136; dense clumps are not strongly affected by the external radiation field, but there is a modest trend toward lower dense clump filling fraction deeper in the cloud.

Indebetouw, Remy; Brogan, Crystal; Leroy, Adam; Hunter, Todd; Kepley, Amanda, E-mail: rindebet@nrao.edu, E-mail: cbrogan@nrao.edu, E-mail: aleroy@nrao.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); and others

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Development of high-spatial and high-mass resolution mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) and its application to the study of small metabolites and endogenous molecules of plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-spatial and high-mass resolution laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric (MS) imaging technology was developed for the attainment of MS images of higher quality containing more information on the relevant cellular and molecular biology in unprecedented depth. The distribution of plant metabolites is asymmetric throughout the cells and tissues, and therefore the increase in the spatial resolution was pursued to reveal the localization of plant metabolites at the cellular level by MS imaging. For achieving high-spatial resolution, the laser beam size was reduced by utilizing an optical fiber with small core diameter (25 ?m) in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer. Matrix application was greatly improved using oscillating capillary nebulizer. As a result, single cell level spatial resolution of ~ 12 ?m was achieved. MS imaging at this high spatial resolution was directly applied to a whole Arabidopsis flower and the substructures of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anther were successfully visualized. MS imaging of high spatial resolution was also demonstrated to the secondary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana and a high degree of localization of detected metabolites was successfully unveiled. This was the first MS imaging on the root for molecular species. MS imaging with high mass resolution was also achieved by utilizing the LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the direct identification of the surface metabolites on the Arabidopsis stem and root and differentiation of isobaric ions having the same nominal mass with no need of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS imaging at high-spatial and high-mass resolution was also applied to cer1 mutant of the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to demonstrate its usefulness in biological studies and reveal associated metabolite changes in terms of spatial distribution and/or abundances compared to those of wild-type. The spatial distribution of targeted metabolites, mainly waxes and flavonoids, was systematically explored on various organs, including flowers, leaves, stems, and roots at high spatial resolution of ~ 12-50 ?m and the changes in the abundance level of these metabolites were monitored on the cer1 mutant with respect to the wild-type. This study revealed the metabolic biology of CER1 gene on each individual organ level with very detailed high spatial resolution. The separate MS images of isobaric metabolites, i.e. C29 alkane vs. C28 aldehyde could be constructed on both genotypes from MS imaging at high mass resolution. This allows tracking of abundance changes for those compounds along with the genetic mutation, which is not achievable with low mass resolution mass spectrometry. This study supported previous hypothesis of molecular function of CER1 gene as aldehyde decarbonylase, especially by displaying hyper accumulation of aldehydes and C30 fatty acid and decrease in abundance of alkanes and ketones in several plant organs of cer1 mutant. The scope of analytes was further directed toward internal cell metabolites from the surface metabolites of the plant. MS profiling and imaging of internal cell metabolites were performed on the vibratome section of Arabidopsis leaf. Vibratome sectioning of the leaf was first conducted to remove the surface cuticle layer and it was followed by enzymatic treatment of the section to induce the digestion of primary cell walls, middle lamella, and expose the internal cells underneath to the surface for detection with the laser by LDI-MS. The subsequent MS imaging onto the enzymatically treated vibratome section allowed us to map the distribution of the metabolites in the internal cell layers, linolenic acid (C18:3 FA) and linoleic acid (C18:2 FA). The development of an assay for relative quantification of analytes at the single subcellular/organelle level by LDI-MS imaging was attempted and both plausibility and significant obstacles were seen. As a test system, native plant organelle, chloroplasts isolated from the spinach leaves were used

Jun, Ji Hyun

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

358

Evaluation of histone sequence and modifications by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The histones, together with other specialized proteins and DNA, form the extraordinarily complex structure of chromatin. Electrospray ionization (ESI) permits the promotion of such protein species into the gas phase as intact, multiply charged molecular species. Mass spectrometry (MS), using a linear quadrupole mass filter, permits measurement of the relative molecular mass of these intact species with precision and accuracy. The latter are sufficient to evaluate variations in the primary structure of the histones and the type and extent of the natural and induced multiple covalent modifications. The locations of modifications are revealed by tandem mass spectrometry using tandem linear quadrupole or ion trap instruments on the intact species or the modified peptides derived by selective proteolysis. Experiments in applying this technique to histones from K562, a human-derived cell line, have demonstrated variations in the profile of modification through the normal cell cycle and in the presence of agents that inhibit enzymes responsible for reversal of the modification. The authors are currently testing the hypothesis that ESI-MS will permit the sensitive and selective identification of insult-induced modifications, distinguishing them from natural cell-cycle changes. This will be possible because ESI-MS reveals the full details of the profile of multiple posttranslational modifications of histones.

Edmonds, C.G.; Loo, J.A.; Smith, R.D.; Fuciarelli, A.F.; Thrall, B.D.; Morris, J.E.; Springer, D.L. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Absolute neutrino mass measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

Wolf, Joachim [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), IEKP, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

360

A power beaming based infrastructure for space power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At present all space mission power requirements are met by integral, on-board, self-contained power systems. To provide needed flexibility for space exploration and colonization, an additional approach to on-board, self-contained power systems is needed. Power beaming, an alternative approach to providing power, has the potential to provide increased mission flexibility while reducing total mass launched into space. Laser-power beaming technology provides a viable power and communication infrastructure that can be developed sequentially as it is applied to power satellite constellations in Earth orbit and to orbital transport vehicles transferring satellites and cargos to geosynchronous orbit and beyond. Coupled with nuclear electric propulsion systems for cargo transport, the technology can be used to provide global power to the Lunar surface and to Mars' surface and moons. The technology can be developed sequentially as advances in power system and propulsion system technology occur. This paper presents stepwise development of an infrastructure based on power beaming that can support the space development and exploration goals of the Space Exploration Initiative. Power scenarios based on commonality of power systems hardware with cargo transport vehicles are described. Advantages of this infrastructure are described. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Bamberger, J.A.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power for molecular imaging experiments. This high mass resolving power ensures that closely spaced peaks at the same nominal mass are resolved for proper image generation. Typically higher magnetic fields are used to increase mass resolving power. However, a gain in mass resolving power can also be realized by phase correction of the data for absorption mode display. In addition to mass resolving power, absorption mode offers higher mass accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio over the conventional magnitude mode. Here we present the first use of absorption mode for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging. The Autophaser algorithm is used to phase correct each spectrum (pixel) in the image and then these parameters are used by the Chameleon work-flow based data processing software to generate absorption mode ?Datacubes? for image and spectral viewing. Absorption mode reveals new mass and spatial features that are not resolved in magnitude mode and results in improved selected ion image contrast.

Smith, Donald F.; Kilgour, David P.; Konijnenburg, Marco; O'Connor, Peter B.; Heeren, Ronald M.

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

362

Simple Low-Frequency Beam Pickup  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detection of the field induced by a beam outside of the beam pipe can be used as a beam diagnostic. Wires placed in longitudinal slots in the outside wall of the beam pipe can be used as a beam pickup. This has a very small beam-coupling impedance and avoids complications of having a feedthrough. The signal can be reasonably high at low frequencies. We present a field waveform at the outer side of a beam pipe, obtained as a result of calculations and measurements. We calculate the beam-coupling impedance due to a long longitudinal slot in the resistive wall and the signal induced in a wire placed in such a slot and shielded by a thin screen from the beam. These results should be relevant for impedance calculations of the slot in an antechamber and for slots in the PEP-II distributed ion pump screens. The design of the low-frequency beam position monitor is very simple. It can be used in storage rings, synchrotron light sources, and free electron lasers, like LINAC coherent light source.

