National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for mold prep cxs

  1. PREP

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesprep" target"blank">Pantex Renewable Energy Project (PREP) ribbon-cutting this week. PREP establishes thelargest...

  2. PREP

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    the Pantex Renewable Energy Project (PREP) ribbon-cutting this week. PREP establishes...

  3. LCLS Prep Lab Images | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LCLS Prep Lab Images « Back to LCLS Prep Laboratory LCLS Prep Lab LCLS Prep Lab, Acid Wash and Water Purifier LCLS Prep Lab, Corner LCLS FEH LCLS Prep Lab, Acetone LCLS Prep Lab, First Aid LCLS Prep Lab, pH LCLS Prep Lab, Lisa Hammon LCLS Prep Lab, Glass LCLS Prep Lab, Hazardous Waste Cabinet LCLS Prep Lab, Door Previous Pause Next

  4. Geoscience Prep Lab Slideshow | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geoscience Prep Lab Slideshow « Back to Geoscience Laboratory Geoscience Prep Lab Geoscience Prep Lab 2 Geoscience Prep Lab 3 Geoscience Prep Lab 4 Geoscience Prep Lab 5 Geoscience Prep Lab Door

  5. PREP | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Under Secretary Klotz delivers remarks at PREP ribbon-cutting Under Secretary Klotz delivered remarks at the Pantex Renewable Energy Project (PREP) ribbon-cutting this week. PREP ...

  6. BCM1 Prep Lab Slideshow | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BCM1 Prep Lab Slideshow « Back to BCM1 Prep Laboratory BCM1 Prep Lab Entry Entry BCM1 Prep Lab BCM1 Prep Lab Corner BCM1 Prep Lab Washing Station BCM1 Prep Lab Microscopes BCM1 Prep Lab Glove Box BCM1 Prep Lab Glove Box Detail

  7. BCM2 Prep Lab Slideshow | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BCM2 Prep Lab Slideshow « Back to BCM2 Prep Laboratory BCM2 Prep Lab BCM2 Prep Lab Station 2 BCM2 Prep Lab Washing Station BCM2 Prep Lab Glove Box BCM2 Prep Lab Station 4 BCM2 Prep Lab Station 5 BCM2 Prep Lab Glass

  8. Leatherwood prep plant upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollis, R.W.; Jain, S.M.

    2007-06-15

    The Blue Diamond Coal Co. recently implemented major circuit modifications to the Leatherwood coal preparation plant (formerly known as the J.K. Cornett prep plant) in Slemp, KY, USA. The plant was originally built in the late 1980s, and then modified in 1999. The 2006 plant modifications included: two Krebs 33-inch heavy-media cyclones; five 10 x 20 ft single deck Conn-Weld Banana type vibrating screens; two 10 ft x 48 inch Eriez self-leveling magnetic separators; two Derrick Stacksizer high frequency screens; two CMI EBR-48 centrifugal dryers; Warman process pumps; and eight triple start MDL spiral concentrators. 2 figs.

  9. JLab's Science Education Website Helps Students Prep for 2006...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JLab's Science Education Website Helps Students Prep for 2006 Standards of Learning Tests JLab's Science Education Website Helps Students Prep for 2006 Standards of Learning Tests ...

  10. INGOT MOLD

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mangold, A.J. Jr.; MaHaffey, J.W.; Reese, S.L.

    1958-04-29

    An improved ingot-mold assembly is described, consisting of a body having a cavity and a recess extending through to the bottom of the body from the cavity, and the bottom of the cavity having an internal shoulder extending downward and a plug having an external shoulder. The plug extends above the shoulders and below the bottom of the body.

  11. Production Risk Evaluation Program (PREP) - summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kjeldgaard, E.A.; Saloio, J.H.; Vannoni, M.G.

    1997-03-01

    Nuclear weapons have been produced in the US since the early 1950s by a network of contractor-operated Department of Energy (DOE) facilities collectively known as the Nuclear Weapon Complex (NWC). Recognizing that the failure of an essential process might stop weapon production for a substantial period of time, the DOE Albuquerque Operations office initiated the Production Risk Evaluation Program (PREP) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to assess quantitatively the potential for serious disruptions in the NWC weapon production process. PREP was conducted from 1984-89. This document is an unclassified summary of the effort.

  12. Sandia Energy - One-Pot-to-Prep Biomass for Biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    One-Pot-to-Prep Biomass for Biofuels Home Renewable Energy Energy Transportation Energy Biofuels Facilities Partnership JBEI News News & Events Research & Capabilities Biomass...

  13. Pyrotechnic filled molding powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartzel, Lawrence W.; Kettling, George E.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to thermosetting molding compounds and more particularly to a pyrotechnic filled thermosetting compound comprising a blend of unfilled diallyl phthalate molding powder and a pyrotechnic mixture.

  14. Polymer gel molds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walls, Claudia A.; Nunn, Stephen D.; Janney, Mark A.; McMillan, April D.; Kirby, Glen H.

    2002-01-01

    A polymer gel is formed into a mold defining a preselected shape. A flowable composition may be formed into a preselected shape via contact with the polymer gel mold.

  15. Molds for cable dielectrics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roose, L.D.

    1996-12-10

    Molds for use in making end moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of a cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made. 5 figs.

  16. Molds for cable dielectrics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roose, Lars D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01

    Molds for use in making end moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of a cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made.

  17. 3D blade mold

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    blade mold - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy ...

  18. Mold Materials For Permanent Molding of Aluminum Alloys (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Mold Materials For Permanent Molding of Aluminum Alloys A test that involves ... This test has been employed to determine the relative thermal fatigue resistance of ...

  19. Silicon micro-mold

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morales, Alfredo M.

    2006-10-24

    The present invention describes a method for rapidly fabricating a robust 3-dimensional silicon-mold for use in preparing complex metal micro-components. The process begins by depositing a conductive metal layer onto one surface of a silicon wafer. A thin photoresist and a standard lithographic mask are then used to transfer a trace image pattern onto the opposite surface of the wafer by exposing and developing the resist. The exposed portion of the silicon substrate is anisotropically etched through the wafer thickness down to conductive metal layer to provide an etched pattern consisting of a series of rectilinear channels and recesses in the silicon which serve as the silicon micro-mold. Microcomponents are prepared with this mold by first filling the mold channels and recesses with a metal deposit, typically by electroplating, and then removing the silicon micro-mold by chemical etching.

  20. Prepping Power Engineers for the Smart Grid | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Prepping Power Engineers for the Smart Grid Prepping Power Engineers for the Smart Grid June 19, 2012 - 4:01pm Addthis This video examines electrostatic induction, a phenomenon that means a conductive object in the vicinity of a power line may have energy coupled to it even if it's not connected to the line. Check out the other videos created by the partnership Bonneville Power Administration, Washington State University and the Northwest Workforce Training Center for Electric Power Engineering

  1. Controlling abrasion in coal prep plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, W.

    1996-12-31

    Maintenance departments in many industries are continually battling the daily fires that run costs up and productivity down. Many plants have equipment that must operate under wet sliding conditions which can lead to accelerated wear of the equipment. Electric power generating plants, for example, have ongoing maintenance concerns for piping, chutes, hoppers, heat exchangers, and valves. Pulp and paper plants have heavy maintenance on: plate screens, conical bottoms of blow tanks, chutes, and augers. Coal handling equipment is often subjected to wet sliding conditions. Utility and coal prep plants can have serious flow problems if an improper structural or wear material is selected. Vibrating screens, chutes, surge bin feeders, conical distributors, screw conveyors, and cyclones are some of the components that must resist the ravages of corrosion and wear. This paper will address many of the issues that affect the life of plant components under wet sliding conditions. Environmental effects and material effects will be examined. Since the material of construction is most times the easier to change, the paper will concentrate on this subject. Such factors as: hardness, surface roughness, corrodent, and material of construction will be explored. Both controlled laboratory studies and real world service evaluations will be presented.

  2. MOLDS FOR CASTING PLUTONIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, J.W.; Miley, F.; Pritchard, W.C.

    1962-02-27

    A coated mold for casting plutonium comprises a mold base portion of a material which remains solid and stable at temperatures as high as the pouring temperature of the metal to be cast and having a thin coating of the order of 0.005 inch thick on the interior thereof. The coating is composed of finely divided calcium fluoride having a particle size of about 149 microns. (AEC)

  3. Bureau of Land Management - Examples of Non-LUP Prep Plan or...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Bureau of Land Management - Examples of Non-LUP Prep Plan or EIS Prep Plan Abstract This page links to...

  4. Light Metals Permanent Mold Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2004-11-01

    The research will develop the gravity and/or low-pressure permanent-mold casting processes with sand or permanent-mold cores for aluminum and magnesium based alloys.

  5. End moldings for cable dielectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roose, L.D.

    1993-12-31

    End moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of the cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble- free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made. Disclosed are a method for making the cable connectors either in the field or in a factory, molds suitable for use with the method, and the molded cable connectors, themselves.

  6. End moldings for cable dielectrics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roose, Lars D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    End moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of the cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made. Disclosed is a method for making the cable connectors either in the field or in a factory, molds suitable for use with the method, and the molded cable connectors, themselves.

  7. REFRACTORY COATING FOR GRAPHITE MOLDS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoddard, S.D.

    1958-06-24

    Refractory coating for graphite molds used in the casting of uranium is described. The coating is an alumino-silicate refractory composition which may be used as a mold surface in solid form or as a coating applied to the graphite mold. The composition consists of a mixture of ball clay, kaolin, alumina cement, alumina, water, sodium silicate, and sodium carbonate.

  8. MOLDED SEALING ELEMENT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradford, B.W.; Skinner, W.J.

    1959-03-24

    Molded sealing elements suitable for use under conditions involving exposure to uranium hexafluoride vapor are described. Such sealing elements are made by subjecting graphitic carbons to a preliminary treatment with uranium hexafluoride vapor, and then incorporating polytetrafluorethylene in them. The resulting composition has good wear resistant and frictional properties and is resistant to disintegration by uranium hexafluoride over long periods of exposure.

  9. High Cost/High Risk Components to Chalcogenide Molded Lens Model: Molding Preforms and Mold Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2012-10-05

    This brief report contains a critique of two key components of FiveFocal's cost model for glass compression molding of chalcogenide lenses for infrared applications. Molding preforms and mold technology have the greatest influence on the ultimate cost of the product and help determine the volumes needed to select glass molding over conventional single-point diamond turning or grinding and polishing. This brief report highlights key areas of both technologies with recommendations for further study.

  10. Low-pressure injection molding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mangels, J.A. (Ceradyne Inc., Costa Mesa, CA (United States))

    1994-05-01

    Ceramic injection molding experienced a revival in the 1970s and 1980s with the application of ceramics for gas turbine components. Concurrently, techniques were being developed for the injection molding of powdered metal compositions into complex shaped articles. The impetus for the development of injection molding as a ceramic fabrication process lay in the potential to produce complex-shaped components to near-net shape. In the ceramic injection molding process, ceramic powders are processed to obtain the desired particle size, distribution and morphology and blended to obtain a homogeneous distribution. These powders are then mixed with the organic binders, generally in a heated, highshear mixer at temperatures above the melting point of the organic binders. The injection molding mix is pelletized, cooled and fed into an injection molding machine. The molding mix is reheated to a fluid state and injected under high pressure (7--70 MPa) into a die cavity. The molded part is removed from the tooling after the molding mix has solidified in the die. The organic binders are then removed from the component at temperatures up to 400 C, generally by some combination of wicking and thermal decomposition. Finally, the component is sintered to obtain its final ceramic properties, using conventional ceramic processes.

  11. Method for molding ceramic powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janney, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant for the metal-containing powder, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one multifunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and an organic solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, whereafter the product may be sintered.

  12. Method for molding ceramic powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janney, M.A.

    1990-01-16

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant for the metal-containing powder, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one multifunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and an organic solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, where after the product may be sintered.

  13. Under Secretary Klotz delivers remarks at PREP ribbon-cutting | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Under Secretary Klotz delivers remarks at PREP ribbon-cutting Wednesday, June 18, 2014 - 1:23pm Under Secretary Klotz delivered remarks at the Pantex Renewable Energy Project (PREP) ribbon-cutting this week. PREP establishes the largest federally-owned wind farm in the country and will generate approximately 47 million kilowatt-hours of electricity annually, more than 60 percent of the electricity needed for Pantex. The project will reduce CO2

  14. Molded polymer solar water heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourne, Richard C.; Lee, Brian E.

    2004-11-09

    A solar water heater has a rotationally-molded water box and a glazing subassembly disposed over the water box that enhances solar gain and provides an insulating air space between the outside environment and the water box. When used with a pressurized water system, an internal heat exchanger is integrally molded within the water box. Mounting and connection hardware is included to provide a rapid and secure method of installation.

  15. Staged mold for encapsulating hazardous wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Unger, Samuel L.; Telles, Rodney W.; Lubowitz, Hyman R.

    1990-01-01

    A staged mold for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  16. Staged mold for encapsulating hazardous wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Unger, Samuel L.; Telles, Rodney W.; Lubowitz, Hyman R.

    1988-01-01

    A staged mold for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  17. Ready, Set . . . Get Prepped for Monday's Launch of the 'America's Next

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Top Energy Innovator' Challenge | Department of Energy Ready, Set . . . Get Prepped for Monday's Launch of the 'America's Next Top Energy Innovator' Challenge Ready, Set . . . Get Prepped for Monday's Launch of the 'America's Next Top Energy Innovator' Challenge April 29, 2011 - 10:35am Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs The 'America's Next Top Energy Innovator' Challenge will begin on May 2. That means that starting on Monday,

  18. JLab's Science Education Website Helps Students Prep for 2006 Standards of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learning Tests | Jefferson Lab JLab's Science Education Website Helps Students Prep for 2006 Standards of Learning Tests JLab's Science Education Website Helps Students Prep for 2006 Standards of Learning Tests March 28, 2006 The use of Jefferson Lab's Science Education website is climbing as Virginia students prepare to take the spring 2006 Standards of Learning tests. "The most frequently accessed pages on our website include the Virginia Standards of Learning Science, Math and

  19. Students Use JLab Website to Prep for Virginia Standards of Learning Tests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Jefferson Lab Students Use JLab Website to Prep for Virginia Standards of Learning Tests Students Use JLab Website to Prep for Virginia Standards of Learning Tests NEWPORT NEWS, Va., April 20, 2011 - Thousands of Virginia students are expected to flock to Jefferson Lab's Science Education website just as they have done each spring for the past several years as they prepare for the Virginia Standards of Learning tests. Jefferson Lab recently received the 2010 SOL questions and responses

  20. Injection Molding of Plastics from Agricultural Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, M.; Ruan, R.

    2001-02-22

    The objective of this research was to conduct a systematic study to relate injection molding parameters to properties of blends of starch and synthetic polymer. From this study, we wished to develop a thorough understanding of the injection molding process and gain significant insight into designing molds and aiding in developing products cheaply and efficiently.

  1. HIGH TEMPERATURE REFRACTORY COATING FOR GRAPHITE MOLDS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoddard, S.D.

    1958-10-21

    An improved foundry mold coating for use with graphite molds used in the casting of uranium is presented. The refractory mold coating serves to keep the molten uranium from contact with graphite of the mold and thus prevents carbon pickup by the molten metal. The refractory coating is made by dry mixing certain specific amounts of aluminum oxide, bentonite, Tennessee ball clay, and a soluble silicate salt. Water is then added to the mixture and the suspension thus formed is applied by spraying onto the mold.

  2. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pekala, Richard W.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    1998-03-24

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50-800 kg/m.sup.3 (0.05-0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization.

  3. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pekala, R.W.; Hrubesh, L.W.

    1998-03-24

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner is disclosed. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50--800 kg/m{sup 3} (0.05--0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization. 4 figs.

  4. Porous media heat transfer for injection molding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2016-05-31

    The cooling of injection molded plastic is targeted. Coolant flows into a porous medium disposed within an injection molding component via a porous medium inlet. The porous medium is thermally coupled to a mold cavity configured to receive injected liquid plastic. The porous medium beneficially allows for an increased rate of heat transfer from the injected liquid plastic to the coolant and provides additional structural support over a hollow cooling well. When the temperature of the injected liquid plastic falls below a solidifying temperature threshold, the molded component is ejected and collected.

  5. Improved Magnesium Molding Process (Thixomolding) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    molding results in product yields of 50% and creates waste - scrap, slag, and dross. ... Eliminates slag and dross and their disposal problems. Waste Reduction Reduces scrap that ...

  6. Measuring the Transport of Siloxane-Based Mold Release Agents...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measuring the Transport of Siloxane-Based Mold Release Agents In An Encapsulation Mold. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measuring the Transport of Siloxane-Based Mold ...

  7. Dynamic Feed Control For Injection Molding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kazmer, David O.

    1996-09-17

    The invention provides methods and apparatus in which mold material flows through a gate into a mold cavity that defines the shape of a desired part. An adjustable valve is provided that is operable to change dynamically the effective size of the gate to control the flow of mold material through the gate. The valve is adjustable while the mold material is flowing through the gate into the mold cavity. A sensor is provided for sensing a process condition while the part is being molded. During molding, the valve is adjusted based at least in part on information from the sensor. In the preferred embodiment, the adjustable valve is controlled by a digital computer, which includes circuitry for acquiring data from the sensor, processing circuitry for computing a desired position of the valve based on the data from the sensor and a control data file containing target process conditions, and control circuitry for generating signals to control a valve driver to adjust the position of the valve. More complex embodiments include a plurality of gates, sensors, and controllable valves. Each valve is individually controllable so that process conditions corresponding to each gate can be adjusted independently. This allows for great flexibility in the control of injection molding to produce complex, high-quality parts.

  8. Low Cost Injection Mold Creation via Hybrid Additive and Conventional...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Low Cost Injection Mold Creation via Hybrid Additive and Conventional Manufacturing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low Cost Injection Mold Creation via Hybrid Additive ...

  9. Transforming Wind Turbine Blade Mold Manufacturing with 3D Printing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transforming Wind Turbine Blade Mold Manufacturing with 3D Printing Transforming Wind Turbine Blade Mold Manufacturing with 3D Printing Addthis Description Innovation in the design ...

  10. Castable plastic mold with electroplatable base

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Domeier, Linda A.; Morales, Alfredo M.; Gonzales, Marcela G.; Keifer, Patrick M.

    2004-01-20

    A sacrificial plastic mold having an electroplatable backing is provided as are methods of making such a mold via the infusion of a castable liquid formulation through a porous metal substrate (sheet, screen, mesh or foam) and into the features of a micro-scale master mold. Upon casting and demolding, the porous metal substrate is embedded within the cast formulation and projects a plastic structure with features determined by the mold tool. The plastic structure provides a sacrificial plastic mold mechanically bonded to the porous metal substrate, which provides a conducting support suitable for electroplating either contiguous or non-contiguous metal replicates. After electroplating and lapping, the sacrificial plastic can be dissolved, leaving the desired metal structure bonded to the porous metal substrate. Optionally, the electroplated structures may be debonded from the porous substrate by selective dissolution of the porous substrate or a coating thereon.

  11. Hydraulically-assisted compression molding material and process development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collister, J.E.; Butler, K.I.; Rinz, J.E. [Premix, Inc., North Kingsville, OH (United States)

    1996-11-01

    The Sheet Molding Compound (SMC) industry has recently seen an introduction of novel materials which are claimed to allow molders of SMC parts to alter their process to mold at substantially lower molding pressures. Although this is viewed as a major advantage for SMC molders, little description of molding processes has been given which take full advantage of these novel materials. The work reported in this paper describes one possible alternative process which will enable molders to capture the low-cost potential of reducing the required molding pressures. This process involves the use of low-cost mold construction, and the use of a novel method of applying molding pressure that obviates the need for a high-cost compression press, which causes the authors to apply a new name to this process; Hydraulic-Assisted Compression Molding. Molding results are presented for SMC which was designed to be molded at reduced pressures and temperatures (6.9 bar and 100 C).

  12. Sacrificial plastic mold with electroplatable base

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Domeier, Linda A.; Hruby, Jill M.; Morales, Alfredo M.

    2002-01-01

    A sacrificial plastic mold having an electroplatable backing is provided. One embodiment consists of the infusion of a softened or molten thermoplastic through a porous metal substrate (sheet, screen, mesh or foam) and into the features of a micro-scale molding tool contacting the porous metal substrate. Upon demolding, the porous metal substrate will be embedded within the thermoplastic and will project a plastic structure with features determined by the mold tool. This plastic structure, in turn, provides a sacrificial plastic mold mechanically bonded to the porous metal substrate which provides a conducting support suitable for electroplating either contiguous or non-contiguous metal replicates. After electroplating and lapping, the sacrificial plastic can be dissolved to leave the desired metal structure bonded to the porous metal substrate. Optionally, the electroplated structures may be debonded from the porous substrate by selective dissolution of the porous substrate or a coating thereon.

  13. Sacrificial Plastic Mold With Electroplatable Base

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Domeier, Linda A.; Hruby, Jill M.; Morales, Alfredo M.

    2005-08-16

    A sacrificial plastic mold having an electroplatable backing is provided. One embodiment consists of the infusion of a softened or molten thermoplastic through a porous metal substrate (sheet, screen, mesh or foam) and into the features of a micro-scale molding tool contacting the porous metal substrate. Upon demolding, the porous metal substrate will be embedded within the thermoplastic and will project a plastic structure with features determined by the mold tool. This plastic structure, in turn, provides a sacrificial plastic mold mechanically bonded to the porous metal substrate which provides a conducting support suitable for electroplating either contiguous or non-contiguous metal replicates. After electroplating and lapping, the sacrificial plastic can be dissolved to leave the desired metal structure bonded to the porous metal substrate. Optionally, the electroplated structures may be debonded from the porous substrate by selective dissolution of the porous substrate or a coating thereon.

  14. Black Bear Prep plant replaces high-frequency screens with fine wire sieves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, C.J.; Nottingham, J.

    2007-12-15

    At the Black Bear prep plant (near Wharncliffe, WV, USA) the clean coal from the spirals traditionally reported to high-frequency screens, which removed high-ash clay fines. Screens have inherent inefficiencies that allow clean coal to report to the screen underflow. The goal of this project was to capture the maximum amount of spiral clean coal while still removing the high-ash clay material found in the spiral product. The reduction of the circulating load and plant downtime for unscheduled maintenance were projected as additional benefits. After the plant upgrade, the maintenance related to the high frequency screens was eliminated and an additional 2.27 tons per hour (tph) of fine coal was recovered, which resulted in a payback period of less than one year. The article was adapted from a paper presented at Coal Prep 2007 in April 2007, Lexington, KY, USA. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Powder Injection Molding of Titanium Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Nyberg, Eric A.; Weil, K. Scott; Miller, Megan R.

    2005-01-01

    Powder injection molding (PIM) is a well-established, cost-effective method of fabricating small-to-moderate size metal components. Derived from plastic injection molding and employing a mixture of metal powder and plastic binder, the process has been used with great success in manufacturing a wide variety of metal products, including those made from stainless steel, nickel-based superalloys, and copper alloys. Less progress has been achieved with titanium and other refractory metal alloys because of problems with alloy impurities that are directly attributable to the injection molding process. Specifically, carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen are left behind during binder removal and become incorporated into the chemistry and microstructure of the material during densification. Even at low concentration, these impurities can cause severe degradation in the mechanical properties of titanium and its alloys. We have developed a unique blend of PIM constituents where only a small volume fraction of binder (~5 10 vol%) is required for injection molding; the remainder of the mixture consists of the metal powder and binder solvent. Because of the nature of decomposition in the binder system and the relatively small amount used, the binder is eliminated almost completely from the pre-sintered component during the initial stage of a two-step heat treatment process. Results will be presented on the first phase of this research, in which the binder, injection molding, de-binding and sintering schedule were developed. Additional data on the mechanical and physical properties of the material produced will be discussed.

  16. Method for encapsulating hazardous wastes using a staged mold

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Unger, Samuel L.; Telles, Rodney W.; Lubowitz, Hyman R.

    1989-01-01

    A staged mold and method for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  17. Numerical recipes for mold filling simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kothe, D.; Juric, D.; Lam, K.; Lally, B.

