Sample records for moisture cdiac climate

  1. Climate Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. CDIAC lists the following collections under the broad heading of climate information: Global Temperature, Precipitation, Sea Level Pressure, and Station Pressure Data, United States Temperature, Precipitation, and Snow Data, USSR and People's Republic of China Climate Data, Cloud and Sunshine Data, and Other Climatic Data.

  2. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Thomas A Boden (CDIAC Di-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Thomas A Boden (CDIAC Di of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) PARTNERS: National Aeronautic and Space Administra- tion's (NASA://cdiac.ornl.gov/ PROJECT DESCRIPTION The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) is the primary climate -change

  3. ORNL/CDIAC-159 PACIFICA DATA SYNTHESIS PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013 Prepared for the Climate Change Research Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research & Carbon Hydrographic Data Office CDIAC Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center CFCs Chlorofluorocarbons University, USA 7 Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, US DOE, USA 8

  4. ORNL/CDIAC-147 DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.ndp001.2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Activity Numbers KP 12 04 01 0 and KP.3334/CDIAC/atg.ndp001.2004 The Carbon Dioxide Research Group, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UniversityNDP 001a ORNL/CDIAC-147 DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.ndp001.2004 Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

  5. Integrating soil moisture and groundwater into climate models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krakauer, Nir Y.

    dNm dt =m Nm1- Nm -h Nh min1, Nm State transition to oscillatory solutions with efficient hunting: same initial and boundary conditions, but soil moisture set to seasonal climatology from DYNA experiments: Irrigation Simulate equilibrium climate with a mixed- layer ocean, year-2000 or 2050 (A1B

  6. Modeling land surface processes of the midwestern United States : predicting soil moisture under a warmer climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation seeks to quantify the response of soil moisture to climate change in the midwestern United States. To assess this response, a dynamic global vegetation model, Integrated Biosphere Simulator, was coupled ...

  7. Moisture Flux Convergence in Regional and Global Climate Models: Implications for Droughts in the Southwestern United States Under Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yanhong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Salathe, E.; Dominguez, Francina; Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The water cycle of the southwestern United States (SW) is dominated by winter storms that maintain a positive annual net precipitation. Analysis of the control and future climate from four pairs of regional and global climate models (RCMs and GCMs) shows that the RCMs simulate a higher fraction of transient eddy moisture fluxes because the hydrodynamic instabilities associated with flow over complex terrain are better resolved. Under global warming, this enables the RCMs to capture the response of transient eddies to increased atmospheric stability that allows more moisture to converge on the windward side of the mountains by blocking. As a result, RCMs simulate enhanced transient eddy moisture convergence in the SW compared to GCMs, although both robustly simulate drying due to enhanced moisture divergence by the divergent mean flow in a warmer climate. This enhanced convergence leads to reduced susceptibility to hydrological change in the RCMs compared to GCMs.

  8. Three Case Studies: Moisture Control in a Hot, Humid Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    French, W. R.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as analysis of the problems, and recommendations for correction. Each of these projects would be classified an airconditioned building in a hot, humid climate, and subject to the problems and design issues concomitant with these types of projects. The first...

  9. Moisture performance of sealed attics in the mixed-humid climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Pallin, Simon B [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory studied 8 homes in the mixed-humid climate, 4 with vented attics and 4 with sealed attics. ORNL wanted to understand the moisture performance of the sealed attic and how it affected the interior environment. We found that the attic and interior of sealed attic homes were more humid than the attic and interior observed in vented attic homes. This is due to the lack of ventilation in the sealed attic. Historically attics have been vented to dehumidify the attic and interior of the home. A sealed attic design greatly reduces the venting potential and thus this drying pathway and can cause elevated interior moisture over a vented attic home. Despite the elevated attic and interior moisture in the sealed attic homes, so far no mold or material degradation has been found. The roof sheathing moisture content has stayed below 20%, indicating low potential for material degradation. Also the relative humidity at the roof sheathing has stayed within the ASHRAE 160 design criteria except for a short time during the 2011/2012 winter. This was due to a combination of the sealed attic design (minimal venting to the outside) and the duct work not being operated in the attic which usually provides a dehumidification pathway. It was also found that when the humidity was controlled using the HVAC system, it resulted in 7% more cooling energy consumption. In the mixed-humid climate this reduces the cost effectiveness of the sealed attic design as a solution for bringing ducts into a semi-conditioned space. Because of this we are recommending the other alternatives be used to bringing ducts into the conditioned space in both new construction and retrofit work in the mixed-humid climate.

  10. Atmospheric Trace Gases from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication, Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. The collections under the CDIAC heading of Atmospheric Trace Gases include: Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide, Atmospheric Methane, Atmospheric Carbon Monoxide, Atmospheric Hydrogen, Isotopes in Greenhouse Gases, Radionuclides, Aerosols, and Other Trace Gases.

  11. Wall Design Redundancy for Improving the Moisture Performance of Building Cladding Systems in Hot-Humid Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, C. W.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of approximately 4,000 buildings in the hot-humid climate locations of the United States where the potential for decay of hygroscopic building materials or corrosion of metals is moderate-to-severe found that redundant moisture...

  12. Global Carbon Budget from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Global Carbon Project (GCP) was established in 2001 in recognition of the scientific challenge and critical importance of the carbon cycle for Earth's sustainability. The growing realization that anthropogenic climate change is a reality has focused the attention of the scientific community, policymakers and the general public on the rising concentration of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere, and on the carbon cycle in general. Initial attempts, through the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and its Kyoto Protocol, are underway to slow the rate of increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. These societal actions require a scientific understanding of the carbon cycle, and are placing increasing demands on the international science community to establish a common, mutually agreed knowledge base to support policy debate and action. The Global Carbon Project is responding to this challenge through a shared partnership between the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP), the International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environmental Change (IHDP), the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) and Diversitas. This partnership constitutes the Earth Systems Science Partnership (ESSP). This CDIAC collection includes datasets, images, videos, presentations, and archived data from previous years.

  13. Trace Gas Emissions Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, and models and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Collections under the broad heading of Trace Gas Emissions are organized as Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions, Land-Use CO2 Emissions, Soil CO2 Emissions, and Methane.

  14. Land Use and Ecosystems Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication titled Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Land Use and Ecosystems information includes Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Data Sets, data sets from Africa and Asia, the Worldwide Organic Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Dataset, and much more.

  15. PACIFICA (PACIFic ocean Interior CArbon) Database: A Data Synthesis Resource (NDP-92, ORNL/CDIAC-159)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Suzuki, T.; Ishii, M.; Aoyama, M. R; Christian, J. R.; Enyo, K.; Kawano, T.; Key, R. M.; Kosugi, N.; Kozyr, A.; Miller, L. A.; Murata, A.; Nakano, T.; Ono, T.; Saino, T.; Sasaki, K.; Sasano, D; Takatani, Y.; Wakita, M.; Sabine, C.

    PACIFICA (PACIFic ocean Interior CArbon) was an international collaborative project for synthesis of data on ocean interior carbon and its related parameters in the Pacific Ocean. The North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES), Section on Carbon and Climate (S-CC) supported the project. Hydrographic/hydrochemical datasets have been merged from a total of 272 cruises, including those from cruises conducted between the late 1980s and 2000 but not included in GLODAP, as well as CLIVAR/CO2 Repeat Hydrography datasets from the 2000s. Adjustments were calculated to account for analytical offsets in dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, salinity, oxygen, and nutrients (nitrate and nitrite, phosphate, and silicic acid) for each cruise as a result of the secondary quality control procedure, based on crossover analysis using data from deep layers (Tanhua et al., 2010). A total of 59 adjusted datasets from Line P off the west coast of Canada were also merged. Finally, the authors have produced the adjusted PACIFICA database that consists of datasets from a total of 306 cruises that also includes 34 datasets from WOCE Hydrographic Program cruises in the Pacific Ocean conducted in the 1990s. The PACIFICA database is available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP-92) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and the primary PACIFICA data site at pacifica.pices.jp. The NDP consists of the original cruise data files, adjusted data product, and the documentation.

  16. Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning Energy and Moisture Levels in the Hot-Humid Climate, Cocoa, Florida (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season. ?

  17. Terrestrial Carbon Management Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, and models and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Collections under the broad heading of Terrestrial Carbon Management are organized as Carbon Accumulation with Cropland Management, Carbon Accumulation with Grassland Management, Carbon Loss Following Cultivation, Carbon Accumulation Following Afforestation, and Carbon Sources and Sinks Associated with U.S. Cropland Production.

  18. CARINA (Carbon dioxide in the Atlantic Ocean) Data from CDIAC

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The idea for CARINA developed at a workshop (CO2 in the northern North Atlantic) that was held at the HANSE-Wissenschaftskolleg (HANSE Institute for Advanced Study) in Delmenhorst, Germany from June 9 to 11, 1999. While the main scientific focus is the North Atlantic, some data from the South Atlantic have been included in the project, along with data from the Arctic Ocean. Data sets go back to 1972, and more than 100 are currently available. The data are also being used in conjunction with other projects and research groups, such as the Atlantic Ocean Carbon Synthesis Group. See the inventory of data at http://store.pangaea.de/Projects/CARBOOCEAN/carina/data_inventory.htm See a detailed table of information on the cruises at http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/CARINA/Carina_table.html and also provides access to data files. The CARBOOCEAN data portal provides a specialized interface for CARINA data, a reference list for historic carbon data, and password protected access to the "Data Underway Warehouse.".

  19. ORNL/CDIAC-128 CARBON DIOXIDE, HYDROGRAPHIC, AND CHEMICAL DATA OBTAINED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S.A. Prepared by Alexander Kozyr1 Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center 1 Energy, Environment of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Activity Numbers KP 12 04 01 0 and KP#12;ORNL/CDIAC-128 NDP-075 CARBON DIOXIDE, HYDROGRAPHIC, AND CHEMICAL DATA OBTAINED DURING THE R

  20. Test Plan to Evaluate the Relationship Among IAQ, Comfort, Moisture, and Ventilation in Humid Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Martin, Eric

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This experimental plan describes research being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in coordinatation with Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), Florida HERO, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to evaluate the impact of ventilation rate on interior moisture levels, temperature distributions, and indoor air contaminant concentrations. Specifically, the research team will measure concentrations of indoor air contaminants, ventilation system flow rates, energy consumption, and temperature and relative humidity in ten homes in Gainesville, FL to characterize indoor pollutant levels and energy consumption associated with the observed ventilation rates. PNNL and FSEC have collaboratively prepared this experimental test plan, which describes background and context for the proposed study; the experimental design; specific monitoring points, including monitoring equipment, and sampling frequency; key research questions and the associated data analysis approach; experimental logistics, including schedule, milestones, and team member contact information; and clearly identifies the roles and responsibilities of each team in support of project objectives.

  1. Dynamic Analysis of Moisture Transport Through Walls and Associated Cooling Loads in the Hot/Humid Climate of Florianopolis, Brazil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendes, N.; Winkelmann, F. C.; Lamberts, R.; Philippi, P. C.; Da Cunha, Neto, J. A. B.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The simulation results were compared to those obtained by pure conduction heat transfer without moisture effects. Also analyzed were the influence on cooling loads of high moisture content due to rain soaking of materials. and the influence of solar radiation...

  2. ORNL/CDIAC-160 Climatological Distributions of pH, pCO2, Total CO2, Alkalinity,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORNL/CDIAC-160 NDP-094 Climatological Distributions of pH, pCO2, Total CO2, Alkalinity, and CaCO3, Alkalinity, and CaCO3 Saturation in the Global Surface Ocean. ORNL/CDIAC-160, NDP-094. Carbon Dioxide, total CO2 concentration (TCO2), and the degree of CaCO3 saturation for the global surface ocean waters

  3. Global Coastal Carbon Program Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC provides data management support for the Global Coastal Carbon Data Project. The coastal regions data are very important for the understanding of carbon cycle on the continental margins. The Coastal Project data include the bottle (discrete) and surface (underway) carbon-related measurements from coastal research cruises, the data from time series cruises, and coastal moorings. The data from US East Coast, US West Coast, and European Coastal areas are available. CDIAC provides a map interface with vessel or platform names. Clicking on the name brings up information about the vessel or the scientific platform, the kinds of measurements collected and the timeframe, links to project pages, when available, and the links to the data files themselves.

  4. Soil moisture surpasses elevated CO2 and temperature as a control on soil carbon dynamics in a multi-factor climate change experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Classen, Aimee T [ORNL; Norby, Richard J [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some single-factor experiments suggest that elevated CO2 concentrations can increase soil carbon, but few experiments have examined the effects of interacting environmental factors on soil carbon dynamics. We undertook studies of soil carbon and nitrogen in a multi-factor (CO2 x temperature x soil moisture) climate change experiment on a constructed old-field ecosystem. After four growing seasons, elevated CO2 had no measurable effect on carbon and nitrogen concentrations in whole soil, particulate organic matter (POM), and mineral-associated organic matter (MOM). Analysis of stable carbon isotopes, under elevated CO2, indicated between 14 and 19% new soil carbon under two different watering treatments with as much as 48% new carbon in POM. Despite significant belowground inputs of new organic matter, soil carbon concentrations and stocks in POM declined over four years under soil moisture conditions that corresponded to prevailing precipitation inputs (1,300 mm yr-1). Changes over time in soil carbon and nitrogen under a drought treatment (approximately 20% lower soil water content) were not statistically significant. Reduced soil moisture lowered soil CO2 efflux and slowed soil carbon cycling in the POM pool. In this experiment, soil moisture (produced by different watering treatments) was more important than elevated CO2 and temperature as a control on soil carbon dynamics.

  5. Dynamic Analysis of Moisture Transport Through Walls and Associated Cooling Loads in the Hot/Humid Climate of Florianopolis, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendes, N.; Winkelmann, F. C.; Lamberts, R.; Philippi, P. C.; Da Cunha, Neto, J. A. B.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the use of a dynamic model of combined heat and mass transfer to analyze the effects on cooling loads of transient moisture storage and transport through walls with porous building materials, under varying boundary conditions...

  6. A soil moisture budget analysis of Texas using basic climatic data while assuming a possible warming trend across the state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjornson, Brian Matthew

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the slope (dashed lines) of the regression line of precipitation on mean temperature for the Lower Valley. 35. Isopleths of MTRANGE (in 'F) for Texas during August. 71 36. Percentage of monthly soil moisture (SM) for the High Plains for a O'F (control... are significant at the 95% confidence interval. 74 37. Percentage of monthly soil moisture (SM) for the High Plains for a O'F (control), I' F, 2'F, 3'F, and 4'F increase in the mean annual temperature of Texas. Mean monthly temperatures increase non...

  7. Extracting CO2 from seawater: Climate change mitigation and renewable liquid fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Extracting CO2 from seawater: Climate change mitigation and renewable liquid fuel Matthew Eisaman and their impact · Technology: Extracting CO2 from seawater · Application: Renewable liquid fuel #12;Outline: Renewable liquid fuel #12;The data on atmospheric CO2 2000 years ago http://cdiac.ornl.gov/trends/co2

  8. Understanding Spatio-Temporal Variability and Associated Physical Controls of Near-Surface Soil Moisture in Different Hydro-Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Champa

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    -scale), spatial extents (field-, watershed-, and regional-scale), and changing hydro-climates. Various analysis techniques (e.g., time stability, geostatistics, Empirical Orthogonal Function, and Singular Value Decomposition) have been employed to characterize...

  9. Understanding Spatio-Temporal Variability and Associated Physical Controls of Near-Surface Soil Moisture in Different Hydro-Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Champa

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    -scale), spatial extents (field-, watershed-, and regional-scale), and changing hydro-climates. Various analysis techniques (e.g., time stability, geostatistics, Empirical Orthogonal Function, and Singular Value Decomposition) have been employed to characterize...

  10. Oceanic Trace Gases Numeric Data Packages from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Most data sets or packages, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. CDIAC lists the following numeric data packages under the broad heading of Oceanic Trace Gases: Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained during the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16S_2005 ( 01/11/05 - 022405) • Determination of Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Parameters during the R/V Nathaniel B. Palmer Cruise in the Southern Indian Ocean (WOCE Section S04I, 050396 - 070496) • Inorganic Carbon, Nutrient, and Oxygen Data from the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16N_2003a (060403 – 081103) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Maurice Ewing Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A17, 010494 - 032194) • Global Ocean Data Analysis Project GLODAP: Results and Data • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruises in the North Atlantic Ocean on WOCE Sections AR24 (1102 – 120596) and A24, A20, and A22 (053097 – 090397) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic and Chemical Data Obtained During the Nine R/V Knorr Cruises Comprising the Indian Ocean CO2 Survey (WOCE Sections I8SI9S, I9N, I8NI5E, I3, I5WI4, I7N, I1, I10, and I2; 120 194 – 012296) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 28/1 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A8, 032994 - 051294) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruise 138-3, -4, and -5 in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P6E, P6C, and P6W, 050292 - 073092) • Global Distribution of Total Inorganic Carbon and Total Alkalinity below the deepest winter mixed layer depths • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V John V. Vickers Cruise in the Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P13, NOAA CGC92 Cruise, 080492 – 102192) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Hesperides Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A5, 071492 - 081592) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas G. Thompson Cruise in the Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P10, 100593 – 111093) • The International Intercomparison Exercise of Underway fCO2 Systems during the R/V Meteor Cruise 36/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained during the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A10, Dec. 1992-Jan, 1993) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P16A/P17A, P17E/P19S, and P19C, R/V Knorr , Oct. 1992-April 1993) • Surface Water and Atmospheric Underway Carbon Data Obtained During the World Ocean Circulation Experiment Indian Ocean Survey Cruises (R/V Knorr, Dec. 1994 – Jan, 1996) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Akademik Ioffe Cruise in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section S4P, Feb.-April 1992) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-1 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE section P17C) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-3 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE section P16C) • Carbon-14 Measurements in Surface Water CO2 from the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans, 1965-1994 • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During R/V Meteor Cruise 18/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A1E) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the Central South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P17S and P16S) during the TUNES-2 Expedition of the R/V Th

  11. CDIAC -WHPO/CCHDO Data Management Plan for CTD/Hydrographic/CO2/Tracer Data for the Global Ocean Carbon and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon and Repeat Hydrography Program Alex Kozyr Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/oceans/home.html James H. Swift WOCE Hydrographic Program Office (CLIVAR and Carbon Hydrographic Data Office) UCSD oceanographic research depends on the availability and clarity of existing data. Two data offices in the US deal

  12. Wall Drying in Hot and Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, K.; Weston, T.; Pascual, X.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Moisture and subsequent mold problems in buildings are a serious and increasing concern for the building industry. Moisture intrusion in buildings is especially pertinent in hot and humid climates because the climate conditions provide only limited...

  13. NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission and Opportunities for Applications Users

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Molly E.

    Water in the soil—both its amount (soil moisture) and its state (freeze/thaw)—plays a key role in water and energy cycles, in weather and climate, and in the carbon cycle. Additionally, soil moisture touches upon human ...

  14. Can ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 Requirements be Satisfied while Maintaining Moisture Control using Stock HVAC Equipment in Hot, Humid Climates?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, S. C.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy costs. Increased ventilation rates create real capital and operating costs for building owners and operators, with implications beyond energy costs relating to increased ventilation requirements. In hot, humid climates, increased ventilation rates...

  15. Thermal Effects of Moisture in Rigid Insulation Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, G. W.

    The impact of moisture in rigid roof insulation upon energy consumption is often assumed to be a simple function of the conductance. This paper will show that there are complex interactions between conductance, thermal mass, and climate. The energy...

  16. Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile ? Moisture...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2. House-as-a-System Solutions 2.1 New Homes with Whole-House Packages Moisture and Ventilation Solutions in Hot, Humid Climates: Florida Manufactured Housing Research by Building...

  17. Thermal Effects of Moisture in Rigid Insulation Board 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, G. W.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of moisture in rigid roof insulation upon energy consumption is often assumed to be a simple function of the conductance. This paper will show that there are complex interactions between conductance, thermal mass, and climate. The energy...

  18. ORNL/CDIAC-145 GLOBAL OCEAN DATA ANALYSIS PROJECT (GLODAP): RESULTS AND DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Activity Numbers KP 12 04 01 0 and KP 12 02 03 0.S.A. 3 Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, DOE, Oak Ridge, TN, U Published: August 2005 Prepared for the Climate Change Research Division Office of Biological

  19. HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) Data from CDIAC's HIPPO Data Archive

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) study of the carbon cycle and greenhouse gases measured meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and aerosol constituents along transects from approximately pole-to-pole over the Pacific Ocean. HIPPO flew hundreds of vertical profiles from the ocean/ice surface to as high as the tropopause, at five times during different seasons over a three year period from 2009-2011. HIPPO provides the first high-resolution vertically-resolved global survey of a comprehensive suite of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols pertinent to understanding the carbon cycle and challenging global climate models.

  20. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (i) a solid acetylenic compound and (ii) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the reusltant hydrogen.

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    improving our understanding of how clouds and atmospheric moisture interact with solar radiation and the effects of these interactions on climate. Photo courtesy Argonne National...

  2. Fiber optic moisture sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirkham, R.R.

    1984-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for sensing moisture changes by utilizing optical fiber technology. One embodiment uses a reflective target at the end of an optical fiber. The reflectance of the target varies with its moisture content and can be detected by a remote unit at the opposite end of the fiber. A second embodiment utilizes changes in light loss along the fiber length. This can be attributed to changes in reflectance of cladding material as a function of its moisture content. It can also be affected by holes or inserts interposed in the cladding material and/or fiber. Changing light levels can also be coupled from one fiber to another in an assembly of fibers as a function of varying moisture content in their overlapping lengths of cladding material.

  3. Recent Advances in Profile Soil Moisture Retrieval Jeffrey P. Walker, Garry R. Willgoose and Jetse D. Kalma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jeff

    and agriculture. The significance of soil moisture is its role in the partitioning of energy at the ground surface for hydrologic, climatic and agricultural studies, such observations of surface soil moisture must be related to accept remote sensing data as input to track soil moisture status in time. As surface observations

  4. Moisture Management for High R-Value Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepage, R.; Schumacher, C.; Lukachko, A.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following report explains the moisture-related concerns for High R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. Hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones (2, 3, 4C, 4, 5A, and 7, respectively). The simulations are informed by experience gained from past research in this area and validated by field measurement and forensic experience. The modeling program was developed to assess the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage. The peak annual moisture content of the wood based exterior sheathing was used to comparatively analyze the response to the moisture loads for each of the walls in each given city. Walls which experienced sheathing moisture contents between 20% and 28% were identified as risky, whereas those exceeding 28% were identified as very high risk. All of the wall assemblies perform well under idealized conditions. However, only the walls with exterior insulation, or cavity insulation which provides a hygrothermal function similar to exterior insulation, perform adequately when exposed to moisture loads. Walls with only cavity insulation are particularly susceptible to air leakage condensation. None of the walls performed well when a precipitation based bulk water leak was introduced to the backside of the sheathing, emphasizing the importance of proper flashing details.

  5. Moisture Management of High-R Walls (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following report explains the moisture-related concerns for High R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. Hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones (2, 3, 4C, 4, 5A, and 7, respectively). The simulations are informed by experience gained from past research in this area and validated by field measurement and forensic experience. The modeling program was developed to assess the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage. The peak annual moisture content of the wood based exterior sheathing was used to comparatively analyze the response to the moisture loads for each of the walls in each given city. Walls which experienced sheathing moisture contents between 20% and 28% were identified as risky, whereas those exceeding 28% were identified as very high risk. All of the wall assemblies perform well under idealized conditions. However, only the walls with exterior insulation, or cavity insulation which provides a hygrothermal function similar to exterior insulation, perform adequately when exposed to moisture loads. Walls with only cavity insulation are particularly susceptible to air leakage condensation. None of the walls performed well when a precipitation based bulk water leak was introduced to the backside of the sheathing, emphasizing the importance of proper flashing details.

  6. Moisture Metrics Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuchmann, Mark

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    the goal of this project was to determine the optimum moisture levels for biomass processing for pellets commercially, by correlating data taken from numerous points in the process, and across several different feedstock materials produced and harvested using a variety of different management practices. This was to be done by correlating energy consumption and material through put rates with the moisture content of incoming biomass ( corn & wheat stubble, native grasses, weeds, & grass straws), and the quality of the final pellet product.This project disseminated the data through a public website, and answering questions form universities across Missouri that are engaged in biomass conversion technologies. Student interns from a local university were employed to help collect data, which enabled them to learn firsthand about biomass processing.

  7. Moisture absorption in hybrid composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Dan Laro

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Calculated Moisture Profile: 8/F1552/F1858' ' 95~ RH Calculated Moisture Profile: F1558/F1852/F1558. 49'C, 954 RH. Calculated Moisture Profile: F155, 8. 49 C, 95% RH. Calculated Moisture Profile: F18518. 49'C, 95% RH. Effect of F185 Coating on F155.... Calculated Moisture Profile F18518-. 49'C, 95% RH. 1. 4 1. 05 0 . 35 I I I / / / I F155 18 F 1 8 5 1/F 1 5 5 8/Fl 85 0 0 16 25 32. 5 48. 75 Time(Hours) Figure 28. Effect of F185 Coating on F155 Core: 49'C, 95o HEI. Us Ut 1. 4 1. 05 7 . 35 I...

  8. Integrated Hygrothermal Performance of Building Envelopes and Systems in Hot and Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karagiozis, A. N.; Desjarlais, A.; Salonvaara, M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In hot and humid climates the interior and exterior environmental loads that building envelopes must respond to are larger than many other climatic conditions. Moisture-originated failures in low-rise residential buildings have put a significant...

  9. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  10. Energy Balance Partitioning and Net Radiation Controls on Soil Moisture – Precipitation Feedbacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Aubrey R.; Brunsell, Nathaniel A.

    2009-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    in determining regional weather and climate. Although this idea has been widely accepted, an under- standing of the physical processes and the scales over which these interactions occur remains somewhat limited. Improving the current understanding... of these relationships has important implications for increasing predictability of local weather and climate. According to Barros and Hwu (Barros and Hwu 2002), the basis of studies on land–atmosphere interactions is the idea that moisture and energy gradients across a...

  11. Presented by Climate End Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . White III (Trey) National Center for Atmospheric Research #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U-scale processes on large-scale climate can be more closely evaluated (clouds, convection, radiation, boundary the energy and moisture budgets of MJO based on cloud resolving simulations using WRF and to improve cloud

  12. Effectiveness of vertical moisture barriers in highway pavements on expansive soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayatilaka, Ranasinghege

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    finite element program, FLODEF, which couples moisture flow and elasticity was calibrated to reproduce the field observations of the suction in each of the locations. The program was then used to perform a study of the effects of climatic zone, degree...

  13. Atmospheric Moisture Transports from Ocean to Land and Global Energy Flows in Reanalyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fasullo, John

    Atmospheric Moisture Transports from Ocean to Land and Global Energy Flows in Reanalyses KEVIN E energy and hydrological cycles from eight current atmospheric reanalyses and their depiction of changes over time. A brief evaluation of the water and energy cycles in the latest version of the NCAR climate

  14. The moisture budget in relation to convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Robert Wilson

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyses of the local rate-of-change of moisture in the layer from 900-750 mb . . . . . . , . . . , . . . . . . 23 Analyses of the local rate-of-change of moisture in the layer from 750-500 mb 24 Vertical profiles of the net vertical boundary flux... of moisture related to MDR 26 10 Analyses of the net vertical boundary flux of moisture in the layer from 900-750 mb 28 Analyses of the net vertical boundary flux of moisture in the layer from 750-500 mb 29 12 Analyses of the net vertical boundary flux...

  15. The Effects of Roof Membrane Color on Moisture Accumulation in Low-slope Commercial Roof Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehrer, Manfred [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of highly reflective roof membrane systems is being promoted and in some cases required in energy codes and green building codes and standards. Highly reflective membranes, which typically are light in color, have demonstrated reduced overall energy consumption in cooling dominated climate. These membranes also are theorized to reduce the heat island effect. Concern has been expressed about using highly reflective roof membrane systems in cool to cold climate zones because they potentially increase moisture accumulation in roof systems. Roof membranes are vapor retarders. The theory is that highly reflective membranes reflect the heat that could enter the roof assembly, potentially providing a condensing surface on the cold side of the roof assembly during winter months. The other concern is that roof systems using highly reflective membranes will not get hot enough during the summer months to dry out moisture that may have condensed or otherwise entered the roof assembly. This study focuses on mechanically attached, highly reflective, single-ply roof systems installed on low-slope (less than 2:12) structures in cool to cold climate zones. Three sources of data are considered when determining the moisture accumulation potential of these systems. 1.Test roof cuts taken during the winter months 2.Modeling data from a building envelope model specifically designed to evaluate moisture accumulation 3.Data from previous studies to determine the effects of roof membrane color on the drying rate of low-slope roof assemblies

  16. Moisture Control | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMake Your NextHow EMMinutes: EMMissionof EnergyMoisture

  17. Flexible Residential Test Facility: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Cooling Season Energy and Moisture Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, D.; Kono, J.; Vieira, R.; Fairey, P.; Sherwin, J.; Withers, C.; Hoak, D.; Beal, D.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season.

  18. Moisture levels at which rice grains will not fissure from moisture adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamau, John Mugeto

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MOISTURE LEVELS AT WHICH RICE GRAINS WILL NOT FISSURE FROM MOISTURE ADSORPTION A Thesis JOHN MUGETO KAMAU Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1985 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering MOISTURE LEVELS AT WHICH RICE GRAINS WILL NQT FISSURE FROM MOISTURE ADSORPTION A Thesis JOHN MUGETO KAMAU Approved as to style and content by: Otto R. Kunze (Chairman of Committee) Calvin B...