Novokhatski, A.; Heifets, S.; /SLAC; Aleksandrov, A.; /Oak Ridge

2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

363

Optics of electron beam in the Recycler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring (Fermilab) requires high current and good quality of the DC electron beam. Electron trajectories of {approx}0.2 A or higher DC electron beam have to be parallel in the cooling section, within {approx}0.2 mrad, making the beam envelope cylindrical. These requirements yielded a specific scheme of the electron transport from a gun to the cooling section, with electrostatic acceleration and deceleration in the Pelletron. Recuperation of the DC beam limits beam losses at as tiny level as {approx}0.001%, setting strict requirements on the return electron line to the Pelletron and a collector. To smooth the beam envelope in the cooling section, it has to be linear and known at the transport start. Also, strength of the relevant optic elements has to be measured with good accuracy. Beam-based optic measurements are being carried out and analyzed to get this information. They include beam simulations in the Pelletron, differential optic (beam response) measurements and simulation, beam profile measurements with optical transition radiation, envelope measurements and analysis with orifice scrapers. Current results for the first half-year of commissioning are presented. Although electron cooling is already routinely used for pbar stacking, its efficiency is expected to be improved.

Burov, Alexey V.; Kazakevich, G.; Kroc, T.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Prost, L.; Pruss, S.; Shemyakin, A.; Sutherland, M.; Tiunov, M.; Warner, A.; /Fermilab

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

A dynamical definition of quasibound molecular clusters Sarah A. Harris and Ian J. Forda)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A dynamical definition of quasibound molecular clusters Sarah A. Harris and Ian J. Forda of a quasibound cluster are identified through a retrospective dynamical definition. The trajectory of a molecular is satisfied, however, at the instant that the energy of the departing molecule in the center of mass frame

Ford, Ian

365

Using neutral beams as a light ion beam probe (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By arranging the particle first banana orbits to pass near a distant detector, the light ion beam probe (LIBP) utilizes orbital deflection to probe internal fields and field fluctuations. The LIBP technique takes advantage of (1) the in situ, known source of fast ions created by beam-injected neutral particles that naturally ionize near the plasma edge and (2) various commonly available diagnostics as its detector. These born trapped particles can traverse the plasma core on their inner banana leg before returning to the plasma edge. Orbital displacements (the forces on fast ions) caused by internal instabilities or edge perturbing fields appear as modulated signal at an edge detector. Adjustments in the q-profile and plasma shape that determine the first orbit, as well as the relative position of the source and detector, enable studies under a wide variety of plasma conditions. This diagnostic technique can be used to probe the impact on fast ions of various instabilities, e.g., Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) and neoclassical tearing modes, and of externally imposed 3D fields, e.g., magnetic perturbations. To date, displacements by AEs and by externally applied resonant magnetic perturbation fields have been measured using a fast ion loss detector. Comparisons with simulations are shown. In addition, nonlinear interactions between fast ions and independent AE waves are revealed by this technique.

Chen, Xi, E-mail: chenxi@fusion.gat.com [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Heidbrink, W. W. [University of California Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Van Zeeland, M. A.; Pace, D. C.; Petty, C. C.; Fisher, R. K. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Kramer, G. J.; Nazikian, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Austin, M. E. [University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Hanson, J. M. [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Zeng, L. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Bipolar molecular outflows driven by hydromagnetic protostellar winds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate that magnetically-collimated protostellar winds will sweep ambient material into thin, radiative, momentum-conserving shells whose features reproduce those commonly observed in bipolar molecular outflows. We find the typical position-velocity and mass-velocity relations to occur in outflows in a wide variety of ambient density distributions, regardless of the time histories of their driving winds.

Christopher D. Matzner; Christopher F. McKee

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

367

Ultra-high-mass mass spectrometry with charge discrimination using cryogenic detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultra-high-mass time-of-flight mass spectrometer using a cryogenic particle detector as an ion detector with charge discriminating capabilities. Cryogenic detectors have the potential for significantly improving the performance and sensitivity of time-of-flight mass spectrometers, and compared to ion multipliers they exhibit superior sensitivity for high-mass, slow-moving macromolecular ions and can be used as "stop" detectors in time-of-flight applications. In addition, their energy resolving capability can be used to measure the charge state of the ions. Charge discrimination is very valuable in all time-of-flight mass spectrometers. Using a cryogenically-cooled Nb-Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 -Nb superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction (STJ) detector operating at 1.3 K as an ion detector in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for large biomolecules it was found that the STJ detector has charge discrimination capabilities. Since the cryogenic STJ detector responds to ion energy and does not rely on secondary electron production, as in the conventionally used microchannel plate (MCP) detectors, the cryogenic detector therefore detects large molecular ions with a velocity-independent efficiency approaching 100%.

Frank, Matthias (Berkeley, CA); Mears, Carl A. (Oakland, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA); Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Low Emittance Electron Beam Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied the properties of a low emittance electron beam produced by laser pulses incident onto an rf gun photocathode. The experiments were carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermilab. Such beam studies are necessary for fixing the design of new Linear Colliders as well as for the development of Free Electron Lasers. An overview of the A0 photoinjector is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 we describe the A0 photoinjector laser system. A stable laser system is imperative for reliable photoinjector operation. After the recent upgrade, we have been able to reach a new level of stability in the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the pulse amplitude, and of the temporal and transverse profiles. In Chapter 3 we present a study of transverse emittance versus the shape of the photo-cathode drive-laser pulse. For that purpose a special temporal profile laser shaping device called a pulse-stacker was developed. In Chapter 4 we discuss longitudinal beam dynamics studies using a two macro-particle bunch; this technique is helpful in analyzing pulse compression in the magnetic chicane, as well as velocity bunching effects in the rf-gun and the 9-cell accelerating cavity. In Chapter 5 we introduce a proposal for laser acceleration of electrons. We have developed a laser functioning on the TEM*{sub 01} mode, a mode with a longitudinal electric field component which is suitable for such a process. Using this technique at energies above 40 MeV, one would be able to observe laser-based acceleration.

Tikhoplav, Rodion; /Rochester U.; ,

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Radiation and Background Levels in a CLIC Detector due to Beam-Beam Effects Optimisation of Detector Geometries and Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The high charge density---due to small beam sizes---and the high energy of the proposed CLIC concept for a linear electron--positron collider with a centre-of-mass energy of up to 3~TeV lead to the production of a large number of particles through beam-beam interactions at the interaction point during every bunch crossing (BX). A large fraction of these particles safely leaves the detector. A still significant amount of energy will be deposited in the forward region nonetheless, which will produce secondary particles able to cause background in the detector. Furthermore, some particles will be created with large polar angles and directly cause background in the tracking detectors and calorimeters. The main sources of background in the detector, either directly or indirectly, are the incoherent $mathrm{e}^{+}mathrm{e}^{-}$ pairs and the particles from $gammagamma ightarrow$ hadron events. The background and radiation levels in the detector have to be estimated, to study if a detector is feasible, that can han...

Sailer, André; Lohse, Thomas

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

370

Protective laser beam viewing device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A protective laser beam viewing system or device including a camera selectively sensitive to laser light wavelengths and a viewing screen receiving images from the laser sensitive camera. According to a preferred embodiment of the invention, the camera is worn on the head of the user or incorporated into a goggle-type viewing display so that it is always aimed at the area of viewing interest to the user and the viewing screen is incorporated into a video display worn as goggles over the eyes of the user.

Neil, George R.; Jordan, Kevin Carl

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

371

Nuclear astrophysics and electron beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron beams provide important probes and constraints for nuclear astrophysics. This is especially exciting at energies within the regime of chiral effective field theory (EFT), which provides a systematic expansion for nuclear forces and electroweak operators based on quantum chromodynamics. This talk discusses some recent highlights and future directions based on chiral EFT, including nuclear structure and reactions for astrophysics, the neutron skin and constraints for the properties of neutron-rich matter in neutron stars and core-collapse supernovae, and the dark matter response of nuclei.