    1998-07-01

    Has the ability to simulate the filling of a mold progressed to a point where an appropriate numerical recipe achieves the desired results? If results are defined to be topological robustness, computational efficiency, quantitative accuracy, and predictability, all within a computational domain that faithfully represents complex three-dimensional foundry molds, then the answer unfortunately remains no. Significant interfacial flow algorithm developments have occurred over the last decade, however, that could bring this answer closer to maybe. These developments have been both evolutionary and revolutionary, will continue to transpire for the near future. Might they become useful numerical recipes for mold filling simulations? Quite possibly. Recent progress in algorithms for interface kinematics and dynamics, linear solution methods, computer science issues such as parallelization and object-oriented programming, high resolution Navier-Stokes (NS) solution methods, and unstructured mesh techniques, must all be pursued as possible paths toward higher fidelity mold filling simulations. A detailed exposition of these algorithmic developments is beyond the scope of this paper, hence the authors choose to focus here exclusively on algorithms for interface kinematics. These interface tracking algorithms are designed to model the movement of interfaces relative to a reference frame such as a fixed mesh. Current interface tracking algorithm choices are numerous, so is any one best suited for mold filling simulation? Although a clear winner is not (yet) apparent, pros and cons are given in the following brief, critical review. Highlighted are those outstanding interface tracking algorithm issues the authors feel can hamper the reliable modeling of today`s foundry mold filling processes.

  18. Transforming Wind Turbine Blade Mold Manufacturing with 3D Printing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transforming Wind Turbine Blade Mold Manufacturing with 3D Printing Transforming Wind Turbine Blade Mold Manufacturing with 3D Printing A screenshot of the cover of the 3D blade ...

  19. Gating of Permanent Molds for Aluminum Casting (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings. Equipment and procedure for real time X-Ray radiography of molten aluminum flow into permanent molds have been developed. ...

  20. Matched metal die compression molded structural random fiber sheet molding compound flywheel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Satish V.; Christensen, Richard M.; Toland, Richard H.

    1985-01-01

    A flywheel (10) is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel (10) has a body of essentially planar isotropic high strength structural random fiber sheet molding compound (SMC-R). The flywheel (10) may be economically produced by a matched metal die compression molding process. The flywheel (10) makes energy intensive efficient use of a fiber/resin composite while having a shape designed by theory assuming planar isotropy.

  1. Matched metal die compression molded structural random fiber sheet molding compound flywheel. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, S.V.; Christensen, R.M.; Toland, R.H.

    1980-09-24

    A flywheel is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel has a body of essentially planar isotropic high strength structural random fiber sheet molding compound (SMC-R). The flywheel may be economically produced by a matched metal die compression molding process. The flywheel makes energy intensive efficient use of a fiber/resin composite while having a shape designed by theory assuming planar isotropy.

  2. Houston Pre-Freshman Enrichment Program (Houston PREP). Final report, June 9, 1997--July 25, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    The 1997 Houston Pre-Freshman Enrichment Program (PREP) was conducted at the campus of the University of Houston-Downtown from June 9 to July 25, 1997. Program participants were recruited from the Greater Houston Area. All participants were identified as high-achieving students with an interest in learning about the engineering and science professions. The goal of the program was to better prepare our pre-college youth prior to entering college as mathematics, science and engineering majors. The program participants were middle school and high school students from the Aldine, Alief, Channel View, Clear Creek, Cypress-Fairbanks, Fort Bend, Galena Park, Houston, Humble, Katy, Klein, North Forest, Pasadena, Private, and Spring Branch Independent School Districts. Of the 194 students starting the program, 165 students were from economically and socially disadvantage groups under-represented in the engineering and science professions, and 118 of the 194 were women. Our First Year group for 1997 composed of 96% minority and women students. Second and Third Year students combined were 96% minority or women. With financial support from the Center for Computational Sciences and Advanced Distributed Simulation, the Fourth Year Program was added to PREP this year. Twelve students completed the program (83% minority or women).

  3. Houston prefreshman enrichment program (Houston PREP). Final report, June 10, 1996--August 1, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    The 1996 Houston Pre-freshman Enrichment Program (PREP) was conducted on the campus of the University of Houston-Downtown from June 10 to August 1, 1996. Program Participants were recruited from the Greater Houston area. All participants were identified as high achieving students with an interest in learning about the engineering and science professions. The goal of the program was to better prepare our pre-college youth prior to entering college as mathematics, science and engineering majors. The program participants were middle school and high school students from the Aldine, Alief, Channel View, Crockett, Cypress-Fairbanks, Fort Bend, Galena Park, Houston, Humble, Katy, Klein, North Forest, Pasadena, Private, and Spring Branch Independent School Districts. Of the 197 students starting the program, 170 completed, 142 students were from economically and socially disadvantage groups underrepresented in the engineering and science professions, and 121 of the 197 were female. Our First Year group for 1996 composed of 96% minority and women students. Our Second and Third Year students were 100% and 93.75% minority or women respectively. This gave an overall minority and female population of 93.75%. This year, special efforts were again made to recruit students from minority groups, which caused a significant increase in qualified applicants. However, due to space limitations, 140 applicants were rejected. Investigative and discovery learning were key elements of PREP. The academic components of the program included Algebraic Structures, Engineering, Introduction to Computer Science, Introduction to Physics, Logic and Its Application to Mathematics, Probability and Statistics, Problem Solving Seminar using computers and PLATO software, SAT Preparatory Seminars, and Technical Writing.

  4. Transforming Wind Turbine Blade Mold Manufacturing with 3D Printing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WORKING TOGETHER TO BUILD A FASTER AND LEANER FUTURE FOR WIND TURBINE BLADE MANUFACTURING ... For the wind industry, 3D printing could transform turbine blade mold manufacturing, ...

  5. Composite fabrication via resin transfer molding technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamison, G.M.; Domeier, L.A.

    1996-04-01

    The IMPReS (Integrated Modeling and Processing of Resin-based Structures) Program was funded in FY95 to consolidate, evaluate and enhance Sandia`s capabilities in the design and fabrication of composite structures. A key driver of this and related programs was the need for more agile product development processes and for model based design and fabrication tools across all of Sandia`s material technologies. A team of polymer, composite and modeling personnel was assembled to benchmark Sandia`s existing expertise in this area relative to industrial and academic programs and to initiate the tasks required to meet Sandia`s future needs. RTM (Resin Transfer Molding) was selected as the focus composite fabrication technology due to its versatility and growing use in industry. Modeling efforts focused on the prediction of composite mechanical properties and failure/damage mechanisms and also on the uncured resin flow processes typical of RTM. Appropriate molds and test composites were fabricated and model validation studies begun. This report summarizes and archives the modeling and fabrication studies carried out under IMPReS and evaluates the status of composite technology within Sandia. It should provide a complete and convenient baseline for future composite technology efforts within Sandia.

  6. Method for collecting spores from a mold

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Au, Frederick H. F.; Beckert, Werner F.

    1977-01-01

    A technique and apparatus used therewith for determining the uptake of plutonium and other contaminants by soil microorganisms which, in turn, gives a measure of the plutonium and/or other contaminants available to the biosphere at that particular time. A measured quantity of uncontaminated spores of a selected mold is added to a moistened sample of the soil to be tested. The mixture is allowed to sit a predetermined number of days under specified temperature conditions. An agar layer is then applied to the top of the sample. After three or more days, when spores of the mold growing in the sample have formed, the spores are collected by a miniature vacuum collection apparatus operated under preselected vacuum conditions, which collect only the spores with essentially no contamination by mycelial fragments or culture medium. After collection, the fungal spores are dried and analyzed for the plutonium and/or other contaminants. The apparatus is also suitable for collection of pollen, small insects, dust and other small particles, material from thin-layer chromatography plates, etc.

  7. Crack-resistant siloxane molding compounds. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McFarland, J.W.; Swearngin, C.B.

    1980-11-03

    The crack resistance of phenyl silicone molding resins containing siliceous fillers is improved by incorporating therein about 0.5 to 5.5% by weight of ..beta..-eucryptite, a lithium aluminum silicate having a negative thermal expansion coefficient. These molding resins are particularly suitable for encapsulating electronic devices such as diodes, coils, resistors, and the like.

  8. Silicon micro-mold and method for fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morales, Alfredo M.

    2005-01-11

    The present invention describes a method for rapidly fabricating a robust 3-dimensional silicon micro-mold for use in preparing complex metal micro-components. The process begins by depositing a conductive metal layer onto one surface of a silicon wafer. A thin photoresist and a standard lithographic mask are then used to transfer a trace image pattern onto the opposite surface of the wafer by exposing and developing the resist. The exposed portion of the silicon substrate is anisotropically etched through the wafer thickness down to conductive metal layer to provide an etched pattern consisting of a series of rectilinear channels and recesses in the silicon which serve as the silicon micro-mold. Microcomponents are prepared with this mold by first filling the mold channels and recesses with a metal deposit, typically by electroplating, and then removing the silicon micro-mold by chemical etching.

  9. Public health and economic impact of dampness and mold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudarri, David; Fisk, William J.

    2007-06-01

    The public health risk and economic impact of dampness and mold exposures was assessed using current asthma as a health endpoint. Individual risk of current asthma from exposure to dampness and mold in homes from Fisk et al. (2007), and asthma risks calculated from additional studies that reported the prevalence of dampness and mold in homes were used to estimate the proportion of U.S. current asthma cases that are attributable to dampness and mold exposure at 21% (95% confidence internal 12-29%). An examination of the literature covering dampness and mold in schools, offices, and institutional buildings, which is summarized in the appendix, suggests that risks from exposure in these buildings are similar to risks from exposures in homes. Of the 21.8 million people reported to have asthma in the U.S., approximately 4.6 (2.7-6.3) million cases are estimated to be attributable to dampness and mold exposure in the home. Estimates of the national cost of asthma from two prior studies were updated to 2004 and used to estimate the economic impact of dampness and mold exposures. By applying the attributable fraction to the updated national annual cost of asthma, the national annual cost of asthma that is attributable to dampness and mold exposure in the home is estimated to be $3.5 billion ($2.1-4.8 billion). Analysis indicates that exposure to dampness and mold in buildings poses significant public health and economic risks in the U.S. These findings are compatible with public policies and programs that help control moisture and mold in buildings.

  10. ''Heat Transfer at the Mold-Metal Interface in Permanent Mold Casting of Aluminum Alloys'' Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Professor R. D. Pehlke, Principal Investigator, Dr. John M. Cookson, Dr. Shouwei Hao, Dr. Prasad Krishna, Kevin T. Bilkey

    2001-12-14

    This project on heat transfer coefficients in metal permanent mold casting has been conducted in three areas. They are the theoretical study at the University of Michigan, the experimental investigation of squeeze casting at CMI-Tech Center (Now Hayes-Lemmerz Technical Center) and the experimental investigation of low pressure permanent mold casting at Amcast Automotive.

  11. Interface conditions of two-shot molded parts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisslinger, Thomas; Bruckmoser, Katharina Resch, Katharina; Lucyshyn, Thomas E-mail: guenter.langecker@unileoben.ac.at; Langecker, Guenter Ruediger E-mail: guenter.langecker@unileoben.ac.at; Holzer, Clemens

    2014-05-15

    The focus of this work is on interfaces of two-shot molded parts. It is well known that e.g. material combination, process parameters and contact area structures show significant effects on the bond strength of multi-component injection molded parts. To get information about the bond strength at various process parameter settings and material combinations a test mold with core back technology was used to produce two-component injection molded tensile test specimens. At the core back process the different materials are injected consecutively, so each component runs through the whole injection molding cycle (two-shot process). Due to this consecutive injection molding processes, a cold interface is generated. This is defined as overmolding of a second melt to a solidified polymer preform. Strong interest lies in the way the interface conditions change during the adhesion formation between the individual components. Hence the interface conditions were investigated by computed tomography and Raman spectroscopy. By analyzing these conditions the understanding of the adhesion development during the multi-component injection molding was improved.

  12. Residual orientation in micro-injection molded parts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Healy, John; Edward, Graham H.; Knott, Robert B. (Monash); (ANSTO)

    2008-06-30

    The residual orientation following micro-injection molding of small rectangular plates with linear polyethylene has been examined using small-angle neutron scattering, and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering. The effect of changing the molding conditions has been examined, and the residual chain orientation has been compared to the residual orientation of the crystallites as a function of position in the sample. This study has found that, for micromoldings, the orientation of the crystallites decreases with increasing injection speed and increasing mold thickness. The combined data suggest that the majority of the orientation present comes from oriented crystal growth rather than residual chain orientation.

  13. Method and mold for casting thin metal objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pehrson, Brandon P; Moore, Alan F

    2014-04-29

    Provided herein are various embodiments of systems for casting thin metal plates and sheets. Typical embodiments include layers of mold cavities that are oriented vertically for casting the metal plates. In some embodiments, the mold cavities include a beveled edge such that the plates that are cast have a beveled edge. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled with a molten metal through an open horizontal edge of the cavity. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled through one or more vertical feed orifices. Further disclosed are methods for forming a thin cast metal plate or sheet where the thickness of the cast part is in a range from 0.005 inches to 0.2 inches, and the surface area of the cast part is in a range from 16 square inches to 144 square inches.

  14. Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface Controls Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Josh A. Salmond

    2009-08-07

    The modernization of the Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface (MHC PP OI) consisted of upgrading the antiquated single board computer with a proprietary operating system to off-the-shelf hardware and off-the-shelf software with customizable software options. The pump package is the machine interface between a central heating and cooling system that pumps heat transfer fluid through an injection or compression mold base on a local plastic molding machine. The operator interface provides the intelligent means of controlling this pumping process. Strict temperature control of a mold allows the production of high quality parts with tight tolerances and low residual stresses. The products fabricated are used on multiple programs.

  15. Evaluation of Additive Manufacturing for Composite Part Molds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duty, Chad E.; Springfield, Robert M.

    2015-02-01

    The ORNL Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) collaborated with Tru-Design to test the quality and durability of molds used for making fiber reinforced composites using additive manufacturing. The partners developed surface treatment techniques including epoxy coatings and machining to improve the quality of the surface finish. Test samples made using the printed and surface finished molds demonstrated life spans suitable for one-of-a-kind and low-volume applications, meeting the project objective.

  16. Infrared curing simulations of liquid composites molding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakouzi, S.; Pancrace, J.; Schmidt, F. M.; Le Maoult, Y.; Berthet, F. [Universite de Toulouse (France); INSA, UPS, Mines Albi, ISAE, ICA - Institut Clement Ader, Campus Jarlard, F-81013 Albi cedex 09 (France); Ecole des Mines Albi, Campus Jarlard, F-81013 Albi (France)

    2011-05-04

    Infrared radiation is an effective energy source to cure thermosetting polymers. Its usage is expected to reduce curing time in comparison with thermal heating and mold thermally regulated. In addition, because of the polymerization mechanism and instant on-off control of this power, an improvement in the final properties of the material is also expected. In this paper, we studied the infrared interaction with carbon (or glass) fibers reinforced epoxy matrix, where Liquid resin infusion (LRI) is used to manufacture the composite. Temperature of the composite is a key parameter that affects its mechanical properties and is controlled by the infrared emitters and the exothermic heat released from the polymerization. Radiative heat flux is computed using the in-lab developed software RAYHEAT. Then, the heat flux (or absorbed energy for glass fibers) is exported to the finite element based program COMSOLMULTIPHYSICS where heat balance equation is solved. This equation is coupled with the exothermic heat released during the curing process in order to predict the composite temperature versus time and degree of cure. Numerical simulations will be performed on planar parts (sheet shape) as well as curvilinear shapes. Experimental validations of the infrared curing carbon (glass)-epoxy composite system are presented in this paper Sheet surface temperature distribution are measured thanks to infrared camera. Kinetic parameters were estimated from differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) experimental data.

  17. Investigation of Heat Transfer at the Mold/Metal Interface in Permanent Mold Casting of Light Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert D. Pehlke; John T. Berry

    2005-12-16

    Accurate modeling of the metal casting process prior to creating a mold design demands reliable knowledge of the interfacial heat transfer coefficient at the mold metal interface as a function of both time and location. The phenomena concerned with the gap forming between the mold and the solidifying metal are complex but need to be understood before any modeling is attempted. The presence of mold coatings further complicates the situation. A commercial casting was chosen and studied in a gravity permanent mold casting process. The metal/mold interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC) was the focus of the research. A simple, direct method has been used to evaluate the IHTC. Both the simulation and experiments have shown that a reasonably good estimate of the heat transfer coefficient could be made in the case studied. It has been found that there is a good agreement between experiments and simulations in the temperature profiles during the solidification process, given that the primary mechanism of heat transfer across the gap in permanent mold casting of light alloys is by conduction across the gap. The procedure utilized to determine the interfacial heat transfer coefficient can be applied to other casting processes. A recently completed project involving The University of Michigan and Mississippi State University, together with several industrial partners, which was supported by the USDOE through the Cast Metals Coalition, examined a number of cases of thermal contact. In an investigation which gave special consideration to the techniques of measurement, several mold coatings were employed and results presented as a function of time. Realistic conditions of coating thickness and type together with an appropriate combination of mold preheat and metal pouring temperature were strictly maintained throughout the investigation. Temperature sensors, in particular thermocouples, play an important part in validating the predictions of solidification models. Cooling

  18. High resolution PFPE-based molding High resolution PFPE-based molding High resolution PFPE-based molding techniques for nanofabrication of high pattern density sub-20 nm features: A fundamental materials approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Stuart S [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Samulski, Edward [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Lopez, Renee [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Ruiz, Ricardo [Hitachi; DeSimone, Joseph [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Described herein is the development and investigation of PFPE-based elastomers for high resolution replica molding applications. The modulus of the elastomeric materials was increased through synthetic and additive approaches while maintaining relatively low surface energies (<25 mN/m). Using practically relevant large area master templates, we show that the resolution of the molds is strongly dependant upon the elastomeric mold modulus. A composite mold approach was used to form flexible molds out of stiff, high modulus materials that allow for replication of sub-20 nm post structures. Sub-100 nm line grating master templates, formed using e-beam lithography, were used to determine the experimental stability of the molding materials. It was observed that as the feature spacing decreased, high modulus composite molds were able to effectively replicate the nano-grating structures without cracking or tear-out defects that typically occur with high modulus elastomers.

  19. Decontamination formulation with additive for enhanced mold remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker, Mark D.; Irvine, Kevin; Berger, Paul; Comstock, Robert

    2010-02-16

    Decontamination formulations with an additive for enhancing mold remediation. The formulations include a solubilizing agent (e.g., a cationic surfactant), a reactive compound (e.g., hydrogen peroxide), a carbonate or bicarbonate salt, a water-soluble bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate), a mold remediation enhancer containing Fe or Mn, and water. The concentration of Fe.sup.2+ or Mn.sup.2+ ions in the aqueous mixture is in the range of about 0.0001% to about 0.001%. The enhanced formulations can be delivered, for example, as a foam, spray, liquid, fog, mist, or aerosol for neutralization of chemical compounds, and for killing certain biological compounds or agents and mold spores, on contaminated surfaces and materials.

  20. Permanent Mold Casting of JIS-AC4C Aluminum Alloy Using a Low-Temperature Mold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamagata, Hiroshi; Nikawa, Makoto

    2011-01-17

    Permanent mold casting using mold temperatures below 200 deg. C was conducted to obtain a high-strength, thin-walled casting. Al-7.36 mass% Si -0.18 Cu- 0.27Mg-0.34Fe alloy JIS-AC4C was cast using a bottom pouring cast plan. The product had a rectangular tube shape (70 mm W x 68 mm D x 180 mm H) with wall thicknesses of 1, 3 and 5 mm. The effect of heat insulation at the melt path was compared when using a sand runner insert and when using a steel runner insert as well as a powder mold release agent. Fine microstructures were observed in the casting. The smaller the thickness, the higher the hardness with smaller secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS). However, the hardness and the SDAS were unaffected by the mold temperature. It was proposed that the avoidance of the formation of primary {alpha} dendrite at the melt path generates a higher strength casting with adequate mold filling.

  1. Molecular orientation distributions during injection molding of liquid crystalline polymers: Ex situ investigation of partially filled moldings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Jun; Burghardt, Wesley R.; Bubeck, Robert A.

    2013-01-10

    The development of molecular orientation in thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers (TLCPs) during injection molding has been investigated using two-dimensional wide-angle X-ray scattering coordinated with numerical computations employing the Larson-Doi polydomain model. Orientation distributions were measured in 'short shot' moldings to characterize structural evolution prior to completion of mold filling, in both thin and thick rectangular plaques. Distinct orientation patterns are observed near the filling front. In particular, strong extension at the melt front results in nearly transverse molecular alignment. Far away from the flow front shear competes with extension to produce complex spatial distributions of orientation. The relative influence of shear is stronger in the thin plaque, producing orientation along the filling direction. Exploiting an analogy between the Larson-Doi model and a fiber orientation model, we test the ability of process simulation tools to predict TLCP orientation distributions during molding. Substantial discrepancies between model predictions and experimental measurements are found near the flow front in partially filled short shots, attributed to the limits of the Hele-Shaw approximation used in the computations. Much of the flow front effect is however 'washed out' by subsequent shear flow as mold filling progresses, leading to improved agreement between experiment and corresponding numerical predictions.

  2. Mold with improved core for metal casting operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gritzner, Verne B.; Hackett, Donald W.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a mold containing an improved core for use in casting hollow, metallic articles. The core is formed of, or covered with, a layer of cellular material which possesses sufficient strength to maintain its structural integrity during casting, but will crush to alleviate the internal stresses that build up if the normal contraction during solidification and cooling is restricted.

  3. The effect of process parameters on the thermal conditions during moving mold ESR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heilman, J.E.; Damkroger, B.K.

    1994-09-01

    Several experimental melts were conducted using a moving mold electroslag remelting furnace. The conditions of electrode immersion depth, slag cap thickness, and melt current were varied. Mold wall temperatures and slag pool temperatures were measured and the heat flux through the mold wall was calculated. The relationships between varying ESR melt parameters and the resultant thermal conditions were examined. The thermal profile of the mold, the heat transfer to the mold coolant total and fractional, and the formation of a slag skin were studied.

  4. Grain Refinement of Permanent Mold Cast Copper Base Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.Sadayappan; J.P.Thomson; M.Elboujdaini; G.Ping Gu; M. Sahoo

    2005-04-01

    Grain refinement is a well established process for many cast and wrought alloys. The mechanical properties of various alloys could be enhanced by reducing the grain size. Refinement is also known to improve casting characteristics such as fluidity and hot tearing. Grain refinement of copper-base alloys is not widely used, especially in sand casting process. However, in permanent mold casting of copper alloys it is now common to use grain refinement to counteract the problem of severe hot tearing which also improves the pressure tightness of plumbing components. The mechanism of grain refinement in copper-base alloys is not well understood. The issues to be studied include the effect of minor alloy additions on the microstructure, their interaction with the grain refiner, effect of cooling rate, and loss of grain refinement (fading). In this investigation, efforts were made to explore and understand grain refinement of copper alloys, especially in permanent mold casting conditions.

  5. Compacting Plastic-Bonded Explosive Molding Powders to Dense Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Olinger

    2005-04-15

    Dense solid high explosives are made by compacting plastic-bonded explosive molding powders with high pressures and temperatures for extended periods of time. The density is influenced by manufacturing processes of the powders, compaction temperature, the magnitude of compaction pressure, pressure duration, and number of repeated applications of pressure. The internal density variation of compacted explosives depends on method of compaction and the material being compacted.

  6. A Novel Method of Injection Molding Titanium Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyberg, Eric A.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Weil, K. Scott

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a unique blend of powder injection molding feedstock materials in which only a small volume fraction of binder (< 8%) is required; the remainder of the mixture consists of the metal powder and a solid aromatic solvent. Because of the nature of the decomposition in the binder system and the relatively small amount used, the binder is eliminated almost completely from the pre-sintered component during the initial stage of a two-step heat treatment process.

  7. Spray forming process for producing molds, dies and related tooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McHugh, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Key, James F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01

    A method for spray forming manufacturing of near-net-shape molds, dies and related toolings, wherein liquid material such as molten metal, metallic alloys, or polymers are atomized into fine droplets by a high temperature, high velocity gas and deposited onto a pattern. Quenching of the atomized droplets provides a heat sink, thereby allowing undercooled and partially solidified droplets to be formed in-flight. Composites can be formed by combining the atomized droplets with solid particles such as whiskers or fibers.

  8. From micro- to nano-scale molding of metals : size effect during molding of single crystal Al with rectangular strip punches.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.; Meng, W. J.; Mei, F.; Hiller, J.; Miller, D. J. (Materials Science Division); (Louisiana State Univ.); (Enervana Tech. LLC)

    2011-02-01

    A single crystal Al specimen was molded at room temperature with long, rectangular, strip diamond punches. Quantitative molding response curves were obtained at a series of punch widths, ranging from 5 {micro}m to 550 nm. A significant size effect was observed, manifesting itself in terms of significantly increasing characteristic molding pressure as the punch width decreases to 1.5 {micro}m and below. A detailed comparison of the present strip punch molding results was made with Berkovich pyramidal indentation on the same single crystal Al specimen. The comparison reveals distinctly different dependence of the characteristic pressure on corresponding characteristic length. The present results show the feasibility of micro-/nano-scale compression molding as a micro-/nano-fabrication technique, and offer an experimental test case for size-dependent plasticity theories.