  19. Moisture and Ventilation Solutions in Hot, Humid Climates: Florida...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Innovation. See another example of technology solutions for manufactured homes. Find more case studies of Building America projects across the country that demonstrate high...

  20. Moisture and Ventilation Solutions in Hot, Humid Climates: Florida

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement of the National 93-4EnergyMissionIllnessMohammed

  1. PREDICTION OF MOISTURE CONTENT AND MOISTURE GRADIENT OF AN OVERLAID PARTICLEBOARD1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PREDICTION OF MOISTURE CONTENT AND MOISTURE GRADIENT OF AN OVERLAID PARTICLEBOARD1 Qinglin Wu and HPL backer. A model based on the diffusion theory was developed to predict MC and moisture distribution for a multi-ply wood composite panel. The model's prediction of the mean MC for a three-layer PB

  2. Moisture Penetration Through Optical Fiber Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Moisture Penetration Through Optical Fiber Coatings J. L. Armstrong, M. J. Matthewson and C. R for measuring the diffusion coefficients of water vapor through optical fiber polymer coatings has been. Kurkjian #12;732 International Wire & Cable Symposium Proceedings 1998 Moisture Penetration Through Optical

  3. Vadose Zone Soil Moisture Wicking Using Super Absorbent Polymers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vadose Zone Soil Moisture Wicking Using Super Absorbent Polymers. Vadose Zone Soil Moisture Wicking Using Super Absorbent Polymers. Abstract: Super-absorbent polymers (SAPs) have...

  4. Evaluation of SMOS Retrievals of Soil Moisture over the Central United States with Currently Available In-situ Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    SMOS retrievals by comparing them to in-situ soil moisture observations4 for the top 5 cm at several.01% of the total water on the planet [Prigent et al.,20 2005]. But soil water content is important for many reasons, such as agriculture. Soil water21 content also has an important influence on climate, as it determines

  5. Soil animal responses to moisture availability are largely scale, not ecosystem dependent: insight from a cross-site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, Diana

    Soil animal responses to moisture availability are largely scale, not ecosystem dependent: insight Cruces, NM 88012, USA, 4 USDA ARS Grassland Soil and Water Research Laboratory, Temple, TX 76502, USA, 5 Abstract Climate change will result in reduced soil water availability in much of the world either due

  6. UNCORRECTEDPROOF One-dimensional soil moisture prole retrieval by assimilation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jeff

    moisture and surface temperature data into a soil moisture and heat transfer model. The direct insertion

  7. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council's Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of ...

  8. How do elevated [CO2], warming, and reduced precipitation interact to affect soil moisture and LAI in an old field ecosystem?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dermody, Orla [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Weltzin, Jake [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Engel, Elizabeth C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Allen, Phillip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Norby, Richard J [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil moisture content and leaf area index (LAI) are properties that will be particularly important in mediating whole system responses to the combined effects of elevated atmospheric [CO2], warming and altered precipitation. Warming and drying will likely reduce soil moisture, and this effect may be exacerbated when these factors are combined. However, elevated [CO2] may increase soil moisture contents and when combined with warming and drying may partially compensate for their effects. The response of LAI to elevated [CO2] and warming will be closely tied to soil moisture status and may mitigate or exacerbate the effects of global change on soil moisture. Using open-top chambers (4-m diameter), the interactive effects of elevated [CO2], warming, and differential irrigation on soil moisture availability were examined in the OCCAM (Old-Field Community Climate and Atmospheric Manipulation) experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in eastern Tennessee. Warming consistently reduced soil moisture contents and this effect was exacerbated by reduced irrigation. However, elevated [CO2] partially compensated for the effects of warming and drying on soil moisture. Changes in LAI were closely linked to soil moisture status. LAI was determined using an AccuPAR ceptometer and both the leaf area duration (LAD) and canopy size were increased by irrigation and elevated [CO2]. The climate of the southeastern United States is predicted to be warmer and drier in the future. This research suggests that although elevated [CO2] will partially ameliorate the effects of warming and drying, losses of soil moisture will increase from old field ecosystems in the future.

  9. MoistureMap: A soil moisture monitoring, prediction and reporting system for sustainable land and water management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jeff

    9 MoistureMap: A soil moisture monitoring, prediction and reporting system for sustainable land soil moisture monitoring, prediction and reporting system (MoistureMap) for Australia uncertainty at 1km resolution, by assimilating (i) low-resolution passive microwave-derived surface soil

  10. Measuring soil moisture with imaging radars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubois, P.C.; Zyl, J. van [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.] [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.; Engman, T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An empirical algorithm for the retrieval of soil moisture content and surface Root Mean Square (RMS) height from remotely sensed radar data was developed using scatterometer data. The algorithm is optimized for bare surfaces and requires two copolarized channels at a frequency between 1.5 and 11 GHz. It gives best results for kh {le} 2.5, {mu}{sub {upsilon}}{le}35%, and {theta}{ge}30{degree}. Omitting the usually weaker hv-polarized returns makes the algorithm less sensitive to system cross-talk and system noise, simplify the calibration process and adds robustness to the algorithm in the presence of vegetation. However, inversion results indicate that significant amounts of vegetation (NDVI>0.4) cause the algorithm to underestimate soil moisture and overestimate RMS height. A simple criteria based on the {sigma}{sub hv}{sup 0}/{sigma}{sub vv}{sup 0} ratio is developed to select the areas where the inversion is not impaired by the vegetation. The inversion accuracy is assessed on the original scatterometer data sets but also on several SAR data sets by comparing the derived soil moisture values with in-situ measurements collected over a variety of scenes between 1991 and 1994. Both spaceborne (SIR-C) and airborne (AIRSAR) data are used in the test. Over this large sample of conditions, the RMS error in the soil moisture estimate is found to be less than 4.2% soil moisture.

  11. Control of Moisture Ingress into Photovoltaic Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempe, M. D.

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During long-term exposure of photovoltaic modules to environmental stress, the ingress of water into the module is correlated with decreased performance. By using diffusivity measurements for water through encapsulants such as ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), we have modeled moisture ingress using a finite-element analysis with atmospheric data from various locations such as Miami, Florida. This analysis shows that because of the high diffusivity of EVA, even an impermeable glass back-sheet alone is incapable of preventing significant moisture ingress from the edges for a 20-year lifecycle. This result has led us to investigate ways to protect modules from moisture through the use of different encapsulating chemistries and materials.

  12. Distributed fiber optic moisture intrusion sensing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and system for monitoring and identifying moisture intrusion in soil such as is contained in landfills housing radioactive and/or hazardous waste. The invention utilizes the principle that moist or wet soil has a higher thermal conductance than dry soil. The invention employs optical time delay reflectometry in connection with a distributed temperature sensing system together with heating means in order to identify discrete areas within a volume of soil wherein temperature is lower. According to the invention an optical element and, optionally, a heating element may be included in a cable or other similar structure and arranged in a serpentine fashion within a volume of soil to achieve efficient temperature detection across a large area or three dimensional volume of soil. Remediation, moisture countermeasures, or other responsive action may then be coordinated based on the assumption that cooler regions within a soil volume may signal moisture intrusion where those regions are located.

  13. Influence of Moisture on Heating in Feeds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, L. R.; Halick, J. V.

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    investigation was supported in part by a grant-in-aid from ~uthwestern Sugar and Molasses Company, New York, through urtesy of A. I. Kaplan, president. ?e are indebted to E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, ngton, Del. through the courtesy of F. M. Jornlin..., standards for the moisture content of all in- gredients used in feeds should be reevaluated. The absence of heating in molasses feeds will not be insured by establishing a standard for the moisture content of molasses alone. Standardr for molasses...

  14. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for atmospheric trace gases: FY 1993 activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Stoss, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment, and Resources Center

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specialty publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC`s staff also provide technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC (including World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases) during the period October 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of NDPS, CMPS, technical reports, newsletters, fact sheets, specialty publications, and reprints are provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also presented.

  15. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center: FY 1991 activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M.; Stoss, F.W.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specially publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC`s staff also provides technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC during the period October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of numeric data packages, computer model packages, technical reports, newsletters, factsheets, specially publications, and reprints is provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also described.

  16. Assessment of NGNP Moisture Ingress Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Landman

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of modular HTGR moisture ingress events, making use of a phenomena identification and ranking process, was conducted by a panel of experts in the related areas for the U.S. next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) design. Consideration was given mainly to the prismatic core gas-cooled reactor configurations incorporating a steam generator within the primary circuit.

  17. 1. Control moisture. 2. Clean regularly.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , water heaters, and fireplaces that burn fuel must vent to the outside. Stoves, ovens, and cook on the things we do to affect how healthy our home is. Step 1. Control Moisture Water and excessive humidity of pesticides. Food and water attract pests. Controlling food and water helps to minimize pests. Sealing

  18. Measurements of moisture suction in hot mix asphalt mixes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kassem, Emad Abdel-Rahman

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    with different bond energies and exhibited different field performance in terms of resistance to moisture damage. The suction measurements in sand asphalt specimens were used to calculate the moisture diffusion coefficient. The results revealed that water...

  19. Soil moisture modeling and scaling using passive microwave remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Narendra N.

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil moisture in the shallow subsurface is a primary hydrologic state governing land-atmosphere interaction at various scales. The primary objectives of this study are to model soil moisture in the root zone in a distributed manner and determine...

  20. Evaluation of moisture damage within asphalt concrete mixes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Brij D.

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    as bond energy in order to predict moisture damage. Mixtures with the two types of bitumen and each aggregate with and without hydrated lime were evaluated. The hydrated lime substantially improved the resistance of the mixture to moisture damage....

  1. Researching Complex Heat, Air and Moisture Interactions for a Wide-Range of Building Envelope Systems and Environmental Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karagiozis, A.N.

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document serves as the final report documenting work completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Fraunhofer Institute in Building Physics (Holzkirchen, Germany) under an international CRADA No. 0575 with Fraunhofer Institute of Bauphysics of the Federal Republic of Germany for Researching Complex Heat, Air and Moisture Interactions for a Wide Range of Building Envelope Systems and Environmental Loads. This CRADA required a multi-faceted approach to building envelope research that included a moisture engineering approach by blending extensive material property analysis, laboratory system and sub-system thermal and moisture testing, and advanced moisture analysis prediction performance. The Participant's Institute for Building physics (IBP) and the Contractor's Buildings Technology Center (BTC) identified potential research projects and activities capable of accelerating and advancing the development of innovative, low energy and durable building envelope systems in diverse climates. This allowed a major leverage of the limited resources available to ORNL to execute the required Department of Energy (DOE) directives in the area of moisture engineering. A joint working group (ORNL and Fraunhofer IBP) was assembled and a research plan was executed from May 2000 to May 2005. A number of key deliverables were produced such as adoption of North American loading into the WUFI-software. in addition the ORNL Weather File Analyzer was created and this has been used to address environmental loading for a variety of US climates. At least 4 papers have been co-written with the CRADA partners, and a chapter in the ASTM Manual 40 on Moisture Analysis and Condensation Control. All deliverables and goals were met and exceeded making this collaboration a success to all parties involves.

  2. Effect of varying moisture levels on sorghum stand establishment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanyenji, Ben Machaki

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to germinate, emerge, and survive under low moisture situations. At the lowest moisture level (20% water holding capacity of the potted soil/media; 264 water on dry weight basis), germination was reduced by 50 percent. Hegari and CSM388 had the highest... germination performance at this moisture level. Seedling emergence was decreased by 60 percent from performance under optimum moisture (454 water holding capacity potted soil/media) and cultivers such as Segaolane and CSM388 had the highest emergence...

  3. Wall Drying in Hot and Humid Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, K.; Weston, T.; Pascual, X.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WALL DRYING IN HOT AND HUMID CLIMATES Kimdolyn Boone Theresa Weston, PhD Xuaco Pascual Product Development Engineer Building Scientist Field Services Engineer E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company Richmond, VA ABSTRACT... time based on the varying weather conditions. Constant interior conditions of 70?F and 55% RH were chosen. This corresponds to typical interior temperatures and a high level of moisture production within the house. This was chosen as a worse...

  4. Process for treating moisture laden coal fines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Burl E. (New Kensington, PA); Henry, Raymond M. (Gibsonia, PA); Trivett, Gordon S. (South Surrey, CA); Albaugh, Edgar W. (Birmingham, AL)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for making a free flowing granular product from moisture laden caked coal fines, such as wet cake, by mixing a water immiscible substance, such as oil, with the caked coal, preferably under low shear forces for a period of time sufficient to produce a plurality of free flowing granules. Each granule is preferably comprised of a dry appearing admixture of one or more coal particle, 2-50% by weight water and the water immiscible substance.

  5. Developing a High-Resolution Texas Water and Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    for hyperresolution: global food production; water resources sustainability; flood, drought, and climate change and vegetation; · landatmospheric interactions; soil moisture & evapotranspiration; · inclusion of water quality as part of the biogeochemical cycle; · representation of human impacts from water management; · utilizing

  6. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center: FY 1992 activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Stoss, F.W. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specialty publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIACs staff also provides technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC during the period October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. As analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of numeric data packages, computer model packages, technical reports, newsletters, fact sheets, specialty publications, and reprints is provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also described.

  7. Practical Considerations of Moisture in Baled Biomass Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William A. Smith; Ian J. Bonner; Kevin L. Kenney; Lynn M. Wendt

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural residues make up a large portion of the immediately available biomass feedstock for renewable energy markets. Current collection and storage methods rely on existing feed and forage practices designed to preserve nutrients and properties of digestibility. Low-cost collection and storage practices that preserve carbohydrates across a range of inbound moisture contents are needed to assure the economic and technical success of the emerging biomass industry. This study examines the movement of moisture in storage and identifies patterns of migration resulting from several on-farm storage systems and their impacts on moisture measurement and dry matter recovery. Baled corn stover and energy sorghum were stored outdoors in uncovered, tarp-covered, or wrapped stacks and sampled periodically to measure moisture and dry matter losses. Interpolation between discrete sampling locations in the stack improved bulk moisture content estimates and showed clear patterns of accumulation and re-deposition. Atmospheric exposure, orientation, and contact with barriers (i.e., soil, tarp, and wrap surfaces) were found to cause the greatest amount of moisture heterogeneity within stacks. Although the bulk moisture content of many stacks remained in the range suitable for aerobic stability, regions of high moisture were sufficient to support microbial activity, thus support dry matter loss. Stack configuration, orientation, and coverage methods are discussed relative to impact on moisture management and dry matter preservation. Additionally, sample collection and data analysis are discussed relative to assessment at the biorefinery as it pertains to stability in storage, queuing, and moisture carried into processing.

  8. Changing Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and a wide range of academic areas are investigating the different compo- nents. More recently, they are taking information gleaned from the global climate models and applying them to research questions pertaining to Texas. Dr. Bruce Mc...Carl, Regents Professor of agricultural economics at Texas A&M University, has researched the economics of climate change for the last 20 years. McCarl, as a lead CHANGING CLIMATES tx H2O | pg. McCarl ] tx H2O | pg. 4 Changing Climates author...

  9. Moisture and temperature effects in composite materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Gwo-Ping

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Y. Weitsman Th1s thesis concerns env1ronmental effects in graphite/epoxy composites, with emphas1s on environmentally induced damage. The thesis consists of two major parts. The first part presents an experimental 1... weight gain (in %) of a 12-ply unidirectional AS4/3502 graphite/epoxy laminate during exposure to 346'K, 95% R. H. environment. Data (i) and predictions of Flck's law (solid line) Moisture content (ln %) of a 12-ply unidirectional AS4/3502 graphite...

  10. Variation in soil moisture and N availability modulates carbon and water exchange in a California grassland experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    St. Clair, S.B.; Sudderth, E.; Fischer, M.L.; Torn, M.S.; Stuart, S.; Salve, R.; Eggett, D.; Ackerly, D.

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Variability in the magnitude and timing of precipitation is predicted to change under future climate scenarios. The primary objective of this study was to understand how variation in precipitation patterns consisting of soil moisture pulses mixed with intermittent dry down events influence ecosystem gas fluxes. We characterized the effects of precipitation amount and timing, N availability, and plant community composition on whole ecosystem and leaf gas exchange in a California annual grassland mesocosm study system that allowed precise control of soil moisture conditions. Ecosystem CO2 and fluxes increased significantly with greater precipitation and were positively correlated with soil moisture. A repeated 10 day dry down period following 11 days of variable precipitation inputs strongly depressed net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) across a range of season precipitation totals, and plant community types. Ecosystem respiration (Re), evapotranspiration (ET) and leaf level photosynthesis (Amax) showed greatest sensitivity to dry down periods in low precipitation plots. Nitrogen additions significantly increased NEE, Re and Amax, particularly as water availability was increased. These results demonstrate that N availability and intermittent periods of soil moisture deficit (across a wide range of cumulative season precipitation totals) strongly modulate ecosystem gas exchange.

  11. Soil Moisture and the Drought in Texas Todd Caldwell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Neutron scatter 50 2 2010 AmeriFlux Dielectric 215 1 2005 NEON ?? 20 1 ~2011 West Texas Mesonet: 79 sitesSoil Moisture and the Drought in Texas Todd Caldwell Bridget Scanlon Michael Young Di Long Water;Soil Moisture and the Drought in Texas I. How is drought linked to water resources? II. Where does soil

  12. High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  13. Soil Moisture Measurement in Heterogeneous Terrain Merlin, O.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jeff

    , uncertainty assessment, soil moisture patterns. EXTENDED ABSTRACT Reliable soil moisture measurement over such data, portable electronic sensors offer a practical alternative to gravimetric measurements % v/v in clay. On the other hand, the real component of the measured relative DC is found to be more

  14. Measurements of moisture suction in hot mix asphalt mixes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kassem, Emad Abdel-Rahman

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of moisture in hot mix asphalt (HMA) causes loss of strength and durability of the mix, which is referred to as moisture damage. This study deals with the development of experimental methods for measuring total suction in HMA, which can...

  15. The moisture budget in relation to convection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Robert Wilson

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : x10-6g cm-2s-1) 30 (, 'j I" '~, ". :, ', :, ':: P, ' r 0 (a) 0600 GMT, 24 April 1975 . . . ~t' . '. a--'-, . ' ' P) D (b) 0600 GiXT, 25 April 1975 Analyses of the net vertacal boundary flux of moisture in the layer from 500-350 mb... 120 4 060 , J 16O I 2 1" , 090 ~ J 120 32+ r I 24~ 190 12 10 (b) 700 mb Fig. 3. Synoptic charts for 0600 GMT on 24 April 1975. 16 86. 16 04 08 I 12 I I f 08 I 08 I L 08 12 16 (a) Surface 20 - 8 A 4X 4 0 ) O2O ~~(~ -2 J--4...

  16. Climate Systems and Climate Change Is Climate Change Real?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    Chapter 10 Climate Systems and Climate Change #12;Is Climate Change Real? 1980 1898 2005 2003 #12;Arctic Sea Ice Changes #12;Observed Global Surface Air Temperature #12;! Current climate: weather station data, remote sensing data, numerical modeling using General Circulation Models (GCM) ! Past climate

  17. Old-field Community, Climate and Atmospheric Manipulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aimee Classen

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are in the process of finishing a number of laboratory, growth chamber and greenhouse projects, analyzing data, and writing papers. The projects reported addressed these subjects: How do climate and atmospheric changes alter aboveground plant biomass and community structure; Effects of multiple climate changes factors on plant community composition and diversity: what did we learn from a 5-year open-top chamber experiment using constructed old-field communities; Do atmospheric and climatic change factors interact to alter woody seedling emergence, establishment and productivity; Soil moisture surpasses elevated CO{sub 2} and temperature in importance as a control on soil carbon dynamics; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter belowground root and fungal biomass; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter soil microarthropod and microbial communities; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter belowground microbial function; Linking root litter diversity and microbial functioning at a micro scale under current and projected CO{sub 2} concentrations; Multifactor climate change effects on soil ecosystem functioning depend on concurrent changes in plant community composition; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter aboveground insect populations; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter festuca endophyte infection; How do climate and atmospheric changes soil carbon stabilization.

  18. Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battisti, David

    Novim Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies Jason J. Blackstock David S. Battisti Santa Barbara, California #12;Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies This report should, A. A. N. Patrinos, D. P. Schrag, R. H. Socolow and S. E. Koonin, Climate Engineering Responses

  19. Moisture burst structure in satellite water vapor imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulsh, David Joel

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The moisture burst is a tropical synoptic-scale weather event that typically originates along the ITCZ and has been defined previously in window-channel infrared imagery. This research uses 6. 7-micrometer water vapor absorption band imagery to composite 35... moisture burst events during the North Pacific cool season of 1983-1984. Composite maps are constructed at four times, each 24 h apart, during the life cycle of the moisture burst. A comparative baseline is provided by an additional composite of 35 dates...

  20. Moisture effects in low-slope roofs: Drying rates after water addition with various vapor retarders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedersen, C.R. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Petrie, T.W. [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Courville, G.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Childs, P.W.; Wilkes, K.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests have been conducted in the Large Scale Climate Simulator (LSCS) of the US. Building Envelope Research Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to investigate downward drying rates of various unvented, low-slope roof systems. A secondary objective was to study heat flow patterns so as to understand how to control latent heat effects on impermeable heat flux transducers. Nine test sections were tested simultaneously. The sections had a p deck above fibrous-glass insulation and were examples of cold-deck systems. These five sections had various vapor retarder systems on a gypsum board ceiling below the insulation. The other four sections had a lightweight insulating concrete deck below expanded polystyrene insulation and the same vapor retarder systems, and were examples of warm-deck systems. The cold-deck systems had materials that were relatively permeable to water vapor, while the materials in the warm-deck systems were less permeable. All test sections were topped by an impermeable roofing membrane. The test sections were instrumented with thermocouples between all layers and with small heat flux transducers at the bottom and top of the fibrous-glass insulation and in the middle of the expanded polystyrene insulation. Two different kinds of moisture probes were used to qualitatively monitor the movement of the moisture. The heat flux measurements showed that heat conduction dominates the system using impermeable insulation materials, with only a slight increase due to increased thermal conductivity of wet expanded polystyrene. There was significant transfer of latent heat in the test sections with permeable insulation, causing the peak heat fluxes to increase by as much as a factor of two. With temperatures imposed that are typical of summer days, latent heat transfer associated with condensation and evaporation of moisture in the test sections was measured to be as important as the heat transfer by conduction.

  1. DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/vrc.ndp061 ORNL/CDIAC-107

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    89512 Prepared by Robert M. Cushman Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Office of Biological and Environmental Research Budget Activity Number KP 12 04 01 0 Prepared by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831

  2. "Managing Department Climate Change"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    "Managing Department Climate Change" #12;Presenters · Ronda Callister Professor, Department Department Climate? · Assesment is essential for determining strategies for initiating change · In a research climate · Each panelist will describe an intervention designed to improve department climate ­ Ronda

  3. Changing Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    these data with predictions from the IPCC. Professor of geography at Texas State University, Dr. David Butler, does climate change research mainly in the Rocky Moun- tains with U.S. Geological Survey funding. He has also done research on how climate...://wiid.twdb.state.tx.us Detailed information about individual water wells. This system uses a geographic information system-based tool to show locations of water wells and download data on water levels and water quality. Reports that were developed about on-site conditions...

  4. Evaluation of the Effective Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Estimating Moisture Buffering in Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, J.; Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the effective moisture penetration depth (EMPD) model, and its suitability for building simulations. The EMPD model is a compromise between the simple, inaccurate effective capacitance approach and the complex, yet accurate, finite-difference approach. Two formulations of the EMPD model were examined, including the model used in the EnergyPlus building simulation software. An error in the EMPD model we uncovered was fixed with the release of EnergyPlus version 7.2, and the EMPD model in earlier versions of EnergyPlus should not be used.

  5. Hygric Redistribution in Insulated Assemblies: Retrofitting Residential Envelopes Without Creating Moisture Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smegal, J.; Lstiburek, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Building America program has recognized that most of the current housing stock is in need of energy related retrofits. One of the best ways of reducing the space conditioning energy consumption is to improve the thermal performance of the enclosure by adding exterior board foam insulation. This report quantifies the amount of water that can become trapped in the drainage cavity of typical wall systems, and measures the effect of water trapped in the drainage cavity on the moisture content of the sheathing. This study also attempts to explain the discrepancy between hygrothermal simulations and field performance of low permeance, low R-value exterior insulation (e.g. 3/4-in. foil faced polyisocyanurate) in cold climates.

  6. Measurement of Moisture Content in Sand, Slag, and Crucible Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, J.H.

    1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The deinventory process at Rocky Flats (RFETS) has included moisture content measurements of sand, slag, and crucible (SSC) materials by performing weight loss measurements at 210 degrees - 220 degrees Celsius on representative samples prior to packaging for shipment. Shipping requirements include knowledge of the moisture content. Work at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) showed that the measurement at 210 degrees - 220 degrees Celsius did not account for all of the moisture. The objective of the work in this report was to determine if the measurement at 210 degrees - 220 degrees Celsius at RFETS could be used to set upper bounds on moisture content and therefore, eliminate the need for RFETS to unpack, reanalyze and repack the material.

  7. Moisture Risk in Unvented Attics Due to Air Leakage Paths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prahl, D.; Shaffer, M.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IBACOS completed an initial analysis of moisture damage potential in an unvented attic insulated with closed-cell spray polyurethane foam. To complete this analysis, the research team collected field data, used computational fluid dynamics to quantify the airflow rates through individual airflow (crack) paths, simulated hourly flow rates through the leakage paths with CONTAM software, correlated the CONTAM flow rates with indoor humidity ratios from Building Energy Optimization software, and used Warme und Feuchte instationar Pro two-dimensional modeling to determine the moisture content of the building materials surrounding the cracks. Given the number of simplifying assumptions and numerical models associated with this analysis, the results indicate that localized damage due to high moisture content of the roof sheathing is possible under very low airflow rates. Reducing the number of assumptions and approximations through field studies and laboratory experiments would be valuable to understand the real-world moisture damage potential in unvented attics.

  8. Moisture Diffusion in Asphalt Binders and Fine Aggregate Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasconcelos, Kamilla L.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    cost in highway maintenance and vehicle operations. One key mechanism of how moisture reaches the asphalt-aggregate interface is by its permeation or diffusion through the asphalt binder or mastic. Different techniques are available for diffusion...

  9. Evaluation of Moisture Susceptibility of Warm Mix Asphalt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia Cucalon, Maria Lorena

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    . To evaluate WMA moisture susceptibility during this critical period, standard laboratory tests were used for three field projects each with an HMA control mixtures and multiple WMA mixtures. Different specimen types were also evaluated to capture differences...

  10. Geomorphic responses as indicators of paleoclimate and climatic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is little doubt that climate is an important parameter affecting the shape of the Earth`s surface. However absolute observance to the principles of climatic geomorphology leads us away from the study of processes because the analyses passes directly from climate to landscape form. An alternative approach is to examine the effects of climate change on the nature of the processes operating in the near surface environment. Utilizing this methodology, the climate-process relations take on greater significance, and lead to an understanding of the response(s) of geomorphic systems to shifts in climatic regime. Given that geomorphic systems respond to changes in climate regime, it should also be true that delineation of the changes in the types, rates, and magnitudes of geomorphic processes will provide insights into the timing and nature of past shifts in climate, particularly effective moisture. It is this approach that has been utilized herein. Specifically, geomorphic responses in eolian, lacustrine, and fluvial systems that have resulted in erosional and depositional events have been documented for several sites in Nevada (Figure 1), and used to infer the timing and character of climatic change in the Basin and Range Physiographic Province. The results and conclusions of the specific studies are provided.

  11. The spatial and temporal organization of soil moisture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Gregor Klaus

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL ORGANIZATION OF SOIL MOISTURE A Thesis by GREGOR KLAUS VOGEL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December... 1995 Major Subject: Water Resources Engineering THE SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL ORGANIZATION OF SOIL MOISTURE A Thesis by GREGOR KLAUS VOGEL Submitted to Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  12. Evaluation of moisture damage within asphalt concrete mixes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Brij D.

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    with load cycles. The analysis demonstrates the need to consider mixture compliance as well as bond energy in order to predict moisture damage. Mixtures with the two types of bitumen and each aggregate with and without hydrated lime were... evaluated. The hydrated lime substantially improved the resistance of the mixture to moisture damage. iv To my parents. v ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to extend my sincere thanks to everyone who helped...

  13. Measurement of the Equivalent Thermal Resistance of Rooftop Lawns in a Hot-Climate Wind Tunnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rooftop lawn. A hot-climate wind tunnel experiment was carried out in order to obtain and analyze the heat and moisture transport in the rooftop lawn. Furthermore, a calculation with the energy conservation equation was carried out using the results...

  14. Measurement of the Equivalent Thermal Resistance of Rooftop Lawns in a Hot-Climate Wind Tunnel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rooftop lawn. A hot-climate wind tunnel experiment was carried out in order to obtain and analyze the heat and moisture transport in the rooftop lawn. Furthermore, a calculation with the energy conservation equation was carried out using the results...

  15. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development Daniel H. Cole*THE COSTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE . ADAPTATIONCONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE . IV. A.

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: Climate Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MonitoringClimate Security Climate Security Climate Security Global reductions in greenhouse gases will eventually be motivated by an international climate treaty and will entail...