Schwenk, A. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt, Germany and ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

372

Proton beam therapy control system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

373

Proton beam therapy control system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

374

Proton beam therapy control system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

Baumann, Michael A. (Riverside, CA); Beloussov, Alexandre V. (Bernardino, CA); Bakir, Julide (Alta Loma, CA); Armon, Deganit (Redlands, CA); Olsen, Howard B. (Colton, CA); Salem, Dana (Riverside, CA)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

375

Proton beam therapy control system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

Baumann, Michael A. (Riverside, CA); Beloussov, Alexandre V. (San Bernardino, CA); Bakir, Julide (Alta Loma, CA); Armon, Deganit (Longmeadow, MA); Olsen, Howard B. (Irvine, CA); Salem, Dana (Riverside, CA)

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

376

SPEAR3 Beam Line Availability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,#2446Smalln n u a l rBeam Line

377

The Beam | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump Jump to:Information 'Grand Paris' Project:Beam Jump to:

378

MASS POLITICAL MOBILIZATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................................................................................................................... MASS POLITICAL MOBILIZATION ................................................................................................................................................... Boix & Stokes: The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Politics Boixandstokes-chap21 Revise Proof page 497 20.4.2007 12:41pm #12;Boix & Stokes: The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Politics Boixandstokes-chap21

379

Masses of Fundamental Particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the original paper entitled, "Masses of Fundamental Particles"(arXiv:1109.3705v5, 10 Feb 2012), not only the masses of fundamental particles including the weak bosons, Higgs boson, quarks, and leptons, but also the mixing angles of quarks and those of neutrinos are all explained and/or predicted in the unified composite models of quarks and leptons successfully. In this addendum entitled, "Higgs Boson Mass in the Minimal Unified Subquark Model", it is emphasized that the Higgs boson mass is predicted to be about 130Gev in the minimal unified subquark model, which agrees well with the experimental values of 125-126GeV recently found by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations at the LHC.

Hidezumi Terazawa

2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

380

Heavy Hybrid mesons Masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We estimate the ground state masses of the heavy hybrid mesons using a phenomenological QCD-type potential. 0^{- -},1^{- -},0^{- +},1^{- +} and 0^{+ -} J^{PC} states are considered.

F. Iddir; L. Semlala

2006-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Dust Emission from the Perseus Molecular Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using far-infrared emission maps taken by IRAS and Spitzer and a near-infrared extinction map derived from 2MASS data, we have made dust temperature and column density maps of the Perseus molecular cloud. We show that the emission from transiently heated very small grains and the big grain dust emissivity vary as a function of extinction and dust temperature, with higher dust emissivities for colder grains. This variable emissivity can not be explained by temperature gradients along the line of sight or by noise in the emission maps, but is consistent with grain growth in the higher density and lower temperature regions. By accounting for the variations in the dust emissivity and VSG emission, we are able to map the temperature and column density of a nearby molecular cloud with better accuracy than has previously been possible.

S. Schnee; J. Li; A. A. Goodman; A. I. Sargent

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

382

HIGEE Mass Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HIGEE MASS TRANSFER R.J. Mohr and R. Fowler GLITSCH, INC. Dallas, Texas ABSTRACT Distillation, absorption, and gas stripping have traditionally been performed in tall columns utilizing trays or packing. Columns perform satisfactorily... transfer system which utilizes a rotating bed of packing to achieve high efficiency separations, and consequent reduction in size and weight. INTRODUCTION HIGEE is probably one of the most interesting developments in mass transfer equipment made...

Mohr, R. J.; Fowler, R.

383

BIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microscope) Analytical Equipment · High Performance Liquid Chromatography · Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography · Gas Chromatography · GC/MS · Elemental Analyser Molecular Biology Equipment · Biorad PCR Machine reactor for scale up studies In-line Particle sizers Rheometers Separation tanks Oscillating column (4m

Greenaway, Alan

384

Fermionic Molecular Dynamics: Multifragmentation in heavy-ion collisions and in excited nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within Fermionic Molecular Dynamics we investigate fragmentation of a compound system which was created in a heavy-ion collision at a beam energy in the Fermi energy domain and the decay of excited iron nuclei. We show that in FMD many-body correlations play an important role in the formation of fragments.

H. Feldmeier; J. Schnack

1997-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

385

Environmental assessment -- Proposed neutrino beams at the Main Injector project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to build a beamline on the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) site to accommodate an experimental research program in neutrino physics. The proposed action, called Neutrino Beams at the Main Injector (NuMI), is to design, construct, operate and decommission a facility for producing and studying a high flux beam of neutrinos in the energy range of 1 to 40 GeV (1 GeV is one billion or 10{sup 9} electron volts). The proposed facility would initially be dedicated to two experiments, COSMOS (Cosmologically Significant Mass Oscillations) and MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search). The neutrino beam would pass underground from Fermilab to northern Minnesota. A tunnel would not be built in this intervening region because the neutrinos easily pass through the earth, not interacting, similar to the way that light passes through a pane of glass. The beam is pointed towards the MINOS detector in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. Thus, the proposed project also includes construction, operation and decommissioning of the facility located in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota that houses this MINOS detector. This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the DOE`s National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021). This EA documents DOE`s evaluation of potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed construction and operation of NuMI at Fermilab and its far detector facility located in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. Any future use of the facilities on the Fermilab site would require the administrative approval of the Director of Fermilab and would undergo a separate NEPA review. Fermilab is a Federal high-energy physics research laboratory in Batavia, Illinois operated on behalf of the DOE by Universities Research Association, Inc.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system for measuring the average power of a beam such as a laser beam, including a calorimeter configured to operate over a wide range of coolant flow rates and being cooled by continuously flowing coolant for absorbing light from a laser beam to convert the laser beam energy into heat. The system further includes a flow meter for measuring the coolant flow in the calorimeter and a pair of thermistors for measuring the temperature difference between the coolant inputs and outputs to the calorimeter. The system also includes a microprocessor for processing the measured coolant flow rate and the measured temperature difference to determine the average power of the laser beam.

Baker, John (Livermore, CA); Collins, Leland F. (Pleasanton, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Ripon, CA); Micali, James V. (Dublin, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Composite multi-vortex diffraction-free beams and van Hove singularities in honeycomb lattices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We find diffraction-free beams for graphene and MoS$_2$-type honeycomb optical lattices. The resulting composite solutions have the form of multi-vortices, with spinor topological charges ($n$, $n\\pm1$). Exact solutions for the spinor components are obtained in the Dirac limit. The effects of the valley degree of freedom and the mass are analyzed. Passing through the van-Hove singularity the topological structure of the solutions is modified. Exactly at the singularity the diffraction-free beams take the form of strongly localized one-dimensional stripes.

Paltoglou, Vassilis; Efremidis, Nikolaos K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Coherence delay augmented laser beam homogenizer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The geometrical restrictions on a laser beam homogenizer are relaxed by ug a coherence delay line to separate a coherent input beam into several components each having a path length difference equal to a multiple of the coherence length with respect to the other components. The components recombine incoherently at the output of the homogenizer, and the resultant beam has a more uniform spatial intensity suitable for microlithography and laser pantogography. Also disclosed is a variable aperture homogenizer, and a liquid filled homogenizer.

Rasmussen, P.; Bernhardt, A.

1993-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

389

Electroweak Tests at Beta-beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the possibility of measuring the Weinberg angle from (anti)neutrino-electron scattering using low energy beta beams, a method that produces single flavour neutrino beams from the beta-decay of boosted radioactive ions. We study how the sensitivity of a possible measurement depends on the intensity of the ion beam and on a combination of different Lorentz boosts of the ions.

A. B. Balantekin; J. H. de Jesus; C. Volpe

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

390

Halpha with Heating by Particle Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using 1D NLTE radiative hydrodynamics we model the influence of the particle beams on the Halpha line profile treating the beam propagation and the atmosphere evolution self-consistently. We focus on the influence of the non-thermal collisional rates and the return current. Based on our results, we propose a diagnostic method for determination of the particle beam presence in the formation regions of the Halpha line.

J. Kasparova; M. Varady; M. Karlicky; P. Heinzel; Z. Moravec

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

391

Coherence delay augmented laser beam homogenizer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The geometrical restrictions on a laser beam homogenizer are relaxed by ug a coherence delay line to separate a coherent input beam into several components each having a path length difference equal to a multiple of the coherence length with respect to the other components. The components recombine incoherently at the output of the homogenizer, and the resultant beam has a more uniform spatial intensity suitable for microlithography and laser pantogography. Also disclosed is a variable aperture homogenizer, and a liquid filled homogenizer.

Rasmussen, Paul (Livermore, CA); Bernhardt, Anthony (Berkeley, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

393

High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Dane, Clifford B. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Focused ion beam source method and apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A focused ion beam having a cross section of submicron diameter, a high ion current, and a narrow energy range is generated from a target comprised of particle source material by laser ablation. The method involves directing a laser beam having a cross section of critical diameter onto the target, producing a cloud of laser ablated particles having unique characteristics, and extracting and focusing a charged particle beam from the laser ablated cloud. The method is especially suited for producing focused ion beams for semiconductor device analysis and modification.

Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Lykke, Keith R. (Gaithersburg, MD); Lill, Thorsten B. (Sunnyvale, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Effect of Diffusion on Bunched Beam Echo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When a beam receives a dipole kick, its centroid signal decoheres due to the betatron tune spread in the beam. Long after the signal has decohered, however, a followup quadrupole kick to the beam brings a pronounced echo back to the centroid signal. This echo effect has been analyzed for the case of a bunched beam in Ref. [1]. In this work, the perturbation calculation of Ref. [1] is extended to include a diffusion in betatron amplitude. The effect of diffusion on the magnitude of the echo is then parameterized and studied.

Stupakov, G.V.; Chao, A.W.; /SLAC

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Silicon-based transistors are well-understood, basic components of contemporary electronic technology. In contrast, there is...

397

Ultrasonic imaging with limited-diffraction beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Limited-diffraction beams are a class of waves that may be localized in space and time. Theoretically, these beams are propagation invariant and can propagate to an infinite distance without spreading. In practice, when these beams are produced with wave sources of a finite aperture and energy, they have a very large depth of field, meaning that they can keep a small beam width over a large distance. Because of this property, limited-diffraction beams may have applications in various areas such as medical imaging and tissue characterization. In this paper, fundamentals of limited-diffraction beams are reviewed and the studies of these beams are put into a unified theoretical framework. Theory of limited-diffraction beams is further developed. New limited-diffraction solutions to Klein-Gordon Equation and Schrodinger Equation, as well as limited-diffraction solutions to these equations in confined spaces are obtained. The relationship between the transformation that converts any solutions to an (-1)-dimensional wave equation to limited-diffraction solutions of an -dimensional equation and the Lorentz transformation is clarified and extended. The transformation is also applied to the Klein-Gordon Equation. In addition, applications of limited-diffraction beams are summarized.

Jian-yu Lu

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

398

Low-noise macroscopic twin beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applying a multiphoton-subtraction technique to two-color macroscopic squeezed vacuum state of light generated via high-gain parametric down conversion we conditionally prepare a new state of light: bright multi-mode low-noise twin beams. The obtained results demonstrate up to 8-fold suppression of noise in each beam while preserving and even moderately improving the nonclassical photon number correlations between the beams. The prepared low-noise macroscopic state, containing up to 2000 photons per mode, is not among the states achievable through nonlinear optical processes. The proposed technique substantially improves the usefulness of twin beams for quantum technologies.

Timur Sh. Iskhakov; Vladyslav C. Usenko; Radim Filip; Maria V. Chekhova; Gerd Leuchs

2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

399

Beam Characterization at the Neutron Radiography Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quality of a neutron imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This project characterized the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio and image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. Improvement of the existing NRAD MCNP beamline model includes validation of the model’s energy spectrum and the development of enhanced image simulation methods. The image simulation methods predict the radiographic image of an object based on the foil reaction rate data obtained by placing a model of the object in front of the image plane in an MCNP beamline model.

Sarah Morgan; Jeffrey King

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Summary of the LARP Mini-Workshop on Beam-Beam Compensation 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LARP Mini-Workshop on Beam-Beam Compensation 2007 was held at SLAC, 2-4 July 2007. It was attended by 33 participants from 10 institutions in Asia, Europe, and America. 26 presentations were given, while more than one third of the time was allocated to discussions. The workshop web site is Ref. [1]. The workshop's main focus was on long-range and head-on beam-beam compensation, with a view towards application in the LHC. Other topics included the beam-beam performance of previous, existing and future circular colliders; beam-beam simulations; new operating modes, theory, and unexplained phenomena. This summary is also published as Ref. [2].

Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven; Bruning, Oliver S.; Koutchouk, J.P.; Zimmermann, F.; /CERN; Sen, T.; Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab; Ohmi, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Furman, M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Cai, Y.; Chao, A.; /SLAC

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H.sup.- beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H.sup.- beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H.sup.- beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H.sup.- beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H.sup.- beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H.sup.- beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser.

Johnstone, Carol J. (Warrenville, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H{sup {minus}} beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H{sup {minus}} beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H{sup {minus}} beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H{sup {minus}} beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H{sup {minus}} beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H{sup {minus}} beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser. 9 figs.

Johnstone, C.J.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

403

Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Studies on beam propagation pertaining to beamed microwave power transmission and open resonator quasi-optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the space shuttle. A near-field program is used to compare the collection efficiencies obtainable with a parabolic dish and a resonant Gaussian beam antenna. The second application of the computer programs is the analysis of a reference system for beaming... characteristics of the maximum tapers in Table 4. . 81 45 Collection efficiency characteristics of the high efficiency tapers. 84 46 Proposed shuttle beamed power demonstration using an 8 ft. parabolic dish as the transmitter antenna. 89 47 Gaussian beam...

McCleary, James Carlton

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Atomic mass compilation 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic mass reflects the total binding energy of all nucleons in an atomic nucleus. Compilations and evaluations of atomic masses and derived quantities, such as neutron or proton separation energies, are indispensable tools for research and applications. In the last decade, the field has evolved rapidly after the advent of new production and measuring techniques for stable and unstable nuclei resulting in substantial ameliorations concerning the body of data and their precision. Here, we present a compilation of atomic masses comprising the data from the evaluation of 2003 as well as the results of new measurements performed. The relevant literature in refereed journals and reports as far as available, was scanned for the period beginning 2003 up to and including April 2012. Overall, 5750 new data points have been collected. Recommended values for the relative atomic masses have been derived and a comparison with the 2003 Atomic Mass Evaluation has been performed. This work has been carried out in collaboration with and as a contribution to the European Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network of Evaluations.

Pfeiffer, B., E-mail: bpfeiffe@uni-mainz.de [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Gießen (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Venkataramaniah, K. [Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prasanthinilayam (India)] [Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prasanthinilayam (India); Czok, U. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Gießen (Germany)] [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Gießen (Germany); Scheidenberger, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany) [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Gießen (Germany)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced beam dynamics Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

beam-beam interactions with large beam-beam parameter Summary: 1 . The dynamics of the beams could therefore be com- plicated by multimode oscillations of the beam... with...

407

Cascaded injection resonator for coherent beam combining of laser arrays  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides a cascaded injection resonator for coherent beam combining of laser arrays. The resonator comprises a plurality of laser emitters arranged along at least one plane and a beam sampler for reflecting at least a portion of each laser beam that impinges on the beam sampler, the portion of each laser beam from one of the laser emitters being reflected back to another one of the laser emitters to cause a beam to be generated from the other one of the laser emitters to the beam reflector. The beam sampler also transmits a portion of each laser beam to produce a laser output beam such that a plurality of laser output beams of the same frequency are produced. An injection laser beam is directed to a first laser emitter to begin a process of generating and reflecting a laser beam from one laser emitter to another laser emitter in the plurality. A method of practicing the invention is also disclosed.

Kireev, Vassili [Sunnyvale, CA; Liu, Yun; Protopopescu, Vladimir [Knoxville, TN; Braiman, Yehuda [Oak Ridge, TN

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

408

Optical remote diagnostics of atmospheric propagating beams of ionizing radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Data is obtained for use in diagnosing the characteristics of a beam of ionizing radiation, such as charged particle beams, neutral particle beams, and gamma ray beams. In one embodiment the beam is emitted through the atmosphere and produces nitrogen fluorescence during passage through air. The nitrogen fluorescence is detected along the beam path to provide an intensity from which various beam characteristics can be calculated from known tabulations. Optical detecting equipment is preferably located orthogonal to the beam path at a distance effective to include the entire beam path in the equipment field of view.