  9. Method and composition for molding low density desiccant syntactic foam articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lula, James W.; Schicker, James R.

    1984-01-01

    A method and a composition are provided for molding low density desiccant syntactic foam articles. A low density molded desiccant article may be made as a syntactic foam by blending a thermosetting resin, microspheres and molecular sieve desiccant powder, molding and curing. Such articles have densities of 0.2-0.9 g/cc, moisture capacities of 1-12% by weight, and can serve as light weight structural supports.

  10. Deformable silicone grating fabricated with a photo-imprinted polymer mold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamada, Itsunari, E-mail: yamada.i@e.usp.ac.jp [Department of Electronic Systems Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Shiga Prefecture, Hikone, Shiga 522-8533 (Japan)] [Department of Electronic Systems Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Shiga Prefecture, Hikone, Shiga 522-8533 (Japan); Nishii, Junji [Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan)] [Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Saito, Mitsunori [Department of Electronics and Informatics, Ryukoku University, Otsu, Shiga 520-2194 (Japan)] [Department of Electronics and Informatics, Ryukoku University, Otsu, Shiga 520-2194 (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    A tunable transmission grating was fabricated by molding a silicone elastomer (polydimethylsiloxane). Its optical characteristics were then evaluated during compression. For fabrication, a glass plate with a photoimprinted polymer grating film was used as a mold. Both the grating period and diffraction transmittance of the molded elastomer were functions of the compressive stress. The grating period changed from 3.02 to 2.86 ?m during compressing the elastomer in the direction perpendicular to the grooves.

  11. Method for molding ceramic powders using a water-based gel casting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janney, Mark A.; Omatete, Ogbemi O.

    1991-07-02

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one monofunctional monomer and at least one difunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and a aqueous solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product any be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, whereafter the product may be sintered.

  12. Method and composition for molding low-density desiccant syntactic-foam articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1981-12-07

    These and other objects of the invention are achieved by a process for molding to size a desiccant syntactic foam article having a density of 0.2 to 0.9 g/cc and a moisture capacity of 1 to 12% by weight, comprising the steps of: charging a mold with a powdery mixture of an activated desiccant, microspheres and a thermosetting resin, the amount of the desiccant being sufficient to provide the required moisture capacity, and the amounts of the microspheres and resin being such that the microspheres/desiccant volume fraction exceeds the packing factor by an amount sufficient to substantially avoid shrinkage without causing excessively high molding pressures; covering the mold and heating the covered mold to a temperature and for an amount of time sufficient to melt the resin; and tightly closing the mold and heating the closed mold to a temperature and for an amount of time sufficient to cure the resin, and removing the resultant desiccant syntactic foam article from the mold. In a composition of matter aspect, the present invention provides desiccant syntactic foam articles, and a composition of matter for use in molding the same.

  13. Method for molding ceramic powders using a water-based gel casting process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jenny, Mark A.; Omalete, Ogbemi O.

    1992-09-08

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one monofunctional monomer and at least one difunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and a aqueous solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, whereafter the product may be sintered.

  14. Spray forming process for producing molds, dies and related tooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McHugh, K.M.; Key, J.F.

    1998-02-17

    A method is disclosed for spray forming manufacturing of near-net-shape molds, dies and related toolings, wherein liquid material such as molten metal, metallic alloys, or polymers are atomized into fine droplets by a high temperature, high velocity gas and deposited onto a pattern. Quenching of the atomized droplets provides a heat sink, thereby allowing undercooled and partially solidified droplets to be formed in-flight. Composites can be formed by combining the atomized droplets with solid particles such as whiskers or fibers. 17 figs.

  15. Spray forming system for producing molds, dies and related tooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McHugh, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01

    A system for the spray forming manufacturing of near-net-shape molds, dies and related toolings, wherein liquid material such as molten metal, metallic alloys, or polymers are atomized into fine droplets by a high temperature, high velocity gas and deposited onto a pattern. Quenching of the atomized droplets provides a heat sink, thereby allowing undercooled and partially solidified droplets to be formed in-flight. Composites can be formed by combining the atomized droplets with solid particles such as powders, whiskers or fibers.

  16. CREEP MODELING FOR INJECTION-MOLDED LONG-FIBER THERMOPLASTICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil; Bapanapalli, Satish K.

    2008-06-30

    This paper proposes a model to predict the creep response of injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs). The model accounts for elastic fibers embedded in a thermoplastic resin that exhibits the nonlinear viscoelastic behavior described by the Schaperys model. It also accounts for fiber length and orientation distributions in the composite formed by the injection-molding process. Fiber length and orientation distributions were measured and used in the analysis that applies the Eshelbys equivalent inclusion method, the Mori-Tanaka assumption (termed as the Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka approach) and the fiber orientation averaging technique to compute the overall strain increment resulting from an overall constant applied stress during a given time increment. The creep model for LFTs has been implemented in the ABAQUS finite element code via user-subroutines and has been validated against the experimental creep data obtained for long-glass-fiber/polypropylene specimens. The effects of fiber orientation and length distributions on the composite creep response are determined and discussed.

  17. Using Direct Metal Deposition to Fabricate Mold Plates for an Injection Mold Machine Allowing for the Evaluation of Cost Effective Near-Sourcing Opportunities in Larger, High Volume Consumer Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duty, Chad E; Groh, Bill

    2014-10-31

    ORNL collaborated with Radio Systems Corporation to investigate additive manufacturing (AM) of mold plates for plastic injection molding by direct metal deposition. The team s modelling effort identified a 100% improvement in heat transfer through use of conformal cooling lines that could be built into the mold using a revolutionary design enabled by additive manufacturing. Using the newly installed laser deposition system at the ORNL Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) a stainless steel mold core was printed.

  18. In-Situ Real Time Monitoring and Control of Mold Making and Filling Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2004-11-01

    This factsheet describes a research effort to develop an innovative approach to introduce technologies for real-time characterization of sand molds, lost foam patterns, and monitoring of the mold filling process. This will reduce scrap, improve product quality, and save energy.

  19. Low Cost Injection Mold Creation via Hybrid Additive and Conventional Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Watkins, Thomas R.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Carver, Keith; England, Roger

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the proposed project between Cummins and ORNL is to significantly reduce the cost of the tooling (machining and materials) required to create injection molds to make plastic components. Presently, the high cost of this tooling forces the design decision to make cast aluminum parts because Cummins typical production volumes are too low to allow injection molded plastic parts to be cost effective with the amortized cost of the injection molding tooling. In addition to reducing the weight of components, polymer injection molding allows the opportunity for the alternative cooling methods, via nitrogen gas. Nitrogen gas cooling offers an environmentally and economically attractive cooling option, if the mold can be manufactured economically. In this project, a current injection molding design was optimized for cooling using nitrogen gas. The various components of the injection mold tooling were fabricated using the Renishaw powder bed laser additive manufacturing technology. Subsequent machining was performed on the as deposited components to form a working assembly. The injection mold is scheduled to be tested in a projection setting at a commercial vendor selected by Cummins.

  20. Proof-of-Concept Manufacturing and Testing of Composite Wind Generator Blades Made by HCBMP (High Compression Bladder Molded Prepreg)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William C. Leighty; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2005-10-04

    Proof-of-Concept Manufacturing and Testing of Composite Wind Generator Blades Made by HCBMP (High Compression Bladder Molded Prepreg)

  1. Slurry Molding Technologies for Novel Carbon and Graphite Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burchell, T.D.

    2004-06-30

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a slurry molding technology for the manufacture of porous, high surface area, carbon fiber composites molecular sieves, and carbon-carbon composite preforms. Potentially, this technology could be applied to the manufacture of a host of novel carbon materials including porous adsorbent carbons, low-pressure drop adsorbent carbon composites, ultra-fine-grained graphite, and carbon fiber reinforced graphite. New opportunities for high surface carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) materials are now emerging. Many of these opportunities are driven by increasingly harsh environmental pressures. Traditional granular activated carbon (GAC) is not suitable for many of these applications because of the difficulties encountered with attrition and in forming ''structures'' which have the necessary mechanical and physical properties. In addition, the electrical desorption of adsorbed species is not possible with GAC due to its low bulk electrical conductivity. Activated carbon fibers have been found to be useful in some applications. Work by ORNL has shown, for example, that CFCMS materials are capable of adsorbing various gases and desorbing them under electrical stimulation. For some applications these fibers have to be formed into a structure that can offer the desired mechanical integrity and pressure drop characteristics. To date, the work by ORNL has focused on the use of a single manufacturer's isotropic pitch fibers which, when activated, may be cost prohibitive for many applications. Fine-grained graphite is attractive for many applications including the chemical processing industry where their unique combination of properties--including high strength and chemical inertness, are particularly attractive. However, a lack of toughness can limit their utility in certain applications. The use of ultra-fine powders in conjunction with slurry molding and hot pressing offers the possibility of higher strength

  2. A Model for Fiber Length Attrition in Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TuckerIII, Charles L. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Phelps, Jay H [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; El-Rahman, Ahmed Abd [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Long-fiber thermoplastic (LFT) composites consist of an engineering thermoplastic matrix with glass or carbon reinforcing fibers that are initially 10 to 13 mm long. When an LFT is injection molded, flow during mold filling orients the fibers and degrades the fiber length. Fiber orientation models for injection molding are well developed, and special orientation models for LFTs have been developed. Here we present a detailed quantitative model for fiber length attrition in a flowing fiber suspension. The model tracks a discrete fiber length distribution (FLD) at each spatial node. Key equations are a conservation equation for total fiber length, and a breakage rate equation. The breakage rate is based on buckling of fibers due to hydrodynamic forces, when the fibers are in unfavorable orientations. The FLD model is combined with a mold filling simulation to predict spatial and temporal variations in fiber length distribution in a mold cavity during filling. The predictions compare well to experiments on a glassfiber/ PP LFT molding. Fiber length distributions predicted by the model are easily incorporated into micromechanics models to predict the stress-strain behavior of molded LFT materials. Author to whom correspondence should be addressed; electronic mail: ctucker@illinois.edu 1

  3. Polymer mold makes perfect silicon nanostructures > EMC2 News > The Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Center at Cornell mold makes perfect silicon nanostructures July 2nd, 2015 › By Anne Ju Wiesner lab Scanning electron microscopy micrographs show a periodically ordered mesoporous gyroidal resin template (A and B) and the resulting laser-induced crystalline silicon nanostructure after template removal (C and D). Using molds to shape things is as old as humanity. In the Bronze Age, the copper-tin alloy was melted and cast into weapons in ceramic molds. Today, injection and

  4. AirfoilPrep.py

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-05-01

    A Python module for preprocessing and evaluating aerodynamic ainoil data---primarily for wind turbine applications.

  5. Development of extruded and molded straight joint for ultra high-voltage XLPE cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimomura, T.; Ando, K.; Asahi, K.; Sugiyama, K.

    1986-01-01

    In Japan, 154-kV crosslinked polyethylene-insulated cables (XLPE) are already in use for long-distance tranmission lines, but 275-kV XLPE cables are used only for short-distance lines (without joints) on the premises of power-generation plants and substations. 275-kV XLPE cable is expected to be used for long-distance transmission lines in the near future because of its overall cost advantage. To respond to this need, a straight-through joint with the same reliability as the cable should be developed. Reliable joints should be formed and molded with the same curable PE compounds as the cable insulation. At present, 154-kV XLPE cables for long-distance transmission lines are usually constructed with the joint comprising XLPE insulation wrapped with curable PE tape and molded by heating. However, this taped molded joint has the disadvantages of troublesome tape handling. On the other hand, extruded molded joints are constructed by injecting curable melted PE into a mold with an extruder, eliminating contamination. The report describes the characteristics of the extruded and molded joint developed for 154, 275 and 500 kV class XLPE cables.

  6. Long-Fiber Thermoplastic Injection Molded Composites: from Process Modeling to Property Prediction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Holbery, Jim D.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Smith, Mark T.

    2005-09-01

    Recently, long-fiber filled thermoplastics have become a great interest to the automotive industry since these materials offer much better property performance (e.g. elastic moduli, strength, durability) than their short-fiber analogues, and they can be processed through injection molding with some specific tool design. However, in order that long-fiber thermoplastic injection molded composites can be used efficiently for automotive applications, there is a tremendous need to develop process and constitutive models as well as computational tools to predict the microstructure of the as-formed composite, and its resulting properties and macroscopic responses from processing to the final product. The microstructure and properties of such a composite are governed by i) flow-induced fiber orientation, ii) fiber breakage during injection molding, and iii) processing conditions (e,g. pressure, mold and melt temperatures, mold geometries, injection speed, etc.). This paper highlights our efforts to address these challenging issues. The work is an integrated part of a research program supported by the US Department of Energy, which includes The development of process models for long-fiber filled thermoplastics, The construction of an interface between process modeling and property prediction as well as the development of new constitutive models to perform linear and nonlinear structural analyses, Experimental characterization of model parameters and verification of the model predictions.

  7. Development and Demonstration of Adanced Tooling Alloys for Molds and Dies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin M. McHugh; Enrique J. Lavernia

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes research results in the project Development and Demonstration of Advanced Tooling Alloys for Molds and Dies. Molds, dies and related tooling are used to manufacture most of the plastic and metal products we use every day. Conventional fabrication of molds and dies involves a multiplicity of machining, benching and heat treatment unit operations. This approach is very expensive and time consuming. Rapid Solidifcation Process (RSP) Tooling is a spray-forming technology tailored for producing molds and dies. The appraoch combines rapid solidifcation processing and net-shape materials processing in a single step. An atomized spray of a tool-forming alloy, typically a tool steel, is deposited onto an easy-to-form tool pattern to replicate the pattern's shape and surface features. By so doing, the approach eliminates many machining operations in conventional mold making, significantly reducing cost, lead time and energy. Moreover, rapid solidification creates unique microstructural features by suppressing carbide precipitation and growth, and creating metastable phases. This can result in unique material properties following heat treatment. Spray-formed and aged tool steel dies have exhibited extended life compared to conventional dies in many forming operations such as forging, extrusion and die casting. RSP Tooling technolocy was commercialized with the formation of RSP Tooling, LLC in Solon, Oh.

  8. Natural Fiber Composite Retting, Preform Manufacture and Molding (Project 18988/Agreement 16313)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Howe, Daniel T.; Laddha, Sachin; Fifield, Leonard S.

    2009-12-31

    Plant-based natural fibers can be used in place of glass in fiber reinforced automotive composites to reduce weight, cost and provide environmental benefits. Current automotive applications use natural fibers in injection molded thermoplastics for interior, non-structural applications. Compression molded natural fiber reinforced thermosets have the opportunity to extend natural fiber composite applications to structural and semi-structural parts and exterior parts realizing further vehicle weight savings. The development of low cost molding and fiber processing techniques for large volumes of natural fibers has helped in understanding the barriers of non-aqueous retting. The retting process has a significant effect on the fiber quality and its processing ability that is related to the natural fiber composite mechanical properties. PNNL has developed a compression molded fiber reinforced composite system of which is the basis for future preforming activities and fiber treatment. We are using this process to develop preforming techniques and to validate fiber treatment methods relative to OEM provided application specifications. It is anticipated for next fiscal year that demonstration of larger quantities of SMC materials and molding of larger, more complex components with a more complete testing regimen in coordination with Tier suppliers under OEM guidance.

  9. Electrical and dielectric properties of foam injection-molded polypropylene/multiwalled carbon nanotube composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ameli, A.; Nofar, M.; Saniei, M.; Hossieny, N.; Park, C. B.; Pötschke, P.

    2015-05-22

    A combination of high dielectric permittivity (ε′) and low dielectric loss (tan δ) is required for charge storage applications. In percolative systems such as conductive polymer composites, however, obtaining high ε′ and low tan δ is very challenging due to the sharp insulation-conduction transition near the threshold region. Due to the particular arrangement of conductive fillers induced by both foaming and injection molding processes, they may address this issue. Therefore, this work evaluates the application of foam injection molding process in fabricating polymer nanocomposites for energy storage. Polypropylene-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PP-MWCNT) composites were prepared by melt mixing and foamed in an injection molding process. Electrical conductivity (σ), ε′ and tan δ were then characterized. Also, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) was used to investigate the carbon nanotube’s arrangement as well as cellular morphology. The results showed that foam injection-molded composites exhibited highly superior dielectric properties to those of solid counterparts. For instance, foamed samples had ε′=68.3 and tan δ =0.05 (at 1.25 vol.% MWCNT), as opposed to ε′=17.8 and tan δ=0.04 in solid samples (at 2.56 vol.% MWCNT). The results of this work reveal that high performance dielectric nanocomposites can be developed using foam injection molding technologies for charge storage applications.

  10. Modeling the effect of gas transport on the formation of defects during thermolysis of powder moldings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, J.H.; Edirisinghe, M.J.; Evans, J.R.; Twizell, E.H.

    1996-04-01

    The removal of binder from ceramic or metal moldings by thermolysis involves the transport of degradation products through the parent organic phase and the vacated porous body. A numerical model has been developed to combine an equation which takes into account different gas-flow regimes with an equation for the transport of organic molecules in molten polymers. Computer modeling reveals the critical heating rate above which defects occur due to boiling of the polymer-monomer solution at the center of the molding. The situation in which a porous outer layer of the molding develops, offering resistance to flow of the evolved monomer gas, is then treated. This gives rise to a moving boundary with a variable concentration of diffusant which is dependent on the surface flux, gas transport coefficient and thickness of the porous layer. The contributions of diffusion and viscous flow to gas transport are considered. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  11. Quantitative PCR Analysis of Molds in the Dust from Homes of Asthmatic Children in North Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vesper, Stephen J.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Ashley, Peter; Haugland, Richard A.; Yeatts, Karin; Bradham, Karen; Svendsen, Eric

    2007-07-10

    The vacuum cleaner bag (VCB) dust from the homes of 19 asthmatic children in North Carolina (NC) was analyzed by mold specific quantitative PCR. These results were compared to the analysis of the VCB dust from 157 homes in the HUD American Healthy Home Survey of homes in the US. The American Relative Moldiness Index (ARMI) was calculated for each of the homes. The mean and standard deviation (SD) of the ARMI values in the homes of the NC asthmatic children was 11.0 (5.3), compared to the HUD survey VCB ARMI value mean and SD of 6.6 (4.4). The median ARMI value was significantly higher(p < 0.001) in the asthmatic childrenss homes. The molds Chaetomium globosum and Eurotium amsterdameli were the primary species in the NC homes making the ARMI values higher. Vacuum cleaner bag dust samples may be a less expensive but still useful method of home mold analysis.

  12. Validation of New Process Models for Large Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastic Composite Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Kunc, Vlastimil; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2012-02-23

    This report describes the work conducted under the CRADA Nr. PNNL/304 between Battelle PNNL and Autodesk whose objective is to validate the new process models developed under the previous CRADA for large injection-molded LFT composite structures. To this end, the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models implemented in the 2013 research version of Moldflow was used to simulate the injection molding of 600-mm x 600-mm x 3-mm plaques from 40% glass/polypropylene (Dow Chemical DLGF9411.00) and 40% glass/polyamide 6,6 (DuPont Zytel 75LG40HSL BK031) materials. The injection molding was performed by Injection Technologies, Inc. at Windsor, Ontario (under a subcontract by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ORNL) using the mold offered by the Automotive Composite Consortium (ACC). Two fill speeds under the same back pressure were used to produce plaques under slow-fill and fast-fill conditions. Also, two gating options were used to achieve the following desired flow patterns: flows in edge-gated plaques and in center-gated plaques. After molding, ORNL performed measurements of fiber orientation and length distributions for process model validations. The structure of this report is as follows. After the Introduction (Section 1), Section 2 provides a summary of the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models. A summary of model implementations in the latest research version of Moldflow is given in Section 3. Section 4 provides the key processing conditions and parameters for molding of the ACC plaques. The validations of the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models are presented and discussed in Section 5. The conclusions will be drawn in Section 6.

  13. In-situ Formation of Ti Alloys via Powder Injection Molding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Nyberg, Eric A.; Weil, K. Scott; Miller, Megan R.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a unique blend of powder injection molding (PIM) feedstock materials in which only a small volume fraction of binder (< 8%) is required; the remainder of the mixture consists of the metal powder and a solid aromatic solvent. Because of the nature of the decomposition in the binder system and the relatively small amount used, the binder can be completely removed from the molded component during heat treatment. Here, we present results from an initial study on in-situ titanium alloy formation in near-net shape components manufactured by this novel PIM technique.

  14. A new binder for powder injection molding titanium and other reactive metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weil, K. Scott; Nyberg, Eric A.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2006-06-26

    We have developed a new aromatic-based binder for powder injection molding (PIM) reactive metals, such as titanium, zirconium, niobium, tungsten, and molybdenum. Because of careful selection of the binder constituents, thermal removal is readily accomplished at low temperatures and short-times via vacuum sublimation. In this way the binder can be cleanly extracted from the green part prior to sintering to minimize the amount of residual carbon left in the final component. Rheological measurements indicate that powder loadings in the PIM feedstock as high as 67 vol% could be achieved using the new binder system, while still maintaining low mixing torques and injection molding pressures.

  15. Spray-formed tooling for injection molding and die casting applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. M. McHugh; B. R. Wickham

    2000-06-26

    Rapid Solidification Process (RSP) Tooling{trademark} is a spray forming technology tailored for producing molds and dies. The approach combines rapid solidification processing and net-shape materials processing in a single step. The ability of the sprayed deposit to capture features of the tool pattern eliminates costly machining operations in conventional mold making and reduces turnaround time. Moreover, rapid solidification suppresses carbide precipitation and growth, allowing many ferritic tool steels to be artificially aged, an alternative to conventional heat treatment that offers unique benefits. Material properties and microstructure transformation during heat treatment of spray-formed H13 tool steel are described.

  16. Spray-formed Tooling for Injection Molding and Die Casting Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mc Hugh, Kevin Matthew

    2000-06-01

    Rapid Solidification Process (RSP) ToolingTM is a spray forming technology tailored for producing molds and dies. The approach combines rapid solidification processing and net-shape materials processing in a single step. The ability of the sprayed deposit to capture features of the tool pattern eliminates costly machining operations in conventional mold making and reduces turnaround time. Moreover, rapid solidification suppresses carbide precipitation and growth, allowing many ferritic tool steels to be artificially aged, an alternative to conventional heat treatment that offers unique benefits. Material properties and microstructure transformation during heat treatment of spray-formed H13 tool steel are described.

  17. In-Situ Real Time Monitoring and Control of Mold Making and Filling Processes: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohamed Abdelrahman; Kenneth Currie

    2010-12-22

    This project presents a model for addressing several objectives envisioned by the metal casting industries through the integration of research and educational components. It provides an innovative approach to introduce technologies for real time characterization of sand molds, lost foam patterns and monitoring of the mold filling process. The technology developed will enable better control over the casting process. It is expected to reduce scrap and variance in the casting quality. A strong educational component is integrated into the research plan to utilize increased awareness of the industry professional, the potential benefits of the developed technology, and the potential benefits of cross cutting technologies.

  18. Correlation between ERMI values and other Moisture and Mold Assessments of Homes in the American Healthy Home Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vesper, Sephen J.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Cox, David J.; DeWalt, Gary

    2009-11-30

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the correlation between ERMI values in the HUD American Healthy Home Survey (AHHS) homes and either inspector reports or occupant assessments of mold and moisture. Methods: In the AHHS, moisture and mold were assessed by a pair of inspectors and with an occupant questionnaire. These results were compared to the results of the Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) values for each home. Results: Homes in the highest ERMI quartile were most often in agreement with visual inspection and/or occupant assessment. However, in 52% of the fourth quartile ERMI homes, the inspector and occupant assessment did not indicate water or mold problems. Yet the concentrations of each ERMI panel mold species detected in all fourth quartile homes were statistically indistinguishable. Conclusions: About 50% of water-damaged, moldy homes were not detected by inspection or questioning of the occupant about water and mold.

  19. Compressed Air System Modifications Improve Efficiency at a Plastics Blow Molding Plant (Southeastern Container Plant)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2001-06-01

    This case study is one in a series on industrial firms who are implementing energy efficient technologies and system improvements into their manufacturing processes. This case study documents the activities, savings, and lessons learned on the plastics blow molding plant project.