  17. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources BoardBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  18. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change as approved Prepared by the California AirBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  19. Climate change action plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delivery Climate change action plan 2009-2011 #12;2 | Climate change action plan ©istockphoto.com #12;Climate Change Action Plan Climate change action plan | 3 Contents Overview 4 Preface and Introduction 5 Climate change predictions for Scotland 6 The role of forestry 7 Protecting and managing

  20. Climate-Soil-Vegetation Control on Groundwater Table Dynamics and its Feedbacks in a Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Qian, Yun; Liang, Xu

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the three dynamically linked branches of the water cycle, including atmospheric, surface, and subsurface water, groundwater is the largest reservoir and an active component of the hydrologic system. Because of the inherent slow response time, groundwater may be particularly relevant for long time-scale processes such as multi-years or decadal droughts. This study uses regional climate simulations with and without surface water – groundwater interactions for the conterminous U.S. to assess the influence of climate, soil, and vegetation on groundwater table dynamics, and its potential feedbacks to regional climate. Analysis shows that precipitation has a dominant influence on the spatial and temporal variations of groundwater table depth (GWT). The simulated GWT is found to decrease sharply with increasing precipitation. Our simulation also shows some distinct spatial variations that are related to soil porosity and hydraulic conductivity. Vegetation properties such as minimum stomatal resistance, and root depth and fraction are also found to play an important role in controlling the groundwater table. Comparing two simulations with and without groundwater table dynamics, we find that groundwater table dynamics mainly influences the partitioning of soil water between the surface (0 – 0.5 m) and subsurface (0.5 – 5 m) rather than total soil moisture. In most areas, groundwater table dynamics increases surface soil moisture at the expense of the subsurface, except in regions with very shallow groundwater table. The change in soil water partitioning between the surface and subsurface is found to strongly correlate with the partitioning of surface sensible and latent heat fluxes. The evaporative fraction (EF) is generally higher during summer when groundwater table dynamics is included. This is accompanied by increased cloudiness, reduced diurnal temperature range, cooler surface temperature, and increased cloud top height. Although both convective and non-convective precipitation are enhanced, the higher EF changes the partitioning to favor more non-convective precipitation, but this result could be sensitive to the convective parameterization used. Compared to simulations without groundwater table dynamics, the dry bias in the summer precipitation is slightly reduced over the central and eastern U.S. Groundwater table dynamics can provide important feedbacks to atmospheric processes, and these feedbacks are stronger in regions with deeper groundwater table, because the interactions between surface and subsurface are weak when the groundwater table is deep. This increases the sensitivity of surface soil moisture to precipitation anomalies, and therefore enhances land surface feedbacks to the atmosphere through changes in soil moisture and evaporative fraction. By altering the groundwater table depth, land use change and groundwater withdrawal can alter land surface response and feedback to the climate system.

  1. Policy-relevant science to help solve the carbon-climate problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009 #12;#12;Carbon emissions and the scale of the problem #12;#12;Rates of atmospheric CO2 change Calculated from Petit et al (1999) Calculated from Keeling and Whorf (2005) #12;Anthropogenic CO2 emissions et al. 2007, PNAS 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 CO2Emissions(GtCy-1 ) 5 6 7 8 9 10 Actual emissions: CDIAC

  2. Climate Past, Climate Present, Climate Future Douglas Nychka,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nychka, Douglas

    series and an energy balance model. 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000 -1.5-1.0-0.50.00.5 Year Degree. Supported by US NSF 7th World Congress Prob. and Stat., Singapore July 2008 #12;What is climate? Climate will use statistics to talk about the "known un- knowns" for the Earth's climate Statistics uses

  3. The Influence of Moisture and Temperature on Cotton Root Rot.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taubenhaus, J. J. (Jacob Joseph); Dana, B. F. (Bliss F.)

    1928-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . BAYLES, B. S., Superintendent J. PAUL LUSK, S. M., Plant Patholog Teachers in the School of Arnicultnre Carryine Coo~erative Projects on the Statit -- . G W ADRIANCE M S ~srociate~~rofessor of Horticulture S ' W 'BI~SING ~h D 'kro&sor of Entomology V... of the season. This initial moisture supply, together mith the additions during the growing season, permitted the continued development of root rot throughout the entire season. ,It the INFLUENCE OF MOISTURE AND TEMPERATURE ON COTTON ROOT ROT 9 end...

  4. Moisture Sensor for Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6)-filled Circuit Breakers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sauers, I.

    2001-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements at ORNL were made on the Kahn moisture sensor which Doble Engineering wants to evaluate for use in SF{sub 6} circuit breakers. Test conducted at ORNL indicate that vacuum conditions, as might be found in SF{sub 6} circuit breakers prior to filling with SF{sub 6}, could lead to significant changes in calibration, resulting in erroneous readings of moisture content. Similar effects might also be observed in cases where SF{sub 6} byproducts are present, due the reactivity of some of these byproducts with water.

  5. System design description for surface moisture measurement system (SMMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargo, G.F.

    1996-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The SMMS has been developed to measure moisture in the top few centimeters of tank waste. The SMMS development was initiated by the preliminary findings of SAR-033, and does not necessarily fulfill any established DQO. After the SAR-033 is released, if no significant changes are made, moisture measurements in the organic waste tanks will rapidly become a DQO. The SMMS was designed to be installed in any 4 inch or larger riser, and to allow maximum adjustability for riser lengths, and is used to deploy a sensor package on the waste surface within a 6 foot radius about the azimuth. The first sensor package will be a neutron probe.

  6. Investigation of moisture content variations in highway subgrades and bases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenkins, Edward Donald

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , temperature gradient, hydraulic gradient, and textural radient, Frost action is caused. by a freezing temperature which forms ice crystals and draws moisnure from the soil pores. This creates a hvdraulic gradient for tI e movement of moisture in the liq... and the remedies are fairly well-known and used. in highway construction. There are three conditions required for detrimental frost action to occur: (1) a frost susceptible soil; (2) a freezing temperature; and ($) a water source. The movement 10 of moisture...

  7. Remote monitoring of soil moisture using airborne microwave radiometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Charles Lindsey

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REMOTE MONITORING OF SOIL MOISTURE USING AIRBORNE MICROWAVE RADIOMETERS A Thesis by CHARLES LINDSEY J(ROLL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A)M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1973 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering REMOTE MONITORING OF SOIL MOISTURE USING AIRBORNE MICROWAVE RADIOMETERS A Thesis by CHARLES LINDSEY KROLL Approved as to style and content by: man o Co mrtt Hca o D artmc c Ill l c r Mem e Member...

  8. Stresses in adhesive joints due to moisture sorption 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jen, Ming-Hwa Robert

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the Case of 2 Moisture Absorpt1on. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 The Non-Dimensional Peel Stress p and the Interlaminar Shear Stresses T and T vs. the Non-Dimensional D1stance x for the Case of Moi stfre Absorption . . . . . . . . . 54 The Non...-Dimensional Displacement W2 of the Outer-Adherends vs. the Non-Dimens1onal Distance x for the Case of Moisture Desorption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 The Non-Dimensional Peel Stress p and the Interlaminar Shear Stresses T and T2 vs. the Non-D1mens1onal...

  9. Predicting farm machinery operation time with a soil moisture mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordovsky, James Paul

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -1972 . 76 Figure Page 24. Measured and computed plant available soil moisture in the top 30 cm of the soil profile on watershed Y-8 at Riesel, Texas during 1969, 1970, and 1972 79-81 25. Measured and computed plant available soil moisture in the top... for September, October, and November, 1977 97-99 32. Observed and calculated trafficability data at Corpus Christi, Texas for July, September, October, and November, 1977 . . 101-104 A-1 . The value of PM when S = O. l and S = 0. 25 and aM is the independ...

  10. Climate Action Plan (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To better understand the current and future vulnerabilities and risks to climate change, DNREC Secretary Collin O’Mara directed the Division of Energy and Climate to conduct a statewide climate...

  11. Climate Data Operators (CDO)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Data Operators (CDO) Climate Data Operators (CDO) Description and Overview CDO is a large tool set for working on climate data. NetCDF 34, GRIB including SZIP compression,...

  12. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changing feedbacks in the climate–biosphere system Front.313–32 Bonan G B 2008 Forests and climate change: forcings,feedbacks, and the climate benefits of forests Science

  13. Climate Code Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Nick; Jones, David

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Code Foundation - who are we? A non-profit organisation founded in August 2010; our goal is to promote the public understanding of climate science, by increasing the visibility and clarity of the software used in climate science...

  14. Climate VISION: Contact Us

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Energy Office of Climate Change Policy and Technology (PI-50) 202-586-8339 Mining - Contacts Association Climate VISION Lead Constance Holmes Senior Economist, Director...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate A Model for the Nation: Promoting Education and Innovation in Vermont's Electricity Sector On May 8, 2012, in Climate, Customers & Partners, Energy, Energy Surety,...

  16. Climate Action Plan (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recognizing the profound implications that global warming and climate variation could have on the economy, environment and quality of life in Montana, the Climate Change Advisory Committee (CCAC)...

  17. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  18. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  19. Climate Change Response

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Interior Climate Change Response "From the Everglades to the Great Lakes to Alaska and everywhere in between, climate change is a leading threat to natural and cultural...

  20. Evaluating the Representation and Impact of Convective Processes in the NCAR’s Community Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaoqing Wu

    2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection and clouds affect atmospheric temperature, moisture and wind fields through the heat of condensation and evaporation and through redistributions of heat, moisture and momentum. Individual clouds have a spatial scale of less than 10 km, much smaller than the grid size of several hundred kilometers used in climate models. Therefore the effects of clouds must be approximated in terms of variables that the model can resolve. Deriving such formulations for convection and clouds has been a major challenge for the climate modeling community due to the lack of observations of cloud and microphysical properties. The objective of our DOE CCPP project is to evaluate and improve the representation of convection schemes developed by PIs in the NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and study its impact on global climate simulations.

  1. Effects of soil moisture on the responses of soil temperatures to climate change in cold regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subin, Z.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the Commu- nity Earth System Model 1 (CESM1) (http://poorly simulated by current earth system models. A number of

  2. Derivation of Soil Moisture Retention Characteristics from Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    systems require knowledge of the relationships between soil moisture content (), soil water pressure (h, and evapotranspiration. The soil factors include soil matric potential and water content relationship, saturated content of soil. The relation between matric potential and volumetric water content in a soil is termed

  3. SOIL MOISTURE CHARACTERISTICS IN UPPER PART OF HINDON RIVER CATCHMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    of the contribution of various parts of a watershed to the ground water storage. Convenient and reliable techniques for the water demand of the vegetation, as well as for the recharge of the ground water storage. A fair into ground water aquifers. For analytical studies on soil moisture regime, critical review and accurate

  4. Detection and Attribution of Climate Change : From global mean temperature change to climate extremes and high impact weather.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This talk will describe how evidence has grown in recent years for a human influence on climate and explain how the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change concluded that it is extremely likely (>95% probability) that human influence on climate has been the dominant cause of the observed global-mean warming since the mid-20th century. The fingerprint of human activities has also been detected in warming of the ocean, in changes in the global water cycle, in reductions in snow and ice, and in changes in some climate extremes. The strengthening of evidence for the effects of human influence on climate extremes is in line with long-held basic understanding of the consequences of mean warming for temperature extremes and for atmospheric moisture. Despite such compelling evidence this does not mean that every instance of high impact weather can be attributed to anthropogenic climate change, because climate variability is often a major factor in many locations, especially for rain...

  5. Moisture Distribution and Flow During Drying of Wood and Fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zink-Sharp, Audrey; Hanna, Robert B.

    2001-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    New understanding, theories, and techniques for moisture flow and distribution were developed in this research on wood and wood fiber. Improved understanding of the mechanisms of flake drying has been provided. Observations of flake drying and drying rate curves revealed that rate of moisture loss consisted of two falling rate periods and no constant rate drying period was observed. Convective heat transfer controls the first period, and bound water diffusion controls the second period. Influence of lower drying temperatures on bending properties of wood flakes was investigated. Drying temperature was found to have a significant influence on bending stiffness and strength. A worksheet for calculation of the energy required to dry a single strandboard flake was developed but has not been tested in an industrial setting yet. A more complete understanding of anisotropic transverse shrinkage of wood is proposed based on test results and statistical analysis. A simplified mod el of a wood cell's cross-section was drawn for calculating differential transverse shrinkage. The model utilizes cell wall thickness and microfibrillar packing density and orientation. In spite of some phenomena of cell wall structure not yet understood completely, the results might explain anisotropic transverse shrinkage to a major extent. Boundary layer theory was found useful for evaluating external moisture resistance during drying. Simulated moisture gradients were quire comparable to the actual gradients in dried wood. A mathematical procedure for determining diffusion and surface emission coefficients was also developed. Thermal conductivity models of wood derived from its anatomical structure were created and tested against experimental values. Model estimations provide insights into changes in heat transfer parameters during drying. Two new techniques for measuring moisture gradients created in wood during drying were developed. A new technique that utilizes optical properties of cobalt chloride was developed for nondestructive determination of surface moisture content. Fundamental new understanding of drying characteristics in wood and fiber has been provided that can be used by researchers to improve drying of wood and fiber. The three techniques for measuring moisture content and gradients provided in this study are efficient, practical, and economical - easy to apply by industry and researchers. An energy consumption worksheet is provided as a first step toward reducing energy consumed during drying of lumber and strandboard flakes. However, it will need additional verification and testing.

  6. Preliminary non-destructive assessment of moisture content, hydration and dielectric properties of Portland cement concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avelar Lezama, Ivan

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Moisture availability is a focal point in the structural development of young concrete. Under low humidity and hot weather conditions, concrete loses moisture rapidly as it hardens, and it is very difficult, if not impossible, ...

  7. Moisture degradation in FRP bonded concrete systems : an interface fracture approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Au, Ching, 1977-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) characterization, and kink criterion implementation, form a synergistic analysis of the mechanistic debonding behavior affected by moisture. Results have shown that moisture affected debonding is a highly complex ...

  8. A Coupled Micromechanical Model of Moisture-Induced Damage in Asphalt Mixtures: Formulation and Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caro Spinel, Silvia

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The deleterious effect of moisture on the structural integrity of asphalt mixtures has been recognized as one of the main causes of early deterioration of asphalt pavements. This phenomenon, usually referred to as moisture damage, is defined...

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF A RAPID TEST TO DETERMINE MOISTURE SENSTIVITY OF HMA (SUPERPAVE) MIXTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiwakoti, Harihar

    2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Exiting test methods to determine moisture sensitivity in hot mix asphalt are time consuming and inconsistent. This research focused on wheel tracking devices to develop a rapid test method to evaluate moisture sensitivity. The Asphalt Pavement...

  10. SOLID WOOD PRODUCTS I TECHNICAL NOTE CALIBRATION OF MOISTURE METERS FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tanks, and boats, the kiln and allowed to cool. They were content (MC) of wood. However, the cor and electrical resis- cypress have been supplied by moisture handled or conditioned. One moisture tance

  11. The Soil Moisture Active and Passive Mission (SMAP): Science and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    The soil moisture active and passive mission (SMAP) will provide global maps of soil moisture content and surface freeze/thaw state. Global measurements of these variables are critical for terrestrial water and carbon cycle ...

  12. Climate Leadership Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted and organized by the Association of Climate Change Officers (ACCO), Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES), and the Climate Registry, the three-day conference will showcase how new business opportunities, current policies, technologies, climate solutions and energy transformation will drive our low-carbon future.

  13. programs in climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) project develops and maintains advanced numerical models of the ocean, sea ice, and ice sheets for use in global climate change

  14. Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Formulating Climate Change...

  15. Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate Engineering Center Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States October 29, 2009 #12;2Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States 2 Response Strategies to ClimateResponse Strategies to Climate ChangeChange

  16. Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment for Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher P. Ischay; Ernest L. Fossum; Polly C. Buotte; Jeffrey A. Hicke; Alexander Peterson

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Idaho (UI) was asked to participate in the development of a climate change vulnerability assessment for Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This report describes the outcome of that assessment. The climate change happening now, due in large part to human activities, is expected to continue in the future. UI and INL used a common framework for assessing vulnerability that considers exposure (future climate change), sensitivity (system or component responses to climate), impact (exposure combined with sensitivity), and adaptive capacity (capability of INL to modify operations to minimize climate change impacts) to assess vulnerability. Analyses of climate change (exposure) revealed that warming that is ongoing at INL will continue in the coming decades, with increased warming in later decades and under scenarios of greater greenhouse gas emissions. Projections of precipitation are more uncertain, with multi model means exhibiting somewhat wetter conditions and more wet days per year. Additional impacts relevant to INL include estimates of more burned area and increased evaporation and transpiration, leading to reduced soil moisture and plant growth.

  17. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Changeand Kate Scow. 2006. “Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.

  18. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Kate Scow. 2006. “Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.Sea Level. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.

  19. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CLIMATE CHANGE Multiplying Threats to National Securityfor the impacts of climate change on national security. Pagea warming world. Page 11 “Climate change acts as a threat

  20. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    net impact of climate change on agriculture in California,of Climate Change on California Agriculture. ” PresentationEffects of Climate Change on California Agriculture Positive

  1. Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsidered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009 Paper 1080 Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredby author(s). Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredimpact of climate change on agriculture, there still exists

  2. Evolution of moisture convergence in a mesoscale convective complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bercherer, John Phillip

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee: Dr. Keuneth C. Brundidge Two separate Mesoscale Convective Complexes (MCCs) were investigated to determine if a characteristic surface moisture convergence (MC) signature existed on the mesoscale during their lifecycle. The first storm (Case 1... convergence, a bandpass filtering technique was utilized. It was found that MC could identify the general area of initial thunderstorm activity 2 h prior to its development for both cases. During the initial development stage of Case 1, advection...

  3. Hazards and operability study for the surface moisture monitoring system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Board, B.D.

    1996-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Nuclear Reservation Tank Farms` underground waste tanks have been used to store liquid radioactive waste from defense materials production since the 1940`s. Waste in certain of the tanks may contain material in the form of ferrocyanide or various organic compounds which could potentially be susceptible to condensed phase chemical reactions. Because of the presence of oxidizing materials (nitrate compounds) and heat sources (radioactive decay and chemical reactions), the ferrocyanide or organic material could potentially fuel a propagating exothermic reaction with undesirable consequences. Analysis and experiments indicate that the reaction propagation and/or initiation may be prevented by the presence of sufficient moisture in the waste. Because the reaction would probably be initiated at the surface of the waste, evidence of sufficient moisture concentration would help provide evidence that the tank waste can continue to be safely stored. The Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS) was developed to collect data on the surface moisture in the waste by inserting two types of probes (singly) into a waste tank-a neutron probe and an electromagnetic inductance (EMI) probe. The sensor probes will be placed on the surface of the waste utilizing a moveable deployment arm to lower them through an available riser. The movement of the SMMS within the tank will be monitored by a camera lowered through an adjacent riser. The SMMS equipment is the subject of this study. Hazards and Operability Analysis (HAZOP) is a systematic technique for assessing potential hazards and/or operability problems for a new activity. It utilizes a multidiscipline team of knowledgeable individuals in a systematic brainstorming effort. The results of this study will be used as input to an Unreviewed Safety Question determination.

  4. [DELTA T dryer/moisture control system]. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drying Technology, Inc. was awarded a grant for the purpose of extending DELTA T dryer/moisture control technology into additional industries. Ultimate purpose of the grant was to save energy and improve efficiency in the process industries. Results indicate that these objectives have been met and will continue as this new technology is duplicated in the present industries and also is extended into other industries as well.

  5. The structure of a late-spring moisture burst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockton, Jay Richard

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    masses from tropical air masses. McGuirk et ol. (1983) developed a moisture burst climatology for the months of November through Apnl, utilizing Geostationary Operational Environmental Satelhte-West (GOES-W) IR imagery taken every six hours. Four... in the area. c) Point comparisons outside of the active burst regions show systematic overpredictions of mean relative humidity and underpredictions of temporal variability by ECMWF analyses with respect to observations. d) Satellite channel radiance data...

  6. Nondestructive NMR technique for moisture determination in radioactive materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aumeier, S.; Gerald, R.E. II; Growney, E.; Nunez, L.; Kaminski, M.

    1998-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report focuses on experimental and computational studies used to evaluate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting, quantifying, and monitoring hydrogen and other magnetically active nuclei ({sup 3}H, {sup 3}He, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu) in Spent nuclear fuels and packaging materials. The detection of moisture by using a toroid cavity NMR imager has been demonstrated in SiO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} systems. The total moisture was quantified by means of {sup 1}H NMR detection of H{sub 2}O with a sensitivity of 100 ppm. In addition, an MRI technique that was used to determine the moisture distribution also enabled investigators to discriminate between bulk and stationary water sorbed on the particles. This imaging feature is unavailable in any other nondestructive assay (NDA) technique. Following the initial success of this program, the NMR detector volume was scaled up from the original design by a factor of 2000. The capacity of this detector exceeds the size specified by DOE-STD-3013-96.

  7. Climate ChangeClimate Change and Runoff Managementand Runoff Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Climate ChangeClimate Change and Runoff Managementand Runoff Management in Wisconsinin Wisconsin NASECA February 3, 2011 David S. Liebl #12;Overview · Understanding climate change · Wisconsin's changing climate · Expected impacts · Adaptation strategies #12;Visible Light Energy in = Energy out Absorbed

  8. Measure Guideline: Supplemental Dehumidification in Warm-Humid Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document covers a description of the need and applied solutions for supplemental dehumidification in warm-humid climates, especially for energy efficient homes where the sensible cooling load has been dramatically reduced. In older homes in warm-humid climates, cooling loads are typically high and cooling equipment runs a lot to cool the air. The cooling process also removes indoor moisture, reducing indoor relative humidity. However, at current residential code levels, and especially for above-code programs, sensible cooling loads have been so dramatically reduced that the cooling system does not run a lot to cool the air, resulting in much less moisture being removed. In these new homes, cooling equipment is off for much longer periods of time especially during spring/fall seasons, summer shoulder months, rainy periods, some summer nights, and some winter days. In warm-humid climates, those long off periods allow indoor humidity to become elevated due to internally generated moisture and ventilation air change. Elevated indoor relative humidity impacts comfort, indoor air quality, and building material durability. Industry is responding with supplemental dehumidification options, but that effort is really in its infancy regarding year-round humidity control in low-energy homes. Available supplemental humidity control options are discussed. Some options are less expensive but may not control indoor humidity as well as more expensive and comprehensive options. The best performing option is one that avoids overcooling and avoids adding unnecessary heat to the space by using waste heat from the cooling system to reheat the cooled and dehumidified air to room-neutral temperature.

  9. Climate WorkshopsClimate Workshops for Department Chairsp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilbury, Dawn

    Climate WorkshopsClimate Workshops for Department Chairsp University of Wisconsin ADVANCE-IT Slides) #12;Why focus on departmental climate? Individuals experience climate in their immediate workplace negative climate than male faculty Improving department climate is critical for retention and advancement

  10. Climate Leadership Conference

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Climate Leadership Conference is your annual exchange for addressing global climate change through policy, innovation, and business solutions. Forward-thinking lead­ers from busi­ness, gov­ern...

  11. The Climate Policy Dilemma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pindyck, Robert S.

    Climate policy poses a dilemma for environmental economists. The economic argument for stringent GHG abatement is far from clear. There is disagreement among both climate scientists and economists over the likelihood of ...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to address the most challenging and demanding climate-change issues. Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) is designed to accel-erate the development and applica-tion of...

  13. The Climate Policy Dilemma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pindyck, Robert S.

    Climate policy poses a dilemma for environmental economists. The economic argument for stringent greenhouse gas (GHG) abatement is far from clear. There is disagreement among both climate scientists and economists concerning ...

  14. Climate Change Economics and Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, Daniela

    AFRICA COLLEGE Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy Adapting to Climate Change 3 CLIMATE...Furthermore, there is strong scientific evidence that climate change will disrupt the global economy, environment and society a growing population in a changing climate is, therefore, a major global challenge. Changes in climate

  15. Campus Conversations: CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attari, Shahzeen Z.

    booklet is an adaptation and updating of Global Warming and Climate Change, a brochure developed in 1994 that will address climate change. Scientists tell us that the climate of the earth is warming, and that the warming into the foundation of the world economy and into the everyday things we do (driving) and use (electricity). Thus

  16. METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Ming

    AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Journal of Climate EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary PDF it is available. © 201 American Meteorological Society1 #12;Sun et al. climate downscaling of the Australian currents 1 Marine downscaling of a future climate scenario for Australian boundary currents Chaojiao Sun

  17. Campus Climate Camden Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Stephen José

    Campus Climate Report Camden Campus New Brunswick/Piscataway Campus Newark Campus Student Survey #12;I. INTRODUCTION Executive Summary The Rutgers Campus Climate Survey was designed to determine how University, the campus climate surveys revealed strong areas of satisfaction with the Rutgers University

  18. Forest Research: Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

  19. Climate Change Workshop 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    1 Climate Change Workshop 2007 Adaptive Management and Resilience Relevant for the Platte River, UNL Climate Change Workshop 2007 · Resilience ·Why it matters · Adaptive Management ·How it helps ·Adaptive Capacity · What it is Overview Climate Change Workshop 2007 "A public Domain, once a velvet carpet

  20. Condensation potential in high thermal performance walls. Hot, humid summer climate. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherwood, G.E.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To observe actual moisture patterns and the potential for condensation due to long periods of air conditioning in a hot, humid climate, a test structure was constructed near Gulfport, Mississippi, for exposure of eight types of insulated wall panels at controlled indoor conditions and typical outdoor weather conditions. Panels were instrumented with moisture sensors and tested without (Phase 1) and with (Phase 2) penetrations (electrical outlets) in the indoor surface. There was no sustained condensation in any of the walls during either winter season. One type of high thermal performance wall had sustained condensation during both summers, but the wall dried out as the weather became cooler, and moisture content of framing never exceeded 17 percent. Low-permeance sheathing appeared to provide resistance to the buildup of moisture during summer in walls with high overall R values. Penetrating the walls with electrical outlets resulted in slightly higher moisture levels in all of the walls throughout the year. This paper should be useful to building designers, builders, and building code officials in establishing vapor retarder requirements for walls.

  1. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center: FY 1991 activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M.; Stoss, F.W.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specially publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC's staff also provides technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC's staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC during the period October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC's response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of numeric data packages, computer model packages, technical reports, newsletters, factsheets, specially publications, and reprints is provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC's information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also described.

  2. Using electrical resistance probes for moisture determination in switchgrass windrows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chesser Jr., G. D.; Davis, J. D.; Purswell, J. L.; Lemus, R.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Determining moisture levels in windrowed biomass is important for both forage producers and researchers. Energy crops such as switchgrass have been troublesome when using the standard methods set for electrical resistance meters. The objectives of this study were to i) develop the methodologies needed to measure MC in switchgrass using electrical resistance meters, ii) to determine the effects of pressure and probe orientation on MC measurement and iii) to generate MC calibration equations for electrical resistance meters using switchgrass in the senescence growth stage. Two meters (Meter 1, Farmex HT-PRO; Meter 2, Delmhorst F-2000) were selected based on commercial availability. A forage compression apparatus was designed and constructed with on-farm materials and methods to provide a simple system of applying pressure achievable by any forage producer or researcher in the field. Two trials were performed to test four levels of moisture contents (10, 20, 30, and 40%), five pressures (0, 1.68, 3.11, 4.55, 6.22 kN/m 2; 0, 35, 65, 95, 130 lb/ft 2), and two probe orientations (axial and transverse) in a 4x5x2 factorial design. Results indicated that meter accuracy increased as pressure increased. Regression models accounted for 91% and 81% of the variation for Meter 1 and Meter 2 at a pressure of 4.55 kN/m 2 (95 lb/ft 2) and a transverse probe orientation. Calibration equations were developed for both meters to improve moisture measurement accuracy for farmers and researchers in the field.

  3. Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice 10 November 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    1 Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice 10 November 2011 J. Hansen, M. Sato, coincident with increased global warming. The most dramatic and important change of the climate dice change is the natural variability of climate. How can a person discern long-term climate change, given

  4. A soil moisture availability model for crop stress prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gay, Roger Franklin

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wet so11 profile [Ritch1e et al. , 1972] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Relationships between the ratio of actual evaporation (Ea) to pan evaporat1on (E an) as a function of the available soil water in Rule and Bragg soybean [Burch et al. , 1978...] F1gure Interact1ons between soil-moisture status and other components of a general crop yield model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Figure Root densit1es for ra1nfed Ruse and Bragg soybean, 98 days after planting [Burch et al. , 1978...

  5. Transient Analysis for Thermal and Moisture Behavior of Building Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, X.; Chen, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (,0)mx m= (10) 3.SOLVING METHOD Applying the Laplace transformation to Eqs.(3), (4), (5), (6), (7) and (8) with respect to t , they become 2 00 dTLSTTSm dx ??=?? + m (11) 2 00 dmDSmmST dx T? ?=?? + (12) 11 11 1 11 (,) [(,) ] (1... diffusivity approaches unity. So far, there have been many studies[3,8]concerned with the interactive effect between temperature and moisture, experimentally or analytically. However, for the convenience of analysis, most of the analytical investigations...

  6. Determination of moisture in solids using high frequency methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Melven Boyd

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~, An induction-Ccpacit Oscillator of Unusual Fre uenc Stabi lit-, Proc ~ I. -". ". , larch, 1948 ~ (14) Glass':one, Samuel, Textbook of Physical Chemistry? D. Tan Nostrand Companv, Ino. , New York, 1947 pp 417 (15) Ibid, pp, 333 ... and low melting solids ~ . '. :eascrement of a change in a physical consL'ant ro deucrcc ne moisture content is incorporated in many methods' The chango in dielectric constant has been used with some success (0, 7 ' 8), 'cut s. "a' n it has boon more...

  7. Production of High Quality Dust Control Foam to Minimize Moisture Addition to Coal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Termine, F.; Jordan, S. T.