Karl, Jr., Robert R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Galaxy Cosmological Mass Function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the galaxy cosmological mass function (GCMF) in a semi-empirical relativistic approach using observational data provided by galaxy redshift surveys. Starting from the theory of Ribeiro & Stoeger (2003, arXiv:astro-ph/0304094) between the mass-to-light ratio, the selection function obtained from the luminosity function (LF) data and the luminosity density, the average luminosity $L$ and the average galactic mass $\\mathcal{M}_g$ are computed in terms of the redshift. $\\mathcal{M}_g$ is also alternatively estimated by a method that uses the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF). Comparison of these two forms of deriving the average galactic mass allows us to infer a possible bias introduced by the selection criteria of the survey. We used the FORS Deep Field galaxy survey sample of 5558 galaxies in the redshift range $0.5 light ratio and its GSMF data. Assuming ${\\mathcal{M}_{g_0}} \\approx 10^{11} \\mathcal{M}_\\odot$ as the local value of the average galactic mass, the LF approach results in $L_{B} \\propto (1+z)^{(2.40 \\pm 0.03)}$ and $\\mathcal{M}_g \\propto (1+z)^{(1.1\\pm0.2)}$. However, using the GSMF results produces $\\mathcal{M}_g \\propto (1+z)^{(-0.58 \\pm 0.22)}$. We chose the latter result as it is less biased. We then obtained the theoretical quantities of interest, such as the differential number counts, to calculate the GCMF, which can be fitted by a Schechter function. The derived GCMF follows theoretical predictions in which the less massive objects form first, being followed later by more massive ones. In the range $0.5 < z < 2.0$ the GCMF has a strong variation that can be interpreted as a higher rate of galaxy mergers or as a strong evolution in the star formation history of these galaxies.

Amanda R. Lopes; Alvaro Iribarrem; Marcelo B. Ribeiro; William R. Stoeger

2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

410

Impact parameter dependence of isospin effects on the mass dependence of balance energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the effect of isospin degree of freedom on the balance energy as well as its mass dependence throughout the mass range 48-270 for two sets of isobaric systems with N/Z = 1 and 1.4 using isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (IQMD) model. Our fndings reveal the dominance of Coulomb repulsion in isospin effects on balance energy as well as its mass dependence throughout the range of the colliding geometry.

Sakshi Gautam; Aman D Sood

2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

411

Mass of Ne-16  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1983 The American Physical Society 28 C. J. WOODWARD, R. E. TRIBBLE, AND D. M. TANNER 27 tron rf. A 0.3 mm Kapton absorber foil was insert- ed after the proportional counter in order to ensure that the He particles stopped in the Si detector...PHYSICAL REVIEWER C VOLUME 27, NUMBER 1 Mass of ' Ne JANUARY 1983 C. J. Woodward, * R. E. Tribble, and D. M. Tanner Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 23 August 1982) The mass of ' Ne has been...

Woodward, C. J.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tanner, D. M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Note: A real-time beam current density meter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a real-time beam current density meter for charged particle beams. It measures the mean current density by collimating a uniform and large diameter primary beam. The suppression of the secondary electrons and the deflection of the beam were simulated, and it was tested with a 105 keV Ar{sup 7+} ion beam.

Liu Junliang; Yu Deyang; Ruan Fangfang; Xue Yingli; Wang Wei [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Polarization of fast particle beams by collisional pumping  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus for highly polarizing a fast beam of particles by collisional pumping, including generating a fast beam of particles, and also generating a thick electron-spin-polarized medium positioned as a target for the beam. The target is made sufficiently thick to allow the beam to interact with the medium to produce collisional pumping whereby the beam becomes highly polarized.

Stearns, J. Warren (Castro Valley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA); Pyle, Robert V. (Berkeley, CA); Anderson, L. Wilmer (Madison, WI); Ruby, Lawrence (Berkeley, CA); Schlachter, Alfred S. (Oakland, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Non-dissipative boundary feedback for Rayleigh and Timoshenko beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-dissipative boundary feedback for Rayleigh and Timoshenko beams Chris Guiver and Mark R. Opmeer-dissipative feedback that has been shown in the literature to exponentially stabilize an Euler-Bernoulli beam makes a Rayleigh beam and a Timoshenko beam unstable. 1 Introduction Feedback control of beams is a much studied

Opmeer, Mark

415

Aerodynamic beam generator for large particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new type of aerodynamic particle beam generator is disclosed. This generator produces a tightly focused beam of large material particles at velocities ranging from a few feet per second to supersonic speeds, depending on the exact configuration and operating conditions. Such generators are of particular interest for use in additive fabrication techniques.

Brockmann, John E. (Albuquerque, NM); Torczynski, John R. (Albuquerque, NM); Dykhuizen, Ronald C. (Albuquerque, NM); Neiser, Richard A. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Mark F. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Structure of pulsar beams: conal versus patchy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structure of mean pulsar radiation patterns is discussed within the nested-cones and patchy beam models. Observational predictions of both these models are analyzed and compared with available data on pulsar waveforms. It is argued that observational properties of pulsar waveforms are highly consistent with the nested-cone model and, in general, inconsistent with the patchy beam model.

J. Kijak; J. Gil

2002-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

417

RESOLVING BEAM TRANSPORT PROBLEMS IN ELECTROSTATIC ACCELERATORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESOLVING BEAM TRANSPORT PROBLEMS IN ELECTROSTATIC ACCELERATORS J. D. LARSON (*) Oak Ridge National are frequently encounte- red during the design, operation and upgrading of electrostatic accelerators. Examples are provided of analytic procedures that clarify accelerator ion optics and lead to more effective beam

Boyer, Edmond

418

High-energy electron beam technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-energy electron beam (HEEB) technology was developed under the US Department of Defense (DOD) charged-particle-beam (CPB) directed-energy program. The program's objective was advanced military weapon systems. For the past two decades, charged-particle-beam research focused on producing intense beams and the vehicles to deliver large amounts of electrical energy. The charged-particle beams of interest for weapon systems had particle energies up to 100 MeV, beam currents of tens of kiloamperes, and propagation distances in excess of 100 m. However, such high energy levels are not required for industrial uses of the technology. It is anticipated that these less-aggressive beams will provide an electrical heat source suitable for a variety of materials processing applications, including surface treatment, joining, shock hardening, phase-transformation hardening, peening, shock-wave compaction, and melting. Much more R and D is needed to transfer to industry the high-energy electron beam technology developed in the CPB program. For example, its power as a materials processing tool must be convincingly demonstrated. Also required are compact, reliable accelerators that are relatively simple to use and reasonably priced.

Danko, J.C.; Lundin, C.D. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)); Nolting, E.E. (Naval Surface Warfare Center, White Oak, MD (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Fast Beam-Based BPM Calibration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Alignment Diagnostic System (ADS) of the LCLS undulator system indicates that the 33 undulator quadrupoles have extremely high position stability over many weeks. However, beam trajectory straightness and lasing efficiency degrade more quickly than this. A lengthy Beam Based Alignment (BBA) procedure must be executed every two to four weeks to re-optimize the X-ray beam parameters. The undulator system includes RF cavity Beam Position Monitors (RFBPMs), several of which are utilized by an automatic feedback system to align the incoming electron-beam trajectory to the undulator axis. The beam trajectory straightness degradation has been traced to electronic drifts of the gain and offset of the BPMs used in the beam feedback system. To quickly recover the trajectory straightness, we have developed a fast beam-based procedure to recalibrate the BPMs. This procedure takes advantage of the high-precision monitoring capability of the ADS, which allows highly repeatable positioning of undulator quadrupoles. This report describes the ADS, the position stability of the LCLS undulator quadrupoles, and some results of the new recovery procedure.

Bertsche, K.; Loos, H.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Peters, F.; /SLAC

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Emittance growth from electron beam modulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In linac ring colliders like MeRHIC and eRHIC a modulation of the electron bunch can lead to a modulation of the beam beam tune shift and steering errors. These modulations can lead to emittance growth. This note presents simple formulas to estimate these effects which generalize some previous results.

Blaskiewicz, M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

On the properties of Circular-Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Circular-Beams were introduced as a very general solution of the paraxial wave equation carrying Orbital Angular Momentum. Here we study their properties, by looking at their normalization and their expansion in terms of Laguerre-Gauss modes. We also study their far-field divergence and, for particular cases of the beam parameters, their possible experimental generation.

Giuseppe Vallone

2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

422

Polymer surface treatment with particle beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polymer surface and near surface treatment process produced by irradiation with high energy particle beams. The process is preferably implemented with pulsed ion beams. The process alters the chemical and mechanical properties of the polymer surface in a manner useful for a wide range of commercial applications.

Stinnett, Regan W. (1033 Tramway La. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); VanDevender, J. Pace (7604 Lamplighter NE., Albuquerque, NM 87109)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Polymer surface treatment with particle beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polymer surface and near surface treatment process produced by irradiation with high energy particle beams is disclosed. The process is preferably implemented with pulsed ion beams. The process alters the chemical and mechanical properties of the polymer surface in a manner useful for a wide range of commercial applications. 16 figs.

Stinnett, R.W.; VanDevender, J.P.

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

424

Beam characterization at the Neutron Radiography Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quality of a neutron-imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, potential image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This paper provides a characterization of the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio and potential image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. The NRAD has an effective collimation ratio greater than 125, a beam divergence of 0.3 +_ 0.1 degrees, and a gold foil cadmium ratio of 2.7. The flux profile has been quantified and the facility is an ASTM Category 1 radiographic facility. Based on bare and cadmium covered foil activation results, the neutron energy spectrum used in the current MCNP model of the radiography beamline over-samples the thermal region of the neutron energy spectrum.

Sarah W. Morgan; Jeffrey C. King; Chad L. Pope

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

LCDETxxxxxxx Improved TESLA Optics and Beam Induced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LC­DET­xxxx­xxx Improved TESLA Optics and Beam Induced Backgrounds Update Karsten BË?uÃ?er, DESY and Olivier Napoly, CEA/Saclay LCWS 2002, Jeju, Korea Abstract A new tesla optics with l*=5m is under development. An update is given on the simulation of the beam induced backgrounds in the TESLA detector. 1

426

Policy Issues for Retail Beamed Power Transmission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar electric power using retail delivery of beamed power. Recent advances in power beaming have made to enable widespread adoption of this clean and sustainable contribution to meeting energy needs. It is seen to micro-renewable energy resource exploitation since wired power transmission is only cost effective over

427

Molecular Squares as Molecular Sieves: Size-Selective Transport Through  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular Squares as Molecular Sieves: Size-Selective Transport Through Porous-Membrane squaresº: cyclic structures typically featuring metal-ion cor- ners and difunctional bridging ligands processes: size-selective molecular transport from a guest-containing solution to one initially free

428

GPU-optimized Code for Long-term Simulations of Beam-beam Effects in Colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the development of the new code for long-term simulation of beam-beam effects in particle colliders. The underlying physical model relies on a matrix-based arbitrary-order symplectic particle tracking for beam transport and the Bassetti-Erskine approximation for beam-beam interaction. The computations are accelerated through a parallel implementation on a hybrid GPU/CPU platform. With the new code, a previously computationally prohibitive long-term simulations become tractable. We use the new code to model the proposed medium-energy electron-ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab.

Roblin, Yves [JLAB; Morozov, Vasiliy [JLAB; Terzic, Balsa [JLAB; Aturban, Mohamed A. [Old Dominion University; Ranjan, D. [Old Dominion University; Zubair, Mohammed [Old Dominion University

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Optimization of beam configuration in laser fusion based on the laser beam pattern  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simple method based on the laser beam pattern is proposed and numerically demonstrated to optimize a beam configuration for direct drive laser fusion. In this method, both the geometrical factor G{sub l} and the single beam factor B{sub l} are considered. By diminishing the product of B{sub l}·G{sub l}, the irradiation nonuniformity can be decreased to the order of 10{sup ?5}. This optimization method can be applied on the design of irradiation systems for an arbitrary number of beams and any axially symmetric beam patterns.

Xu, Teng; Xu, Lixin; Wang, Anting; Gu, Chun; Wang, Shengbo; Liu, Jing; Wei, Ankun [Department of Optics and Optical Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)] [Department of Optics and Optical Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Carbon Fiber Damage in Particle Beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in beam wire scanners. The heating of the fiber due to energy loss of the particles travelling through is simulated with Geant4. The heating induced by the beam electromagnetic field is estimated with ANSYS. The heat transfer and sublimation processes are modelled. Due to the model nonlinearity, a numerical approach based on discretization of the wire movement is used to solve it for particular beams. Radiation damage to the fiber is estimated with SRIM. The model is tested with available SPS and LEP data and a dedicated damage test on the SPS beam is performed followed by a post-mortem analysis of the wire remnants. Predictions for the LHC beams are made.

Dehning, B; Kroyer, T; Meyer, M; Sapinski, M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Microwave accelerator E-beam pumped laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device and method for pumping gaseous lasers by means of a microwave accelerator. The microwave accelerator produces a relativistic electron beam which is applied along the longitudinal axis of the laser through an electron beam window. The incident points of the electron beam on the electron beam window are varied by deflection coils to enhance the cooling characteristics of the foil. A thyratron is used to reliably modulate the microwave accelerator to produce electron beam pulses which excite the laser medium to produce laser pulse repetition frequencies not previously obtainable. An aerodynamic window is also disclosed which eliminates foil heating problems, as well as a magnetic bottle for reducing laser cavity length and pressures while maintaining efficient energy deposition.

Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Stein, William E. (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Soft beams: when capillarity induces axial compression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the interaction of an elastic beam with a liquid drop in the case where bending and extensional effects are both present. We use a variational approach to derive equilibrium equations and constitutive relation for the beam. This relation is shown to include a term due to surface energy in addition of the classical Young's modulus term, leading to a modification of Hooke's law. At the triple point where solid, liquid, and vapor phases meet we find that the external force applied on the beam is parallel to the liquid-vapor interface. Moreover, in the case where solid-vapor and solid-liquid interface energies do not depend on the extension state of the beam, we show that the extension in the beam is continuous at the triple point and that the wetting angle satisfy the classical Young-Dupr\\'e relation.

Sébastien Neukirch; Arnaud Antkowiak; Jean-Jacques Marigo

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

433

SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM CURRENT MONITOR ELECTRONICS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to be constructed at ORNL is a collaboration of six laboratories. Beam current monitors for SNS will be used to monitor H-minus and H-plus beams ranging from the 15 mA (tune-up in the Front End and Linac) to over 60 A fully accumulated in the Ring. The time structure of the beams to be measured range from 645 nsec ''mini'' bunches, at the 1.05 MHz ring revolution rate, to an overall 1 mS long macro pulse. Beam current monitors (BCMs) for SNS have requirements depending upon their location within the system. The development of a general approach to satisfy requirements of various locations with common components is a major design objective. This paper will describe the development of the beam current monitors and electronics.

KESSELMAN, M.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

434

Ion Beam Deposition of Thin Films: Growth Processes and Nanostructure Formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion beam deposition is a process far from thermodynamic equilibrium and is in particular suited to grow metastable thin films with diamond-like properties, such as tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) and cubic boron nitride (c-BN). In this contribution the atomistic description of the deposition and growth processes are reviewed and compared to experimental results, obtained from mass selected ion beam deposition. The focus will be set to the nucleation and growth processes of boron nitride as a model system for ion based thin film formation. Furthermore, recent examples for nanostructure formation in ion deposited compound thin films will be presented. Ion beam deposited metal-carbon nano-composite thin films exhibit a variety of different morphologies such as rather homogeneous nanocluster distributions embedded in an a-C matrix, but also the self-organized formation of nanoscale multilayer structures.

Hofsaess, Hans C. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Measurement of the Neutron Lifetime by Counting Trapped Protons in a Cold Neutron Beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A measurement of the neutron lifetime $\\tau_{n}$ performed by the absolute counting of in-beam neutrons and their decay protons has been completed. Protons confined in a quasi-Penning trap were accelerated onto a silicon detector held at a high potential and counted with nearly unit efficiency. The neutrons were counted by a device with an efficiency inversely proportional to neutron velocity, which cancels the dwell time of the neutron beam in the trap. The result is $\\tau_{n} = (886.6\\pm1.2{\\rm [stat]}\\pm3.2{\\rm [sys]})$ s, which is the most precise measurement of the lifetime using an in-beam method. The systematic uncertainty is dominated by neutron counting, in particular the mass of the deposit and the $^{6}$Li({\\it{n,t}}) cross section. The measurement technique and apparatus, data analysis, and investigation of systematic uncertainties are discussed in detail.