  20. DAMAGE MODELING OF INJECTION-MOLDED SHORT- AND LONG-FIBER THERMOPLASTICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2009-10-30

    This article applies the recent anisotropic rotary diffusion reduced strain closure (ARD-RSC) model for predicting fiber orientation and a new damage model for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs) to analyze progressive damage leading to total failure of injection-molded long-glass-fiber/polypropylene (PP) specimens. The ARD-RSC model was implemented in a research version of the Autodesk Moldflow Plastics Insight (MPI) processing code, and it has been used to simulate injection-molding of a long-glass-fiber/PP plaque. The damage model combines micromechanical modeling with a continuum damage mechanics description to predict the nonlinear behavior due to plasticity coupled with damage in LFTs. This model has been implemented in the ABAQUS finite element code via user-subroutines and has been used in the damage analyses of tensile specimens removed from the injection-molded long-glass-fiber/PP plaques. Experimental characterization and mechanical testing were performed to provide input data to support and validate both process modeling and damage analyses. The predictions are in agreement with the experimental results.

  1. Measurement of Heat Flux at Metal-Mold Interface during Casting Solidification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    All previous studies on interfacial heat transfer coefficient have been based on indirect methods for estimating the heat flux that employed either inverse heat transfer analysis procedures or instrumentation arrangements to measure temperatures and displacements near the metal-mold interface. In this paper, the heat transfer at the metal-mold interfaces is investigated using a sensor for the direct measurement of heat flux. The heat flux sensor (HFS) was rated for 700oC and had a time response of less than 10 ms. Casting experiments were conducted using graphite molds for aluminum alloy A356. Several casting experiments were performed using a graphite coating and a boron nitride coating. The measurement errors were estimated. The temperature of the mold surface was provided by the HFS while the temperature of the casting surface was measured using a thermocouple. Results for the heat transfer coefficients were obtained based on measured heat flux and temperatures. Four stages were clearly identified for the variation in time of the heat flux. Values of the heat transfer coefficient were in good agreement with data from previous studies.

  2. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy-SMARRT): Light Metals Permanent Mold Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fasoyinu, Yemi

    2014-03-31

    Current vehicles use mostly ferrous components for structural applications. It is possible to reduce the weight of the vehicle by substituting these parts with those made from light metals such as aluminum and magnesium. Many alloys and manufacturing processes can be used to produce these light metal components and casting is known to be most economical. One of the high integrity casting processes is permanent mold casting which is the focus of this research report. Many aluminum alloy castings used in automotive applications are produced by the sand casting process. Also, aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloys are the most widely used alloy systems for automotive applications. It is possible that by using high strength aluminum alloys based on an aluminum-copper (Al-Cu) system and permanent mold casting, the performance of these components can be enhanced significantly. This will also help to further reduce the weight. However, many technological obstacles need to be overcome before using these alloys in automotive applications in an economical way. There is very limited information in the open literature on gravity and low-pressure permanent mold casting of high strength aluminum alloys. This report summarizes the results and issues encountered during the casting trials of high strength aluminum alloy 206.0 (Al-Cu alloy) and moderate strength alloy 535.0 (Al-Mg alloy). Five engineering components were cast by gravity tilt-pour or low pressure permanent mold casting processes at CanmetMATERIALS (CMAT) and two production foundries. The results of the casting trials show that high integrity engineering components can be produced successfully from both alloys if specific processing parameters are used. It was shown that a combination of melt processing and mold temperature is necessary for the elimination of hot tears in both alloys.

  3. Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites: From Process Modeling to Prediction of Mechanical Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil; Jin, Xiaoshi; Tucker III, Charles L.; Costa, Franco

    2013-12-18

    This article illustrates the predictive capabilities for long-fiber thermoplastic (LFT) composites that first simulate the injection molding of LFT structures by Autodesk Simulation Moldflow Insight (ASMI) to accurately predict fiber orientation and length distributions in these structures. After validating fiber orientation and length predictions against the experimental data, the predicted results are used by ASMI to compute distributions of elastic properties in the molded structures. In addition, local stress-strain responses and damage accumulation under tensile loading are predicted by an elastic-plastic damage model of EMTA-NLA, a nonlinear analysis tool implemented in ABAQUS via user-subroutines using an incremental Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka approach. Predicted stress-strain responses up to failure and damage accumulations are compared to the experimental results to validate the model.

  4. Fluid flow modeling of resin transfer molding for composite material wind turbine blade structures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairns, Douglas S. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Rossel, Scott M. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT)

    2004-06-01

    Resin transfer molding (RTM) is a closed mold process for making composite materials. It has the potential to produce parts more cost effectively than hand lay-up or other methods. However, fluid flow tends to be unpredictable and parts the size of a wind turbine blade are difficult to engineer without some predictive method for resin flow. There were five goals of this study. The first was to determine permeabilities for three fabrics commonly used for RTM over a useful range of fiber volume fractions. Next, relations to estimate permeabilities in mixed fabric lay-ups were evaluated. Flow in blade substructures was analyzed and compared to predictions. Flow in a full-scale blade was predicted and substructure results were used to validate the accuracy of a full-scale blade prediction.

  5. Recycling plastic scrap: Injection molding. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of scrap plastic produced in the injection molding process. Plastic pellets made from scrap, that are used in the injection molding process, are also discussed. Recycling equipment and automated recycling systems are described. The reuse of plastic scrap culled from junk automobiles and packaging materials is discussed, and waste byproducts from polyurethane production are described. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  6. Wall-slip of highly filled powder injection molding compounds: Effect of flow channel geometry and roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hausnerova, Berenika; Sanetrnik, Daniel [Dept. of Production Engineering, Faculty of Technology, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, nm. T.G. Masaryka 5555, 760 01 Zln, Czech Republic and Centre of Polymer Systems, University Institute, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, Nad Ovc (Czech Republic); Paravanova, Gordana [Centre of Polymer Systems, University Institute, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, Nad Ovcrnou 3685, 760 01 Zln (Czech Republic)

    2014-05-15

    The paper deals with the rheological behavior of highly filled compounds proceeded via powder injection molding (PIM) and applied in many sectors of industry (automotive, medicine, electronic or military). Online rheometer equipped with slit dies varying in surface roughness and dimensions was applied to investigate the wall-slip as a rheological phenomenon, which can be considered as a parameter indicating the separation of compound components (polymer binder and metallic powder) during high shear rates when injection molded.

  7. Recycling plastic scrap: Injection molding. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of scrap plastic produced in the injection molding process. Plastic pellets made from scrap, that are used in the injection molding process, are also discussed. Recycling equipment and automated recycling systems are described. The reuse of plastic scrap culled from junk automobiles and packaging materials is discussed, and waste byproducts from polyurethane production are described. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  8. An Elastic-Plastic and Strength Prediction Model for Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Bapanapalli, Satish K.

    2008-09-01

    This paper applies a recently developed model to predict the elastic-plastic stress/strain response and strength of injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs). The model combines a micro-macro constitutive modeling approach with experimental characterization and modeling of the composite microstructure to determine the composite stress/strain response and strength. Specifically, it accounts for elastic fibers embedded in a thermoplastic resin that exhibits the elastic-plastic behavior obeying the Ramberg-Osgood relation and J-2 deformation theory of plasticity. It also accounts for fiber length, orientation and volume fraction distributions in the composite formed by the injection-molding process. Injection-molded-long-glass-fiber/polypropylene (PP) specimens were prepared for mechanical characterization and testing. Fiber length, orientation, and volume fraction distributions were then measured at some selected locations for use in the computation. Fiber orientations in these specimens were also predicted using an anisotropic rotary diffusion model developed for LFTs. The stress-strain response of the as-formed composite was computed by an incremental procedure that uses the Eshelbys equivalent inclusion method, the Mori-Tanaka assumption and a fiber orientation averaging technique. The model has been validated against the experimental stress-strain results obtained for these long-glass-fiber/PP specimens.

  9. PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENT OF COMPRESSION MOLDED KENAF FIBER REINFORCED VINYL ESTER COMPOSITES THROUGH RESIN ADDITIVE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Laddha, Sachin; Kafentzis, Tyler A.

    2010-05-17

    Plant-based bio-fiber has the potential to achieve weight and cost savings over glass fiber in automotive polymer composites if moisture stability and fiber-resin compatibility issues can be solved. This paper describes the compression molding of 50vol% 2 inch random nonwoven mat kenaf fiber vinyl ester composites with and without chemical resin additives intended to improve moisture stability and resin compatibility. The 2wt% addition of n-undecanoyl chloride or 10-undecenoyl chloride to the styrene-based resin prior to molding of the kenaf composites was observed to decrease the 24hr, 25oC moisture uptake of the molded panels by more than 50%. The tensile stiffness and flexural stiffness of the soaked panels containing these additives were seen to increase by more than 30% and 70%, respectively, relative to panels made with no additives. While dry panel (50% relative humidity at 25oC) strengths did not significantly change in the presence of the additives, tensile strength was observed to increase by more than 40% and flexural strength more than doubled for the soaked panels.

  10. Numerical approach of the injection molding process of fiber-reinforced composite with considering fiber orientation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen Thi, T. B., E-mail: thanhbinh.skku@gmail.com, E-mail: yokoyama@kit.ac.jp; Yokoyama, A., E-mail: thanhbinh.skku@gmail.com, E-mail: yokoyama@kit.ac.jp [Department of Advanced Fibro-Science, Kyoto Institute of Technology (Japan); Ota, K., E-mail: kei-ota@toyobo.jp, E-mail: katsuhiro-kodama@toyobo.jp, E-mail: katsuhisa-yamashita@toyobo.jp, E-mail: yumiko-isogai@toyobo.jp, E-mail: kenji-furuichi@toyobo.jp, E-mail: chisato-nonomura@toyobo.jp; Kodama, K., E-mail: kei-ota@toyobo.jp, E-mail: katsuhiro-kodama@toyobo.jp, E-mail: katsuhisa-yamashita@toyobo.jp, E-mail: yumiko-isogai@toyobo.jp, E-mail: kenji-furuichi@toyobo.jp, E-mail: chisato-nonomura@toyobo.jp; Yamashita, K., E-mail: kei-ota@toyobo.jp, E-mail: katsuhiro-kodama@toyobo.jp, E-mail: katsuhisa-yamashita@toyobo.jp, E-mail: yumiko-isogai@toyobo.jp, E-mail: kenji-furuichi@toyobo.jp, E-mail: chisato-nonomura@toyobo.jp; Isogai, Y., E-mail: kei-ota@toyobo.jp, E-mail: katsuhiro-kodama@toyobo.jp, E-mail: katsuhisa-yamashita@toyobo.jp, E-mail: yumiko-isogai@toyobo.jp, E-mail: kenji-furuichi@toyobo.jp, E-mail: chisato-nonomura@toyobo.jp; Furuichi, K., E-mail: kei-ota@toyobo.jp, E-mail: katsuhiro-kodama@toyobo.jp, E-mail: katsuhisa-yamashita@toyobo.jp, E-mail: yumiko-isogai@toyobo.jp, E-mail: kenji-furuichi@toyobo.jp, E-mail: chisato-nonomura@toyobo.jp; Nonomura, C., E-mail: kei-ota@toyobo.jp, E-mail: katsuhiro-kodama@toyobo.jp, E-mail: katsuhisa-yamashita@toyobo.jp, E-mail: yumiko-isogai@toyobo.jp, E-mail: kenji-furuichi@toyobo.jp, E-mail: chisato-nonomura@toyobo.jp [Toyobo Co., LTD. Research Center (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    One of the most important challenges in the injection molding process of the short-glass fiber/thermoplastic composite parts is being able to predict the fiber orientation, since it controls the mechanical and the physical properties of the final parts. Folgar and Tucker included into the Jeffery equation a diffusive type of term, which introduces a phenomenological coefficient for modeling the randomizing effect of the mechanical interactions between the fibers, to predict the fiber orientation in concentrated suspensions. Their experiments indicated that this coefficient depends on the fiber volume fraction and aspect ratio. However, a definition of the fiber interaction coefficient, which is very necessary in the fiber orientation simulations, hasn't still been proven yet. Consequently, this study proposed a developed fiber interaction model that has been introduced a fiber dynamics simulation in order to obtain a global fiber interaction coefficient. This supposed that the coefficient is a sum function of the fiber concentration, aspect ratio, and angular velocity. The proposed model was incorporated into a computer aided engineering simulation package C-Mold. Short-glass fiber/polyamide-6 composites were produced in the injection molding with the fiber weight concentration of 30 wt.%, 50 wt.%, and 70 wt.%. The physical properties of these composites were examined, and their fiber orientation distributions were measured by micro-computed-tomography equipment ?-CT. The simulation results showed a good agreement with experiment results.

  11. High-Resolution PFPE-based Molding Techniques for Nanofabrication of High-Pattern Density, Sub-20 nm Features: A Fundamental Materials Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Stuart S.; Retterer, Scott; Lopez, Rene; Ruiz, Ricardo; Samulski, Edward T.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2010-04-14

    Several perfluoropolyether (PFPE)-based elastomers for high-resolution replica molding applications are explored. The modulus of the elastomeric materials was increased through synthetic and additive approaches while maintaining relatively low surface tension values (<25 mN/m). Using large area (>4 in.{sup 2}) master templates, we experimentally show the relationship between mold resolution and material properties such as modulus and surface tension for materials used in this study. A composite mold approach was used to form flexible molds out of stiff, high modulus materials that allow for replication of sub-20 nm post structures. Sub-100 nm line grating master templates, formed using e-beam lithography, were used to determine the experimental stability of the molding materials. It was observed that as the feature spacing decreased, high modulus PFPE tetramethacrylate (TMA) composite molds were able to effectively replicate the nanograting structures without cracking or tear-out defects that typically occur with high modulus elastomers.

  12. Meta-Analyses of the Associations of Respiratory Health Effectswith Dampness and Mold in Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Lei-Gomez, Quanhong; Mendell, Mark J.

    2006-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences recently completed a critical review of the scientific literature pertaining to the association of indoor dampness and mold contamination with adverse health effects. In this paper, we report the results of quantitative meta-analysis of the studies reviewed in the IOM report. We developed point estimates and confidence intervals (CIs) to summarize the association of several respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes with the presence of dampness and mold in homes. The odds ratios and confidence intervals from the original studies were transformed to the log scale and random effect models were applied to the log odds ratios and their variance. Models were constructed both accounting for the correlation between multiple results within the studies analyzed and ignoring such potential correlation. Central estimates of ORs for the health outcomes ranged from 1.32 to 2.10, with most central estimates between 1.3 and 1.8. Confidence intervals (95%) excluded unity except in two of 28 instances, and in most cases the lower bound of the CI exceeded 1.2. In general, the two meta-analysis methods produced similar estimates for ORs and CIs. Based on the results of the meta-analyses, building dampness and mold are associated with approximately 30% to 80% increases in a variety of respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes. The results of these meta-analyses reinforce the IOM's recommendation that actions be taken to prevent and reduce building dampness problems.

  13. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Titanium Components Fabricated by a New Powder Injection Molding Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyberg, Eric A.; Miller, Megan R.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Weil, K. Scott

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a powder injection molding (PIM) binder system for titanium that employs naphthalene as the primary constituent to facilitate easy binder removal and mitigate problems with carbon contamination. In the study presented here, we examined densification behavior, microstructure, and mechanical properties in specimens formed by this process. In general, we found that we could achieve tensile strengths comparable to wrought titanium in the PIM-formed specimens, but that maximum elongation was less than expected. Chemical and microstructural analyses suggest that use of higher purity powder and further process optimization will lead to significant improvements in ductility.

  14. Rapid solidification processing system for producing molds, dies and related tooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McHugh, Kevin M.

    2004-06-08

    A system for the spray forming manufacturing of near-net-shape molds, dies and related toolings, wherein liquid material such as molten metal, metallic alloys, or polymers are atomized into fine droplets by a high temperature, high velocity gas and deposited onto a pattern. Quenching of the in-flight atomized droplets provides a heat sink, thereby allowing undercooled and partially solidified droplets to be formed in-flight. Composites can be formed by combining the atomized droplets with solid particles such as powders, whiskers or fibers.

  15. Association of residential dampness and mold with respiratory tract infections and bronchitis: a meta-analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Eliseeva, Ekaterina A.; Mendell, Mark J.

    2010-11-15

    Dampness and mold have been shown in qualitative reviews to be associated with a variety of adverse respiratory health effects, including respiratory tract infections. Several published meta-analyses have provided quantitative summaries for some of these associations, but not for respiratory infections. Demonstrating a causal relationship between dampness-related agents, which are preventable exposures, and respiratory tract infections would suggest important new public health strategies. We report the results of quantitative meta-analyses of published studies that examined the association of dampness or mold in homes with respiratory infections and bronchitis. For primary studies meeting eligibility criteria, we transformed reported odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) to the log scale. Both fixed and random effects models were applied to the log ORs and their variances. Most studies contained multiple estimated ORs. Models accounted for the correlation between multiple results within the studies analyzed. One set of analyses was performed with all eligible studies, and another set restricted to studies that controlled for age, gender, smoking, and socioeconomic status. Subgroups of studies were assessed to explore heterogeneity. Funnel plots were used to assess publication bias. The resulting summary estimates of ORs from random effects models based on all studies ranged from 1.38 to 1.50, with 95% CIs excluding the null in all cases. Use of different analysis models and restricting analyses based on control of multiple confounding variables changed findings only slightly. ORs (95% CIs) from random effects models using studies adjusting for major confounding variables were, for bronchitis, 1.45 (1.32-1.59); for respiratory infections, 1.44 (1.31-1.59); for respiratory infections excluding nonspecific upper respiratory infections, 1.50 (1.32-1.70), and for respiratory infections in children or infants, 1.48 (1.33-1.65). Little effect of publication

  16. Dual Durameter Blow Molded Rocker Cover Design With Unique Isolation Strategy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Freese, V, Charles Edwin

    2000-07-11

    The rocker arm cover on a diesel engine can be formed of a rigid molded plastic material to minimize the transmission of noise into the atmosphere. Sonic vibration of the cover can be reduced by reducing the cover material stiffness. The reduced stiffness of the cover material allows the roof area of the cover to be momentarily displaced away from the cylinder head in the presence of an acoustic wave, so that the roof area is not able to develop the restoring force that is necessary for vibrational motion.

  17. US prep plant census 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-10-15

    Each year Coal Age conducts a fairly comprehensive survey of the industry to produce the US coal preparation plant survey. This year's survey shows how many mergers and acquisitions have given coal operators more coal washing capacity. The plants are tabulated by state, giving basic details including company owner, plant name, raw feed, product ash %, quality, type of plant builder and year built. 1 tab., 1 photo.

  18. CX-010027: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Removal of Glass Feed Prep System from 786-A (EDL) CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 01/22/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  19. Numerical prediction of fiber orientation in injection-molded short-fiber/thermoplastic composite parts with experimental validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thi, Thanh Binh Nguyen; Morioka, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Hamanaka, Senji; Yamashita, Katsuhisa; Nonomura, Chisato

    2015-05-22

    Numerical prediction of the fiber orientation in the short-glass fiber (GF) reinforced polyamide 6 (PA6) composites with the fiber weight concentration of 30%, 50%, and 70% manufactured by the injection molding process is presented. And the fiber orientation was also directly observed and measured through X-ray computed tomography. During the injection molding process of the short-fiber/thermoplastic composite, the fiber orientation is produced by the flow states and the fiber-fiber interaction. Folgar and Tucker equation is the well known for modeling the fiber orientation in a concentrated suspension. They included into Jeffreys equation a diffusive type of term by introducing a phenomenological coefficient to account for the fiber-fiber interaction. Our developed model for the fiber-fiber interaction was proposed by modifying the rotary diffusion term of the Folgar-Tucker equation. This model was presented in a conference paper of the 29{sup th} International Conference of the Polymer Processing Society published by AIP conference proceeding. For modeling fiber interaction, the fiber dynamic simulation was introduced in order to obtain a global fiber interaction coefficient, which is sum function of the fiber concentration, aspect ratio, and angular velocity. The fiber orientation is predicted by using the proposed fiber interaction model incorporated into a computer aided engineering simulation package C-Mold. An experimental program has been carried out in which the fiber orientation distribution has been measured in 100 x 100 x 2 mm injection-molded plate and 100 x 80 x 2 mm injection-molded weld by analyzed with a high resolution 3D X-ray computed tomography system XVA-160?, and calculated by X-ray computed tomography imaging. The numerical prediction shows a good agreement with experimental validation. And the complex fiber orientation in the injection-molded weld was investigated.

  20. Simulation of the Two Stages Stretch-Blow Molding Process: Infrared Heating and Blowing Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bordival, M.; Schmidt, F. M.; Le Maoult, Y.; Velay, V. [CROMeP - Ecole des Mines d'Albi Carmaux - Campus Jarlard - 81013 Albi cedex 09 (France)

    2007-05-17

    In the Stretch-Blow Molding (SBM) process, the temperature distribution of the reheated perform affects drastically the blowing kinematic, the bottle thickness distribution, as well as the orientation induced by stretching. Consequently, mechanical and optical properties of the final bottle are closely related to heating conditions. In order to predict the 3D temperature distribution of a rotating preform, numerical software using control-volume method has been developed. Since PET behaves like a semi-transparent medium, the radiative flux absorption was computed using Beer Lambert law. In a second step, 2D axi-symmetric simulations of the SBM have been developed using the finite element package ABAQUS registered . Temperature profiles through the preform wall thickness and along its length were computed and applied as initial condition. Air pressure inside the preform was not considered as an input variable, but was automatically computed using a thermodynamic model. The heat transfer coefficient applied between the mold and the polymer was also measured. Finally, the G'sell law was used for modeling PET behavior. For both heating and blowing stage simulations, a good agreement has been observed with experimental measurements. This work is part of the European project ''APT{sub P}ACK'' (Advanced knowledge of Polymer deformation for Tomorrow's PACKaging)

  1. Optimization of Micro Metal Injection Molding By Using Grey Relational Grade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibrahim, M. H. I. [Dept. Of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (UTHM), 86400 Parit Raja, Batu Pahat, Johor (Malaysia); Precision Process Research Group, Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Muhamad, N.; Sulong, A. B.; Nor, N. H. M.; Harun, M. R.; Murtadhahadi [Precision Process Research Group, Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Jamaludin, K. R. [UTM Razak School of Engineering and Advanced Technology, UTM International Campus, 54100 Jalan Semarak, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2011-01-17

    Micro metal injection molding ({mu}MIM) which is a variant of MIM process is a promising method towards near net-shape of metallic micro components of complex geometry. In this paper, {mu}MIM is applied to produce 316L stainless steel micro components. Due to highly stringent characteristic of {mu}MIM properties, the study has been emphasized on optimization of process parameter where Taguchi method associated with Grey Relational Analysis (GRA) will be implemented as it represents novel approach towards investigation of multiple performance characteristics. Basic idea of GRA is to find a grey relational grade (GRG) which can be used for the optimization conversion from multi objectives case which are density and strength to a single objective case. After considering the form 'the larger the better', results show that the injection time(D) is the most significant followed by injection pressure(A), holding time(E), mold temperature(C) and injection temperature(B). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) is also employed to strengthen the significant of each parameter involved in this study.

  2. Bulk and Surface Molecular Orientation Distribution in Injection-molded Liquid Crystalline Polymers: Experiment and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, J.; Burghardt, W; Bubeck, R; Burgard, S; Fischer, D

    2010-01-01

    Bulk and surface distributions of molecular orientation in injection-molded plaques of thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers (TLCPs) have been studied using a combination of techniques, coordinated with process simulations using the Larson-Doi 'polydomain' model. Wide-angle X-ray scattering was used to map out the bulk orientation distribution. Fourier Transform Infrared Attenuated Total Reflectance (FTIR-ATR) and Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) were utilized to probe the molecular orientation states to within about {approx}5 {micro}m and {approx}2 nm, respectively, of the sample surface. These noninvasive, surface-sensitive techniques yield reasonable self-consistency, providing complementary validation of the robustness of these methods. An analogy between Larson-Doi and fiber orientation models has allowed the first simulations of TLCP injection molding. The simulations capture many fine details in the bulk orientation distribution across the sample plaque. Direct simulation of surface orientation at the level probed by FTIR-ATR and NEXAFS was not possible due to the limited spatial resolution of the simulations. However, simulation results extracted from the shear-dominant skin region are found to provide a qualitatively accurate indicator of surface orientation. Finally, simulations capture the relation between bulk and surface orientation states across the different regions of the sample plaque.