    PRODUCTION OF HIGH QUALITY DUST CONTROL FOAM TO MINIMIZE MOISTURE ADDITION TO COAL Frank Tenni ne Steve T. Jordan BETZ Laboratories, Trevose, PA Inc. ABSTRACT Foam is displacing wet suppression as the method of choice for controlling... fugitive emissions from coal. Coal treated by wet suppression consumes through moisture addition, a heat energy equivalent of 1 ton out of every 500 tons fired. The application of foam requires less than 10% of the moisture usually required for wet...

  8. A study of the troxler nuclear soil density and moisture gauges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedenwald, Robert Lane

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Be 60 source was used in moisture determinations and a Co source in density measurements. Average deviations of 0. 8 pounds of water per cubic foot of soil were reported for moisture measurements. Density measurements varied by 3 pounds per cubic... foot. It was found that moisture readings may be affected by chemically bound water but for mineral soils, soil type generally has little effect on the calibration of these instruments. Goldberg et al (15) in 1955 constructed a sensitive, r liable...

  9. This study is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) through grant EF1049251: "Assessing Decadal Climate Change Impacts on Urban Populations in the Southwestern United States."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Decadal Climate Change Impacts on Urban Populations in the Southwestern United States." Data calibrates a point-scale soil water balance model to available soil moisture data, using historical, despite its notable effects on water, energy and biomass conditions. This omission is noteworthy

  10. Advanced MR moisture sensor market feasibility analysis. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper briefly documents activities, background information, and results of marketing studies on the Magnetic Resonance Advanced Moisture Sensor (AMS). The main goals of the study are to identify industrial uses to guide development efforts, to become familiar with the industrial and magnetic resonance research capabilities/resources at the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and to develop a summary data sheet describing the AMS product for use with a broad mail survey of potential users. The studies are being performed through an alliance of Quantum Magnetics, US DOE, SwRI, The Townsend Agency, and PAI Partners. Efforts are being focused on NIR, Raman, and other optical spectroscopies as process measurement tools for onstream applications. Domestic and world markets for process analytical instrumentation, process moisture instrumentation, and nuclear magnetic resonance instrumentation are summarized. Three applications are identified as the most promising for magnetic resonance instrumentation: (1) polymer production, (2) pharmaceuticals preparation, and (3) prepared food processing. It is estimated that the process magnetic resonance market could reach $5 to $10 million annually by the end of this decade.

  11. Monitoring and controlling moisture during carpet and textile drying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, J.W.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial dryer/moisture control is usually performed by feedback type systems, i.e., sensors indirectly measure moisture content (MC) of the product after it leaves the dryer, or exhaust temperature from the last zone is used as an indicator of the existing MC. Such a control system is inherently weak because of the {open_quotes}after-the-fact{close_quotes} nature of the MC data. A feedback system may be improved by adding feedforward loops to handle disturbances to the system, e.g., variations in entering MC and feed rate. Such additions to the control system are expensive and require higher expertise for operating and maintaining. If the MC of the product could be measured inside the dryer, a control system could be offered that would be superior to feedback/feedforward types. This has not been possible up to this time because no MC sensor was capable of withstanding the atmosphere inside dryers. Moreover, the sample size would not have been large enough to be representative.

  12. Temperature and moisture dependence of dielectric constant for silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrubesh, L.H., LLNL

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dielectric constants of silica aerogels are among the lowest measured for any solid material. The silica aerogels also exhibit low thermal expansion and are thermally stable to temperatures exceeding 500{degrees}C. However, due to the open porosity and large surface areas for aerogels, their dielectric constants are strongly affected by moisture and temperature. This paper presents data for the dielectric constants of silica aerogels as a function of moisture content at 25{degrees}C, and as a function of temperature, for temperatures in the range from 25{degrees}C to 450{degrees}C. Dielectric constant data are also given for silica aerogels that are heat treated in dry nitrogen at 500{degrees}C, then cooled to 25{degrees}C for measurements in dry air. All measurements are made on bulk aerogel spheres at 22GHz microwave frequency, using a cavity perturbation method. The results of the dependence found here for bulk materials can be inferred to apply also to thin films of silica aerogels having similar nano-structures and densities.

  13. Global ClimateGlobal Climate meets dynamics inmeets dynamics in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    texture.texture. Here we will go to high latitudes for examples, whereHere we will go to high latitudes Arctic basin. From satellite passive microwave radiometer.meter. #12;Beneath the ocean surface, moisture flux, heat fluxwinds, moisture flux, heat flux meridionalmeridional energy transportenergy

  14. Is this climate porn? How does climate change communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Is this climate porn? How does climate change communication affect our perceptions and behaviour;1 Is this climate porn? How does climate change communication affect our perceptions and behaviour? Thomas D. Lowe 1 these kinds of messages (which have recently been dubbed `climate porn' (Ereaut and Segnit, 2006)), can

  15. Climate history and paleoclimate -HS 2011 Climate proxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 Climate proxies 18O Climate History & Paleoclimate ­ September 30, 2011 #12;How do we know about the past? Instrumental Historical Through proxies Climate proxies Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 #12;What is a `proxy'? "Proxy, as used here

  16. Ensemble climate predictions using climate models and observational constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REVIEW Ensemble climate predictions using climate models and observational constraints BY PETER A. STOTT 1,* AND CHRIS E. FOREST 2 1 Hadley Centre for Climate Change (Reading Unit), Meteorology Building for constraining climate predictions based on observations of past climate change. The first uses large ensembles

  17. Climate history and paleoclimate -HS 2011 Future climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 Future climate Climate History & Paleoclimate - December 9, 2011 1 #12;Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 IPCC 2007 4th Assessment report (AR4) More information can be found: http://www.ipcc.ch/ Remark: 5th assessment report is due in 2013/2014 2 #12;Climate

  18. Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Professor of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulme, Mike

    Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Mike Hulme Professor of Climate Change Science, Society and Sustainability Group School of Environmental Sciences Rethinking Climate Change, Conflict security" "increase risk of conflicts among and within nations" #12;· from `climatic change' to `climate-change

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Accelerated Climate Modeling for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy New Project Is the ACME of Computer Science to Address Climate Change On December 3, 2014, in Analysis, Climate, Global Climate & Energy,...

  20. ORNL/CDIAC-34 Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Activity Number KP 12 04 01 0 Prepared by the Carbon Dioxide. Burtis Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 4777's (DOE) Environmental Sciences Division, Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER

  1. ORNL/CDIAC-57 Proceedings of RIHMI-WDC,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Activity Number KP 05 00 00 0 Prepared by the Carbon Compiled by Marvel D. Burtis Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division Oak Prepared for the Global Change Research Program Environmental Sciences Division Office of Health

  2. ORNL/CDIAC-64 Proceedings of RIHMI-WDC,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Activity Number KP 05 00 00 0 Prepared by the Carbon Dioxide Compiled by Marvel D. Burtis Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division Oak for the #12;Global Change Research Program Environmental Sciences Division Office of Health and Environmental

  3. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kingdom, Uzbekistan, Iran, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Algeria, Egypt, South Africa, Australia, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, New...

  4. The Climate Impacts LINK Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    The Climate Impacts LINK Project The Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia Funded by the UK Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions, Contract Ref EPG 1/1/68 The Climate Impacts LINK Project: Applying Results from the Hadley Centre's Climate Change Experiments for Climate

  5. Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises Committee on Abrupt Climate Change Ocean Studies Board of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Abrupt climate change : inevitable surprises / Committee on Abrupt Climate Change, Ocean Studies Board, Polar Research Board, Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate

  6. Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air ResourcesBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  7. Conservation and Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

  8. Global climatic catastrophes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budyko, M.I.; Golitsyn, G.S.; Izrael, A

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work inquires into global climatic catastrophes of the past, presenting data not easily available outside of the Socialist Countries, and applies these results to the study of future climatic developments, especially as they threaten in case of Nuclear Warfare - Nuclear Winter. The authors discuss probable after effects from the Soviet point of view on the basis of research, stressing the need to avoid all conflict which might lead to the next and final Global Climatic Catastrophy.

  9. Climate Action Plan (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Governor Timothy M. Kaine established the Governor's Commission on Climate Change in December 2007. The commission prepared a plan for Virginia that identified ways to reduce greenhouse gas...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from improved climate models to performance models for underground waste storage to 3D printing and digital rock physics. Marianne Walck (Director ... NASA Award for Marginal...

  11. Climate Change, Drought & Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry Climate Change, Drought, and Environment—Michael Champ, Executive Director, The Sustainable Water Challenge

  12. Climate Vision: Presidential Statements

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Remarks by the President at Major Economies Meeting on Energy Security and Climate Change September 28, 2007 THE PRESIDENT: Good morning. Thank you. Welcome to the State...

  13. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    much more than carbon sequestration does, and often in abiophysics, carbon sequestration, climate change, climatethe accompanying carbon sequestration does—and sometimes in

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Management On January 27, 2011, in A growing consensus exists among climate scientists, economists, and policy makers that the link between man-made emissions of greenhouse...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protected: White House Water Roundtable: Question 4 On September 20, 2011, in Climate, Water There is no excerpt because this is a protected post. Protected: White House Water...

  16. Welcome to Climate VISION

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Program Mission Private Sector Initiatives Asia Pacific Partnership ClimateTechnology.gov Resources and Links 1605(b) Site Map Technology Pathways Contact Us News and Events How...

  17. Peel and Shear Fracture Characterization of Debonding in FRP Plated Concrete Affected by Moisture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    polymer CFRP plated concrete systems by mechanically testing accelerated moisture conditioned mesoscalePeel and Shear Fracture Characterization of Debonding in FRP Plated Concrete Affected by Moisture fracture toughness as the quantification parameter of the CFRP-epoxy-concrete trilayer system, which

  18. Monitoring Soil Moisture and Drought Using a Thermal TwoSource Energy Balance Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Monitoring Soil Moisture and Drought Using a Thermal TwoSource Energy Balance Model Christopher. In general, dry soil or stressed vegetation heats up more rapidly than wet soil or unstressed vegetation, using one dual polarized channel (either Cband or Xband) for the retrieval of soil moisture

  19. Using moisture transport properties of rice seed components for identifying fissure resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Audrey Elizabeth

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , LaGrue, Lemont, and Cypress. Equilibrium moisture content (EMC) tests exposed 200 grams of brown rice to identify how the four varieties compare in their ability to hold moisture at a specific condition. Cypress, Lemont, and LaGrue tended to hold...

  20. SOIL MOISTURE RETENTION CHARACTERISTICS AT RD 838 OF I. G. N. P. STAGE -II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    aquifers. For analytical studies on soil moisture regime, critical review and accurate assessment among soil moisture characteristic curves are attributed primarily to the differences in pore size structures. In addition, the curves generally show hysteresis according to the wetting or drying of soils

  1. NEC Hazardous classification and compliance regarding the surface moisture monitor measurement system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bussell, J.H., WHC

    1996-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Electrical Code, NFPA 70, and National Fire Protection Association requirements for use of Surface Moisture Monitor Systems in classified locations are discussed. The design and configuration of the surface moisture monitor are analyzed with respect to how they comply with requirements of the National Electrical Code requirements, articles 500-504.

  2. SOIL MOISTURE CHARACTERIZATION USING MULTI-ANGULAR POLARIMETRIC RADARSAT-2 DATASETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    SOIL MOISTURE CHARACTERIZATION USING MULTI-ANGULAR POLARIMETRIC RADARSAT-2 DATASETS Hongquan Wang to be a solution to improve the effectiveness of bare soil char- acterization. However, the potential single and multiple incidence angle acquisitions is investigated against in situ soil moisture

  3. Dynamic Effects on Moisture Transport in Asphalt Concrete M. Emin Kutay1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    Dynamic Effects on Moisture Transport in Asphalt Concrete M. Emin Kutay1 and Ahmet H. Aydilek2 2007 133:7 406 CE Database subject headings: Moisture; Asphalt concrete; Dynamics; Hydraulic and Magdalena 2002 ; however, limited research has been conducted in modeling dynamic flow in porous geomedia

  4. Importance of moisture transport, snow cover and soil freezing to ground temperature predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Importance of moisture transport, snow cover and soil freezing to ground temperature predictions moisture transport, snow accumulation and melting, and soil freezing and thawing are investigated transport, snow cover, and soil freezing. 1. Introduction Prediction of ground temperature is an important

  5. Optimization of stomatal conductance for maximum carbon gain under dynamic soil moisture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katul, Gabriel

    Optimization of stomatal conductance for maximum carbon gain under dynamic soil moisture Stefano Accepted 26 September 2013 Available online 9 October 2013 Keywords: Optimization Photosynthesis Soil moisture Stomatal conductance Transpiration a b s t r a c t Optimization theories explain a variety

  6. ClimateChangeLIVE Webcast: Join the Climate Conversation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join ClimateChangeLIVE's webcast, bringing together students and climate experts for a discussion about climate change and what students and classes around the country are doing to be part of the climate solution. Students will be able to interact with climate scientists and experts online through Facebook and Twitter. A GreenWorks! grant will be offered to help schools with climate action projects.

  7. 1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate A BrAzil-UK AnAlysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;3DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL April 2011Alysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;4 DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE

  8. Method and apparatus for fuel gas moisturization and heating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ranasinghe, Jatila (Niskayuna, NY); Smith, Raub Warfield (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel gas is saturated with water heated with a heat recovery steam generator heat source. The heat source is preferably a water heating section downstream of the lower pressure evaporator to provide better temperature matching between the hot and cold heat exchange streams in that portion of the heat recovery steam generator. The increased gas mass flow due to the addition of moisture results in increased power output from the gas and steam turbines. Fuel gas saturation is followed by superheating the fuel, preferably with bottom cycle heat sources, resulting in a larger thermal efficiency gain compared to current fuel heating methods. There is a gain in power output compared to no fuel heating, even when heating the fuel to above the LP steam temperature.

  9. Moisture corrections in neutron coincidence counting of PuO/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, J.E.; Menlove, H.O.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Passive neutron coincidence counting is capable of 1% assay accuracy for pure, well-characterized PuO/sub 2/ samples that contain plutonium masses from a few tens of grams to several kilograms. Moisture in the sample can significantly bias the assay high by changing the (..cap alpha..,n) neutron production, the sample multiplication, and the detection efficiency. Monte Carlo calculations and an analytical model of coincidence counting have been used to quantify the individual and cumulative effects of moisture biases for two PuO/sub 2/ sample sizes and a range of moisture levels from 0 to 9 wt %. Results of the calculations suggest a simple correction procedure for moisture bias that is effective from 0 to 3 wt % H/sub 2/O. The procedure requires that the moisture level in the sample be known before the coincidence measurement.

  10. Global air quality and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of Chemistry- Climate Models 5, 2010. 320 S. Wu,and R. Van Dorland, in Climate Change 2007: The PhysicalInter- governmental Panel on Climate Change, ed. D. Qin, M.

  11. Climate Change at Annual Timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stine, Alexander Robin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1900–93, Journal of Climate, 10 (5), 1004–1020, 1997. Zhou,University of East Anglia’s Climate Research Unit (Jones etand those from WCRP “Climate of the Twentieth Century”

  12. MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION TO PUBLIC HEALTH RISKS's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012041 Prepared for: California Energy Commission of California. #12; ii ABSTRACT This study reviewed first available frameworks for climate change adaptation

  13. Climate Sciences: Atmospheric Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    1 Climate Sciences: Atmospheric Thermodynamics Instructor: Lynn Russell, NH343 http://aerosol.ucsd.edu/courses.html Text: Curry & Webster Atmospheric Thermodynamics Ch1 Composition Ch2 Laws Ch3 Transfers Ch12 Energy Climate Sciences: Atmospheric Thermodynamics Instructor: Lynn Russell, NH343 http

  14. Soil moisture in complex terrain: quantifying effects on atmospheric boundary layer flow and providing improved surface boundary conditions for mesoscale models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniels, Megan Hanako

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    74 ii Soil Moisture Sensors: Decagon ECH2O Capacitance133 A.10 Soil types corresponding to each75 Soil Moisture and Temperature Probe

  15. Caribbean and Pacific moisture sources on the Isthmus of Panama revealed from stalagmite and surface water d18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asmerom, Yemane

    Caribbean and Pacific moisture sources on the Isthmus of Panama revealed from stalagmite values from Panama and Costa Rica. The d18 O values decrease with distance from the Caribbean Sea a contribution of both Caribbean and Pacific sourced moisture to the isthmus. We estimated the Pacific moisture

  16. Dealing in Doubt: The Climate Denial Industry and Climate Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairchild, Mark D.

    Dealing in Doubt: The Climate Denial Industry and Climate Science A Brief History of Attacks action on climate change has become more likely. This time, though, there is a difference. In recent, despite its lack of evidence or scientific support. The last peak in the climate denial campaign

  17. Climate simulators and climate projections Jonathan Rougier1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Peter

    Climate simulators and climate projections Jonathan Rougier1 Department of Mathematics University;Abstract We provide a statistical interpretation of current practice in climate mod- elling. This includes: definitions for weather and climate; clarifying the relationship between simulator output and simulator

  18. The role of solar absorption in climate and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The role of solar absorption in climate and climate change William Collins UC Berkeley Research Boulder, Colorado, USA #12;2 Prior Research on Absorption and Climate Field Experiments: · Central · Climate with enhanced cloud absorption Synthesis of models and aerosol observations: · Development

  19. Development of the prototype Munitions Case Moisture Meter, Model ORNL-1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agouridis, D.C.; Gayle, T.M.; Griest, W.H.

    1993-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a great need for a rapid and simple means of determining the moisture content in combustible cartridge case (ccc) munitions. Previous studies have demonstrated that accumulation of moisture in ccc rounds, such as the M829, leads to softening of the case wall and weakening of the adhesive joint. Moisture in the ccc can lead to incomplete combustion of the case upon firing the round. Currently, there are no facile methods for measuring the moisture content. A prototype portable meter for non-destructive and rapid estimation of moisture in ccc has been developed. The Munitions Case Moisture Meter Model ORNL-1 demonstrates the feasibility of developing an instrument based on the moisture dependence of dielectric properties, to measure moisture in ccc munitions in storage and in the field. These instruments are simple, inexpensive, lightweight, portable, low-power battery operated, and intrinsically safe. They provide nondestructive, noninvasive, and rapid measurements. Calibration data for the prototype are not available at this time. Therefore, calibration of the meter and the development of a scale reading directly moisture content in munitions rounds could not be completed. These data will be supplied by the US Army from its tests of the meter with actual munitions. However, experimental results on empty cccs in laboratory conditions demonstrate satisfactory performance of the instrument. Additional work is needed to bring the prototype to its optimum usefulness and accuracy for field measurements. This includes: Calibration of the meter scale with full-up munitions; Data and evaluation procedures to adjust the performance of the meter for different environmental conditions such as temperature and humidity; and Studies of the dielectric properties of moist ccc materials, as a function of frequency and temperature, are needed for adjustment of the meter for optimal performance.

  20. Development of the prototype Munitions Case Moisture Meter, Model ORNL-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agouridis, D.C.; Gayle, T.M.; Griest, W.H.

    1993-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a great need for a rapid and simple means of determining the moisture content in combustible cartridge case (ccc) munitions. Previous studies have demonstrated that accumulation of moisture in ccc rounds, such as the M829, leads to softening of the case wall and weakening of the adhesive joint. Moisture in the ccc can lead to incomplete combustion of the case upon firing the round. Currently, there are no facile methods for measuring the moisture content. A prototype portable meter for non-destructive and rapid estimation of moisture in ccc has been developed. The Munitions Case Moisture Meter Model ORNL-1 demonstrates the feasibility of developing an instrument based on the moisture dependence of dielectric properties, to measure moisture in ccc munitions in storage and in the field. These instruments are simple, inexpensive, lightweight, portable, low-power battery operated, and intrinsically safe. They provide nondestructive, noninvasive, and rapid measurements. Calibration data for the prototype are not available at this time. Therefore, calibration of the meter and the development of a scale reading directly moisture content in munitions rounds could not be completed. These data will be supplied by the US Army from its tests of the meter with actual munitions. However, experimental results on empty cccs in laboratory conditions demonstrate satisfactory performance of the instrument. Additional work is needed to bring the prototype to its optimum usefulness and accuracy for field measurements. This includes: Calibration of the meter scale with full-up munitions; Data and evaluation procedures to adjust the performance of the meter for different environmental conditions such as temperature and humidity; and Studies of the dielectric properties of moist ccc materials, as a function of frequency and temperature, are needed for adjustment of the meter for optimal performance.

  1. Moisture in Molasses as a Factor in the Heating of Feeds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halick, John V.; Richardson, L. R.

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sugars after inversion, moisture, Brix and ash. Moist.ure was determined by the vacuum oven drying method and ranged from 19 to over 31 percent. Over 71.0 percent of the samples contained 26 percent or more of lwater. If 10 percent of molasses... in a feed contain a normal amount of water, the extra water added in the molasses might raise the moisture content to an unsafe level. Different values for solids were obtained by the Brix and the vacuum oven drying methods, Brix is an unreliable...

  2. Measurements of Backsheet Moisture Permeation and Encapsulant-Substrate Adhesion: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Barber, G.; Kennedy, C.; McMahon, T.

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 2001 NCPV Program Review Meeting: Measurements of backsheet moisture permeation and encapsulant-substrate adhesion. At the March 2001 NCPV workshop on ''Moisture Ingress and High-Voltage Isolation'', industry participants identified several properties associated with PV module durability that are critical for commercial success. These include interface conductivity, adhesion of encapsulants to substrate materials as a function of in-service exposure conditions, and moisture permeation through backsheet materials as a function of temperature. Electrical data is discussed in a companion paper; adhesion and water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) measurements are presented herein.

  3. Experimental Study of Multi-type Macromolecule Porosity Moisture-Conditioned Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, X.; Fan, Y.; Di, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MATERIALS AND EXPERIMENTAL DEVICES 4.1 The Experimental Materials (1) Porous materials: Concrete blocks, weight for 550Kg/m3, pore rate of 73%, saturated humidity rate of 45%, dimensions of 300?600?80mm. (2) Combined with the moisture conditioned... on buildings or wallpaper to adjust humidity. 2) Concrete blocks: 300?600?80mm. (3) Combined with the moisture conditioned plate and porous materials 1) Moisture conditioned plate: Absorbent resin adsorption salt solution, forms a Gel, mixed the Gel...

  4. Global climatic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houghton, R.A.; Woodwell, G.M.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the climatic effects of trace gases such as carbon dioxide and methane. It discusses the expected changes from the increases in trace gases and the extent to which the expected changes can be found in the climate record and in the retreat of glaciers. The use of ice cores in correlating atmospheric composition and climate is discussed. The response of terrestrial ecosystems as a biotic feedback is discussed. Possible responses are discussed, including reduction in fossil-fuel use, controls on deforestation, and reforestation. International aspects, such as the implications for developing nations, are addressed.

  5. Biological Impacts of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarty, John P.

    Biological Impacts of Climate Change John P McCarty, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE and reproduction depend on how well adapted individuals are to local climate patterns. Climate change can disrupt subsequent impacts on populations or species' distributions across geographic regions. Climate change may

  6. Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gvirtzman, Haim

    climate and cultural changes are observed in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Near East [e.g., Bookman et1 23 Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International Journal Devoted to the Description, Causes and Implications of Climatic Change ISSN 0165-0009 Volume 112 Combined 3-4 Climatic Change (2012) 112:769-789 DOI

  7. Climate Change Adaptation Planning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This course provides an introduction to planning for climate change impacts, with examples of tribes that have been going through the adaptation planning process. The course is intended for tribal...

  8. Cool Farming: Climate impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    Cool Farming: Climate impacts of agriculture and mitigation potential greenpeace.org Campaigningfor meat categories as well as milk and selected plant products for comparison. 36 Figure 1: Total global

  9. Climate Action Plan (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There is a growing scientific consensus that increasing emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere are affecting the temperature and variability of the Earth’s climate. Recognizing the...

  10. Climate Action Plan (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On November 14, 2007, Governor Jennifer M. Granholm issued Executive Order No. 2007-42 establishing the Michigan Climate Action Council (MCAC). The Council is comprised of members representing...

  11. Refining climate models

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Warren, Jeff; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Ricciuto, Daniel

    2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Using dogwood trees, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers are gaining a better understanding of the role photosynthesis and respiration play in the atmospheric carbon dioxide cycle. Their findings will aid computer modelers in improving the accuracy of climate simulations.

  12. Climate Action Plan (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recognizing the implications that global climate change may have on the economy, environment and quality of life in Minnesota, Governor Tim Pawlenty signed into law the 2007 Next Generation Energy...

  13. Refining climate models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Jeff; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Ricciuto, Daniel

    2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Using dogwood trees, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers are gaining a better understanding of the role photosynthesis and respiration play in the atmospheric carbon dioxide cycle. Their findings will aid computer modelers in improving the accuracy of climate simulations.

  14. Climate VISION: Events

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Efficiency and CO2 Intensity Improvement (PDF 24 KB) October 24-26, 2005 12th Annual EPA Natural Gas STAR Workshop September 28-30, 2005 Climate RESOLVE GHG Management Workshop...

  15. Climate Science and Drought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas Climate Change and Drought Wendy Gordon, Ph.D. The University of Texas ? Austin Environmental Science Institute Texas Wildfires 2011 From the beginning of the fire season on November 15, 2010 to October 31, 2011 nearly 28,000 fires had... have been particularly severe due to the ongoing 2011 Southern US drought, and exacerbating the problem is land management practices, the unusual convergence of strong winds, unseasonably warm temperatures, and low humidity. Climate...

  16. Compaction Effects on Uniformity, Moisture Diffusion, and Mechanical Properties of Asphalt Pavements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kassem, Emad Abdel-Rahman Ahmed

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    in gyratory specimens were related to the mixture mechanical properties measured using the Overlay and Hamburg tests. The second part of this study focused on studying the relationship between air void distribution and moisture diffusion. A laboratory test...

  17. TEMPERATURE AND MOISTURE EFFECTS ON COMPOSITE MATERIALS FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TEMPERATURE AND MOISTURE EFFECTS ON COMPOSITE MATERIALS FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES by Mei Li A thesis graduate students in the composite materials group for their help and kindness. Finally, thanks to my dear

  18. Investigation of Conditions for Moisture Damage in Asphalt Concrete and Appropriate Laboratory Test Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Qing

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Asphalt Concrete-Physical Testing. ” Final Report, #930-of Asphalt Concrete: Chemical Testing. ” Alabama Highwayconcrete mixes, it is preferred to use a mix that would have good moisture resistance under laboratory testing

  19. Investigation of Conditions for Moisture Damage in Asphalt Concrete and Appropriate Laboratory Test Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, John T; Lu, Qing

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Asphalt Concrete-Physical Testing. ” Final Report no.of Asphalt Concrete: Chemical Testing. ” Alabama Highwayconcrete mixes, it is preferable to use a mix that would have good moisture resistance under laboratory testing

  20. Estimation of soil moisture in paddy field using Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arif, Chusnul; Setiawan, Budi Indra; Doi, Ryoichi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In paddy field, monitoring soil moisture is required for irrigation scheduling and water resource allocation, management and planning. The current study proposes an Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) model to estimate soil moisture in paddy field with limited meteorological data. Dynamic of ANN model was adopted to estimate soil moisture with the inputs of reference evapotranspiration (ETo) and precipitation. ETo was firstly estimated using the maximum, average and minimum values of air temperature as the inputs of model. The models were performed under different weather conditions between the two paddy cultivation periods. Training process of model was carried out using the observation data in the first period, while validation process was conducted based on the observation data in the second period. Dynamic of ANN model estimated soil moisture with R2 values of 0.80 and 0.73 for training and validation processes, respectively, indicated that tight linear correlations between observed and estimated values of s...

  1. OVERSTORY-IMPOSED HETEROGENEITY IN SOLAR RADIATION AND SOIL MOISTURE IN A SEMIARID WOODLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breshears, David D.; Rich, Paul M.; Barnes, Fairley J.; Katherine, Campbell

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plants and the intercanopy patches that separate them, yielding an overstory with intermediate closure. Field measurements of microclimate at the scale of canopy patches, particularly for near-ground solar radiation and soil moisture, are largely lacking...

  2. The effects of aggregate gradation on moisture diffusivity in a cementious based material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szecsy, Richard

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravel), and the presence of fly ash (10% by cement weight or none). Also developed, is an experimental laboratory procedure which measures the moisture diffusivity of a cementious material. The method and procedure for measuring diffusivity developed...

  3. PATTERNS OF LEAF WETTABILITY ALONG AN EXTREME MOISTURE GRADIENT IN WESTERN PATAGONIA, ARGENTINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brewer, Carol

    PATTERNS OF LEAF WETTABILITY ALONG AN EXTREME MOISTURE GRADIENT IN WESTERN PATAGONIA, ARGENTINA Patagonia, Argentina. Morphological and structural characteristics of leaves significantly affected leaf surfaces. Keywords: leaf wetness, morphology, water droplet, Patagonia, gradient. Introduction A large

  4. Moisture sensor based on evanescent wave light scattering by porous sol-gel silica coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, Shiquan; Singh, Jagdish P.; Winstead, Christopher B.

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical fiber moisture sensor that can be used to sense moisture present in gas phase in a wide range of concentrations is provided, as well techniques for making the same. The present invention includes a method that utilizes the light scattering phenomenon which occurs in a porous sol-gel silica by coating an optical fiber core with such silica. Thus, a porous sol-gel silica polymer coated on an optical fiber core forms the transducer of an optical fiber moisture sensor according to an embodiment. The resulting optical fiber sensor of the present invention can be used in various applications, including to sense moisture content in indoor/outdoor air, soil, concrete, and low/high temperature gas streams.