J. S. Nico; M. S. Dewey; D. M. Gilliam; F. E. Wietfeldt; X. Fei; W. M. Snow; G. L. Greene; J. Pauwels; R. Eykens; A. Lamberty; J. Van Gestel; R. D. Scott

2004-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

436

Heavy ion beam loss mechanisms at an electron-ion collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are currently several proposals to build a high-luminosity electron-ion collider, to study the spin structure of matter and measure parton densities in heavy nuclei, and to search for gluon saturation and new phenomena like the colored glass condensate. These measurements require operation with heavy-nuclei. We calculate the cross-sections for two important processes that will affect accelerator and detector operations: bound-free pair production, and Coulomb excitation of the nuclei. Both of these reactions have large cross-sections, 28-56 mb, which can lead to beam ion losses, produce beams of particles with altered charge:mass ratio, and produce a large flux of neutrons in zero degree calorimeters. The loss of beam particles limits the sustainable electron-ion luminosity to levels of several times $10^{32}/$cm$^2$/s.

Spencer R. Klein

2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

437

Mass Extinctions Geology 331  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into shallow water and released to atmosphere. · Oxidation of coal and hydrocarbons by extensive erosion of sedimentary rocks, and/or massive volcanic eruptions in Siberia? CH2O + O2 CO2 +H2O · Release of methane by rapid influx of C12 caused by methane release and mass dying at the end of the Permian. Organisms

Kammer, Thomas

438

Residential Thermal Mass Construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The southwest has long known the value of building homes with high mass materials. The ancient Pueblo Indians found that by using "adobe" they could capture the energy necessary to survive the harsh desert climate. Our ancestors knew that a heavy...

Thieken, J. S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Deep Beams and Slabs The purpose of skin reinforcement in a deep beam is to limit the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep Beams and Slabs Deep Beams The purpose of skin reinforcement in a deep beam is to limit require different amounts of skin reinforcement. The purpose of our experiment is to compare beams designed with the different amounts of skin reinforcement required by these codes. 3 deep beams following

Barthelat, Francois

440

E-Print Network 3.0 - average beam power Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at target, trajectory (M) Screen positions (M... S. Childress -- Proton BeamsProton Beams 1616 Main Injector Beam Power 2008Main Injector Beam Power 2008 Main... ... Source:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Broadband microwave burst produced by electron beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretical and experimental study of fast electron beams attracts a lot of attention in the astrophysics and laboratory. In the case of solar flares the problem of reliable beam detection and diagnostics is of exceptional importance. This paper explores the fact that the electron beams moving oblique to the magnetic field or along the field with some angular scatter around the beam propagation direction can generate microwave continuum bursts via gyrosynchrotron mechanism. The characteristics of the microwave bursts produced by beams differ from those in case of isotropic or loss-cone distributions, which suggests a new tool for quantitative diagnostics of the beams in the solar corona. To demonstrate the potentiality of this tool, we analyze here a radio burst occurred during an impulsive flare 1B/M6.7 on 10 March 2001 (AR 9368, N27W42). Based on detailed analysis of the spectral, temporal, and spatial relationships, we obtained firm evidence that the microwave continuum burst is produced by electron beams. For the first time we developed and applied a new forward fitting algorithm based on exact gyrosynchrotron formulae and employing both the total power and polarization measurements to solve the inverse problem of the beam diagnostics. We found that the burst is generated by a oblique beam in a region of reasonably strong magnetic field ($\\sim 200-300$ G) and the burst is observed at a quasi-transverse viewing angle. We found that the life time of the emitting electrons in the radio source is relatively short, $\\tau_l \\approx 0.5$ s, consistent with a single reflection of the electrons from a magnetic mirror at the foot point with the stronger magnetic field. We discuss the implications of these findings for the electron acceleration in flares and for beam diagnostics.

A. T. Altyntsev; G. D. Fleishman; G. -L. Huang; V. F. Melnikov

2007-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

442

Nanostructured Silicon Membranes for Control of Molecular Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A membrane that allows selective transport of molecular species requires precise engineering on the nanoscale. Membrane permeability can be tuned by controlling the physical structure of the pores. Here, a combination of electron-beam and optical lithography, along with cryogenic deep reactive ion etching, has been used to fabricate silicon membranes that are physically robust, have uniform pore-sizes, and are directly integrated into a microfluidic network. Additional reductions in pore size were achieved using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon dioxide to coat membrane surfaces. Cross sectioning of the membranes using focused ion beam milling was used to determine the physical shape of the membrane pores before and after coating.

Srijanto, Bernadeta R [ORNL] [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL] [ORNL; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson [ORNL] [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Nuclear dynamics at the balance energy of mass asymmetric colliding nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the quantum molecular dynamics model, we study the nuclear dynamics at the balance energy of mass asymmetric colliding nuclei by keeping the total mass of the system fixed as 40, 80, 160, and 240. The calculations are performed by varying the mass asymmetry ($\\eta$ = $\\frac{A_{T}-A_{P}}{A_{T}+A_{P}}$; where $A_{T}$ and $A_{P}$ are the masses of the target and projectile, respectively) of the reaction from 0.1 to 0.7. In particular, we study the various quantities like average and maximum density, collision rate, participant-spectator matter, anisotropic ratio, relative momentum as well as their mass asymmetry and mass dependence. We find sizeable effects of mass asymmetry on these quantities. Our results indicate that the mass dependence of various quantities increases slightly with increase in $\\eta$.

Supriya Goyal

2011-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

444

Horizontal Beam Tubes - HFIR Technical Parameters | ORNL Neutron...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Beam Tubes The reactor has four horizontal beam tubes that supply the neutrons to the neutron scattering instruments. Details for each beam tube and instrument can be found on...

445

Interference of a pair of symmetric partially coherent beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

optical effects; (140.3300) Laser beam shaping; (350.5500)of symmetric Collett-Wolf beams,” Opt. Lett. 30, 1605–1607 (of highly directional light beams? ”, Opt. Lett. 2, 27–29 (

Garc?a-Guerrero, E. E.; Mendez, E. R.; Gu, Zu-Han; Leskova, T. A.; Maradudin, A. A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques recoil separators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques recoil separators approach! · directly Smith, Rolfs, Barnes NIMA306 (1991) 233 #12;michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques;michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques recoil separators proof of concept with 12C

447

Riddle of the Neutrino Mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss some known approaches and results as well as few new ideas concerning origins and nature of neutrino mass. The key issues include (i) connections of neutrino and charged fermions masses, relation between masses and mixing, energy scale of new physics behind neutrino mass where possibilities spread from the Planck and GUT masses down to a sub-eV scale. The data hint two different new physics involved in generation of neutrino mass. Determination of the CP phase as well as mass hierarchy can play important role in identification of new physics. It may happen that sterile neutrinos provide the key to resolve the riddle.

Smirnov, A Yu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Molecular Selectivity of Brown Carbon Chromophores  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complementary methods of high-resolution mass spectrometry and micro-spectroscopy were utilized for molecular analysis of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from ozonolysis of two structural monoterpene isomers: D-limonene (LSOA) and a-pinene (PSOA). Laboratory simulated aging of LSOA and PSOA, through conversion of carbonyls into imines mediated by NH3 vapors in humid air, resulted in selective browning of the LSOA sample, while the PSOA sample remained white. Comparative analysis of the reaction products in the aged LSOA and PSOA samples provided insights into chemistry relevant to formation of brown carbon chromophores. A significant fraction of carbonyl-imine conversion products with identical molecular formulas were detected in both samples. This reflects the high level of similarity in the molecular composition of these two closely related SOA materials. Several highly conjugated products were detected exclusively in the brown LSOA sample and were identified as potential chromophores responsible for the observed color change. The majority of the unique products in the aged LSOA sample with the highest number of double bonds contain two nitrogen atoms. We conclude that chromophores characteristic of the carbonyl- imine chemistry in LSOA are highly conjugated oligomers of secondary imines (Schiff bases) present at relatively low concentrations. Formation of this type of conjugated compounds in PSOA is hindered by the structural rigidity of the a-pinene oxidation products. Our results suggest that the overall light-absorbing properties of SOA may be determined by trace amounts of strong brown carbon chromophores.

Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Roach, Patrick J.; Eckert, Peter A.; Gilles, Mary K.; Wang, Bingbing; Lee, Hyun Ji; Hu, Qichi

2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

449

Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high-power-density laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems.

Lasche, George P. (Arlington, VA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high-power-density-laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems. 25 figs.

Lasche, G.P.

1987-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

451

Interaction between corrosion crack width and steel loss in RC beams corroded under load  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents results and discussions on an experimental study conducted to relate the rate of widening of corrosion cracks with the pattern of corrosion cracks as well as the level of steel corrosion for RC beams (153 x 254 x 3000 mm) that were corroded whilst subjected to varying levels of sustained loads. Steel corrosion was limited to the tensile reinforcement and to a length of 700 mm at the centre of the beams. The rate of widening of corrosion cracks as well as strains on uncracked faces of RC beams was constantly monitored during the corrosion process, along the corrosion region and along other potential cracking faces of beams using a demec gauge. The distribution of the gravimetric mass loss of steel along the corrosion region was measured at the end of the corrosion process. The results obtained showed that: the rate of widening of each corrosion crack is dependent on the overall pattern of the cracks whilst the rate of corrosion is independent of the pattern of corrosion cracks. A mass loss of steel of 1% was found to induce a corrosion crack width of about 0.04 mm.

Malumbela, Goitseone, E-mail: malumbela@mopipi.ub.b [Dpt. of Civil Eng., Univ. of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch, 7700 (South Africa); Alexander, Mark; Moyo, Pilate [Dpt. of Civil Eng., Univ. of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch, 7700 (South Africa)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Bound state spectra of three-body muonic molecular ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The results of highly accurate calculations are presented for all twenty-two known bound $S(L = 0)-, P(L = 1)-, D(L = 2)-$ and $F(L = 3)-$states in the six three-body muonic molecular ions $pp\\mu, pd\\mu, pt\\mu, dd\\mu, dt\\mu$ and $tt\\mu$. A number of bound state properties of these muonic molecular ions have been determined numerically to high accuracy. The dependence of the total energies of these muonic molecules upon particle masses is considered. We also discuss the current status of muon-catalysis of nuclear fusion reactions.

Alexei M. Frolov; David M. Wardlaw

2010-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

453

Bound state spectra of three-body muonic molecular ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The results of highly accurate calculations are presented for all twenty-two known bound $S(L = 0)-, P(L = 1)-, D(L = 2)-$ and $F(L = 3)-$states in the six three-body muonic molecular ions $pp\\mu, pd\\mu, pt\\mu, dd\\mu, dt\\mu$ and $tt\\mu$. A number of bound state properties of these muonic molecular ions have been determined numerically to high accuracy. The dependence of the total energies of these muonic molecules upon particle masses is considered. We also discuss the current status of muon-catalysis of nuclear fusion reactions.

Frolov, Alexei M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Molecular transformations in hydroprocessing - a cycloalkyl-coronene conundrum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focused on the molecular transformations of polycyclic aromatic and hydroaromatic hydrocarbons in hydroprocessing of vacuum gas oils. High performance liquid chromatography with UV diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and field ionization mass spectrometry (FIMS) were used to elucidate the composition of hydroprocessed oils. Detailed compositional data reveal the presence of large polycyclic aromatic and cycloalkylaromatic species having up to eleven fused rings. Discovery of cycloalkyl-coronenes, having up to four naphthenic rings which are peri-fused to a coronene aromatic ring-core is of particular interest because these compounds are not native to petroleum. The molecular transformations leading to their formation are discussed.

Boduszynski, M.M. [Chevron Research and Technology Company, Richmond, CA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

455

Comparison of experimental data and three-dimensional simulations of ion beam neutralization from the Neutralized Transport Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Greenway, B. Logan, R. MacGill, D. Shuman et al., Phys. Rev. ST-Accel. Beams 7, 083501 2004 . Preformed-dimensional 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Along with detailed target images, 4D phase-space data with perveance,16 it is possible to scale the experi- ment to lower mass ions and particle energy as well

Gilson, Erik

456

Long Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

neutralizing plasma column the heavy ion beam can focus to aPlasmas are a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing intense heavy ion beams to focus

Efthimion, P.C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Lasers, Electron Beams and New Years Resolutions | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lasers, Electron Beams and New Years Resolutions Lasers, Electron Beams and New Years Resolutions March 2, 2011 - 3:43pm Addthis Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer,...

458

Ion beam assisted deposition of thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus for depositing thermal barrier coatings on gas turbine blades and vanes using Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EBPVD) combined with Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD).

Youchison, Dennis L. (Albuquerque, NM); McDonald, Jimmie M. (Albuquerque, NM); Lutz, Thomas J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gallis, Michail A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

459

Nanoscale mass conveyors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mass transport method and device for individually delivering chargeable atoms or molecules from source particles is disclosed. It comprises a channel; at least one source particle of chargeable material fixed to the surface of the channel at a position along its length; a means of heating the channel; and a means for applying an controllable electric field along the channel, whereby the device transports the atoms or molecules along the channel in response to applied electric field. In a preferred embodiment, the mass transport device will comprise a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT), although other one dimensional structures may also be used. The MWNT or other structure acts as a channel for individual or small collections of atoms due to the atomic smoothness of the material. Also preferred is a source particle of a metal such as indium. The particles move by dissociation into small units, in some cases, individual atoms. The particles are preferably less than 100 nm in size.

Regan, Brian C. (Oakland, CA); Aloni, Shaul (Albany, CA); Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA)

2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

460

²?²Cf-plasma desorption mass spectrometry of RNA nucleosides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ CH5 + CH3 CH3 + CH4 ~ C2H5 + H2 Proton or hydride transfer reactions of these secondary ions with the sample molecule produce the major portion of the CI mass spectra. Because the molecular ions are formed by these chemical reactions... low, and co'1'lisional deactivation between sample fons and air molecules results in a loss of intensity and resolution for the sample ions detected. -7 The vacuum in the mass spectrometer is maintained in the 10 16 torr region by a Sargent...

Piper, Duane Gilbert

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molecular beam mass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Molecular Interaction between Botulinum Neurotoxin B and Its Protein  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8Mistakes to AvoidKinetics Molecular Beam

462

Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrospray Ionization (ESI) is a process whereby gas phase ions are created from molecules in solution. As a solution exits a narrow tube in the presence of a strong electric field, an aerosol of charged droplets are is formed that produces gas phase ions as they it desolvates. ESI-MS comprises the creation of ions by ESI and the determination of their mass to charge ratio (m/z) by MS.

Kelly, Ryan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

463

Beyond ITER: Neutral beams for DEMO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the development of magnetically confined fusion as an economically sustainable power source, ITER is currently under construction. Beyond ITER is the DEMO programme in which the physics and engineering aspects of a future fusion power plant will be demonstrated. DEMO will produce net electrical power. The DEMO programme will be outlined and the role of neutral beams for heating and current drive will be described. In particular, the importance of the efficiency of neutral beam systems in terms of injected neutral beam power compared to wallplug power will be discussed. Options for improving this efficiency including advanced neutralisers and energy recovery are discussed.

McAdams, R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Injected Beam Dynamics in SPEAR3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the top-off operation it is important to understand the time evolution of charge injected into the storage ring. The large-amplitude horizontal oscillation quickly filaments and decoheres, and in some cases exhibits non-linear x-y coupling before damping to the stored orbit. Similarly, in the longitudinal dimension, any mismatch in beam arrival time, beam energy or phase-space results in damped, non-linear synchrotron oscillations. In this paper we report on measurements of injection beam dynamics in the transverse and longitudinal planes using turn-by-turn BPMs, a fast-gated, image-intensified CCD camera and a Hamamatsu C5680 streak camera.

Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC; Fisher, Alan; /SLAC; Huang, Xiaobiao;