  3. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY 2014 Third Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Sanborn, Scott E.; Mathur, Raj N.; Sharma, Bhisham; Sangid, Michael D.; Wang, Jin; Jin, Xiaoshi; Costa, Franco; Gandhi, Umesh N.; Mori, Steven; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2014-08-15

    This report describes the technical progresses made during the third quarter of FY 2014: 1) Autodesk introduced the options for fiber inlet condition to the 3D solver. These options are already available in the mid-plane/dual domain solver. 2) Autodesk improved the accuracy of 3D fiber orientation calculation around the gate. 3) Autodesk received consultant services from Prof. C.L. Tucker at the University of Illinois on the implementation of the reduced order model for fiber length, and discussed with Prof. Tucker the methods to reduce memory usage. 4) PlastiComp delivered to PNNL center-gated and edge-fan-gated 20-wt% to 30-wt% LCF/PP and LCF/PA66 (7”x7”x1/8”) plaques molded by the in-line direct injection molding (D-LFT) process. 5) PlastiComp molded ASTM tensile, flexural and impact bars under the same D-LFT processing conditions used for plaques for Certification of Assessment and ascertaining the resultant mechanical properties. 6) Purdue developed a new polishing routine, utilizing the automated polishing machine, to reduce fiber damage during surface preparation. 7) Purdue used a marker-based watershed segmentation routine, in conjunction with a hysteresis thresholding technique, for fiber segmentation during fiber orientation measurement. 8) Purdue validated Purdue’s fiber orientation measurement method using the previous fiber orientation data obtained from the Leeds machine and manually measured data by the University of Illinois. 9) PNNL conducted ASMI mid-plane analyses for a 30wt% LCF/PP plaque and compared the predicted fiber orientations with the measured data provided by Purdue University at the selected locations on this plaque. 10) PNNL put together the DOE 2014 Annual Merit Review (AMR) presentation with the team and presented it at the AMR meetings on June 17, 2014. 11) PNNL built ASMI dual domain models for the Toyota complex part and commenced mold filling analyses of the complex part with different wall thicknesses in order to

  4. A Combined Experimental and Computational Approach for the Design of Mold Topography that Leads to Desired Ingot Surface and Microstructure in Aluminum Casting.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Zabaras, N.J.; Samanta, D.; Tan, L.

    2005-10-30

    A design methodology will be developed with which casting mold surface topographies can be tuned to produce required surface features and micro-structural properties of Aluminum ingots. Both static and continuous casting processes will be examined with instrumented molds. Mold surface topographies, which consist of unidirectional and bi-directional groove textures, will be generated using contact and non-contact techniques to elicit a radiator-like effect at the mold-casting interface. The rate of heat extraction, the evolution of near-surface cast microstructure, and shell macro-morphology can be controlled once the proper balance between mold surface area extension and the degree of imperfect wetting at the instant solidification starts is determined. Once this control is achieved, it will be possible to minimize or even eliminate costly post-casting surface milling or scalping which is currently a major barrier to the development of new Aluminum casting processes.

  5. Grain refinement of permanent mold cast copper base alloys. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadayappan, M.; Thomson, J. P.; Elboujdaini, M.; Gu, G. Ping; Sahoo, M.

    2004-04-29

    Grain refinement behavior of copper alloys cast in permanent molds was investigated. This is one of the least studied subjects in copper alloy castings. Grain refinement is not widely practiced for leaded copper alloys cast in sand molds. Aluminum bronzes and high strength yellow brasses, cast in sand and permanent molds, were usually fine grained due to the presence of more than 2% iron. Grain refinement of the most common permanent mold casting alloys, leaded yellow brass and its lead-free replacement EnviroBrass III, is not universally accepted due to the perceived problem of hard spots in finished castings and for the same reason these alloys contain very low amounts of iron. The yellow brasses and Cu-Si alloys are gaining popularity in North America due to their low lead content and amenability for permanent mold casting. These alloys are prone to hot tearing in permanent mold casting. Grain refinement is one of the solutions for reducing this problem. However, to use this technique it is necessary to understand the mechanism of grain refinement and other issues involved in the process. The following issues were studied during this three year project funded by the US Department of Energy and the copper casting industry: (1) Effect of alloying additions on the grain size of Cu-Zn alloys and their interaction with grain refiners; (2) Effect of two grain refining elements, boron and zirconium, on the grain size of four copper alloys, yellow brass, EnviroBrass II, silicon brass and silicon bronze and the duration of their effect (fading); (3) Prediction of grain refinement using cooling curve analysis and use of this method as an on-line quality control tool; (4) Hard spot formation in yellow brass and EnviroBrass due to grain refinement; (5) Corrosion resistance of the grain refined alloys; (6) Transfer the technology to permanent mold casting foundries; It was found that alloying elements such as tin and zinc do not change the grain size of Cu-Zn alloys

  6. Predictive engineering tools for injection-molded long-carbon-fiber thermoplastic composites - FY 2015 third quarterly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Fifield, Leonard S.; Mori, Steven; Gandhi, Umesh N.; Wang, Jin; Costa, Franco; Wollan, Eric J.; Tucker, III, Charles L.

    2015-07-01

    During the third quarter of FY 2015, the following technical progress has been made toward project milestones: 1) Magna oversaw the tool build and prepared the molding plan for the complex part of Phase II. 2) PlastiComp hosted a visit by Magna and Toyota on April 23rd to finalize the molding scope and schedule. The plan for molding trials including selection of molding parameters for both LFT and D-LFT for the U-shape complex part was established. 3) Toyota shipped the U-shape complex part tool to Magna on May 28th, 2015. 4) Plasticomp provided 30wt% LCF/PP and 30wt% LCF/PA66 compounded pellets to Magna for molding the complex part. 5) Magna performed preliminary molding trials on June 2nd, 2015 to validate wall thickness, fill profile, tool temperature and shot size requirements for the complex part. 6) Magna performed the first complex part run on June 16th and 17th, 2015 at Magna’s Composite Centre of Excellence in Concord, ON, Canada. Dale Roland of Plasticomp, and Umesh Gandhi of Toyota also attended the molding. 7) Magna discussed and finalized the plan with PNNL and the team for cutting samples from molded parts at selected locations for fiber orientation and length measurements. 8) Magna provided the computer-aided design (CAD) files of the complex parts with and without ribs to PNNL and Autodesk to build the corresponding ASMI models for injection molding simulations. Magna also provided the actual parameters used. 9) Plasticomp’s provided knowledge and experience of molding LCF materials essential to the successful molding of the parts including optimization of fill speed, tool temperatures, and plasticizing conditions for the 30wt% LCF/PP and 30wt% LCF/PA66 materials in both rib and non-rib versions. 10) Magna molded additional parts for evaluation of mechanical property testing including torsional stiffness on June 29th and 30th, 2015 at Magna’s Composite Center of Excellence. 11) Toyota began preparation for the torsion test of the specimens

  7. End Uses Mechanical Properties Settled By The Modified Sintering Conditions Of The Metal Injection Molding Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marray, Tarek [Laboratoire Materiaux, ECAM, 40 montee Saint Barthelemy, 69321, Lyon, Cedex 05 (France); Arts et Metiers ParisTech, MecaSurf Laboratory (EA 4496), 2, Cours des Arts et Metiers, 13617 Aix en Provence (France); Jaccquet, Philippe; Moinard-Checot, Delphine [Laboratoire Materiaux, ECAM, 40 montee Saint Barthelemy, 69321, Lyon, Cedex 05 (France); Arts et Metiers ParisTech, LaBoMaP, Rue Porte de Paris, 71250 CLUNY (France); Fabre, Agnes; Barrallier, Laurent [Arts et Metiers ParisTech, MecaSurf Laboratory (EA 4496), 2, Cours des Arts et Metiers, 13617 Aix en Provence (France)

    2011-01-17

    Most common mechanical applications require parts with specific properties as hard faced features. It is well known that treating parts under suitable atmospheres may improve hardness and strength yield of steels. Heat treatment process and more particularly thermo-chemical diffusion processes (such as carburizing or its variation: carbonitriding) can be performed to reach the industrial hardness profile requirements. In this work, a low-alloyed steel feedstock based on water soluble binder system is submitted to the MIM process steps (including injection molding, debinding and sintering). As-sintered parts are then treated under a low pressure carbonitriding treatment. This contribution focuses on preliminary results such as microstructural analyses and mechanical properties which are established at each stage of the process to determine and monitor changes.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of submicron polymer waveguides by micro-transfer molding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Te-Wei

    2009-12-15

    Various methods exist for fabrication of micron and submicron sized waveguide structures. However, most of them include expensive and time consuming semiconductor fabrication techniques. An economical method for fabricating waveguide structures is introduced and demonstrated in this thesis. This method is established based on previously well-developed photonic crystal fabrication method called two-polymer microtransfer molding. The waveguide in this work functions by a coupler structure that diffracts the incident light into submicron polymer rods. The light is then guided through the rods. Characterization is done by collecting the light that has been guided through the waveguide and exits the end of these submicron polymer bars. The coupling and waveguiding capabilities are demonstrated using two light sources, a laser and white light.

  9. Design and fabrication of hat-shaped stiffened panel by resin transfer molding method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, R.; Ibekwe, S.I.; Mensah, P.F.; Chehl, S.S.

    1998-12-31

    Hat-shaped stiffened composite panels were fabricated by resin transfer molding (RTM) process. As application of these compression load bearing panels in aircraft wings and fuselage increases, this promising manufacturing technique would contribute towards the goal of attaining reduced part counts and cheaper manufacturing costs. Rigid foam which increases the structural efficiency of panels was utilized in this process. Also Balsa wood was considered as an alternative to the rigid foam and employed as a permanent mandrel in fabricating one of the panels. Buckling analysis result by finite element method and modified closed form solution suggested by Agarwal et al. (1974) agree. Once this process is fine-tuned, it would provide a cheaper method of fabricating composite hat-stiffened panels.

  10. Nondestructive method for chemically machining crucibles or molds from their enclosed ingots and castings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stout, Norman D. (Livermore, CA); Newkirk, Herbert W. (Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01

    An inventive method is described for chemically machining rhenium, rhenium and tungsten alloy, and group 5b and 6b crucibles or molds from included ingots and castings comprised of oxide crystals including YAG and YAG based crystals, garnets, corundum crystals, and ceramic oxides. A mixture of potassium hydroxide and 15 to 90 weight percent of potassium nitrate is prepared and maintained at a temperature above melting and below the lower of 500 degrees centigrade or the temperature of decomposition of the mixture. The enveloping metal container together with its included oxide crystal object is rotated within the heated KOH-KNO.sub.3 mixture, until the container is safely chemically machined away from the included oxide crystal object.

  11. Nanopowder molding method for creating implantable high-aspect-ratio electrodes on thin flexible substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Zhiyu; Thundat, Thomas George

    2006-03-01

    Metal nanoparticles and a nanopowder molding process were used to fabricate 2D and 3D patternable structures having a height-to-width ratio of up to 10:1. By means of this process, an entire neural stimulation circuit, including stimulating electrode, connection trace, and contact pad, can be fused into one continuous, integrated structure where different sections can have different heights, widths, and shapes. The technique is suitable for mass production, and the fabricated electrode is robust and very flexible. More importantly for biomedical applications, the entire fabricated structure can be packed at room temperature onto a biocompatible flexible substrate, such as polydimethylsiloxane, parylene, and polyimide as well as other temperature-sensitive or vacuum-sensitive materials. The electrodes and wires have about the same electrical resistivities as bulk materials and desirable electrochemical properties, including low impedance.

  12. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - Fourth FY 2015 Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Fifield, Leonard S.; Wollan, Eric J.; Roland, Dale; Gandhi, Umesh N.; Mori, Steven; Lambert, Gregory; Baird, Donald G.; Wang, Jin; Costa, Franco; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2015-11-13

    During the last quarter of FY 2015, the following technical progress has been made toward project milestones: 1) PlastiComp used the PlastiComp direct in-line (D-LFT) Pushtrusion system to injection mold 40 30wt% LCF/PP parts with ribs, 40 30wt% LCF/PP parts without ribs, 10 30wt% LCF/PA66 parts with ribs, and 35 30wt% LCF/PA66 parts without ribs. In addition, purge materials from the injection molding nozzle were obtained for fiber length analysis, and molding parameters were sent to PNNL for process modeling. 2) Magna cut samples at four selected locations (named A, B, C and D) from the non-ribbed Magna-molded parts based on a plan discussed with PNNL and the team and shipped these samples to Virginia Tech for fiber orientation and length measurements. 3) Virginia Tech started fiber orientation and length measurements for the samples taken from the complex parts using Virginia Tech’s established procedure. 4) PNNL and Autodesk built ASMI models for the complex parts with and without ribs, reviewed process datasheets and performed preliminary analyses of these complex parts using the actual molding parameters received from Magna and PlastiComp to compare predicted to experimental mold filling patterns. 5) Autodesk assisted PNNL in developing the workflow to use Moldflow fiber orientation and length results in ABAQUS® simulations. 6) Autodesk advised the team on the practicality and difficulty of material viscosity characterization from the D-LFT process. 7) PNNL developed a procedure to import fiber orientation and length results from a 3D ASMI analysis to a 3D ABAQUS® model for structural analyses of the complex part for later weight reduction study. 8) In discussion with PNNL and Magna, Toyota developed mechanical test setups and built fixtures for three-point bending and torsion tests of the complex parts. 9) Toyota built a finite element model for the complex parts subjected to torsion loading. 10) PNNL built the 3D ABAQUS® model of the complex ribbed

  13. Low Speed Technology for Small Turbine Development Reaction Injection Molded 7.5 Meter Wind Turbine Blade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David M. Wright; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2007-07-31

    An optimized small turbine blade (7.5m radius) was designed and a partial section molded with the RIM (reaction-injection molded polymer) process for mass production. The intended market is for generic three-bladed wind turbines, 100 kilowatts or less, for grid-assist end users with rural and semi-rural sites, such as the farm/ranch market, having low to moderate IEC Class 3-4 wind regimes. This blade will have substantial performance improvements over, and be cheaper than, present-day 7.5m blades. This is made possible by the injection-molding process, which yields high repeatability, accurate geometry and weights, and low cost in production quantities. No wind turbine blade in the 7.5m or greater size has used this process. The blade design chosen uses a RIM skin bonded to a braided infused carbon fiber/epoxy spar. This approach is attractive to present users of wind turbine blades in the 5-10m sizes. These include rebladeing California wind farms, refurbishing used turbines for the Midwest farm market, and other manufacturers introducing new turbines in this size range.

  14. A New Direct-Pour In-Mold (DPI) Technology for Producing Ductile and Compacted Graphite Iron Castings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason Hitchings; Jay R. Hitchings

    2007-07-20

    A new "Direct Pour In-Mold" (DPI) Magnesium treatment technology has been developed that can produce both Nodular and Compacted Graphite iron. The DPI technology converts the standard horizontal runner system into a vertical one, by placing a Magnesium Ferrosilicon treatment alloy and molten metal filter into a specially designed container. The DPI container is easily placed into either vertically or horizontally parted molds, and then a base metal can be poured directly into it. The metal is treated and filtered as it passes through, and then proceeds directly into a runner or casting cavity. Various sizes of containers provide all of the necessary components required to deliver a range of weights of treated and filtered metal at accurate and consistent flow rates. The DPI containers provide energy savings over competing techniques, increased mold yields, very high Magnesium recovery, zero Magnesium fume, and no post inoculation is required. By treating the metal just prior to it entering a casting cavity many other benefits and advantages are also realized.

  15. A wide variety of injection molding technologies is now applicable to small series and mass production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blo, P., E-mail: bloss@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: juettner@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: jacob@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: loeser@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: michaelis@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: krajewsky@kuz-leipzig.de; Jttner, G., E-mail: bloss@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: juettner@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: jacob@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: loeser@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: michaelis@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: krajewsky@kuz-leipzig.de; Jacob, S., E-mail: bloss@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: juettner@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: jacob@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: loeser@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: michaelis@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: krajewsky@kuz-leipzig.de; Lser, C., E-mail: bloss@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: juettner@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: jacob@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: loeser@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: michaelis@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: krajewsky@kuz-leipzig.de; Michaelis, J., E-mail: bloss@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: juettner@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: jacob@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: loeser@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: michaelis@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: krajewsky@kuz-leipzig.de; Krajewsky, P., E-mail: bloss@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: juettner@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: jacob@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: loeser@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: michaelis@kuz-leipzig.de, E-mail: krajewsky@kuz-leipzig.de [Kunststoff-Zentrum in Leipzig gGmbH (KuZ), Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Micro plastic parts open new fields for application, e. g., to electronics, sensor technologies, optics, and medical engineering. Before micro parts can go to mass production, there is a strong need of having the possibility for testing different designs and materials including material combinations. Hence, flexible individual technical and technological solutions for processing are necessary. To manufacture high quality micro parts, a micro injection moulding machine named formicaPlast based on a two-step plunger injection technology was developed. Resulting from its design, the residence time and the accuracy problems for managing small shot volumes with reproducible high accuracy are uncompromisingly solved. Due to their simple geometry possessing smooth transitions and non adherent inner surfaces, the plunger units allow to process 'all' thermoplastics from polyolefines to high performance polymers, optical clear polymers, thermally sensitive bioresorbables, highly filled systems (the so-called powder injection molding PIM), and liquid silicon rubber (LSR, here with a special kit). The applied platform strategy in the 1K and 2K version allows integrating automation for assembling, handling and packaging. A perpendicular arrangement allows encapsulation of inserts, also partially, and integration of this machine into process chains. Considering a wide variety of different parts consisting of different materials, the high potential of the technology is demonstrated. Based on challenging industrial parts from electronic applications (2K micro MID and bump mat, where both are highly structured parts), the technological solutions are presented in more detail.

  16. Tailorable 3D microfabrication for photonic applications: two-polymer microtransfer molding (proceedings paper)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; kim, Chang-Hwan; Constant, Kristen; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2006-02-28

    For photonic devices, extending beyond the planar regime to the third dimension can allow a higher degree of integration and novel functionalities for applications such as photonic crystals and integrated optical circuits. Although conventional photolithography can achieve both high quality and structural control, it is still costly and slow for three-dimensional (3D) fabrication. Moreover, as diverse functional polymers emerge, there is potential to develop new techniques for quick and economical fabrication of 3D structures. We present a 3D microfabrication technique based on the soft lithographic technique, called two-polymer microtransfer molding (2P-{micro}TM) to accomplish low cost, high structural fidelity and tailorable 3D microfabrication for polymers. Using 2P-{micro}TM, highly layered polymeric microstructures are achievable by stacking planar structures layer by layer. For increased processing control, the surface chemistry of the polymers is characterized as a function of changing ultraviolet dosage to optimize yield in layer transfer. We discuss the application of the 2P-{micro}TM to build polymer templates for woodpile photonic crystals, and demonstrate methods for converting the polymer templates to dielectric and metallic photonic crystal structures. Finally, we will show that 2P-{micro}TM is promising for fabricating 3D polymeric optical waveguides.

  17. Characterization of fold defects in AZ91D and AE42 magnesium alloy permanent mold castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bichler, L. [Centre for Near-net-shape Processing of Materials, Ryerson University, 101 Gerrard St. E., Toronto, M5B 2K3 (Canada); Ravindran, C., E-mail: rravindr@ryerson.ca [Centre for Near-net-shape Processing of Materials, Ryerson University, 101 Gerrard St. E., Toronto, M5B 2K3 (Canada)

    2010-03-15

    Casting premium-quality magnesium alloy components for aerospace and automotive applications poses unique challenges. Magnesium alloys are known to freeze rapidly prior to filling a casting cavity, resulting in misruns and cold shuts. In addition, melt oxidation, solute segregation and turbulent metal flow during casting contribute to the formation of fold defects. In this research, formation of fold defects in AZ91D and AE42 magnesium alloys cast via the permanent mold casting process was investigated. Computer simulations of the casting process predicted the development of a turbulent metal flow in a critical casting region with abrupt geometrical transitions. SEM and light optical microscopy examinations revealed the presence of folds in this region for both alloys. However, each alloy exhibited a unique mechanism responsible for fold formation. In the AZ91D alloy, melt oxidation and velocity gradients in the critical casting region prevented fusion of merging metal front streams. In the AE42 alloy, limited solubility of rare-earth intermetallic compounds in the {alpha}-Mg phase resulted in segregation of Al{sub 2}RE particles at the leading edge of a metal front and created microstructural inhomogeneity across the fold.

  18. Ceramic micro-injection molded nozzles for serial femtosecond crystallography sample delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beyerlein, K. R.; Heymann, M.; Kirian, R.; Adriano, L.; Bajt, S.; Knoška, J.; Wilde, F.; Chapman, H. N.

    2015-12-15

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFELs) allows for room temperature protein structure determination without evidence of conventional radiation damage. In this method, a liquid suspension of protein microcrystals can be delivered to the X-ray beam in vacuum as a micro-jet, which replenishes the crystals at a rate that exceeds the current XFEL pulse repetition rate. Gas dynamic virtual nozzles produce the required micrometer-sized streams by the focusing action of a coaxial sheath gas and have been shown to be effective for SFX experiments. Here, we describe the design and characterization of such nozzles assembled from ceramic micro-injection molded outer gas-focusing capillaries. Trends of the emitted jet diameter and jet length as a function of supplied liquid and gas flow rates are measured by a fast imaging system. The observed trends are explained by derived relationships considering choked gas flow and liquid flow conservation. Finally, the performance of these nozzles in a SFX experiment is presented, including an analysis of the observed background.

  19. Ceramic micro-injection molded nozzles for serial femtosecond crystallography sample delivery

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Beyerlein, K. R.; Adriano, L.; Heymann, M.; Kirian, R.; Knoska, J.; Wilde, F.; Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.

    2015-12-08

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFELs) allows for room temperature protein structure determination without evidence of conventional radiation damage. In this method, a liquid suspension of protein microcrystals can be delivered to the X-ray beam in vacuum as a micro-jet, which replenishes the crystals at a rate that exceeds the current XFEL pulse repetition rate. Gas dynamic virtual nozzles produce the required micrometer-sized streams by the focusing action of a coaxial sheath gas and have been shown to be effective for SFX experiments. Here, we describe the design and characterization of such nozzles assembled from ceramic micro-injectionmore » molded outer gas-focusing capillaries. Trends of the emitted jet diameter and jet length as a function of supplied liquid and gas flow rates are measured by a fast imaging system. The observed trends are explained by derived relationships considering choked gas flow and liquidflow conservation. In conclusion, the performance of these nozzles in a SFX experiment is presented, including an analysis of the observed background.« less

  20. Optimization and evaluation of metal injection molding by using X-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Shidi; Zhang, Ruijie; Qu, Xuanhui

    2015-06-15

    6061 aluminum alloy and 316L stainless steel green bodies were obtained by using different injection parameters (injection pressure, speed and temperature). After injection process, the green bodies were scanned by X-ray tomography. The projection and reconstruction images show the different kinds of defects obtained by the improper injection parameters. Then, 3D rendering of the Al alloy green bodies was used to demonstrate the spatial morphology characteristics of the serious defects. Based on the scanned and calculated results, it is convenient to obtain the proper injection parameters for the Al alloy. Then, reasons of the defect formation were discussed. During mold filling, the serious defects mainly formed in the case of low injection temperature and high injection speed. According to the gray value distribution of projection image, a threshold gray value was obtained to evaluate whether the quality of green body can meet the desired standard. The proper injection parameters of 316L stainless steel can be obtained efficiently by using the method of analyzing the Al alloy injection. - Highlights: • Different types of defects in green bodies were scanned by using X-ray tomography. • Reasons of the defect formation were discussed. • Optimization of the injection parameters can be simplified greatly by the way of X-ray tomography. • Evaluation standard of the injection process can be obtained by using the gray value distribution of projection image.

  1. In mold laser welding for high precision polymer based optical components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, N., E-mail: id2694@alunos.uminho.pt, E-mail: pontes@dep.uminho.pt; Pontes, A. J., E-mail: id2694@alunos.uminho.pt, E-mail: pontes@dep.uminho.pt [IPC - Institute for Polymers and Composites, Department of Polymer Engineering, University of Minho, 4800-058 Guimares (Portugal)

    2014-05-15

    To assemble a complete subsystem as a rear lamp, is necessary to have different machines and to perform several tasks. This necessity obliges the companies to have large structures to support all the assembling process. These huge structures are very costly and have as a consequence the reduction of the competitiveness of the companies. The process presented in this document has the intention of reducing the number of tasks needed to produce the final subsystem/product. To achieve this goal were combined several technologies, as in-mould assembling, laser welding and LEDs (light-emitting diode). One of the advantages of this process was the utilization of only one injection molding machine with three injection units to do all the assembling process. To achieve the main objective, firstly, the rear lamp was designed according to with the legislation of UNECE Vehicle Regulations - 1958 Agreements; Regulation No. 50 -Rev.2 - Position lamps, stop lamps, direction indicators for motorcycles. Posterior several polymeric materials were studied at different levels. Initial were studied several concentrations of carbon nanotubes mixed with PC (polycarbonate). This had the objective of determine, if these materials are suitable to conduct the necessary electric current to turn on the different LEDs. One of the main advantages of this process is the use of the laser transmission welded process. Since, with this welding technology is possible reduce the complexity of the final part. To understand the potentialities of this technology a combination of two materials was studied. The studied showed that all materials presented a high transparency to the laser beam. In terms of weld process, the study showed that the best welding conditions are the lowest velocity, diameter and power. With these studies was possible conclude that this new process is suitable to be implemented at the industrial level.