  5. The effects of soil moisture on pecan weevil emergence and predicting drought delay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schraer, Stephen Martin

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    soils. Drought conditions, induced on soil plots, as well as natural soil conditions were used to assess the effects of soil particle size distribution and soil moisture on soil hardness. Soil hardness can be determined by the following: 572...

  6. Measurement of moisture and total reducing sugars using Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehrubeoglu, Mehrube

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    industrial applications. In this project, the accuracy and feasibility of measuring moisture and total reducing sugar content in a vegetable medium using a Near Infrared Spectroscopy technique was investigated as an alternative to slow and tedious classical...

  7. The Effect of Moisture Absorption on the Physical Properties of Polyurethane Shape Memory Polymer Foams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Ya-Jen

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of moisture absorption on the glass transition temperature (Tg) and stress/strain behavior of network polyurethane shape memory polymer (SMP) foams has been investigated. With our ultimate goal of engineering polyurethane SMP foams...

  8. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Moisture

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The BigSiding Retrofit in a Cold Climate, New

  9. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Moisture

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The BigSiding Retrofit in a Cold Climate, NewManagement of

  10. MODEL 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE: IMPACT OF CAPLUG REMOVAL ON FIBERBOARD MOISTURE LEVEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.

    2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Two 9975 shipping packages were removed from KAC and provided to SRNL for test purposes, after both packages were found to exceed the 1 inch maximum criterion for the axial gap at the top of the package. Package 9975-01818 was found with an axial gap of 1.437 inch, and an estimated 2.5 liters of excess moisture in the lower fiberboard layers. Package 9975-02287 was found with an axial gap of 1.008 inch, and only slightly elevated moisture levels relative to typical packages. Prior data from the 9975 Surveillance Program has shown that the 9975 drum provides a degree of isolation, and will tend to preserve fiberboard moisture levels for an extended period of time. Both packages were provided to SRNL to identify whether removal of the 4 caplugs in each package would allow moisture to escape the package. Following testing with the caplugs removed for approximately 1 year, this report documents the findings from this effort. Two 9975 shipping packages removed from service in K-Area Complex (KAC) due to an excessive axial gap have been tested in SRNL to determine if caplug removal would facilitate the reduction of excess fiberboard moisture. An additional question to be answered through this testing was whether the resulting moisture loss would reduce the axial gap, reversing the effect seen during storage with excess moisture present. These packages have completed approximately 1 year in test, during which time the weight of each package has steadily decreased as a result of moisture migration out of the package. However, elevated moisture levels still remain in the packages. During this test period, the bottom fiberboard layers of package 9975-01818 (which contained the greater amount of excess moisture) experienced further compaction, and the axial gap of both packages has increased. This effort has shown that removal of the caplugs may not be a sufficient measure to rehabilitate packages with excess moisture or excess axial gaps in a timely manner. However, this measure might make a meaningful contribution in combination with other actions (to be determined). It is recommended that the caplug removal tests in SRNL be discontinued at this time.

  11. The influence of particle-size distribution and moisture levels on the formation of soil hardpans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Herman John

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE INFLUENCE OF PARTICLE-SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND MOISTURE LEVELS ON THE FORMATION OF SOIL HARDPANS A Thesis By HERMAN J. BAUER Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January, 1963 Major Subject: Soil Physics THE INFLUENCE OF PARTICLE-SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND MOISTURE LEVELS ON THE FORMATION OF SOIL HARDPANS A Thesis By HERMAN J. BAUER Approved as to style and content...

  12. The influence of particle-size distribution and moisture levels on the formation of soil hardpans 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Herman John

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE INFLUENCE OF PARTICLE-SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND MOISTURE LEVELS ON THE FORMATION OF SOIL HARDPANS A Thesis By HERMAN J. BAUER Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January, 1963 Major Subject: Soil Physics THE INFLUENCE OF PARTICLE-SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND MOISTURE LEVELS ON THE FORMATION OF SOIL HARDPANS A Thesis By HERMAN J. BAUER Approved as to style and content...

  13. Elemental Analyses of Hanford Surface Neutron Moisture Measurement Calibration Standard Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, W.T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Elemental analyses have been performed on twenty samples taken from the moisture standards prepared to use in performing experimental calibrations of the surface neutron moisture measurement system. These standards consisted of mixtures of sand, hydrated alumina, and boron carbide. Elemental analyses were performed primarily to discover the quantities of any strong thermal neutron absorbers that may have been present in the mixture in unknown trace quantities.

  14. Effect of external stress on moisture diffusion in an epoxy resin and its composite material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henson, Michael Chamberlain

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF EXTERNAL STRESS ON MOISTURE DIFFUSION IN AN EPOXY RESIN AND ITS C(MPOSITE MATERIAL A Thesis by MICHAEL CHAMBERLAIN HENSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subject: Civil Engineering EFFECT OF EXTERNAL STRESS ON MOISTURE DIFFUSION IN AN EPOXY RESIN AND ITS CCNPOSITE MATERIAL A Thesis by MICHAEL CHAMBERLAIN HENSON Approved as to style and content by: (Y...

  15. The effects of grain moisture content and grain temperature on the penetration of hydrogen cyanide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunz, Sidney E

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS QF CRAIN MOISTURE CONTENT AND GRAIN TEMiPERATURE ON THE &NETRATION OF HYDROGEN CYANIDE A Thesis SIDNEY EDMUND KUNZ Submitted to the Graduate School of ths Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE (Mionth) 1262 (Year) Mayor Subject ghtdlggllQJLK THE EFFECTS OF GRAIN MOISTURE CONTENT JBD GRAIN TEMPERATURE ON THE PENETRATION OF HYDROGEN CYANIDE A Thesis SIDNEY EDNUND KUNZ Approved as to style...

  16. Distribution of soil and leaf water potentials of mature grapefruit trees under three soil moisture regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prathapar, Sanmugam Ahembaranathan

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DISTRIBUTION OF SOIL AND LEAF WATER POTENTIALS OF MATURE GRAPEFRUIT TREES UNDER THREE SOIL MOISTURE REGIMES A Thesis by SANMUGAM AHEMBARANATHAN PRATHAPAP, Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Major Subject; Agricultural Engineering DISTRIBUTION OF SOIL AND LEAF WATER POTENTIALS OF MATURE GRAPEFRUIT TREES UNDER THREE SOIL MOISTURE REGIMES A Thesis by SANMUGAM AHEMBARANATHAN PRATHAPAR...

  17. Dual frequency microwave radiometer measurements of soil moisture for bare and vegetated rough surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Siu Lim

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DUAL FREQUENCY MICROWAVE RADIOMETER MEASUREMENTS OF SOIL MOISTURE FOR BARE AND VEGETATED ROUGH SURFACES A Thesis by SIU LIM LEE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A(M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering DUAL FREQUENCY MICROWAVE RADIOMETER MEASUREMENTS OF' SOIL MOISTURE FOR BARE AND VEGETATED ROUGH SURFACES A Thesis by SIU LIM LEE Approved as to style and content by: (C rman...

  18. Evaluation of oil shale bitumen as a pavement asphalt additive to reduce moisture damage susceptibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, R.E.; Harnsberger, P.M.; Wolf, J.M.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An unrefined shale bitumen was evaluated as an agent to reduce moisture damage susceptibility of asphalt aggregate mixtures. Some activity was observed but less than might have been expected based on the molecular weight and nitrogen content of the bitumen. The counter effects of free carboxylic acids, which are known to be variable in asphalt and which are also present in the unrefined bitumen, appear to diminish the activity of the bitumen to inhibit moisture damage. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Potential Soil Moisture Products from the Aquarius Radiometer and Scatterometer Using an Observing System Simulation Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yan [I.M. Systems Group at NOAA/NCEP/EMC; Feng, Xia [George Mason University; Houser, Paul [George Mason University; Anantharaj, Valentine G [ORNL; Fan, Xingang [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green; De Lannoy, Gabrielle [Ghent University, Belgium; Zhan, Xiwu [NOAA/NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research; Dabbiru, Lalitha [Mississippi State University (MSU)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE), we investigate the potential soil moisture retrieval capability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Aquarius radiometer (L-band 1.413 GHz) and scatterometer (L-band, 1.260 GHz). We estimate potential errors in soil moisture retrievals and identify the sources that could cause those errors. The OSSE system includes (i) a land surface model in the NASA Land Information System, (ii) a radiative transfer and backscatter model, (iii) a realistic orbital sampling model, and (iv) an inverse soil moisture retrieval model. We execute the OSSE over a 1000 2200 km2 region in the central United States, including the Red and Arkansas river basins. Spatial distributions of soil moisture retrieved from the radiometer and scatterometer are close to the synthetic truth. High root mean square errors (RMSEs) of radiometer retrievals are found over the heavily vegetated regions, while large RMSEs of scatterometer retrievals are scattered over the entire domain. The temporal variations of soil moisture are realistically captured over a sparely vegetated region with correlations 0.98 and 0.63, and RMSEs 1.28% and 8.23% vol/vol for radiometer and scatterometer, respectively. Over the densely vegetated region, soil moisture exhibits larger temporal variation than the truth, leading to correlation 0.70 and 0.67, respectively, and RMSEs 9.49% and 6.09% vol/vol respectively. The domain-averaged correlations and RMSEs suggest that radiometer is more accurate than scatterometer in retrieving soil moisture. The analysis also demonstrates that the accuracy of the retrieved soil moisture is affected by vegetation coverage and spatial aggregation.

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Climate/Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ClimateEnvironment ClimateEnvironment On January 27, 2011, in ClimateEnvironment Sensing and Monitoring Modeling and Analysis Carbon Management Water & Environment Publications...

  1. Climate Change Science Institute | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Science Institute SHARE Climate Change Science Institute To advance understanding of the Earth system, describe the consequences of climate change, and evaluate and...

  2. Geoengineering the Earth's Climate

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Google Tech Talks

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emergency preparedness is generally considered to be a good thing, yet there is no plan regarding what we might do should we be faced with a climate emergency. Such an emergency could take the form of a rapid shift in precipitation patterns, a collapse of the great ice sheets, the imminent triggering of strong climate system feedbacks, or perhaps the loss of valuable ecosystems. Over the past decade, we have used climate models to investigate the potential to reverse some of the effects of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere by deflecting some incoming sunlight back to space. This would probably be most cost-effectively achieved with the placement of small particles in or above the stratosphere. Our model simulations indicate that such geoengineering approaches could potentially bring our climate closer to the state is was in prior to the introduction of greenhouse gases. This talk will present much of what is known about such geoengineering approaches, and raise a range of issues likely to stimulate lively discussion. Speaker: Ken Caldeira Ken Caldeira is a scientist at the Carnegie Institution Department of Global Ecology and a Professor (by courtesy) at the Stanford University Department of Environmental and Earth System Sciences. Previously, he worked for 12 years in the Energy and Environment Directorate at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Department of Energy). His research interests include the numerical simulation of Earth's climate, carbon, and biogeochemistry; ocean acidification; climate emergency response systems; evaluating approaches to supplying environmentally-friendly energy services; ocean carbon sequestration; long-term evolution of climate and geochemical cycles; and marine biogeochemical cycles. Caldeira has a B.A. in Philosophy from Rutgers College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences from New York University.

  3. Regional climate effects of irrigation and urbanization in thewestern united states: a model intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, M.A.; Kueppers, L.M.; Sloan, L.C.; Cavan, D.C.; Jin, J.; Kanamaru, H.; Miller, N.L.; Tyree, M.; Du, H.; Weare, B.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the western United States, more than 30,500 square miles has been converted to irrigated agriculture and urban areas. This study compares the climate responses of four regional climate models (RCMs) to these past land-use changes. The RCMs used two contrasting land cover distributions: potential natural vegetation, and modern land cover that includes agriculture and urban areas. Three of the RCMs represented irrigation by supplementing soil moisture, producing large decreases in August mean (-2.5 F to -5.6 F) and maximum (-5.2 F to -10.1 F) 2-meter temperatures where natural vegetation was converted to irrigated agriculture. Conversion to irrigated agriculture also resulted in large increases in relative humidity (9 percent 36 percent absolute change). Only one of the RCMs produced increases in summer minimum temperature. Converting natural vegetation to urban land cover produced modest but discernable climate effects in all models, with the magnitude of the effects dependent upon the preexisting vegetation type. Overall, the RCM results indicate that land use change impacts are most pronounced during the summer months, when surface heating is strongest and differences in surface moisture between irrigated land and natural vegetation are largest. The irrigation effect on summer maximum temperatures is comparable in magnitude (but opposite in sign) to predicted future temperature change due to increasing greenhouse gas concentrations.

  4. NEW WORK AND STUDY OPPORTUNITIES IN CLIMATE CHANGE Climate System Analysis Group (CSAG)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    . - Postdoc: Climate modeling - Postdoc: Climate change information communication and dissemination - Research Associate: Climate change information communication and dissemination - PhD: Climate change information communication and dissemination - MSc/PhD: Physical science of climate change What to expect: Successful

  5. Debating Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Debating Climate Change explores, both theoretically and empirically, how people argue about climate change and link to each other through various elements in their arguments. As science is a central issue in the debate, the arguments of scientists and the interpretations and responses of non-scientists are important aspects of the analysis. The book first assesses current thinking about the climate change debate and current participants in the debates surrounding the issue, as well as a brief history of various groups’ involvements. Chapters 2 and 3 distill and organize various ways of framing the climate change issue. Beginning in Chapter 4, a modified classical analysis of the elements carried in an argument is used to identify areas and degrees of disagreement and agreement. One hundred documents, drawn from a wide spectrum of sources, map the topic and debate space of the climate change issue. Five elements of each argument are distilled: the authority of the writer, the evidence presented, the formulation of the argument, the worldview presented, and the actions proposed. Then a social network analysis identifies elements of the arguments that point to potential agreements. Finally, the book suggests mechanisms by which participants in the debate can build more general agreements on elements of existing agreement.

  6. Downscaled climate change impacts on agricultural water resources in Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmsen, E.W.; Miller, N.L.; Schlegel, N.J.; Gonzalez, J.E.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to estimate reference evapotranspiration (ET{sub o}), rainfall deficit (rainfall - ET{sub o}) and relative crop yield reduction for a generic crop under climate change conditions for three locations in Puerto Rico: Adjuntas, Mayaguez, and Lajas. Reference evapotranspiration is estimated by the Penman-Monteith method. Rainfall and temperature data were statistically downscaled and evaluated using the DOE/NCAR PCM global circulation model projections for the B1 (low), A2 (mid-high) and A1fi (high) emission scenarios of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emission Scenarios. Relative crop yield reductions were estimated from a function dependent water stress factor, which is a function of soil moisture content. Average soil moisture content for the three locations was determined by means of a simple water balance approach. Results from the analysis indicate that the rainy season will become wetter and the dry season will become drier. The 20-year mean 1990-2010 September rainfall excess (i.e., rainfall - ET{sub o} > 0) increased for all scenarios and locations from 149.8 to 356.4 mm for 2080-2100. Similarly, the 20-year average February rainfall deficit (i.e., rainfall - ET{sub o} < 0) decreased from a -26.1 mm for 1990-2010 to -72.1 mm for the year 2080-2100. The results suggest that additional water could be saved during the wet months to offset increased irrigation requirements during the dry months. Relative crop yield reduction did not change significantly under the B1 projected emissions scenario, but increased by approximately 20% during the summer months under the A1fi emissions scenario. Components of the annual water balance for the three climate change scenarios are rainfall, evapotranspiration (adjusted for soil moisture), surface runoff, aquifer recharge and change in soil moisture storage. Under the A1fi scenario, for all locations, annual evapotranspiration decreased owing to lower soil moisture, surface runoff decreased, and aquifer recharge increased. Aquifer recharge increased at all three locations because the majority of recharge occurs during the wet season and the wet season became wetter. This is good news from a groundwater production standpoint. Increasing aquifer recharge also suggests that groundwater levels may increase and this may help to minimize saltwater intrusion near the coasts as sea levels increase, provided that groundwater use is not over-subscribed.

  7. FINAL REPORT FOR MOISTURE EFFECTS ON COMPACTION OF FIBERBOARD IN A 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefek, T.; Daugherty, W.; Estochen, E.

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Compaction of lower layers in the fiberboard assembly has been observed in 9975 packages that contain elevated moisture. Lab testing has resulted in a better understanding of the relationship between the fiberboard moisture level and compaction of the lower fiberboard assembly, and the behavior of the fiberboard during transport. In laboratory tests of cane fiberboard, higher moisture content has been shown to correspond to higher total compaction, greater rate of compaction, and continued compaction over a longer period of time. In addition, laboratory tests have shown that the application of a dynamic load results in higher fiberboard compaction compared to a static load. The test conditions and sample geometric/loading configurations were chosen to simulate the regulatory requirements for 9975 package input dynamic loading. Dynamic testing was conducted to acquire immediate and cumulative changes in geometric data for various moisture levels. Two sample sets have undergone a complete dynamic test regimen, one set for 27 weeks, and the second set for 47 weeks. The dynamic input, data acquisition, test effects on sample dynamic parameters, and results from this test program are summarized and compared to regulatory specifications for dynamic loading. Compaction of the bottom fiberboard layers due to the accumulation of moisture is one possible cause of an increase in the axial gap at the top of the package. The net compaction of the bottom layers will directly add to the axial gap. The moisture which caused this compaction migrated from the middle region of the fiberboard assembly (which is typically the hottest). This will cause the middle region to shrink axially, which will also contribute directly to the axial gap. Measurement of the axial gap provides a screening tool for identifying significant change in the fiberboard condition. The data in this report provide a basis to evaluate the impact of moisture and fiberboard compaction on 9975 package performance during storage at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

  8. Using Whole-House Field Tests to Empirically Derive Moisture Buffering Model Inputs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, J.; Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.; Hancock, E.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building energy simulations can be used to predict a building's interior conditions, along with the energy use associated with keeping these conditions comfortable. These models simulate the loads on the building (e.g., internal gains, envelope heat transfer), determine the operation of the space conditioning equipment, and then calculate the building's temperature and humidity throughout the year. The indoor temperature and humidity are affected not only by the loads and the space conditioning equipment, but also by the capacitance of the building materials, which buffer changes in temperature and humidity. This research developed an empirical method to extract whole-house model inputs for use with a more accurate moisture capacitance model (the effective moisture penetration depth model). The experimental approach was to subject the materials in the house to a square-wave relative humidity profile, measure all of the moisture transfer terms (e.g., infiltration, air conditioner condensate) and calculate the only unmeasured term: the moisture absorption into the materials. After validating the method with laboratory measurements, we performed the tests in a field house. A least-squares fit of an analytical solution to the measured moisture absorption curves was used to determine the three independent model parameters representing the moisture buffering potential of this house and its furnishings. Follow on tests with realistic latent and sensible loads showed good agreement with the derived parameters, especially compared to the commonly-used effective capacitance approach. These results show that the EMPD model, once the inputs are known, is an accurate moisture buffering model.

  9. Sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes: Mean state and interannual variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Xiao, Heng; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes (LSP) using an atmospheric general circulation model both uncoupled (with prescribed SSTs) and coupled to an oceanic general circulation model. The emphasis is on the interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes, which have first order influence on the surface energy and water budgets. The sensitivity to those processes is represented by the differences between model simulations, in which two land surface schemes are considered: 1) a simple land scheme that specifies surface albedo and soil moisture availability, and 2) the Simplified Simple Biosphere Model (SSiB), which allows for consideration of interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical process. Observational datasets are also employed to assess the reality of model-revealed sensitivity. The mean state sensitivity to different LSP is stronger in the coupled mode, especially in the tropical Pacific. Furthermore, seasonal cycle of SSTs in the equatorial Pacific, as well as ENSO frequency, amplitude, and locking to the seasonal cycle of SSTs are significantly modified and more realistic with SSiB. This outstanding sensitivity of the atmosphere-ocean system develops through changes in the intensity of equatorial Pacific trades modified by convection over land. Our results further demonstrate that the direct impact of land-atmosphere interactions on the tropical climate is modified by feedbacks associated with perturbed oceanic conditions ("indirect effect" of LSP). The magnitude of such indirect effect is strong enough to suggest that comprehensive studies on the importance of LSP on the global climate have to be made in a system that allows for atmosphere-ocean interactions.

  10. UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National Adaptation Programme Meg Patel Defra #12 change #12;Weather & climate impacts - economic, societal, environmental Water consumption per capita;Legislative Framework Climate Change Act 2008 Adaptation Reporting Power 2011 Climate Change Risk Assessment

  11. Climate Change in Lowland Central America During the Late Deglacial and Early Holocene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillesheim, M B; Hodell, D A; Leyden, B W; Brenner, M; Curtis, J H; Anselmetti, F S; Ariztegui, D; Buck, D G; Guilderson, T P; Rosenmeier, M F; Schnurrenberger, D W

    2005-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The transition from arid glacial to moist early Holocene conditions represented a profound change in northern lowland Neotropical climate. Here we report a detailed record of changes in moisture availability during the latter part of this transition ({approx}11,250 to 7,500 cal yr BP) inferred from sediment cores retrieved in Lake Peten Itza, northern Guatemala. Pollen assemblages demonstrate that a mesic forest had been largely established by {approx}11,250 cal yr BP, but sediment properties indicate that lake level was more than 35 m below modern stage. From 11,250 to 10,350 cal yr BP, during the Preboreal period, lithologic changes in sediments from deep-water cores (>50 m below modern water level) indicate several wet-dry cycles that suggest distinct changes in effective moisture. Four dry events (designated PBE1-4) occurred at 11,200, 10,900, 10,700, and 10,400 cal yr BP and correlate with similar variability observed in the Cariaco Basin titanium record and glacial meltwater pulses into the Gulf of Mexico. After 10,350 cal yr BP, multiple sediment proxies suggest a shift to a more persistently moist early Holocene climate. Comparison of results from Lake Peten Itza with other records from the circum-Caribbean demonstrates a coherent climate response during the entire span of our record. Furthermore, lowland Neotropical climate during the late deglacial and early Holocene period appears to be tightly linked to climate change in the high-latitude North Atlantic. We speculate that the observed changes in lowland Neotropical precipitation were related to the intensity of the annual cycle and associated displacements in the mean latitudinal position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and Azores-Bermuda high-pressure system. This mechanism operated on millennial-to-submillennial timescales and may have responded to changes in solar radiation, glacial meltwater, North Atlantic sea ice, and the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC).

  12. COPENHAGEN CONSENSUS ON CLIMATE A Perspective Paper on Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    of Carbon Capture as a Response to Climate Change Roger Pielke, Jr. #12;COPENHAGEN CONSENSUS ON CLIMATE Engineering, Including an Analysis of Carbon Capture as a Response to Climate Change #12;AbstrAct PReface but not accurate. Second, it summarizes an analysis of the potential role for air capture technologies to play

  13. Climate Extremes, Uncertainty and Impacts Climate Change Challenge: The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Extremes, Uncertainty and Impacts Climate Change Challenge: The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, AR4) has resulted in a wider acceptance of global climate change climate extremes and change impacts. Uncertainties in process studies, climate models, and associated

  14. Status of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Status of Climate Change 2013 CaTee Conference San Antonio 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-56 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Menu for Today • IPCC 2013: Assessment Report #5 • Facts about Climate Change... • Who will Win, Who will Lose • What Needs to be Done ESL-KT-13-12-56 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 IPCC #5 • No great surprises - Sharper language • Uncertainties are still large • Essentially...

  15. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization2 PermitClean0ClimateClimate Change

  16. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization2 PermitClean0ClimateClimate

  17. Climate Change | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Climate Change Climate Change September 16, 2014 C3E Spotlights Women Leaders in Clean Energy Careers Women clean energy leaders convene in Boston for the Women in Clean Energy...

  18. Session Title Climate Smart Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Elizabeth A.

    Session Title Climate Smart Agriculture Session Date Khosla (moderator) Professor, Soil and Crop Sciences College of Agricultural Climate Smart Agriculture is a multi-disciplinary approach to practice agriculture

  19. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of climate change, energy security and economic stability.DoD is improving U.S. energy security and national security.www.greenpacks.org • Energy Security & Climate Change:

  20. Climate Action Plan (New Orleans)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Orleans' Climate Action Plan will provide a road map to reach the City's greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction goal by 2030 while orchestrating its adaptation to climate change. The CAP will outline...

  1. Climate Action Plan (Ontario, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Climate Ready, Ontario's Adaptation Strategy and Action Plan, outlines the problems, goals, and key strategies for the province's approach to climate change and the problems it poses. The Plan...

  2. Farming: A Climate Change Culprit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Simulations run at NERSC show impact of land-use change on African monsoon precipitation June 7, 2014 | Tags:...

  3. Climate shocks: Natural and anthropogenic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondratyev, K.Ya.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Much recent climate research has focused on the effects of CO{sub 2} and radiatively important trace species, volcanic eruptions, and nuclear exchanges on our future climate. These studies suggest that anthropogenic influence will alter our present climate. The reliability of the climate models are a subject of debate, yet valid information derived from climate models is critical for policy-makers and politicians to make decisions regarding energy use and development and defense strategies. K.Ya. Kondratyev, a leading Soviet climate scientist, addresses the role of the greenhouse effect, nuclear winter, and volcanic eruptions on our climate in a recently published book entitled Climate Shocks: Natural and Anthropogenic. The book provides a detailed survey of the literature on these fields, including the pertinent Soviet literature that is often not surveyed by Western scientists.

  4. 1, 231253, 2005 Synoptic climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    CPD 1, 231­253, 2005 Synoptic climate change as driver of New Zealand glaciation H. Rother and J / Esc Print Version Interactive Discussion EGU Climate of the Past Discussions, 1, 231­253, 2005 www.climate-of-the-past.net/cpd/1/231/ SRef-ID: 1814-9359/cpd/2005-1-231 European Geosciences Union Climate of the Past Discussions

  5. Climate Action Plan (Manitoba, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manitoba's Climate Action Plan centers around energy efficiency, although it includes mandates and initiatives for renewable sources of energy.

  6. Electronmagnetic induction probe calibration for electrical conductivity measurements and moisture content determination of Hanford high level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittekind, W.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Logic of converting EMI measured electrical conductivity to moisture with expected uncertainty. Estimates from present knowledge, assumptions, and measured data. Archie`s Law has been used since the 1940`s to relate electrical conductivity in porous media to liquid volume fraction. Measured electrical conductivity to moisture content uses: Porosity, Interstitial liquid electrical conductivity, Solid particle density,Interstitial liquid density, and interstitial liquid water content. The uncertainty of assumed values is calculated to determine the final moisture wt.% result uncertainty.

  7. Atmospheric Moisture Budget and Spatial Resolution Dependence of Precipitation Extremes in Aquaplanet Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Qing; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Rauscher, Sara; Ringler, Todd; Taylor, Mark

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates the resolution dependency of precipitation extremes in an aqua-planet framework. Strong resolution dependency of precipitation extremes is seen over both tropics and extra-tropics, and the magnitude of this dependency also varies with dynamical cores. Moisture budget analyses based on aqua-planet simulations with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) using the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) and High Order Method Modeling Environment (HOMME) dynamical cores but the same physics parameterizations suggest that during precipitation extremes moisture supply for surface precipitation is mainly derived from advective moisture convergence. The resolution dependency of precipitation extremes mainly originates from advective moisture transport in the vertical direction. At most vertical levels over the tropics and in the lower atmosphere over the subtropics, the vertical eddy transport of mean moisture field dominates the contribution to precipitation extremes and its resolution dependency. Over the subtropics, the source of moisture, its associated energy, and the resolution dependency during extremes are dominated by eddy transport of eddies moisture at the mid- and upper-troposphere. With both MPAS and HOMME dynamical cores, the resolution dependency of the vertical advective moisture convergence is mainly explained by dynamical changes (related to vertical velocity or omega), although the vertical gradients of moisture act like averaging kernels to determine the sensitivity of the overall resolution dependency to the changes in omega at different vertical levels. The natural reduction of variability with coarser resolution, represented by areal data averaging (aggregation) effect, largely explains the resolution dependency in omega. The thermodynamic changes, which likely result from non-linear feedback in response to the large dynamical changes, are small compared to the overall changes in dynamics (omega). However, after excluding the data aggregation effect in omega, thermodynamic changes become relatively significant in offsetting the effect of dynamics leading to reduce differences between the simulated and aggregated results. Compared to MPAS, the simulated stronger vertical motion with HOMME also results in larger resolution dependency. Compared to the simulation at fine resolution, the vertical motion during extremes is insufficiently resolved/parameterized at the coarser resolution even after accounting for the natural reduction in variability with coarser resolution, and this is more distinct in the simulation with HOMME. To reduce uncertainties in simulated precipitation extremes, future development in cloud parameterizations must address their sensitivity to spatial resolution as well as dynamical cores.

  8. VISUAL ANALYTICS FOR CLIMATE ANDTEXT ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    . Wednesday, April 11, 12 #12;CLIMATE DATA DELUGE Wednesday, April 11, 12 #12;CLIMATE DATA DELUGE Wednesday, April 11, 12 #12;CLIMATE DATA DELUGE Wednesday, April 11, 12 #12;CLIMATE DATA DELUGE Wednesday, April 11, 12 #12;CLIMATE DATA DELUGE Wednesday, April 11, 12 #12;CLIMATE DATA DELUGE Wednesday, April 11, 12

  9. Oregon Climate Assessment Report December 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    - Climate change and agriculture in Oregon"" " " " " 151 Chapter 5 - The potential effects of climate changeOregon Climate Assessment Report December 2010 Oregon Climate Change Research Institute #12;Oregon Climate Assessment Report December 2010 Oregon Climate Change Research Institute Recommended citation

  10. STATUS REPORT FOR MOISTURE EFFECTS ON COMPACTION OF FIBERBOARD IN A 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefek, T.; Daugherty, W.; Estochen, E.

    2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Compaction of lower layers in the fiberboard overpack has been observed in 9975 packages that contain elevated moisture. Lab testing has resulted in a better understanding of the relationship between the fiberboard moisture level and compaction of the lower fiberboard assembly, and the behavior of the fiberboard during transport. In laboratory tests, higher moisture content has been shown to correspond to higher total compaction of fiberboard material, greater rate of compaction, and continued compaction over a longer period of time. In addition, laboratory tests have shown that the application of a dynamic load results in higher fiberboard compaction. The test conditions and sample geometric/loading configurations were chosen to simulate the regulatory requirements for 9975 package input dynamic loading. Dynamic testing was conducted over a period of six months to acquire immediate and cumulative changes in geometric data for various moisture levels. Currently, one sample set has undergone a complete dynamic test regimen, while testing of another set is still in-progress. The dynamic input, data acquisition, test effects on sample dynamic parameters, and interim results from this test program are summarized and compared to regulatory specifications for dynamic loading. This will provide a basis from which to evaluate the impact of moisture and fiberboard compaction on the safety basis for transportation (Safety Analysis Report for Packaging) and storage (facility Documented Safety Analysis) at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

  11. BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report executive summary #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

  12. BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

  13. Climate Change Major information sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.ipcc.ch/ Vital Climate Graphics, at http://www.grida.no/climate/vital/ Climate Change Impacts on US, at http://www.gcrio.org/NationalAssessment/ Greenhouse Warming Prediction #12;Energy Predictions 2 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA); International Energy Agency (IEA) 2% growth per year, or doubling in 35 years (shortcut: 70/%=doubling) Fossil

  14. Climate Change Action Plan Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    Climate Change Action Plan Report Intermountain Region 2013 National Park Service Resource Stewardship and Science Landscape Conservation and Climate Change Division #12;About this Report Each National Park Service is responding to the challenge of climate change; and (2) raise awareness among NPS

  15. 4, 28752899, 2007 Climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    HESSD 4, 2875­2899, 2007 Climate change impact and model inaccuracy P. Droogers et al. Title Page are under open-access review for the journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Climate change impact­2899, 2007 Climate change impact and model inaccuracy P. Droogers et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  16. CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS, VULNERABILITIES, AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012071 Prepared for: California Energy, as well as projections of future changes in climate based on modeling studies using various plausible

  17. Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources #12;CLIMATE CHANGE SCOPING PLAN State of California Air Resources Board Resolution 08-47 December 11 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that cause global warming; WHEREAS, the adverse impacts of climate change

  18. Variation in soil moisture and N availability modulates carbon and water exchange in a California grassland experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St. Clair, S.B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in soil moisture and N availability modulates carbon andamount and timing, N availability, and plant communityparticularly as water availability was increased. These

  19. CLIMATE POLICY The Planet's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falge, Eva

    CLIMATE POLICY The Planet's Laundromat The Planet's Laundromat ANTHROPOLOGY Rukina's Remarkable Planck Society's Science Express last fall as it began its trip through India. India's Prime Minister Man). As a mem- ber of the German delegation, the visit afford- ed me the opportunity to learn more about India

  20. ENERGY, CLIMATE AND SUSTAINABLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENERGY, CLIMATE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT NAMAs and the Carbon Market Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions of developing countries PersPectives series 2009 #12;NAMAs and the Carbon MarketPPrOPriate MitigatiON actiONs: china's experience and Perspective . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Fei

  1. Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL INTEREST Sandia Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND 2012-1846P CustomTraining Sandia providesPRAsandhowtheycanbemanaged to increase levels of safety and security. Like othertrainings,Sandiaexpertsdesigncoursesto beasbroadorin

  2. COLORADO CLIMATE Basic Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or cold, wetness or dryness, calm or storm, clearness or cloudiness Climate - the statistical collection;The Earth's Energy Balance Incoming energy from the sun (solar radiation) heats the Earth Some by the Earth and re-emitted Incoming solar radiation is shorter wavelengths (higher energy) than what

  3. aerosols and climate : uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contributes to creating a level playing field. (BC emissions tradeble like CO2 emissions?) OUTLINE #12;size. policy measures, is even more uncertain (emissions & their chemical fingerprint are uncertain (not just aerosol emissions, not just climate impacts) OUTLINE #12;- Standardization doesn't reduce

  4. Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk Forum 2012 A Joint Program with LA RIMS Education Day Rethinking Catastrophic Risk in Risk Management: Earthquake-Related Challenges Featuring: Keynote Speaker Dr. Frank Beuthin, Willis Group Holdings Plc. Yohei Miyamoto, Aon Risk Solutions Curtis deVera, Marsh

  5. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

  6. Low-temperature conversion of high-moisture biomass: Topical report, January 1984--January 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Elliott, D.C.; Butner, R.S.; Neuenschwander, G.G.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing a low-temperature, catalytic process that converts high-moisture biomass feedstocks and other wet organic substances to useful gaseous and liquid fuels. The advantage of this process is that it works without the need for drying or dewatering the feedstock. Conventional thermal gasification processes, which require temperatures above 750/degree/C and air or oxygen for combustion to supply reaction heat, generally cannot utilize feedstocks with moisture contents above 50 wt %, as the conversion efficiency is greatly reduced as a result of the drying step. For this reason, anaerobic digestion or other bioconversion processes traditionally have been used for gasification of high-moisture feedstocks. However, these processes suffer from slow reaction rates and incomplete carbon conversion. 50 refs., 21 figs., 22 tabs.

  7. ANALYSIS OF THE AXIAL GAP VS FIBERBOARD MOISTURE CONTENT IN A 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The fiberboard assembly within a 9975 shipping package contains a modest amount of moisture, which can migrate to the cooler regions of the package when an internal heat load is present. Typically, this leads to increased moisture levels in the bottom fiberboard layers, along with elevated chloride levels which can leach from the fiberboard. Concerns have been raised that this condition could lead to corrosion of the stainless steel drum. It has been postulated that checking the axial gap at the top of the package against the current 1 inch maximum criterion provides a sufficient indication regarding the integrity of the fiberboard and drum. This report estimates the increase in axial gap that might be expected for a given moisture increase in the bottom fiberboard layers, and the likelihood that the increase will create a nonconforming condition that will lead to identification of the moisture increase. Using data relating the fiberboard moisture content with the degree of compaction under load, the present analysis indicates that the axial gap will increase by 0.282 inch as the bottom fiberboard layers approach the saturation point. This increase will cause approximately 58% of packages with otherwise nominal package component dimensions to fail the axial gap criterion, based on a survey of axial gap values recorded in K-Area surveillance activities. As the moisture content increases above saturation, the predicted increase in axial gap jumps to 0.405 inch, which would result in 92% or more of all packages failing the axial gap criterion. The data and analysis described in this report are specific to cane fiberboard. While it is expected that softwood fiberboard will behave similarly, such behavior has not yet been demonstrated.

  8. Tropical synoptic scale moisture fields observed from the Nimbus-7 SMMR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fink, Jeffrey David

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TROPICAL SYNOPTIC SCALE MOISTURE FIELDS OBSERVED FROM THE NIMBUS ? 7 SMMR A Thesis by JEFFREY DAVID FINK Submitted to the OfFice of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... ( iliember) AIarshnll J. 1VIcVnrlnnd ( (tlemb er ) James Il. Scoggins (Read of Departnrent) i%lay 1989 ns ABSTRACT Tropical Synoptic Scale Moisture Fields Observed from the NIMBUS ? 7 SMMR. (May 1989) Jefl'rey David Fink, B. S. , Texas A...

  9. Study of the moisture-fertility requirements of cotton in the Brazos River Valley, 1957

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keese, Carroll Wayne

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the moisture level imposed, and that water was not used efficiently from the two to five-foot zone. Hamilton and Stanberry (2) investigated the effects of varying rates of nitrogen fertilizer on the need of cotton for irrigation at Yuma, Arizona...LIBRARY II a III COLLEI:. e& 7EXAs STUDY OF THE MOISTURE-FERTILITY REQUIREMENTS OF COTTON IN THE BRAZOS RIVER VALLEY - 1957 A Thesis by CARROLL VIAYNE KEESE Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College...

  10. The effects of soil moisture on the phytotoxicity of a microwave field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whatley, Thomas Lamar

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THF. FFFECTS OF SOIL MOISTURE ON THE PHYTOTOXICITY OF A MICROWAVE FIELD A Thesis THOMAS LAMAR WHATLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1974 Ma5or Sub)ect: Agronomy THE EFFECTS OF SOIL MOISTURE ON THE PHYTOTOXICITY OF A MICROHAVE FIELD A Thesis by THOMAS LAMAR VHATLEY Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) Member) ( t) August...

  11. A climatology of tropical moisture bursts in the eastern North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Neil Ray

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CLIil'IATOLOGY OF TROFICAL MOISTURE BURSTS IN THF. EASTERN NORTH PACIFIC OCEAN A Theseus NEIL R A Y SMITH Submitted to the Graduate College of' Texas AKIil University in partial fulfil)nient of the requirements I'o. the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1986 M;i;iir Subject: Meteorology A CLIMATOLOGY OF TROPICAL MOISTURE BURSTS IN THE EASTERN NORTH PACIFIC OCEAN A Thesis NEIL RAY SMITH Approved as to style and content by: James P. McE uirk (Co-Chairman) ylmer H, Thompson (Co...

  12. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008). "Accountability of networked climate governance: Therise of transnational climate partnerships." GlobalBoard. CARB (2008d). Climate change proposed scoping plan: a

  13. Climate Change in the South American Monsoon System: Present Climate and CMIP5 Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Charles; Carvalho, Leila M. V

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lau, 1998: Does a monsoon climate exist over South America?J. Climate, 11, 1020–1040.America monsoon system. Climate Dyn. , 36, 1865–1880, doi:

  14. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Board. CARB (2008d). Climate change proposed scoping plan: aJ. (2009). "Cities, Climate Change and Urban Heat Islandet al. (2006). Climate change in California: health,

  15. Bringing climate change down to earth : science and participation in Canadian and Australian climate change campaigns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padolsky, Miriam Elana

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    about Global Climate Change. Public Understanding of ScienceFoundation. 2005a. Climate Change: A Matter of SurvivalFoundation. 2005b. Climate Change > Actions 2005 [cited 10

  16. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    impacts of climate change on California agriculture. Climateby climate change in California, such as agriculture areas agriculture. Without proactive climate change mitigation

  17. Climate Survey Original TemplateClimate Survey Original TemplateClimate Survey Original TemplateClimate Survey Original Template The Chair of the Department of DEPT NAME, NAME, is dedicated to improving workplace climate in your office. As part

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Climate Survey Original TemplateClimate Survey Original TemplateClimate Survey Original TemplateClimate Survey Original Template The Chair of the Department of DEPT NAME, NAME, is dedicated to improving Survey Original TemplateClimate Survey Original TemplateClimate Survey Original TemplateClimate Survey

  18. Climate-Energy Nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Sayler; Randall Gentry; Jie Zhuang

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 140-page published proceedings of the workshop include individual articles and PowerPoint slides for all workshop presentations. The proceedings also contain pertinent background information on the China-US Joint Research Center, partnering organizations, and workshop goals and objectives. Overall, the workshop increased the understanding of the impacts of climate change on energy use and renewable energy production as well as the complex relationships among land use, energy production, and ecological restoration. The workshop served as an international platform for scientists and students of different research backgrounds to develop a unified perspective on energy and climate relationships. Such understanding will benefit future cooperation between China and the US in mitigating global climate change. The workshop’s agenda, which is highly interdisciplinary, explored many potential opportunities for international collaboration in ecosystem management, climate modeling, greenhouse gas emissions, and bioenergy sustainability. International research groups have been suggested in the areas of genomes and biotechnology of energy plants, sustainable management of soil and water resources, carbon sequestration, and microbial processes for ecological cycles. The project has attracted considerable attention from institutes beyond the China-US Joint Research Center partners, and several of them (such as Institute of Qing-Tibet Plateau Research, Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Institute of Applied Ecology, CAS) have expressed interest in joining the partnership. In addition, the workshop played a significant role in facilitating establishment of private-public partnerships between government and private bioenergy companies (such as L.R. Shugarts and Associates, Inc.), including seed providers (Blade Energy Crops, Thousand Oaks, CA), pilot demonstration projects at coal-producing cities (e.g., Huaibei, Anhui province, China), and the development of methodology for assessment of the sustainable production of biofuels (such as life-cycle analysis, sustainability metrics, and land-use policy). Establishment of two US-China scientific research networks in the area of bioenergy and environmental science is a significant result of the workshop.

  19. Examining the Relationship between Antecedent Soil Moisture and Summer Precipitation in the U.S. Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Lei

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................................................................. 67 5.2 Spatial variations in the soil moisture-precipitation relationship............ 67 5.3 Temporal variations in the soil moisture-precipitation relationship ....... 71 5.4 Persistence of spatial patterns in SM anomalies... ..................................... 74 5.5 Temporal variations in the relationship between GP summer precipitation and Ni?o SSTs ................................................................... 75 5.6 SST persistence versus SM persistence...

  20. Effect of grid size on runoff and soil moisture for a variable-source-area hydrology model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    landscapes are dependent on the distribution and pattern of soil moisture and water transport. In this paper for efficient manage- ment of water quality [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1994, 1995, 1996Effect of grid size on runoff and soil moisture for a variable-source-area hydrology model Wen

  1. Carbon dioxide and climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific and public interest in greenhouse gases, climate warming, and global change virtually exploded in 1988. The Department's focused research on atmospheric CO{sub 2} contributed sound and timely scientific information to the many questions produced by the groundswell of interest and concern. Research projects summarized in this document provided the data base that made timely responses possible, and the contributions from participating scientists are genuinely appreciated. In the past year, the core CO{sub 2} research has continued to improve the scientific knowledge needed to project future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations, to estimate climate sensitivity, and to assess the responses of vegetation to rising concentrations of CO{sub 2} and to climate change. The Carbon Dioxide Research Program's goal is to develop sound scientific information for policy formulation and governmental action in response to changes of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1990 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments.

  2. The role of large-scale, extratropical dynamics in climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepherd, T.G. [ed.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The climate modeling community has focused recently on improving our understanding of certain processes, such as cloud feedbacks and ocean circulation, that are deemed critical to climate-change prediction. Although attention to such processes is warranted, emphasis on these areas has diminished a general appreciation of the role played by the large-scale dynamics of the extratropical atmosphere. Lack of interest in extratropical dynamics may reflect the assumption that these dynamical processes are a non-problem as far as climate modeling is concerned, since general circulation models (GCMs) calculate motions on this scale from first principles. Nevertheless, serious shortcomings in our ability to understand and simulate large-scale dynamics exist. Partly due to a paucity of standard GCM diagnostic calculations of large-scale motions and their transports of heat, momentum, potential vorticity, and moisture, a comprehensive understanding of the role of large-scale dynamics in GCM climate simulations has not been developed. Uncertainties remain in our understanding and simulation of large-scale extratropical dynamics and their interaction with other climatic processes, such as cloud feedbacks, large-scale ocean circulation, moist convection, air-sea interaction and land-surface processes. To address some of these issues, the 17th Stanstead Seminar was convened at Bishop`s University in Lennoxville, Quebec. The purpose of the Seminar was to promote discussion of the role of large-scale extratropical dynamics in global climate change. Abstracts of the talks are included in this volume. On the basis of these talks, several key issues emerged concerning large-scale extratropical dynamics and their climatic role. Individual records are indexed separately for the database.

  3. SOIL MOISTURE RETENTION CHARACTERISTICS AND HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY FOR DIFFERENT AREAS IN INDIA IN SELECTED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    systems require knowledge of the relationships between soil moisture content (), soil water pressure (h and water content relationship, hydraulic conductivity and water content relationship of the soil, saturated conductivity is affected markedly by the volumetric water content of soil. The relation between matric

  4. MOISTURE EFFECT ON DURABILITY OF AXIALLY LOADED CONCRETE-FILLED TUBULAR FRP PILES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MOISTURE EFFECT ON DURABILITY OF AXIALLY LOADED CONCRETE-FILLED TUBULAR FRP PILES Miguel Pando, Ph_rizkalla@ncsu.edu ABSTRACT Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite piles are a possible foundation alternative for projects located in harsh marine environments. Problems associated with traditional pile materials used in harsh

  5. Feasibility study of prompt gamma neutron activation for NDT measurement of moisture in stone and brick

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, R. A.; Al-Sheikhly, M. [Materials Science and Engineering Dept., U. of Maryland, College Park MD 20742 (United States); Grissom, C.; Aloiz, E. [Museum Conservation Institute, Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC 20746 (United States); Paul, R. [Chemical Sciences Division, NIST, Gaithersburg MD 20899 (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The conservation of stone and brick architecture or sculpture often involves damage caused by moisture. The feasibility of a NDT method based on prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA) for measuring the element hydrogen as an indication of water is being evaluated. This includes systematic characterization of the lithology and physical properties of seven building stones and one brick type used in the buildings of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. To determine the required dynamic range of the NDT method, moisture-related properties were measured by standard methods. Cold neutron PGNA was also used to determine chemically bound water (CBW) content. The CBW does not damage porous masonry, but creates an H background that defines the minimum level of detection of damaging moisture. The CBW was on the order of 0.5% for all the stones. This rules out the measurement of hygric processes in all of the stones and hydric processed for the stones with fine scale pore-size distributions The upper bound of moisture content, set by porosity through water immersion, was on the order of 5%. The dynamic range is about 10–20. The H count rates were roughly 1–3 cps. Taking into account differences in neutron energies and fluxes and sample volume between cold PGNA and a portable PGNA instrument, it appears that it is feasible to apply PGNA in the field.

  6. A Satellite Study of Tropical Moist Convection and Environmental Variability: A Moisture and Thermal Budget Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masunaga, Hirohiko

    radiometer and scatterometer aboard different platforms. Satellite measurements of atmospheric parameters of moisture and dry static energy and their vertical flux at cloud base from satellite observations alone convergence for highly organized systems; 2) FT diabatic heating is largely offset on an instantaneous basis

  7. Passive microwave soil moisture downscaling using evaporative fraction Olivier Merlin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    stations (METFLUX) and six flights of the L-band Push Broom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR). For each PBMR fraction (EF), which is the ratio of the evapotranspiration to the total energy available at the surface, especially for high soil moisture values. Those results illustrate the potential use of high

  8. Evaluation of ERS Scatterometer soil moisture products over a half-degree region in Southwestern France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . Based on a high resolution soil moisture simulation (1km²) validated at the local scale, the ERS in the water and energy exchanges between the land surface and the atmosphere. Several authors have shown027231 #12;Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sensors such as the AMSR-E radiometer (since 2002

  9. Soil moisture variability of root zone profiles within SMEX02 remote sensing footprints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as the par- titioning of incoming solar radiation and long wave radia- tion into outgoing long wave radiation.e., various active and passive microwave sensors), which provide mean sur- face soil moisture (0­5 cm) values footprints can provide a blueprint to design ground-based experiments and net- works and to efficiently use

  10. Characterization of fracture patterns and hygric properties for moisture flow modelling in cracked concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of building materials is far from complete. The pore structure of the material itself may change over time assessment, not only of building and building components, but of any built structure in general structures, as well as on the health and comfort of their occupants. Any analysis of moisture transfer

  11. ASSESSMENT OF BISCUIT MOISTURE AND BISCUIT BROWNING Jens Michael Carstensen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    weight moisture measurements. The data set includes biscuits from different lines and both hot and cooled. The imaging system, VideometerLab (www.videometer.com) captures 18 high resolution spectral images representations may be estimated in both the biscuit center region and in the edge/corner region. CIELAB

  12. Uncertainties in Estimating Moisture Fluxes over the Intra-Americas Sea ALBERTO M. MESTAS-NUEZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by these uncertainties. Therefore, NCEP­ NCAR reanalysis, with its global coverage and long-term record, can be used-third of all the summer moisture that enters the continental United States is transported by the GPLLJ (Helfand United States. Future re- search aimed at understanding summer precipitation must therefore deal

  13. Monitoring ET, Soil Moisture Saves Farmers Water, Energy, Time and Money

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Monitoring ET, Soil Moisture Saves Farmers Water, Energy, Time and Money By Sandi Alswager Karstens irrigation," said Gary Zoubek, extension educator in York County. "Using these tools not only saves energy that these two tools used together can save two to three inches of irrigation water per season, he said

  14. Fuel moisture influences on fire-altered carbon in masticated fuels: An experimental study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ] Biomass burning is a significant contributor to atmospheric carbon emissions but may also provide mastication (mechanical forest thinning) and fire convert biomass to black carbon is essential moisture and its role in dictating both the quantity and quality of the carbon produced in masticated fuel

  15. Evapotranspiration and regional probabilities of soil moisture stress in rainfed crops, southern India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biggs, Trent

    India Trent W. Biggs a, *, Prasanta K. Mishra b , Hugh Turral c a Department of Geography, San Diego 0902; fax: +1 619 594 4938. E-mail addresses: tbiggs@mail.sdsu.edu (T.W. Biggs), pkmbellary in press as: Biggs, T.W. et al., Evapotranspiration and regional probabilities of soil moisture stress

  16. The effects of moisture and particle size of feedlot biomass on co-firing burner performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chen-Jung

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    increased from 350 ppm to 650 ppm while CO decreased from 46,000 ppm to 18,000 ppm (data measured at the first probe, 6" from the burner). The external water injection used to simulate high moisture FB decreased the pollutant emissions (NO[]) from 570 ppm...

  17. Modeling studies of gas movement and moisture migration at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Y.W.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling studies on moisture redistribution processes that are mediated by gas phase flow and diffusion have been carried out. The problem addressed is the effect of a lowered humidity of the soil gas at the land surface on moisture removal from Yucca Mountain, the potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. At the land surface, humid formation gas contacts much drier atmospheric air. Near this contact, the humidity of the soil gas may be considerably lower than at greater depth, where the authors expect equilibrium with the liquid phase and close to 100% humidity. The lower relative humidity of the soil gas may be modeled by imposing, at the land surface, an additional negative capillary suction corresponding to vapor pressure lowering according to Kelvin`s Equation, thus providing a driving force for the upward movement of moisture in both the vapor and liquid phases. Sensitivity studies show that moisture removal from Yucca Mountain arising from the lowered-relative-humidity boundary condition is controlled by vapor diffusion. There is much experimental evidence in the soil literature that diffusion of vapor is enhanced due to pore-level phase change effects by a few orders of magnitude. Modeling results presented here will account for this enhancement in vapor diffusion.

  18. UNCORRECTEDPROOF 1 Towards deterministic downscaling of SMOS soil moisture using MODIS derived soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of environmental applications including meteor- 33 ology, hydrology, water resource management and climatology. 34UNCORRECTEDPROOF 1 Towards deterministic downscaling of SMOS soil moisture using MODIS derived soil Kerr b 4 a Civil and Environmental Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Australia 5 b Centre d

  19. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team) : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Anthropogenic climate change studies: scenario experiments (96) : : : : : : : : : 7 2 following its creation, the ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' team had to make its proofs in order

  20. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change of the tropical climate : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Short­term variability studies : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 8 2.3 Climate drift sensitivity studies

  1. Hillslope-scale soil moisture estimation with a physically-based ecohydrology model and L-band microwave remote sensing observations from space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores, Alejandro Nicolas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil moisture is a critical hydrosphere state variable that links the global water, energy, and carbon cycles. Knowledge of soil moisture at scales of individual hillslopes (10's to 100's of meters) is critical to advancing ...

  2. Presented by Climate Extremes: The Science,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of climate change and impacts · Feedback among climate, land use, and population distribution · Climate Severe storms projected to grow more intense and frequent with changing climate 1. Observed trends match climate patterns and changing likelihoods of severe events, may bridge the gap · The challenge in going

  3. 4, 173211, 2008 Climate and glacier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    CPD 4, 173­211, 2008 Climate and glacier response to ENSO in subtropical Andes E. Dietze et al.0 License. Climate of the Past Discussions Climate of the Past Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Climate of the Past Response of regional climate and glacier ice proxies to El Ni

  4. Climate Change Adaptation for Local Government

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Climate Change Adaptation for Local Government A Resource Guide June 2011 Jenny Fraser, Adaptation to Climate Change Team, Simon Fraser University #12;Page 1 of 26 Climate Change Adaptation for Local: RESOURCES THAT SUPPORT CLIMATE CHANGE ASSESSMENT 3. Past and Future Climate Change and Its Impacts 4

  5. Climate Change and Tourism Dr David Viner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    Climate Change and Tourism éCLAT Dr David Viner Climatic Research Unit University of East Anglia d.viner@uea.ac.uk Tourism has a strong international dimension and is sensitive to any changes of climate that alter to attract visitors are likely to be vulnerable to climate change and the implementation of climate change

  6. CLIMATE CHANGE: Past, Present and Future: Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    CLIMATE CHANGE: Past, Present and Future: Introduction Richard Allan, Department of Meteorology r.p.allan@reading.ac.uk #12;Text Books and References · Henson, B., Rough Guide to Climate Change http://www.amazon.co.uk/Climate-Change-Guides-Reference- Titles/dp/1858281059 · Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Climate Change 2007, www

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Climate Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    limit economic development, impact interdependent infrastructure (such as energy and agriculture), and are a fundamental source of ... Climate Security On May 13, 2011, in...

  8. Climate Action Plan (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Governor Sanford issued Executive Order 2007-04 on February 16, 2007, establishing the South Carolina Climate, Energy and Commerce Advisory Committee (CECAC).

  9. Climate VISION: How to Participate

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    companies on the Climate VISION website. Many of these resources - including case studies, training courses, and more - are available to any company. We encourage your...

  10. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Impacts on California’s Water Supply Source Medellin-AzuaraClimate Change on Yields and Water use of Major Californiawith Less: Agricultural Water Conservation and Efficiency in

  11. Climate Action Plan (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recognizing the profound implications that global warming and climate variation could have on the economy, environment and quality of life in the Southwest, New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson...

  12. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    seas, droughts and fresh water shortages. ? Risk Assessmentinse- curity, water and food shortages, and climate-drivenalso struggle with shortages in fresh water, food and other

  13. Massachusetts Takes On Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimmell, Ken; Laurie, Burt

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consumers and business with their energy costs by removingintegrated energy and climate policies lead to real businessas for energy efficiency measures in homes, businesses and

  14. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climate change is coal gasification, which can make theworld leaders in coal gasification tech- nology, has beenexperimenting with "in situ" gasification, where the coal is

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Climate change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research effort. Created to help resolve scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, ARM focuses on studying the role of clouds and aerosols in atmospheric and...

  16. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climate change is coal gasification, which can make thethe world leaders in coal gasification tech- nology, haswill not occur. If not coal gasification, then perhaps fuel

  17. Long-term climate variability and abrupt climate change Instructor: Dr. Igor Kamenkovich, associate professor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Long-term climate variability and abrupt climate change Instructor: Dr. Igor Kamenkovich, associate students to learn about existing theories of abrupt climate changes and climate variability on time scales of long-term climate variability and abrupt climate change. This course compliments current MPO courses

  18. Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment Hydrology, Earth Science and Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    · GRACE and Geophysics ­ 2004 Sumatra Earthquake · GRACE and Climate Change ­ East Greenland Melting ­ Observe changes with unprecidented accuracy GRACE can not discriminate between sources/causes Water: Atmosphere (Transport of water, pressure) Climate (Glaciers, Ice mass melting -> Run off) Hydrology

  19. Sea Level Rise Adaptation: From Climate Chaos to Climate Resilience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    Sea Level Rise Adaptation: From Climate Chaos to Climate Resilience Human Dimensions and Ocean, 2013 #12;Main Discussion Points · How do we incorporate Sea-Level Rise into planning and regulatory actions? · What Does the new NRC Report on Sea- Level Rise mean to Decision-makers? · How does Sea-Level

  20. Climate Change Response

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1. FeedstockCLEAN AIR ACT §CleantechClimate ChangeInterior

  1. Climate Data Operators (CDO)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization2 PermitClean0Climate Change: Effects

  2. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization2 PermitClean0Climate

  3. Sandia Energy - Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcomeLong Lifetime of KeyCarbonSandiaClimate

  4. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related Links Facilities andPastWritten Records5 ARM Climate

  5. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related Links Facilities andPastWritten Records5 ARM Climate3 ARM

  6. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related Links Facilities andPastWritten Records5 ARM Climate3 ARM

  7. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related Links Facilities andPastWritten Records5 ARM Climate3

  8. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related Links Facilities andPastWritten Records5 ARM Climate38

  9. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related Links Facilities andPastWritten Records5 ARM Climate383

  10. Effects of Material Moisture Adsorption and Desorption on Building Cooling Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairey, P.; Kosar, D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ventilation of buildings in hot, humid climates has been shown to induce higher latent loads and higher room relative humidities during periods following the ventilation....

  11. Climate Change and National Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is increasingly recognized as having national security implications, which has prompted dialogue between the climate change and national security communities – with resultant advantages and differences. Climate change research has proven useful to the national security community sponsors in several ways. It has opened security discussions to consider climate as well as political factors in studies of the future. It has encouraged factoring in the stresses placed on societies by climate changes (of any kind) to help assess the potential for state stability. And it has shown that, changes such as increased heat, more intense storms, longer periods without rain, and earlier spring onset call for building climate resilience as part of building stability. For the climate change research community, studies from a national security point of view have revealed research lacunae, for example, such as the lack of usable migration studies. This has also pushed the research community to consider second- and third-order impacts of climate change, such as migration and state stability, which broadens discussion of future impacts beyond temperature increases, severe storms, and sea level rise; and affirms the importance of governance in responding to these changes. The increasing emphasis in climate change science toward research in vulnerability, resilience, and adaptation also frames what the intelligence and defense communities need to know, including where there are dependencies and weaknesses that may allow climate change impacts to result in security threats and where social and economic interventions can prevent climate change impacts and other stressors from resulting in social and political instability or collapse.