  2. Evaluation of Hand Lay-Up and Resin Transfer Molding in Composite Wind Turbine Blade Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CAIRNS,DOUGLAS S.; SHRAMSTAD,JON D.

    2000-06-01

    The majority of the wind turbine blade industry currently uses low cost hand lay-up manufacturing techniques to process composite blades. While there are benefits to the hand lay-up process, drawbacks inherent to this process along with advantages of other techniques suggest that better manufacturing alternatives may be available. Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) was identified as a processing alternative and shows promise in addressing the shortcomings of hand lay-up. This report details a comparison of the RTM process to hand lay-up of composite wind turbine blade structures. Several lay-up schedules and critical turbine blade structures were chosen for comparison of their properties resulting from RTM and hand lay-up processing. The geometries investigated were flat plate, thin and thick flanged T-stiffener, I-beam, and root connection joint. It was found that the manufacturing process played an important role in laminate thickness, fiber volume, and weight for the geometries investigated. RTM was found to reduce thickness and weight and increase fiber volumes for all substructures. RTM resulted in tighter material transition radii and eliminated the need for most secondary bonding operations. These results would significantly reduce the weight of wind turbine blades. Hand lay-up was consistently slower in fabrication times for the structures investigated. A comparison of mechanical properties showed no significant differences after employing fiber volume normalization techniques to account for geometry differences resulting from varying fiber volumes. The current root specimen design does not show significant mechanical property differences according to process and exceeds all static and fatigue requirements.

  3. Molded plasmonic crystals for detecting and spatially imaging surface bound species by surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baca, A. J.; Truong, T. T.; Cambrea, L. R.; Montgomery, J. M.; Abdula, D.; Banks, T. R.; Yao, J.; Nuzzo, R. G.; Gray, S. K.; Rogers, J. A.

    2009-06-24

    This report introduces a type of plasmonic crystal that consists of metal coated nanostructures of relief molded on a polymer film as a substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Such crystals exhibit SERS enhancement factors of {approx} 10{sup 5}, over large areas and with sufficiently high levels of uniformity for precise two-dimensional Raman mapping of surface bound monolayers. The ease of fabrication together with the high sensitivities and spatial resolution that can be achieved suggests an attractive route to SERS substrates for portable chemical warfare agent detection, environmental monitors, noninvasive imaging of biomolecules, and other applications.

  4. Suppressing the Skin-Core Structure of Injection-Molded Isotactic Polypropylene via Combination of an in situ Microfibrillar Network and an Interfacial Compatibilizer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X Yi; C Chen; G Zhong; L Xu; J Tang; X Ji; B Hsiao; Z Li

    2011-12-31

    Injection-molded semicrystalline polymer parts generally exhibited a so-called skin-core structure basically as a result of the large gradients of temperature, shear rate, stress, and pressure fields created by the boundary conditions of injection molding. Suppression of the skin-core structure is a long-term practical challenge. In the current work, the skin-core structure of the conventional injection-molded isotactic polypropylene (iPP) was largely relieved by the cooperative effects of an in situ microfibrillar network and interfacial compatibilizer. The in situ poly(ethylene terephthalate) microfibrils of 1-8 {micro}m in diameter and large aspect ratios of above 40 tended to entangle with each other to generate a microfibrillar network in the iPP melt. During injection molding, the iPP molecules experienced confined flow in the microchannels or pores formed by the microfibrillar network, which could redistribute and homogenize the flow field of polymer melt. Addition of the compatibilizer, glycidyl methacrylate-grafted iPP, restrained the molecular orientation but facilitated preservation of oriented molecules due to the chemical bonds at the interface between PET microfibrils and iPP. The cooperative effects of in situ microfibrillar network and interfacial compatibilizer led to almost the same molecular orientation across the whole thickness of the injection-molded parts. Additionally, the content of {beta} crystals in different layers of injection-molded iPP parts depended on the combined effects of the molecular orientation, the amount of oriented crystals, and the crystallization time between 105 and 140 C. The presence of the interfacial compatibilizer facilitated formation of the {beta} crystals because of preservation of the oriented molecules.

  5. Prediction of the Elastic-Plastic Stress/Strain Response for Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2009-01-26

    This paper proposes a model to predict the elastic-plastic response of injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs). The model accounts for elastic fibers embedded in a thermoplastic resin that exhibits the elastic-plastic behavior obeying the Ramberg-Osgood relation and J-2 deformation theory of plasticity. It also accounts for fiber length and orientation distributions in the composite formed by the injection-molding process. Fiber orientation was predicted using the anisotropic rotary diffusion model recently developed by Phelps and Tucker for LFTs. An incremental procedure using the Eshelbys equivalent inclusion method and the Mori-Tanaka model is proposed to compute the overall stress increment resulting from an overall strain increment for an aligned fiber composite that contains the same fiber volume fraction and length distribution as the actual composite. The incremental response of the later is then obtained from the solution for the aligned fiber composite that is averaged over all possible fiber orientations using the orientation averaging method. Failure during incremental loading is predicted using the Van Hattum-Bernado model. The elastic-plastic and strength prediction model for LFTs was validated against the experimental stress-strain results obtained for long glass fiber/polypropylene specimens.

  6. Prediction of the Elastic-Plastic Stress/Strain Response for Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba N. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL; Phelps, Jay H [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; TuckerIII, Charles L. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Bapanapalli, Satish K [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a model to predict the elastic-plastic response of injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs). The model accounts for elastic fibers embedded in a thermoplastic resin that exhibits the elastic-plastic behavior obeying the Ramberg-Osgood relation and J-2 deformation theory of plasticity. It also accounts for fiber length and orientation distributions in the composite formed by the injection-molding process. Fiber orientation was predicted using an anisotropic rotary diffusion model recently developed for LFTs. An incremental procedure using Eshelby's equivalent inclusion method and the Mori-Tanaka assumption is proposed to compute the overall stress increment resulting from an overall strain increment for an aligned-fiber composite that contains the same fiber volume fraction and length distribution as the actual composite. The incremental response of the latter is then obtained from the solution for the aligned-fiber composite by averaging over all fiber orientations. Failure during incremental loading is predicted using the Van Hattum-Bernado model. The model is validated against the experimental stress-strain results obtained for long-glass-fiber/polypropylene specimens.

  7. CX-005040: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Induction Furnace Melting (Includes Graphite and Mold Prep)CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 01/19/2011Location(s): Albany, OregonOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. Compressed Air System Modifications Improve Efficiency at a Plastics Blow Molding Plant (Southeastern Container Plant): Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) BestPractices Technical Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wogsland, J.

    2001-06-18

    This case study is one in a series on industrial firms who are implementing energy efficient technologies and system improvements into their manufacturing processes. This case study documents the activities, savings, and lessons learned on the plastics blow molding plant project.

  9. A Fully Coupled Simulation and Optimization Scheme for the Design of 3D Powder Injection Molding Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayad, G.; Barriere, T.; Gelin, J. C. [Femto-ST Institute/LMA, ENSMM, 26 Rue de l'Epitaphe, 25000 Besancon (France); Song, J. [Femto-ST Institute/LMA, ENSMM, 26 Rue de l'Epitaphe, 25000 Besancon (France); Department of Applied Mechanics and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, 610031 Chengdu (China); Liu, B. [Department of Applied Mechanics and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, 610031 Chengdu (China)

    2007-05-17

    The paper is concerned with optimization and parametric identification of Powder Injection Molding process that consists first in injection of powder mixture with polymer binder and then to the sintering of the resulting powders parts by solid state diffusion. In the first part, one describes an original methodology to optimize the injection stage based on the combination of Design Of Experiments and an adaptive Response Surface Modeling. Then the second part of the paper describes the identification strategy that one proposes for the sintering stage, using the identification of sintering parameters from dilatometer curves followed by the optimization of the sintering process. The proposed approaches are applied to the optimization for manufacturing of a ceramic femoral implant. One demonstrates that the proposed approach give satisfactory results.

  10. Use of a Naphthalene-Based Binder in Injection Molding Net-Shape Titanium Components of Controlled Porosity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weil, K. Scott; Nyberg, Eric A.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2005-07-01

    We have recently developed a naphthalene-based binder system for use in powder injection molding (PIM) of ceramic and metallic materials. The use of a binder that can be removed via sublimation offers several unique advantages relative to the typical thermoplastic and/or thermoset binders employed in PIM. One of these is that essentially no volume change takes place during debindering. This offers a relatively facile method of introducing porosity into a net-shape part of potentially complex geometry. In the study described in this paper, the effects of powder loading and subsequent isostatic compaction on the size and amount of porosity in the components produced by this technique were investigated. In general, it was found that the amount of porosity is inversely proportional to the initial concentration of metal powder in the PIM feedstock. Likewise, average pore size displays a similar relationship with powder loading.

  11. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY 2014 First Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Sanborn, Scott E.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Mathur, Raj N.; Sangid, Michael D.; Jin, Xiaoshi; Costa, Franco; Gandhi, Umesh N.; Mori, Steven; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2014-02-19

    The CRADA between PNNL, Autodesk, Toyota and Magna has been effective since October 28th, 2013. The whole team including CRADA and subcontract partners kicked off the project technically on November 1st, 2013. This report describes work performed during the first quarter of FY 2014. The following technical progresses have been made toward project milestones: 1) The project kickoff meeting was organized at PlastiComp, Inc. in Winona on November 13th, 2013 involving all the project partners. During this meeting the research plan and Gantt chart were discussed and refined. The coordination of the research activities among the partners was also discussed to ensure that the deliverables and timeline will be met. 2) Autodesk delivered a research version of ASMI to PNNL for process modeling using this tool under the project. PNNL installed this research version on a PNNL computer and tested it. Currently, PNNL is using ASMI to prepare the models for PlastiComp plaques. 3) PlastiComp has compounded long carbon-fiber reinforced polypropylene and polyamide 6,6 compounds for rheological and thermal characterization tests by the Autodesk laboratories in Melbourne, Australia. 4) Initial mold flow analysis was carried out by PlastiComp to confirm that the 3D complex part selected by Toyota as a representative automotive part is moldable. 5) Toyota, Magna, PlastiComp and PNNL finalized the planning for molding the Toyota 3D complex part. 6) Purdue University worked with PNNL to update and specify the test matrix for characterization of fiber length/orientation. 7) Purdue University developed tools to automate the data collection and analysis of fiber length and orientation measurements. 8) Purdue University designed and specified equipment to replace the need for equipment using the technology established by the University of Leeds at General Motors.

  12. Structural behavior and dynamics of an anomalous fluid between attractive and repulsive walls: Templating, molding, and superdiffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leoni, Fabio; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2014-11-07

    Confinement can modify the dynamics, the thermodynamics, and the structural properties of liquid water, the prototypical anomalous liquid. By considering a generic model for anomalous liquids, suitable for describing solutions of globular proteins, colloids, or liquid metals, we study by molecular dynamics simulations the effect that an attractive wall with structure and a repulsive wall without structure have on the phases, the crystal nucleation, and the dynamics of the fluid. We find that at low temperatures the large density of the attractive wall induces a high-density, high-energy structure in the first layer (templating effect). In turn, the first layer induces a molding effect on the second layer determining a structure with reduced energy and density, closer to the average density of the system. This low-density, low-energy structure propagates further through the layers by templating effect and can involve all the existing layers at the lowest temperatures investigated. Therefore, although the high-density, high-energy structure does not self-reproduce further than the first layer, the structured wall can have a long-range influence thanks to a sequence of templating, molding, and templating effects through the layers. We find that the walls also have an influence on the dynamics of the liquid, with a stronger effect near the attractive wall. In particular, we observe that the dynamics is largely heterogeneous (i) among the layers, as a consequence of the sequence of structures caused by the walls presence, and (ii) within the same layer, due to superdiffusive liquid veins within a frozen matrix of particles near the walls at low temperature and high density. Hence, the partial freezing of the first layer does not correspond necessarily to an effective reduction of the channel's section in terms of transport properties, as suggested by other authors.

  13. LANSCE | Lujan Center | Chemical & Sample Prep

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical & Sample Preparation For general questions, please contact the Lujan Center Chemical and Sample Preparation Laboratory responsible: Charles Kelsey | ckelsey@lanl.gov | 505.665.5579 Sample and Equipment Shipping Instructions For questions regarding shipping procedures, contact theLujan Center Experiment Coordinator: TBA Chemistry Laboratories High-Pressure Laboratory X-ray Laboratory Spectroscopy Laboratory Clean Room Laboratory Glove box - He atmosphere High-purity water Diamond

  14. WWF-Climate Prep | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    analysis, Low emission development planning Resource Type Case studiesexamples, Lessons learnedbest practices, Training materials Website http:www.climateprep.orgabo...

  15. Emerald prep plant gets a polishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2008-04-15

    In anticipation of a second longwall and increased production, Emerald plans to increase capacity at its coal preparation plant. 3 photos.

  16. Theory and technology of the molding process: Study and algorithmization of calculation for the stressed-strained state of a powdered medium under compression by slanted plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leshchinskii, V.M.; Blokhin, A.G.; Stoyanov, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the effect of the technological parameters on the molding process during shear compression of powder composites. An algorithm has been developed for the design of the technological processes. The correspondence between the continuum model of the uniform shear of a layer of powder and the actual behavior of the medium is analyzed and the physical sense of the compaction rate, which characterizes the sensitivity of the given medium to hydrostatic pressure, is determined.

  17. Assessment of Current Process Modeling Approaches to Determine Their Limitations, Applicability and Developments Needed for Long-Fiber Thermoplastic Injection Molded Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Holbery, Jim; Smith, Mark T.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Norris, Robert E.; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2006-11-30

    This report describes the status of the current process modeling approaches to predict the behavior and flow of fiber-filled thermoplastics under injection molding conditions. Previously, models have been developed to simulate the injection molding of short-fiber thermoplastics, and an as-formed composite part or component can then be predicted that contains a microstructure resulting from the constituents’ material properties and characteristics as well as the processing parameters. Our objective is to assess these models in order to determine their capabilities and limitations, and the developments needed for long-fiber injection-molded thermoplastics (LFTs). First, the concentration regimes are summarized to facilitate the understanding of different types of fiber-fiber interaction that can occur for a given fiber volume fraction. After the formulation of the fiber suspension flow problem and the simplification leading to the Hele-Shaw approach, the interaction mechanisms are discussed. Next, the establishment of the rheological constitutive equation is presented that reflects the coupled flow/orientation nature. The decoupled flow/orientation approach is also discussed which constitutes a good simplification for many applications involving flows in thin cavities. Finally, before outlining the necessary developments for LFTs, some applications of the current orientation model and the so-called modified Folgar-Tucker model are illustrated through the fiber orientation predictions for selected LFT samples.

  18. Interrogation of Surface, Skin, and Core Orientation in Thermotropic Liquid-Crystalline Copolyester Moldings by Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure and Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rendon,S.; Bubeck, R.; Thomas, L.; Burghardt, W.; Hexemer, A.; Fischer, D.

    2007-01-01

    Injection molding thermotropic liquid-crystalline polymers (TLCPs) usually results in the fabrication of molded articles that possess complex states of orientation that vary greatly as a function of thickness. 'Skin-core' morphologies are often observed in TLCP moldings. Given that both 'core' and 'skin' orientation states may often differ both in magnitude and direction, deconvolution of these complex orientation states requires a method to separately characterize molecular orientation in the surface region. A combination of two-dimensional wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) in transmission and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy is used to probe the molecular orientation in injection molded plaques fabricated from a 4,4'-dihydroxy-{alpha}-methylstilbene (DH{alpha}MS)-based thermotropic liquid crystalline copolyester. Partial electron yield (PEY) mode NEXAFS is a noninvasive ex situ characterization tool with exquisite surface sensitivity that samples to a depth of 2 nm. The effects of plaque geometry and injection molding processing conditions on surface orientation in the regions on- and off- axis to the centerline of injection molded plaques are presented and discussed. Quantitative comparisons are made between orientation parameters obtained by NEXAFS and those from 2D WAXS in transmission, which are dominated by the microstructure in the skin and core regions. Some qualitative comparisons are also made with 2D WAXS results from the literature.

  19. An Integrated Approach Linking Process to Structural Modeling With Microstructural Characterization for Injections-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Smith, Mark T.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Frame, Barbara; Norris, Robert E.; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin

    2008-09-01

    The objective of our work is to enable the optimum design of lightweight automotive structural components using injection-molded long fiber thermoplastics (LFTs). To this end, an integrated approach that links process modeling to structural analysis with experimental microstructural characterization and validation is developed. First, process models for LFTs are developed and implemented into processing codes (e.g. ORIENT, Moldflow) to predict the microstructure of the as-formed composite (i.e. fiber length and orientation distributions). In parallel, characterization and testing methods are developed to obtain necessary microstructural data to validate process modeling predictions. Second, the predicted LFT composite microstructure is imported into a structural finite element analysis by ABAQUS to determine the response of the as-formed composite to given boundary conditions. At this stage, constitutive models accounting for the composite microstructure are developed to predict various types of behaviors (i.e. thermoelastic, viscoelastic, elastic-plastic, damage, fatigue, and impact) of LFTs. Experimental methods are also developed to determine material parameters and to validate constitutive models. Such a process-linked-structural modeling approach allows an LFT composite structure to be designed with confidence through numerical simulations. Some recent results of our collaborative research will be illustrated to show the usefulness and applications of this integrated approach.

  20. COMPRESSION MOLDED, BIO-FIBER REINFORCED, HIGH PERFORMANCE THERMOSET COMPOSITES FOR STRUCTURAL AND SEMI-STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2010-09-15

    Major goals for the future of transportation materials include reduced weight of components, reduced cost of materials and increased use of renewable content. Reinforcement of transportation composites with plant fibers has the potential to decrease component weight relative to glass fiber reinforcement, reduce cost of materials relative to carbon fiber reinforcement, and significantly increase the fraction of composite components from a renewable source. Barriers to widespread application of natural fiber reinforced components in structural and semi-structural vehicle applications have included the natural propensity of these materials to uptake moisture and the corresponding loss of mechanical properties with exposure to moisture. Through novel advances in fiber treatment, processing and molding to address moisture absorption and resin interfacing, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is reducing these barriers. Herein we demonstrate natural fiber reinforced composites that are 1) composed of more than 50wt% renewable content, 2) weigh 17% less than glass fiber composites with the same fiber volume, and 3) exhibit wet mechanical properties suitable for semi-structural application. Lower cost, lower energy in production, and reduced greenhouse gas production are anticipated advantages of the described PNNL technologies.

  1. The Mold Rush

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    treatment of infectious disease in the mid-1900s, but many no longer work, and resistant bacteria pose a significant threat to global populations. Although the use-and misuse-of...

  2. Microelectronics plastic molded packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.R.; Palmer, D.W.; Peterson, D.W.

    1997-02-01

    The use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) microelectronics for nuclear weapon applications will soon be reality rather than hearsay. The use of COTS for new technologies for uniquely military applications is being driven by the so-called Perry Initiative that requires the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) to accept and utilize commercial standards for procurement of military systems. Based on this philosophy, coupled with several practical considerations, new weapons systems as well as future upgrades will contain plastic encapsulated microelectronics. However, a conservative Department of Energy (DOE) approach requires lifetime predictive models. Thus, the focus of the current project is on accelerated testing to advance current aging models as well as on the development of the methodology to be used during WR qualification of plastic encapsulated microelectronics. An additional focal point involves achieving awareness of commercial capabilities, materials, and processes. One of the major outcomes of the project has been the definition of proper techniques for handling and evaluation of modern surface mount parts which might be used in future systems. This program is also raising the familiarity level of plastic within the weapons complex, allowing subsystem design rules accommodating COTS to evolve. A two year program plan is presented along with test results and commercial interactions during this first year.

  3. Injection molded component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    James, Allister W; Arrell, Douglas J

    2014-09-30

    An intermediate component includes a first wall member, a leachable material layer, and a precursor wall member. The first wall member has an outer surface and first connecting structure. The leachable material layer is provided on the first wall member outer surface. The precursor wall member is formed adjacent to the leachable material layer from a metal powder mixed with a binder material, and includes second connecting structure.

  4. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY 2015 First Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Fifield, Leonard S.; Kijewski, Seth A.; Sangid, Michael D.; Wang, Jin; Jin, Xiaoshi; Costa, Franco; Tucker, III, Charles L.; Mathur, Raj N.; Gandhi, Umesh N.; Mori, Steven

    2015-01-29

    plan for the project and submitted the established plan to DOE. 9) PNNL performed ASMI mid-plane analyses for the fast-fill center-gated 30wt% LCF/PP and 50wt% LCF/PA66 plaques and compared the predicted fiber orientations with the measured data provided by Purdue at Locations A, B, and C on these plaques. 10) Based on discussions with the University of Illinois and Autodesk, PNNL proposed a procedure to adjust fiber orientation data for Location A of the center-gated plaques so that the data can be expressed and interpreted in the flow/cross-flow direction coordinate system. 11) PNNL tested the new ASMI version received from Autodesk, examined and discussed 3D fiber orientation predictions for PlastiComp plaques. 12) PlastiComp, Inc. (PlastiComp), Toyota Research Institute North America (Toyota) and Magna Exteriors and Interiors Corp. (Magna) participated in discussions with team members on the go/no-go plan and the issues related to fiber length measurements. Toyota continued the discussion with Magna on tool modification for molding the complex part in order to achieve the target fiber length in the part.

  5. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - Second FY 2015 Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Fifield, Leonard S.; Kijewski, Seth A.; Sangid, Michael D.; Wang, Jin; Costa, Franco; Tucker, III, Charles L.; Mathur, Raj N.; Gandhi, Umesh N.; Mori, Steven

    2015-05-19

    validation and compared the predicted fiber orientations with the measured data provided by Purdue at Locations A, B, and C on these plaques. The 15% accuracy criterion based on evaluation of tensile and bending stiffness was used to assess the accuracy in fiber orientation predictions. 9) PNNL completed ASMI mid-plane analyses for all the PlastiComp plaques defined on the go/no-go list for fiber length distribution (FLD) model validation and compared the predicted length distributions with the measured data provided by Purdue at Locations A, B, and C on these plaques. The 15% accuracy criterion based on evaluation of tensile and bending stiffness was used to assess the accuracy in fiber orientation predictions. 10) PNNL tested the new ASMI version received from Autodesk in March 2015, examined and discussed 3D fiber orientation predictions for PlastiComp plaques. 11) PlastiComp, Inc. (PlastiComp), Toyota Research Institute North America (Toyota) and Magna Exteriors and Interiors Corporation (Magna) participated in discussions with team members on the go/no-go plan. Toyota continued the discussion with Magna on tool modification for molding the complex part in order to achieve the target fiber length in the part.

  6. Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) for the determination of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) in foundry molding sand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dungan, R.S. [USDA ARS, Beltsville, MD (United States). Environmental Management & Byproducts Utilization Laboratory

    2005-07-01

    The use of headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) to determine benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) in foundry molding sand, specifically a 'green sand' (clay-bonded sand) was investigated. The BTEX extraction was conducted using a 75 {mu} M carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane (CAR-PDMS) fiber, which was suspended above 10 g of sample. The SPME fiber was desorbed in a gas chromatograph injector port (280{sup o}C for 1 min) and the analytes were characterized by mass spectrometry. The effects of extraction time and temperature, water content, and clay and bituminous coal percentage on HS-SPME of BTEX were investigated. Because green sands contain bentonite clay and carbonaceous material such as crushed bituminous coal, a matrix effect was observed. The detection limits for BTEX were determined to be {lt}= 0.18 ng g{sup -1} of green sand.

  7. Microsoft Word - NTSF Text Prep Document - Mark Your Calendar...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to learn more about the event. NTSF Website w NTSF Wiki Site w Rosen Plaza w Orlando Tourism June 7-9, 2016-Mark your Calendar National Transportation Stakeholders Forum 2016...

  8. Ready, Set . . . Get Prepped for Monday's Launch of the 'America...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Laboratory scientists found multiple uses for thin film lithium ion conductors - for batteries and for solar cells. | Photo Courtesy of the National Renewable Energy ...