  12. Editors Kirsten Halsns & Amit Garg ENERGY, CLIMATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editors Kirsten Halsnæs & Amit Garg ENERGY, CLIMATE Sustainable Development, Energy and Climate Development, Energy and Climate Exploring Synergies and Tradeoffs Methodological Issues and Case Studies from Brazil, China, India, South Africa, Bangladesh and Senegal Editors Kirsten Halsnæs & Amit Garg ENERGY

  13. POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON FLOODING IN WISCONSIN Ken Potter and Zach Schuster flood scenarios in Wisconsin · Potential impact of climate change on Wisconsin flooding · Ongoing #12;WISCONSIN INITIATIVE ON CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS · Partnership between the University of Wisconsin

  14. Climate Change and Place Roundtable Discussion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Urban Development and Climate Change,” 2007. The fullThink about what runaway climate change would mean where youWorld Changing Seattle, WA Climate change is global in scale

  15. CLIMATE VULNERABILITY AND ADAPTATION STUDY FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE VULNERABILITY AND ADAPTATION STUDY FOR CALIFORNIA Legal Analysis of Barriers's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012019 Prepared for: California Energy Commission to that framework that would facilitate adaptation to climate change. Since such changes may be difficult

  16. Climate Workshops for Department Chairs Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    #12;Climate Workshops for Department Chairs Introduction Why focus on Department Chairs? Goals participating departments Evidence from Campus-wide Climate Surveys #12;Why focus on Department Chairs? Individuals experience climate in their immediate workplace ­ the department Chairs can significantly

  17. Climate policy and dependence on traded carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew, Robbie M; Davis, Steven J; Peters, Glen P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contact us My IOPscience Climate policy and dependence on10.1088/1748-9326/8/3/034011 Climate policy and dependenceCenter for International Climate and Environmental Research—

  18. CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION: PHYSIOLOGY, LIFE HISTORY, AND ECOSYSTEM CHANGE A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center of the uncertainties with climate change effects on terrestrial ecosystems is understanding where transitions

  19. ATNI Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians is hosting the Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change. This two-day conference will discuss climate change impacts, policy on climate change, tribal needs, funding opportunities, and more.

  20. Dissemination of Climate Model Output to the Public and Commercial Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Stockwell, PhD

    2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate is defined by the Glossary of Meteorology as the mean of atmospheric variables over a period of time ranging from as short as a few months to multiple years and longer. Although the term climate is often used to refer to long-term weather statistics, the broader definition of climate is the time evolution of a system consisting of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere. Physical, chemical, and biological processes are involved in interactions among the components of the climate system. Vegetation, soil moisture, and glaciers are part of the climate system in addition to the usually considered temperature and precipitation (Pielke, 2008). Climate change refers to any systematic change in the long-term statistics of climate elements (such as temperature, pressure, or winds) sustained over several decades or longer. Climate change can be initiated by external forces, such as cyclical variations in the Earth's solar orbit that are thought to have caused glacial and interglacial periods within the last 2 million years (Milankovitch, 1941). However, a linear response to astronomical forcing does not explain many other observed glacial and interglacial cycles (Petit et al., 1999). It is now understood that climate is influenced by the interaction of solar radiation with atmospheric greenhouse gasses (e.g., carbon dioxide, chlorofluorocarbons, methane, nitrous oxide, etc.), aerosols (airborne particles), and Earth's surface. A significant aspect of climate are the interannual cycles, such as the El Nino La Nina cycle which profoundly affects the weather in North America but is outside the scope of weather forecasts. Some of the most significant advances in understanding climate change have evolved from the recognition of the influence of ocean circulations upon the atmosphere (IPCC, 2007). Human activity can affect the climate system through increasing concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases, air pollution, increasing concentrations of aerosol, and land alteration. A particular concern is that atmospheric levels of CO{sub 2} may be rising faster than at any time in Earth's history, except possibly following rare events like impacts from large extraterrestrial objects (AMS, 2007). Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations have increased since the mid-1700s through fossil fuel burning and changes in land use, with more than 80% of this increase occurring since 1900. The increased levels of CO{sub 2} will remain in the atmosphere for hundreds to thousands of years. The complexity of the climate system makes it difficult to predict specific aspects of human-induced climate change, such as exactly how and where changes will occur, and their magnitude. The Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) was established by World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the United Nations in 1988. The IPCC was tasked with assessing the scientific, technical and socioeconomic information needed to understand the risk of human-induced climate change, its observed and projected impacts, and options for adaptation and mitigation. The IPCC concluded in its Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) that warming of the climate system is unequivocal, and that most of the observed increase in globally averaged temperatures since the mid-20th century is very likely due to the observed increased in anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations (IPCC, 2007).

  1. Final Report on Evaluating the Representation and Impact of Convective Processes in the NCAR Community Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X. Wu, G. J. Zhang

    2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection and clouds affect atmospheric temperature, moisture and wind fields through the heat of condensation and evaporation and through redistributions of heat, moisture and momentum. Individual clouds have a spatial scale of less than 10 km, much smaller than the grid size of several hundred kilometers used in climate models. Therefore the effects of clouds must be approximated in terms of variables that the model can resolve. Deriving such formulations for convection and clouds has been a major challenge for the climate modeling community due to the lack of observations of cloud and microphysical properties. The objective of our DOE CCPP project is to evaluate and improve the representation of convection schemes developed by PIs in the NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and study its impact on global climate simulations. • The project resulted in nine peer-reviewed publications and numerous scientific presentations that directly address the CCPP’s scientific objective of improving climate models. • We developed a package of improved convection parameterization that includes improved closure, trigger condition for convection, and comprehensive treatment of convective momentum transport. • We implemented the new convection parameterization package into several versions of the NCAR models (both coupled and uncoupled). This has led to 1) Improved simulation of seasonal migration of ITCZ; 2) Improved shortwave cloud radiative forcing response to El Niño in CAM3; 3) Improved MJO simulation in both uncoupled and coupled model; and 4) Improved simulation of ENSO in coupled model. • Using the dynamic core of CCM3, we isolated the dynamic effects of convective momentum transport. • We implemented mosaic treatment of subgrid-scale cloud-radiation interaction in CCM3.

  2. Effect of process variables on the density and durability of the pellets made from high moisture corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat die pellet mill was used to understand the effect of high levels of feedstock moisture content in the range of 28–38% (w.b.), with die rotational speeds of 40–60 Hz, and preheating temperatures of 30–110 °C on the pelleting characteristics of 4.8 mm screen size ground corn stover using an 8 mm pellet die. The physical properties of the pelletised biomass studied are: (a) pellet moisture content, (b) unit, bulk and tapped density, and (c) durability. Pelletisation experiments were conducted based on central composite design. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that feedstock moisture content influenced all of the physical properties at P < 0.001. Pellet moisture content decreased with increase in preheating temperature to about 110 °C and decreasing the feedstock moisture content to about 28% (w.b.). Response surface models developed for quality attributes with respect to process variables has adequately described the process with coefficient of determination (R2) values of >0.88. The other pellet quality attributes such as unit, bulk, tapped density, were maximised at feedstock moisture content of 30–33% (w.b.), die speeds of >50 Hz and preheating temperature of >90 °C. In case of durability a medium moisture content of 33–34% (w.b.) and preheating temperatures of >70 °C and higher die speeds >50 Hz resulted in high durable pellets. It can be concluded from the present study that feedstock moisture content, followed by preheating, and die rotational speed are the interacting process variables influencing pellet moisture content, unit, bulk and tapped density and durability.

  3. Hydrologic Response to Climate Variability, Climate Change, and Climate Extreme in the U.S.: Climate Model Evaluation and Projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai R.; Qian, Yun

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water resources are sensitive to climate variability and change; predictions of seasonal to interannual climate variations and projections of long-term climate trends can provide significant values in managing water resources. This study examines the control (1975–1995) and future (1995–2100) climate simulated by a global climate model (GCM) and a regional climate simulation driven by the GCM control simulation for the U.S. Comparison of the regional climate simulation with observations across 13 subregions showed that the simulation captured the seasonality and the distributions of precipitation rate quite well. The GCM control and climate change simulations showed that, as a result of a 1% increase in greenhouse gas concentrations per year, there will be a warming of 2–3°C across the U.S. from 2000 to 2100. Although precipitation is not projected to change during this century, the warming trend will increase evapotranspiration to reduce annual basin mean runoff over five subregions along the coastal and south-central U.S.

  4. Climate Dynamics Observational, Theoretical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Xiquan

    1 23 Climate Dynamics Observational, Theoretical and Computational Research on the Climate System.6, and -22.5 Wm-2 , respectively, indicating a net cooling effect of clouds on the TOA radiation budget-2 , respectively, resulting in a larger net cooling effect of 2.9 Wm-2 in the model simu- lations

  5. Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    1 23 Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International Journal Devoted to the Description, Causes that the most genetically diverse populations are the ones most at risk from climate change, so that global warming will erode the species' genetic variability faster than it curtails the species' geographic

  6. Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the Southwest Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the...

  7. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Electric Power

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Letters of IntentAgreements The electric power sector participates in the Climate VISION program through the Electric Power Industry Climate Initiative (EPICI) and its Power...

  8. Symbiosis: Addressing Biomass Production Challenges and Climate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Symbiosis: Addressing Biomass Production Challenges and Climate Change Symbiosis: Addressing Biomass Production Challenges and Climate Change This presentation was the opening...

  9. Training for Climate Adaptation in Conservation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wildlife Conservation Society and the Northern Institute of Applied Climate Science are hosting this two-day training for climate adaptation.

  10. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    agencies, interacting with the legislative branch on climate change issues affecting agriculture and forestry, and representing USDA on U.S. delegations to international climate...

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates of Second Key Atmospheric Component On May 1, 2013, in Analysis, Capabilities, Climate, CRF, Energy, Facilities, Global Climate & Energy, Modeling & Analysis, News, News &...

  12. BPA prepares for a changing climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    both generally and as part of events such as El Nio. Evidence of global and regional climate change is mounting. The recently released National Climate Assessment confirmed...

  13. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) supports the Climate VISION initiative to address climate change through enhanced research in technology and science, incentives, and...

  14. Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a CoupledLand Surface Mesoscale Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The land surface has been shown to form strong feedbacks with climate due to linkages between atmospheric conditions and terrestrial ecosystem exchanges of energy, momentum, water, and trace gases. Although often ignored in modeling studies, land management itself may form significant feedbacks. Because crops are harvested earlier under drier conditions, regional air temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture, for example, affect harvest timing, particularly of rain-fed crops. This removal of vegetation alters the land surface characteristics and may, in turn, affect regional climate. We applied a coupled climate(MM5) and land-surface (LSM1) model to examine the effects of early and late winter wheat harvest on regional climate in the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility in the Southern Great Plains, where winter wheat accounts for 20 percent of the land area. Within the winter wheat region, simulated 2 m air temperature was 1.3 C warmer in the Early Harvest scenario at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Soils in the harvested area were drier and warmer in the top 10 cm and wetter in the 10-20 cm layer. Midday soils were 2.5 C warmer in the harvested area at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Harvest also dramatically altered latent and sensible heat fluxes. Although differences between scenarios diminished once both scenarios were harvested, the short-term impacts of land management on climate were comparable to those from land cover change demonstrated in other studies.

  15. Soil Moisture Feedbacks to Precipitation in Southern Africa BENJAMIN I. COOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with below-normal rainfall during the summer wet season (Reason and Rouault 2002). Be- cause changes in these SSTs may be a signature of an- thropogenic climate change, there is some speculation that the near­March) precipitation in southern Africa are investigated using the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3

  16. Substrate Moisture Content Effects on Growth and Shelf Life of Angelonia angustifolia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bingham, Alison

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    [Impatiens walleriana (Hook.)], petunia, salvia [Salvia splendens Sellow (ex Roemer & J.A. Schultes)] and vinca [Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don.] for an extended period of time despite varying plant sizes with little to no runoff and wastage of water... moisture sensors and solenoid valves interfaced to an irrigation controller. When ? dropped below the set point, the controller opened solenoid valves and the impatiens, petunias, salvia, and vinca were irrigated and substrate water content was returned...

  17. Influence of Airflow on Laboratory Storage of High Moisture Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn M. Wendt; Ian J. Bonner; Amber N. Hoover; Rachel M. Emerson; William A. Smith

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Storing high moisture biomass for bioenergy use is a reality in many areas of the country where wet harvest conditions and environmental factors prevent dry storage from being feasible. Aerobic storage of high moisture biomass leads to microbial degradation and self-heating, but oxygen limitation can aid in material preservation. To understand the influence of oxygen presence on high moisture biomass (50 %, wet basis), three airflow rates were tested on corn stover stored in laboratory reactors. Temperature, carbon dioxide production, dry matter loss, chemical composition, fungal abundance, pH, and organic acids were used to monitor the effects of airflow on storage conditions. The results of this work indicate that oxygen availability impacts both the duration of self-heating and the severity of dry matter loss. High airflow systems experienced the greatest initial rates of loss but a shortened microbially active period that limited total dry matter loss (19 %). Intermediate airflow had improved preservation in short-term storage compared to high airflow systems but accumulated the greatest dry matter loss over time (up to 27 %) as a result of an extended microbially active period. Low airflow systems displayed the best performance with the lowest rates of loss and total loss (10 %) in storage at 50 days. Total structural sugar levels of the stored material were preserved, although glucan enrichment and xylan loss were documented in the high and intermediate flow conditions. By understanding the role of oxygen availability on biomass storage performance, the requirements for high moisture storage solutions may begin to be experimentally defined.

  18. Biochemical changes in the proteins of sorghum grain during moisture reconstitution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billings, Toby Jackson

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MICROORGANISM INHABITING SORGHUM GRAIN AFTER RECONSTITUTION Medium Growth Acid Gas MR VP Nitrate Reduction Mannose yes yes no Glucose yes yes no Sucrose yes no no Gal actos e yes yes no Mannitol Starch Maltose yes yes yes no no yes...BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES IN THE PROTEINS OF SORGHUM GRAIN DURING MOISTURE RECONSTITUTION A Thesis by TOBY JACKSON BILLINGS Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...

  19. Effect of external stress on moisture diffusion in an epoxy resin and its composite material 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henson, Michael Chamberlain

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) Michael Chamberlain Henson, B. S. , Texas A&N University Chairman of Advisory Comnittee: Dr. Y. Weitsman The effects of stress on moisture diffusion in a graphite epoxy composrte material have been studied experimentally by examining the correspondrng... diffusion at all stress levels while the graphite epoxy generated results indicative of Non-Fickean, . concentration dependent diffusion at different levels of stress. The external stress affected both materials in a similar manner, causing...

  20. Effect of an external stress on moisture diffusion in composite materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porth, Edward John

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . 49 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Cure Cycle for Hexcel F155 Graphite/Epoxy. . Cure Cycle for Narmco M329-7 Adhesive. Final Configuration of the Graphite/Epoxy and Stainless Steel Tensile Coupons. Load Frame Used to Stress Tensile Coupons During...-ply laminates absorbed more moisture than unidirectional laminates. However, it was also noted that cross-ply laminates are less compact than unidirectional laminates. Gillat and Broutman [5] subjected bidirectional graphite/epoxy laminates to external loads...

  1. Preliminary non-destructive assessment of moisture content, hydration and dielectric properties of Portland cement concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avelar Lezama, Ivan

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    PRELIMINARY NON-DESTRUCTIVE ASSESSMENT OF MOISTURE CONTENT, HYDRATION AND DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE A Thesis by IVAN AVELAR LEZAMA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A... AND DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE A Thesis by IVAN AVELAR LEZAMA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  2. Size reduction of high- and low-moisture corn stalks by linear knife grid system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Narayan, S. [First American Scientific Co.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High- and low-moisture corn stalks were tested using a linear knife grid size reduction device developed for first-stage size reduction. The device was used in conjunction with a universal test machine that quantified shearing stress and energy characteristics for forcing a bed of corn stalks through a grid of sharp knives. No published engineering performance data for corn stover with similar devices are available to optimize performance; however, commercial knife grid systems exist for forage size reduction. From the force displacement data, mean and maximum ultimate shear stresses, cumulative and peak mass-based cutting energies for corn stalks, and mean new surface area-based cutting energies were determined from 4 5 refill runs at two moisture contents (78.8% and 11.3% wet basis), three knife grid spacings (25.4, 50.8, and 101.6 mm), and three bed depths (50.8, 101.6, and 152.4 mm). In general, the results indicated that peak failure load, ultimate shear stress, and cutting energy values varied directly with bed depth and inversely with knife grid spacing. Mean separation analysis established that high- and low-moisture conditions and bed depths 101.6 mm did not differ significantly (P < 0.05) for ultimate stress and cutting energy values, but knife grid spacing were significantly different. Linear knife grid cutting energy requirements for both moisture conditions of corn stalks were much smaller than reported cutting energy requirements. Ultimate shear stress and cutting energy results of this research should aid the engineering design of commercial scale linear knife gird size reduction equipment for various biomass feedstocks.

  3. Tertiary nitrogen heterocyclic material to reduce moisture-induced damage in asphalt-aggregate mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Plancher, Henry (Laramie, WY); Petersen, Joseph C. (Laramie, WY)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Asphalt-aggregate roads crack when subjected to freezing and thawing cycles. Herein, the useful life of asphalts are substantially improved by a minor amount of a moisture damage inhibiting agent selected from compounds having a pyridine moiety, including acid salts of such compounds. A shale oil fraction may serve as the source of the improving agent and may simply be blended with conventional petroleum asphalts.

  4. Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

  5. Varying trends in surface energy fluxes and associated climatebetween 1960-2002 based on transient climate simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazarenko, Larissa; Menon, Surabi

    2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The observed reduction in land surface radiation over the last several decades (1960-1990)---the so-called ''dimming effect''--- and the more recent evidence of a reversal in ''dimming'' over some locations beyond 1990 suggest several consequences on climate, notably on the hydrological cycle. Such a reduction in radiation should imply reduced surface temperature (Ts) and precipitation, which have not occurred. We have investigated the possible causes for the above climate features using a climate model coupled to a dynamic ocean model under natural and anthropogenic conditions. To isolate the aerosol influence on surface radiation trends, we have analyzed transient climate simulations from1960 to 2002 with and without anthropogenic aerosols. Based on a linear trend with aerosol effects included, the global mean change in the surface solar radiation absorbed over land is -0.021+-0.0033 Wm-2yr-1. Although the overall trend is negative, we do note a reversal in dimming after 1990, consistent with observations. Without aerosol effects, the surface solar radiation absorbed over land increases throughout 1960 to 2002, mainly due to the decrease in cloud cover associated with increased greenhouse warming. In spite of a simulated increase in Ts of 0.012 Kyr-1 for 1960 to 2002, the global mean latent heat flux and associated intensity of the hydrological cycle decrease overall, however with increases over some land locations due mainly to moisture advection. Simulated changes correspond more closely to observed changes when accounting for aerosol effects on climate.

  6. Impact of Hillslope-Scale Organization of Topography, Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature, and Vegetation on Modeling Surface Microwave Radiation Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores, Alejandro N.

    Microwave radiometry will emerge as an important tool for global remote sensing of near-surface soil moisture in the coming decade. In this modeling study, we find that hillslope-scale topography (tens of meters) influences ...

  7. A wireless soil moisture smart sensor web using physics-based optimal control: Concept and initial demonstrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moghaddam, Mahta

    This paper introduces a new concept for a smart wireless sensor web technology for optimal measurements of surface-to-depth profiles of soil moisture using in-situ sensors. The objective of the technology, supported by the ...

  8. Precipitation and soil impacts on partitioning of subsurface moisture in Avena barbata: Observations from a greenhouse experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salve, R.; Torn, M.S.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the impact of two grassland soils and precipitation regimes on soil-moisture dynamics. We set up an experiment in a greenhouse, and monitored soil moisture dynamics in mesocosms planted with Avena barbata, an annual species found in California grasslands. By repeating the precipitation input at regular intervals, we were able to observe plant manipulation of soil moisture during well-defined periods during the growing season. We found that the amount of water partitioned to evapotranspiration, seepage, and soil storage varied among different growth stages. Further, both soil type and precipitation regimes had a significant impact on redistributing soil moisture. Whereas in the low-precipitation treatments most water was released to the atmosphere as evapotranspiration, major losses from the high-precipitation treatment occurred as gravity drainage. Observations from this study emphasize the importance of understanding intra-seasonal relationships between vegetation, soil, and water.

  9. Moisture and temperature effects on curvature of anti-symmetric cross-ply graphite/epoxy laminates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lott, Randall Stephen

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MOISTURE AND TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CURVATURE OF ANTI-SYMMETRIC CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by RANDALL STEPHEN LOTT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering MOISTURE AND TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CURVATURE OF ANTI-SYMMETRIC CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by RANDALL STEPHEN LOTT Approved as to style and content...

  10. IMPACTS OF SOIL MOISTURE VARIABILITY ON CONVECTIVE PRECIPITATION IN THE CENTRAL PLAINS THROUGH LAND-ATMOSPHERE FEEDBACKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Aubrey R.

    2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    of cummulative precipitation for a) FC b) 50FC c) WP ............ 31 Figure 4. Precipitation summed over the domain for the 12 day period for each model run............................................................................................................................ 66 Figure 17. Scatter plots of soil moisture versus Bowen ratio (top) a) FC b) 50FC c) WP and soil moisture versus net radiation (bottom) d) FC e) 50FC f) WP for the 4 km runs...

  11. Forestry and ClimateForestry and Climate ChangeChange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    and Forests:Climate Change and Forests: The GoodThe Good ·Forests as carbon sinks ·Longer growing season · CO2 · Reduced emissions ­ DNR too! · Enhanced sequestration · Bio-energy #12;What to Do?What to Do

  12. Climate Change and Forest Disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dale, Virginia H.; Joyce, Linda A.; McNulty, Steve; Neilson, Ronald P.; Ayres, Matthew P.; Flannigan, Michael D.; Hanson, Paul J.; Irland, Lloyd C.; Lugo, Ariel E.; Peterson, Chris J.; Simberloff, Daniel; Swanson, Frederick J.; Stocks, Brian J.; Wotton, B. Michael; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of disturbances caused by climate change (e.g., Ojima et al. 1991).Yet modeling studies indicate the im- portance of climate effects on disturbance regimes (He et al. 1999). Local, regional, and global changes in temperature and precipitation can influence... circulation models (GCMs)—one de- veloped by the Hadley Center in the United Kingdom (HADCM2SUL) and one by the Canadian Climate Center (CGCM1)—have been selected for this national assessment (MacCracken et al. 2000). These transient GCMs simulate at...

  13. Climate Change: The Sun's Role

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerald E. Marsh

    2007-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The sun's role in the earth's recent warming remains controversial even though there is a good deal of evidence to support the thesis that solar variations are a very significant factor in driving climate change both currently and in the past. This precis lays out the background and data needed to understand the basic scientific argument behind the contention that variations in solar output have a significant impact on current changes in climate. It also offers a simple, phenomenological approach for estimating the actual-as opposed to model dependent-magnitude of the sun's influence on climate.

  14. Dalhousie University Climate Change Plan 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    University Climate Change Plan 2010 -- 4 Campus Energy Systems Green Buildings Sustainable TransportDalhousie University Climate Change Plan 2010 #12;Dalhousie University Climate Change Plan 2010 -- 2 The Climate Change Plan was prepared by The Dalhousie Office of Sustainability with advice from

  15. The Climate of the South Platte Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Climate of the South Platte Basin Colorado Climate Center http://climate.atmos.colostate.edu #12;Key Features of the Climate of the South Platte Basin #12;Temperature Cold winters Hot summers #12;Precipitation Monthly Average Precipitation for Selected Sites in the South Platte Basin 0.00 0

  16. Stormwater, Climate Change and Wisconsin's Coastal Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Stormwater, Climate Change and Wisconsin's Coastal Communities Johnson Foundation at Wingspread · Precipitation and high water · Adapting to our changing climate · Assisting coastal communities Photo: WDNR #12 source of risk from changing climate. City of Green Bay watershed - #12;Predicted climate includes

  17. 2, 11551186, 2006 Mid-Holocene climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    CPD 2, 1155­1186, 2006 Mid-Holocene climate change in Europe: a data-model comparison S. Brewer et.clim-past-discuss.net/2/1155/2006/ © Author(s) 2006. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Climate of the Past Discussions Climate of the Past Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Climate

  18. Climate-development-energy policy related seminars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Paula Kivimaa (Finnish Environment Institute) From energy to climate policy in Finland Energy & climate Energy & Climate Tue 3rd Dec 18.00- 19.30 Large Jubilee Jeremy Leggett (SolarCentury) The EnergyClimate-development-energy policy related seminars Autumn term 2013 Date Time Location Speaker

  19. ProGreen 2014 Colorado Climate Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Complex Mountain topography · Solar energy and seasonal cycles drive our climate #12;Colorado has" and we LOVE IT! #12;Monitoring our Climate · Elements: temperature, precipitation, snow, wind, solarProGreen 2014 Colorado Climate Update Nolan Doesken Colorado State Climatologist Colorado Climate

  20. Journal of Climate EARLY ONLINE RELEASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yongyun

    investigate the climate dynamic feedbacks during a transition from the present climate7 to the extremely coldJournal of Climate EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary PDF of the author-produced manuscript. Hu, 2011: The initiation of modern "soft Snowball" and "hard Snowball" climates in CCSM3. Part II

  1. Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    1 Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers in the US and South Korea Pierre Y. Julien Dept. of Civil and Environ. Eng. Colorado State University Seoul, South Korea August 11, 2009 Climate Change and Large Rivers 1. Climatic changes have been on-going for some time; 2. Climate changes usually predict

  2. An iconic approach to representing climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    1 An iconic approach to representing climate change Saffron Jessica O'Neill A thesis submitted-experts to be meaningfully engaged with the issue of climate change. This thesis investigates the value of engaging non-experts with climate change at the individual level. Research demonstrates that individuals perceive climate change

  3. Climatic Impact of Volcanic Emissions Alan Robock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    and interannual climate forecasts following large eruptions, it provides support for nuclear winter theory

  4. Expanding Global Cooperation on Climate Justice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    in evaluating the financial architecture necessary to support just and sustainable climate interventions

  5. The physical science behind climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, William

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to soil moisture and water resources in many regions. In thesea-level rise. Sea level rises because water expands as itis warmed and because water from melting glaciers and ice

  6. Climate Insights 101 Questions and Discussion Points: Module 1, Lesson 4: An Introduction to Climate Modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Climate Insights 101 Questions and Discussion Points: Module 1, Lesson 4: An Introduction to Climate Modelling 1 Climate Insights 101 Questions and Discussion Points Module 1, Lesson 4: An Introduction to Climate Modelling Available at http://pics.uvic.ca/education/climate-insights-101 Updated May

  7. Climate Sensitivity Estimated From Earth's Climate History James E. Hansen and Makiko Sato

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    1 Climate Sensitivity Estimated From Earth's Climate History James E. Hansen and Makiko Sato NASA's climate history potentially can yield accurate assessment of climate sensitivity. Imprecise knowledge of the fast-feedback climate sensitivity, which is the sensitivity that most immediately affects humanity. Our

  8. Chicago Climate Exchange, Inc. 2010 Chicago Climate Exchange 1 The Role of Exchanges and Standardization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chicago Climate Exchange®, Inc.© 2010 Chicago Climate Exchange 1 The Role of Exchanges and Standardization in Reducing Emissions at Scale Michael J. Walsh, Ph.D. Executive Vice President Chicago Climate Exchange, Inc. #12;Chicago Climate Exchange®, Inc.© 2010 Chicago Climate Exchange Pacala-Socolow GHG

  9. Climate Mathematician Job Advertisement, September 2013 FACULTY POSITION IN CLIMATE MATHEMATICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallo, Linda C.

    1 Climate Mathematician Job Advertisement, September 2013 FACULTY POSITION IN CLIMATE MATHEMATICS in Climate Mathematics, beginning in August 2014. Exceptional candidates at the Associate Professor level an active interdisciplinary research program in climate mathematics with a focus on next generation climate

  10. "Climate change is sure to occur in some form." The study of climate impacts notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "Climate change is sure to occur in some form." 1 #12;The study of climate impacts notes how scientists generally agree that humans are changing the climate, and that if we continue pumping carbon we learn from past climate variations? How can we best adapt to climate change? This report attempts

  11. Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change Changes · Due to ­ Climate Change ­ Land Cover / Land Use Change ­ Interaction of Climate and Land Cover Change · Resolution ­ Space ­ Time Hydro-Climatic Change · Variability vs. Change (Trends) · Point data

  12. Assessing the effects of ocean diffusivity and climate sensitivity on the rate of global climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittner, Andreas

    sensitivity and ocean heat uptake on the rate of future climate change. We apply a range of values for climate a significant effect on the rate of transient climate change for high values of climate sensitivity, while values of climate sensitivity and low values of ocean diffusivity. Such high rates of change could

  13. Nature Climate Change features Los

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research February 27, 2013 New print edition of journal tags tree-stress project for cover story LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Feb. 27, 2013-The print...

  14. Climate Action Plan (New Jersey)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The NJDEP Office of Sustainability and Green Energy coordinates programs that reduce greenhouse gas emissions that cause climate change, as well as programs designed to help New Jersey become...

  15. Electric Vehicles Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    Hot Topics Electric Vehicles Global Climate Change Green Building Hydraulic Fracturing Nuclear to global warming. The UKgovernment has just announced it is investing $1 billion in their development Green Living Industry Regulation Remediation Research and Technology Sustainability Waste Water Products

  16. Climate sensitivity of marine energy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Gareth P; Wallace, Robin

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine energy has a significant role to play in lowering carbon emissions within the energy sector. Paradoxically, it may be susceptible to changes in climate that will result from rising carbon emissions. Wind patterns are expected to change...

  17. Essays in climate and development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerrero Compeán, Roberto

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is a collection of three essays on environmental policy and empirical development economics, unified in their underlying inquiry of the welfare effects of climate in Mexico. The first chapter presents ...

  18. Climate Action Plan (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The North Carolina Department of Environmental and Natural Resources (DENR) has established a priority in the 2009 - 2013 Strategic Plan to respond to climate change using both mitigation and...

  19. Tropical Cyclones and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knutson, Thomas R.

    Whether the characteristics of tropical cyclones have changed or will change in a warming climate — and if so, how — has been the subject of considerable investigation, often with conflicting results. Large amplitude ...

  20. 2009 Operations Employee Climate Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009 Operations Employee Climate Survey March 2009 #12;Acknowledgements TheBerkeleyLab Survey Team Associates has conducted a number of large-scale surveys for organizations in higher education, including MIT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Survey

  1. Climate Forcings and Climate Sensitivities Diagnosed from Coupled Climate Model Integrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forster, P M A F; Taylor, K E

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple technique is proposed for calculating global mean climate forcing from transient integrations of coupled Atmosphere Ocean General Circulation Models (AOGCMs). This 'climate forcing' differs from the conventionally defined radiative forcing as it includes semi-direct effects that account for certain short timescale responses in the troposphere. Firstly, we calculate a climate feedback term from reported values of 2 x CO{sub 2} radiative forcing and surface temperature time series from 70-year simulations by twenty AOGCMs. In these simulations carbon dioxide is increased by 1%/year. The derived climate feedback agrees well with values that we diagnose from equilibrium climate change experiments of slab-ocean versions of the same models. These climate feedback terms are associated with the fast, quasi-linear response of lapse rate, clouds, water vapor and albedo to global surface temperature changes. The importance of the feedbacks is gauged by their impact on the radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere. We find partial compensation between longwave and shortwave feedback terms that lessens the inter-model differences in the equilibrium climate sensitivity. There is also some indication that the AOGCMs overestimate the strength of the positive longwave feedback. These feedback terms are then used to infer the shortwave and longwave time series of climate forcing in 20th and 21st Century simulations in the AOGCMs. We validate the technique using conventionally calculated forcing time series from four AOGCMs. In these AOGCMs the shortwave and longwave climate forcings we diagnose agree with the conventional forcing time series within {approx}10%. The shortwave forcing time series exhibit order of magnitude variations between the AOGCMs, differences likely related to how both natural forcings and/or anthropogenic aerosol effects are included. There are also factor of two differences in the longwave climate forcing time series, which may indicate problems with the modeling of well-mixed-greenhouse-gas changes. The simple diagnoses we present provide an important and useful first step for understanding differences in AOGCM integrations, indicating that some of the differences in model projections can be attributed to different prescribed climate forcing, even for so-called standard climate change scenarios.

  2. Final Report for DOE Project: Climate Effects on Plant Range Distributions and Community Structure of Pacific Northwest Prairies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bridgham, Scott D. [University of Oregon; Johnson, Bart [University of Oregon

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest (PNW) prairies are an imperiled ecosystem that contain a large number of plant species with high fidelity to this habitat. The few remaining high-quality PNW prairies harbor a number of sensitive, rare, and endangered plant species that may be further at-risk with climate change. Thus, PNW prairies are an excellent model system to examine how climate change will affect the distribution of native plant species in grassland sites. Our experimental objectives were to determine: (i) how climate change will affect the range distribution of native plant species; (ii) what life history stages are most sensitive to climate change in a group of key indicator native species; (iii) the robustness of current restoration techniques and suites of species to changing climate, and in particular, the relative competitiveness of native species versus exotic invasive species; and (iv) the effects of climate change on carbon and nutrient cycling and soil-microbial-plant feedbacks. We addressed these objectives by experimentally increasing temperature 2.5 to 3.0 ºC above ambient with overhead infrared lamps and increasing wet-season precipitation by 20% above ambient in three upland prairie sites in central-western Washington, central-western Oregon, and southwestern Oregon from fall 2010 through 2012. Additional precipitation was applied within 2 weeks of when it fell so precipitation intensity was increased, particularly during the winter rainy season but with minimal additions during the summer dry season. These three sites also represent a 520-km natural climate gradient of increasing degree of severity of Mediterranean climate from north to south. After removing the extant vegetation, we planted a diverse suite of 12 native species that have their northern range limit someplace within the PNW in each experimental plot. An additional 20 more wide-spread native species were also planted into each plot. We found that recruitment of plant species within their ranges was negatively impacted by increased temperatures, but for species planted north of their current range, increased temperature was neutral. However, for surviving plants climate treatments and site-specific factors (e.g., nutrient availability) were the strongest predictors of plant growth and seed set. When recruitment and plant growth are considered together, increased temperatures are negative within a species current range but beyond this range they become positive. Germination was the most critical stage for plant response across all sites and climate treatments. Our results underscore the importance of including plant vital rates into models that are examining climate change effects on plant ranges. Warming altered plant community composition, decreased diversity, and increased total cover, with warmed northern communities over time becoming more like ambient communities further south. In particular, warming increased the cover of annual introduced species, suggesting that the observed biogeographic pattern of increasing invasion by this plant functional group in US West Coast prairies as one moves further south is at least in part due to climate. Our results suggest that with the projected increase in drought severity with climate change, Pacific Northwest prairies may face an increase of invasion by annuals, similar to what has been observed in California, resulting in novel species assemblages and shifts in functional composition, which in turn may alter ecosystem function. Warming generally increased nutrient availability and plant productivity across all sites. The seasonality of soil respiration responses to heating were strongly dependent on the Mediterranean climate gradient in the PNW, with heating responses being generally positive during periods of adequate soil moisture and becoming neutral to negative during periods of low soil moisture. The asynchrony between temperature and precipitation may make soils less sensitive to warming. Precipitation effects were minimal for all measured responses indicating the importance of increased temperature

  3. Glossary: Carbon dioxide and climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Glossary contains definitions of selected CO{sub 2}-related terms as well as tables containing information related to CO{sub 2} and climate. Each term is defined with an emphasis on its relationship to CO{sub 2} and climate. Many of the definitions are then followed by a more detailed description of the term and its use. References to the literature from which the definitions were taken are listed at the end of the Glossary.

  4. Mid-Century Ensemble Regional Climate Change Scenarios for the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai R.; Qian, Yun; Bian, Xindi; Washington, Warren M.; Han, Jongil; Roads, John O.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To study the impacts of climate change on water resources in the western U.S., global climate simulations were produced using the National Center for Atmospheric Research/Department of Energy (NCAR/DOE) Parallel Climate Model (PCM). The Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) was used to downscale the PCM control (1995-2015) and three future (2040-2060) climate simulations to yield ensemble regional climate simulations at 40 km spatial resolution for the western U.S. This paper focuses on analyses of regional simulations in the Columbia River and Sacramento-San Joaquin River Basins. Results based on the regional simulations show that by mid-century, the average regional warming of 1-2.5oC strongly affects snowpack in the western U.S. Along coastal mountains, reduction in annual snowpack is about 70%. Besides changes in mean temperature, precipitation, and snowpack, cold season extreme daily precipitation is found to increase by 5 to 15 mm/day (15-20%) along the Cascades and the Sierra. The warming results in increased rainfall over snowfall and reduced snow accumulation (or earlier snowmelt) during the cold season. In the Columbia River Basin, these changes are accompanied by more frequent rain-on-snow events. Overall, they induce higher likelihood of wintertime flooding and reduced runoff and soil moisture in the summer. Such changes could have serious impacts on water resources and agriculture in the western U.S. Changes in surface water and energy budgets in the Columbia River and Sacramento-San Joaquin basins are driven mainly by changes in surface temperature, which are statistically significant at the 0.95 confidence level. Changes in precipitation, however, are spatially incoherent and not statistically significant except for the drying trend during summer.

  5. Radiant cooling in US office buildings: Towards eliminating the perception of climate-imposed barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stetiu, C.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Much attention is being given to improving the efficiency of air-conditioning systems through the promotion of more efficient cooling technologies. One such alternative, radiant cooling, is the subject of this thesis. Performance information from Western European buildings equipped with radiant cooling systems indicates that these systems not only reduce the building energy consumption but also provide additional economic and comfort-related benefits. Their potential in other markets such as the US has been largely overlooked due to lack of practical demonstration, and to the absence of simulation tools capable of predicting system performance in different climates. This thesis describes the development of RADCOOL, a simulation tool that models thermal and moisture-related effects in spaces equipped with radiant cooling systems. The thesis then conducts the first in-depth investigation of the climate-related aspects of the performance of radiant cooling systems in office buildings. The results of the investigation show that a building equipped with a radiant cooling system can be operated in any US climate with small risk of condensation. For the office space examined in the thesis, employing a radiant cooling system instead of a traditional all-air system can save on average 30% of the energy consumption and 27% of the peak power demand due to space conditioning. The savings potential is climate-dependent, and is larger in retrofitted buildings than in new construction. This thesis demonstrates the high performance potential of radiant cooling systems across a broad range of US climates. It further discusses the economics governing the US air-conditioning market and identifies the type of policy interventions and other measures that could encourage the adoption of radiant cooling in this market.

  6. www.climate.iitb.ac.in 1st CLIMATE SCIENCE AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarawagi, Sunita

    and emissions modeling, Climate mitigation technologies (enhanced carbon capture systems, photoactive materials and technology: Terrestrial carbon sources and sinks, Prediction of climate extremes, Climate perturbation and devices, non-carbon energy technologies, biorefineries, negative net-carbon technologies

  7. Internalizing Climate Change—Scientific Resource Management and the Climate Change Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dettinger, Michael D.; Culberson, Steven

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Council. 2001. Climate change sci- ence: an analysis of someNWT, Dracup JA. 2004. Climate change impacts uncertainty forVR, Kusler J. 2000. Climate change: Potential impacts and

  8. Influence of Transpiration Suppressants, Sprinkler Irrigation and Moisture Levels on Transpiration and Evapotranspiration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerard, C. J.

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and net radiation data indicated that reflective treatment on tomatoes was effective in reflecting the incoming solar radiation in 1969. Thermoelectric Data Sap flow as influenced by treatments and climatic conditions was evaluated with a thermoelectric...

  9. Expensive Moisture/Insulation System Problems at Several Central Florida and South Texas Nursing Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotz, W. A.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    where temperaturs reach 150° F. increases condensation due to inadequate details in mechanical insulation on ducts and pipes Vinyl wall covering is well known to be a disaster in this climate but interior decorators continue to specify it on various...

  10. New Peak Moisture Design Data in the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harriman, L.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 26 of the 1997 edition of the Handbook of Fundamentals published by ASHRAE (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers) contains climatic design data that has been completely revised, recalculated and expanded...

  11. Climate Change Impacts for the Conterminous USA: An Integrated Assessment Part 4. Water Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Allison M.; Brown, Robert A.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Srinivasan, Ragahvan; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global warming will impact the hydrologic cycle by increasing the capacity of the atmosphere to hold moisture. Anticipated impacts are generally increased evaporation at low latitudes and increased precipitation at middle and high latitudes. The impacts on specific regions will depend on changes in weather patterns and are certain to be complex. Here we apply a suite of 12 potential climate change scenarios that could occur over the next century as atmospheric CO2 concentrations reach double the pre-industrial level to the Hydrologic Unit Model of the United States (HUMUS) to simulate water supply in the conterminous United States. In Part 4 we examine the sufficiency of this water supply to meet changing demands of irrigated agriculture. General Circulation Models (GCMs) used to simulate climate disagree on whether the US as a whole and its constituent regions will receive more or less precipitation as global warming occurs. The changes in water yield driven by changes in climate will likely be most consequential in the semi-arid western parts of the country where water yield is currently scarce and the resource is intensively managed. Changes of greater than +/-50% with respect to present day water yield are projected in parts of the Midwest and Southwest US. Interannual variability is likely to increase with reduced water yield but decrease with wetter conditions.

  12. President Obama on Climate Change | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    President Obama on Climate Change President Obama on Climate Change Addthis Speakers President Barack Obama Duration 2:46 Topic Energy Sector Jobs Renewables Solar Climate Change...

  13. Climate Change, the Clean Air Act, and Industrial Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaswan, Alice

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Change, the Clean Air Act, and Industrial PollutionCONSIDERATIONS IN CLIMATE POLICY . A.pollutant Considerations into Climate Policy 1.

  14. Climate Change and San Francisco Bay-Delta Tidal Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, V. Thomas; Callaway, John C.; Schile, Lisa M.; Vasey, Michael C.; Herbert, Ellen R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Institute for Climate Change Research, Coastalthe context of predicted climate change. Madroño 54(3):234–18–20. Dettinger MD. 2005. From climate-change spaghetti to

  15. Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models Berkeley Lab Researcher Says Climate Science is Entering New...

  16. Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation Photo showing climate zone maps based on the IECC...

  17. Building America Climate-Specific Guidance | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building America Building America Climate-Specific Guidance Building America Climate-Specific Guidance Building America Climate-Specific Guidance 2014 Housing Innovation...

  18. Stakeholder Engagement in Climate Change Policymaking in American Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiack, Duran; Kamieniecki , Sheldon

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the dimensions of climate change communication by conductingdynamics around climate change communication at thethe dimensions of climate change communication by conducting

  19. Economic Damages from Climate Change: An Assessment of Market Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanemann, W Michael; Dale, Larry

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the affects of climate change on agriculture in irrigatedmarket impacts from climate change on US agriculture and onimpacts of climate change on US agriculture. The first set

  20. Seawalls Are Not Enough: Climate Change & U.S. Interests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Jody; Guzman, Andrew

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of climate change on agriculture, for example, isthe impacts of climate change on agriculture. The reasonsimpact of climate change on agriculture, forestry, coastal

  1. Improving Comfort in Hot-Humid Climates with a Whole-House Dehumidifier, Windermere, Florida (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maintaining comfort in a home can be challenging in hot-humid climates. At the common summer temperature set point of 75 degrees F, the perceived air temperature can vary by 11 degrees F because higher indoor humidity reduces comfort. Often the air conditioner (AC) thermostat set point is lower than the desirable cooling level to try to increase moisture removal so that the interior air is not humid or "muggy." However, this method is not always effective in maintaining indoor relative humidity (RH) or comfort. In order to quantify the performance of a combined whole-house dehumidifier (WHD) AC system, researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America team Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) monitored the operation of two Lennox AC systems coupled with a Honeywell DH150 TrueDRY whole-house dehumidifier for a six-month period. By using a WHD to control moisture levels (latent cooling) and optimizing a central AC to control temperature (sensible cooling), improvements in comfort can be achieved while reducing utility costs. Indoor comfort for this study was defined as maintaining indoor conditions at below 60% RH and a humidity ratio of 0.012 lbm/lbm while at common dry bulb set point temperatures of 74 degrees -80 degrees F. In addition to enhanced comfort, controlling moisture to these levels can reduce the risk of other potential issues such as mold growth, pests, and building component degradation. Because a standard AC must also reduce dry bulb air temperature in order to remove moisture, a WHD is typically needed to support these latent loads when sensible heat removal is not desired.

  2. Northeast Climate Science Center: Transposing Extreme Rainfall to Assess Climate Vulnerability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Climate models predict significant increases in the magnitude and frequency of extreme rainfalls.  However, climate model projections of precipitation vary greatly across models.  For communities...

  3. Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate Change Uncertainty Quantification, the Next Frontier The Role Played by Oceans in Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Restrepo, Juan M.

    Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate Change Uncertainty Quantification, the Next Department University of Arizona October 11, 2008 #12;Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate, Undergraduate Students: 2. UQGQG #12;Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate Change Uncertainty

  4. Flexible Ultra Moisture Barrier Film for Thin-Film Photovoltaic Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David M. Dean

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Flexible Thin-film photovoltaic (TFPV) is a low cost alternative to incumbent c-Si PV products as it requires less volume of costly semiconductor materials and it can potentially reduce installation cost. Among the TFPV options, copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) has the highest efficiency and is believed to be one of the most attractive candidates to achieve PV cost reduction. However, CIGS cells are very moisture sensitive and require module water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of less than 1x10-4 gram of water per square meter per day (g-H2O/m2/day). Successful development and commercialization of flexible transparent ultra moisture barrier film is the key to enable flexible CIGS TFPV products, and thus enable ultimate PV cost reduction. At DuPont, we have demonstrated at lab scale that we can successfully make polymer-based flexible transparent ultra moisture barrier film by depositing alumina on polymer films using atomic layer deposition (ALD) technology. The layer by layer ALD approach results in uniform and amorphous structure which effectively reduces pinhole density of the inorganic coating on the polymer, and thus allow the fabrication of flexible barrier film with WVTR of 10-5 g-H2O/m2/day. Currently ALD is a time-consuming process suitable only for high-value, relatively small substrates. To successfully commercialize the ALD-on-plastic technology for the PV industry, there is the need to scale up this technology and improve throughput. The goal of this contract work was to build a prototype demonstrating that the ALD technology could be scaled-up for commercial use. Unfortunately, the prototype failed to produce an ultra-barrier film by the close of the project.

  5. AEROSOL, CLOUDS, AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCHWARTZ, S.E.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth's climate is thought to be quite sensitive to changes in radiative fluxes that are quite small in absolute magnitude, a few watts per square meter, and in relation to these fluxes in the natural climate. Atmospheric aerosol particles exert influence on climate directly, by scattering and absorbing radiation, and indirectly by modifying the microphysical properties of clouds and in turn their radiative effects and hydrology. The forcing of climate change by these indirect effects is thought to be quite substantial relative to forcing by incremental concentrations of greenhouse gases, but highly uncertain. Quantification of aerosol indirect forcing by satellite- or ground-based remote sensing has proved quite difficult in view of inherent large variation in the pertinent observables such as cloud optical depth, which is controlled mainly by liquid water path and only secondarily by aerosols. Limited work has shown instances of large magnitude of aerosol indirect forcing, with local instantaneous forcing upwards of 50 W m{sup 66}-2. Ultimately it will be necessary to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models to accurately identify the anthropogenic forcing at present and over secular time and to assess the influence of this forcing in the context of other forcings of climate change. While the elements of aerosol processes that must be represented in models describing the evolution and properties of aerosol particles that serve as cloud condensation particles are known, many important components of these processes remain to be understood and to be represented in models, and the models evaluated against observation, before such model-based representations can confidently be used to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models.

  6. International H2O Project (IHOP) 2002: Datasets Related to Atmospheric Moisture and Rainfall Prediction

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schanot, Allen [IHOP 2002 PI; Friesen, Dick [IHOP 2002 PI

    IHOP 2002 was a field experiment that took place over the Southern Great Plains of the United States from 13 May to 25 June 2002. The chief aim of IHOP_2002 was improved characterization of the four-dimensional (4-D) distribution of water vapor and its application to improving the understanding and prediction of convection. The region was an optimal location due to existing experimental and operational facilities, strong variability in moisture, and active convection [copied from http://www.eol.ucar.edu/projects/ihop/]. The project's master list of data identifies 146 publicly accessible datasets.

  7. Cavitation controlled acoustic probe for fabric spot cleaning and moisture monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw (Naperville, IL); Chien, Hual-Te (Naperville, IL); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are provided for monitoring a fabric. An acoustic probe generates acoustic waves relative to the fabric. An acoustic sensor, such as an accelerometer is coupled to the acoustic probe for generating a signal representative of cavitation activity in the fabric. The generated cavitation activity representative signal is processed to indicate moisture content of the fabric. A feature of the invention is a feedback control signal is generated responsive to the generated cavitation activity representative signal. The feedback control signal can be used to control the energy level of the generated acoustic waves and to control the application of a cleaning solution to the fabric.

  8. The effect of soil moisture levels on evapotranspiration from cotton and grain sorghum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Arland David

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    measured value of soil t moisture. Substituting these values into Equations (I), (2) and (3) gave the following three equations: SM =be ct t SM =bK t t SM = d ? b log (t+c ) t (5) (6) The next logical step would have been to evaluate... as several atmospheres pressure which is sufficient tc move water to the leaves of even the tallest trees. The flew cf water can be governed by either the rate at which it is extracted from the soil or the rate at which it moves through the plants...

  9. Responses of bitterweed (Hymenoxys odorata) to 2, 4-D in relation to soil moisture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sultemeier, George Wayne

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aoistme for shoat three weehs battee syrayfsg with 2, ~ oa iTass 7. Taboos clay lhsdaD clay Ososa clay Valesa clog Valera else' shallow yhase Irioa alar Ceyrsssed 16. 3 1702 2$og sSoae ylents ia this sell asterisk sai yro4aee4 seek... and herbicidal aotion at time of spraying on ths several clay soil types. Mater is universally a component of soils, although ths amounts present may wary from hygrosopio to a quantity sufficient to saturate the soil. FLaM moisture samples msy be oompared...

  10. Surface soil moisture estimation with the electrically scanning microwave radiometer (ESMR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theis, Sidney Wayne

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that is important in determining the ability of a plant to uptake water and that determines the state of saturation of a soil. Matric potential is very important for crop modeling and runoff prediction. Roe et al. (1971) observed that the emissivity of a mooth... that were approximately 15 to 20 cm high. For an area covered with thick turfted grass to a height of 20 cm, Barton (1978) obtained a poor relationship between soil moisture and emissivity for both the ESHR and a 2. 65-cm radiometer. The ESHR response...

  11. Phase relationship equation for moisture induced shrink and swell of soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, Stacey Bruemmer

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the w moisture content prior to swell, a = air void coefficient equal to the ratio of air volume change (AV?) to the initial air volume (V?), n(1-S) = ratio of VA to the initial total volume (Vr). The shrinkage form of PREMISS (1. 2), also derived... in Chapter VI, is: AV hw = Sn ? (t + a, ?j r where a? = the air void constant equal to the ratio of dV? to the change in water volume (dV~). The parameters S, n and w are readily obtained from soil samples. Means of obtaining the change im water...

  12. Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

    This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

  13. Regional Climate Modeling: Progress, Challenges, and Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuqing; Leung, Lai R.; McGregor, John L.; Lee, Dong-Kyou; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Ding, Yihui; Kimura, Fujio

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional climate modeling with regional climate models (RCMs) has matured over the past decade and allows for meaningful utilization in a broad spectrum of applications. In this paper, latest progresses in regional climate modeling studies are reviewed, including RCM development, applications of RCMs to dynamical downscaling for climate change assessment, seasonal climate predictions and climate process studies, and the study of regional climate predictability. Challenges and potential directions of future research in this important area are discussed, with the focus on those to which less attention has been given previously, such as the importance of ensemble simulations, further development and improvement of regional climate modeling approach, modeling extreme climate events and sub-daily variation of clouds and precipitation, model evaluation and diagnostics, applications of RCMs to climate process studies and seasonal predictions, and development of regional earth system models. It is believed that with both the demonstrated credibility of RCMs’ capability in reproducing not only monthly to seasonal mean climate and interannual variability but also the extreme climate events when driven by good quality reanalysis and the continuous improvements in the skill of global general circulation models (GCMs) in simulating large-scale atmospheric circulation, regional climate modeling will remain an important dynamical downscaling tool for providing the needed information for assessing climate change impacts and seasonal climate predictions, and a powerful tool for improving our understanding of regional climate processes. An internationally coordinated effort can be developed with different focuses by different groups to advance regional climate modeling studies. It is also recognized that since the final quality of the results from nested RCMs depends in part on the realism of the large-scale forcing provided by GCMs, the reduction of errors and improvement in physics parameterizations in both GCMs and RCMs remain a priority for climate modeling community.

  14. A National Strategy for Advancing Climate Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunlea, Edward; Elfring, Chris

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate models are the foundation for understanding and projecting climate and climate-related changes and are thus critical tools for supporting climate-related decision making. This study developed a holistic strategy for improving the nationâ??s capability to accurately simulate climate and related Earth system changes on decadal to centennial timescales. The committeeâ??s report is a high level analysis, providing a strategic framework to guide progress in the nationâ??s climate modeling enterprise over the next 10-20 years. This study was supported by DOE, NSF, NASA, NOAA, and the intelligence community.

  15. Economics, ethics, and climate policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, R.B.; Monahan, P.A.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Are the costs of greenhouse gas emissions abatement justified by the perceived benefits of sustained climate stability Do people of the present generation have a moral right to impose climate risks on their descendants in generations to come This report examines these questions in light of the emergent facts of climate science and their socioeconomic implications. We consider alternative normative criteria for social decision-making with particular emphasis on cost-benefit analysis and the principle of sustainable development. While each framework yields important insights, we argue that the gross uncertainties associated with climate change and the distribution of impacts between present and future generations constrain the usefulness of cost-benefit criteria in evaluating climate policy. If one accepts the ethical proposition that it is morally wrong to impose catastrophic risks on unborn generations when reducing those risks would not noticeably diminish the quality of life of existing persons, a case can be made for concerted policy action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  16. Economics, ethics, and climate policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, R.B.; Monahan, P.A.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Are the costs of greenhouse gas emissions abatement justified by the perceived benefits of sustained climate stability? Do people of the present generation have a moral right to impose climate risks on their descendants in generations to come? This report examines these questions in light of the emergent facts of climate science and their socioeconomic implications. We consider alternative normative criteria for social decision-making with particular emphasis on cost-benefit analysis and the principle of sustainable development. While each framework yields important insights, we argue that the gross uncertainties associated with climate change and the distribution of impacts between present and future generations constrain the usefulness of cost-benefit criteria in evaluating climate policy. If one accepts the ethical proposition that it is morally wrong to impose catastrophic risks on unborn generations when reducing those risks would not noticeably diminish the quality of life of existing persons, a case can be made for concerted policy action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  17. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction- August 13, 2014- Moisture Monitoring Results in an R-40 Wall

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, Moisture Monitoring Results in an R-40 Wall, was presented at the Building America webinar, High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II, on August 13, 2014.

  18. Plant Response and Environmental Data from the Oldfield Community Climate and Atmospheric Manipulation (OCCAM) Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Oldfield Community Climate and Atmospheric Manipulation (OCCAM) project is a joint effort of ORNL and the University of Tennessee to investigate community and ecosystem response to global change, specifically looking at the interactive effects of atmospheric carbon dioxide, surface temperatures, and soil moisture. The plants studied for their response to warming temperatures, elevated carbon dioxide, and altered water availability include C3 and C4 grasses, forbs, and legumes. These plants are typical of an old-field ecosystem that establishes itself on unused agricultural land. The results of the research focus on species abundance, production, phenology, and what is going on chemically below ground. Data are currently available from 2003 through July, 2008.

  19. The AmeriFlux Data Activity and Data System: An Evolving Collection of Data Management Techniques, Tools, Products and Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boden, Thomas A [ORNL; Krassovski, Misha B [ORNL; Yang, Bai [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA has provided scientific data management support for the U.S. Department of Energy and international climate change science since 1982. Over this period, climate change science has expanded from research focusing on basic understanding of geochemical cycles, particularly the carbon cycle, to integrated research addressing climate change impacts, vulnerability, adaptation, and mitigation. Interests in climate change data and information worldwide have grown remarkably and, as a result, so have demands and expectations for CDIAC s data systems. To meet the growing demands, CDIAC s strategy has been to design flexible data systems using proven technologies blended with new, evolving technologies and standards. CDIAC development teams are multidisciplinary and include computer science and information technology expertise, but also scientific expertise necessary to address data quality and documentation issues and to identify data products and system capabilities needed by climate change scientists. CDIAC has learned there is rarely a single commercial tool or product readily available to satisfy long-term scientific data system requirements (i.e., one size does not fit all and the breadth and diversity of environmental data are often too complex for easy use with commercial products) and typically deploys a variety of tools and data products in an effort to provide credible data freely to users worldwide. Like many scientific data management applications, CDIAC s data systems are highly customized to satisfy specific scientific usage requirements (e.g., developing data products specific for model use) but are also designed to be flexible and interoperable to take advantage of new software engineering techniques, standards (e.g., metadata standards) and tools and to support future Earth system data efforts (e.g., ocean acidification). CDIAC has provided data management support for numerous long-term measurement projects crucial to climate change science. One current example is the AmeriFlux measurement network. AmeriFlux provides continuous measurements from forests, grasslands, wetlands, and croplands in North, Central, and South America and offers important insight about carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. We share our approaches in satisfying the challenges of delivering AmeriFlux data worldwide to benefit others with similar challenges handling climate change data, further heighten awareness and use of an outstanding ecological data resource, and highlight expanded software engineering applications being used for climate change measurement data.

  20. Renewable Energy and Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chum, H. L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change issued the Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation (SRREN) at http://srren.ipcc-wg3.de/ (May 2011 electronic version; printed form ISBN 978-1-107-60710-1, 2012). More than 130 scientists contributed to the report.* The SRREN assessed existing literature on the future potential of renewable energy for the mitigation of climate change within a portfolio of mitigation options including energy conservation and efficiency, fossil fuel switching, RE, nuclear and carbon capture and storage (CCS). It covers the six most important renewable energy technologies - bioenergy, direct solar, geothermal, hydropower, ocean and wind, as well as their integration into present and future energy systems. It also takes into consideration the environmental and social consequences associated with these technologies, the cost and strategies to overcome technical as well as non-technical obstacles to their application and diffusion.