  9. Pre-Freshman Enrichment Program (PREP). Closeout documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-19

    This is the final report on a project to support a science/mathematics summer program aimed at minority middle school students, whose objective was to introduce them to career opportunities, job interest, and financial help for pursuing a career objective in a technology field. The report describes program results from the summers of 1992, 1993 and 1996. It was administered through Eastern New Mexico University.

  10. Mold Materials For Permanent Molding of Aluminum Alloys (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A paper copy of this document is also available for sale to the public from the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. A test that involves ...

  11. Constant permeability of (Fe{sub 0.75}B{sub 0.20}Si{sub 0.05}){sub 96}Nb{sub 4} bulk metallic glass prepared by B{sub 2}O{sub 3} flux melting and Cu-mold casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitoh, T.; Shibata, D. [Department of Machine Intelligence and Systems Engineering, Faculty of Systems Science and Technology, Akita Prefectural University, Yurihonjo 015-0055 (Japan)

    2009-04-01

    The effect of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} flux melting on the soft magnetic properties of (Fe{sub 0.75}B{sub 0.20}Si{sub 0.05}){sub 96}Nb{sub 4} bulk metallic glass prepared by casting has been investigated. Ring-shaped bulk specimens that were prepared by B{sub 2}O{sub 3} flux melting and Cu-mold casting (fluxed specimens) show a flat hysteresis curve, indicating a good linear relationship between the magnetic induction and the applied magnetic field. Although the permeability of the fluxed specimens is lower than that of the specimens prepared by conventional Cu-mold casting by one order of magnitude, their coercivities are almost same. These results show that it is possible to develop a new soft magnetic material that exhibits constant permeability with low core loss.

  12. Polymeric Mold For Providing A Microscale Part

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boehme, Dale R.; Bankert, Michelle A.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2005-01-11

    The invention is a developer system for developing a PMMA photoresist having exposed patterns comprising features having both very small sizes, and very high aspect ratios. The developer system of the present invention comprises a developer tank, an intermediate rinse tank and a final rinse tank, each tank having a source of high frequency sonic agitation, temperature control, and continuous filtration. It has been found that by moving a patterned wafer, through a specific sequence of developer/rinse solutions, where an intermediate rinse solution completes development of those portions of the exposed resist left undeveloped after the development solution, by agitating the solutions with a source of high frequency sonic vibration, and by adjusting and closely controlling the temperatures and continuously filtering and recirculating these solutions, it is possible to maintain the kinetic dissolution of the exposed PMMA polymer as the rate limiting step.

  13. Method for molding threads in graphite panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, W.W.; Spencer, C.

    1994-11-29

    A graphite panel with a hole having a damaged thread is repaired by drilling the hole to remove all of the thread and making a new hole of larger diameter. A bolt with a lubricated thread is placed in the new hole and the hole is packed with graphite cement to fill the hole and the thread on the bolt. The graphite cement is cured, and the bolt is unscrewed therefrom to leave a thread in the cement which is at least as strong as that of the original thread. 8 figures.

  14. Combinatorial Multilevel Mold Insert Using Micromachining and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Initial plating tests verified that the fabricated templates built on a copper substrate ... Fabrication and Results Copper (Cu) was the first choice and compared to other potential ...

  15. Natural Fiber Composites: Retting, Preform Manufacture & Molding

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

  16. Method for molding threads in graphite panels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Short, William W.; Spencer, Cecil

    1994-01-01

    A graphite panel (10) with a hole (11) having a damaged thread (12) is repaired by drilling the hole (11) to remove all of the thread and make a new hole (13) of larger diameter. A bolt (14) with a lubricated thread (17) is placed in the new hole (13) and the hole (13) is packed with graphite cement (16) to fill the hole and the thread on the bolt. The graphite cement (16) is cured, and the bolt is unscrewed therefrom to leave a thread (20) in the cement (16) which is at least as strong as that of the original thread (12).

  17. Natural Fiber Composites: Retting, Preform Manufacture & Molding...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. lm12smith.pdf (1.4 MB) More Documents & Publications FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting ...

  18. Sample Prep, Workflow Automation and Nucleic Acid Fractionation for Next Generation Sequencing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roskey, Mark

    2010-06-03

    Mark Roskey of Caliper LifeSciences discusses how the company's technologies fit into the next generation sequencing workflow on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  19. ITEP Webinar: Methods to Assess and Document Mold Contamination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP), this free, two-part webinar series is aimed toward tribes, Alaska Native Villages, and Pacific Islanders. The first part is...

  20. Induction Consolidation/Molding of Thermoplastic Composites Using Smart Susceptors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose objective is to explore and define the technical and economic viability of induction consolidation for thermoplastic composites and to fabricate a wide spectrum of components in an energy-efficient manner.

  1. Transforming Wind Turbine Blade Mold Manufacturing with 3D Printing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (ORNL) Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) system. BAAM is 500 to 1,000 times faster and capable of printing polymer components over 10 times larger than today's industrial additive machines. With research blades measuring 13 meters (42 feet) in length, BAAM provides the necessary scale and foundation for this ground-breaking advancement in blade research and manufacturing. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) plays a strategic role

  2. Transforming Wind Turbine Blade Mold Manufacturing with 3D Printing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Big Area Additive Manufacturing, or BAAM machine developed in collaboration with Cincinnati Incorporated. BAAM is 500 to 1,000 times faster and capable of printing polymer components over 10 times larger than today's industrial additive machines. With research blades measuring 13 meters (42 feet) in length, BAAM provides the necessary scale and foundation for this ground-breaking advancement in blade research and manufacturing. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Energy Efficiency

  3. Gating of Permanent Molds for ALuminum Casting (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A paper copy of this document is also available for sale to the public from the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. This report summarizes a ...

  4. Gating of Permanent Molds for Aluminum Casting (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A paper copy of this document is also available for sale to the public from the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. This report summarizes a ...

  5. Gating of Permanent Molds for ALuminum Casting (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. ... Publication Date: 2004-03-30 OSTI Identifier: 822451 DOE Contract Number: FC36-01ID13983 ...

  6. Casting Process Simulator 3D Mold Fill an Solidification

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-03-06

    The CAPS software is a tool used to setup, simulate, and examine the results from three-dimensional filling and solidification of a sand casting.

  7. Casting Process Simulator 2D Mold Fill and Solidification

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-05-06

    The CaPS software is a tool used to setup, simulate, and examine the results from two-dimensional filling and solidification of a sand casting.

  8. US ITER | Media Corner

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    US ITER preps for high performance plasma heating US ITER preps for high performance plasma heating New test results and innovations advance ion cyclotron high power transmission ...

  9. Dynamic displacements of the RHIC dipole cold mass with injection molded composite posts during quench conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sondericker, J. Wolf, L.J.

    1991-02-01

    The new design of the RHIC dipole magnets incorporate helium containment bellows having a convolution diameter of only 7.63 inches. The present bellows are 12.80 inches in diameter. The smaller bellows present a substantially reduced pressure area which can be expected to reduce proportionately the end force on the cold mass during a quench. But, the objection was raised that the smaller bellows would present greater obstruction to the helium flow during a quench thereby producing higher pressure differentials. This analysis was undertaken to address these assertions by predicting the dynamic displacements of the cold mass using the latest test data on the stiffness of the IMC posts, pressure-time histories acquired from the recent full cell tests of RHIC magnets, and the dimensions of the new expansion joints. The analysis treated the cold mass as an elastic body having a saggittal curvature. The technique of normal mode expansion of a lumped-parameter system was used to obtain the results and conclusions reported herein.

  10. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2013-04-04

    This quarterly report summarizes the status for the project planning to initiate all the legal and contract documents required for establishing the subcontracts needed and a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Autodesk, Inc., Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing North America (Toyota), and Magna Exterior and Interiors Corporation (Magna). During the first quarter (10/1/2012 to 12/31/2012), the statements of work (SOW) for the subcontracts to Purdue University, University of Illinois, and PlastiComp, Inc. were completed. A draft of the CRADA SOW was sent to Autodesk, Toyota, and Magna for technical and legal reviews. PNNL Legal Services contacted project partners Legal counterparts for preparing legal documents for the project. A non-disclosure agreement was drafted and sent to all the parties for reviews.

  11. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2013-05-30

    This quarterly report summarizes the status for the project planning to complete all the legal and contract documents required for establishing the subcontracts needed and a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Autodesk, Inc., Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing North America (Toyota), and Magna Exterior and Interiors Corporation (Magna). During the second quarter (1/1/2013 to 3/31/2013), all the technical and legal documents for the subcontracts to Purdue University, University of Illinois, and PlastiComp, Inc. were completed. The revised CRADA documents were sent to DOE, Autodesk, Toyota, and Magna for technical and legal reviews. PNNL Legal Services contacted project partners Legal counterparts for completing legal documents for the project. A non-disclosure agreement was revised and sent to all the parties for reviews.

  12. Phosphor suspended in silicone, molded/formed and used in a remote phosphor configuration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kolodin, Boris; Deshpande, Anirudha R

    2014-09-16

    A light emitting package comprising a support hosting at least one light emitting diode. A light transmissive dome comprised of a silicone including a phosphor material positioned to receive light emitted by the diode. A glass cap overlies said dome.

  13. Household mold and dust allergens: Exposure, sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gent, Janneane F.; Kezik, Julie M.; Hill, Melissa E.; Tsai, Eling; Li, De-Wei; Leaderer, Brian P.

    2012-10-15

    Background: Few studies address concurrent exposures to common household allergens, specific allergen sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity. Objective: To identify levels of allergen exposures that trigger asthma exacerbations in sensitized individuals. Methods: We sampled homes for common indoor allergens (fungi, dust mites (Der p 1, Der f 1), cat (Fel d 1), dog (Can f 1) and cockroach (Bla g 1)) for levels associated with respiratory responses among school-aged children with asthma (N=1233) in a month-long study. Blood samples for allergy testing and samples of airborne fungi and settled dust were collected at enrollment. Symptoms and medication use were recorded on calendars. Combined effects of specific allergen sensitization and level of exposure on wheeze, persistent cough, rescue medication use and a 5-level asthma severity score were examined using ordered logistic regression. Results: Children sensitized and exposed to any Penicillium experienced increased risk of wheeze (odds ratio [OR] 2.12 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12, 4.04), persistent cough (OR 2.01 95% CI 1.05, 3.85) and higher asthma severity score (OR 1.99 95% CI 1.06, 3.72) compared to those not sensitized or sensitized but unexposed. Children sensitized and exposed to pet allergen were at significantly increased risk of wheeze (by 39% and 53% for Fel d 1>0.12 {mu}g/g and Can f 1>1.2 {mu}g/g, respectively). Increased rescue medication use was significantly associated with sensitization and exposure to Der p 1>0.10 {mu}g/g (by 47%) and Fel d 1>0.12 {mu}g/g (by 32%). Conclusion: Asthmatic children sensitized and exposed to low levels of common household allergens Penicillium, Der p 1, Fel d 1 and Can f 1 are at significant risk for increased morbidity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Few studies address concurrent allergen exposures, sensitization and asthma morbidity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Children with asthma were tested for sensitivity to common indoor allergens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homes were sampled for these allergens and asthma morbidity monitored during the subsequent month. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Children exposed and sensitized to Penicillium, Der p, Fel d, Can f risk increased asthma morbidity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These children might benefit from targeted intervention strategies.

  14. Non-Incineration Treatment to Reduce Benzene and VOC Emissions from Green Sand Molding Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred S. Cannon; Robert C. Voigt

    2002-06-28

    Final report describing laboratory, pilot scale and production scale evaluation of advanced oxidation systems for emissions and cost reduction in metal casting green sand systems.

  15. Equipment Inventory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    21KBr Centrifuge Centrifuge SSRL BioChemMat Prep Lab 2 131 209 Saint Gobain K-104 Sanyo MIR-154 Cooled Incubator Temperature Control LCLS Sample Prep Lab 999 109 Sanyo MPR-215F...

  16. Micromolding of a Highly Fluorescent Reticular Coordination Polymer: Solvent-Mediated Reconfigurable Polymerization in a Soft Lithographic Mold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y You; H Yang; J Chung; J Kim; Y Jung; S Park

    2011-12-31

    Coordination polymerization of pyridine-based ligands and zinc or silver ions was controlled by soft lithographic micromolding in capillaries. The polymer patterns that are produced are highly fluorescent and supramolecularly structured.

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  18. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY13 Fourth Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2013-12-02

    This quarterly report summarizes the status of the project planning to obtain all the approvals required for a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Autodesk, Inc., Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing North America (Toyota), and Magna Exterior and Interiors Corporation (Magna). The final CRADA documents processed by PNNL’s Legal Services were submitted to all the parties for signatures.

  19. The genome of the xerotolerant mold Wallemia sebi reveals adaptations to osmotic stress and suggests cryptic sexual reproduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahajabeen, Padamsee; Kumas, T. K. Arun; Riley, Robert; Binder, Manfred; Boyd, Alex; Calvo, Ann M.; Furukawa, Kentaro; Hesse, Cedar; Hohmann, Stefan; James, Tim Y.; LaButti, Kurt; Lapidus, Alla; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Miller, Kari; Shantappa, Sourabha; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Hibbett, David S.; McLaughlin, David J.; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Aime, Mary C.

    2011-09-03

    Wallemia (Wallemiales, Wallemiomycetes) is a genus of xerophilic Fungi of uncertain phylogenetic position within Basidiomycota. Most commonly found as food contaminants, species of Wallemia have also been isolated from hypersaline environments. The ability to tolerate environments with reduced water activity is rare in Basidiomycota. We sequenced the genome of W. sebi in order to understand its adaptations for surviving in osmotically challenging environments, and we performed phylogenomic and ultrastructural analyses to address its systematic placement and reproductive biology. W. sebi has a compact genome (9.8 Mb), with few repeats and the largest fraction of genes with functional domains compared with other Basidiomycota. We applied several approaches to searching for osmotic stress-related proteins. In silico analyses identied 93 putative osmotic stress proteins; homology searches showed the HOG (High Osmolarity Glycerol) pathway to be mostly conserved. Despite the seemingly reduced genome, several gene family expansions and a high number of transporters (549) were found that also provide clues to the ability of W. sebito colonize harsh environments. Phylogenetic analyses of a 71-protein dataset support the position of Wallemia as the earliest diverging lineage of Agaricomycotina, which is conrmed by septal pore ultrastructure that shows the septal pore apparatus as a variant of the Tremella-type. Mating type gene homologs were idented although we found no evidence of meiosis during conidiogenesis, suggesting there may be aspects of the life cycle of W. sebi that remain cryptic

  20. A Research Agenda on Assessing and Remediating Home Dampness and Mold to Reduce Dampness-Related Health Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, Mark J.

    2015-06-01

    This report briefly summarizes, based on recent review articles and selected more recent research reports, current scientific knowledge on two topics: assessing unhealthy levels of indoor D/M in homes and remediating home dampness-related problems to protect health. Based on a comparison of current scientific knowledge to that required to support effective, evidence-based, health-protective policies on home D/M, gaps in knowledge are highlighted, prior questions and research questions specified, and necessary research activities and approaches recommended.

  1. Predictive Engineering Tools for Injection-Molded Long-Carbon-Fiber Thermoplastic Composites - FY13 Third Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2013-08-06

    This quarterly report summarizes the status for the project planning to obtain all the approvals required for a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Autodesk, Inc., Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing North America (Toyota), and Magna Exterior and Interiors Corporation (Magna). The CRADA documents have been processed by PNNL Legal Services that is also coordinating the revision effort with the industrial parties to address DOEs comments.

  2. BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Training: Fundamentals of Building Measurement & Verification (CMVP prep) When: 2222016 8:00am - 2242016 5:00pm Where: Tacoma Public Utilities Administration Building 3628 S....

  3. Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Please send your RSVP to Carrie Cobb at clcobb@bpa.gov. Training Opportunity: Fundamentals of Building Measurement & Verification (CMVP prep) The Fundamentals of Building...

  4. January 2014 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    project contractor Siemens Government Technologies Inc., in signing one of the massive wind turbine blades that will become part of the Pantex Renewable Energy Project (PREP)....

  5. Biomass

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Energy Co-Evolution of Biofuels Lignocellulosic Biomass Microalgae ... HomeBiomass Permalink One-Pot-to-Prep Biomass for Biofuels Biofuels, Biomass, Energy, ...

  6. EERE PowerPoint 97-2004 Template: Green Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Fluid Residence Ages Desert Peak Sampling 122014 Sample Prep Line, valves, gauges, gas extraction membrane CO 2 ... size and long sampling time * First generation sample ...

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Bioscience Partnership...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Biology Hub: microliter-based digital microfluidic (DMF) platform - Ken Patel Blood RNA prep - Steve Branda PDID: miniature pulsed-discharge ionization detector for...

  8. Demonstration of Pyrolysis Biorefinery Concept for Biopower,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Office (BETO) Project Peer Review Demonstration of Pyrolysis Biorefinery Concept for ... plants * Product development and demonstration *4 Biomass Prep and Handling Pyrolysis ...

  9. CAES Home

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    materials. All imaging and sample prep activities shall be performed in accordance with CAES Operating Procedures. Radioactive Samples Materials: Radioactive material requests are...

  10. Muon g-2 Superconducting Magnet Commissioning Preparation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-26

    A time-lapse of the Fermilab muon g-2 ring being installed and prepped, from June 27, 2014 to June 5, 2015.

  11. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Advanced Technology Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reequipping and Engineering CX(s) Applied: B1.31, B5.1 Date: 09062011 ... Aptera All-Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicles CX(s) Applied: B1.31, B5.1 Date: 0620...

  12. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area PowerAdministratio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reconstruction of the V.T. Hanlon Substation CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 03232015 ... Reconstruction of the V.T. Hanlon Substation CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 03232015 ...

  13. Materials for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Steam Turbines Task 4: Cast Superalloy Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thangirala, Mani

    2015-09-30

    validated with solidification simulation analysis and the casting met NDT inspection and acceptance criteria. Heat treated and sectioned to extract trepan samples at different locations comparing with cast on coupons test data. Material properties requisite for design, such as tensile, creep/rupture, LCF, Fracture Toughness, Charpy V-notch chemical analysis testing were carried out. The test results will be presented in the final report. The typical Haynes 282 large size Steam Turbine production casting from Order to Delivery foundry schedule with the activity break up is shown in Figures 107 and 108. • From Purchase Order placement to Casting pouring ~ 26 weeks. 1. Sales and commercial review 3 2. Engineering Drawings/models review 4 3. Pattern and core box manufacturing 6 4. Casting process engineering review 4 5. FEM and solidification simulation analysis 4 6. Gating & Feeder Attachments, Ceramic tiling 2 7. Molding and coremaking production scheduling 6 8. Melting planning and schedule 3 9. Pouring, cooling and shake out 2 • From Pouring to casting Delivery ~ 29 weeks 10. Shot blast and riser cutting, gates removal 3 11. Homogenizing , solutionizing HT furnace prep 4 12. Grinding, Fettling 2 13. Aging HT Cycle, cooling 2 14. VT and LPT NDT inspections 2 15. Radiographic inspection 4 16. Mechanical testing, Chemical analysis test certs 4 17. Casting weld repair upgrades and Aging PWHT 4 18. NDT after weld repairs and casting upgrades 3 19. Casting Final Inspection and test certifications 3 20. Package and delivery 2 Hence the Total Lead time from P.O to Casting delivery is approximately 55 weeks. The Task 4.2 and Task 4.3 activities and reporting completed.

  14. Spiral concentrators recover fine coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2005-12-15

    Compound spirals offer better performance in a more efficient configuration. Prep plant operators in the US are increasingly opting to use spiral concentrators. They are easy to install, operate and maintain but their downfall is low capacity. The article describes spirals available from PrepTech/Multotec, Krebs Engineers and Roche MT. It reports on research on spiral concentrator technology. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  15. Fabrication of metallic microstructures by micromolding nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Winter, Michael R.; Domeier, Linda A.; Allan, Shawn M.; Skala, Dawn M.

    2002-01-01

    A method is provided for fabricating metallic microstructures, i.e., microcomponents of micron or submicron dimensions. A molding composition is prepared containing an optional binder and nanometer size (1 to 1000 nm in diameter) metallic particles. A mold, such as a lithographically patterned mold, preferably a LIGA or a negative photoresist mold, is filled with the molding composition and compressed. The resulting microstructures are then removed from the mold and the resulting metallic microstructures so provided are then sintered.

  16. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 12. Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an alternative, inexpensive resource which has been considered in this analysis. Sheet molding compound and powdered performing, P4, followed by compression molding in each case...

  17. Development of Partial Filter Technology for HDD Retrofit | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retrofit 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and ... Molds Hold Promise for Enhanced Wind Energy Manufacturing 3-D Printed Molds Hold ...

  18. Comparing Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Idling 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and ... Molds Hold Promise for Enhanced Wind Energy Manufacturing 3-D Printed Molds Hold ...

  19. Method for making an elastomeric member with end pieces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, L.O.; McNinch, J.H. Jr.; Nowell, G.C.

    1984-10-23

    A molding process is described for molding an elongated elastomeric member with wire mesh sleeves bonded to the ends. A molding preform of elastomeric material is positioned within a seamless mold cylinder, and the open ends of the wire mesh sleeves are mounted to end plug assemblies slidably received into the mold cylinder and positioned against the ends of the preform. A specialized profile is formed into surfaces of the respective end plug assemblies and by heating of the mold, the ends of the elastomeric preform are molded to the profile, as well as bonded to the reinforcing wire mesh sleeves. Vacuum is applied to the interior of the mold to draw outgassing vapors through relief spaces there through. The completed elastomeric member is removed from the mold cylinder by stretching, the consequent reduction in diameter enabling ready separation from the mold cylinder and removal thereof. 9 figs.

  20. Method for making an elastomeric member with end pieces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O.; McNinch, Jr., Joseph H.; Nowell, Gregory C.

    1984-01-01

    A molding process for molding an elongated elastomeric member (60) with wire mesh sleeves (16) bonded to the ends (14). A molding preform (10) of elastomeric material is positioned within a seamless mold cylinder (26), and the open ends of the wire mesh sleeves (16) are mounted to end plug assemblies (30) slidably received into the mold cylinder (26) and positioned against the ends (14) of the preform (10). A specialized profile is formed into surfaces (44) of the respective end plug assemblies (30) and by heating of the mold (26), the ends (14) of the elastomeric preform (10) are molded to the profile, as well as bonded to the reinforcing wire mesh sleeves (16). Vacuum is applied to the interior of the mold to draw outgassing vapors through relief spaces therethrough. The completed elastomeric member (60) is removed from the mold cylinder (26) by stretching, the consequent reduction in diameter enabling ready separation from the mold cylinder (26) and removal thereof.

  1. CX-010375: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Replace Existing Firehouse CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 09/20/2011 Location(s): California Offices(s): Berkeley Site Office

  2. FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8, 2011 CX-006459: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analytical Physics - Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08082011 Location(s): Albany, Oregon...

  3. CX-012231: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mica Peak Radio Station upgrade CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 06/09/2014 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  4. CX-009515: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tide Creek Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 11/08/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  5. CX-011215: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nepese Marsh Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 10/17/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Fermi Site Office

  6. CX-012606: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Preparing of Environmental Samples for Analysis CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41810 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  7. CX-012581: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Demolition of Outfall Sampling Station CX(s) Applied: B1.23Date: 41844 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  8. CX-012572: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    H-Area Vehicle Barrier Installation CX(s) Applied: B1.15Date: 41862 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  9. CX-012566: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Z-Area Fire Tank Painting CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41865 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  10. CX-012628: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Deactivation and Decommissioning of 711-L CX(s) Applied: B1.23Date: 41793 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  11. CX-012559: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Seal Access Plugs at 105-C CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41872 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  12. CX-012587: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    HB-Line Security Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41835 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  13. CX-011194: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Particle Physics Division Outback Garage CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 09/19/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Fermi Site Office

  14. CX-010195: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Polymer Synthesis Lab - Modification CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/15/2013 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-010241: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen Pathway Analyses CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 02/28/2013 Location(s): Virginia Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  16. CX-012310: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sawmill Creek Stream Bank Erosion CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/06/2014 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Argonne Site Office

  17. CX-012437: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High Energy Density Lithium Battery CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41878 Location(s): New YorkOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. CX-012028: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    High Temperature Laboratory CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/21/2014 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. CX-011538: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ninemile Creek Lower Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 11/26/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  20. CX-011536: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Aeneans Creek Spring Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 11/25/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  1. CX-011537: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wanacut Creek Upper Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 11/26/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  2. CX-012793: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    15-Minute Transmission Scheduling CX(s) Applied: B4.4, B4.5Date: 41933 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  3. CX-012110: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cowlitz Falls Fish Facility Access Agreement Extension CX(s) Applied: A2 Date: 04/02/2014 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  4. CX-009707: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alcoa Power Sales Contract CX(s) Applied: B4.1 Date: 12/04/2012 Location(s): Oregon, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  5. CX-009513: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Aquatic Invasive Mussels Monitoring CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 10/15/2012 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  6. CX-013632: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alcoa Power Sales Contract Amendment CX(s) Applied: B4.11Date: 04/23/2015 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  7. CX-008989: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State Energy Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08/27/2012 Location(s): Kansas Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  8. CX-008144: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Planned Repair of Flow Lines CX(s) Applied: B5.4 Date: 08/09/2011 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): RMOTC

  9. CX-011564: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excess Facilities Deactivation and Demolition CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 11/05/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  10. CX-012705: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC)-703 Fire Alarm Replacement CX(s) Applied: B2.2Date: 41858 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  11. CX-012725: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Materials and Fuel Complex (MFC)-782 Fire Sprinkler Installation CX(s) Applied: B2.2Date: 41829 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  12. CX-013825: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Lab A19 Cleanroom Construction CX(s) Applied: B1.31Date: 06/29/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  13. CX-014183: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Heyburn Substation Door Replacement CX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 09/03/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  14. CX-009398: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Domestic Source Recovery CX(s) Applied: B2.6 Date: 11/01/2012 Location(s): New Mexico Offices(s): Los Alamos Site Office

  15. CX-014379: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ouagga Mussel Study Funding CX(s) Applied: B3.16Date: 10/29/2015 Location(s): NevadaOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  16. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: West Virginia | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... June 10, 2015 CX-013868: Categorical Exclusion Determination B-33 HVAC Upgrades CX(s) ... Ceramic High Temperature Thermoelectric Heat Exchanger and Heat Recuperators for Power ...

  17. CX-012822: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Santiam-Toledo Structure 39/7 Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41876 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  18. CX-012799: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Malin-Hilltop Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41915 Location(s): CaliforniaOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  19. CX-012805: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Brasada-Harney #1 Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41908 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  20. CX-013386: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chemical Vapor Deposition CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 01/07/2015 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  1. CX-008724: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rexburg Bus Lot Lease Termination CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 07/05/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  2. CX-012283: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    USC Autoclave CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/14/2014 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  3. CX-007853: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Arizona Rooftop Challenge (ARC) CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01/27/2012 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  4. CX-007864: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Broward County SOLAR Project CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01/27/2012 Location(s): Florida Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  5. CX-012640: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lexington-Longview #1 Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41865 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  6. CX-011065: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 08/29/2013 Location(s): Kansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-011788: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    I-75 Green Corridor Project CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 02/10/2014 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. CX-007497: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Clean Energy Coalition - Michigan Green Fleets CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 12/06/2011 Location(s): Michigan Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-010938: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 09/17/2013 Location(s): Kansas, Kansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-011271: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Idaho Petroleum Reduction Leadership Project CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 09/30/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-010514: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Center for Nanoscale Energy CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/24/2013 Location(s): North Dakota Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  12. CX-010756: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar Utility Network Deployment Acceleration CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08/15/2013 Location(s): Virginia Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  13. CX-011102: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    American Solar Transformation Initiative CX(s) Applied: A11 Date: 08/09/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  14. CX-008543: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Colorado State Energy Plan 2012 CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 06/25/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  15. CX-013794: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Horn Rapids Tap Disconnect Additions CX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 06/17/2015 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  16. CX-009786: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Beck Road Substation Meter Installation CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 01/07/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  17. CX-010435: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    De Moss Substation Expansion CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  18. CX-012645: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wenatchee District 2014 Transmission Line Maintenance - Multiple Lines CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41862 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  19. CX-012817: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bell Maintenance Headquarters Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41890 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  20. CX-010727: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dayton Tap Line Retirement CX(s) Applied: B4.10 Date: 08/13/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  1. CX-011173: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Yaak Substation Transformer Replacement CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 09/18/2013 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  2. CX-010770: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wildland Fire Chainsaw Training CX(s) Applied: B1.2 Date: 08/01/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  3. FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FE Categorical Exclusions FE Categorical Exclusions RSS June 4, 2014 CX-011993: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cheniere Marketing, LLC CX(s) Applied: B5.7 Date: 06042014...

  4. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Washington, D.C. | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Methane and Volatile Organic Carbon (VOC) Emissions Best Practices Database Project CX(s) ... State Energy Efficiency Policy Benchmarking, Technical Assistance, and Sate and ...

  5. CX-009418: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electron Beam Melting CX(s) Applied: None applied. Date: 10/30/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Kansas City Site Office

  6. CX-013721: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar Vacuum Furnace CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 04/28/2015 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-009797: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Eni USA Gas Marketing, LLC CX(s) Applied: B5.7 Date: 02/06/2013 Location(s): Louisiana Offices(s): Fossil Energy

  8. CX-013534: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ENI USA Gas Marketing, LLC CX(s) Applied: B5.7Date: 04/14/2015 Location(s): Multiple LocationsOffices(s): Fossil Energy

  9. CX-012495: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building 6 Stack Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41855 Location(s): West VirginiaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-010338: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Eugene Substation Fiber Interconnection CX(s) Applied: B4.7 Date: 05/21/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  11. CX-006681: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Drilling Location in Section 29CX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 12/23/2009Location(s): Casper, WyomingOffice(s): RMOTC

  12. CX-011634: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Closure Turf Installation CX(s) Applied: B6.1 Date: 08/27/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Pantex Site Office

  13. CX-008700: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Natapoc Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 06/12/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  14. CX-010398: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Power Line Configuration CX(s) Applied: B4.13 Date: 04/25/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  15. CX-010091: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Power Line Configuration 2013-1 CX(s) Applied: B4.13 Date: 04/15/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  16. CX-011642: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pantex Lake Land Utilization CX(s) Applied: B1.11 Date: 11/05/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Pantex Site Office

  17. CX-003703: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Determination Florida Hydrogen Initiative - Florida Institute of Technology (Interdisciplinary Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Academic Program) CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09...

  18. CX-011239: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Security Upgrades at Multiple Substations CX(s) Applied: ? Date: 10/02/2013 Location(s): Oregon, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  19. CX-010689: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Generic CX Determination for Financial Assistance Awards CX(s) Applied: Unknown Date: 07/17/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Chicago Office

  20. CX-007866: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SunShot Massachusetts CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01/27/2012 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  1. CX-010656: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Stormwater Drainage Repair CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/18/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  2. CX-012311: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Accelerator Test Facility II CX(s) Applied: B3.10 Date: 05/28/2014 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Brookhaven Site Office

  3. CX-007400: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Offshore Wind Removing Market Barriers CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 12/07/2011 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  4. CX-010248: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hawaii Renewable Energy Development Venture CX(s) Applied: B5.18 Date: 03/25/2013 Location(s): Hawaii Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  5. CX-009202: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Port Angeles Substation Equipment Additions CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 09/14/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  6. CX-008179: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Building 09-056 Demolition CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 04/24/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Pantex Site Office

  7. CX-010767: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    University Boulevard Water Meter Installation CX(s) Applied: B2.2 Date: 08/14/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  8. CX-008546: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    National Open-ocean Energy Laboratory CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 06/20/2012 Location(s): Florida Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  9. CX-010587: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mariah Wind CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 07/03/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  10. CX-013629: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oregon City Station Service Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 04/27/2015 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  11. CX-012655: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acquisition of Access Road Easements CX(s) Applied: B1.24Date: 41849 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  12. CX-010589: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nine Canyon Communication Tower Addition CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 07/01/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  13. CX-013446: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Longview Substation Sanitary Sewer Upgrade CX(s) Applied: B4.9Date: 03/25/2015 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  14. CX-010869: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Nauticas Research Program CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/07/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Argonne Site Office

  15. CX-007957: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal Incentive Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01/30/2012 Location(s): Connecticut Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-007880: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evergreen State Solar Partnership CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01/27/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  17. CX-007858: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southwest Solar Transformation Initiative CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01/27/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  18. CX-007859: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Developing Solar Friendly Communities CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01/27/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  19. CX-007399: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Offshore Wind Removing Market Barriers CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 12/20/2011 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  20. CX-007779: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Routine Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 01/13/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  1. CX-010734: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Covington District Culvert Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/22/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  2. CX-014180: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonanza Communication Facility Expansion CX(s) Applied: B1.19Date: 09/10/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  3. CX-014386: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dworshak Passive Repeater project CX(s) Applied: B1.19Date: 10/13/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  4. CX-014382: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Communication Equipment Removals (#WC Projects) CX(s) Applied: B1.19Date: 10/21/2015 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  5. CX-014368: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Haystack Butte Radio Communication Site CX(s) Applied: B1.19Date: 12/07/2015 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  6. CX-013430: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Diffusion Couple Test CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 02/10/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  7. CX-008161: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prosser Hatchery Backup Generator Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 04/16/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  8. CX-013972: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slatt Substation Restroom Installation CX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 08/12/2015 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  9. CX-013423: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kalispell Maintenance Headquarters Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 01/28/2015 Location(s): MontanaOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  10. CX-013450: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ellensburg Guy Wire Installation CX(s) Applied: B4.9Date: 03/06/2015 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  11. CX-012812: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chemawa-Salem #1 & #2 Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41893 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  12. CX-007939: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 02/16/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-009005: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Henderson Solar Energy Project CX(s) Applied: B5.16 Date: 08/22/2012 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  14. CX-013605: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electrochemistry Corrosion Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 03/05/2015Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  15. CX-012658: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chief Joseph and Custer Substations Security Fence Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.11Date: 41843 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  16. CX-008535: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    King County Biogas and Nutrient Reduction CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/22/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  17. CX-010532: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Various Demolition Jobs CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 06/07/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Fermi Site Office

  18. CX-012498: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Light Extraction Structure for OLED Lighting CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41852 Location(s): MarylandOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. CX-012317: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High Performance Computing Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 06/16/2014 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  20. CX-012708: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex Training Trailer CX(s) Applied: B1.15Date: 41844 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  1. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Nationwide | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... February 18, 2016 CX-014630: Categorical Exclusion Determination Inspection and Repair of West Hackberry-Sun 42-Inch Crude Oil Pipeline CX(s) Applied: 0 Date: 02182016 ...

  2. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Strategic Petroleum Reserve...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    February 18, 2016 CX-014630: Categorical Exclusion Determination Inspection and Repair of West Hackberry-Sun 42-Inch Crude Oil Pipeline CX(s) Applied: 0 Date: 02182016 ...

  3. CX-007650: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Control Room Consolidation CX(s) Applied: B2.2 Date: 12/29/2011 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  4. CX-001856: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination Rural Cooperative Geothermal Development Electric and Agriculture CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 04282010 Location(s): Paisley, Oregon Office(s): Energy...

  5. CX-008545: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar Energy Evolution and Diffusion Studies CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 06/19/2012 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  6. CX-011822: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Light Willow Demonstration CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/09/2014 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  7. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Golden Field Office | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Categorical Exclusion Determination U.S. Department of Energy Collegiate Entrepreneurship Prize Award Number: TBD FOA CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 12222014 Location(s): CO...

  8. CX-012656: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Bend Communication Site Engine Generator Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41848 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  9. CX-006520: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-006520: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Energy Density Distributed Hydrostatic Direct Drive for Large Wind Turbine and Marine Hydro-Kinetic Device Applications CX(s) ...

  10. CX-003608: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-003608: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sustainable Algal Energy Production and Environmental Remediation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08252010 Location(s): Virginia ...

  11. CX-012278: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Building 36 Use Permit CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 06/23/2014 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-012434: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low Cost Titanium Casting Technology CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41878 Location(s): OhioOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-013619: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Upper Lemhi Conservation Easement Acquisition CX(s) Applied: B1.25Date: 05/26/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  14. CX-007778: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Support Buildings CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 01/13/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  15. CX-014376: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ross Complex Road Project CX(s) Applied: B1.32Date: 11/12/2015 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  16. CX-007418: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sidewalks to School CX(s) Applied: B1.13 Date: 12/13/2011 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  17. CX-012602: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sorption of Humate onto SRS Sediment CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41820 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  18. CX-008282: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biogas Reconditioning Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/01/2012 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. CX-008438: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biogas Reconditioning Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 06/27/2012 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-012619: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chromatography and Analytical Sensor Measurements CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41799 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  1. CX-007587: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gas Chromatography CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/29/2011 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. CX-010124: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chromatography / Mass Spectrometry CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/20/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  3. CX-011534: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grays River Confluence Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 11/08/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  4. CX-011707: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Laser Nanoparticle Lab CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/15/2014 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-010699: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Boulevard Annex Lease Termination CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 07/11/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  6. CX-007417: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Shift CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 12/21/2011 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  7. CX-011369: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Relief Valve Test Stand Relocation CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 10/24/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  8. CX-013319: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex Landscaping CX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 12/16/2014 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  9. CX-012722: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Test Reactor Area (TRA)-653 Conference Room Modifications CX(s) Applied: B1.15Date: 41829 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  10. CX-013463: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Test Reactor Air Conditioning Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.4Date: 02/19/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  11. CX-012724: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Electronic Message Board Installation CX(s) Applied: B1.7Date: 41830 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  12. CX-009018: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State Energy Program - Tennessee CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08/23/2012 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  13. CX-009587: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    City of Houston, Texas CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 12/12/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  14. CX-013787: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bell Substation HVAC Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 06/30/2015 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  15. CX-009237: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Dow Chemical Company CX(s) Applied: B5.7 Date: 10/02/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Fossil Energy

  16. CX-010578: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Celilo Converter Station Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 07/25/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  17. CX-008341: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A-6 Office Building CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 04/19/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program

  18. CX-012653: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Holcomb-Naselle #1 Access Road Improvements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41855 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  19. CX-012643: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chehalis-Covington #1 Access Roads CX(s) Applied: B1.13Date: 41865 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  20. CX-013482: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Administrative Support Complex CX(s) Applied: B1.15Date: 02/26/2015 Location(s): TexasOffices(s): Pantex Site Office

  1. CX-014200: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sagebrush Seedling Planting - ESER CX(s) Applied: B1.20Date: 09/21/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  2. CX-100159 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Proposed Rulemaking for Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial and Industrial Pumps RIN: 1904-AC54 CX(s) Applied: B5.1

  3. CX-012787: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nationwide AFV Emergency Responder, Recovery, Reconstruction & Investigation CX(s) Applied: B5.15Date: 41906 Location(s): IllinoisOffices(s): Argonne Site Office

  4. CX-012189: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Microbial Laboratory Analysis CX(s) Applied: B3.12 Date: 05/06/2014 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Argonne Site Office

  5. CX-012195: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alfalfa Substation Control House Replacement CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 05/02/2014 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  6. CX-010730: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Paisley Geothermal Integration CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 08/09/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  7. CX-008883: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Indian Creek Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 08/14/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  8. CX-009711: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tucannon River Substation Expansion Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 11/01/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  9. CX-010148: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Merritt Radio Station Upgrade CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 04/18/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  10. CX-014374: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Underwood Tap Structure Relocation CX(s) Applied: B4.13Date: 12/01/2015 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  11. CX-013345: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plant Accumulators Study CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 12/08/2014 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  12. CX-009543: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sopogy Subcontract CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.15 Date: 11/28/2012 Location(s): Hawaii Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  13. CX-012641: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mossy Rock-Chehalis #1 Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41865 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  14. CX-009753: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Propane Corridor Development Program CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 12/06/2012 Location(s): Georgia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-014383: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midway Substation Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 10/20/2015 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  16. CX-013428: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sempra LNG Marketing, LLC CX(s) Applied: B5.7Date: 01/23/2015 Location(s): LouisianaOffices(s): Fossil Energy

  17. CX-013780: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Troy Substation Tap Yard Expansion CX(s) Applied: B4.11Date: 07/14/2015 Location(s): MontanaOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  18. CX-012482: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mid-Atlantic Regional Infrastructure Development Project CX(s) Applied: B5.22Date: 41862 Location(s): MarylandOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. CX-013604: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Corrosion Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 03/05/2015 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  20. CX-011116: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sunpath SANFAB CX(s) Applied: B5.16 Date: 08/09/2013 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  1. CX-006646: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Restoration South of 54-TPX-10CX(s) Applied: B6.1Date: 02/09/2010Location(s): Casper, WyomingOffice(s): RMOTC

  2. CX-011402: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Apel Steel Corporation CX(s) Applied: B5.16 Date: 11/07/2013 Location(s): Alabama Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  3. CX-012583: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biofuels Production Experiment CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41841 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  4. CX-008973: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Petrography Laboratory CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/01/2012 Location(s): West Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-012228: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Deer Park Substation Connection Modifications CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 06/17/2014 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  6. CX-009312: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pecan Street Smart Grid Extension Service CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/30/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-012795: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Bonneville Substation 23- Kilovolt Line Retermination CX(s) Applied: B4.11Date: 41926 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  8. CX-011628: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Enclosure Modification Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/05/2013 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office

  9. CX-012580: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tritium Responsive Infrastructure Modifications CX(s) Applied: B1.15Date: 41844 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  10. CX-007793: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jonesboro Maintenance Facility Additions CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 05/10/2011 Location(s): Arkansas Offices(s): Southwestern Power Administration

  11. CX-007798: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Springfield Maintenance Garage CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 12/08/2010 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Southwestern Power Administration

  12. CX-005846: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-005846: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wood Pole Replacement and Minor Access Road Maintenance Along Various Transmission Line Rights-Of-Way in the Wenatchee District CX(s) ...

  13. CX-008729: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reverse Osmosis System Removal CX(s) Applied: B1.26 Date: 06/25/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  14. CX-010515: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Efficiency Public Service Campaign CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 06/14/2013 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  15. CX-012188: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Emerald Ash Borer Control CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/06/2014 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Argonne Site Office

  16. CX-010768: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    ZIRCEX Nuclear Fuel Dissolution Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/12/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  17. CX-003164: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003164: Categorical Exclusion Determination Optimization of Biomass Production Across a Landscape CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 07262010...

  18. CX-012254: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydro Research Foundation University Research Awards - Vanderbilt CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/28/2014 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  19. CX-012253: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydro Research Foundation University Research Awards - OSU CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/27/2014 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  20. CX-012118: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydro Research Foundation University Research Awards - Tufts CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/21/2014 Location(s): Georgia Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  1. CX-011416: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Technology Integration Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 12/19/2013 Location(s): Ohio Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. CX-011535: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    East Grangeville Substation Sale CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 11/14/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  3. CX-012233: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Shed Acquisition at Kalispell Substation CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 06/09/2014 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  4. CX-010157: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fairmount Substation Equipment Acquisition CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 03/27/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  5. CX-012570: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Install Elevated Fire Water Storage Tank CX(s) Applied: B2.5Date: 41862 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  6. CX-014651: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Chemical Vapor Deposition CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 02/17/2016 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  7. CX-012791: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Grizzly Captain Jack Transmission Line Access Road Acquisition CX(s) Applied: B1.24Date: 41935 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  8. CX-012706: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Radiochemistry Laboratory (RCL) Supply Intake Filter Housing CX(s) Applied: B2.5Date: 41858 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  9. CX-010113: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Compression Stress Relaxometer CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/28/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  10. CX-012472: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Technology Integration Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.11Date: 41873 Location(s): OhioOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-012776: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Catalyst Processing, KCP14-05 CX(s) Applied: NOT NOTEDDate: 41857 Location(s): MissouriOffices(s): Kansas City Site Office

  12. CX-014616: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biogasification CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 01/12/2016 Location(s): West VirginiaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-009203: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ross Maintenance Headquarters Project CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 09/19/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  14. CX-011686: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ross Communication Tower Fiber Installation CX(s) Applied: B4.7 Date: 01/15/2014 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  15. CX-009198: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ross Transformer Oil Terminal Upgrade CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 09/24/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  16. CX-012808: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LURR 20140504 Ross Substation Comcast Fiber Installation CX(s) Applied: B4.9Date: 41906 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  17. CX-003520: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    20: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003520: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pontiac High School Geothermal CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 08262010 Location(s): Pontiac, ...

  18. CX-001198: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    98: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001198: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: 1010 Avenue of the Arts - New School and Performing Arts Theater CX(s) Applied: ...

  19. CX-013565: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    65: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-013565: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analytical Methods for Radiochemical Measurements CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04162015 ...

  20. CX-003936: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    36: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003936: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hawaii Energy Sustainability Program (Subtask 2.3.1: Hydrogen Research and Development) CX(s) ...

  1. CX-012557: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    557: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-012557: Categorical Exclusion Determination Electrodepositon of Molybdenum, NickelMolybdenum alloy, Cesium, and Strontium CX(s) Applied: ...

  2. CX-001199: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001199: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tennessee Energy Efficient Schools Initiative Ground Source Heat Pump Program CX(s) Applied: ...

  3. CX-000703: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    03: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000703: Categorical Exclusion Determination Maryland - Clean Energy Economic Development Initiative (CEEDI) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, ...

  4. CX-010117: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10117: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010117: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analytical Methods for Radiochemical Measurements CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03282013 ...

  5. CX-010510: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    510: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010510: Categorical Exclusion Determination Rapid Freeform Sheet Metal Forming: Technology Development and System Verification CX(s) ...

  6. CX-004024: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    24: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004024: Categorical Exclusion Determination Backside Contact Multijunction Solar Cells for High Concentration Applications CX(s) Applied: ...

  7. CX-100275 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    75 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100275 Categorical Exclusion Determination High Performance Building Envelope Assemblies Award Number: DE- EE0007054, 7059, 7060 CX(s) ...

  8. CX-007550: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kearney - Waste Water Treatment Plant CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01/10/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  9. CX-012788: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Bio-Aviation Fuel LCA with GREET CX(s) Applied: B5.15Date: 41906 Location(s): IllinoisOffices(s): Argonne Site Office

  10. CX-012474: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Refractories/Ceramics Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41870 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-008797: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Coal Pile Basin Project CX(s) Applied: B1.29 Date: 06/04/2012 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office

  12. CX-010742: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Integrated Simulation Development and Decision Support CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/15/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  13. CX-012730: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Replace West Hackberry Radio Tower CX(s) Applied: B1.19Date: 41880 Location(s): LouisianaOffices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  14. CX-012531: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Distributed Wireless Antenna Sensors for Boiler Condition CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41836 Location(s): CaliforniaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-013309: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Burns Communication Site Upgrade CX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 01/13/2015 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  16. CX-012539: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Distributed Wireless Antenna Sensors for Boiler Condition CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41836 Location(s): TexasOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  17. CX-008146: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Formation Evaluator Tools (Haliburton) CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 09/11/2011 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): RMOTC

  18. CX-013417: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Trentwood Substation Communication Upgrade CX(s) Applied: B1.19Date: 02/11/2015 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  19. CX-013389: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plutonium Characteristics CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 01/07/2015 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  20. CX-013521: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chemical Oxygen Demand CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 02/03/2015 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  1. CX-010323: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Modify Sprinkler System CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/15/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  2. Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX(s) Applied: DOEEA-1914 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date: 072815 Location(s): CO Office(s): Golden Field Office July 21, 2015 CX-100313...

  3. FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Investigation of Cathode Electrocatalytic Activity using Surfaced Engineered Thin Film Samples CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09082011 Location(s): Pittsburgh,...

  4. CX-011626: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Line Yard Fence Project CX(s) Applied: B1.11 Date: 06/05/2013 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office

  5. CX-011630: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    9831 Wall Construction Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/05/2013 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office

  6. CX-011184: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Salmon Creek Pond Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 08/29/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  7. CX-010772: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Water Security Test Bed (WSTB) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/17/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  8. CX-014570: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    TAN - Monitoring Well Drilling Actions CX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 04/29/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  9. CX-013710: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SAF-D Project CX(s) Applied: A9Date: 05/26/2015 Location(s): MissouriOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-012813: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Redmond-Pilot Butte #1 Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41893 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  11. CX-012816: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Rogue-Gold Beach Access Road Improvement CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41890 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  12. CX-009132: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Landfill Gas Utilization Plant CX(s) Applied: B5.21 Date: 08/02/2012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  13. CX-009542: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar Parks Project CX(s) Applied: B5.16 Date: 11/09/2012 Location(s): Florida Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  14. CX-012796: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Big Eddy-Redmond #1 Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41919 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  15. CX-012038: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Deepwater Reverse-Circulation Primary Cementing CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 04/17/2014 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-009159: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Montana Formaul State Energy Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 09/06/2012 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  17. CX-012433: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Computer Simulation and Prototype Construction and Testing CX(s) Applied: A9Date: 41878 Location(s): GeorgiaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. CX-012636: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Woodward Meadows Property Acquisition Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25Date: 41876 Location(s): MontanaOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  19. CX-004247: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-004247: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carolina Blue Skies Initiative CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 10142010 Location(s): Indian Trail,...

  20. CX-011712: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 01/08/2014 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory