National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for moisture barrier product

  1. Multilayer moisture barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pankow, Joel W; Jorgensen, Gary J; Terwilliger, Kent M; Glick, Stephen H; Isomaki, Nora; Harkonen, Kari; Turkulainen, Tommy

    2015-04-21

    A moisture barrier, device or product having a moisture barrier or a method of fabricating a moisture barrier having at least a polymer layer, and interfacial layer, and a barrier layer. The polymer layer may be fabricated from any suitable polymer including, but not limited to, fluoropolymers such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) or polyethylene naphthalate (PEN), or ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE). The interfacial layer may be formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD). In embodiments featuring an ALD interfacial layer, the deposited interfacial substance may be, but is not limited to, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, AlSiO.sub.x, TiO.sub.2, and an Al.sub.2O.sub.3/TiO.sub.2 laminate. The barrier layer associated with the interfacial layer may be deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The barrier layer may be a SiO.sub.xN.sub.y film.

  2. Effectiveness of vertical moisture barriers in highway pavements on expansive soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayatilaka, Ranasinghege

    1993-01-01

    barriers will have little effect. Sites in wet and semi-arid climates, with medium cracked clay soils show the greatest benefit from using vertical moisture barriers....

  3. Flexible Ultra Moisture Barrier Film for Thin-Film Photovoltaic Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David M. Dean

    2012-10-30

    Flexible Thin-film photovoltaic (TFPV) is a low cost alternative to incumbent c-Si PV products as it requires less volume of costly semiconductor materials and it can potentially reduce installation cost. Among the TFPV options, copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) has the highest efficiency and is believed to be one of the most attractive candidates to achieve PV cost reduction. However, CIGS cells are very moisture sensitive and require module water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of less than 1x10-4 gram of water per square meter per day (g-H2O/m2/day). Successful development and commercialization of flexible transparent ultra moisture barrier film is the key to enable flexible CIGS TFPV products, and thus enable ultimate PV cost reduction. At DuPont, we have demonstrated at lab scale that we can successfully make polymer-based flexible transparent ultra moisture barrier film by depositing alumina on polymer films using atomic layer deposition (ALD) technology. The layer by layer ALD approach results in uniform and amorphous structure which effectively reduces pinhole density of the inorganic coating on the polymer, and thus allow the fabrication of flexible barrier film with WVTR of 10-5 g-H2O/m2/day. Currently ALD is a time-consuming process suitable only for high-value, relatively small substrates. To successfully commercialize the ALD-on-plastic technology for the PV industry, there is the need to scale up this technology and improve throughput. The goal of this contract work was to build a prototype demonstrating that the ALD technology could be scaled-up for commercial use. Unfortunately, the prototype failed to produce an ultra-barrier film by the close of the project.

  4. Hydrogenases and Barriers for Biotechnological Hydrogen Production...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hydrogenases and barriers for biotechnological hydrogen production technologies John W. Peters Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Department of Microbiology Montana State...

  5. Overcoming the Barrier to Achieving Large-Scale Production -...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Overcoming the Barrier to Achieving Large-Scale Production - A Case Study Overcoming the Barrier to Achieving Large-Scale Production - A Case Study This presentation summarizes the...

  6. Thin film electronic devices with conductive and transparent gas and moisture permeation barriers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Lin Jay

    2015-07-28

    Thin film electronic devices (or stacks integrated with a substrate) that include a permeation barrier formed of a thin layer of metal that provides a light transmitting and electrically conductive layer, wherein the electrical conductive layer is formed on a surface of the substrate or device layer such as a transparent conducting material layer with pin holes or defects caused by manufacturing and the thin layer of metal is deposited on the conductive layer and formed from a self-healing metal that forms self-terminating oxides. A permeation plug or block is formed in or adjacent to the thin film of metal at or proximate to the pin holes to block further permeation of contaminants through the pin holes.

  7. Thin film electronic devices with conductive and transparent gas and moisture permeation barriers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Lin Jay

    2013-12-17

    A thin film stack (100, 200) is provided for use in electronic devices such as photovoltaic devices. The stack (100, 200) may be integrated with a substrate (110) such as a light transmitting/transmissive layer. A electrical conductor layer (120, 220) is formed on a surface of the substrate (110) or device layer such as a transparent conducting (TC) material layer (120,220) with pin holes or defects (224) caused by manufacturing. The stack (100) includes a thin film (130, 230) of metal that acts as a barrier for environmental contaminants (226, 228). The metal thin film (130,230) is deposited on the conductor layer (120, 220) and formed from a self-healing metal such as a metal that forms self-terminating oxides. A permeation plug or block (236) is formed in or adjacent to the thin film (130, 230) of metal at or proximate to the pin holes (224) to block further permeation of contaminants through the pin holes (224).

  8. Relationships of radon diffusion coefficient with saturated hydraulic conductivity, fines content and moisture saturation of radon/infiltration barriers for the UMTRA Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, P.Y.; Chen, P.K. [Morrison-Knudsen Co., Inc., Boise, ID (United States)

    1994-01-24

    The release of {sup 222}Radon to the atmosphere is controlled by the rate of its gas transport through earthen materials. Of the many soil-related parameters, radon diffusion coefficient is the key parameter that characterizes this transport. We compared the radon diffusion coefficients measured at the laboratories for the UMTRA Project with simple empirical correlations developed by others. The empirical correlations predict the radon diffusion coefficient based on the fraction of moisture saturation and porosity. One of the more recent correlations agrees reasonably well with the measurements. In addition, by using a series of correlation curves, we studied the empirical relationships of the. radon diffusion coefficient with the saturated hydraulic conductivity, the fines content, and the moisture saturation in soil. The results reveal that a reliable determination of the long-term moisture and porosity is essential in the design of an adequate radon barrier with respect to the radon diffusion coefficient.

  9. Radio frequency plasma power dependence of the moisture permeation barrier characteristics of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited by remote plasma atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Hyunsoo [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of) [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Display Co. Ltd., Tangjeong, Chungcheongnam-Do 336-741 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hagyoung; Lee, Sanghun [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)] [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Heeyoung [Department of Nano-scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Nano-scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Hyeongtag [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of) [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nano-scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-07

    In the present study, we investigated the gas and moisture permeation barrier properties of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited on polyethersulfone films (PES) by capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) type Remote Plasma Atomic Layer Deposition (RPALD) at Radio Frequency (RF) plasma powers ranging from 100 W to 400 W in 100 W increments using Trimethylaluminum [TMA, Al(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}] as the Al source and O{sub 2} plasma as the reactant. To study the gas and moisture permeation barrier properties of 100-nm-thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at various plasma powers, the Water Vapor Transmission Rate (WVTR) was measured using an electrical Ca degradation test. WVTR decreased as plasma power increased with WVTR values for 400 W and 100 W of 2.6 × 10{sup ?4} gm{sup ?2}day{sup ?1} and 1.2 × 10{sup ?3} gm{sup ?2}day{sup ?1}, respectively. The trends for life time, Al-O and O-H bond, density, and stoichiometry were similar to that of WVTR with improvement associated with increasing plasma power. Further, among plasma power ranging from 100 W to 400 W, the highest power of 400 W resulted in the best moisture permeation barrier properties. This result was attributed to differences in volume and amount of ion and radical fluxes, to join the ALD process, generated by O{sub 2} plasma as the plasma power changed during ALD process, which was determined using a plasma diagnosis technique called the Floating Harmonic Method (FHM). Plasma diagnosis by FHM revealed an increase in ion flux with increasing plasma power. With respect to the ALD process, our results indicated that higher plasma power generated increased ion and radical flux compared with lower plasma power. Thus, a higher plasma power provides the best gas and moisture permeation barrier properties.

  10. GPR Surveys across a Prototype Surface Barrier to Determine Temporal and Spatial Variations in Soil Moisture Content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clement, William P.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2008-06-10

    Engineered surface barriers are expected to play a critical role in the closure of waste sites within the DOE complex and currently require monitoring to verify performance. The most comprehensive approach to assess performance is by water balance evaluation, which requires knowledge of the soil water storage. However, water storage measurements are still made mostly by point sensors and as result field-scale estimates are subject to much uncertainty. The objective of this study was to assess the viability of using ground penetrating radar (GPR) to monitor changes in soil moisture distribution, and therefore water storage, at multiple scales. Profiles were collected at four times during the year March, May, September and the following January to track the decrease in storage from the spring to the summer followed by the increase in the winter. A series of 40-m long profiles were collected using 100-Mhz antennas with a sample interval of 0.8 ns and 500 samples per trace in a 400-ns window. A common midpoint (CMP) survey was first used to determine an optimal antenna separation (3.5 m) after which data were collected using a wide-offset reflection geometry. Travel times were used to calculate the electromagnetic velocities which were then used to calculate water content using the Topp’s equation. Changes in the GPR response were easily observed over the course of the study and indicated spatial differences in moisture, which owing to the relatively uniform soil, can be attributed to differences in water removal by evapotranspiration. Water content also showed a strong seasonal strong seasonal dependence that correlate well with seasonal changes in precipitation and plant water uptake. An investigation of the effects of soil water content on the amplitude of the ground wave showed weaker amplitudes in the drier spring and summer months than in the winter suggesting a correlation between amplitude and water content. Results show that GPR can provide accurate non-invasive estimates of spatial and temporal changes in water content and therefore soil water storage.

  11. Hydrogenases and Barriers for Biotechnological Hydrogen Production...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    John Peters, Montana State University, at the Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop held September 24-25, 2013, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado....

  12. ~WOVEGROUND BIOMASS AND NET PRIMARY PRODUCTION ALONG .A VIRGINIA BARRIER ISLAND DUNE CHRONOSEQUENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    ~WOVEGROUND BIOMASS AND NET PRIMARY PRODUCTION ALONG .A VIRGINIA BARRIER ISLAND DUNE CHRONOSEQUENCE BIOMASS AND NET PRIMARY PRODUCTION ALONG A VIRGINIA BARRIER ISLAND DUNE CHRONOSEQUENCE John Joseph DiLustro Old Dominion University, 1994 Director: Dr. Frank P. Day Jr. Aboveground biomass was examined along

  13. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} multi-density layer structure as a moisture permeation barrier deposited by radio frequency remote plasma atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Hyunsoo [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Display Co. Ltd., Tangjeong, Chungcheongnam-Do 336-741 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Heeyoung [Department of Nano-scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hagyoung; Ham, Giyul; Shin, Seokyoon [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Hyeongtag, E-mail: hjeon@hanyang.ac.kr [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nano-scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-21

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited by remote plasma atomic layer deposition have been used for thin film encapsulation of organic light emitting diode. In this study, a multi-density layer structure consisting of two Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers with different densities are deposited with different deposition conditions of O{sub 2} plasma reactant time. This structure improves moisture permeation barrier characteristics, as confirmed by a water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) test. The lowest WVTR of the multi-density layer structure was 4.7 × 10{sup ?5} gm{sup ?2} day{sup ?1}, which is one order of magnitude less than WVTR for the reference single-density Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. This improvement is attributed to the location mismatch of paths for atmospheric gases, such as O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, in the film due to different densities in the layers. This mechanism is analyzed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, elastic recoil detection, and angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These results confirmed that the multi-density layer structure exhibits very good characteristics as an encapsulation layer via location mismatch of paths for H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} between the two layers.

  14. Production of High Quality Dust Control Foam to Minimize Moisture Addition to Coal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Termine, F.; Jordan, S. T.

    1985-01-01

    Foam is displacing wet suppression as the method of choice for controlling fugitive emissions from coal. Coal treated by wet suppression consumes through moisture addition, a heat energy equivalent of 1 ton out of every ...

  15. Moisture Barrier - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMission MissionModelingModified polynomialIndustrialSolar

  16. Geological and production characteristics of strandplain/barrier island reservoirs in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, E.L.; Fowler, M.; Jackson, S.; Madden, M.P.; Reeves, T.K.; Salamy, S.P.; Young, M.A.

    1994-12-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) primary mission in the oil research program is to maximize the economically and environmentally sound recovery of oil from domestic reservoirs and to preserve access to this resource. The Oil Recovery Field Demonstration Program supports DOE`s mission through cost-shared demonstrations of improved Oil Recovery (IOR) processes and reservoir characterization methods. In the past 3 years, the DOE has issued Program Opportunity Notices (PONs) seeking cost-shared proposals for the three highest priority, geologically defined reservoir classes. The classes have been prioritized based on resource size and risk of abandonment. This document defines the geologic, reservoir, and production characteristics of the fourth reservoir class, strandplain/barrier islands. Knowledge of the geological factors and processes that control formation and preservation of reservoir deposits, external and internal reservoir heterogeneities, reservoir characterization methodology, and IOR process application can be used to increase production of the remaining oil-in-place (IOR) in Class 4 reservoirs. Knowledge of heterogeneities that inhibit or block fluid flow is particularly critical. Using the TORIS database of 330 of the largest strandplain/barrier island reservoirs and its predictive and economic models, the recovery potential which could result from future application of IOR technologies to Class 4 reservoirs was estimated to be between 1.0 and 4.3 billion barrels, depending on oil price and the level of technology advancement. The analysis indicated that this potential could be realized through (1) infill drilling alone and in combination with polymer flooding and profile modification, (2) chemical flooding (sufactant), and (3) thermal processes. Most of this future potential is in Texas, Oklahoma, and the Rocky Mountain region. Approximately two-thirds of the potentially recoverable resource is at risk of abandonment by the year 2000.

  17. Overcoming the Barrier to Achieving Large-Scale Production - A Case Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits theCommittee Charter OperatingSemprius Confidential 1 Overcoming the Barriers

  18. Practical Considerations of Moisture in Baled Biomass Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William A. Smith; Ian J. Bonner; Kevin L. Kenney; Lynn M. Wendt

    2013-01-01

    Agricultural residues make up a large portion of the immediately available biomass feedstock for renewable energy markets. Current collection and storage methods rely on existing feed and forage practices designed to preserve nutrients and properties of digestibility. Low-cost collection and storage practices that preserve carbohydrates across a range of inbound moisture contents are needed to assure the economic and technical success of the emerging biomass industry. This study examines the movement of moisture in storage and identifies patterns of migration resulting from several on-farm storage systems and their impacts on moisture measurement and dry matter recovery. Baled corn stover and energy sorghum were stored outdoors in uncovered, tarp-covered, or wrapped stacks and sampled periodically to measure moisture and dry matter losses. Interpolation between discrete sampling locations in the stack improved bulk moisture content estimates and showed clear patterns of accumulation and re-deposition. Atmospheric exposure, orientation, and contact with barriers (i.e., soil, tarp, and wrap surfaces) were found to cause the greatest amount of moisture heterogeneity within stacks. Although the bulk moisture content of many stacks remained in the range suitable for aerobic stability, regions of high moisture were sufficient to support microbial activity, thus support dry matter loss. Stack configuration, orientation, and coverage methods are discussed relative to impact on moisture management and dry matter preservation. Additionally, sample collection and data analysis are discussed relative to assessment at the biorefinery as it pertains to stability in storage, queuing, and moisture carried into processing.

  19. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-04-29

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (i) a solid acetylenic compound and (ii) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the reusltant hydrogen.

  20. Fiber optic moisture sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirkham, R.R.

    1984-08-03

    A method and apparatus for sensing moisture changes by utilizing optical fiber technology. One embodiment uses a reflective target at the end of an optical fiber. The reflectance of the target varies with its moisture content and can be detected by a remote unit at the opposite end of the fiber. A second embodiment utilizes changes in light loss along the fiber length. This can be attributed to changes in reflectance of cladding material as a function of its moisture content. It can also be affected by holes or inserts interposed in the cladding material and/or fiber. Changing light levels can also be coupled from one fiber to another in an assembly of fibers as a function of varying moisture content in their overlapping lengths of cladding material.

  1. Exploring barriers, enablers,jJustification and planning methods for total productive maintenance implementation in automated production of commercial airplanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feliciano, David Michael

    2015-01-01

    The 737 program is currently producing 42 airplanes per month and will increase that production rate to 47 per month by 2017 and 52 per month in 2018 [1] [2]. In order to help meet these rates Boeing plans to increase the ...

  2. Barriers to the increased utilization of coal combustion/desulfurization by-products by government and commercial sectors - Update 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Sondreal, E.A.; Steadman, E.N.; Eylands, K.E.; Dockter, B.A.

    1999-07-01

    The following conclusions are drawn from the information presented in this report: (1) Joint efforts by industry and government focused on meeting RTC recommendations for reduction/removal of barriers have met with some success. The most notable of these are the changes in regulations related to CCB utilization by individual states. Regionally or nationally consistent state regulation of CCB utilization would further reduce regulatory barriers. (2) Technology changes will continue to be driven by the CAAA, and emission control technologies are expected to continue to impact the type and properties of CCBs generated. As a result, continued RD and D will be needed to learn how to utilize new and changing CCBs in environmentally safe, technically sound, and economically advantageous ways. Clean coal technology CCBs offer a new challenge because of the high volumes expected to be generated and the different characteristics of these CCBs compared to those of conventional CCBs. (3) Industry and government have developed the RD and D infrastructure to address the technical aspects of developing and testing new CCB utilization applications, but this work as well as constant quality control/quality assurance testing needs to be continued to address both industry wide issues and issues related to specific materials, regions, or users. (4) Concerns raised by environmental groups and the public will continue to provide environmental and technical challenges to the CCB industry. It is anticipated that the use of CCBs in mining applications, agriculture, structural fills, and other land applications will continue to be controversial and will require case-by-case technical and environmental information to be developed. The best use of this information will be in the development of generic regulations specifically addressing the use of CCBs in these different types of CCB applications. (5) The development of federal procurement guidelines under Executive Order 12873 titled ''Federal Acquisition, Recycling and Waste Prevention,'' in October 1993 was a positive step toward getting CCBs accepted in the marketplace. Industry needs to continue to work with EPA to develop additional procurement guidelines for products containing CCBs--and to take advantage of existing guidelines to encourage the use of CCBs in high-profile projects. (6) Accelerated progress toward increased utilization of CCBs can be made only if there is an increased financial commitment and technical effort by industry and government. The framework for this has been set by the successful cooperation of industry and government under DOE leadership. Cooperation should continue, with DOE fulfilling its lead role established in the RTC. It is clear that the RTC recommendations continue to have validity with respect to increasing CCB utilization and continue to provide guidance to industry and government agencies.

  3. Reaction dynamics of weakly-bound nuclei at near-barrier energies: impact of incomplete fusion on the angular distribution of direct alpha-production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexis Diaz-Torres

    2009-10-22

    The classical trajectory model with stochastic breakup for nuclear collision dynamics of weakly-bound nuclei is further developed. It allows a quantitative study of the importance of incomplete fusion dynamics in the angular distribution of direct alpha-production. Model calculations indicate that the incomplete fusion contribution diminishes with decreasing energy towards the Coulomb barrier, notably separating in angles from the contribution of no-capture breakup events. This should facilitate the experimental disentanglement of these competing reaction processes.

  4. Vehicle barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hirsh, Robert A. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1991-01-01

    A vehicle security barrier which can be conveniently placed across a gate opening as well as readily removed from the gate opening to allow for easy passage. The security barrier includes a barrier gate in the form of a cable/gate member in combination with laterally attached pipe sections fixed by way of the cable to the gate member and lateral, security fixed vertical pipe posts. The security barrier of the present invention provides for the use of cable restraints across gate openings to provide necessary security while at the same time allowing for quick opening and closing of the gate areas without compromising security.

  5. Evaluation of Moisture Susceptibility of Warm Mix Asphalt 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia Cucalon, Maria Lorena

    2013-05-03

    Economic, environmental and engineering benefits promote the rapid implementation of WMA technologies. However, concerns remain based on changes in the production process that may lead to moisture susceptibility in the ...

  6. Soil Density/Moisture Gauge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This scenario provides the planning instructions, guidance, and evaluation forms necessary to conduct an exercise involving a highway shipment of a soil moisture/density gauge (Class 7 -...

  7. Ultra-thin moisture barrier coatings for passive components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Robert A. (Robert Allen), 1980-

    2004-01-01

    Polymer Multi-Layer (PML) capacitors have demonstrated excellent performance for numerous power electronics applications, particularly where high temperature stability is required. These capacitors are sensitive to high ...

  8. Moisture and Structural Analysis for High Performance Hybrid Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grin, A.; Lstiburek, J.

    2012-09-01

    Based on past experience in the Building America program, BSC has found that combinations of materials and approaches—in other words, systems—usually provide optimum performance. Integration is necessary, as described in this research project. The hybrid walls analyzed utilize a combination of exterior insulation, diagonal metal strapping, and spray polyurethane foam and leave room for cavity-fill insulation. These systems can provide effective thermal, air, moisture, and water barrier systems in one assembly and provide structure.

  9. Process for treating moisture laden coal fines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Burl E. (New Kensington, PA); Henry, Raymond M. (Gibsonia, PA); Trivett, Gordon S. (South Surrey, CA); Albaugh, Edgar W. (Birmingham, AL)

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for making a free flowing granular product from moisture laden caked coal fines, such as wet cake, by mixing a water immiscible substance, such as oil, with the caked coal, preferably under low shear forces for a period of time sufficient to produce a plurality of free flowing granules. Each granule is preferably comprised of a dry appearing admixture of one or more coal particle, 2-50% by weight water and the water immiscible substance.

  10. Designing for Absolute Moisture Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunnelly, R. M.; Fex, J. P.

    2002-01-01

    public assembly building, chances are the origin of the IAQ problems stem from excessive moisture in the space. Excessive moisture in the space can either come from water damage (leaking pipes or poor integrity of the building envelope), or it comes from...

  11. Fiber optic moisture sensor with moisture-absorbing reflective target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirkham, Randy R. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing moisture changes by utilizing optical fiber technology. One embodiment uses a reflective target at the end of an optical fiber. The reflectance of the target varies with its moisture content and can be detected by a remote unit at the opposite end of the fiber. A second embodiment utilizes changes in light loss along the fiber length. This can be attributed to changes in reflectance of cladding material as a function of its moisture content. It can also be affected by holes or inserts interposed in the cladding material and/or fiber. Changing light levels can also be coupled from one fiber to another in an assembly of fibers as a function of varying moisture content in their overlapping lengths of cladding material.

  12. Moisture absorption in hybrid composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Dan Laro

    1983-01-01

    Moisture Analysis for Steady State Boundary Conditions", Journal of Com osite Materials, Vol. 15, March 1981, pp. 142-152. 7. Weitsman, Y. , Priorate Communication, Texas A&M University, January 1983. 8. Wirth, Patricia E. and Rodin, Ervin Y. , "A... of Department) December 1983 111. ABSTRACT Moisture Absorption in Hybrid Composites (December 1983) Dan Laro Clark, B. S. Aerospace Engineering Texas A&M University Co-Chairmen of Advisory Comnittee: Dr. Y. Weitsman Dr. W. J. Horn This thesis presents...

  13. CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS PARTNERSHIP ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND RELEVANCE TO THE DOE COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, H.; Langton, C.; Flach, G.; Kosson, D.

    2010-11-15

    The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) was initiated to reduce risk and uncertainties in the performance assessments that directly impact U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) environmental cleanup and closure programs. The CBP is supported by the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) and has been specifically addressing the following critical EM program needs: (i) the long-term performance of cementitious barriers and materials in nuclear waste disposal facilities and (ii) increased understanding of contaminant transport behavior within cementitious barrier systems to support the development and deployment of adequate closure technologies. To accomplish this, the CBP has two initiatives: (1) an experimental initiative to increase understanding of changes in cementitious materials over long times (> 1000 years) over changing conditions and (2) a modeling initiative to enhance and integrate a set of computational tools validated by laboratory and field experimental data to improve understanding and prediction of the long-term performance of cementitious barriers and waste forms used in nuclear applications. In FY10, the CBP developed the initial phase of an integrated modeling tool that would serve as a screening tool which could help in making decisions concerning disposal and tank closure. The CBP experimental programs are underway to validate this tool and provide increased understanding of how CM changes over time and under changing conditions. These initial CBP products that will eventually be enhanced are anticipated to reduce the uncertainties of current methodologies for assessing cementitious barrier performance and increase the consistency and transparency of the DOE assessment process. These tools have application to low activity waste forms, high level waste tank closure, D&D and entombment of major nuclear facilities, landfill waste acceptance criteria, and in-situ grouting and immobilization of vadose zone contamination. This paper summarizes the recent work provided by the CBP to support DOE operations and regulatory compliance and the accomplishments over the past 2 years. Impacts of this work include: (1) a forum for DOE-NRC technical exchange, (2) material characterization to support PA predictions, (3) reducing uncertainty in PA predictions, (4) establishing base case performance to improve PA predictions, and (5) improving understanding and quantification of moisture and contaminant transport used in PAs. Additional CBP accomplishments include: sponsorship of a national test bed workshop to obtain collaboration in establishing the path forward in obtaining actual data to support future predictions on cementitious barrier performance evaluations, and participation in an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Cooperative Research Project on the use of cementitious barriers for low-level radioactive waste treatment and disposal.

  14. FIRE IMPACTS ON AN ENGINEERED BARRIER’S PERFORMANCE: THE HANFORD BARRIER ONE YEAR AFTER A CONTROLLED BURN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Link, Steven O.; Leary, Kevin D.; Berlin, Gregory T.

    2010-03-31

    A critical unknown for long-term engineered barrier performance is the effect of wild fire during a post-institutional control environment where routine maintenance may be limited or non-existent. In September 2008, a controlled burn was conducted on one half of a vegetated, multilayered capillary barrier emplaced over a Hanford waste site. The effects on barrier performance have been monitored and documented over the past year. Soil physical, chemical, and hydrologic properties; plant floristics and density; and animal-use were characterized before and after the fire with the unburned half of the barrier serving as a control. Temperatures during the controlled burn ranged from 250 oC at 1.5 cm below the surface to over 700 oC at 1 m above the surface. Significant decreases in hydraulic conductivity and surface-soil wettability were observed immediately after the fire due primarily to hydrophobic conditions created by the fire. Major soil nutrients, pH, and electrical conductivity remain elevated post-fire. Up until June 2009, post-burn soil moisture content in the 0-1 m depth interval was significantly lower on the burned section than the unburned section and is attributed to differences in surface evaporation. Higher soil moisture contents in the 1-2 m interval on the burned section are attributed to insignificant water uptake owing to the absence of deep-rooted shrubs. Moisture profiles reversed after June to show lower water contents throughout the profile on the unburned section. Dense stands of sagebrush were destroyed from the fire allowing many more species to emerge thereby increasing species diversity. Seed sources contributing to this species diversification were from either the existing seedbank and/or wind-blown sources. Measurements are ongoing and the results are expected to help close a knowledge gap about barrier recovery after major disturbances.

  15. Stress-wave velocity of wood-based panels: Effect of moisture,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stress-wave velocity of wood-based panels: Effect of moisture, product type, and material direction Guangping Han Qinglin Wu Xiping Wang Abstract The effect of moisture on longitudinal stress-wave veloc- ity, particleboard, and southern pine lumber was evaluated. It was shown that the stress-wave velocity decreased

  16. T Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY08 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

    2009-02-01

    DOE’s Office of River Protection constructed a temporary surface barrier over a portion of the T Tank Farm as part of the T Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. The surface barrier is designed to minimize the infiltration of precipitation into the contaminated soil zone created by the Tank T-106 leak and minimize movement of the contamination. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barrier at reducing soil moisture. A solar-powered system was installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations (i.e., instrument Nests A, B, C, and D) beneath the barrier and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nest A is placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serves as a control, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barrier. Nest B provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests C and D are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barrier.

  17. Prediction of tilted capillary barrier performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, S.W.; McCord, J.T.; Dwyer, S.F.

    1997-04-01

    Capillary barriers, consisting of tilted fine-over-coarse layers under unsaturated conditions, have been suggested as landfill covers to divert water infiltration away from sensitive underground regions, especially for arid and semi-arid regions. The Hydrological Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) computer code is an evaluation tool for landfill covers used by designers and regulators. HELP is a quasi-two-dimensional model that predicts moisture movement into and through the underground soil and waste layers. Processes modeled within HELP include precipitation, runoff, evapotranspiration, unsaturated vertical drainage, saturated lateral drainage, and leakage through liners. Unfortunately, multidimensional unsaturated flow phenomena that are necessary for evaluating tilted capillary barriers are not included in HELP. Differences between the predictions of the HELP and those from a multidimensional unsaturated flow code are presented to assess the two different approaches. Comparisons are presented for the landfill covers including capillary barrier configurations at the Alternative Landfill Cover Demonstration (ALCD) being conducted at Sandia.

  18. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  19. Field study plan for alternate barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, H.D.; Gee, G.W.; Relyea, J.F.

    1989-05-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is providing technical assistance in selecting, designing, evaluating, and demonstrating protective barriers. As part of this technical assistance effort, asphalt, clay, and chemical grout will be evaluated for use as alternate barriers. The purpose of the subsurface layer is to reduce the likelihood that extreme events (i.e., 100-year maximum storms, etc.) will cause significant drainage through the barrier. The tests on alternate barriers will include laboratory and field analysis of the subsurface layer performance. This field test plan outlines the activities required to test and design subsurface moisture barriers. The test plan covers activities completed in FY 1988 and planned through FY 1992 and includes a field-scale test of one or more of the alternate barriers to demonstrate full-scale application techniques and to provide performance data on a larger scale. Tests on asphalt, clay, and chemical grout were initiated in FY 1988 in small (30.5 cm diameter) tube-layer lysimeters. The parameters used for testing the materials were different for each one. The tests had to take into account the differences in material characteristics and response to change in conditions, as well as information provided by previous studies. 33 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Moisture Durability with Vapor-Permeable Insulating Sheathing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepage, R.; Lstiburek, J.

    2013-09-01

    Exterior sheathing insulation is an effective strategy in increasing the overall R-value of wall assemblies; other benefits include decreasing the effects of thermal bridging and increasing the moisture durability of the built assembly. Vapor-permeable exterior insulation, such as mineral board or expanded polystyrene foam, are one such product that may be used to achieve these benefits. However, uncertainty exists on the effects of inward driven moisture and the interaction of increased sheathing temperatures on the moisture durability of the edifice. To address these concerns, Building Science Corporation (BSC) conducted a series of hygrothermal models for cities representing a range of different climate zones. This report describes the research project, key research questions, and the procedures utilized to analyse the problems.

  1. Predicting long-term moisture contents of earthen covers at uranium mill tailings sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, G.W.; Nielson, K.K.; Rogers, V.C.

    1984-09-01

    The three methods for long-term moisture prediction covered in this report are: estimates from water retention (permanent wilting point) data, correlation with climate and soil type, and detailed model simulation. The test results have shown: soils vary greatly in residual moisture. Expected long-term moisture saturation ratios (based on generalized soil characteristics) range from 0.2 to 0.8 for soils ranging in texture from sand to clay, respectively. These values hold for noncompacted field soils. Measured radon diffusion coefficients for soils at 15-bar water contents ranged from 5.0E-2 cm/sup 2//s to 5.0E-3 cm/sup 2//s for sands and clays, respectively, at typical field densities. In contrast, fine-textured pit-run earthen materials, subjected to optimum compaction (>85% Proctor density) and dried to the 15-bar water content, ranged from 0.7 to 0.9 moisture saturation. Compacted pit-run soils at these moisture contents exhibited radon diffusion coefficients as low as 3.0E-4 cm/sup 2//s. The residual moisture saturation for cover soils is not known since no engineered barrier has been in place for more than a few years. A comparison of methods for predicting moisture saturation indicates that model simulations are useful for predicting effects of climatic changes on residual soil moisture, but that long-term moisture also can be predicted with some degree of confidence using generalized soil properties or empirical correlations based both on soils and climatic information. The optimal soil cover design will likely include more than one layer of soil. A two-layer system using a thick (1-m minimum) plant root zone of uncompacted soil placed over a moistened, tightly compacted fine-textured soil is recommended. This design concept has been tested successfully at the Grand Junction, Colorado, tailings piles.

  2. Rapid Determination of Moisture and Fat in Meats By Microwave And Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claflin, Amy Elizabeth

    2013-08-30

    methods that require less time, labor, skill, and cost. Microwave drying and nuclear magnetic resonance technologies for the determination of moisture and fat in meat products, respectively, have been incorporated into the CEM Smart Trac 5 System...

  3. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arena, Lois; Mantha, Pallavi

    2013-05-01

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) team evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls. Wall assemblies evaluated included code minimum walls using spray foam insulation and fiberglass batts, high R-value walls at least 12 in. thick (R-40 and R-60 assemblies), and brick walls with interior insulation.

  4. Moisture Control | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment of Energy FacilitiesCleantechthe openControlling moisture can make your

  5. ULTRA BARRIER TOPSHEET (UBT) FOR FLEXIBLE PHOTOVOLTAICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan, Nachtigal; Berniard, Tracie; Murray, Bill; Roehrig, Mark; Schubert, Charlene; Spagnola, Joseph; Weigel, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This poster describes the 3M Ultra-Barrier Solar Film and its application; production scale-up and data; reliability and qualification testing; and improvements in the next generation.

  6. ULTRA BARRIER TOPSHEET (UBT) FOR FLEXIBLE PHOTOVOLTAICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeScioli, Derek

    2013-06-01

    This slide-show presents 3M photovoltaic-related products, particularly flexible components. Emphasis is on the 3M Ultra Barrier Solar Films. Topics covered include reliability and qualification testing and flexible photovoltaic encapsulation costs.

  7. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, R.E.; Ramsey, D.R.; Stampfer, J.F.; Macdonald, J.M.

    1998-03-31

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material. 4 figs.

  8. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, Robert E. (Los Alamos, NM); Ramsey, David R. (Bothel, WA); Stampfer, Joseph F. (Santa Fe, NM); Macdonald, John M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material.

  9. Aalborg Universitet Moisture risks arising from retrofitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    on an evaluation by the building owner or user. However, the risk is not quantified. To make the decision moreAalborg Universitet Moisture risks arising from retrofitting Møller, Eva B.; Aagaard, Niels for published version (APA): Møller, E. B., & Aagaard, N-J. (2013). Moisture risks arising from retrofitting

  10. New Barrier Coating Materials for PV Module Backsheets: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, G. D.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Terwilliger, K.; Glick, S. H.; Pern, J.; McMahon, T. J.

    2002-05-01

    This conference paper describes the high moisture barrier high resistivity coatings on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) have been fabricated and characterized for use in PV module back sheet applications. These thin film barriers exhibit water vapor transmission rates (WVTR) as low as 0.1 g/m2-day at 37.8 C and have shown excellent adhesion (> 10 N/mm) to both ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) and PET even after filtered xenon arc lamp UV exposure. The WVTR and adhesion values for this construction are compared to and shown to be superior to candidate polymeric backsheet materials.

  11. Hydrogen permeation resistant barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGuire, J.C.; Brehm, W.F.

    1980-02-08

    A hydrogen permeation resistant barrier is formed by diffusing aluminum into an iron or nickel alloy and forming an intermetallic aluminide layer.

  12. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council's Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of ...

  13. Hazards and operability study for the surface moisture monitoring system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Board, B.D.

    1996-04-04

    The Hanford Nuclear Reservation Tank Farms` underground waste tanks have been used to store liquid radioactive waste from defense materials production since the 1940`s. Waste in certain of the tanks may contain material in the form of ferrocyanide or various organic compounds which could potentially be susceptible to condensed phase chemical reactions. Because of the presence of oxidizing materials (nitrate compounds) and heat sources (radioactive decay and chemical reactions), the ferrocyanide or organic material could potentially fuel a propagating exothermic reaction with undesirable consequences. Analysis and experiments indicate that the reaction propagation and/or initiation may be prevented by the presence of sufficient moisture in the waste. Because the reaction would probably be initiated at the surface of the waste, evidence of sufficient moisture concentration would help provide evidence that the tank waste can continue to be safely stored. The Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS) was developed to collect data on the surface moisture in the waste by inserting two types of probes (singly) into a waste tank-a neutron probe and an electromagnetic inductance (EMI) probe. The sensor probes will be placed on the surface of the waste utilizing a moveable deployment arm to lower them through an available riser. The movement of the SMMS within the tank will be monitored by a camera lowered through an adjacent riser. The SMMS equipment is the subject of this study. Hazards and Operability Analysis (HAZOP) is a systematic technique for assessing potential hazards and/or operability problems for a new activity. It utilizes a multidiscipline team of knowledgeable individuals in a systematic brainstorming effort. The results of this study will be used as input to an Unreviewed Safety Question determination.

  14. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Anand A. (Orlando, FL); Campbell, Christian X. (Orlando, FL); Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  15. Retractable barrier strip

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marts, Donna J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Barker, Stacey G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wowczuk, Andrew (Wheeling, WV); Vellenoweth, Thomas E. (Wheeling, WV)

    2002-01-01

    A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture spikes for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture spikes have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture spikes removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The plurality of barrier blocks hare hingedly interconnected by complementary hinges integrally formed into the side of each barrier block which allow the strip to be rolled for easy storage and retrieval, but which prevent irregular or back bending of the strip. The shafts of adjacent barrier blocks are pivotally interconnected via a double hinged universal joint to accommodate irregularities in a roadway surface and to transmit torsional motion of the shaft from block to block. A single flexshaft cable is connected to the shaft of an end block to allow a user to selectively cause the shafts of a plurality of adjacently connected barrier blocks to rotate the tire-puncture spikes to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire, and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. The flexshaft is provided with a resiliently biased retracting mechanism, and a release latch for allowing the spikes to be quickly retracted after the intended vehicle tire is punctured.

  16. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  17. Distributed fiber optic moisture intrusion sensing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-06-24

    Method and system for monitoring and identifying moisture intrusion in soil such as is contained in landfills housing radioactive and/or hazardous waste. The invention utilizes the principle that moist or wet soil has a higher thermal conductance than dry soil. The invention employs optical time delay reflectometry in connection with a distributed temperature sensing system together with heating means in order to identify discrete areas within a volume of soil wherein temperature is lower. According to the invention an optical element and, optionally, a heating element may be included in a cable or other similar structure and arranged in a serpentine fashion within a volume of soil to achieve efficient temperature detection across a large area or three dimensional volume of soil. Remediation, moisture countermeasures, or other responsive action may then be coordinated based on the assumption that cooler regions within a soil volume may signal moisture intrusion where those regions are located.

  18. Retractable barrier strip

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marts, D.J.; Barker, S.G.; McQueen, M.A.

    1996-04-16

    A portable barrier strip is described having retractable tire-puncture means for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture means, such as spikes, have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture means removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The shaft removably and pivotally interconnects the plurality of barrier blocks. Actuation cables cause the shaft to rotate the tire-puncture means to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. Each tire-puncture means is received in a hollow-bed portion of its respective barrier block when in the retracted position. The barrier strip rests in its deployed position and substantially motionless as a tire rolls thereon and over. The strip is rolled up for retrieval, portability, and storage purposes, and extended and unrolled in its deployed position for use. 13 figs.

  19. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shurter, R.P.

    1992-09-15

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput. 3 figs.

  20. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shurter, Roger P. (Jemez Springs, NM)

    1992-01-01

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput.

  1. Cooling Energy Measurements of Houses with Attics Containing Radiant Barriers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levins, W. P.; Karnitz, M. A.; Knight, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the energy savings brought about by installing radiant barriers in the attics of single-family houses. The radiant barrier used for this test was a product...

  2. Researchers smash the inkjet resolution barrier | printweek.com | Latest Pr...ews, Jobs, Features, Product Reviews, Used Printing and Packaging Machinery q Skip to Content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    , Product Reviews, Used Printing and Packaging Machinery q Skip to Content q Skip to Channel Navigation q Buying q Paper q Materials q Business q Environment q Design http://www.printweek.com/news/737375 Printing and Packaging Machinery News q Print Article q Email to a friend Researchers smash the inkjet

  3. Silicon Oxynitride Thin Film Barriers for PV Packaging (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Cueto, J. A.; Glick, S. H.; Terwilliger, K. M.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Pankow, J. W.; Keyes, B. M.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Pern, F. J.

    2006-10-03

    Dielectric, adhesion-promoting, moisture barriers comprised of silicon oxynitride thin film materials (SiOxNy with various material stoichiometric compositions x,y) were applied to: 1) bare and pre-coated soda-lime silicate glass (coated with transparent conductive oxide SnO2:F and/or aluminum), and polymer substrates (polyethylene terephthalate, PET, or polyethylene napthalate, PEN); plus 2) pre- deposited photovoltaic (PV) cells and mini-modules consisting of amorphous silicon (a-Si) and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) thin-film PV technologies. We used plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process with dilute silane, nitrogen, and nitrous oxide/oxygen gas mixtures in a low-power (< or = 10 milliW per cm2) RF discharge at ~ 0.2 Torr pressure, and low substrate temperatures < or = 100(degrees)C, over deposition areas ~ 1000 cm2. Barrier properties of the resulting PV cells and coated-glass packaging structures were studied with subsequent stressing in damp-heat exposure at 85(degrees)C/85% RH. Preliminary results on PV cells and coated glass indicate the palpable benefits of the barriers in mitigating moisture intrusion and degradation of the underlying structures using SiOxNy coatings with thicknesses in the range of 100-200 nm.

  4. Soil Moisture Constants and Physical Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Kauai, and Oahu. These soils represent 10 great soil groups commonly found in the State of HawaiiSoil Moisture Constants and Physical Properties of Selected Soils in Hawaii Teruo Yamamoto U S is a geologist with the Pacific Southwest Sta- tion's watershed management research project in Honolulu, Hawaii

  5. Moisture Penetration Through Optical Fiber Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Moisture Penetration Through Optical Fiber Coatings J. L. Armstrong, M. J. Matthewson and C. R Fiber Coatings Janet L. Armstrong, 1 M. John Matthewson, 1 Charles R. Kurkjian 2 1 Rutgers University for measuring the diffusion coefficients of water vapor through optical fiber polymer coatings has been

  6. Assessment of NGNP Moisture Ingress Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Landman

    2011-04-01

    An assessment of modular HTGR moisture ingress events, making use of a phenomena identification and ranking process, was conducted by a panel of experts in the related areas for the U.S. next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) design. Consideration was given mainly to the prismatic core gas-cooled reactor configurations incorporating a steam generator within the primary circuit.

  7. Micro heat barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marshall, Albert C.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    2003-08-12

    A highly effective, micron-scale micro heat barrier structure and process for manufacturing a micro heat barrier based on semiconductor and/or MEMS fabrication techniques. The micro heat barrier has an array of non-metallic, freestanding microsupports with a height less than 100 microns, attached to a substrate. An infrared reflective membrane (e.g., 1 micron gold) can be supported by the array of microsupports to provide radiation shielding. The micro heat barrier can be evacuated to eliminate gas phase heat conduction and convection. Semi-isotropic, reactive ion plasma etching can be used to create a microspike having a cusp-like shape with a sharp, pointed tip (<0.1 micron), to minimize the tip's contact area. A heat source can be placed directly on the microspikes. The micro heat barrier can have an apparent thermal conductivity in the range of 10.sup.-6 to 10.sup.-7 W/m-K. Multiple layers of reflective membranes can be used to increase thermal resistance.

  8. Field observations of soil moisture variability across scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Famiglietti, James S; Ryu, Dongryeol; Berg, Aaron A; Rodell, Matthew; Jackson, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    extent scales and wet- ness conditions. The more than 36,000deviation, CV, and skew- ness versus mean moisture contentstandard deviation and skew- ness versus mean soil moisture,

  9. Climate Change Effects on California Precipitation and Soil Moisture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, Neil

    2015-01-01

    soil moisture, water year-average 2 meter air temperature (soil moisture, water year-average 2 meter air temperature (air temperature (“T2 dry ssn ”, unit ? C) changes for all 10 water

  10. Soil moisture modeling and scaling using passive microwave remote sensing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Narendra N.

    2007-04-25

    Soil moisture in the shallow subsurface is a primary hydrologic state governing land-atmosphere interaction at various scales. The primary objectives of this study are to model soil moisture in the root zone in a distributed ...

  11. Technology Solutions Case Study: Moisture Management of High-Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-12-01

    Moisture management of high-R walls is important to ensure optimal performance. This case study, developed by Building America team Building Science Corporation, focuses on how eight high-R walls handle the three main sources of moisture—construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leaks.

  12. Surface moisture measurement system operation and maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargo, G.F., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-11

    The purpose of this manual is to provide detailed operating instructions for the Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS).In addition, operating instructions for the Liquid Observation Well Moisture Measurement System (LOWMMS) are included. These systems were developed primarily in support of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Safety Programs for moisture measurement in organic and ferrocyanide watch list tanks.

  13. Using moisture transport properties of rice seed components for identifying fissure resistance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Audrey Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Fissure resistance was related to the moisture transport properties of Cypress, Lemont, LaGrue, and Teqing rice varieties. The moisture transport properties, moisture diffusivity and resistance, were calculated using a three-dimensional moisture...

  14. Thermal barrier coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

    2001-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

  15. Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

  16. Application of TDR technology to water content monitoring of capillary barriers made of pulp and paper residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, A.R.; Burnotte, F.; Lefebvre, G.

    1999-03-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) can be curbed by covering tailings with capillary barriers. The purposes of these barriers is to prevent O{sub 2} from interacting with mine residues. This control can be made by keeping a high degree of moisture inside the cover material. Saturation is thus a key parameter to be monitored. The purpose of this paper is to present how the time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique can be used in order to monitor the volumetric water content for pulp and paper residues that have been used as capillary barriers. Calibration curves for deinking residues are presented and compared to literature data relating to mineral and organic soils.

  17. Assessing Impact of Biofuel Production on Regional Water Resource...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Achieving Water-Sustainable Bioenergy Production Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June 2006 Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June 2006...

  18. Underground waste barrier structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

  19. Backfill barrier as a component in a multiple barrier nuclear waste isolation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, E.J.

    1980-05-01

    Quantitative estimates of the potential effectiveness of backfill barriers based on a linear sorption model are presented. Using getters such as clays (known sorbents), a backfill approximately 1-foot-thick can delay by 10/sup 4/ to 10/sup 5/ years the breakthrough of transuranics. A delay of 10/sup 3/ years is possible for major cationic fission products. These delays can be achieved provided that (1) the distribution coefficient (K/sub d/, a measure of affinity for sorbed species) for the barrier material is equal to or greater than 2000 ml/g for transuranics and 200 ml/g for fission products; (2) the interstitial groundwater velocity through the barrier is limited to 1 ft/year or less; (3) the effective porosity of the barrier is equal to or less than 0.1; and (4) the physical integrity of the barrier is maintained (no channels or cracks). Mixtures containing expanding clays such as smectites and other getters are expected to satisfy these criteria.

  20. Barrier breaching device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honodel, C.A.

    1983-06-01

    A barrier breaching device that is designed primarily for opening holes in interior walls of buildings uses detonating fuse for explosive force. The fuse acts as the ribs or spokes of an umbrella-like device that may be opened up to form a cone. The cone is placed against the wall so that detonating fuse that rings the base of the device and which is ignited by the spoke-like fuses serves to cut a circular hole in the wall.

  1. Reducing the moisture content of clean coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehoe, D. )

    1992-12-01

    Coal moisture content can profoundly effect the cost of burning coal in utility boilers. Because of the large effect of coal moisture, the Empire State Electric Energy Research Corporation (ESEERCO) contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute to investigate advanced coal dewatering methods at its Coal Quality Development Center. This report contains the test result on the high-G solid-bowl centrifuge, the second of four devices to be tested. The high-G solid-bowl centrifuge removes water for coal by spinning the coal/water mixture rapidly in a rotating bowl. This causes the coal to cling to the sides of the bowl where it can be removed, leaving the water behind. Testing was performed at the CQDC to evaluate the effect of four operating variables (G-ratio, feed solids concentration, dry solids feed rate, and differential RPM) on the performance of the high-G solid-bowl centrifuge. Two centrifuges of different bowl diameter were tested to establish the effect of scale-up of centrifuge performance. Testing of the two centrifuges occurred from 1985 through 1987. CQDC engineers performed 32 tests on the smaller of the two centrifuges, and 47 tests on the larger. Equations that predict the performance of the two centrifuges for solids recovery, moisture content of the produced coal, and motor torque were obtained. The equations predict the observed data well. Traditional techniques of establishing the performance of centrifuge of different scale did not work well with the two centrifuges, probably because of the large range of G-ratios used in the testing. Cost of operating a commercial size bank of centrifuges is approximately $1.72 per ton of clean coal. This compares well with thermal drying, which costs $1.82 per ton of clean coal.

  2. Moisture and temperature effects in composite materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Gwo-Ping

    1987-01-01

    ) Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Y. Weitsman Th1s thesis concerns env1ronmental effects in graphite/epoxy composites, with emphas1s on environmentally induced damage. The thesis consists of two major parts. The first part presents an experimental 1... weight gain (in %) of a 12-ply unidirectional AS4/3502 graphite/epoxy laminate during exposure to 346'K, 95% R. H. environment. Data (i) and predictions of Flck's law (solid line) Moisture content (ln %) of a 12-ply unidirectional AS4/3502 graphite...

  3. Hydrogenases and Barriers for Biotechnological Hydrogen Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc.,1ActivityfromWorkshop:Powered

  4. Moisture Management for High R-Value Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepage, R.; Schumacher, C.; Lukachko, A.

    2013-11-01

    This report explains the moisture-related concerns for high R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. In this project, hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones. The modeling program assessed the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage; the report presents results of the study.

  5. Performing a local barrier operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-03-04

    Performing a local barrier operation with parallel tasks executing on a compute node including, for each task: retrieving a present value of a counter; calculating, in dependence upon the present value of the counter and a total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a base value, the base value representing the counter's value prior to any task joining the local barrier; calculating, in dependence upon the base value and the total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a target value of the counter, the target value representing the counter's value when all tasks have joined the local barrier; joining the local barrier, including atomically incrementing the value of the counter; and repetitively, until the present value of the counter is no less than the target value of the counter: retrieving the present value of the counter and determining whether the present value equals the target value.

  6. Performing a local barrier operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-03-04

    Performing a local barrier operation with parallel tasks executing on a compute node including, for each task: retrieving a present value of a counter; calculating, in dependence upon the present value of the counter and a total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a base value of the counter, the base value representing the counter's value prior to any task joining the local barrier; calculating, in dependence upon the base value and the total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a target value, the target value representing the counter's value when all tasks have joined the local barrier; joining the local barrier, including atomically incrementing the value of the counter; and repetitively, until the present value of the counter is no less than the target value of the counter: retrieving the present value of the counter and determining whether the present value equals the target value.

  7. Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier Program: Asphalt technology data and status report - FY 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, H.D.; Romine, R.A.; Zacher, A.H.

    1994-09-01

    The asphalt layer within the Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier (HPIB) is an important component of the overall design. This layer provides a RCRA equivalent backup to the overlying earthen layers in the unlikely event that these layers are not able to reduce the infiltration rate to less than 0.05 cm/yr. There is only limited amount of information on using asphalt for a moisture infiltration barrier over the long times required by the HPIB. Therefore, a number of activities are under way, as part of the Barrier Development Program, to obtain data on the performance of asphalt as a moisture barrier in a buried environment over a 1000-year period. These activities include (1) determining RCRA equivalency, (2) measurement of physical properties, (3) measurement of aging characteristics, and (4) relationship to ancient asphalt analogs. During FY 1994 progress was made on all of these activities. Studies were conducted both in the laboratory and on the prototype barrier constructed over the 216-B-57 crib in the 200 East Area on the Hanford Site. This report presents results obtained from the asphalt technology tasks during FY 1994. Also included are updates to planned activities for asphalt analogs and monitoring the asphalt test pad near the prototype barrier. Measurements of hydraulic conductivity on the HMAC portion of the prototype barrier show that the asphalt layers easily meet the RCRA standard of 1 {times} 10{sup -7} cm/s. In-place measurements using a new field falling head technique show an average of 3.66 {times} 10{sup -8} cm/s, while cores taken from the north end of the prototype and measured in a laboratory setup averaged 1.29 {times} 10{sup -9} cm/s. Measurements made on the fluid applied asphalt membrane (polymer-modified asphalt) show an extremely low permeability of less than 1 {times} 10{sup -11} cm/s.

  8. ORNL Radiant Barrier - ETSD Division

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ETSD Division EES Directorate ORNL Building Technologies Research and Integration Center Energy and Transportation Science Division Overview How do radiation barriers save energy?...

  9. Techno-Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Production by Gasification of Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the cost of the production of hydrogen from three candidate biomass feedstocks and identify the barriers

  10. The moisture budget in relation to convection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Robert Wilson

    1976-01-01

    : x10-6g cm-2s-1) 30 (, 'j I" '~, ". :, ', :, ':: P, ' r 0 (a) 0600 GMT, 24 April 1975 . . . ~t' . '. a--'-, . ' ' P) D (b) 0600 GiXT, 25 April 1975 Analyses of the net vertacal boundary flux of moisture in the layer from 500-350 mb... 120 4 060 , J 16O I 2 1" , 090 ~ J 120 32+ r I 24~ 190 12 10 (b) 700 mb Fig. 3. Synoptic charts for 0600 GMT on 24 April 1975. 16 86. 16 04 08 I 12 I I f 08 I 08 I L 08 12 16 (a) Surface 20 - 8 A 4X 4 0 ) O2O ~~(~ -2 J--4...

  11. Agriculture intensifies soil moisture decline in Northern China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yaling; Pan, Zhihua; Zhuang, Qianlai; Miralles, Diego; Teuling, Adriann; Zhang, Tonglin; An, Pingli; Dong, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jingting; He, Di; Wang, Liwei; Pan, Xuebiao; Bai, Wei; Niyogi, Dev

    2015-07-09

    Northern China is one of the most densely populated regions in the world. Agricultural activities have intensified since the 1980s to provide food security to the country. However, this intensification has likely contributed to an increasing scarcity in water resources, which may in turn be endangering food security. Based on in-situ measurements of soil moisture collected in agricultural plots during 1983–2012, we find that topsoil (0–50 cm) volumetric water content during the growing season has declined significantly (p<0.01), with a trend of -0.011 to -0.015 m3 m-3 per decade. Observed discharge declines for the three large river basins are consistent with the effects of agricultural intensification, although other factors (e.g. dam constructions) likely have contributed to these trends. Practices like fertilizer application have favoured biomass growth and increased transpiration rates, thus reducing available soil water. In addition, the rapid proliferation of water-expensive crops (e.g., maize) and the expansion of the area dedicated to food production have also contributed to soil drying. Adoption of alternative agricultural practices that can meet the immediate food demand without compromising future water resources seem critical for the sustainability of the food production system.

  12. Agriculture intensifies soil moisture decline in Northern China

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Yaling; Pan, Zhihua; Zhuang, Qianlai; Miralles, Diego; Teuling, Adriann; Zhang, Tonglin; An, Pingli; Dong, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jingting; He, Di; et al

    2015-07-09

    Northern China is one of the most densely populated regions in the world. Agricultural activities have intensified since the 1980s to provide food security to the country. However, this intensification has likely contributed to an increasing scarcity in water resources, which may in turn be endangering food security. Based on in-situ measurements of soil moisture collected in agricultural plots during 1983–2012, we find that topsoil (0–50 cm) volumetric water content during the growing season has declined significantly (pmore »with the effects of agricultural intensification, although other factors (e.g. dam constructions) likely have contributed to these trends. Practices like fertilizer application have favoured biomass growth and increased transpiration rates, thus reducing available soil water. In addition, the rapid proliferation of water-expensive crops (e.g., maize) and the expansion of the area dedicated to food production have also contributed to soil drying. Adoption of alternative agricultural practices that can meet the immediate food demand without compromising future water resources seem critical for the sustainability of the food production system.« less

  13. Moisture Management of High-R Walls (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-12-01

    The following report explains the moisture-related concerns for High R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. Hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones (2, 3, 4C, 4, 5A, and 7, respectively). The simulations are informed by experience gained from past research in this area and validated by field measurement and forensic experience. The modeling program was developed to assess the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage. The peak annual moisture content of the wood based exterior sheathing was used to comparatively analyze the response to the moisture loads for each of the walls in each given city. Walls which experienced sheathing moisture contents between 20% and 28% were identified as risky, whereas those exceeding 28% were identified as very high risk. All of the wall assemblies perform well under idealized conditions. However, only the walls with exterior insulation, or cavity insulation which provides a hygrothermal function similar to exterior insulation, perform adequately when exposed to moisture loads. Walls with only cavity insulation are particularly susceptible to air leakage condensation. None of the walls performed well when a precipitation based bulk water leak was introduced to the backside of the sheathing, emphasizing the importance of proper flashing details.

  14. High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  15. Moisture Management for High R-Value Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepage, R.; Schumacher, C.; Lukachko, A.

    2013-11-01

    The following report explains the moisture-related concerns for High R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. Hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones (2, 3, 4C, 4, 5A, and 7, respectively). The simulations are informed by experience gained from past research in this area and validated by field measurement and forensic experience. The modeling program was developed to assess the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage. The peak annual moisture content of the wood based exterior sheathing was used to comparatively analyze the response to the moisture loads for each of the walls in each given city. Walls which experienced sheathing moisture contents between 20% and 28% were identified as risky, whereas those exceeding 28% were identified as very high risk. All of the wall assemblies perform well under idealized conditions. However, only the walls with exterior insulation, or cavity insulation which provides a hygrothermal function similar to exterior insulation, perform adequately when exposed to moisture loads. Walls with only cavity insulation are particularly susceptible to air leakage condensation. None of the walls performed well when a precipitation based bulk water leak was introduced to the backside of the sheathing, emphasizing the importance of proper flashing details.

  16. High-R Walls for Remodeling. Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  17. Thermal barrier coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburg, PA)

    2010-06-22

    This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

  18. Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In this study, we attempt to provide a comprehensive examination of various market and policy barriers to demand response providing ancillary services in both ISO/RTO and non-ISO/RTO regions, especially at the program provider level. It is useful to classify barriers in order to create a holistic understanding and identify parties that could be responsible for their removal. This study develops a typology of barriers focusing on smaller customers that must rely on a program provider (i.e., electric investor owned utility or IOU, ARC) to create an aggregated DR resource in order to bring ancillary services to the balancing authority. The barriers were identified through examinations of regulatory structures, market environments, and product offerings; and discussions with industry stakeholders and regulators.

  19. Sandia Energy - Siting and Barrier Mitigation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Siting and Barrier Mitigation Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Siting and Barrier Mitigation Siting and Barrier MitigationTara Camacho-Lopez2015-08-12...

  20. 200-BP-1 Prototype Hanford Barrier -- 15 Years of Performance Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Link, Steven O.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2011-09-30

    Monitoring is an essential component of engineered barrier system design and operation. A composite capacitive cover, including a capillary break and an evapotranspiration (ET) barrier at the Hanford Site, is generating data that can be used to help resolve these issues. The prototype Hanford barrier was constructed over the 216-B-57 Crib in 1994 to evaluate surface-barrier constructability, construction costs, and physical and hydrologic performance at the field scale. The barrier has been routinely monitored between November 1994 and September 1998 as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) treatability test of barrier performance for the 200 BP 1 Operable Unit. Since FY 1998, monitoring has focused on a more limited set of key water balance, stability, and biotic parameters. In FY 2009, data collection was focused on: (1) water-balance monitoring, consisting of precipitation, runoff, soil moisture storage, and drainage measurements with evapotranspiration calculated by difference; (2) stability monitoring, consisting of asphalt-layer-settlement, basalt-side-slope-stability, and surface-elevation measurements; (3) vegetation dynamics; and (4) animal use. September 2009 marked 15 years since the start of monitoring and the collection of performance data. This report describes the results of monitoring activities during the period October 1, 2008, through September 30, 2009, and summarizes the 15 years of performance data collected from September 1994 through September 2009.

  1. Manufacturing Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization Manufacturing Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization Presented at the NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D...

  2. Permeable Reactive Barriers | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    reaction occurs with the barrier material that results in adsorption, mineral precipitation, or degradation to a harmless compound. Reactive barriers that do not incorporate...

  3. Vehicle barrier with access delay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swahlan, David J; Wilke, Jason

    2013-09-03

    An access delay vehicle barrier for stopping unauthorized entry into secure areas by a vehicle ramming attack includes access delay features for preventing and/or delaying an adversary from defeating or compromising the barrier. A horizontally deployed barrier member can include an exterior steel casing, an interior steel reinforcing member and access delay members disposed within the casing and between the casing and the interior reinforcing member. Access delay members can include wooden structural lumber, concrete and/or polymeric members that in combination with the exterior casing and interior reinforcing member act cooperatively to impair an adversarial attach by thermal, mechanical and/or explosive tools.

  4. Relativistic tunneling through opaque barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Leo, Stefano; Leonardi, Vinicius [Department of Applied Mathematics, State University of Campinas, SP 13083-970, Campinas (Brazil)

    2011-02-15

    We propose an analytical study of relativistic tunneling through opaque barriers. We obtain a closed formula for the phase time. This formula is in excellent agreement with the numerical simulations and corrects the standard formula obtained by the stationary phase method. An important result is found when the upper limit of the incoming energy distribution coincides with the upper limit of the tunneling zone. In this case, the phase time is proportional to the barrier width.

  5. Global interrupt and barrier networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton-On-Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Kopcsay, Gerard V. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Mount Kisco, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Mount Kisco, NY)

    2008-10-28

    A system and method for generating global asynchronous signals in a computing structure. Particularly, a global interrupt and barrier network is implemented that implements logic for generating global interrupt and barrier signals for controlling global asynchronous operations performed by processing elements at selected processing nodes of a computing structure in accordance with a processing algorithm; and includes the physical interconnecting of the processing nodes for communicating the global interrupt and barrier signals to the elements via low-latency paths. The global asynchronous signals respectively initiate interrupt and barrier operations at the processing nodes at times selected for optimizing performance of the processing algorithms. In one embodiment, the global interrupt and barrier network is implemented in a scalable, massively parallel supercomputing device structure comprising a plurality of processing nodes interconnected by multiple independent networks, with each node including one or more processing elements for performing computation or communication activity as required when performing parallel algorithm operations. One multiple independent network includes a global tree network for enabling high-speed global tree communications among global tree network nodes or sub-trees thereof. The global interrupt and barrier network may operate in parallel with the global tree network for providing global asynchronous sideband signals.

  6. The effect of moisture on a glass/epoxy composite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatawanich, Candy Suda

    1996-01-01

    Research was done to determine the effect of moisture on the transverse tensile strength and the interfacial shear strength of a glass/epoxy composite. Specimens with two different fiber sizings, one epoxy compatible and one vinyl-ester compatible...

  7. Moisture Risk in Unvented Attics Due to Air Leakage Paths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prahl, D.; Shaffer, M.

    2014-11-01

    IBACOS completed an initial analysis of moisture damage potential in an unvented attic insulated with closed-cell spray polyurethane foam. To complete this analysis, the research team collected field data, used computational fluid dynamics to quantify the airflow rates through individual airflow (crack) paths, simulated hourly flow rates through the leakage paths with CONTAM software, correlated the CONTAM flow rates with indoor humidity ratios from Building Energy Optimization software, and used Warme und Feuchte instationar Pro two-dimensional modeling to determine the moisture content of the building materials surrounding the cracks. Given the number of simplifying assumptions and numerical models associated with this analysis, the results indicate that localized damage due to high moisture content of the roof sheathing is possible under very low airflow rates. Reducing the number of assumptions and approximations through field studies and laboratory experiments would be valuable to understand the real-world moisture damage potential in unvented attics.

  8. Moisture Risk in Unvented Attics Due to Air Leakage Paths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prahl, D.; Shaffer, M.

    2014-11-01

    IBACOS completed an initial analysis of moisture damage potential in an unvented attic insulated with closed-cell spray polyurethane foam. To complete this analysis, the research team collected field data, used computational fluid dynamics to quantify the airflow rates through individual airflow (crack) paths, simulated hourly flow rates through the leakage paths with CONTAM software, correlated the CONTAM flow rates with indoor humidity ratios from Building Energy Optimization software, and used Wärme und Feuchte instationär Pro two-dimensional modeling to determine the moisture content of the building materials surrounding the cracks. Given the number of simplifying assumptions and numerical models associated with this analysis, the results indicate that localized damage due to high moisture content of the roof sheathing is possible under very low airflow rates. Reducing the number of assumptions and approximations through field studies and laboratory experiments would be valuable to understand the real-world moisture damage potential in unvented attics.

  9. The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission: Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Peggy

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council's Decadal Survey. Its mission design consists of L-band ...

  10. Moisture Diffusion in Asphalt Binders and Fine Aggregate Mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasconcelos, Kamilla L.

    2011-08-08

    cost in highway maintenance and vehicle operations. One key mechanism of how moisture reaches the asphalt-aggregate interface is by its permeation or diffusion through the asphalt binder or mastic. Different techniques are available for diffusion...

  11. Transient Analysis for Thermal and Moisture Behavior of Building Elements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, X.; Chen, Y.

    2006-01-01

    hybrid numerical method of Laplace transformation and the finite difference is first applied to solve its transient hygrothermal problem, in which the temperature and moisture coupling at the inner and outer surfaces is taken into account in the boundary...

  12. Building Integrated Heat and Moisture Exchange | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1 of 2 Building-integrated heat and moisture exchanger, the AirFlow(tm) Panel, installed for evaluation at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. Image: Architectural Applications 2 of 2...

  13. The spatial and temporal organization of soil moisture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Gregor Klaus

    1995-01-01

    . The spatial correlation remains unchanged with the scale and follows a power law decay typical of scaling processes. Soil moisture also shows clear scaling properties on its spatial clustering patterns. A well-defined organization of statistical character...

  14. Investigation of Soil Moisture - Vegetation Interactions in Oklahoma 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Trenton W.

    2013-03-06

    and-atmosphere interactions are an important component of climate, especially in semi-arid regions such as the Southern Great Plains. Interactions between soil moisture and vegetation modulate land-atmosphere coupling and thus represent a crucial...

  15. Thermal Effects of Moisture in Rigid Insulation Board 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, G. W.

    1992-01-01

    The impact of moisture in rigid roof insulation upon energy consumption is often assumed to be a simple function of the conductance. This paper will show that there are complex interactions between conductance, thermal mass, and climate. The energy...

  16. Measurement of Moisture Content in Sand, Slag, and Crucible Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, J.H.

    1999-09-20

    The deinventory process at Rocky Flats (RFETS) has included moisture content measurements of sand, slag, and crucible (SSC) materials by performing weight loss measurements at 210 degrees - 220 degrees Celsius on representative samples prior to packaging for shipment. Shipping requirements include knowledge of the moisture content. Work at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) showed that the measurement at 210 degrees - 220 degrees Celsius did not account for all of the moisture. The objective of the work in this report was to determine if the measurement at 210 degrees - 220 degrees Celsius at RFETS could be used to set upper bounds on moisture content and therefore, eliminate the need for RFETS to unpack, reanalyze and repack the material.

  17. Evaluation of moisture damage within asphalt concrete mixes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Brij D.

    2004-09-30

    (Member) (Head of Department) August 2003 Major Subject: Civil Engineering iii ABSTRACT Evaluation of Moisture Damage within Asphalt Concrete Mixes. (August 2003) Brij D. Shah, B.E., Gujarat University Chair...

  18. Electromagnetic induction moisture measurement system acceptance test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargo, G.F., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this acceptance test plan (ATP) is to verify that the mechanical, electrical and software features of the ElectroMagnetic Induction (EMI) probe are operating as designed,and that the unit is ready for field service. The accepted EMI and Surface Moisture Measurement Systems (SMMS) will be used primarily in support of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Safety Programs for moisture measurement of organic and ferrocyanide watch list tanks.

  19. Investigation of moisture content variations in highway subgrades and bases 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenkins, Edward Donald

    1957-01-01

    MOVEMENT OF MOISTURE BY CAPILLARITY Frost Action Temperature Gradient Hydraulic Gradient Textural Gradient Summa + ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ MOVElfZNT OF MOISTURE IN THE VAPOR PHASE GRAVITATIONAL FLO)V EVAPORATION TRANSPIRATION CONTROLLING... by caoillarity are these: (l) frost action, (2) temperature gradient, ()) hydraulic gradient, and (4) textural gradient. Frost Action Of these causes, frost action is the best known and understood, as it is a common problem in the northern United States...

  20. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

  1. Influence of Airflow on Laboratory Storage of High Moisture Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn M. Wendt; Ian J. Bonner; Amber N. Hoover; Rachel M. Emerson; William A. Smith

    2014-04-01

    Storing high moisture biomass for bioenergy use is a reality in many areas of the country where wet harvest conditions and environmental factors prevent dry storage from being feasible. Aerobic storage of high moisture biomass leads to microbial degradation and self-heating, but oxygen limitation can aid in material preservation. To understand the influence of oxygen presence on high moisture biomass (50 %, wet basis), three airflow rates were tested on corn stover stored in laboratory reactors. Temperature, carbon dioxide production, dry matter loss, chemical composition, fungal abundance, pH, and organic acids were used to monitor the effects of airflow on storage conditions. The results of this work indicate that oxygen availability impacts both the duration of self-heating and the severity of dry matter loss. High airflow systems experienced the greatest initial rates of loss but a shortened microbially active period that limited total dry matter loss (19 %). Intermediate airflow had improved preservation in short-term storage compared to high airflow systems but accumulated the greatest dry matter loss over time (up to 27 %) as a result of an extended microbially active period. Low airflow systems displayed the best performance with the lowest rates of loss and total loss (10 %) in storage at 50 days. Total structural sugar levels of the stored material were preserved, although glucan enrichment and xylan loss were documented in the high and intermediate flow conditions. By understanding the role of oxygen availability on biomass storage performance, the requirements for high moisture storage solutions may begin to be experimentally defined.

  2. Viscosity-Induced Crossing of the Phantom Barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brevik, Iver

    2015-01-01

    We show explicitly, by using astrophysical data plus reasonable assumptions for the bulk viscosity in the cosmic fluid, how the magnitude of this viscosity may be high enough to drive the fluid from its position in the quintessence region at present time $t=0$ across the barrier $w=-1$ into the phantom region in the late universe. The phantom barrier is accordingly not a sharp mathematical divide, but rather a fuzzy concept. We also calculate the limiting forms of various thermodynamical quantities, including the rate of entropy production, for a dark energy fluid near the future Big Rip singularity.

  3. Enhanced tunneling through nonstationary barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palomares-Baez, J. P.; Rodriguez-Lopez, J. L. [Advanced Materials Department, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi 78231 (Mexico); Ivlev, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and NanoCenter, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi 78000 (Mexico)

    2007-11-15

    Quantum tunneling through a nonstationary barrier is studied analytically and by a direct numerical solution of Schroedinger equation. Both methods are in agreement and say that the main features of the phenomenon can be described in terms of classical trajectories which are solutions of Newton's equation in complex time. The probability of tunneling is governed by analytical properties of a time-dependent perturbation and the classical trajectory in the plane of complex time. Some preliminary numerical calculations of Euclidean resonance (an easy penetration through a classical nonstationary barrier due to an underbarrier interference) are presented.

  4. In Situ Formation Of Reactive Barriers For Pollution Control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Riley, Robert G. (West Richland, WA)

    2004-04-27

    A method of treating soil contamination by forming one or more zones of oxidized material in the path of percolating groundwater is disclosed. The zone or barrier region is formed by delivering an oxidizing agent into the ground for reaction with an existing soil component. The oxidizing agent modifies the existing soil component creating the oxidized zone. Subsequently when soil contaminates migrate into the zone, the oxidized material is available to react with the contaminates and degrade them into benign products. The existing soil component can be an oxidizable mineral such as manganese, and the oxidizing agent can be ozone gas or hydrogen peroxide. Soil contaminates can be volatile organic compounds. Oxidized barriers can be used single or in combination with other barriers.

  5. Electrolyte creepage barrier for liquid electrolyte fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Jian (Alberta, CA); Farooque, Mohammad (Danbury, CT); Yuh, Chao-Yi (New Milford, CT)

    2008-01-22

    A dielectric assembly for electrically insulating a manifold or other component from a liquid electrolyte fuel cell stack wherein the dielectric assembly includes a substantially impermeable dielectric member over which electrolyte is able to flow and a barrier adjacent the dielectric member and having a porosity of less than 50% and greater than 10% so that the barrier is able to measurably absorb and chemically react with the liquid electrolyte flowing on the dielectric member to form solid products which are stable in the liquid electrolyte. In this way, the barrier inhibits flow or creepage of electrolyte from the dielectric member to the manifold or component to be electrically insulated from the fuel cell stack by the dielectric assembly.

  6. Vented Cavity Radiant Barrier Assembly And Method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L. (Piedmont, CA); Jackaway, Adam D. (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-05-16

    A vented cavity radiant barrier assembly (2) includes a barrier (12), typically a PV module, having inner and outer surfaces (18, 22). A support assembly (14) is secured to the barrier and extends inwardly from the inner surface of the barrier to a building surface (14) creating a vented cavity (24) between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. A low emissivity element (20) is mounted at or between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. At least part of the cavity exit (30) is higher than the cavity entrance (28) to promote cooling air flow through the cavity.

  7. Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings A Dissertation Presented to The Faculty of the School ________________________________________________________________________ Abstract The dissertation begins by exploring the growth of 7YSZ coatings on vapor deposited NiCoCrAlY bond coats at different substrate rotation rates. The experiments show that as the rotation rate

  8. Plastic Schottky barrier solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldrop, James R. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Cohen, Marshall J. (Thousand Oaks, CA)

    1984-01-24

    A photovoltaic cell structure is fabricated from an active medium including an undoped, intrinsically p-type organic semiconductor comprising polyacetylene. When a film of such material is in rectifying contact with a magnesium electrode, a Schottky-barrier junction is obtained within the body of the cell structure. Also, a gold overlayer passivates the magnesium layer on the undoped polyacetylene film.

  9. Performance Testing of Radiant Barriers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    TVA has conducted a study to determine the effects of radiant barriers (RBI (i.e., material with a low emissivity surface facing an air space), when used with fiberglass, on attic heat transfer during summer and winter. This study employed five...

  10. Systematic study of projectile structure effect on fusion barrier distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratap Roy; A. Saxena; B. K. Nayak; E. T. Mirgule; B. John; Y. K. Gupta; L. S. Danu; R. P. Vind; Ashok Kumar; R. K. Choudhury

    2011-07-29

    Quasielastic excitation function measurement has been carried out for the $^{4}$He + $^{232}$Th system at $\\theta_{lab}$=160$^\\circ$ with respect to the beam direction, to obtain a representation of the fusion barrier distribution. Using the present data along with previously measured barrier distribution results on $^{12}$C, $^{16}$O, and $^{19}$F + $^{232}$Th systems a systematic analysis has been carried out to investigate the role of target and/or projectile structures on fusion barrier distribution. It is observed that for $^{4}$He, $^{12}$C, and $^{16}$O + $^{232}$Th, reactions the couplings due to target states only are required in coupled channel fusion calculations to explain the experimental data, whereas for the $^{19}$F+ $^{232}$Th system along with the coupling of target states, inelastic states of $^{19}$F are also required to explain the experimental results on fusion-barrier distribution. The width of the barrier distribution shows interesting transition behavior when plotted with respect to the target-projectile charge product for the above systems.

  11. System design description for surface moisture measurement system (SMMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargo, G.F.

    1996-09-23

    The SMMS has been developed to measure moisture in the top few centimeters of tank waste. The SMMS development was initiated by the preliminary findings of SAR-033, and does not necessarily fulfill any established DQO. After the SAR-033 is released, if no significant changes are made, moisture measurements in the organic waste tanks will rapidly become a DQO. The SMMS was designed to be installed in any 4 inch or larger riser, and to allow maximum adjustability for riser lengths, and is used to deploy a sensor package on the waste surface within a 6 foot radius about the azimuth. The first sensor package will be a neutron probe.

  12. Discrete Element Modeling of Impact Damage on Thermal Barrier Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minor, Peter Michel

    2013-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating morphology produced by air plasmacompared to other potential thermal barrier coating2 Thermal Barrier Coatings 2.1 System of

  13. Overcoming Multifamily Sector Barriers in Austin, Texas | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overcoming Multifamily Sector Barriers in Austin, Texas Overcoming Multifamily Sector Barriers in Austin, Texas Presents techniques on overcoming the barriers of multifamily energy...

  14. DOE Discussion on Small Business Contract Barriers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small and large business representatives discussed barriers to competition at a well-attended Waste Management Conference session.

  15. Overcoming Multifamily Sector Barriers in Austin, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents techniques on overcoming the barriers of multifamily energy efficiency projects, including how to market to property managers.

  16. ULTRA BARRIER TOPSHEET (UBT) FOR FLEXIBLE PHOTOVOLTAICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, Charlene

    2013-01-09

    This slideshow presents work intended to: Scale-up the Generation -1 UBT to 1+meter width full-scale manufacturing; Develop a Generation-2 UBT on the pilot line, targeting improved performance, longer lifetime and lower cost; Transfer Generation-2 UBT from the pilot line to the full-scale manufacturing line in 2014; and Validate service life of Generation-1 UBT for the 25+ year lifetime. 3M has scaled up UBT for production at 1.2 meter width. 3M is conducting extensive lifetime studies including: –Evaluation of customer processing and installation conditions; –Indoor accelerated testing of UBT film and full CIGS modules; –Outdoor testing of UBT film and CIGS modules. Results have been used to improve ultra barrier film performance for flex module applications.

  17. MONITORING SUBSURFACE BARRIER INTEGRITY USING PERFLUOROCARBON TRACERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Laboratory, Hanford, Fernald, and Rocky Flats. Barriers are also considered an important reme (PFTs) have been tested as a means of barrier veri- fication at the Hanford geotech,¢cal test facility through the barrier. This paper discusses the experimental design, test reSUlts, data analysis

  18. Specific heat of apple at different moisture contents and temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viacheslav Mykhailyk; Nikolai Lebovka

    2013-05-11

    This work discusses results of experimental investigations of the specific heat, $C$, of apple in a wide interval of moisture contents ($W=0-0.9$) and temperatures ($T = 283-363$ K). The obtained data reveal the important role of the bound water in determination of $C(W,T)$ behaviour. The additive model for description of $C(W)$ dependence in the moisture range of $0.1apple was considered as a mixture of water and hydrated apple material (water plasticised apple) with specific heat $C_h$. The difference between $C_h$ and specific heat of dry apple, $\\Delta Cb=C_h-C_d$, was proposed as a measure of the excess contribution of bound water to the specific heat. The estimated amounts of bound water $W_b$ were comparable with the monolayer moisture content in apple. The analytical equation was proposed for approximation of $C(W,T)$ dependencies in the studied intervals of moisture content and temperature.

  19. The Influence of Soil Moisture Upon the Geothermal Climate Signal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smerdon, Jason E.

    The Influence of Soil Moisture Upon the Geothermal Climate Signal A.W. England*, Xiaohua Lin climate warming over the past few hundred years are being obtained from profiles of borehole temperature fractions of the geothermal climate signal. One of the long-term objectives of this investigation is to use

  20. Stress and Moisture Effects on Thin Film Buckling Delamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    ­2 GPa compres- sive residual stresses were sputter deposited on top of thin (below 100 nm) copperStress and Moisture Effects on Thin Film Buckling Delamination P. Waters & A.A. Volinsky Received, commonly called telephone cords, shown in Fig. 2 for the 1 2m W film on top of a 20 nm diamond-like carbon

  1. ESTIMATION OF GROUND WATER RECHARGE USING SOIL MOISTURE BALANCE APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    ESTIMATION OF GROUND WATER RECHARGE USING SOIL MOISTURE BALANCE APPROACH C. P. Kumar* ABSTRACT The amount of water that may be extracted from an aquifer without causing depletion is primarily dependent upon the ground water recharge. Thus, a quantitative evaluation of spatial and temporal distribution

  2. A Simulation of Moisture Diffusion Process in Furniture-Grade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    made for solid wood along the three principal directions Partial vapor pressure ­ the most proper for the moisture diffusion process through MDF using partial vapor pressure as the driving force, and (c/cm/mmHg/Hr) P = partial vapor pressure (mmHg) X = dimension coordinate (cm) Diffusion Cell RH1, P1 RH2, P2 Salt

  3. SOIL MOISTURE CHARACTERISTICS IN UPPER PART OF HINDON RIVER CATCHMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    1 SOIL MOISTURE CHARACTERISTICS IN UPPER PART OF HINDON RIVER CATCHMENT C. P. Kumar* Vijay Kumar** Vivekanand Singh*** ABSTRACT Knowledge of the physics of soil water movement is crucial to the solution for estimating the soil hydraulic properties are required for prediction of soil water flow. This paper presents

  4. Influences of soil moisture and vegetation on convective precipitation forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Influences of soil moisture and vegetation on convective precipitation forecasts over the United and vegetation on 30 h convective precipitation forecasts using the Weather Research and Forecasting model over, the complete removal of vegetation produced substantially less precipitation, while conversion to forest led

  5. TRITIUM BARRIER MATERIALS AND SEPARATION SYSTEMS FOR THE NGNP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, S; Thad Adams, T

    2008-07-17

    Contamination of downstream hydrogen production plants or other users of high-temperature heat is a concern of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. Due to the high operating temperatures of the NGNP (850-900 C outlet temperature), tritium produced in the nuclear reactor can permeate through heat exchangers to reach the hydrogen production plant, where it can become incorporated into process chemicals or the hydrogen product. The concentration limit for tritium in the hydrogen product has not been established, but it is expected that any future limit on tritium concentration will be no higher than the air and water effluent limits established by the NRC and the EPA. A literature survey of tritium permeation barriers, capture systems, and mitigation measures is presented and technologies are identified that may reduce the movement of tritium to the downstream plant. Among tritium permeation barriers, oxide layers produced in-situ may provide the most suitable barriers, though it may be possible to use aluminized surfaces also. For tritium capture systems, the use of getters is recommended, and high-temperature hydride forming materials such as Ti, Zr, and Y are suggested. Tritium may also be converted to HTO in order to capture it on molecular sieves or getter materials. Counter-flow of hydrogen may reduce the flux of tritium through heat exchangers. Recommendations for research and development work are provided.

  6. Cryogenic Barrier Demonstration Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, L.A.; Yarmak, E.; Long, E.L.

    2000-03-01

    A long-term frozen soil barrier was implemented at the HRE (Homogeneous Reactor Experiment) Pond facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1997. This was performed to verify the technical feasibility and costs of deploying a frozen barrier at a radiologically contaminated site. Work began in September 1996 and progressed through to December 1999. The frozen barrier has been operational since November 1997. Verification of the barrier integrity was performed independently by the EPA's SITE Program. This project showed frozen barriers offer a proven technology to retain below grade hazardous substances at relatively low costs with minimal effect on the environment.

  7. A Continuum Coupled Moisture-mechanical Constitutive Model for Asphalt Concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shakiba, Maryam

    2013-12-09

    The presence and flow of moisture degrade engineering properties of asphalt concrete as part of thermodynamic, chemical, physical, and mechanical processes. This detrimental effect is referred to as moisture damage. The aim of this dissertation...

  8. Moisture degradation in FRP bonded concrete systems : an interface fracture approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Au, Ching, 1977-

    2005-01-01

    (cont.) characterization, and kink criterion implementation, form a synergistic analysis of the mechanistic debonding behavior affected by moisture. Results have shown that moisture affected debonding is a highly complex ...

  9. Modeling and application of soil moisture at varying spatial scales with parameter scaling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Narendra Narayan

    2009-05-15

    The dissertation focuses on characterization of subpixel variability within a satellite-based remotely sensed coarse-scale soil moisture footprint. The underlying heterogeneity of coarse-scale soil moisture footprint is masked by the area...

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF A RAPID TEST TO DETERMINE MOISTURE SENSTIVITY OF HMA (SUPERPAVE) MIXTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiwakoti, Harihar

    2007-12-14

    Exiting test methods to determine moisture sensitivity in hot mix asphalt are time consuming and inconsistent. This research focused on wheel tracking devices to develop a rapid test method to evaluate moisture sensitivity. The Asphalt Pavement...

  11. Long-term functional plasticity in plant hydraulic architecture in response to supplemental moisture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Steven R.

    Long-term functional plasticity in plant hydraulic architecture in response to supplemental of nearby individuals growing where soil moisture had been supplemented for 14 years. Traditional parameters receiving supplemental moisture consistently showed significant responses in all considered traits related

  12. A Coupled Micromechanical Model of Moisture-Induced Damage in Asphalt Mixtures: Formulation and Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caro Spinel, Silvia

    2011-02-22

    The deleterious effect of moisture on the structural integrity of asphalt mixtures has been recognized as one of the main causes of early deterioration of asphalt pavements. This phenomenon, usually referred to as moisture ...

  13. The Soil Moisture Active and Passive Mission (SMAP): Science and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    The soil moisture active and passive mission (SMAP) will provide global maps of soil moisture content and surface freeze/thaw state. Global measurements of these variables are critical for terrestrial water and carbon cycle ...

  14. SOIL MOISTURE RETENTION CHARACTERISTICS AND HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY FOR DIFFERENT AREAS IN INDIA IN SELECTED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    SOIL MOISTURE RETENTION CHARACTERISTICS AND HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY FOR DIFFERENT AREAS IN INDIA systems require knowledge of the relationships between soil moisture content (), soil water pressure (h) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (K). This study involved field and laboratory determination of soil

  15. NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission and Opportunities for Applications Users

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Molly E.

    Water in the soil—both its amount (soil moisture) and its state (freeze/thaw)—plays a key role in water and energy cycles, in weather and climate, and in the carbon cycle. Additionally, soil moisture touches upon human ...

  16. Double barrier system for an in situ conversion process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKinzie, Billy John [Houston, TX; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; Cowan, Kenneth Michael [Sugar land, TX; Deeg, Wolfgang Friedrich Johann [Houston, TX; Wong, Sau-Wai [Rijswijk, NL

    2009-05-05

    A barrier system for a subsurface treatment area is described. The barrier system includes a first barrier formed around at least a portion of the subsurface treatment area. The first barrier is configured to inhibit fluid from exiting or entering the subsurface treatment area. A second barrier is formed around at least a portion of the first barrier. A separation space exists between the first barrier and the second barrier.

  17. Energy Efficiency Projects: Overcoming Internal Barriers to Implementa...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency Projects: Overcoming Internal Barriers to Implementation Energy Efficiency Projects: Overcoming Internal Barriers to Implementation This presentation discusses...

  18. Market and policy barriers for demand response providing ancillary services in U.S. markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; MacDonald, Jason; Goldman, Charles

    2013-03-01

    This study provides an examination of various market and policy barriers to demand response providing ancillary services in both ISO/RTO and non-ISO/RTO regions, especially at the program provider level. It is useful to classify barriers in order to create a holistic understanding and identify parties that could be responsible for their removal. This study develops a typology of barriers focusing on smaller customers that must rely on a program provider (i.e., electric investor owned utility or IOU, ARC) to create an aggregated DR resource in order to bring ancillary services to the balancing authority. The barriers were identified through examinations of regulatory structures, market environments, and product offerings; and discussions with industry stakeholders and regulators. In order to help illustrate the differences in barriers among various wholesale market designs and their constituent retail environments, four regions were chosen to use as case studies: Colorado, Texas, Wisconsin, and New Jersey.

  19. Flexible barrier film, method of forming same, and organic electronic device including same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blizzard, John; Tonge, James Steven; Weidner, William Kenneth

    2013-03-26

    A flexible barrier film has a thickness of from greater than zero to less than 5,000 nanometers and a water vapor transmission rate of no more than 1.times.10.sup.-2 g/m.sup.2/day at 22.degree. C. and 47% relative humidity. The flexible barrier film is formed from a composition, which comprises a multi-functional acrylate. The composition further comprises the reaction product of an alkoxy-functional organometallic compound and an alkoxy-functional organosilicon compound. A method of forming the flexible barrier film includes the steps of disposing the composition on a substrate and curing the composition to form the flexible barrier film. The flexible barrier film may be utilized in organic electronic devices.

  20. MoistureMap: A soil moisture monitoring, prediction and reporting system for sustainable land and water management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jeff

    algorithms or rainfall forecasts provide. It is widely recognised that passive microwave is the most promising remote sensing method for soil moisture measurement [Njoku et al., 2002]. While passive microwave must be combined by data assimilation [Walker and Houser, 2005], with point measurements used

  1. T-TY Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY10 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

    2011-01-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection has constructed interim surface barriers over a portion of the T and TY tank farms as part of the Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. The interim surface barriers (hereafter referred to as the surface barriers or barriers) are designed to minimize the infiltration of precipitation into the soil zones containing radioactive contaminants and minimize the movement of the contaminants. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barriers at reducing soil moisture. Solar-powered systems were installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations in the T (i.e., instrument Nests TA, TB, TC, and TD) and the TY (i.e., instrument Nests TYA and TYB) Farms beneath the barriers and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nests TA and TYA are placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serve as controls, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barriers. Nest TB provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests TC, TD, and TYB are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barriers. Except for occasional times for TC and TD and planned dates for TYB, during FY10, the battery voltage at the TMS and instrument Nests in both T and TY tank farms remained above 12.0 V, denoting that the battery voltages were sufficient for the stations to remain functional. All the HDUs were functioning normally, but some pressure-head values were greater than the upper measurement limit. The values that exceeded the upper limit may indicate wet soil conditions and/or measurement error, but they do not imply a malfunction of the sensors. Similar to FY07 through FY09, in FY10, the soil under natural conditions in the T Farm (Nest TA) was generally recharged during the winter period (October–March), and they discharged during the summer period (April–September). Soil water conditions above about 1.5-m to 2-m depth from all three types of measurements (i.e., CP, NP, and HDU) showed relatively large variation during the seasonal wetting-drying cycle. For the soil below 2-m depth, the seasonal variation of soil water content was relatively small. The construction of the TISB was completed in April 2008. In the soil below the TISB (Nests TC and TD), the CP-measured water content showed that ? at the soil between 0.6-m and 2.3-m depths was stable, indicating no climatic impacts on soil water conditions beneath the barrier. The NP-measured water content in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 12.2 m (40 ft) since the completion of the barrier decreased by 0.007 to 0.014 m3 m-3. The HDU-measured soil-water pressure at 1-m, 2-m, and 5-m depths decreased by 0.7 to 2.4 m, indicating soil water drainage at these depths of the soil. In the soil below the edge of the TISB (Nest TB), the CP-measured water content was relatively stable through the year; the NP-measured water content showed that soil water drainage was occurring in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 12.2 m (40 ft) but at a slightly smaller magnitude than in Nests TC and TD; the HDU-measurements show that the pressure head changes at Nest TB since the completion of the barrier were generally less than those at TC and TD, but more than those at TA. These results indicate that the TISB is performing as expected by intercepting the meteoric water from infiltrating into the soil, and the soil is becoming drier gradually. The barrier also had some effects on the soil below the barrier edge, but at a reduced magnitude. There was no significant difference in soil-water regime between the two nests in the TY tank farm because the barrier at the TY Farm was just completed one month before the end of the FY.

  2. barrier

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifiesValidation ofUV-RSSSummary5 Kentuckybaikbarrier

  3. SOIL MOISTURE RETENTION CHARACTERISTICS AT RD 838 OF I. G. N. P. STAGE -II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    1 SOIL MOISTURE RETENTION CHARACTERISTICS AT RD 838 OF I. G. N. P. STAGE - II C. P. Kumar* Sanjay knowledge of the relationships between soil moisture content (), soil water pressure (h) and unsaturated presents the soil moisture retention characteristics at RD 838 of Indira Gandhi Nahar Priyojana, Stage - II

  4. T Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY09 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

    2010-01-01

    DOE’s Office of River Protection constructed a temporary surface barrier over a portion of the T Tank Farm as part of the T Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barrier at reducing soil moisture. A solar-powered system was installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations (i.e., instrument Nests A, B, C, and D) beneath the barrier and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nest A is placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serves as a control, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barrier. Nest B provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests C and D are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barrier. Each instrument nest is composed of a capacitance probe (CP) with multiple sensors, multiple heat-dissipation units (HDUs), and a neutron probe (NP) access tube. The monitoring results in FY09 are summarized below. The solar panels functioned normally and could provide sufficient power to the instruments. The CP in Nest C after September 20, 2009, was not functional. The CP sensors in Nest B after July 13 and the 0.9-m CP sensor in Nest D before June 10 gave noisy data. Other CPs were functional normally. All the HDUs were functional normally but some pressure-head values measured by HDUs were greater than the upper measurement-limit. The higher-than-upper-limit values might be due to the very wet soil condition and/or measurement error but do not imply the malfunction of the sensors. Similar to FY07 and FY08, in FY09, the soil under natural conditions (Nest A) was generally recharged during the winter period (October-March) and discharged during the summer period (April-September). Soil water conditions above about 1.5-m to 2-m depth from all three types of measurements (i.e., CP, NP and HDU) showed relatively large variation during the seasonal wetting-drying cycle. For the soil below 2-m depth, the seasonal variation of soil water content was relatively small. The construction of the surface barrier was completed in April 2008. In the soil below the surface barrier (Nests C and D), the CP measurements showed that water content at the soil between 0.6-m and 2.3-m depths was very stable, indicating no climatic impacts on soil water condition beneath the barrier. The NP-measured water content showed that soil water drainage seemed occurring in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 9.1 m (30 ft) in FY09. The HDU-measured water pressure decreased consistently in the soil above 5-m depth, indicating soil water drainage at these depths of the soil. In the soil below the edge of the surface barrier (Nest B), the CP-measured water content was relatively stable through the year except at the 0.9-m depth; the NP-measured water content showed that soil water drainage was occurring in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 9.1 m (30 ft) but at a slightly smaller magnitude than those in Nests C and D; the HDU-measurements show that the pressure head changes in FY09 in Nest B were less than those for C and D but more than those for A. The soil-water-pressure head was more sensitive to soil water regime changes under dry conditions. In the soil beneath the barrier, the theoretical steady-state values of pressure head is equal to the negative of the distance to groundwater table. Hence, it is expected that, in the future, while the water content become stable, the pressure head will keep decreasing for a long time (e.g., many years). These results indicate that the T Tank Farm surface barrier was performing as expected by intercepting the meteoric water from infiltrating into the soil and the soil was becoming drier gradually. The barrier also has some effects on the soil below the barrier edge but at a reduced magnitude.

  5. Nondestructive NMR technique for moisture determination in radioactive materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aumeier, S.; Gerald, R.E. II; Growney, E.; Nunez, L.; Kaminski, M.

    1998-12-04

    This progress report focuses on experimental and computational studies used to evaluate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting, quantifying, and monitoring hydrogen and other magnetically active nuclei ({sup 3}H, {sup 3}He, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu) in Spent nuclear fuels and packaging materials. The detection of moisture by using a toroid cavity NMR imager has been demonstrated in SiO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} systems. The total moisture was quantified by means of {sup 1}H NMR detection of H{sub 2}O with a sensitivity of 100 ppm. In addition, an MRI technique that was used to determine the moisture distribution also enabled investigators to discriminate between bulk and stationary water sorbed on the particles. This imaging feature is unavailable in any other nondestructive assay (NDA) technique. Following the initial success of this program, the NMR detector volume was scaled up from the original design by a factor of 2000. The capacity of this detector exceeds the size specified by DOE-STD-3013-96.

  6. Identification of Key Barriers in Workforce Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-03-31

    This report documents the identification of key barriers in the development of an adequate national security workforce as part of the National Security Preparedness Project, being performed under a Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration grant. Many barriers exist that prevent the development of an adequate number of propertly trained national security personnel. Some barriers can be eliminated in a short-term manner, whereas others will involve a long-term strategy that takes into account public policy.

  7. International Collaborations on Engineered Barrier Systems: Experiment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    interaction to evaluate sealing and clay barrier performance; 2) EBS Experiment -thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) behavior of the EBS under heating conditions and...

  8. Metal Nitride Diffusion Barriers for Copper Interconnects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araujo, Roy A.

    2010-01-14

    Advancements in the semiconductor industry require new materials with improved performance. With the introduction of copper as the interconnect material for integrated circuits, efficient diffusion barriers are required ...

  9. Manufacturing Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improve cost 992011 10 Manufacturing Barriers BASF is interested in mass markets for fuel cells Market forces appear to favor distributed generation - combined heat and...

  10. Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Final Report:Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing,U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8 Support.August 2004

  11. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR EVALUATING SURFACE BARRIERS TO PROTECT GROUNDWATER FROM DEEP VADOSE ZONE CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FAYER JM; FREEDMAN VL; WARD AL; CHRONISTER GB

    2010-02-24

    The U.S. DOE and its predecessors released nearly 2 trillion liters (450 billion gallons) of contaminated liquid into the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. Some of the contaminants currently reside in the deeper parts of the vadose zone where they are much less accessible to characterization, monitoring, and typical remediation activities. The DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) prepared a treatability test plan in 2008 to examine remediation options for addressing contaminants in the deep vadose zone; one of the technologies identified was surface barriers (also known as engineered barriers, covers, and caps). In the typical configuration, the contaminants are located relatively close to the surface, generally within 15 m, and thus they are close to the base of the surface barrier. The proximity of the surface barrier under these conditions yielded few concerns about the effectiveness of the barrier at depth, particularly for cases in which the contaminants were in a lined facility. At Hanford, however, some unlined sites have contaminants located well below depths of 15 m. The issue raised about these sites is the degree of effectiveness of a surface barrier in isolating contaminants in the deep vadose zone. Previous studies by Hanford Site and PNNL researchers suggest that surface barriers have the potential to provide a significant degree of isolation of deep vadose zone contaminants. The studies show that the actual degree of isolation is site-specific and depends on many factors, including recharge rates, barrier size, depth of contaminants, geohydrologic properties ofthe sediments, and the geochemical interactions between the contaminants and the sediments. After the DOE-RL treatability test plan was published, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted to review the information available to support surface barrier evaluation for the deep vadose zone, identify gaps in the information and outcomes necessary to fill the data gaps, and outline tasks to achieve those outcomes. Full understanding of contaminant behavior in the deep vadose zone is constrained by four key data gaps: limited access; limited data; limited time; and the lack of an accepted predictive capability for determining whether surface barriers can effectively isolate deep vadose zone contaminants. Activities designed to fill these data gaps need to have these outcomes: (1) common evaluation methodology that provides a clear, consistent, and defensible basis for evaluating groundwater impacts caused by placement of a surface barrier above deep vadose zone contamination; (2) deep vadose zone data that characterize the lithology, the spatial distribution of moisture and contaminants, the physical, chemical, and biological process that affect the mobility of each contaminant, and the impacts to the contaminants following placement of a surface barrier; (3) subsurface monitoring to provide subsurface characterization of initial conditions and changes that occur during and following remediation activities; and (4) field observations that span years to decades to validate the evaluation methodology. A set of six proposed tasks was identified to provide information needed to address the above outcomes. The proposed tasks are: (1) Evaluation Methodology - Develop common evaluation methodology that will provide a clear, consistent, and defensible basis for evaluating groundwater impacts caused by placement of a surface barrier above deep vadose zone contamination. (2) Case Studies - Conduct case studies to demonstrate the applicability ofthe common evaluation methodology and provide templates for subsequent use elsewhere. Three sites expected to have conditions that would yield valuable information and experience pertinent to deep vadose zone contamination were chosen to cover a range of conditions. The sites are BC Cribs and Trenches, U Plant Cribs, and the T Farm Interim Cover. (3) Subsurface Monitoring Technologies - Evaluate minimally invasive geophysical approaches for delineating subsurface plumes and monitoring their migration in the deep

  12. Biofuels from Corn Stover: Pyrolytic Production and Catalytic Upgrading Studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capunitan, Jewel Alviar

    2013-01-15

    product properties (lower moisture, TAN, and highest heating value), and can be a potential feedstock for co-processing with crude oils in existing refineries. Major reactions involved were conversion of phenolics to aromatics and hydrogenation of ketones...

  13. Subterranean barriers including at least one weld

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Sloan, Paul A.; Richardson, John G.; Walsh, Stephanie; Kostelnik, Kevin M.

    2007-01-09

    A subterranean barrier and method for forming same are disclosed, the barrier including a plurality of casing strings wherein at least one casing string of the plurality of casing strings may be affixed to at least another adjacent casing string of the plurality of casing strings through at least one weld, at least one adhesive joint, or both. A method and system for nondestructively inspecting a subterranean barrier is disclosed. For instance, a radiographic signal may be emitted from within a casing string toward an adjacent casing string and the radiographic signal may be detected from within the adjacent casing string. A method of repairing a barrier including removing at least a portion of a casing string and welding a repair element within the casing string is disclosed. A method of selectively heating at least one casing string forming at least a portion of a subterranean barrier is disclosed.

  14. Multi-layer waste containment barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Ann Marie (Pocatello, ID); Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Nickelson, David F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for constructing an underground containment barrier for containing an in-situ portion of earth. The apparatus includes an excavating device for simultaneously (i) excavating earthen material from beside the in-situ portion of earth without removing the in-situ portion and thereby forming an open side trench defined by opposing earthen sidewalls, and (ii) excavating earthen material from beneath the in-situ portion of earth without removing the in-situ portion and thereby forming a generally horizontal underground trench beneath the in-situ portion defined by opposing earthen sidewalls. The apparatus further includes a barrier-forming device attached to the excavating device for simultaneously forming a side barrier within the open trench and a generally horizontal, multi-layer barrier within the generally horizontal trench. The multi-layer barrier includes at least a first layer and a second layer.

  15. CO2 CH4 flux Air temperature Soil temperature and Soil moisture, Barrow, Alaska 2013 ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Margaret Torn

    2015-01-14

    This dataset consists of field measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux, as well as soil properties made during 2013 in Areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux made from June to September (ii) Calculation of corresponding Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and CH4 exchange (transparent minus opaque) between atmosphere and the ecosystem (ii) Measurements of Los Gatos Research (LGR) chamber air temperature made from June to September (ii) measurements of surface layer depth, type of surface layer, soil temperature and soil moisture from June to September.

  16. CO2 CH4 flux Air temperature Soil temperature and Soil moisture, Barrow, Alaska 2013 ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Margaret Torn

    This dataset consists of field measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux, as well as soil properties made during 2013 in Areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux made from June to September (ii) Calculation of corresponding Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and CH4 exchange (transparent minus opaque) between atmosphere and the ecosystem (ii) Measurements of Los Gatos Research (LGR) chamber air temperature made from June to September (ii) measurements of surface layer depth, type of surface layer, soil temperature and soil moisture from June to September.

  17. Geomembrane barriers using integral fiber optics to monitor barrier integrity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staller, G.E.; Wemple, R.P.

    1996-10-22

    This invention provides a geomembrane or geotextile with embedded optical sensors that are used to monitor the status of containment site barriers. Fiber optic strands are used to form the sensors that can detect and monitor conditions at the sites such as breaches, slope creep, subsidence, leachate levels, fires, and types of materials present or leaking from the site. The strands are integral to the membrane or textile materials. The geosynthetic membrane is deployed at the site in a fashion similar to carpet laying. Edges of the membrane or textile are joined to form a liner and the ends of the membrane or textile become the connection zones for obtaining signals from the sensors. A connection interface with a control system to generate Optical Time Delay Response or other light signals for transmission to the optic fiber strands or sensors and also to receive reflected signals from the sensors is included in the system. Software to interpret the sensor signals can be used in the geosynthetic monitoring system. 6 figs.

  18. Geomembrane barriers using integral fiber optics to monitor barrier integrity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staller, George E. (Albuquerque, NM); Wemple, Robert P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01

    This invention provides a geomembrane or geotextile with embedded optical sensors that are used to monitor the status of containment site barriers. Fiber optic strands are used to form the sensors that can detect and monitor conditions at the sites such as breaches, slope creep, subsidence, leachate levels, fires, and types of materials present or leaking from the site. The strands are integral to the membrane or textile materials. The geosythetic membrane is deployed at the site in a fashion similar to carpet laying. Edges of the membrane or textile are joined to form a liner and the ends of the membrane or textile become the connection zones for obtaining signals from the sensors. A connection interface with a control system to generate Optical Time Delay Response or other light signals for transmission to the optic fiber strands or sensors and also to receive reflected signals from the sensors is included in the system. Software to interpret the sensor signals can be used in the geosythetic monitoring system.

  19. Moisture absorption and bakeout characteristics of rigid-flexible multilayer printed wiring boards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lula, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Moisture absorption and bakeout characteristics of Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD) rigid-flexible printed wiring boards were determined. It was found that test specimens had absorbed 0.95 weight percent moisture when equilibrated to a 50 percent RH, 25{degree}C environment. Heating those equilibrated specimens in a 120{degree}C static air oven removed 92 percent of this absorbed moisture in 24 h. Heating the samples in a 80{degree}C static air oven removed only 64 percent of the absorbed moisture at the end of 24 h. A 120{degree}C vacuum bake removed moisture at essentially the same rate with parylene slowed the absorption rate by approximately 50 percent but did not appreciably affect the equilibrium moisture content or the drying rate.

  20. Low Barrier Hydrogen Bonds in Acyclic Tertiary Diamines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khodagholian, Sevana

    2010-01-01

    9. S. Yaghmaei, In Search of a Low Barrier Hydrogen Bond inP.A. Frey, and J.A. Gerlt, “The Low Barrier Hydrogen Bond inConsiderations Show That Low-Barrier Hydrogen Bonds do not

  1. Moisture monitoring of ferrocyanide tanks: An evaluation of methods and tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.; Babad, H.; Toffer, H.

    1993-04-01

    This report reviews the strengths and limitations of moisture monitoring technologies that could be used for determining moisture concentration in Hanford Site single-shell ferrocyanide waste tanks. Two technologies (neutron diffusion and near-infrared spectroscopy) are being pursued as part of the ferrocyanide program. A third technology, Raman spectroscopy, is in development as a speciation tool at the Westinghouse Hanford Company 222-S Laboratory. The potential application of Raman spectroscopy to moisture monitoring is discussed.

  2. Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

  3. Temperature and moisture dependence of dielectric constant for silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrubesh, L.H., LLNL

    1997-03-01

    The dielectric constants of silica aerogels are among the lowest measured for any solid material. The silica aerogels also exhibit low thermal expansion and are thermally stable to temperatures exceeding 500{degrees}C. However, due to the open porosity and large surface areas for aerogels, their dielectric constants are strongly affected by moisture and temperature. This paper presents data for the dielectric constants of silica aerogels as a function of moisture content at 25{degrees}C, and as a function of temperature, for temperatures in the range from 25{degrees}C to 450{degrees}C. Dielectric constant data are also given for silica aerogels that are heat treated in dry nitrogen at 500{degrees}C, then cooled to 25{degrees}C for measurements in dry air. All measurements are made on bulk aerogel spheres at 22GHz microwave frequency, using a cavity perturbation method. The results of the dependence found here for bulk materials can be inferred to apply also to thin films of silica aerogels having similar nano-structures and densities.

  4. UGA DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION SUPPLEMENTAL GENERAL REQUIREMENTS & STANDARDS GENERAL THERMAL & MOISTURE PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS ROOF DRAINS & ROOFS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    UGA DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION SUPPLEMENTAL GENERAL REQUIREMENTS & STANDARDS GENERAL THERMAL & MOISTURE. ii. General #12;UGA DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION SUPPLEMENTAL GENERAL REQUIREMENTS & STANDARDS GENERAL

  5. Barriers to CHP with Renewable Portfolio Standards, Draft White...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Barriers to CHP with Renewable Portfolio Standards, Draft White Paper, September 2007 Barriers to CHP with Renewable Portfolio Standards, Draft White Paper, September 2007 The...

  6. Barriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency - Report to Congress...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report to Congress, June 2015 Barriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency - Report to Congress, June 2015 This report examines barriers that impede the adoption of energy efficient...

  7. Barriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency - Study (Appendix A...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Study (Appendix A), June 2015 Barriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency - Study (Appendix A), June 2015 This study examines barriers that impede the adoption of energy efficient...

  8. Characterization of Single Barrier Microrefrigerators at Cryogenic Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    at Springerlink.com Characterization of Single Barriercooling) at 100 K. Characterization of Single BarrierThe experimental characterization of single barrier

  9. Thermal Bypass Air Barriers in the 2009 International Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermal Bypass Air Barriers in the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code - Building America Top Innovation Thermal Bypass Air Barriers in the 2009 International Energy...

  10. New Air and Water-Resistive Barrier Technologies for Commercial...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    New Air and Water-Resistive Barrier Technologies for Commercial Buildings New Air and Water-Resistive Barrier Technologies for Commercial Buildings New Air and Water-Resistive...

  11. Overcoming Processing Cost Barriers of High-Performance Lithium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Processing Cost Barriers of High-Performance Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes Overcoming Processing Cost Barriers of High-Performance Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes 2012 DOE Hydrogen...

  12. Market and Policy Barriers for Energy Storage Deployment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electric energy storage technologies can provide numerous grid services, there are a number of factors that restrict their current deployment. The most significant barrier to deployment is high capital costs, though several recent deployments indicate that capital costs are decreasing and energy storage may be the preferred economic alternative in certain situations. However, a number of other market and regulatory barriers persist, limiting further deployment. These barriers can be categorized into regulatory barriers, market (economic) barriers, utility and developer business model barriers, cross-cutting barriers and technology barriers.

  13. On-Bill Financing: Reducing Cost Barriers to Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    On-Bill Financing: Reducing Cost Barriers to Energy Efficiency Improvements (201) On-Bill Financing: Reducing Cost Barriers to Energy Efficiency Improvements (201) October 8...

  14. February 5, 2014 Webinar - The Cementitious Barriers Partnership...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - The Cementitious Barriers Partnership Toolbox, Version 2.0 February 5, 2014 Webinar - Tools and Capabilities of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership Toolbox, Version 2.0 David...

  15. Geothermal Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to Overcome Barriers Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Geothermal Heat Pumps:...

  16. Summary of Gaps and Barriers for Implementing Residential Building...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Gaps and Barriers for Implementing Residential Building Energy Efficiency Strategies Summary of Gaps and Barriers for Implementing Residential Building Energy Efficiency Strategies...

  17. Deployment Barriers to Distributed Wind Energy: Workshop Report...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Deployment Barriers to Distributed Wind Energy: Workshop Report, October 28, 2010 Deployment Barriers to Distributed Wind Energy: Workshop Report, October 28, 2010 This report...

  18. Phoenix Overcomes Barriers and Energizes Homeowners to Make Upgrades...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Phoenix Overcomes Barriers and Energizes Homeowners to Make Upgrades Phoenix Overcomes Barriers and Energizes Homeowners to Make Upgrades A photo of a residence. Energize Phoenix...

  19. Pricing and hedging a barrier option 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogossian, Alan

    2002-01-01

    . Monte-Carlo Simulations Many exotic derivatives, usually those that are path-dependent, cannot be computed using a closed form equation. As we have seen this, it is the case of barrier options with discontinuous barrier (daily or weekly barrier... would like to get the same price for the option each time we use the same parameter. This fact is really important in order to be able to measure the sensitivity of the option's price with respect to its determinants. A straightforward Monte Carlo...

  20. Transport Properties for Triangular Barriers in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abderrahim El Mouhafid; Ahmed Jellal

    2013-11-30

    We theoretically study the electronic transport properties of Dirac fermions through one and double triangular barriers in graphene. Using the transfer matrix method, we determine the transmission, conductance and Fano factor. They are obtained to be various parameters dependent such as well width, barrier height and barrier width. Therefore, different discussions are given and comparison with the previous significant works is done. In particular, it is shown that at Dirac point the Dirac fermions always own a minimum conductance associated with a maximum Fano factor and change their behaviors in an oscillatory way (irregularly periodical tunneling peaks) when the potential of applied voltage is increased.

  1. Approximating European Options by Rebate Barrier Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Qingshuo

    2011-01-01

    When the underlying stock price is a strict local martingale process under an equivalent local martingale measure, Black-Scholes PDE associated with an European option may have multiple solutions. In this paper, we study an approximation for the smallest hedging price of such an European option. Our results show that a class of rebate barrier options can be used for this approximation, when its rebate and barrier are chosen appropriately. An asymptotic convergence rate is also achieved when the knocked-out barrier moves to infinity under suitable conditions.

  2. Method for forming a barrier layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weihs, Timothy P. (Baltimore, MD); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Cubic or metastable cubic refractory metal carbides act as barrier layers to isolate, adhere, and passivate copper in semiconductor fabrication. One or more barrier layers of the metal carbide are deposited in conjunction with copper metallizations to form a multilayer characterized by a cubic crystal structure with a strong (100) texture. Suitable barrier layer materials include refractory transition metal carbides such as vanadium carbide (VC), niobium carbide (NbC), tantalum carbide (TaC), chromium carbide (Cr.sub.3 C.sub.2), tungsten carbide (WC), and molybdenum carbide (MoC).

  3. Determining collective barrier operation skew in a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faraj, Daniel A.

    2015-12-24

    Determining collective barrier operation skew in a parallel computer that includes a number of compute nodes organized into an operational group includes: for each of the nodes until each node has been selected as a delayed node: selecting one of the nodes as a delayed node; entering, by each node other than the delayed node, a collective barrier operation; entering, after a delay by the delayed node, the collective barrier operation; receiving an exit signal from a root of the collective barrier operation; and measuring, for the delayed node, a barrier completion time. The barrier operation skew is calculated by: identifying, from the compute nodes' barrier completion times, a maximum barrier completion time and a minimum barrier completion time and calculating the barrier operation skew as the difference of the maximum and the minimum barrier completion time.

  4. Evapotranspiration studies for protective barriers: Experimental plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, S.O.; Waugh, W.J.

    1989-11-01

    This document describes a general theory and experimental plans for predicting evapotranspiration in support of the Protective Barrier Program. Evapotranspiration is the combined loss of water from plants and soil surfaces to the atmosphere. 45 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  5. Underwater Sensor Barriers with Auction Stanley Barr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Benyuan

    underwater pathways of them. This approach may require deploying large-scale underwater sensor networks network to detect moving objects. In 2-dimensional (2D) terrestrial strip sensor networks, a barrier

  6. Modeling of Residential Attics with Radiant Barriers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkes, K. E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper gives a summary of the efforts at ORNL in modeling residential attics with radiant barriers. Analytical models based on a system of macroscopic heat balances have been developed. Separate models have been developed for horizontal radiant...

  7. Photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic devices with quantum barriers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wernsman, Bernard R. (Jefferson Hills, PA)

    2007-04-10

    A photovoltaic or thermophotovoltaic device includes a diode formed by p-type material and n-type material joined at a p-n junction and including a depletion region adjacent to said p-n junction, and a quantum barrier disposed near or in the depletion region of the p-n junction so as to decrease device reverse saturation current density while maintaining device short circuit current density. In one embodiment, the quantum barrier is disposed on the n-type material side of the p-n junction and decreases the reverse saturation current density due to electrons while in another, the barrier is disposed on the p-type material side of the p-n junction and decreases the reverse saturation current density due to holes. In another embodiment, both types of quantum barriers are used.

  8. Liquid junction schottky barrier solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Richard (Princeton, NJ)

    1980-01-01

    A mixture of ceric ions (Ce.sup.+4) and cerous ions (Ce.sup.+3) in an aqueous electrolyte solution forms a Schottky barrier at the interface between an active region of silicon and the electrolyte solution. The barrier height obtained for hydrogenated amorphous silicon using the Ce.sup.+4 /Ce.sup.+3 redox couple is about 1.7 eV.

  9. Method and apparatus for fuel gas moisturization and heating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ranasinghe, Jatila (Niskayuna, NY); Smith, Raub Warfield (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2002-01-01

    Fuel gas is saturated with water heated with a heat recovery steam generator heat source. The heat source is preferably a water heating section downstream of the lower pressure evaporator to provide better temperature matching between the hot and cold heat exchange streams in that portion of the heat recovery steam generator. The increased gas mass flow due to the addition of moisture results in increased power output from the gas and steam turbines. Fuel gas saturation is followed by superheating the fuel, preferably with bottom cycle heat sources, resulting in a larger thermal efficiency gain compared to current fuel heating methods. There is a gain in power output compared to no fuel heating, even when heating the fuel to above the LP steam temperature.

  10. Communication Role of moisture in the Seebeck effect in cement-based materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    Communication Role of moisture in the Seebeck effect in cement-based materials Jingyao Cao, D of liquid water contributes little, if any, to the Seebeck effect in cement-based materials. Moisture loss Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Fiber reinforcement; Cement paste; Electrical properties

  11. Supplemental Material for Forty Five Years of Observed Soil Moisture in the Ukraine: No

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Supplemental Material for Forty Five Years of Observed Soil Moisture in the Ukraine: No Summer, Kiev, Ukraine 5 Agrometeorology Department, Ukrainian Hydrometeorological Centre, Kiev, Ukraine The individual soil moisture stations in the Ukraine are shown in Figure 1. The data are averaged into the 25

  12. Forty-five years of observed soil moisture in the Ukraine: No summer desiccation (yet)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Forty-five years of observed soil moisture in the Ukraine: No summer desiccation (yet) Alan Robock­October for 141 stations from fields with either winter or spring cereals from the Ukraine for 1958­2002. We-five years of observed soil moisture in the Ukraine: No summer desiccation (yet), Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L

  13. Dendroclimatic Response along a Moisture Gradient in the Southern Rocky Mountains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Shelby Lynn

    2015-06-01

    the moisture gradient. Using tree-ring analysis, I found growth to be slower and more sensitive to climate at the low moisture distributional limit than elsewhere within the spatial distribution. Trees at this site were more impacted by the 1950s drought...

  14. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Moisture and Ventilation Solutions in Hot, Humid Climates: Florida Manufactured Housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes work by Building America researchers who visited 24 manufactured home factories between 1996 and 2003 to investigate moisture problems while improving energy efficiency and identified insufficient air sealing and poor HVAC installation as the biggest culprits. One manufacturer reported zero moisture-related issues in 35,000 homes built after implementing Building America recommendations.

  15. In-situ Soil Moisture Sensing: Measurement Scheduling and Estimation using Compressive Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cafarella, Michael J.

    In-situ Soil Moisture Sensing: Measurement Scheduling and Estimation using Compressive Sensing mingyan@eecs.umich.edu ABSTRACT We consider the problem of monitoring soil moisture evolu- tion using desirable to rely on fewer measurements and estimate with higher accu- racy the original signal (soil

  16. Monitoring Soil Moisture and Drought Using a Thermal TwoSource Energy Balance Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Monitoring Soil Moisture and Drought Using a Thermal TwoSource Energy Balance Model Christopher. In general, dry soil or stressed vegetation heats up more rapidly than wet soil or unstressed vegetation, using one dual polarized channel (either Cband or Xband) for the retrieval of soil moisture

  17. Solar dimming and CO2 effects on soil moisture trends Alan Robock1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Solar dimming and CO2 effects on soil moisture trends Alan Robock1 and Haibin Li1 Received 15 July solar dimming and upward CO2 trends, we conducted experiments with a sophisticated land surface model. Li (2006), Solar dimming and CO2 effects on soil moisture trends, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L20708

  18. Proof of principle report for in-tank moisture monitoring using an active neutron probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, W.T.

    1993-12-01

    This document establishes the proof of principle for use of a neutron probe to measure moisture concentrations in ferrocyanide waste tanks at the Hanford Site. Computer modeling and experiments with a modified neutron probe have shown that neutron-based measurements will provide accurate moisture determinations in Hanford Site ferrocyanide waste tanks. Moisture measurement using neutron moderation and diffusion is an established and extensively documented technology for the well logging industry. Sophisticated neutron transport modeling and calibrations with known moisture concentrations have provided the necessary developmental analyses and validations. Proof of principle was accomplished using the existing in-tank neutron surveillance tool and its support equipment. A minor, inexpensive hardware modification permitted extending the use of the existing probe to moisture measurements. A limited moisture calibration was performed using the modified in-tank neutron probe, and the results were used to adjust model parameters. Scan data from three ferrocyanide tanks have been obtained using the modified in-tank neutron probe, and interpretation of these scans is in progress. Modeling analyses and experimental test results have provided information that will be used to develop a prototype neutron device for improved in-tank moisture monitoring at the Hanford Site. Now a prototype device must be assembled, tested, and fully calibrated in known moisture ferrocyanide waste simulants.

  19. NEC Hazardous classification and compliance regarding the surface moisture monitor measurement system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bussell, J.H., WHC

    1996-06-12

    The National Electrical Code, NFPA 70, and National Fire Protection Association requirements for use of Surface Moisture Monitor Systems in classified locations are discussed. The design and configuration of the surface moisture monitor are analyzed with respect to how they comply with requirements of the National Electrical Code requirements, articles 500-504.

  20. Importance of moisture transport, snow cover and soil freezing to ground temperature predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Importance of moisture transport, snow cover and soil freezing to ground temperature predictions moisture transport, snow accumulation and melting, and soil freezing and thawing are investigated transport, snow cover, and soil freezing. 1. Introduction Prediction of ground temperature is an important

  1. Application of stochastic parameter optimization to the Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagener, Thorsten

    parameter set and underlying posterior distribution within a single optimization run. In particular, weApplication of stochastic parameter optimization to the Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting model Moisture Accounting model (SAC-SMA) model using historical data from the Leaf River in Mississippi

  2. Fact Sheet Radiant barriers and interior radiation control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Radiant Barrier Fact Sheet Overview Radiant barriers and interior radiation control coatings 2 in the map below), radiant barriers could reduce your utility bills by as much as $150 per year load. Contents: Overview · What is a radiant barrier? · What is an interior radiation control coating

  3. 200-BP-1 Prototype Hanford Barrier Annual Monitoring Report for Fiscal Years 2005 Through 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Andy L.; Link, Steven O.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2008-02-01

    A prototype Hanford barrier was deployed over the 216-B-57 Crib at the Hanford Site in 1994 to prevent percolation through the underlying waste and to minimize spreading of buried contaminants. This barrier is being monitored to evaluate physical and hydrologic performance at the field scale. This report summarizes data collected during the period FY 2005 through FY 2007. In FY 2007, monitoring of the prototype Hanford barrier focused on barrier stability, vegetative cover, evidence of plant and animal intrusion, and the main components of the water balance, including precipitation, runoff, storage, drainage, and deep percolation. Owing to a hiatus in funding in FY 2005 through 2006, data collected were limited to automated measurements of the water-balance components. For the reporting period (October 2004 through September 2007) precipitation amount and distribution were close to normal. The cumulative amount of water received from October 1994 through September 2007 was 3043.45 mm on the northern half of the barrier, which is the formerly irrigated treatment, and 2370.58 mm on the southern, non-irrigated treatments. Water storage continued to show a cyclic pattern, increasing in the winter and declining in the spring and summer to a lower limit of around 100 mm in response to evapotranspiration. The 600-mm design storage has never been exceeded. For the reporting period, the total drainage from the soil-covered plots ranged from near zero amounts under the soil-covered plots to almost 20 mm under the side slopes. Over the 13-yr monitoring period, side slope drainage accounted for about 20 percent of total precipitation while the soil-covered plots account for only 0.12 mm total. Above-asphalt and below-asphalt moisture measurements show no evidence of deep percolation of water. Topographic surveys show the barrier and protective side slopes to be stable. Plant surveys show a relatively high coverage of native plants still persists after the initial revegetation in 1994 although species diversity on the soil cover continues to decrease, from 35 in 1997 to 12 in 2007. The formerly irrigated treatments continue to show greater cover of grasses and litter than the non-irrigated treatments. On the formerly irrigated treatments, the mean cover class was 25 to 50 percent for both grasses and shrubs. On the non-irrigated treatments, the mean cover class was 5 to 25 percent from grasses and 25 to 50 percent for shrubs. The western and northern side slopes of the barrier show less plant cover than the soil surface, but show higher species diversity. This may be due to the influence of windblown soil and seeds from adjacent land, or the lack of shrubs competing for resources. Insects and small mammals continue to use the barrier surface and several holes and mounds were observed during the last year. This suggests that the restored barrier surface is beginning to function like a recovering ecosystem. Small-mammal burrowing on the top and sides of the barrier is most prevalent on the finer-grained and disturbed soils while active ant mounds were observed on the northern and western slopes.

  4. Use of element model to evaluate transmissibility reduction due to barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svanes, T.; South, D.; Dronen, O.M.

    1997-08-01

    Water breakthrough has been observed a year earlier than expected in the productive Oseberg Formation in the Veslefrikk Field. Production data revealed extensive water override, whereas the opposite situation was expected based on a homogeneous and coarse flow simulation model. A new model was developed to include geological heterogeneities using a simple upscaling method. The Oseberg Fm. consists of an upper homogeneous unit (zone 2) and a lower unit containing thin barriers of shale and calcite cemented sandstone (zone 1). The barrier content varies laterally. When barriers are distributed in a complex 3D pattern, they reduce the upscaled horizontal transmissibility more than what is obtained by multiplying the sand permeability by the net-to-gross ratio (N/G). However, the transmissibility reduction strongly depends on the spatial distribution of barriers and their geometry. Therefore, a fine scale element model was used to derive the average transmissibility reduction as a function of N/G for alternative geological descriptions of the barriers. A geo-statistical method called General Marked Point Process was used to generate the fine scale descriptions. This work has resulted in a simple upscaling routine for horizontal transmissibility, which represents an effective bridge between geological evaluation of uncertainties and fluid flow simulation. The method combines geo-statistical and deterministic modelling in an elegant manner, recognising that most often these methods complement one another.

  5. Anisotropic capillary barrier for waste site surface covers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stormont, John C. (Sandia Park, NM)

    1996-01-01

    Waste sites are capped or covered upon closure. The cover structure incorporates a number of different layers each having a contributory function. One such layer is the barrier layer. Traditionally the barriers have been compacted soil and geosynthetics. These types of barriers have not been successfully implemented in unsaturated ground conditions like those found in dry climates. Capillary barriers have been proposed as barrier layers in dry environments, but the divergence length of these barriers has been found to be inadequate. An alternative to the capillary barrier is a anisotropic capillary barrier. An anisotropic capillary barrier has an increased divergence length which results in more water being diverted laterally preventing the majority of water from percolating in a downward direction through the barrier.

  6. Overcoming Barriers to Solar Use 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halme, D. S.; Sicotte, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    in lowering of solar system costs in all sectors of the market. MICRO FLO solar domestic water heaters and MEGA collector systems offer the key to the future for all sizes of solar applications from residential water heaters to very large 10,000 m2... American Solar Industry. The opportunities provided through Government assistance programs have enabled the Industry to develop products, standards and the research capability to the edge of commercially realisable solar water heating systems...

  7. IMPACTS OF SOIL MOISTURE VARIABILITY ON CONVECTIVE PRECIPITATION IN THE CENTRAL PLAINS THROUGH LAND-ATMOSPHERE FEEDBACKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Aubrey R.

    2008-08-20

    radiation was not impacted by mean soil moisture. Spatial scaling properties of modeled fields were examined to determine whether these fields exhibit scale invariance. There is large temporal variability in the scaling coefficients of soil moisture, Bowen...

  8. Dynamic Analysis of Moisture Transport Through Walls and Associated Cooling Loads in the Hot/Humid Climate of Florianopolis, Brazil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendes, N.; Winkelmann, F. C.; Lamberts, R.; Philippi, P. C.; Da Cunha, Neto, J. A. B.

    1996-01-01

    . The simulation results were compared to those obtained by pure conduction heat transfer without moisture effects. Also analyzed were the influence on cooling loads of high moisture content due to rain soaking of materials. and the influence of solar radiation...

  9. Using electromagnetic sensors (magnetometers and dielectrometers) to detect corrosion beneath and moisture within paint coatings on aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldfine, N.; Greig, N.A.

    1994-12-31

    Current nondestructive inspection (NDI) techniques, such as visual inspection, ultrasonic testing, and eddy current testing, do not adequately detect the early stages of hidden corrosion under paint in critical structures such as airframes. This paper proposes a sensor system that uses meandering winding magnetometers (MWMs) and interdigital electrode dielectrometers (IDEDs) to detect hidden corrosion under paint and to measure the depth of moisture within barrier paint coatings. The MWM uses magnetic fields and inductive coupling to measure profiles of the properties of conducting media (such as the reduced conductivity near a metal surface caused by an oxygen diffusion layer resulting from early-stage corrosion). The IDED uses electric fields and capacitive coupling to measure the properties of multiple-layered insulating media, such as paint or the metal oxides formed during corrosion. MWM and IDED sensor designs permit Cartesian coordinate modal continuum modeling, which takes advantage of sensor geometries to provide more precise response predictions than are generally possible with conventional eddy current probes. Data are presented to describe the limitations of current NDI techniques, address the need for a new type of corrosion-detection system and discuss the underlying theory and potential of using MWMs and IDEDs to detect corrosion.

  10. Schottky barrier MOSFET systems and fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welch, James D. (10328 Pinehurst Ave., Omaha, NE 68124)

    1997-01-01

    (MOS) device systems-utilizing Schottky barrier source and drain to channel region junctions are disclosed. Experimentally derived results which demonstrate operation of fabricated N-channel and P-channel Schottky barrier (MOSFET) devices, and of fabricated single devices with operational characteristics similar to (CMOS) and to a non-latching (SRC) are reported. Use of essentially non-rectifying Schottky barriers in (MOS) structures involving highly doped and the like and intrinsic semiconductor to allow non-rectifying interconnection of, and electrical accessing of device regions is also disclosed. Insulator effected low leakage current device geometries and fabrication procedures therefore are taught. Selective electrical interconnection of drain to drain, source to drain, or source to source, of N-channel and/or P-channel Schottky barrier (MOSFET) devices formed on P-type, N-type and Intrinsic semiconductor allows realization of Schottky Barrier (CMOS), (MOSFET) with (MOSFET) load, balanced differential (MOSFET) device systems and inverting and non-inverting single devices with operating characteristics similar to (CMOS), which devices can be utilized in modulation, as well as in voltage controled switching and effecting a direction of rectification.

  11. Methods for fabricating a micro heat barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marshall, Albert C.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    2004-01-06

    Methods for fabricating a highly effective, micron-scale micro heat barrier structure and process for manufacturing a micro heat barrier based on semiconductor and/or MEMS fabrication techniques. The micro heat barrier has an array of non-metallic, freestanding microsupports with a height less than 100 microns, attached to a substrate. An infrared reflective membrane (e.g., 1 micron gold) can be supported by the array of microsupports to provide radiation shielding. The micro heat barrier can be evacuated to eliminate gas phase heat conduction and convection. Semi-isotropic, reactive ion plasma etching can be used to create a microspike having a cusp-like shape with a sharp, pointed tip (<0.1 micron), to minimize the tip's contact area. A heat source can be placed directly on the microspikes. The micro heat barrier can have an apparent thermal conductivity in the range of 10.sup.-6 to 10.sup.-7 W/m-K. Multiple layers of reflective membranes can be used to increase thermal resistance.

  12. Enhanced Densification of SDC Barrier Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardy, John S.; Templeton, Jared W.; Lu, Zigui; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-09-12

    This technical report explores the Enhanced Densification of SCD Barrier Layers A samaria-doped ceria (SDC) barrier layer separates the lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathode from the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to prevent the formation of electrically resistive interfacial SrZrO{sub 3} layers that arise from the reaction of Sr from the LSCF with Zr from the YSZ. However, the sintering temperature of this SDC layer must be limited to {approx}1200 C to avoid extensive interdiffusion between SDC and YSZ to form a resistive CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} solid solution. Therefore, the conventional SDC layer is often porous and therefore not as impervious to Sr-diffusion as would be desired. In the pursuit of improved SOFC performance, efforts have been directed toward increasing the density of the SDC barrier layer without increasing the sintering temperature. The density of the SDC barrier layer can be greatly increased through small amounts of Cu-doping of the SDC powder together with increased solids loading and use of an appropriate binder system in the screen print ink. However, the resulting performance of cells with these barrier layers did not exhibit the expected increase in accordance with that achieved with the prototypical PLD SDC layer. It was determined by XRD that increased sinterability of the SDC also results in increased interdiffusivity between the SDC and YSZ, resulting in formation of a highly resistive solid solution.

  13. Soil water depletion by oak trees and the influence of root water uptake on the moisture content spatial statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katul, Gabriel

    Soil water depletion by oak trees and the influence of root water uptake on the moisture content was used to assess the role of root water uptake on the spatial variability of moisture content the spa- tial variability in moisture content due to root water uptake from variability in soil hydraulic

  14. Soil moisture in complex terrain: quantifying effects on atmospheric boundary layer flow and providing improved surface boundary conditions for mesoscale models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniels, Megan Hanako

    2010-01-01

    74 ii Soil Moisture Sensors: Decagon ECH2O Capacitance133 A.10 Soil types corresponding to each75 Soil Moisture and Temperature Probe

  15. Development of the prototype Munitions Case Moisture Meter, Model ORNL-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agouridis, D.C.; Gayle, T.M.; Griest, W.H.

    1993-02-24

    There is a great need for a rapid and simple means of determining the moisture content in combustible cartridge case (ccc) munitions. Previous studies have demonstrated that accumulation of moisture in ccc rounds, such as the M829, leads to softening of the case wall and weakening of the adhesive joint. Moisture in the ccc can lead to incomplete combustion of the case upon firing the round. Currently, there are no facile methods for measuring the moisture content. A prototype portable meter for non-destructive and rapid estimation of moisture in ccc has been developed. The Munitions Case Moisture Meter Model ORNL-1 demonstrates the feasibility of developing an instrument based on the moisture dependence of dielectric properties, to measure moisture in ccc munitions in storage and in the field. These instruments are simple, inexpensive, lightweight, portable, low-power battery operated, and intrinsically safe. They provide nondestructive, noninvasive, and rapid measurements. Calibration data for the prototype are not available at this time. Therefore, calibration of the meter and the development of a scale reading directly moisture content in munitions rounds could not be completed. These data will be supplied by the US Army from its tests of the meter with actual munitions. However, experimental results on empty cccs in laboratory conditions demonstrate satisfactory performance of the instrument. Additional work is needed to bring the prototype to its optimum usefulness and accuracy for field measurements. This includes: Calibration of the meter scale with full-up munitions; Data and evaluation procedures to adjust the performance of the meter for different environmental conditions such as temperature and humidity; and Studies of the dielectric properties of moist ccc materials, as a function of frequency and temperature, are needed for adjustment of the meter for optimal performance.

  16. Development of the prototype Munitions Case Moisture Meter, Model ORNL-1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agouridis, D.C.; Gayle, T.M.; Griest, W.H.

    1993-02-24

    There is a great need for a rapid and simple means of determining the moisture content in combustible cartridge case (ccc) munitions. Previous studies have demonstrated that accumulation of moisture in ccc rounds, such as the M829, leads to softening of the case wall and weakening of the adhesive joint. Moisture in the ccc can lead to incomplete combustion of the case upon firing the round. Currently, there are no facile methods for measuring the moisture content. A prototype portable meter for non-destructive and rapid estimation of moisture in ccc has been developed. The Munitions Case Moisture Meter Model ORNL-1 demonstrates the feasibility of developing an instrument based on the moisture dependence of dielectric properties, to measure moisture in ccc munitions in storage and in the field. These instruments are simple, inexpensive, lightweight, portable, low-power battery operated, and intrinsically safe. They provide nondestructive, noninvasive, and rapid measurements. Calibration data for the prototype are not available at this time. Therefore, calibration of the meter and the development of a scale reading directly moisture content in munitions rounds could not be completed. These data will be supplied by the US Army from its tests of the meter with actual munitions. However, experimental results on empty cccs in laboratory conditions demonstrate satisfactory performance of the instrument. Additional work is needed to bring the prototype to its optimum usefulness and accuracy for field measurements. This includes: Calibration of the meter scale with full-up munitions; Data and evaluation procedures to adjust the performance of the meter for different environmental conditions such as temperature and humidity; and Studies of the dielectric properties of moist ccc materials, as a function of frequency and temperature, are needed for adjustment of the meter for optimal performance.

  17. Pressurized security barrier and alarm system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carver, Don W. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A security barrier for placement across a passageway is made up of interconnected pressurized tubing made up in a grid pattern with openings too small to allow passage. The tubing is connected to a pressure switch, located away from the barrier site, which activates an alarm upon occurrence of a pressure drop. A reinforcing bar is located inside and along the length of the tubing so as to cause the tubing to rupture and set off the alarm upon an intruder's making an attempt to crimp and seal off a portion of the tubing by application of a hydraulic tool. Radial and rectangular grid patterns are disclosed.

  18. Pressurized security barrier and alarm system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carver, D.W.

    1995-04-11

    A security barrier for placement across a passageway is made up of interconnected pressurized tubing made up in a grid pattern with openings too small to allow passage. The tubing is connected to a pressure switch, located away from the barrier site, which activates an alarm upon occurrence of a pressure drop. A reinforcing bar is located inside and along the length of the tubing so as to cause the tubing to rupture and set off the alarm upon an intruder`s making an attempt to crimp and seal off a portion of the tubing by application of a hydraulic tool. Radial and rectangular grid patterns are disclosed. 7 figures.

  19. Maximizing Light Utilization Efficiency and Hydrogen Production in Microalgal Cultures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melis, Anastasios

    2014-12-31

    The project addressed the following technical barrier from the Biological Hydrogen Production section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: Low Sunlight Utilization Efficiency in Photobiological Hydrogen Production is due to a Large Photosystem Chlorophyll Antenna Size in Photosynthetic Microorganisms (Barrier AN: Light Utilization Efficiency).

  20. Measurements of Backsheet Moisture Permeation and Encapsulant-Substrate Adhesion: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Barber, G.; Kennedy, C.; McMahon, T.

    2001-10-01

    Presented at the 2001 NCPV Program Review Meeting: Measurements of backsheet moisture permeation and encapsulant-substrate adhesion. At the March 2001 NCPV workshop on ''Moisture Ingress and High-Voltage Isolation'', industry participants identified several properties associated with PV module durability that are critical for commercial success. These include interface conductivity, adhesion of encapsulants to substrate materials as a function of in-service exposure conditions, and moisture permeation through backsheet materials as a function of temperature. Electrical data is discussed in a companion paper; adhesion and water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) measurements are presented herein.

  1. Barrier erosion control test plan: Gravel mulch, vegetation, and soil water interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J.; Link, S.O. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1988-07-01

    Soil erosion could reduce the water storage capacity of barriers that have been proposed for the disposal of near-surface waste at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Gravel mixed into the top soil surface may create a self-healing veneer that greatly retards soil loss. However, gravel admixtures may also enhance infiltration of rainwater, suppress plant growth and water extraction, and lead to the leaching of underlying waste. This report describes plans for two experiments that were designed to test hypotheses concerning the interactive effects of surface gravel admixtures, revegetation, and enhanced precipitation on soil water balance and plant abundance. The first experiment is a factorial field plot set up on the site selected as a soil borrow area for the eventual construction of barriers. The treatments, arranged in a a split-split-plot design structure, include two densities of gravel admix, a mixture of native and introduced grasses, and irrigation to simulate a wetter climate. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover are monitored with neutron moisture probes and point intercept sampling, respectively. The second experiment consists of an array of 80 lysimeters containing several different barrier prototypes. Surface treatments are similar to the field-plot experiment. Drainage is collected from a valve at the base of each lysimeter tube, and evapotranspiration is estimated by subtraction. The lysimeters are also designed to be coupled to a whole-plant gas exchange system that will be used to conduct controlled experiments on evapotranspiration for modeling purposes. 56 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  2. Field study of gravel admix, vegetation, and soil water interactions: Protective Barrier Program Status Reprt - FY 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J.; Thiede, M.E.; Kemp, C.J.; Cadwell, L.L. Link, S.O.

    1990-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) are collaborating on a field study of the effects of gravel admixtures on plant growth and soil water storage in protective barriers. Protective barriers are engineered earthern covers designed to prevent water, plants, and animals from contacting buried waste and transporting contaminants to groundwater or the land surface. Some of the proposed designs include gravel admixtures or gravel mulches on the barrier surface to control soil loss by wind and runoff. The purpose of this study is to measure, in a field setting, the influence of surface gravel additions on soil water storage and plant cover. The study plots are located northwest of the Yakima Gate in the McGee Ranch old field. Here we report the status of work completed in FY 1989 on the creation of a data management system, a test of water application uniformity, field calibration of neutron moisture gages, and an analysis of the response of plants to various combinations of gravel admixtures and increased rainfall. 23 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Automatic Object Colocation Based on Read Barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mössenböck, Hanspeter

    matches their access order in the program. We implemented this optimization for Sun Microsystems' Java HotSpotTM VM. The garbage collector, which moves objects during collection, assigns consecutive ad- dresses-called hot-field tables, which are then used by the garbage collector for colocation decisions. Read barriers

  4. RealReal heterojunctionsheterojunctions Schottky barrier current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    -EFFICIENCY CDTE AND CIGS THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS: HIGHLIGHTS AND CHALLENGES. National Renewable Energy Laboratory1 RealReal heterojunctionsheterojunctions LECTURE 9 · Schottky barrier current · CdS/CIGS · Energy is the forward-bias current? #12;33 HeterostructureHeterostructure, thin film, cells: a lower, thin film, cells

  5. Radiant Barrier Performance during the Heating Season 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medina, M. A.; O'Neal, D. L.; Turner, W. D.

    1992-01-01

    . Extra null tests limit the number of radiant barrier tests that can be performed during short winter periods. However. nul1tesL~ were run during the months of June 1990 and April 1991 which confirmed that the houses still responded similarly...

  6. Ranking websites through prioritized web accessibility barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brajnik, Giorgio

    of these comments apply as well to the current WCAG 2.0 draft, to Section 508 and to the Italian official technical criteria in WCAG 2.0), or when they do it (like priority levels in WCAG 1.0) they do not depend on specificRanking websites through prioritized web accessibility barriers Giorgio Brajnik Dip. di Matematica

  7. Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-2294E Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response F. Rubinstein, G. Ghatikar, J Ann Piette of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (LBNL) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC and Environment's (CIEE) Demand Response Emerging Technologies Development (DRETD) Program, under Work for Others

  8. Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Shengmin; Yang, Shizhong; Khosravi, Ebrahim

    2011-12-31

    This project (10/01/2010-9/30/2013), “Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems”, originates from Louisiana State University (LSU) Mechanical Engineering Department and Southern University (SU) Department of Computer Science. This proposal will directly support the technical goals specified in DE-FOA-0000248, Topic Area 3: Turbine Materials, by addressing key technologies needed to enable the development of advanced turbines and turbine-based systems that will operate safely and efficiently using coal-derived synthesis gases. We will develop novel molecular dynamics method to improve the efficiency of simulation on novel TBC materials; we will perform high performance computing (HPC) on complex TBC structures to screen the most promising TBC compositions; we will perform material characterizations and oxidation/corrosion tests; and we will demonstrate our new Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems experimentally under Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) environments. The durability of the coating will be examined using the proposed High Temperature/High Pressure Durability Test Rig under real syngas product compositions.

  9. MENDING THE IN SITU MANIPULATION BARRIER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSEN, S.W.

    2006-02-06

    In early 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland and Fluor Hanford requested technical assistance from the DOE Headquarters EM-23 Technical Assistance Program to provide a team of technical experts to develop recommendations for mending the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Barrier in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site in Washington State. To accommodate this request, EM-23 provided support to convene a group of technical experts from industry, a national laboratory, and a DOE site to participate in a 2 1/2-day workshop with the objective of identifying and recommending options to enhance the performance of the 100-D Area reactive barrier and of a planned extension to the northeast. This report provides written documentation of the team's findings and recommendations. In 1995, a plume of dissolved hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], which resulted from operation of the D/DR Reactors at the Hanford site, was discovered along the Columbia River shoreline and in the 100-D Area. Between 1999 and 2003, a reactive barrier using the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) technology, was installed a distance of 680 meters along the river to reduce the Cr(VI) in the groundwater. The ISRM technology creates a treatment zone within the aquifer by injection of sodium dithionite, a strong reducing agent that scavenges dissolved oxygen (DO) from the aquifer and reduces ferric iron [Fe(III)], related metals, and oxy-ions. The reduction of Fe(III) to ferrous [Fe(II)] iron provides the primary reduction capacity to reduce Cr(VI) to the +3 state, which is less mobile and less toxic. Bench-scale and field-scale treatability tests were initially conducted to demonstrate proof-of principle and to provide data for estimation of barrier longevity. These calculations estimated barrier longevity in excess of twenty years. However, several years after initial and secondary treatment, groundwater in a number of wells has been found to contain elevated chromium (Cr) concentrations, indicating some loss of reductive capacity within the aquifer. The Technical Assistance Team (TAT) was requested to perform the following activities: (1) evaluate the most probable condition(s) that has led to the presence of Cr(VI) in 12 different barrier wells (i.e. premature loss of reductive capacity), (2) recommend methods for determining the cause of the problem, (3) recommend methods for evaluating the magnitude of the problem, (4) recommend practicable method(s) for mending the barrier that involves a long-term solution, and (5) recommend methods for extending the barrier to the northeast (e.g., changing injection procedure, changing or augmenting the injected material). Since the March 2004 workshop, a decision has been made to place a hold on the barrier extension until more is known about the cause of the problem. However, the report complies with the original request for information on all of the above activities, but focuses on determining the cause of the problem and mending of the existing barrier.

  10. Surface ecophysiological behavior across vegetation and moisture gradients in tropical South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    variations in energy and carbon exchange over forest and2002. Energy balance closure at FLUXNET sites. Agric. Forestenergy, moisture and carbon ?uxes, at a single point in the Tapajos River National Forest (

  11. Modeling land surface processes of the midwestern United States : predicting soil moisture under a warmer climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation seeks to quantify the response of soil moisture to climate change in the midwestern United States. To assess this response, a dynamic global vegetation model, Integrated Biosphere Simulator, was coupled ...

  12. Moisture proof columnar Cesium Iodide (CsI) layers for gas avalanche microdetectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, I.J.; Cho, H.S.; Hong, W.S.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kadyk, J.

    1999-01-01

    Moisture Proof Columnar Cesium Iodide (CsI) Layers for GasHalogen lamp ) Abstract Cesium iodide columnar layers havingargon-ethane mixtures. The cesium iodide columns are damaged

  13. The effects of aggregate gradation on moisture diffusivity in a cementious based material 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szecsy, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Gravel), and the presence of fly ash (10% by cement weight or none). Also developed, is an experimental laboratory procedure which measures the moisture diffusivity of a cementious material. The method and procedure for measuring diffusivity developed...

  14. The Effect of Moisture Absorption on the Physical Properties of Polyurethane Shape Memory Polymer Foams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Ya-Jen

    2012-07-16

    The effect of moisture absorption on the glass transition temperature (Tg) and stress/strain behavior of network polyurethane shape memory polymer (SMP) foams has been investigated. With our ultimate goal of engineering polyurethane SMP foams...

  15. Moisture sensor based on evanescent wave light scattering by porous sol-gel silica coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, Shiquan; Singh, Jagdish P.; Winstead, Christopher B.

    2006-05-02

    An optical fiber moisture sensor that can be used to sense moisture present in gas phase in a wide range of concentrations is provided, as well techniques for making the same. The present invention includes a method that utilizes the light scattering phenomenon which occurs in a porous sol-gel silica by coating an optical fiber core with such silica. Thus, a porous sol-gel silica polymer coated on an optical fiber core forms the transducer of an optical fiber moisture sensor according to an embodiment. The resulting optical fiber sensor of the present invention can be used in various applications, including to sense moisture content in indoor/outdoor air, soil, concrete, and low/high temperature gas streams.

  16. Deriving soil moisture with the combined L-band radar and radiometer measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Jiancheng

    In this study, we develop a combined active/passive technique to estimate surface soil moisture with the focus on the short vegetated surfaces. We first simulated a database for both active and passive signals under SMAP's ...

  17. Mathematical modeling of evaporative cooling of moisture bearing epoxy composite plates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payette, Gregory Steven

    2006-08-16

    Research is performed to assess the potential of surface moisture evaporative cooling from composite plates as a means of reducing the external temperature of military aircraft. To assess the feasibility of evaporative ...

  18. Relationship Between Soil Moisture Storage and Deep Percolation and Subsurface Return Flow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nieber, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    A simulation study was performed to analyze the relationship between the volume of moisture stored in a soil profile and the rate of percolation and subsurface return flow. The simulation study was derived on the basis of the Richards equation...

  19. Modeling the impact of atmospheric moisture transport on global ice volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nisancioglu, Kerim Hestnes, 1975-

    2004-01-01

    Following Milankovitch's original hypothesis most model studies of changes in global ice volume on orbital time scales have focused on the impact of ablation on ice sheet mass balance. In most cases, poleward moisture flux ...

  20. Investigation of moisture effects on interfacial properties of an epoxy matrix composite by dynamic mechanical analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jo-Yu

    1994-01-01

    The interfacial properties of polymer matrix composites are critical to the retention of the mechanical properties of the composites in a wet environment. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of moisture on the interfacial...

  1. Moisture Performance of High-R Wall Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: Home Innovation Research Labs—Upper Marlboro, MD Partners: -- American Chemistry Council -- National Association of Home Builders -- USDA Forest Products Lab -- Vinyl Siding Institute

  2. Elemental Analyses of Hanford Surface Neutron Moisture Measurement Calibration Standard Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, W.T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-31

    Elemental analyses have been performed on twenty samples taken from the moisture standards prepared to use in performing experimental calibrations of the surface neutron moisture measurement system. These standards consisted of mixtures of sand, hydrated alumina, and boron carbide. Elemental analyses were performed primarily to discover the quantities of any strong thermal neutron absorbers that may have been present in the mixture in unknown trace quantities.

  3. The influence of particle-size distribution and moisture levels on the formation of soil hardpans 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Herman John

    1963-01-01

    THE INFLUENCE OF PARTICLE-SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND MOISTURE LEVELS ON THE FORMATION OF SOIL HARDPANS A Thesis By HERMAN J. BAUER Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January, 1963 Major Subject: Soil Physics THE INFLUENCE OF PARTICLE-SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND MOISTURE LEVELS ON THE FORMATION OF SOIL HARDPANS A Thesis By HERMAN J. BAUER Approved as to style and content...

  4. Experimental Study of Multi-type Macromolecule Porosity Moisture-Conditioned Material 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, X.; Fan, Y.; Di, Y.

    2006-01-01

    , Passive technology, Solar energy 1. INTRODUCTION Large numbers of Chinese existing housing. Urban construction area of china rapid increase from 1996 to date, end of 2003, total area amounted to 1.4091 billion square meters. At the same time... and evaporative cooling effect of the porosity moisture conditioned material is remarkable, and could effectively reduce the cooling load of buildings. Keywords? Passive evaporative, Porosity moisture conditioned material, Energy efficiency in buildings...

  5. Adhesive flexible barrier film, method of forming same, and organic electronic device including same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blizzard, John Donald; Weidner, William Kenneth

    2013-02-05

    An adhesive flexible barrier film comprises a substrate and a barrier layer disposed on the substrate. The barrier layer is formed from a barrier composition comprising an organosilicon compound. The adhesive flexible barrier film also comprises an adhesive layer disposed on the barrier layer and formed from an adhesive composition. A method of forming the adhesive flexible barrier film comprises the steps of disposing the barrier composition on the substrate to form the barrier layer, disposing the adhesive composition on the barrier layer to form the adhesive layer, and curing the barrier layer and the adhesive layer. The adhesive flexible barrier film may be utilized in organic electronic devices.

  6. Reaction, transformation and delamination of samarium zirconate thermal barrier coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    Reaction, transformation and delamination of samarium zirconate thermal barrier coatings Hengbei zirconates have attracted interest for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) because they have very low intrinsic. Here, columnar morphology SZO coatings have been deposited on bond coated superalloy substrates using

  7. Options for Energy Efficiency in India and Barriers to Their...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Options for Energy Efficiency in India and Barriers to Their Adoption: A Scoping Study Jump to: navigation, search Name Options for Energy Efficiency in India and Barriers to Their...

  8. Overcoming Barriers to Wind Development in Appalachian Coal Country

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Bailey; Evan Hansen

    2012-10-09

    This research project synthesizes existing data and communication from experts to assess barriers to wind development in Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, and Kentucky, and makes recommendations where feasible to reduce or eliminate those barriers.

  9. Energy Permitting Wizard Helps Reduce Project Barriers in Hawai...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Permitting Wizard Helps Reduce Project Barriers in Hawai'i Energy Permitting Wizard Helps Reduce Project Barriers in Hawai'i To address the complex permitting process for renewable...

  10. Simulation of localized barrier defects in resonant tunneling diodes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoneberg, Jason Neal

    1995-01-01

    defect assisted tunneling as a possible current mechanism. This study attempts to ascertain the effects of defect potentials in the barriers on current in a simulation of a double barrier resonant tunneling diode. Results indicate that these defects could...

  11. SOLID WOOD PRODUCTS I TECHNICAL NOTE CALIBRATION OF MOISTURE METERS FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tanks, and boats, the kiln and allowed to cool. They were content (MC) of wood. However, the cor in the velop these factors for both electrical re- calculate the specific gravity of each lumber trade in LeMoyen, La., for the type mete1: It was placed at the center of lowish-brown to dark chocolate brown

  12. TTI: 0-6071 Evaluation of Barriers for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for future research are discussed. 17. Key Words High-Speed Roadways, Bridge Rail, Longitudinal BarriersTTI: 0-6071 Evaluation of Barriers for Very High Speed Roadways Research/Test Report 0. Title and Subtitle Evaluation of Barriers for Very High Speed Roadways 5. Report Date January 2010

  13. Molten silicate interactions with thermal barrier coatings Hengbei Zhao a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    Molten silicate interactions with thermal barrier coatings Hengbei Zhao a, , Carlos G. Levi b form 2 April 2014 Available online 12 April 2014 Keywords: Thermal barrier coatings Rare earth zirconate CMAS reaction The strain tolerance of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) used in gas turbine engines

  14. Pricing European Barrier Options Peter W.Buchen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sydney, University of

    barrier options which incorporate a con- stant rebate. The method exploits the symmetries and properties of elemen- tary solutions of the Black-Scholes partial differential equation. The rebate and non-rebate. If rebates apply then the first exit time densities through the barrier are also required. Barrier option

  15. Theoretical Analysis of the Rotational Barrier of Ethane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Theoretical Analysis of the Rotational Barrier of Ethane YIRONG MO*, AND JIALI GAO*, Department The understanding of the ethane rotation barrier is fundamental for structural theory and the conformational a computational approach to probe the rotation barriers of ethane and its congeners in terms of steric repulsion

  16. Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

    2013-03-19

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

  17. Diffusion barriers in modified air brazes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weil, Kenneth Scott (Richland, WA); Hardy, John S. (Richland, WA); Kim, Jin Yong (Richland, WA); Choi, Jung-Pyung (Richland, WA)

    2010-04-06

    A method for joining two ceramic parts, or a ceramic part and a metal part, and the joint formed thereby. The method provides two or more parts, a braze consisting of a mixture of copper oxide and silver, a diffusion barrier, and then heats the braze for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form the braze into a bond holding the two or more parts together. The diffusion barrier is an oxidizable metal that forms either a homogeneous component of the braze, a heterogeneous component of the braze, a separate layer bordering the braze, or combinations thereof. The oxidizable metal is selected from the group Al, Mg, Cr, Si, Ni, Co, Mn, Ti, Zr, Hf, Pt, Pd, Au, lanthanides, and combinations thereof.

  18. Diffusion barriers in modified air brazes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weil, Kenneth Scott; Hardy, John S; Kim, Jin Yong; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2013-04-23

    A method for joining two ceramic parts, or a ceramic part and a metal part, and the joint formed thereby. The method provides two or more parts, a braze consisting of a mixture of copper oxide and silver, a diffusion barrier, and then heats the braze for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form the braze into a bond holding the two or more parts together. The diffusion barrier is an oxidizable metal that forms either a homogeneous component of the braze, a heterogeneous component of the braze, a separate layer bordering the braze, or combinations thereof. The oxidizable metal is selected from the group Al, Mg, Cr, Si, Ni, Co, Mn, Ti, Zr, Hf, Pt, Pd, Au, lanthanides, and combinations thereof.

  19. Sustainable and efficient biohydrogen production via electrohydrogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainable and efficient biohydrogen production via electrohydrogenesis Shaoan Cheng and Bruce E biohydrogen production past the endothermic barrier im- posed by the microbial formation of fermentation dead fuels such as natural gas. Here, we show that efficient and sustainable hydrogen production is possible

  20. Train derailment and railroad barrier interaction simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Heping

    1990-01-01

    or eliminate the risk of the passenger track intrusion by derailing cars on adjacent track is of concern to the railroad authorities. The purpose of this study is through computer simulation to investigate the behavior of the train derailment and to determine... the feasibility of the use of a barrier wall to restrain derailing railroad cars. An analytical model has been developed for the simulation. In the theoretical analysis the equation of motion in the horizontal plane for each derailed car was derived...

  1. Plastic Schottky-barrier solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldrop, J.R.; Cohen, M.J.

    1981-12-30

    A photovoltaic cell structure is fabricated from an active medium including an undoped polyacetylene, organic semiconductor. When a film of such material is in rectifying contact with a metallic area electrode, a Schottky-barrier junction is obtained within the body of the cell structure. Also, a gold overlayer passivates a magnesium layer on the undoped polyacetylene film. With the proper selection and location of elements a photovoltaic cell structure and solar cell are obtained.

  2. Fission barriers and half-lives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.; Swiatecki, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    We briefly review the development of theoretical models for the calculation of fission barriers and half-lives. We focus on how results of actual calculations in a unified macroscopic-microscopic approach provide an interpretation of the mechanisms behind some of the large number of phenomena observed in fission. As instructive examples we choose studies of the rapidly varying fission properties of elements at the end of the periodic system. 31 refs., 10 figs.

  3. QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF FIRE SEPARATION AND BARRIERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutts, D

    2007-04-17

    Fire barriers, and physical separation are key components in managing the fire risk in Nuclear Facilities. The expected performance of these features have often been predicted using rules-of-thumb or expert judgment. These approaches often lack the convincing technical bases that exist when addressing other Nuclear Facility accident events. This paper presents science-based approaches to demonstrate the effectiveness of fire separation methods.

  4. Oxynitride Thin Film Barriers for PV Packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glick, S. H.; delCueto, J. A.; Terwilliger, K. M.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Pankow, J. W.; Keyes, B. M.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Pern, F. J.

    2005-11-01

    Dielectric thin-film barrier and adhesion-promoting layers consisting of silicon oxynitride materials (SiOxNy, with various stoichiometry) were investigated. For process development, films were applied to glass (TCO, conductive SnO2:F; or soda-lime), polymer (PET, polyethylene terephthalate), aluminized soda-lime glass, or PV cell (a-Si, CIGS) substrates. Design strategy employed de-minimus hazard criteria to facilitate industrial adoption and reduce implementation costs for PV manufacturers or suppliers. A restricted process window was explored using dilute compressed gases (3% silane, 14% nitrous oxide, 23% oxygen) in nitrogen (or former mixtures, and 11.45% oxygen mix in helium and/or 99.999% helium dilution) with a worst-case flammable and non-corrosive hazard classification. Method employed low radio frequency (RF) power, less than or equal to 3 milliwatts per cm2, and low substrate temperatures, less than or equal to 100 deg C, over deposition areas less than or equal to 1000 cm2. Select material properties for barrier film thickness (profilometer), composition (XPS/FTIR), optical (refractive index, %T and %R), mechanical peel strength and WVTR barrier performance are presented.

  5. Embedded Optical Sensors for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David R. Clarke

    2006-07-31

    The third year of this program on developing embedded optical sensors for thermal barrier coatings has been devoted to two principal topics: (i) continuing the assessment of the long-term, thermal cycle stability of the Eu{sup 3+} doped 8YSZ temperature sensor coatings, and (ii) improving the fiber-optic based luminescence detector system. Following the earlier, preliminary findings, it has been found that not only is the luminescence from the sensors not affected by prolonged thermal cycling, even after 195 hours at 1425 C, but the variation in luminescence lifetime with temperature remains unchanged. As the temperature of 1425 C is much higher than present engines attain or even planned in the foreseeable future, our findings indicate that the Eu{sup 3+} doped thermal barrier coating sensors are very robust and have the potential of being stable throughout the life of coatings. Investigation of Eu{sup 3+} doped coatings prepared by plasma-spraying exhibited the same luminescence characteristics as those prepared by electron-beam evaporation. This is of major significance since thermal barrier coatings can be prepared by both process technologies. A fiber-optic based luminescence system has been constructed in which the hottest section of fiber operates to at least 1250 C.

  6. FINAL REPORT FOR MOISTURE EFFECTS ON COMPACTION OF FIBERBOARD IN A 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefek, T.; Daugherty, W.; Estochen, E.

    2013-09-17

    Compaction of lower layers in the fiberboard assembly has been observed in 9975 packages that contain elevated moisture. Lab testing has resulted in a better understanding of the relationship between the fiberboard moisture level and compaction of the lower fiberboard assembly, and the behavior of the fiberboard during transport. In laboratory tests of cane fiberboard, higher moisture content has been shown to correspond to higher total compaction, greater rate of compaction, and continued compaction over a longer period of time. In addition, laboratory tests have shown that the application of a dynamic load results in higher fiberboard compaction compared to a static load. The test conditions and sample geometric/loading configurations were chosen to simulate the regulatory requirements for 9975 package input dynamic loading. Dynamic testing was conducted to acquire immediate and cumulative changes in geometric data for various moisture levels. Two sample sets have undergone a complete dynamic test regimen, one set for 27 weeks, and the second set for 47 weeks. The dynamic input, data acquisition, test effects on sample dynamic parameters, and results from this test program are summarized and compared to regulatory specifications for dynamic loading. Compaction of the bottom fiberboard layers due to the accumulation of moisture is one possible cause of an increase in the axial gap at the top of the package. The net compaction of the bottom layers will directly add to the axial gap. The moisture which caused this compaction migrated from the middle region of the fiberboard assembly (which is typically the hottest). This will cause the middle region to shrink axially, which will also contribute directly to the axial gap. Measurement of the axial gap provides a screening tool for identifying significant change in the fiberboard condition. The data in this report provide a basis to evaluate the impact of moisture and fiberboard compaction on 9975 package performance during storage at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

  7. Using Whole-House Field Tests to Empirically Derive Moisture Buffering Model Inputs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, J.; Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.; Hancock, E.

    2014-08-01

    Building energy simulations can be used to predict a building's interior conditions, along with the energy use associated with keeping these conditions comfortable. These models simulate the loads on the building (e.g., internal gains, envelope heat transfer), determine the operation of the space conditioning equipment, and then calculate the building's temperature and humidity throughout the year. The indoor temperature and humidity are affected not only by the loads and the space conditioning equipment, but also by the capacitance of the building materials, which buffer changes in temperature and humidity. This research developed an empirical method to extract whole-house model inputs for use with a more accurate moisture capacitance model (the effective moisture penetration depth model). The experimental approach was to subject the materials in the house to a square-wave relative humidity profile, measure all of the moisture transfer terms (e.g., infiltration, air conditioner condensate) and calculate the only unmeasured term: the moisture absorption into the materials. After validating the method with laboratory measurements, we performed the tests in a field house. A least-squares fit of an analytical solution to the measured moisture absorption curves was used to determine the three independent model parameters representing the moisture buffering potential of this house and its furnishings. Follow on tests with realistic latent and sensible loads showed good agreement with the derived parameters, especially compared to the commonly-used effective capacitance approach. These results show that the EMPD model, once the inputs are known, is an accurate moisture buffering model.

  8. Performing a global barrier operation in a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-12-09

    Executing computing tasks on a parallel computer that includes compute nodes coupled for data communications, where each compute node executes tasks, with one task on each compute node designated as a master task, including: for each task on each compute node until all master tasks have joined a global barrier: determining whether the task is a master task; if the task is not a master task, joining a single local barrier; if the task is a master task, joining the global barrier and the single local barrier only after all other tasks on the compute node have joined the single local barrier.

  9. Development of Barrier Films for Packaging Flexible Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    Pum, Applied Materials, SRC #12;3/23/15 2 Solid State Lighting Flexible Challenges for Other Devices Exposure to moisture can cause degradaPon in both OLED CIGS Requirement of OLEDs Food / PharmaceuDcal packaging Commercial polymer

  10. Low Thermal Conductivity, High Durability Thermal Barrier Coatings for IGCC Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Eric; Gell, Maurice

    2015-01-15

    Advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are crucial to improved energy efficiency in next generation gas turbine engines. The use of traditional topcoat materials, e.g. yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), is limited at elevated temperatures due to (1) the accelerated undesirable phase transformations and (2) corrosive attacks by calcium-magnesium-aluminum-silicate (CMAS) deposits and moisture. The first goal of this project is to use the Solution Precursor Plasma Spray (SPPS) process to further reduce the thermal conductivity of YSZ TBCs by introducing a unique microstructural feature of layered porosity, called inter-pass boundaries (IPBs). Extensive process optimization accompanied with hundreds of spray trials as well as associated SEM cross-section and laser-flash measurements, yielded a thermal conductivity as low as 0.62 Wm?¹K?¹ in SPPS YSZ TBCs, approximately 50% reduction of APS TBCs; while other engine critical properties, such as cyclic durability, erosion resistance and sintering resistance, were characterized to be equivalent or better than APS baselines. In addition, modifications were introduced to SPPS TBCs so as to enhance their resistance to CMAS under harsh IGCC environments. Several mitigation approaches were explored, including doping the coatings with Al?O? and TiO?, applying a CMAS infiltration-inhibiting surface layer, and filling topcoat cracks with blocking substances. The efficacy of all these modifications was assessed with a set of novel CMAS-TBC interaction tests, and the moisture resistance was tested in a custom-built high-temperature moisture rig. In the end, the optimal low thermal conductivity TBC system was selected based on all evaluation tests and its processing conditions were documented. The optimal coating consisted on a thick inner layer of YSZ coating made by the SPPS process having a thermal conductivity 50% lower than standard YSZ coatings topped with a high temperature tolerant CMAS resistant gadolinium zirconate Coating made by the SPPS process. Noteworthy was the fact that the YSZ to GZO interface made by the SPPS process was not the failure location as had been observed in APS coatings.

  11. Effect of residential air-to-air heat and moisture exchangers on indoor humidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barringer, C.G.; McGugan, C.A. )

    1989-01-01

    A project was undertaken to develop guidelines for the selection of residential heat and moisture recovery ventilation systems (HRVs) in order to maintain an acceptable indoor humidity for various climatic conditions. These guidelines were developed from reviews on ventilation requirements, HRV performance specifications, and from computer modeling. Space conditions within three house/occupancy models for several types of HRV were simulated for three climatic conditions (Lake Charles, LA; Seattle, WA; and Winnipeg, MB) in order to determine the impact of the HRVs on indoor relative humidity and space-conditioning loads. Results show that when reduction of cooling cost is the main consideration, exchangers with moisture recovery are preferable to sensible HRVs. For reduction of heating costs, moisture recovery should be done for ventilation rates greater than about 15 L/s and average winter temperatures less than about (minus) 10{degrees}C if internal moisture generation rates are low. For houses with higher ventilation rates and colder average winter temperatures, exchangers with moisture recovery should be used.

  12. Dissociation of nitrogen in a pulse-periodic dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popov, N. A., E-mail: npopov@mics.msu.su [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    Nitrogen molecule dissociation in a pulse-periodic atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge is numerically analyzed. It is shown that the quenching rate of predissociation states at atmospheric pressure is relatively low and the production of nitrogen atoms in this case can be adequately described using the cross section for electron-impact dissociation of N{sub 2} molecules taken from the paper by P.C. Cosby [J. Chem. Phys. 98, 9544 (1993)].

  13. Variation in soil moisture and N availability modulates carbon and water exchange in a California grassland experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St. Clair, S.B.

    2010-01-01

    in soil moisture and N availability modulates carbon andamount and timing, N availability, and plant communityparticularly as water availability was increased. These

  14. Low-temperature conversion of high-moisture biomass: Topical report, January 1984--January 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Elliott, D.C.; Butner, R.S.; Neuenschwander, G.G.

    1988-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing a low-temperature, catalytic process that converts high-moisture biomass feedstocks and other wet organic substances to useful gaseous and liquid fuels. The advantage of this process is that it works without the need for drying or dewatering the feedstock. Conventional thermal gasification processes, which require temperatures above 750/degree/C and air or oxygen for combustion to supply reaction heat, generally cannot utilize feedstocks with moisture contents above 50 wt %, as the conversion efficiency is greatly reduced as a result of the drying step. For this reason, anaerobic digestion or other bioconversion processes traditionally have been used for gasification of high-moisture feedstocks. However, these processes suffer from slow reaction rates and incomplete carbon conversion. 50 refs., 21 figs., 22 tabs.

  15. Post-Mining 2005, November 16-17, Nancy, France 1 LARGE SCALE APPLICATIONS OF COVERS WITH CAPILLARY BARRIER EFFECTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    BARRIER EFFECTS TO CONTROL THE PRODUCTION OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE DAGENAIS Anne-Marie1 , AUBERTIN Michel2 used in recent years as part of the closure plan for mines having an acid mine drainage (AMD) problem migration in the case of more humid climatic conditions. KEYWORDS: Covers, Acid mine drainage, Monitoring

  16. Breaking Barriers in Polymer Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Lonnie J; Duty, Chad E; Post, Brian K; Lind, Randall F; Lloyd, Peter D; Kunc, Vlastimil; Peter, William H; Blue, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) enables the creation of complex structures directly from a computer-aided design (CAD). There are limitations that prevent the technology from realizing its full potential. AM has been criticized for being slow and expensive with limited build size. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a large scale AM system that improves upon each of these areas by more than an order of magnitude. The Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) system directly converts low cost pellets into a large, three-dimensional part at a rate exceeding 25 kg/h. By breaking these traditional barriers, it is possible for polymer AM to penetrate new manufacturing markets.

  17. Coastal Barrier Resources Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures Jump to: navigation, searchClover Hill HighPowerCoastal Barrier

  18. ANALYSIS OF THE AXIAL GAP VS FIBERBOARD MOISTURE CONTENT IN A 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.

    2013-09-30

    The fiberboard assembly within a 9975 shipping package contains a modest amount of moisture, which can migrate to the cooler regions of the package when an internal heat load is present. Typically, this leads to increased moisture levels in the bottom fiberboard layers, along with elevated chloride levels which can leach from the fiberboard. Concerns have been raised that this condition could lead to corrosion of the stainless steel drum. It has been postulated that checking the axial gap at the top of the package against the current 1 inch maximum criterion provides a sufficient indication regarding the integrity of the fiberboard and drum. This report estimates the increase in axial gap that might be expected for a given moisture increase in the bottom fiberboard layers, and the likelihood that the increase will create a nonconforming condition that will lead to identification of the moisture increase. Using data relating the fiberboard moisture content with the degree of compaction under load, the present analysis indicates that the axial gap will increase by 0.282 inch as the bottom fiberboard layers approach the saturation point. This increase will cause approximately 58% of packages with otherwise nominal package component dimensions to fail the axial gap criterion, based on a survey of axial gap values recorded in K-Area surveillance activities. As the moisture content increases above saturation, the predicted increase in axial gap jumps to 0.405 inch, which would result in 92% or more of all packages failing the axial gap criterion. The data and analysis described in this report are specific to cane fiberboard. While it is expected that softwood fiberboard will behave similarly, such behavior has not yet been demonstrated.

  19. Moisture in Molasses as a Factor in the Heating of Feeds. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halick, John V.; Richardson, L. R.

    1952-01-01

    . To determine the factor in molasses responsible for the heat- ing, 75 samples were collected from the storage tanks of feed manufacturers over the State during the summer 1952, and analyzed for total sugars after inversion, moisture, Brix and ash. Moist.... Total reducing sugars after inversion and ash were cal- culated to a 22 percent moisture basis. The values for sugars ranged from 35 to 54 percent, and those for ash from 6 to 16 percent. These differences in sugars and ash could be due to natural...

  20. Nitrate Distribution in Soil Moisture and Groundwater with Intensive Plantation Management on Abandoned Agricultural Land

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    Paper outlines nitrate leaching results of loblolly pine and sweet gum that were grown with irrigation, continuous fertilization and insect pest control on a year old abandoned peanut field. Wells and tension lysimeters were used to measure nitrate in soil moisture and groundwater on three replicate transects for two years. Groundwater nitrate concentration beneath the minimum treatment was much higher than the maximum treatment and old field. All three treatments often exceeded the drinking water standard. Forest and lake edge had low levels while the soil moisture nitrate concentrations in the two plantations treatments were much higher than the old field.

  1. Shear Modulus of Cylindrical CFRP Tendons Exposed to Moisture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toumpanaki, Eleni; Lees, Janet M.; Terrasi, Giovanni P.

    2014-09-02

    studied using a Leica DMLM Optical Microscope (Leica Microsystems, 205 Germany). Unexposed tendon samples were cut with a Dremel 398 tool (Dremel Europe, 206 UK) and cast into a resin matrix (Acri-kleer cold mounting). The samples were later 207... had a sand coating layer to improve 195 the bond between the tendon and concrete. This means that there was an additional in-line 196 production step during pultrusion, where an additional epoxy layer was applied, sand 197 particles were sprayed...

  2. Underground barrier construction apparatus with soil-retaining shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gardner, B.M.; Smith, A.M.; Hanson, R.W.; Hodges, R.T.

    1998-08-04

    An apparatus is described for building a horizontal underground barrier by cutting through soil and depositing a slurry, preferably one which cures into a hardened material. The apparatus includes a digging means for cutting and removing soil to create a void under the surface of the ground, a shield means for maintaining the void, and injection means for inserting barrier-forming material into the void. In one embodiment, the digging means is a continuous cutting chain. Mounted on the continuous cutting chain are cutter teeth for cutting through soil and discharge paddles for removing the loosened soil. This invention includes a barrier placement machine, a method for building an underground horizontal containment barrier using the barrier placement machine, and the underground containment system. Preferably the underground containment barrier goes underneath and around the site to be contained in a bathtub-type containment. 17 figs.

  3. Underground barrier construction apparatus with soil-retaining shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smith, Ann Marie (Pocatello, ID); Hanson, Richard W. (Spokane, WA); Hodges, Richard T. (Deer Park, WA)

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus for building a horizontal underground barrier by cutting through soil and depositing a slurry, preferably one which cures into a hardened material. The apparatus includes a digging means for cutting and removing soil to create a void under the surface of the ground, a shield means for maintaining the void, and injection means for inserting barrier-forming material into the void. In one embodiment, the digging means is a continuous cutting chain. Mounted on the continuous cutting chain are cutter teeth for cutting through soil and discharge paddles for removing the loosened soil. This invention includes a barrier placement machine, a method for building an underground horizontal containment barrier using the barrier placement machine, and the underground containment system. Preferably the underground containment barrier goes underneath and around the site to be contained in a bathtub-type containment.

  4. Modelling the microstructure of thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cirolini, S.; Marchese, M.; Jacucci, G.; Harding, J.H.; Mulheran, P.A.

    1994-12-31

    Thermal barrier coatings produced by plasma spraying have a characteristic microstructure of lamellae, pores and cracks. The lamellae are produced by the splashing of particles onto the substrate. As the coating grows, the lamellae pile on top of each other, producing an interlocking structure. In most cases the growth is rapid and chaotic. The result is a microstructure characterized by pores and cracks. The authors present an improved model for the deposition process of thermal barrier coatings. The task of modeling the coating growth is split into two parts: first the authors consider a description of the particle on arrival at the film, based on the available theoretical, numerical and experimental findings. Second they define and discuss a set of physically-based rules for combining these events to obtain the film. The splats run along the surface and are permitted to curl up (producing pores) or interlock. The computer model uses a mesh to combine these processes and build the coating. They discuss the use of the proposed model in predicting microstructures and hence in correlating the properties of these coatings with the parameters of the process used to make them.

  5. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dovichi, Norman J. (Edmonton, CA); Zhang, Jian Z. (Edmonton, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal to noise ratio.

  6. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1996-10-22

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer is disclosed for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal-to-noise ratio. 12 figs.

  7. Quantum calculation of Coulomb reorientation and near-barrier fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cédric Simenel; Michael Bender; Philippe Chomaz; Thomas Duguet; Gilles De France

    2006-05-08

    We investigate the role of deformation on the fusion probability around the barrier using the Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock theory with a full Skyrme force. We obtain a distribution of fusion probabilities around the nominal barrier due to the different contributions of the various orientations of the deformed nucleus at the touching point. It is also shown that the long range Coulomb reorientation reduces the fusion probability around the barrier.

  8. Test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reese, Matthew; Dameron, Arrelaine; Kempe, Michael

    2014-03-04

    A test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material. An exemplary device comprises a test card having a thin-film conductor-pattern formed thereon and an edge seal which seals the test card to the barrier material. Another exemplary embodiment is an electrical calcium test device comprising: a test card an impermeable spacer, an edge seal which seals the test card to the spacer and an edge seal which seals the spacer to the barrier material.

  9. 2D barrier in a superconducting niobium square

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joya, Miryam R. Barba-ortega, J.; Sardella, Edson

    2014-11-05

    The presence of barriers changes the vortex structure in superconducting Nb square in presence of a uniform applied magnetic field. The Cooper pair configurations in a mesoscopics superconducting square of Nb with a barrier are calculated within the nonlinear Ginzburg Landau equations. We predict the nucleation of multi-vortex states into the sample and a soft entry of the magnetic field inside and around into the barrier. A novel and non-conventional vortex configurations occurs at determined magnetic field.

  10. Neurophenomenological Constraints and Pushing Back the Subjectivity Barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Bruce

    Neurophenomenological Constraints and Pushing Back the Subjectivity Barrier Extended commentary inversions), without appealing to weak arguments based on basic color categories; that is, I suggest

  11. Identifying and Overcoming Critical Barriers to Widespread Second...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Overcoming Critical Barriers to Widespread Second Use of PEV Batteries Neubauer, J.; Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Pesaran, A. 25 ENERGY STORAGE; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY...

  12. Ion beam assisted deposition of thermal barrier coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youchison, Dennis L. (Albuquerque, NM); McDonald, Jimmie M. (Albuquerque, NM); Lutz, Thomas J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gallis, Michail A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-23

    Methods and apparatus for depositing thermal barrier coatings on gas turbine blades and vanes using Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EBPVD) combined with Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD).

  13. Hydrologic Behavior of Two Engineered Barriers Following Extreme Wetting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porro, I.

    2000-09-30

    Many engineered barriers are expected to function for hundreds of years or longer. Over the course of time, it is likely that some barriers will experience infiltration to the point of breakthrough. This study compares the recovery from breakthrough of two storage- evapotranspiration type engineered barriers. Replicates of test plots comprising thick soil and capillary/biobarrier covers were wetted to breakthrough in 1997. Test plots were kept cleared of vegetation to maximize hydrologic stress during recovery. Following cessation of drainage resulting from the wetting irrigations, water storage levels in all plots were at elevated levels compared to pre-irrigation levels. As a result, infiltration of melting snow during the subsequent spring overloaded the storage capacity and produced drainage in all plots. Relatively rapid melting of accumulated snowfall produced the most significant infiltration events each year during the study. Capillary barriers yielded less total drainage than thick soil barriers. By limiting drainage, capillary barriers increased water storage in the upper portions of the test plots, which led to increased evaporation from the capillary barrier plots compared to thick soil plots. Increased evaporation in the capillary barrier plots allowed more water to infiltrate in the second season following the wetting tests without triggering drainage. All thick soil plots again yielded drainage in the second season. Within two years of intentionally induced breakthrough, evaporation alone (without transpiration) restored the capability of the capillary barrier covers to function as intended, although water storage in these covers remained at elevated levels.

  14. THREE VIRGINIA PROGRAMS OVERCOME BARRIERS TO UPGRADES | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    home energy improvements in different regions of the state. Three regional energy alliances operated individual pilot programs to address local needs and barriers: the Local...

  15. Panel 4, Grid-Scale Storage Technologies: Regulatory Barriers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grid-scale Storage Technologies Regulatory Barriers and Policy Instruments Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services May 15 th , 2014 Sacramento, CA Demand 599...

  16. Deployment Barriers to Distributed Wind Energy. Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahlgrimm, Jim; Hartman, Liz; Barker, Bret; Fry, Chris; Meissner, John; Forsyth, Trudy; Baring-Gould, Ian; Newcomb, Charles

    2010-10-28

    This report presents key findings from the Department of Energy's Deployment Barriers to Distributed Wind Technology Workshop, held October 28, 2010 in Denver, Colorado.

  17. Resolving Code and Standard Barriers to Building America Innovations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    resources for a Codes and Standards Innovation (CSI) team to assist research partners and industry in overcoming codes and standards barriers to high-performance innovations. The...

  18. ARM - Field Campaign - Scintillometry and Soil Moisture Remote Sensing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? WeDatastreamstps DocumentationAtlanticENA ContactsProductsSACR26,govCampaignsScintillometry and Soil

  19. Effects of barrier composition and electroplating chemistry on adhesion and voiding in copper/dielectric diffusion barrier films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birringer, Ryan P.; Dauskardt, Reinhold H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Durand Building, Stanford, California 94305-4034 (United States); Shaviv, Roey [Novellus Systems Inc., 4000 North First Street, San Jose, California 95134 (United States); Geiss, Roy H.; Read, David T. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The effects of electroplating chemistry and dielectric diffusion barrier composition on copper voiding and barrier adhesion are reported. Adhesion was quantified using the four-point bend thin film adhesion technique, and voiding in the Cu films was quantified using scanning electron microscopy. A total of 12 different film stacks were investigated, including three different Cu electroplating chemistries and four different barrier materials (SiN, N-doped SiC, O-doped SiC, and dual-layer SiC). Both plating chemistry and barrier composition have a large effect on interface adhesion and voiding in the Cu film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to investigate the segregation of Cu electroplating impurities, such as S and Cl, to the Cu/barrier interface. Secondary ion mass spectrometry was used to quantify oxygen content at the Cu/barrier interface in a subset of samples. This interface oxygen content is correlated with measured adhesion values.

  20. Correction of Lightning Effects on Water Content Reflectometer Soil Moisture Data John S. McCartney* and Jorge G. Zornberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Correction of Lightning Effects on Water Content Reflectometer Soil Moisture Data John S. Mc content measured using WCR (water content reflectometer) probes are susceptible to lightning. Several lightning strikes at the site caused unrealistic shifts in the inferred moisture content (from 0

  1. Evaluation of SMOS Retrievals of Soil Moisture over the Central United States with Currently Available In-situ Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Evaluation of SMOS Retrievals of Soil Moisture over the Central United States with Currently in November 2009. Using SMOS soil moisture retrievals for 2010 processed using algorithm3 V4.00, we evaluated apart. Observations10 from different sensors within a SMOS footprint differ from each other by a larger

  2. Reducing Barriers To The Use of High-Efficiency Lighting Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Morante

    2005-12-31

    With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute completed the four-year research project, Reducing Barriers to the Use of High-Efficiency Lighting Systems. The initial objectives were: (1) identifying barriers to widespread penetration of lighting controls in commercial/industrial (C/I) applications that employ fluorescent lamp technologies, and (2) making recommendations to overcome these barriers. The addition of a fourth year expanded the original project objectives to include an examination of the impact on fluorescent lamps from dimming utilizing different lamp electrode heating and dimming ratios. The scope of the project was narrowed to identify barriers to the penetration of lighting controls into commercial-industrial (C/I) applications that employ fluorescent lamp technologies, and to recommend means for overcoming these barriers. Working with lighting manufacturers, specifiers, and installers, the project identified technological and marketing barriers to the widespread use of lighting controls, specifically automatic-off controls, occupancy sensors, photosensors, dimming systems, communication protocols and load-shedding ballasts. The primary barriers identified include cost effectiveness of lighting controls to the building owner, lack of standard communication protocols to allow different part of the control system to communicate effectively, and installation and commissioning issues. Overcoming the identified barriers requires lighting control products on the market to achieve three main goals: (1) Achieve sufficient functionality to meet the key requirements of their main market. (2) Allow significant cost reduction compared to current market standard systems. Cost should consider: hardware capital cost including wiring, design time required by the specifier and the control system manufacturer, installation time required by the electrician, and commissioning time and remedial time required by the electrician and end user. (3) Minimize ongoing perceived overhead costs and inconvenience to the end user, or in other words, systems should be simple to understand and use. In addition, we believe that no lighting controls solution is effective or acceptable unless it contributes to, or does not compromise, the following goals: (1) Productivity--Planning, installation, commissioning, maintenance, and use of controls should not decrease business productivity; (2) Energy savings--Lighting controls should save significant amounts of energy and money in relation to the expense involved in using them (acceptable payback period); and/or (3) Reduced power demand--Society as a whole should benefit from the lowered demand for expensive power and for more natural resources. Discussions of technology barriers and developments are insufficient by themselves to achieve higher penetration of lighting controls in the market place. Technology transfer efforts must play a key role in gaining market acceptance. The LRC developed a technology transfer model to better understand what actions are required and by whom to move any technology toward full market acceptance.

  3. REVIEW OF MECHANISTIC UNDERSTANDING AND MODELING AND UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS METHODS FOR PREDICTING CEMENTITIOUS BARRIER PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Kosson, D.

    2009-11-30

    Cementitious barriers for nuclear applications are one of the primary controls for preventing or limiting radionuclide release into the environment. At the present time, performance and risk assessments do not fully incorporate the effectiveness of engineered barriers because the processes that influence performance are coupled and complicated. Better understanding the behavior of cementitious barriers is necessary to evaluate and improve the design of materials and structures used for radioactive waste containment, life extension of current nuclear facilities, and design of future nuclear facilities, including those needed for nuclear fuel storage and processing, nuclear power production and waste management. The focus of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) literature review is to document the current level of knowledge with respect to: (1) mechanisms and processes that directly influence the performance of cementitious materials (2) methodologies for modeling the performance of these mechanisms and processes and (3) approaches to addressing and quantifying uncertainties associated with performance predictions. This will serve as an important reference document for the professional community responsible for the design and performance assessment of cementitious materials in nuclear applications. This review also provides a multi-disciplinary foundation for identification, research, development and demonstration of improvements in conceptual understanding, measurements and performance modeling that would be lead to significant reductions in the uncertainties and improved confidence in the estimating the long-term performance of cementitious materials in nuclear applications. This report identifies: (1) technology gaps that may be filled by the CBP project and also (2) information and computational methods that are in currently being applied in related fields but have not yet been incorporated into performance assessments of cementitious barriers. The various chapters contain both a description of the mechanism or and a discussion of the current approaches to modeling the phenomena.

  4. Characterization of fracture patterns and hygric properties for moisture flow modelling in cracked concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of building materials is far from complete. The pore structure of the material itself may change over time assessment, not only of building and building components, but of any built structure in general structures, as well as on the health and comfort of their occupants. Any analysis of moisture transfer

  5. Stable or unstable wetting fronts in water repellent soils effect of antecedent soil moisture content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    contents during the experiment, which caused the soil to be wettable instead of water repellent. The waterStable or unstable wetting fronts in water repellent soils ± effect of antecedent soil moisture content Coen J. Ritsemaa,* , John L. Nieberb , Louis W. Dekkera , T.S. Steenhuisc a DLO Winand Staring

  6. The Effects of Roof Membrane Color on Moisture Accumulation in Low-slope Commercial Roof Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehrer, Manfred [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The use of highly reflective roof membrane systems is being promoted and in some cases required in energy codes and green building codes and standards. Highly reflective membranes, which typically are light in color, have demonstrated reduced overall energy consumption in cooling dominated climate. These membranes also are theorized to reduce the heat island effect. Concern has been expressed about using highly reflective roof membrane systems in cool to cold climate zones because they potentially increase moisture accumulation in roof systems. Roof membranes are vapor retarders. The theory is that highly reflective membranes reflect the heat that could enter the roof assembly, potentially providing a condensing surface on the cold side of the roof assembly during winter months. The other concern is that roof systems using highly reflective membranes will not get hot enough during the summer months to dry out moisture that may have condensed or otherwise entered the roof assembly. This study focuses on mechanically attached, highly reflective, single-ply roof systems installed on low-slope (less than 2:12) structures in cool to cold climate zones. Three sources of data are considered when determining the moisture accumulation potential of these systems. 1.Test roof cuts taken during the winter months 2.Modeling data from a building envelope model specifically designed to evaluate moisture accumulation 3.Data from previous studies to determine the effects of roof membrane color on the drying rate of low-slope roof assemblies

  7. UNCORRECTEDPROOF 2 Requirements of a global near-surface soil moisture satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jeff

    : accuracy, repeat time, and spatial resolution 4 Jeffrey P. Walker a,b,*, Paul R. Houser a 5 a Hydrological) remote sensing studies, using 53both thermal infrared and microwave (passive and ac- 54tive) electromagnetic radiation. Of these, passive 55microwave soil moisture measurement has been the 56most promising

  8. Supplemental Material for Forty Five Years of Observed Soil Moisture in the Ukraine: No

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Supplemental Material for Forty Five Years of Observed Soil Moisture in the Ukraine: No Summer, Kiev, Ukraine 5 Agrometeorology Department, Ukrainian Hydrometeorological Centre, Kiev, Ukraine ­ barley and maize) and 71 (for winter wheat) Ukraine stations. The total seeded areas are from 2002

  9. Forty Five Years of Observed Soil Moisture in the Ukraine: No Summer Desiccation (Yet)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Forty Five Years of Observed Soil Moisture in the Ukraine: No Summer Desiccation (Yet) Alan Robock of Maryland, College Park 4 Ukrainian Research Institute for Environment and Resources, Kiev, Ukraine 5 Agrometeorology Department, Ukrainian Hydrometeorological Centre, Kiev, Ukraine Submitted to Geophysical Research

  10. Sensitivity of satellite microwave and infrared observations to soil moisture at a global scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aires, Filipe

    Sensitivity of satellite microwave and infrared observations to soil moisture at a global scale observations include passive microwave emissivities, active microwave scatterometer data, and infrared. For example, we show that the passive microwave polarization differences at 19 GHz and above are essentially

  11. 20th century seasonal moisture balance in Southeast Asian montane forests from tree cellulose 18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stott, Lowell

    20th century seasonal moisture balance in Southeast Asian montane forests from tree cellulose 18 O composition (18 O) of sub- annual tree cellulose samples of Pinus kesiya growing at 1,500 m elevation on Doi Chiang Dao in northern Thailand. The cellulose 18 O values exhibit a distinctive annual cycle

  12. Surface Emissivity Impact on Temperature and Moisture Soundings from Hyperspectral Infrared Radiance Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    Surface Emissivity Impact on Temperature and Moisture Soundings from Hyperspectral Infrared June 2010, in final form 13 December 2010) ABSTRACT An accurate land surface emissivity (LSE the emissivities are fixed in the retrieval process. The results also confirm that the simultaneous retrieval

  13. EFFECT OF MOISTURE ON BENDING AND BREAKING RESISTANCE (IF COMMERCIAL ORIENTED STRANDBOARDS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) ABSTRACT This is ZI short addendum to an earlier paper (Wu and Suchsland 1997) on bending resistance (E.1EFFECT OF MOISTURE ON BENDING AND BREAKING RESISTANCE (IF COMMERCIAL ORIENTED STRANDBOARDS1 Qinglin the quality and performance of OSB. In an F ) ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~Wu and Suchsland However, the paper did

  14. Investigation of transient, two-dimensional coupled heat and moisture flow in soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, L.S.W.

    1986-01-01

    A two-dimensional finite difference numerical model has been developed to study coupled heat and moisture flow in the soil surrounding an earth-sheltered construction. The model is based on a mechanistic approach formulated by Milly and developed from the work of Philip and deVries. Using soil temperatures and matric potentials as the dependent variables, the model is capable of simulating unsaturated/saturated flow conditions in heterogeneous soil domains. The model is a fully implicit, integrated finite difference approach based on the Patankar Spalding method. The numerical modeling of the governing heat and moisture equations was validated against a number of analytical and quasi-analytical solutions. An axisymmetric, two-dimensional experiment was then defined to which the numerical model could be compared. The experimental apparatus was composed of a cylinder filled with a dredged Mississippi River sand. A series of one and two dimensional heat and moisture flow experiments were run, using boundary conditions consistent with those that occur in the soil surrounding a building. Soil properties used in the model were either calculated from theoretical models or measured experimentally. Agreement between the model and experiments were good, with an error of 10-15% obtained for the two-dimensional coupled heat and moisture flow experiment.

  15. Abrupt change of Antarctic moisture origin at the end of Termination II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappellaz, Jérôme

    Abrupt change of Antarctic moisture origin at the end of Termination II V. Masson-Delmottea,1 , B of events involved in Termination II, the transition between the penultimate glacial and interglacial periods. This termination is marked by a north­south seesaw behavior, with first a slow methane concen

  16. A Satellite Study of Tropical Moist Convection and Environmental Variability: A Moisture and Thermal Budget Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masunaga, Hirohiko

    of a variety of satellite sensors including radars, an infrared and microwave sounder unit, and a microwave including air temperature, water vapor, cumulus cloud cover, and surface wind are composited with respect of moisture and dry static energy and their vertical flux at cloud base from satellite observations alone

  17. Phase relationship equation for moisture induced shrink and swell of soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, Stacey Bruemmer

    1997-01-01

    and the shrinkage limit. These limits are the soil moisture contents that correspond with extreme volumetric conditions. Evaluation of laboratory swell test results show that the swell limit probably does exist, and a procedure for measuring the swell limit of a...

  18. Soil moisture variability of root zone profiles within SMEX02 remote sensing footprints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as the par- titioning of incoming solar radiation and long wave radia- tion into outgoing long wave radiation.e., various active and passive microwave sensors), which provide mean sur- face soil moisture (0­5 cm) values at large spatial scales, are only recently available [24,25,39]. Microwave sensors have many advantages

  19. Modeling studies of gas movement and moisture migration at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Y.W.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-06-01

    Modeling studies on moisture redistribution processes that are mediated by gas phase flow and diffusion have been carried out. The problem addressed is the effect of a lowered humidity of the soil gas at the land surface on moisture removal from Yucca Mountain, the potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. At the land surface, humid formation gas contacts much drier atmospheric air. Near this contact, the humidity of the soil gas may be considerably lower than at greater depth, where the authors expect equilibrium with the liquid phase and close to 100% humidity. The lower relative humidity of the soil gas may be modeled by imposing, at the land surface, an additional negative capillary suction corresponding to vapor pressure lowering according to Kelvin`s Equation, thus providing a driving force for the upward movement of moisture in both the vapor and liquid phases. Sensitivity studies show that moisture removal from Yucca Mountain arising from the lowered-relative-humidity boundary condition is controlled by vapor diffusion. There is much experimental evidence in the soil literature that diffusion of vapor is enhanced due to pore-level phase change effects by a few orders of magnitude. Modeling results presented here will account for this enhancement in vapor diffusion.

  20. Crack Response to Blast Vibrations and Moisture Induced Volumetric Changes in Foundation Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crack Response to Blast Vibrations and Moisture Induced Volumetric Changes in Foundation Soils By C, Evanston, IL. Abstract In this paper vibratory crack response is compared to that produced by volumetric over a period of weeks to several months. On the other hand, crack response produced by volumetric

  1. CRADA with the Belhaven group and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNL-081): Automated soil moisture measuring systems. Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramesh, K.S.

    1996-08-01

    The objectives of this project were to (1) develop an improved, full- scale, inexpensive, soil moisture sensor, using innovative porous ceramic materials as the moisture wicking component and (2) demonstrate the performance of the sensor in the laboratory and in field to determine its reliability and accuracy. The opportunity for this project arose as a result of an inquiry from Belhaven to whom the soil moisture sensor developed at PNNL by John Cary was licensed. The existing Cary sensor needed research and development effort in order to create the type of soil moisture sensor envisioned by the Belhaven for use in an integrated soil moisture systems in the field. PNNL was identified as being uniquely qualified to participate in this Collaborative project.

  2. Hydrogen Production Technical Team Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-06-01

    The Hydrogen Production Technical Team Roadmap identifies research pathways leading to hydrogen production technologies that produce near-zero net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from highly efficient and diverse renewable energy sources. This roadmap focuses on initial development of the technologies, identifies their gaps and barriers, and describes activities by various U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) offices to address the key issues and challenges.

  3. The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) Software Toolbox Capabilities In Assessing The Degradation Of Cementitious Barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, G. P.; Burns, H. H.; Langton, C.; Smith, F. G. III; Brown, K. G.; Kosson, D. S.; Garrabrants, A. C.; Sarkar, S.; van der Sloot, H.; Meeussen, J. C.L.; Samson, E.; Mallick, P.; Suttora, L.; Esh, D. W.; Fuhrmann, M. J.; Philip, J.

    2013-01-11

    The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) Project is a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) Office of Tank Waste and Nuclear Materials Management. The CBP program has developed a set of integrated tools (based on state-of-the-art models and leaching test methods) that help improve understanding and predictions of the long-term structural, hydraulic and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in nuclear applications. Tools selected for and developed under this program have been used to evaluate and predict the behavior of cementitious barriers used in near-surface engineered waste disposal systems for periods of performance up to 100 years and longer for operating facilities and longer than 1000 years for waste disposal. The CBP Software Toolbox has produced tangible benefits to the DOE Performance Assessment (PA) community. A review of prior DOE PAs has provided a list of potential opportunities for improving cementitious barrier performance predictions through the use of the CBP software tools. These opportunities include: 1) impact of atmospheric exposure to concrete and grout before closure, such as accelerated slag and Tc-99 oxidation, 2) prediction of changes in Kd/mobility as a function of time that result from changing pH and redox conditions, 3) concrete degradation from rebar corrosion due to carbonation, 4) early age cracking from drying and/or thermal shrinkage and 5) degradation due to sulfate attack. The CBP has already had opportunity to provide near-term, tangible support to ongoing DOE-EM PAs such as the Savannah River Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) by providing a sulfate attack analysis that predicts the extent and damage that sulfate ingress will have on the concrete vaults over extended time (i.e., > 1000 years). This analysis is one of the many technical opportunities in cementitious barrier performance that can be addressed by the DOE-EM sponsored CBP software tools. Modification of the existing tools can provide many opportunities to bring defense in depth in prediction of the performance of cementitious barriers over time.

  4. Summary of activities at the Engineered Barriers Test Facility, October 1, 1995 to January 31, 1997, and initial data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porro, I.; Keck, K.N.

    1997-03-01

    Replicates of two engineered barrier designs (a thick soil barrier and a bio/capillary barrier) were constructed in the test plots of the facility. Prior to placement of any soil in the test plots, instruments were calibrated and attached to plot instrument towers, which were then installed in the test plots. Soil from Spreading Area B was installed in the test plots in lifts and compacted. Instruments attached to the instrument tower were placed in shallow trenches dug in the lifts and buried. Each instrument was checked to make sure it functioned prior to installation of the next lift. Soil samples were collected from each lift in one plot during construction for later determination of physical and hydraulic properties. After completion of the test plots, the data acquisition system was finalized, and data collection began. Appropriate instrument calibration equations and equation coefficients are presented, and data reduction techniques are described. Initial data show test plot soils drying throughout the summer and early fall. This corresponds to low rainfall during this period. Infiltration of water into the test plots was first detected around mid-November with several subsequent episodes in December. Infiltration was verified by corresponding measurements from several different instruments [time domain reflectometry (TDR), neutron probe, thermocouple psychrometers, and heat dissipation sensors]. Tensiometer data does not appear to corroborate data from the other instruments. Test plots were warmer on the side closest to the access trench indicating a temperature effect from the trench. This resulted in greater soil moisture freezing with less and shallower infiltration on the far side of the plots than on the side closest to the trench. At the end of this monitoring period, infiltration in all but two of the test plots has reached the 155-cm depth. Infiltration in test plots B2 and S3 has reached only the 140-cm depth. The monitored infiltration events have not resulted in drainage from the bottom of the test plots.

  5. Numerical evaluation of the thermal performances of roof-mounted radiant barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranville, Frédéric; Lucas, Franck; Johan, Seriacaroupin

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the thermal performances of roof-mounted radiant barriers. Using dynamic simulations of a mathematical model of a whole test cell including a radiant barrier installed between the roof top and the ceiling, the thermal performance of the roof is calculated. The mean method is more particularly used to assess the thermal resistance of the building component and lead to a value which is compared to the one obtained for a mass insulation product such as polyurethane foam. On a further stage, the thermal mathematical model is replaced by a thermo-aeraulic model which is used to evaluate the thermal resistance of the roof as a function of the airflow rate. The results shows a better performance of the roof in this new configuration, which is widely used in practice. Finally, the mathematical relation between the thermal resistance and the airflow rate is proposed.

  6. Active barrier films of PET for solar cell application: Processing and characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossi, Gabriella; Scarfato, Paola; Incarnato, Loredana [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132 - 84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    A preliminary investigation was carried out on the possibility to improve the protective action offered by the standard multilayer structures used to encapsulate photovoltaic devices. With this aim, a commercial active barrier PET-based material, able to absorb oxygen when activated by liquid water, was used to produce flexible and transparent active barrier films, by means of a lab-scale film production plant. The obtained film, tested in terms of thermal, optical and oxygen absorption properties, shows a slow oxygen absorption kinetics, an acceptable transparency and an easy roll-to-roll processability, so proving itself as a good candidate for the development of protective coating for solar cells against the atmospheric degradation agents like the rain.

  7. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Seth, Brig B.

    2005-08-23

    A device (10) is made, having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10), is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16) and is applied by a process that is not an electron beam physical vapor deposition process. The sintering inhibiting material (22) has a morphology adapted to improve the functionality of the sintering inhibiting material (22), characterized as continuous, nodule, rivulet, grain, crack, flake and combinations thereof and being disposed within at least some of the vertical and horizontal gaps.

  8. Quantum Walk Search through Potential Barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas G. Wong

    2015-09-24

    A randomly walking quantum particle searches for a marked vertex on the complete graph of $N$ vertices in Grover's $\\Theta(\\sqrt{N})$ steps, which is quadratically faster than a classical random walk's $\\Theta(N)$ steps. The basis of this speedup and the success of other quantum walk algorithms is often attributed to the quantum walk's ballistic propagation, which is quadratically faster than a classical random walk's diffusion. We show that this faster propagation is not the whole story, however. If sufficiently strong potential barriers hinder the quantum walk, it can lose its quantum speedup despite retaining ballistic dispersion. Thus ballistic spreading alone does not yield fast quantum walk algorithms. Closer inspection reveals that quantum walks search quickly by applying just the right phases for amplitude amplification to succeed.

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF A RIGID BARRIER FILTER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, Ta-Kuan

    2001-11-06

    A mathematical model is formulated to describe the dynamics of a rigid barrier filter system. Complete with filtration, regeneration and particle re-deposition, this model provides sizing information for new filter systems and diagnostic information for operating filter systems. To turn this model into a practical and smart filter system predictive model, monitoring devices for variables such as real-time particle concentration and size distribution are currently under laboratory development. The program goal is to introduce a smart filter system to supervise its operation and to assure its system reliability. Primarily, a smart filter system will update operating information, sound up malfunction alarms, and provide self-activated measures such as adjusting the cleaning frequency, intensity and back-pulse duration.

  10. EMBEDDED OPTICAL SENSORS FOR THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David R. Clarke

    2004-12-16

    In this first year of the program we have focused on the selection of rare-earth dopants for luminescent sensing in thermal barrier coating materials, the effect of dopant concentration on several of the luminescence characteristics and initial fabrication of one type of embedded sensor, the ''red-line'' sensor. We have initially focused on erbium as the lanthanide dopant for luminescence doping of yttria-stabilized zirconia and europium as the lanthanide for luminescence doping of gadolinium zirconate. The latter exhibits a temperature-dependent luminescence lifetime up to at least 1100 C. A buried layer, ''red-line'' sensor in an electron-beam deposited yttria-stabilized zirconia coating with erbium has been demonstrated and exhibits a temperature-dependent luminescence lifetime up to at least 400 C.

  11. Electrical insulator assembly with oxygen permeation barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Der Beck, Roland R. (Lansdale, PA); Bond, James A. (Exton, PA)

    1994-01-01

    A high-voltage electrical insulator (21) for electrically insulating a thermoelectric module (17) in a spacecraft from a niobium-1% zirconium alloy wall (11) of a heat exchanger (13) filled with liquid lithium (16) while providing good thermal conductivity between the heat exchanger and the thermoelectric module. The insulator (21) has a single crystal alumina layer (SxAl.sub.2 O.sub.3, sapphire) with a niobium foil layer (32) bonded thereto on the surface of the alumina crystal (26) facing the heat exchanger wall (11), and a molybdenum layer (31) bonded to the niobium layer (32) to act as an oxygen permeation barrier to preclude the oxygen depleting effects of the lithium from causing undesirable niobium-aluminum intermetallic layers near the alumina-niobium interface.

  12. Electrical insulator assembly with oxygen permeation barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Der Beck, R.R.; Bond, J.A.

    1994-03-29

    A high-voltage electrical insulator for electrically insulating a thermoelectric module in a spacecraft from a niobium-1% zirconium alloy wall of a heat exchanger filled with liquid lithium while providing good thermal conductivity between the heat exchanger and the thermoelectric module. The insulator has a single crystal alumina layer (SxAl[sub 2]O[sub 3], sapphire) with a niobium foil layer bonded thereto on the surface of the alumina crystal facing the heat exchanger wall, and a molybdenum layer bonded to the niobium layer to act as an oxygen permeation barrier to preclude the oxygen depleting effects of the lithium from causing undesirable niobium-aluminum intermetallic layers near the alumina-niobium interface. 3 figures.

  13. Hillslope-scale soil moisture estimation with a physically-based ecohydrology model and L-band microwave remote sensing observations from space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores, Alejandro Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    Soil moisture is a critical hydrosphere state variable that links the global water, energy, and carbon cycles. Knowledge of soil moisture at scales of individual hillslopes (10's to 100's of meters) is critical to advancing ...

  14. Tunneling of Graphene Massive Dirac Fermions through a Double Barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hocine Bahlouli; El Bouazzaoui Choubabi; Ahmed Jellal; Miloud Mekkaoui

    2011-10-04

    We study the tunneling of Dirac fermions in graphene through a double barrier potential allowing the carriers to have an effective mass inside the barrier as generated by a lattice miss-match with the boron nitride substrate. The consequences of this gap opening on the transmission are investigated. The realization of resonant tunneling conditions is also analyzed.

  15. Barriers that impact on the implementation of sustainable design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    page 1 Barriers that impact on the implementation of sustainable design Michelle Hankinson, Amanda Breytenbach michelleh@dut.ac.za or abreytenbach@uj.ac.za Faculty of Art, Design and Architecture University of sustainable design and barriers that influence their sustainable design practices. The paper reflects

  16. Helping Utilities Make Smart Solar Decisions Utility Barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    of utility-scale solar PV plants. Sandra Burton Regional Director March 8 ­ 9, 2011 Brookhaven National Lab · Considered an R&D activity · Minor facilitation of customer-owned PV #12;Managing Customers Barriers to solar of scale · Shift to revenue generating technology Barrier: Commission's need education on solar benefits

  17. Vapor deposited samarium zirconate thermal barrier coatings Hengbei Zhao a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    by Elsevier B.V. 1. Introduction Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems have become an enabling materials technology for the gas turbine engines used for propulsion and power generation [1]. Through their abilityVapor deposited samarium zirconate thermal barrier coatings Hengbei Zhao a, , Carlos G. Levi b

  18. The Influence of Dust on the Absorptivity of Radiant Barriers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noboa, Homero L.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to model and quantify the increase of the absorptivity of radiant barriers caused by the accumulation of dust on the surface of radiant barriers. This research was the continuation of a previous work by the author...

  19. On causality, apparent 'superluminality' and reshaping in barrier penetration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolovski, D

    2010-01-01

    We consider tunnelling of a non-relativistic particle across a potential barrier. It is shown that the barrier acts as an effective beam splitter which builds up the transmitted pulse from the copies of the initial envelope shifted in the coordinate space backwards relative to the free propagation. Although along each pathway causality is explicitly obeyed, in special cases reshaping can result an overall reduction of the initial envelope, accompanied by an arbitrary coordinate shift. In the case of a high barrier the delay amplitude distribution (DAD) mimics a Dirac $\\delta$-function, the transmission amplitude is superoscillatory for finite momenta and tunnelling leads to an accurate advancement of the (reduced) initial envelope by the barrier width. In the case of a wide barrier, initial envelope is accurately translated into the complex coordinate plane. The complex shift, given by the first moment of the DAD, accounts for both the displacement of the maximum of the transmitted probability density and the...

  20. A MODELING APPROACH TO ESTIMATING SNOW COVER DEPLETION AND SOIL MOISTURE RECHARGE IN A SEMI-ARID CLIMATE AT TWO NASA CLPX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Charles W.

    THESIS A MODELING APPROACH TO ESTIMATING SNOW COVER DEPLETION AND SOIL MOISTURE RECHARGE IN A SEMI A MODELING APPROACH TO ESTIMATING SNOW COVER DEPLETION AND SOIL MOISTURE RECHARGE IN A SEMI-ARID CLIMATE ________________________________________ Department Head #12;iii ABSTRACT A MODELING APPROACH TO ESTIMATING SNOW COVER DEPLETION AND SOIL MOISTURE

  1. GIS for All: Exploring the Barriers and Opportunities for Underexploited GIS Applications GIS for All: Exploring the Barriers and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köbben, Barend

    GIS for All: Exploring the Barriers and Opportunities for Underexploited GIS Applications GIS for All: Exploring the Barriers and Opportunities for Underexploited GIS Applications by Hao Ye1 , Michael that adoption of GIS technologies still remains relatively low in many sectors. We will explore both the bar

  2. Method for lowering the VOCS emitted during drying of wood products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Sujit (1832 Jacksons Creek Point, Marietta, GA 30068); Boerner, James Robert (154 Junedale Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45218); Su, Wei (2262 Orleans Ave., Marietta, GA 30062)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for removal of VOCs from wood products prior to drying the wood products. The method of the invention includes the steps of providing a chamber having an opening for receiving wood and loading the chamber with green wood. The wood is loaded to an extent sufficient to provide a limited headspace in the chamber. The chamber is then closed and the wood is heated in the chamber for a time and at a temperature sufficient to saturate the headspace with moisture and to substantially transfer VOCs from the wood product to the moisture in the headspace.

  3. Effect of process variables on the density and durability of the pellets made from high moisture corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru

    2014-03-01

    A flat die pellet mill was used to understand the effect of high levels of feedstock moisture content in the range of 28–38% (w.b.), with die rotational speeds of 40–60 Hz, and preheating temperatures of 30–110 °C on the pelleting characteristics of 4.8 mm screen size ground corn stover using an 8 mm pellet die. The physical properties of the pelletised biomass studied are: (a) pellet moisture content, (b) unit, bulk and tapped density, and (c) durability. Pelletisation experiments were conducted based on central composite design. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that feedstock moisture content influenced all of the physical properties at P < 0.001. Pellet moisture content decreased with increase in preheating temperature to about 110 °C and decreasing the feedstock moisture content to about 28% (w.b.). Response surface models developed for quality attributes with respect to process variables has adequately described the process with coefficient of determination (R2) values of >0.88. The other pellet quality attributes such as unit, bulk, tapped density, were maximised at feedstock moisture content of 30–33% (w.b.), die speeds of >50 Hz and preheating temperature of >90 °C. In case of durability a medium moisture content of 33–34% (w.b.) and preheating temperatures of >70 °C and higher die speeds >50 Hz resulted in high durable pellets. It can be concluded from the present study that feedstock moisture content, followed by preheating, and die rotational speed are the interacting process variables influencing pellet moisture content, unit, bulk and tapped density and durability.

  4. Automated Impedance Tomography for Monitoring Permeable Reactive Barrier Health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaBrecque, D J; Adkins, P L

    2009-07-02

    The objective of this research was the development of an autonomous, automated electrical geophysical monitoring system which allows for near real-time assessment of Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) health and aging and which provides this assessment through a web-based interface to site operators, owners and regulatory agencies. Field studies were performed at four existing PRB sites; (1) a uranium tailing site near Monticello, Utah, (2) the DOE complex at Kansas City, Missouri, (3) the Denver Federal Center in Denver, Colorado and (4) the Asarco Smelter site in East Helena, Montana. Preliminary surface data over the PRB sites were collected (in December, 2005). After the initial round of data collection, the plan was modified to include studies inside the barriers in order to better understand barrier aging processes. In September 2006 an autonomous data collection system was designed and installed at the EPA PRB and the electrode setups in the barrier were revised and three new vertical electrode arrays were placed in dedicated boreholes which were in direct contact with the PRB material. Final data were collected at the Kansas City, Denver and Monticello, Utah PRB sites in the fall of 2007. At the Asarco Smelter site in East Helena, Montana, nearly continuous data was collected by the autonomous monitoring system from June 2006 to November 2007. This data provided us with a picture of the evolution of the barrier, enabling us to examine barrier changes more precisely and determine whether these changes are due to installation issues or are normal barrier aging. Two rounds of laboratory experiments were carried out during the project. We conducted column experiments to investigate the effect of mineralogy on the electrical signatures resulting from iron corrosion and mineral precipitation in zero valent iron (ZVI) columns. In the second round of laboratory experiments we observed the electrical response from simulation of actual field PRBs at two sites: the Kansas City barrier and the East Helena barrier. As these sites are also used for our field monitoring efforts, this allowed for a comparison between field and laboratory. In column studies with high concentrations of calcium and carbonate/bicarbonate, we observed that the increase of electrical resistivity and decrease of polarization magnitude is significant and is mainly controlled by the precipitation of calcium carbonates. In general, the electrical properties of all of the barriers studied follow a pattern. New barriers are fairly resistive with in-situ conductivity only a few times background (outside the barrier) values. Older barriers get increasingly conductive, with failed barriers showing values of over 100 S/m. The induced polarization response is more complicated. Chargeability values increase over time for young barriers, are largest for healthy barriers in the middle of their lifespan, and decrease as the barrier ages These results suggest that normalized IP appears promising as a measure of barrier age.

  5. The role of plants on isolation barrier systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, S.O.; Downs, J.L.; Waugh, W.J.

    1994-11-01

    Surface barriers are used to isolate buried wastes from the environment. Most have been built for short-term isolation. The need to isolate radioactive wastes from the environment requires that the functional integrity of a barrier be maintained for thousands of years. Barrier function strongly depends on vegetation. Plants reduce wind and water erosion and minimize drainage, but may transport contaminants if roots extend into buried wastes. Our review of the function of plants on surface barriers focuses on the role of plants across mesic to arid environments and gives special consideration to studies done at Hanford. The Hanford Barrier Development Program was created to design and test an earthen cover system to inhibit water infiltration, plant and animal intrusion, and wind and water erosion, while isolating buried wastes for at least 1000 years. Studies at the Hanford have shown that plants will significantly interact with the barrier. Plants transpire soil water back into the atmosphere. Deep-rooted perennials best recycle water; soil water may drain through the root zone of shallow-rooted annuals. Lysimeter studies indicate that a surface layer of fine soil with deep-rooted plants precludes drainage even with three times normal precipitation. The presence of vegetation greatly reduces water and wind erosion, but deep-rooted plants pose a threat of biointrusion and contaminant transport. The Hanford barrier includes a buried rock layer and asphalt layer to prevent biointrusion.

  6. Natural gas vehicles : Status, barriers, and opportunities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rood Werpy, M.; Santini, D.; Burnham, A.; Mintz, M.; Energy Systems

    2010-11-29

    In the United States, recent shale gas discoveries have generated renewed interest in using natural gas as a vehicular fuel, primarily in fleet applications, while outside the United States, natural gas vehicle use has expanded significantly in the past decade. In this report for the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities Program - a public-private partnership that advances the energy, economic, and environmental security of the U.S. by supporting local decisions that reduce petroleum use in the transportation sector - we have examined the state of natural gas vehicle technology, current market status, energy and environmental benefits, implications regarding advancements in European natural gas vehicle technologies, research and development efforts, and current market barriers and opportunities for greater market penetration. The authors contend that commercial intracity trucks are a prime area for advancement of this fuel. Therefore, we examined an aggressive future market penetration of natural gas heavy-duty vehicles that could be seen as a long-term goal. Under this scenario using Energy Information Administration projections and GREET life-cycle modeling of U.S. on-road heavy-duty use, natural gas vehicles would reduce petroleum consumption by approximately 1.2 million barrels of oil per day, while another 400,000 barrels of oil per day reduction could be achieved with significant use of natural gas off-road vehicles. This scenario would reduce daily oil consumption in the United States by about 8%.

  7. The role of moisture transport between ground and atmosphere in global change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rind, D.; Rosenzweig, C.; Stieglitz, M.

    1997-12-31

    Projections of the effect of climate change on future water availability are examined by reviewing the formulations used to calculate moisture transport between the ground and the atmosphere. General circulation models and climate change impact models have substantially different formulations for evapotranspiration, so their projections of future water availability often disagree, even though they use the same temperature and precipitation forecasts. General circulation models forecast little change in tropical and subtropical water availability, while impact models show severe water and agricultural shortages. A comparison of observations and modeling techniques shows that the parameterizations in general circulation models likely lead to an underestimate of the impacts of global warming on soil moisture and vegetation. Such errors would crucially affect the temperature and precipitation forecasts used in impact models. Some impact model evaporation formulations are probably more appropriate than those in general circulation models, but important questions remain. More observations are needed, especially in the vicinity of forests, to determine appropriate parameterizations.

  8. Heat and moisture transfer through building envelope components subjected to outdoor weather conditions including rain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayamaha, S.E.G. [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-05-01

    Singapore experiences a warm and humid climate with abundant rainfall during the entire year. Such conditions are typical of tropical climates where many of today`s metropolitan cities are situated. Rain has been found to affect the thermal performance of building components in two ways, namely, by cooling the surface during rain and thereafter by drying of the absorbed moisture after rain. However, existing software used for predicting the thermal performance of building components do not consider such effects and are therefore inadequate for accurate estimation of the thermal performance of building components in tropical climates. To overcome these limitations, this study was carried out to investigate the simultaneous heat and moisture flow through porous building materials exposed to outdoor conditions such as solar radiation and rain.

  9. Model Studies of Pore Stability and Evolution in Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaeser, A M

    2008-01-01

    durable thermal barrier coatings with novel microstructuresEB-PVD TBCs,” Surface & Coatings Technology, 151, 383-391 (in Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs) A. M. Glaeser M. Kitayama

  10. Tertiary nitrogen heterocyclic material to reduce moisture-induced damage in asphalt-aggregate mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Plancher, Henry (Laramie, WY); Petersen, Joseph C. (Laramie, WY)

    1982-01-01

    Asphalt-aggregate roads crack when subjected to freezing and thawing cycles. Herein, the useful life of asphalts are substantially improved by a minor amount of a moisture damage inhibiting agent selected from compounds having a pyridine moiety, including acid salts of such compounds. A shale oil fraction may serve as the source of the improving agent and may simply be blended with conventional petroleum asphalts.

  11. Tropical synoptic scale moisture fields observed from the Nimbus-7 SMMR 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fink, Jeffrey David

    1989-01-01

    eastern Pacific Ocean weather systems are ea. sy to observe on visual and infrared satellite images. However, it is difficult to quantify their moisture fields due to the great scarcity of conventional data. . In addition, it is difficult to examine... rainfall over the eastern part of the tropical Pacific Ocean because there are few island stations or ship reports available. Satellite passive microwave instruments have been used to determine precip- itable water, liquid water and precipitation over...

  12. Synoptic scale sensitivity of TIROS-N moisture channels in the tropics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackwell, Keith Gordon

    1987-01-01

    -Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. James P. McGuirk Dr. Aylmer H. Thompson Water vapor radiance data obtained from a satellite-borne radiometer were evaluated for synoptic information content and accuracy over the tropical eastern Pac'fic Ocean. An upper moist... cluster of elevated BTs was observed over the subtropical Pacific adjacent to the western flank of a series of moisture bursts. Collocated rawinsonde soundings and satellite BTs consistently showed excellent agreement within this region, indicating...

  13. ANALYSES OF DEFORMATION IN VISCOELASTIC SANDWICH COMPOSITES SUBJECT TO MOISTURE DIFFUSION 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Nikhil P.

    2010-01-16

    &M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Anastasia Muliana Committee Members, Harry Hogan Eyad Masad Head of Department, Dennis L. O?Neal August 2008 Major...% with the increase in moisture concentration. Snead and Palazotto [6] performed an analytical investigation to evaluate the stability characteristics of cylindrical, composite graphite/epoxy (AS/3501-5) laminated panels subjected to axial loads under moist...

  14. Evaluation of moisture sensors for NGV fueling station applications. Topical report, November 1994-April 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, P.F.; Maniquis, V.T.; Hunecke, D.E.; Blazek, C.F.

    1996-08-01

    Moisture content in natural gas has become an important issue for compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling stations. The objective of this project was to evaluate the performance of four hygrometer technologies and identify the most cost effective designs suitable for CNG fueling station applications. The four technologies evaluated were: aluminum oxide, ceramic dewpoint, electrolytic, and silicon chip sensors. The hygrometer performance was evaluated with respect to accuracy, response time, repeatability, operating conditions, maintenance requirements, and cost.

  15. Size reduction of high- and low-moisture corn stalks by linear knife grid system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Narayan, S. [First American Scientific Co.

    2009-04-01

    High- and low-moisture corn stalks were tested using a linear knife grid size reduction device developed for first-stage size reduction. The device was used in conjunction with a universal test machine that quantified shearing stress and energy characteristics for forcing a bed of corn stalks through a grid of sharp knives. No published engineering performance data for corn stover with similar devices are available to optimize performance; however, commercial knife grid systems exist for forage size reduction. From the force displacement data, mean and maximum ultimate shear stresses, cumulative and peak mass-based cutting energies for corn stalks, and mean new surface area-based cutting energies were determined from 4 5 refill runs at two moisture contents (78.8% and 11.3% wet basis), three knife grid spacings (25.4, 50.8, and 101.6 mm), and three bed depths (50.8, 101.6, and 152.4 mm). In general, the results indicated that peak failure load, ultimate shear stress, and cutting energy values varied directly with bed depth and inversely with knife grid spacing. Mean separation analysis established that high- and low-moisture conditions and bed depths 101.6 mm did not differ significantly (P < 0.05) for ultimate stress and cutting energy values, but knife grid spacing were significantly different. Linear knife grid cutting energy requirements for both moisture conditions of corn stalks were much smaller than reported cutting energy requirements. Ultimate shear stress and cutting energy results of this research should aid the engineering design of commercial scale linear knife gird size reduction equipment for various biomass feedstocks.

  16. Moisture performance of sealed attics in the mixed-humid climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boudreaux, Philip R; Pallin, Simon B; Jackson, Roderick K

    2013-12-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory studied 8 homes in the mixed-humid climate, 4 with vented attics and 4 with sealed attics. ORNL wanted to understand the moisture performance of the sealed attic and how it affected the interior environment. We found that the attic and interior of sealed attic homes were more humid than the attic and interior observed in vented attic homes. This is due to the lack of ventilation in the sealed attic. Historically attics have been vented to dehumidify the attic and interior of the home. A sealed attic design greatly reduces the venting potential and thus this drying pathway and can cause elevated interior moisture over a vented attic home. Despite the elevated attic and interior moisture in the sealed attic homes, so far no mold or material degradation has been found. The roof sheathing moisture content has stayed below 20%, indicating low potential for material degradation. Also the relative humidity at the roof sheathing has stayed within the ASHRAE 160 design criteria except for a short time during the 2011/2012 winter. This was due to a combination of the sealed attic design (minimal venting to the outside) and the duct work not being operated in the attic which usually provides a dehumidification pathway. It was also found that when the humidity was controlled using the HVAC system, it resulted in 7% more cooling energy consumption. In the mixed-humid climate this reduces the cost effectiveness of the sealed attic design as a solution for bringing ducts into a semi-conditioned space. Because of this we are recommending the other alternatives be used to bringing ducts into the conditioned space in both new construction and retrofit work in the mixed-humid climate.

  17. Effect of external stress on moisture diffusion in an epoxy resin and its composite material 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henson, Michael Chamberlain

    1986-01-01

    ) Michael Chamberlain Henson, B. S. , Texas A&N University Chairman of Advisory Comnittee: Dr. Y. Weitsman The effects of stress on moisture diffusion in a graphite epoxy composrte material have been studied experimentally by examining the correspondrng... diffusion at all stress levels while the graphite epoxy generated results indicative of Non-Fickean, . concentration dependent diffusion at different levels of stress. The external stress affected both materials in a similar manner, causing...

  18. Effect of an external stress on moisture diffusion in composite materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porth, Edward John

    1983-01-01

    . . 49 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Cure Cycle for Hexcel F155 Graphite/Epoxy. . Cure Cycle for Narmco M329-7 Adhesive. Final Configuration of the Graphite/Epoxy and Stainless Steel Tensile Coupons. Load Frame Used to Stress Tensile Coupons During...-ply laminates absorbed more moisture than unidirectional laminates. However, it was also noted that cross-ply laminates are less compact than unidirectional laminates. Gillat and Broutman [5] subjected bidirectional graphite/epoxy laminates to external loads...

  19. Energy Balance Partitioning and Net Radiation Controls on Soil Moisture – Precipitation Feedbacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Aubrey R.; Brunsell, Nathaniel A.

    2009-01-14

    stream_size 63174 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Brunsell_2009_Energy-balance-partitioning.pdf.txt stream_source_info Brunsell_2009_Energy-balance-partitioning.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text... turbulence, with coarser resolutions unable to capture turbulent motions, which are necessary for convective processes. The ability of the model to capture boundary layer turbulence will alter the dynamics of soil moisture–precipitation feedback...

  20. Development of Optical Technologies for Monitoring Moisture and Particulate in Geothermal Steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. K. Partin

    2006-08-01

    The results of an investigation directed at evaluating the feasibility of using optical measurements for the real-time monitoring moisture and particulate in geothermal steam is described. The measurements exploit new technologies that have been developed for the telecommunications industry and includes new solid state laser devices, large-bandwidth, high-sensitivity detectors and low loss optical fiber compo-nents. In particular, the design, fabrication, and in-plant testing of an optical steam monitor for the detection of moisture is presented. The measurement principle is based upon the selective absorption of infrared energy in response to the presence of moisture. Typically, two wavelengths are used in the measurements: a wavelength that is strongly absorbed by water and a reference wavelength that is minimally influenced by water and steam which serves as a reference to correct for particulate or droplet scattering. The two wavelengths are chosen to be as close as possible in order to more effectively correct for scattering effects. The basic instrumentation platform developed for the in-situ monitoring of steam moisture can be modified and used to perform other measurements of interest to plant operators. An upgrade that will allow the instrument to be used for the sensitive detection of particulate in process streams has been investigated. The new monitor design involves the use of laser diodes that are much less sensitive to water and water vapor and more sensitive to scattering phenomena, as well as new processing techniques to recover these signals. The design reduces the averaging time and sampling volume, while increasing the laser probe power, enhancing particulate detection sensitivity. The design concept and initial laboratory experiments with this system are also reported.

  1. Effect of moisture on air stripping of non volatile organic contaminants from soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Roberto

    1991-01-01

    of the unsaturated soil zone by organic chemicals has been receiving considerable attention recently since it is the major source of ground water pollution. The main objective of this work was to study the viability of air stripping non volatile organic... in the solid phase. Phenol, an EPA priority pollutant which has been identified in ground water supplies, was the model contaminant. Studies involved stripping the contaminant from a column of Norwood/Westwood soil under several moisture conditions. Removal...

  2. Sub-barrier Fusion Cross Sections with Energy Density Formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Muhammad Zamrun; K. Hagino; N. Takigawa

    2006-06-07

    We discuss the applicability of the energy density formalism (EDF) for heavy-ion fusion reactions at sub-barrier energies. For this purpose, we calculate the fusion excitation function and the fusion barrier distribution for the reactions of $^{16}$O with $^{154,}$$^{144}$Sm,$^{186}$W and $^{208}$Pb with the coupled-channels method. We also discuss the effect of saturation property on the fusion cross section for the reaction between two $^{64}$Ni nuclei, in connection to the so called steep fall-off phenomenon of fusion cross sections at deep sub-barrier energies.

  3. Negative Differential Resistance of Electrons in Graphene Barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dragoman, D; Dragoman, Daniela; Dragoman, Mircea

    2007-01-01

    The graphene is a native two-dimensional crystal material consisting of a single sheet of carbon atoms. In this unique one-atom-thick material, the electron transport is ballistic and is described by a quantum relativistic-like Dirac equation rather than by the Schrodinger equation. As a result, a graphene barrier behaves very differently compared to a common semiconductor barrier. We show that a single graphene barrier acts as a switch with a very high on-off ratio and displays a significant differential negative resistance, which promotes graphene as a key material in nanoelectronics.

  4. Negative Differential Resistance of Electrons in Graphene Barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniela Dragoman; Mircea Dragoman

    2007-01-02

    The graphene is a native two-dimensional crystal material consisting of a single sheet of carbon atoms. In this unique one-atom-thick material, the electron transport is ballistic and is described by a quantum relativistic-like Dirac equation rather than by the Schrodinger equation. As a result, a graphene barrier behaves very differently compared to a common semiconductor barrier. We show that a single graphene barrier acts as a switch with a very high on-off ratio and displays a significant differential negative resistance, which promotes graphene as a key material in nanoelectronics.

  5. An analysis of moisture accumulation in the roof cavities of manufactured housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burch, D.

    1995-09-01

    A detailed computer analysis is conducted to investigate whether moisture problems occur in the roof cavity of manufactured homes constructed in compliance with the current Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Standards for manufactured housing. The current HUD Standards require a ceiling vapor retarder, but do not require outdoor ventilation of the roof cavity. In cold climates, the analysis revealed that moisture accumulates at lower roof surface and poses a risk of material degradation. The analysis found the following combination of passive measures to be effective in preventing detrimental winter moisture accumulation at lower surface of the roof: (1) providing a ceiling vapor retarder; (2) sealing penetrations and openings in the ceiling construction, and (3) providing natural ventilation openings in the roof cavity. In addition, the performance of a roof cavity exposed to a hot and humid climate is investigated. The analysis revealed that outdoor ventilation of the roof cavity causes the monthly mean relative humidity at the upper surface of the vapor retarder to exceed 80%. This condition is conducive to mold and mildew growth.

  6. Effects of Compressive Force, Particle Size and Moisture Content on Mechanical Properties of Biomass Grinds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Sudhagar; Tabil, Lope Jr.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2006-03-01

    Chemical composition, moisture content, bulk and particle densities, and geometric mean particle size were determined to characterize grinds from wheat and barley straws, corn stover and switchgrass. The biomass grinds were compressed for five levels of compressive forces (1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4400 N) and three levels of particle sizes (3.2, 1.6 and 0.8 mm) at two levels of moisture contents (12% and 15% (wb) to establish the compression and relaxation data. Corn stover grind produced the highest compact density at low pressure during compression. Compressive force, particle size and moisture content of grinds significantly affected the compact density of barley straw, corn stover and switchgrass grinds. However, different particle sizes of wheat straw grind did not produce any significant difference on compact density. Barley straw grind had the highest asymptotic modulus among all other biomass grinds indicating that compact from barley straw grind were more rigid than those of other compacts. Asymptotic modulus increased with an increase in maximum compressive pressure. The trend of increase in asymptotic modulus (EA) with the maximum compressive pressure ( 0) was fitted to a second order polynomial equation. Keywords: Biomass grinds, chemical composition, compact density and asymptotic modulus

  7. Oxidation and degradation of a plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynes, J.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Porter, W.D.

    1996-04-01

    The isothermal oxidation behavior of thermal barrier coating (TBC) specimens consisting of single-crystal superalloy substrates, vacuum plasma-sprayed Ni-22Cr-10Al-1Y bond coatings and air plasma-sprayed 7.5 wt.% yttria stabilized zirconia top coatings was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis at 1150{degrees}C for up to 200 hours. Coating durability was assessed by furnace cycling at 1150{degrees}C. Coatings and reaction products were identified by x-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

  8. Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol: A Joint Research Agenda

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houghton, John; Weatherwax, Sharlene; Ferrell, John

    2006-06-07

    The Biomass to Biofuels Workshop, held December 7–9, 2005, was convened by the Department of Energy’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research in the Office of Science; and the Office of the Biomass Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The purpose was to define barriers and challenges to a rapid expansion of cellulosic-ethanol production and determine ways to speed solutions through concerted application of modern biology tools as part of a joint research agenda. Although the focus was ethanol, the science applies to additional fuels that include biodiesel and other bioproducts or coproducts having critical roles in any deployment scheme.

  9. Moisture Flux Convergence in Regional and Global Climate Models: Implications for Droughts in the Southwestern United States Under Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yanhong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Salathe, E.; Dominguez, Francina; Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-05-10

    The water cycle of the southwestern United States (SW) is dominated by winter storms that maintain a positive annual net precipitation. Analysis of the control and future climate from four pairs of regional and global climate models (RCMs and GCMs) shows that the RCMs simulate a higher fraction of transient eddy moisture fluxes because the hydrodynamic instabilities associated with flow over complex terrain are better resolved. Under global warming, this enables the RCMs to capture the response of transient eddies to increased atmospheric stability that allows more moisture to converge on the windward side of the mountains by blocking. As a result, RCMs simulate enhanced transient eddy moisture convergence in the SW compared to GCMs, although both robustly simulate drying due to enhanced moisture divergence by the divergent mean flow in a warmer climate. This enhanced convergence leads to reduced susceptibility to hydrological change in the RCMs compared to GCMs.

  10. Understanding Spatio-Temporal Variability and Associated Physical Controls of Near-Surface Soil Moisture in Different Hydro-Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Champa

    2013-05-06

    Near-surface soil moisture is a key state variable of the hydrologic cycle and plays a significant role in the global water and energy balance by affecting several hydrological, ecological, meteorological, geomorphologic, ...

  11. Impact of Hillslope-Scale Organization of Topography, Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature, and Vegetation on Modeling Surface Microwave Radiation Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores, Alejandro N.

    Microwave radiometry will emerge as an important tool for global remote sensing of near-surface soil moisture in the coming decade. In this modeling study, we find that hillslope-scale topography (tens of meters) influences ...

  12. Precipitation and soil impacts on partitioning of subsurface moisture in Avena barbata: Observations from a greenhouse experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salve, R.; Torn, M.S.

    2011-03-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the impact of two grassland soils and precipitation regimes on soil-moisture dynamics. We set up an experiment in a greenhouse, and monitored soil moisture dynamics in mesocosms planted with Avena barbata, an annual species found in California grasslands. By repeating the precipitation input at regular intervals, we were able to observe plant manipulation of soil moisture during well-defined periods during the growing season. We found that the amount of water partitioned to evapotranspiration, seepage, and soil storage varied among different growth stages. Further, both soil type and precipitation regimes had a significant impact on redistributing soil moisture. Whereas in the low-precipitation treatments most water was released to the atmosphere as evapotranspiration, major losses from the high-precipitation treatment occurred as gravity drainage. Observations from this study emphasize the importance of understanding intra-seasonal relationships between vegetation, soil, and water.

  13. A wireless soil moisture smart sensor web using physics-based optimal control: Concept and initial demonstrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moghaddam, Mahta

    This paper introduces a new concept for a smart wireless sensor web technology for optimal measurements of surface-to-depth profiles of soil moisture using in-situ sensors. The objective of the technology, supported by the ...

  14. Examining the Relationship between Antecedent Soil Moisture and Summer Precipitation in the U.S. Great Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Lei

    2010-01-14

    This dissertation focuses on examining the relationship between antecedent soil moisture and summer precipitation in the U.S. Great Plains (GP). The influence of Nino sea surface temperatures (SSTs) on summer precipitation ...

  15. Moisture and temperature effects on curvature of anti-symmetric cross-ply graphite/epoxy laminates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lott, Randall Stephen

    1980-01-01

    MOISTURE AND TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CURVATURE OF ANTI-SYMMETRIC CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by RANDALL STEPHEN LOTT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering MOISTURE AND TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CURVATURE OF ANTI-SYMMETRIC CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by RANDALL STEPHEN LOTT Approved as to style and content...

  16. Embedded Optical Sensors for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David R. Clarke

    2005-11-09

    In the second year of this program on developing embedded optical sensors for thermal barrier coatings, our research has focused three topics: (1) Eu{sup 3+} doping for temperature sensing, (2) the effect of long-term, high-temperature aging on the characteristics of the luminescence from the Eu{sup 3+} ions of 8YSZ materials, (3) construction of a fiber-optic based luminescence detector system. It has been demonstrated that the variation in luminescence lifetime with temperature is identical for electron-beam evaporated Eu-doped YSZ coatings as for bulk ceramics of the same composition. Experiments indicate that the luminescence lifetime method of measuring temperatures is sensitive up to 1150 C for both Eu-doped YSZ coatings and Eu-doped Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Furthermore, the technique is sensitive up to 1250 C for the composition Eu{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}. The luminescence spectra Eu-doped YSZ are insensitive to long-term aging at high-temperatures, even to 195 hours at 1425 C, except for a small frequency shift that is probably too small in measure except with instruments of the highest spectral resolution. The temperature of 1425 C is much higher than present engines attain or even planned in the foreseeable future. Nevertheless, experiments are on-going to explore longer term exposures. A fiber-optic based luminescence system has been constructed in which the hottest section of fiber operates to at least 1250 C.

  17. Hanford prototype-barrier status report: FY 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, A.L.; Gee, G.W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Link, S.O. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    An above-grade surface barrier consisting of a vegetated soil-cover, surrounded by gravel and rock side slopes, is being tested for the US Department of Energy (DOE). It is part of a treatability study at the 200-BP-1 Operable Unit in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington. The surface barrier, constructed in 1994, covers 2.5 ha (6.9 acre) of land surface and is situated over an inactive liquid-waste disposal crib. A set of under drains, built into the barrier using curbed asphalt, allows precise measurement of drainage from the soil cover and the side slopes. The treatability test includes measurements of water balance, wind and water erosion, subsidence, plant growth, and plant and animal intrusion. The test compares the performance of the barrier under ambient and simulated climate change (elevated precipitation) conditions. This report documents findings from the third year of testing.

  18. Analysis of Attic Radiant Barrier Systems Using Mathematical Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairey, P.; Swami, M.

    1988-01-01

    During the past six years, the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) has conducted extensive experimental research on radiant barrier systems (RBS). This paper presents recent research on the development of mathematical attic models. Two levels...

  19. In situ formation of phosphate barriers in soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Robert C. (Edgewood, NM)

    2002-01-01

    Reactive barriers and methods for making reactive barriers in situ in soil for sequestering soil ontaminants including actinides and heavy metals. The barrier includes phosphate, and techniques are disclosed for forming specifically apatite barriers. The method includes injecting dilute reagents into soil in proximity to a contamination plume or source such as a waste drum to achieve complete or partial encapsulation of the waste. Controlled temperature and pH facilitates rapid formation of apatite, for example, where dilute aqueous calcium chloride and dilute aqueous sodium phosphate are the selected reagents. Mixing of reagents to form precipitate is mediated and enhanced through movement of reagents in soil as a result of phenomena including capillary action, movement of groundwater, soil washing and reagent injection pressure.

  20. Microsoft Word - Barriers to Achieving the Modern Grid_Final...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    our 21 st Century Economy V1.0 Barriers to Achieving the Modern Grid A declining infusion of new thought is occurring. The technical experience base of utilities is graying....

  1. Nontechnical Barriers to Solar Energy Use: Review of Recent Literature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margolis, R.; Zuboy, J.

    2006-09-01

    This paper reviews the nontechnical barriers to solar energy use, drawing on recent literature to help identify key barriers that must be addressed as part of the Technology Acceptance efforts under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solar America Initiative. A broad literature search yielded more than 400 references, which were narrowed to 19 recent documents on nontechnical barriers to the use of solar energy and other energy efficiency and renewable energy (EE/RE) technologies. Some of the most frequently identified barriers included lack of government policy supporting EE/RE, lack of information dissemination and consumer awareness about energy and EE/RE, high cost of solar and other EE/RE technologies compared with conventional energy, and inadequate financing options for EE/RE projects.

  2. Double Barriers and Magnetic Field in Bilayer Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilham Redouani; Ahmed Jellal; Hocine Bahlouli

    2015-05-21

    We study the transmission probability in an AB-stacked bilayer graphene of Dirac fermions scattered by a double barrier structure in the presence of a magnetic field. We take into account the full four bands of the energy spectrum and use the boundary conditions to determine the transmission probability. Our numerical results show that for energies higher than the interlayer coupling, four ways for transmission probabilities are possible while for energies less than the height of the barrier, Dirac fermions exhibits transmission resonances and only one transmission channel is available. We show that, for AB-stacked bilayer graphene, there is no Klein tunneling at normal incident. We find that the transmission displays sharp peaks inside the transmission gap around the Dirac point within the barrier regions while they are absent around the Dirac point in the well region. The effect of the magnetic field, interlayer electrostatic potential and various barrier geometry parameters on the transmission probabilities are also discussed.

  3. Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier AMFC Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on in market entry process ! #12;Mainstream Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell ( PEM) Cost Barriers 3 Graphite batteries and diesel generators #12;PFM vs. PEM stack- Cost Analysis per kW at 10^3 unit volumes 6 PFM

  4. Sub-barrier capture with quantum diffusion approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Sargsyan; R. A. Kuzyakin; G. G. Adamian; N. V. Antonenko; W. Scheid; H. Q. Zhang

    2011-08-05

    With the quantum diffusion approach the behavior of capture cross sections and mean-square angular momenta of captured systems are revealed in the reactions with deformed and spherical nuclei at sub-barrier energies. With decreasing bombarding energy under the barrier the external turning point of the nucleus-nucleus potential leaves the region of short-range nuclear interaction and action of friction. Because of this change of the regime of interaction, an unexpected enhancement of the capture cross section is found at bombarding energies far below the Coulomb barrier. This effect is shown its worth in the dependence of mean-square angular momentum on the bombarding energy. From the comparison of calculated capture cross sections and experimental capture or fusion cross sections the importance of quasifission near the entrance channel is demonstrated for the actinidebased reactions and reactions with medium-heavy nuclei at extreme sub-barrier energies.

  5. TANK FARM INTERIM SURFACE BARRIER MATERIALS AND RUNOFF ALTERNATIVES STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOLM MJ

    2009-06-25

    This report identifies candidate materials and concepts for interim surface barriers in the single-shell tank farms. An analysis of these materials for application to the TY tank farm is also provided.

  6. Materials that Improve the Cost-Effectiveness of Air Barrier...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems 1 of 3 3M has developed a primer-less self-adhered membrane that serves as an air, liquid water, and water vapor barrier. This technology installs in up to half the...

  7. Comparison Test for Infection Control Barriers for Construction in Healthcare 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bassett, Aimee

    2013-05-06

    is determined from measured particle count on filter. The results show that an effective barrier manufactured from simple and readily available building supplies stops the transmission of 12-micron dust particles under a standard set of conditions. The test...

  8. Fusion dynamics of symmetric systems near barrier energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao-Qing Feng; Gen-Ming Jin

    2009-09-06

    The enhancement of the sub-barrier fusion cross sections was explained as the lowering of the dynamical fusion barriers within the framework of the improved isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (ImIQMD) model. The numbers of nucleon transfer in the neck region are appreciably dependent on the incident energies, but strongly on the reaction systems. A comparison of the neck dynamics is performed for the symmetric reactions $^{58}$Ni+$^{58}$Ni and $^{64}$Ni+$^{64}$Ni at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. An increase of the ratios of neutron to proton in the neck region at initial collision stage is observed and obvious for neutron-rich systems, which can reduce the interaction potential of two colliding nuclei. The distribution of the dynamical fusion barriers and the fusion excitation functions are calculated and compared them with the available experimental data.

  9. Experimental investigation of natural gas moisture content and NGV regulator performance. Topical report, October 1993-April 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, P.F.; Hunecke, D.E.; Maniquis, V.T.; Blazek, C.F.

    1996-05-01

    High moisture levels in natural gas can result in operational problems on-board natural gas vehicle (NGVs) or at fueling stations. Since some NGV stations have experienced higher than recommended moisture levels, NGV equipment must be able to tolerate a reasonable level of moisture. At the pressure regulator on-board the vehicle, gas is expanded from the storage pressure (up to 3600 psig) to the pressure of the fuel delivery system (typically 100 psig). This gas expansion produces significant temperature decreases ranging 100 deg F to 150 deg F. At these low temperatures, water in the gas may drop out and form water droplets, frost or hydrates, which can obstruct on-board components. Experimental testing was conducted at IGT to evaluate the performance of four commercially available NGV regulators (MECO, ITT Conoflow, MESA, and GFI) at extreme temperatures and gas moisture levels. Specific objectives of this project were to identify moisture levels which interfere with operation of these components and to identify component features or designs which are most resistant to high moisture levels.

  10. Band Tunneling through Double Barrier in Bilayer Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasan A. Alshehab; Hocine Bahlouli; Abderrahim El Mouhafid; Ahmed Jellal

    2014-01-20

    By taking into account the full four band energy spectrum, we calculate the transmission probability and conductance of electrons across symmetric and asymmetric double potential barrier with a confined interlayer potential difference in bilayer graphene. For energies less than the interlayer coupling \\gamma_{1}, E \\gamma_{1}, we obtain four possible ways for transmission resulting from the two propagating modes. We compute the associated transmission probabilities as well as their contribution to the conductance, study the effect of the double barrier geometry.

  11. Barriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency - Report to Congress, June 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    This report examines barriers that impede the adoption of energy efficient technologies and practices in the industrial sector, and identifies successful examples and opportunities to overcome these barriers. Three groups of energy efficiency technologies and measures were examined: industrial end-use energy efficiency, industrial demand response, and industrial combined heat and power. This report also includes the estimated economic benefits from hypothetical Federal energy efficiency matching grants, as directed by the Act.

  12. One-way Ponderomotive Barrier in a Uniform Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I.Y. Dodin; N.J. Fisch

    2005-02-14

    The possibility of an asymmetric ponderomotive barrier in a nonuniform dc magnetic field by high-frequency radiation near the cyclotron resonance for selected plasma species was contemplated in Physics of Plasmas 11 (November 2004) 5046-5064. Here we show that a similar one-way barrier, which reflects particles incident from one side while transmitting those incident from the opposite side, can be produced also in a uniform magnetic field, entirely due to inhomogeneity of high-frequency drive.

  13. Structural and safety characteristics and warrants for highway traffic barriers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohutek, Terry Lee

    1975-01-01

    Ross Highway traffic barriers are highway appurtenances that provide vehicle occupants with a relative degree of protection from roadside hazards and from errant vehicles encroaching across a median. The six basic types of traffic barr1ers are roads... are decision criteria that 1dentify sites along highways that need traff1c barrier installations. Structural and safety character- istics of the barr1ers refer to the impact performance, the structural integrity, and the safety of the vehicle occupants upon...

  14. Barriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency - Study (Appendix A), June 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    This study examines barriers that impede the adoption of energy efficient technologies and practices in the industrial sector, and identifies successful examples and opportunities to overcome these barriers. Three groups of energy efficiency technologies and measures were examined: industrial end-use energy efficiency, industrial demand response, and industrial combined heat and power. This study also includes the estimated economic benefits from hypothetical Federal energy efficiency matching grants, as directed by the Act.

  15. Tunneling through high energy barriers in simulated quantum annealing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elizabeth Crosson; Mingkai Deng

    2014-10-30

    We analyze the performance of simulated quantum annealing (SQA) on an optimization problem for which simulated classical annealing (SA) is provably inefficient because of a high energy barrier. We present evidence that SQA can pass through this barrier to find the global minimum efficiently. This demonstrates the potential for SQA to inherit some of the advantages of quantum annealing (QA), since this problem has been previously shown to be efficiently solvable by quantum adiabatic optimization.

  16. Effects of Alloy Disorder on Schottky-Barrier Heights 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MYLES, CW; REN, SF; Allen, Roland E.; REN, SY.

    1987-01-01

    on the Schottky barriers at semiconductor-alloy ?metal interfaces are investigated within the defect model of Schottky-barrier formation. The deep levels and the associ- ated wave functions for surface antisite defects, which are believed to be responsible... the effect of the random local environment of each defect on these deep levels. For the cation and anion antisite defects at the (110) surfaces of six different III-V semiconductor alloys, the inhomogeneous broadening of the associated deep levels is found...

  17. Development of a Bulk-Format System to Harvest, Handle, Store, and Deliver High-Tonnage Low-Moisture Switchgrass Feedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Womac, Alvin; Groothuis, Mitch; Westover, Tyler; Phanphanich, Manunya; Webb, Erin; Sokhansanj, Shahab; Turhollow, Anthony

    2013-09-24

    This project evaluates and compares comprehensive feedstock logistics systems (FLS), where a FLS is defined to comprehensively span from biomass material standing in a field to conveyance of a uniform, industrial-milled product into the throat of a biomass conversion facility (BCF). Elements of the bulk-format FLS evaluated in this project include: field-standing switchgrass dry chopped into bulk format on the farm, hauled (either loose or bulk compacted) to storage, stored with confining overburden in a protective facility, reclaimed and conveyed to bulk-format discharge, bulk compacted into an ejector trailer, and conveyed as bulk flow into the BCF. In this FLS evaluation, bulk storage bins served as a controlled and sensored proxy for large commercial stacks protected from moisture with a membrane cover.

  18. Ocean Barrier Layers’ Effect on Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xu, Zhao; Li, M.; Hsieh, J.

    2012-09-04

    Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are 'quasi-permanent' features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

  19. Jonestown Quadruple Net Value Report- Breaking Barriers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Couvillion, Sarah; English, Garrett; Vasylyeva, Anastasiya; Allen, Jacob; Jorgenson, Davis; Kaska, Michael; Terrazas, Nathan; Barnette, Beau; Garcia, Karina; Cruz, Sarah; Harwell, Ethan

    2014-12-04

    gas yield of 35 wt.% was determined at 800°C. The average yield of CO, H2 and total hydrocarbons (THC) generally increased with increased temperature but CO2 production decreased. Methane, ethane, and propane dominated the THC. The bio-oil yield at 600...

  20. Use of co-combustion bottom ash to design an acoustic absorbing material for highway noise barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arenas, Celia; Leiva, Carlos; Vilches, Luis F.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • The particle size of bottom ash influenced the acoustic behavior of the barrier. • The best sound absorption coefficients were measured for larger particle sizes. • The maximum noise absorption is displaced to lower frequencies for higher thickness. • A noise barrier was designed with better properties than commercial products. • Recycling products from bottom ash no present leaching and radioactivity problems. - Abstract: The present study aims to determine and evaluate the applicability of a new product consisting of coal bottom ash mixed with Portland cement in the application of highway noise barriers. In order to effectively recycle the bottom ash, the influence of the grain particle size of bottom ash, the thickness of the panel and the combination of different layers with various particle sizes have been studied, as well as some environmental properties including leachability (EN-12457-4, NEN-7345) and radioactivity tests. Based on the obtained results, the acoustic properties of the final composite material were similar or even better than those found in porous concrete used for the same application. According to this study, the material produced presented no environmental risk.

  1. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM FEATURES, EVENTS AND PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaros, W.

    2005-08-30

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of engineered barrier system (EBS) features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to models and analyses used to support the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for exclusion screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 173273]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with those features, events, and processes relevant to the EBS focusing mainly on those components and conditions exterior to the waste package and within the rock mass surrounding emplacement drifts. The components of the EBS are the drip shield, waste package, waste form, cladding, emplacement pallet, emplacement drift excavated opening (also referred to as drift opening in this report), and invert. FEPs specific to the waste package, cladding, and drip shield are addressed in separate FEP reports: for example, ''Screening of Features, Events, and Processes in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174995]), ''Clad Degradation--FEPs Screening Arguments (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170019]), and Waste-Form Features, Events, and Processes'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170020]). For included FEPs, this report summarizes the implementation of the FEP in the TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). This report also documents changes to the EBS FEPs list that have occurred since the previous versions of this report. These changes have resulted due to a reevaluation of the FEPs for TSPA-LA as identified in Section 1.2 of this report and described in more detail in Section 6.1.1. This revision addresses updates in Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) administrative procedures as they pertain to this report; the current procedures are addressed in Section 2. This revision also addresses updates to the technical basis in supporting analysis and model reports and corroborative documentation, as presented in Sections 4 and 6 of this report. Finally, Sections 4, 5, and 6 of this report provide additional information pertaining to the relevant FEPs-related Acceptance Criteria presented in ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (YMRP) (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274], Sections 2.2.1.2.1.3 and 2.2.1.3.3.3).

  2. Helium Ash Simulation Studies with Divertor Helium Pumping in JET Internal Transport Barrier Discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helium Ash Simulation Studies with Divertor Helium Pumping in JET Internal Transport Barrier Discharges

  3. Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

    2014-01-10

    This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

  4. Cavitation controlled acoustic probe for fabric spot cleaning and moisture monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw (Naperville, IL); Chien, Hual-Te (Naperville, IL); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for monitoring a fabric. An acoustic probe generates acoustic waves relative to the fabric. An acoustic sensor, such as an accelerometer is coupled to the acoustic probe for generating a signal representative of cavitation activity in the fabric. The generated cavitation activity representative signal is processed to indicate moisture content of the fabric. A feature of the invention is a feedback control signal is generated responsive to the generated cavitation activity representative signal. The feedback control signal can be used to control the energy level of the generated acoustic waves and to control the application of a cleaning solution to the fabric.

  5. Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

    This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

  6. International H2O Project (IHOP) 2002: Datasets Related to Atmospheric Moisture and Rainfall Prediction

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schanot, Allen [IHOP 2002 PI; Friesen, Dick [IHOP 2002 PI

    IHOP 2002 was a field experiment that took place over the Southern Great Plains of the United States from 13 May to 25 June 2002. The chief aim of IHOP_2002 was improved characterization of the four-dimensional (4-D) distribution of water vapor and its application to improving the understanding and prediction of convection. The region was an optimal location due to existing experimental and operational facilities, strong variability in moisture, and active convection [copied from http://www.eol.ucar.edu/projects/ihop/]. The project's master list of data identifies 146 publicly accessible datasets.

  7. Electron dynamics and plasma jet formation in a helium atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Algwari, Q. Th. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Maths and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, University Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Electronic Department, College of Electronics Engineering, Mosul University, Mosul 41002 (Iraq); O'Connell, D. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Maths and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, University Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-19

    The excitation dynamics within the main plasma production region and the plasma jets of a kHz atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet operated in helium was investigated. Within the dielectric tube, the plasma ignites as a streamer-type discharge. Plasma jets are emitted from both the powered and grounded electrode end; their dynamics are compared and contrasted. Ignition of these jets are quite different; the jet emitted from the powered electrode is ignited with a slight time delay to plasma ignition inside the dielectric tube, while breakdown of the jet at the grounded electrode end is from charging of the dielectric and is therefore dependent on plasma production and transport within the dielectric tube. Present streamer theories can explain these dynamics.

  8. Effects of chronic warming and nutrient additions on ecosystem respiration and methane fluxes along a tundra moisture gradient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nadelhoffer, K.; Murray, G.; Giblin, A.; Shaver, G.; Laundre, J.; Johnson, L.; Stanley, A. (Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA (United States)); Schimel, J. (Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States))

    1994-06-01

    We measured ecosystem respiration (ER: or CO[sub 2] flux), methane (CH[sub 4]) fluxes and net ecosystem production (NEP) near Toolik Lake, Alaska to compare effects of temperature, moisture and nutrients on tundra C balances. We measured fluxes using closed chambers in control, warmed and fertilized plots in wet, moist and dry tundra. ER rankings of tundra types differed between years. In 1992 ER was [approximately]70 g C m[sup [minus]2]y[sup [minus]1] in wet and moist tundra and was 50% lower in dry tundra. In 1993 ER was >150 g C m[sup [minus]2]y[sup [minus]1] in moist tundra and [approximately]55 g C m[sup [minus]2]y[sup [minus]1] in wet and dry tundra. CH[sub 4] emissions ranged from 3.5 to 7 g C m[sup [minus]2]y[sup [minus]1] in wet and from 0.6 to 2.8 g C m[sup [minus]2]y[sup [minus]1] in moist tundra. Dry tundra consumed about 0.1 g CH[sub 4]-C m[sup [minus]2]y[sup [minus]1]. In wet tundra ER increased slightly with warming but dramatically with fertilization. Wet tundra NEP increased with fertilization but not with warming. CH[sub 4] emissions from wet tundra increased with warming but decreased with fertilization. Warming and fertilization increased ER but neither treatment affected NEP in moist tundra. CH[sub 4] emissions from moist tundra responded similarly but less dramatically to treatments than did wet tundra CH[sub 4] fluxes. Warming did not affect ER or NEP in dry tundra, fertilization increased both process. Consumption of CH[sub 4] in dry tundra increased with warming but decreased with fertilization.

  9. Test Plan for Evaluating Hammer and Fixed Cutter Grinders Using Multiple Varieties and Moistures of Biomass Feedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not listed

    2007-07-01

    Biomass preprocessing is a critical operation in the preparation of feedstock for the front-end of a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery. Its purpose is to chop, grind, or otherwise format the biomass material into a suitable feedstock for optimum conversion to ethanol and other bioproducts. Without this operation, the natural size, bulk density, and flowability characteristics of harvested biomass would decrease the capacities and efficiencies of feedstock assembly unit operations and biorefinery conversion processes to the degree that programmatic cost targets could not be met. The preprocessing unit operation produces a bulk flowable material that 1) improves handling and conveying efficiencies throughout the feedstock assembly system and biorefinery 2) increases biomass surface areas for improved pretreatment efficiencies, 3) reduces particle sizes for improved feedstock uniformity and density, and 4) fractionates structural components for improved compositional quality. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is tasked with defining the overall efficiency/effectiveness of current commercial hammer and fixed cutter grinding systems and other connecting systems such as harvest and collection, storage, transportation, and handling for a wide variety of feedstock types used in bioethanol or syngas production. This test plan details tasks and activities for two separate full-scale grinding tests: Material Characterization Test and Machine Characterization Test. For the Material Characterization Test, a small amount (~5-7 tons each) of several feedstock varieties will be ground. This test will define the fractionation characteristics of the grinder that affect the bulk density, particle size distribution, and quality of the size reduced biomass resulting from different separation screen sizes. A specific screen size will be selected based on the characteristics of the ground material. The Machine Characterization Test will then use this selected screen to grind several 30-ton batches of different feedstock varieties and moistures. This test will focus on identifying the performance parameters of the grinding system specific to the feed, fractionation, and screen separation components and their affect on machine capacity and efficiency.

  10. On causality, apparent 'superluminality' and reshaping in barrier penetration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Sokolovski

    2010-03-20

    We consider tunnelling of a non-relativistic particle across a potential barrier. It is shown that the barrier acts as an effective beam splitter which builds up the transmitted pulse from the copies of the initial envelope shifted in the coordinate space backwards relative to the free propagation. Although along each pathway causality is explicitly obeyed, in special cases reshaping can result an overall reduction of the initial envelope, accompanied by an arbitrary coordinate shift. In the case of a high barrier the delay amplitude distribution (DAD) mimics a Dirac $\\delta$-function, the transmission amplitude is superoscillatory for finite momenta and tunnelling leads to an accurate advancement of the (reduced) initial envelope by the barrier width. In the case of a wide barrier, initial envelope is accurately translated into the complex coordinate plane. The complex shift, given by the first moment of the DAD, accounts for both the displacement of the maximum of the transmitted probability density and the increase in its velocity. It is argued that analysing apparent 'superluminality' in terms of spacial displacements helps avoid contradiction associated with time parameters such as the phase time.

  11. Subsurface barrier validation with the SEAtrace{trademark} system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandra Dalvit Dunn; William Lowry; Veraun Chipman

    1999-09-01

    Under contract to the Department of Energy, Science and Engineering Associates has completed development and testing of a subsurface barrier verification and monitoring system. This system, called SEAtrace{trademark}, is able to locate and size leaks with a high degree of accuracy in subsurface barriers that are emplaced in an unsaturated medium. It uses gaseous tracer injection, in-field real-time monitoring, and real time data analysis to evaluate barrier integrity. The approach is: Conservative as it measures vapor leaks in a containment system whose greatest risk is posed by liquid leaks; Applicable to any impermeable type of barrier emplacement technology in the unsaturated zone; Inexpensive as it uses readily available, non-toxic, nonhazardous gaseous tracers, does not require an inordinately large number of sampling points, and injection and sampling points can be emplaced by direct push techniques; Capable of assessing not only a barrier's initial integrity, but can also provide long-term monitoring. To date, six demonstrations of the system have been completed. Results from two of the demonstrations are detailed in this report. They include the final developmental demonstration of the SEAtrace system and a comparison demonstration of two tracer based verification technologies. The final developmental demonstration of SEAtrace was completed at a naval facility in Brunswick, Maine. The demonstration was funded solely by the DOE and was performed in cooperation with the US Navy, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Maine Department of Environmental Protection.

  12. 1366 Direct Wafer: Demolishing the Cost Barrier for Silicon Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenz, Adam

    2013-08-30

    The goal of 1366 Direct Wafer™ is to drastically reduce the cost of silicon-based PV by eliminating the cost barrier imposed by sawn wafers. The key characteristics of Direct Wafer are 1) kerf-free, 156-mm standard silicon wafers 2) high throughput for very low CAPEX and rapid scale up. Together, these characteristics will allow Direct Wafer™ to become the new standard for silicon PV wafers and will enable terawatt-scale PV – a prospect that may not be possible with sawn wafers. Our single, high-throughput step will replace the expensive and rate-limiting process steps of ingot casting and sawing, thereby enabling drastically lower wafer cost. This High-Impact PV Supply Chain project addressed the challenges of scaling Direct Wafer technology for cost-effective, high-throughput production of commercially viable 156 mm wafers. The Direct Wafer process is inherently simple and offers the potential for very low production cost, but to realize this, it is necessary to demonstrate production of wafers at high-throughput that meet customer specifications. At the start of the program, 1366 had demonstrated (with ARPA-E funding) increases in solar cell efficiency from 10% to 15.9% on small area (20cm2), scaling wafer size up to the industry standard 156mm, and demonstrated initial cell efficiency on larger wafers of 13.5%. During this program, the throughput of the Direct Wafer furnace was increased by more than 10X, simultaneous with quality improvements to meet early customer specifications. Dedicated equipment for laser trimming of wafers and measurement methods were developed to feedback key quality metrics to improve the process and equipment. Subsequent operations served both to determine key operating metrics affecting cost, as well as generating sample product that was used for developing downstream processing including texture and interaction with standard cell processing. Dramatic price drops for silicon wafers raised the bar significantly, but the developments made under this program have increased 1366 confidence that Direct Wafers can be produced for ~$0.10/W, still nearly 50% lower than current industry best practice. Wafer quality also steadily improved throughout the program, both in electrical performance and geometry. The improvements to electrical performance were achieved through a combination of optimized heat transfer during growth, reduction of metallic impurities to below 10 ppbw total metals, and lowering oxygen content to below 2e17 atoms/cc. Wafer average thickness has been reduced below 200µm with standard deviation less than 20µm. Measurement of spatially varying thickness shortly after wafer growth is being used to continually improve uniformity by adjusting thermal conditions. At the conclusion of the program, 1366 has developed strong relationships with four leading Tier1 cell manufactures and several have demonstrated 17% cell efficiency on Direct Wafer. Sample volumes were limited, with the largest trial consisting of 300 Direct Wafers, and there remains strong pull for larger quantities necessary for qualification before sales contracts can be signed. This will be the focus of our pilot manufacturing scale up in 2014.

  13. Sub-barrier fusion with N/Z exotic beams of light nuclei Hence, sub-barrier fusion is sensitive to the density dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Souza, Romualdo T.

    Sub-barrier fusion with N/Z exotic beams of light nuclei Hence, sub-barrier fusion is sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy in the EOS at sub-saturation density. Sub-barrier fusion affects the composition of the Fermi tail Measuring fusion for an isotopic chain of projectile nuclei one

  14. Directed transport of active particles over asymmetric energy barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Koumakis; C. Maggi; R. Di Leonardo

    2015-06-29

    We theoretically and numerically investigate the transport of active colloids to target regions, delimited by asymmetric energy barriers. We show that it is possible to introduce a generalized effective temperature that is related to the local variance of particle velocities. The stationary probability distributions can be derived from a simple diffusion equation in the presence of an inhomogeneous effective temperature resulting from the action of external force fields. In particular, transitions rates over asymmetric energy barriers can be unbalanced by having different effective temperatures over the two slopes of the barrier. By varying the type of active noise, we find that equal values of diffusivity and persistence time may produce strongly varied effective temperatures and thus stationary distributions.

  15. Transport Properties through Double Barrier Structure in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed Jellal; El Bouazzaoui Choubabi; Hocine Bahlouli; Abdullah Aljaafari

    2012-02-12

    The mode-dependent transmission of relativistic ballistic massless Dirac fermion through a graphene based double barrier structure is being investigated for various barrier parameters. We compare our results with already published work and point out the relevance of these findings to a systematic study of the transport properties in double barrier structures. An interesting situation arises when we set the potential in the leads to zero, then our 2D problem reduces effectively to a 1D massive Dirac equation with an effective mass proportional to the quantized wave number along the transverse direction. Furthermore we have shown that the minimal conductivity and maximal Fano factor remain insensitive to the ratio between the two potentials V_2/V_1=\\alpha.

  16. Subsurface barrier demonstration test strategy and performance specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treat, R.L.; Cruse, J.M.

    1994-05-01

    This document was developed to help specify a major demonstration test project of subsurface barrier systems supporting the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program. The document focuses discussion on requirements applicable to demonstration of three subsurface barrier concepts: (1) Injected Material, (2) Cryogenic, and (3) Desiccant. Detailed requirements are provided for initial qualification of a technology proposal followed by the pre-demonstration and demonstration test requirements and specifications. Each requirement and specification is accompanied by a discussion of the rationale for it. The document also includes information on the Hanford Site tank farms and related data; the related and currently active technology development projects within the DOE`s EM-50 Program; and the overall demonstration test strategy. Procurement activities and other preparations for actual demonstration testing are on hold until a decision is made regarding further development of subsurface barriers. Accordingly, this document is being issued for information only.

  17. Systematic Study of Fission Barriers of Excited Superheavy Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheikh-Javid, A; Pei, J C

    2009-01-01

    A systematic study of fission-barrier dependence on excitation energy has been performed using the self-consistent finite-temperature Hartree-Fock+BCS (FT-HF+BCS) formalism with the SkM* Skyrme energy density functional. The calculations have been carried out for even-even superheavy nuclei with Z ranging between 110 and 124. For an accurate description of fission pathways, the effects of triaxial and reflection-asymmetric degrees of freedom have been fully incorporated. Our survey demonstrates that the dependence of isentropic fission barriers on excitation energy changes rapidly with particle number, pointing to the importance of shell effects even at large excitation energies characteristic of compound nuclei. The fastest decrease of fission barriers with excitation energy is predicted for deformed nuclei around N=164 and spherical nuclei around N=184 that are strongly stabilized by ground-state shell effects. For nuclei 240Pu and 256Fm, which exhibit asymmetric spontaneous fission, our calculations predic...

  18. Response of the regional water cycle to an increase of atmosphere moisture related to global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frei, C.; Widmann, M.; Luethi, D.

    1997-11-01

    This study examines the sensitivity of the mid-latitude regional hydrological cycle to an imposed warming. Mesoscale limited-area climate simulations over Europe are performed. The modelling study is complemented with a detailed analysis of the observed precipitation and circulation trends in the same region. It is demonstrated that an increase of the moisture content leads to an enhancement of the model`s water cycle during the synoptically active seasons. The simulations suggest that this mechanism may contribute towards an increase in mean precipitation and more frequency occurrence of heavy precipitation events. Observational analysis results illustrate that the relationship between precipitation and atmospheric moisture seen in the climate simulations constitutes a possible physical mechanism relevant for the interpretation of the observed trends. A key feature of the model results is the pronounced increase in the frequency of strong precipitation events associated with the intensification of the water cycle. This large sensitivity highlights the vulnerability of the precipitation climate with respect to global climate change. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Modifications to WRFs dynamical core to improve the treatment of moisture for large-eddy simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiao, Heng; Endo, Satoshi; Wong, May; Skamarock, William C.; Klemp, Joseph B.; Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, Jr., William I.; Vogelmann, Andrew; Wang, Hailong; Liu, Yangang; et al

    2015-10-29

    Yamaguchi and Feingold (2012) note that the cloud fields in their large-eddy simulations (LESs) of marine stratocumulus using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model exhibit a strong sensitivity to time stepping choices. In this study, we reproduce and analyze this sensitivity issue using two stratocumulus cases, one marine and one continental. Results show that (1) the sensitivity is associated with spurious motions near the moisture jump between the boundary layer and the free atmosphere, and (2) these spurious motions appear to arise from neglecting small variations in water vapor mixing ratio (qv) in the pressure gradient calculation in themore »acoustic sub-stepping portion of the integration procedure. We show that this issue is remedied in the WRF dynamical core by replacing the prognostic equation for the potential temperature ? with one for the moist potential temperature ?m=?(1+1.61qv), which allows consistent treatment of moisture in the calculation of pressure during the acoustic sub-steps. With this modification, the spurious motions and the sensitivity to the time stepping settings (i.e., the dynamic time step length and number of acoustic sub-steps) are eliminated in both of the example stratocumulus cases. In conclusion, this modification improves the applicability of WRF for LES applications, and possibly other models using similar dynamical core formulations, and also permits the use of longer time steps than in the original code.« less

  20. Hydrogen Production by Water Biophotolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghirardi, Maria L.; King, Paul W.; Mulder, David W.; Eckert, Carrie; Dubini, Alexandra; Maness, Pin-Ching; Yu, Jianping

    2014-01-22

    The use of microalgae for production of hydrogen gas from water photolysis has been studied for many years, but its commercialization is still limited by multiple challenges. Most of the barriers to commercialization are attributed to the existence of biological regulatory mechanisms that, under anaerobic conditions, quench the absorbed light energy, down-regulate linear electron transfer, inactivate the H2-producing enzyme, and compete for electrons with the hydrogenase. Consequently, the conversion efficiency of absorbed photons into H2 is significantly lower than its estimated potential of 12–13 %. However, extensive research continues towards addressing these barriers by either trying to understand and circumvent intracellular regulatory mechanisms at the enzyme and metabolic level or by developing biological systems that achieve prolonged H2 production albeit under lower than 12–13 % solar conversion efficiency. This chapter describes the metabolic pathways involved in biological H2 photoproduction from water photolysis, the attributes of the two hydrogenases, [FeFe] and [NiFe], that catalyze biological H2 production, and highlights research related to addressing the barriers described above. These highlights include: (a) recent advances in improving our understanding of the O2 inactivation mechanism in different classes of hydrogenases; (b) progress made in preventing competitive pathways from diverting electrons from H2 photoproduction; and (c) new developments in bypassing the non-dissipated proton gradient from down-regulating photosynthetic electron transfer. As an example of a major success story, we mention the generation of truncated-antenna mutants in Chlamydomonas and Synechocystis that address the inherent low-light saturation of photosynthesis. In addition, we highlight the rationale and progress towards coupling biological hydrogenases to non-biological, photochemical charge-separation as a means to bypass the barriers of photobiological systems.

  1. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction- August 13, 2014- Moisture Monitoring Results in an R-40 Wall

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, Moisture Monitoring Results in an R-40 Wall, was presented at the Building America webinar, High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II, on August 13, 2014.

  2. BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2001-05-01

    In summary, stoker-fired boilers that cofire or switch to biomass fuel may potentially have to deal with ash behavior issues such as production of different concentrations and quantities of fine particulate or aerosols and ash-fouling deposition. Stoker boiler operators that are considering switching to biomass and adding potential infrastructure to accommodate the switch may also at the same time be looking into upgrades that will allow for generating additional power for sale on the grid. This is the case for the feasibility study being done currently for a small (<1-MW) stoker facility at the North Dakota State Penitentiary, which is considering not only the incorporation of a lower-cost biomass fuel but also a refurbishing of the stoker boiler to burn slightly hotter with the ability to generate more power and sell excess energy on the grid. These types of fuel and boiler changes can greatly affect ash behavior issues.

  3. Development of a low-profile portable concrete barrier 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidry, Todd Randall

    1991-01-01

    A low-profile portable concrete barrier (PCB) has been developed for use in low-speed (approximately 45 mph [73 km/h] or less) work zones. The purpose of the low-profile barrier is to shield the work zone and redirect errant vehicles while.... SEQUENTIAL PHOTOGRAPHS OF CRASH TESTS APPENDIX D. ACCELEROMETER TRACES AND PLOTS OF ROLL, PITCH AND YAW RATES APPENDIX E. TEST VEHICLE PROPERTIES VITA Page 6 8 8 10 10 13 13 17 18 19 20 24 29 29 41 50 52 53 63 68 73 82 85 LIST...

  4. The Functional Requirements and Design Basis for Information Barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, James L.

    2012-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Information Barrier Working Group workshop held at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM, February 2-4, 1999. This workshop was convened to establish the functional requirements associated with warhead radiation signature information barriers, to identify the major design elements of any such system or approach, and to identify a design basis for each of these major elements. Such information forms the general design basis to be used in designing, fabricating, and evaluating the complete integrated systems developed for specific purposes.

  5. An investigation of minimum distance landing over a barrier 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filburn, Ralph Bernard, III

    1968-01-01

    in barrier height over the standard height of fifty feet was only 1. 1 feet. However, by decrcasinq the tail length by a similar amount the barrier height over wh ich the airplane could land is reduced by 9. 6 feet. This indicated that there was a limit... engine , jet, supersonic f igh ter Minos: Ta1 1 Dimensions: Low wing monoplane, swept, wing area-385. 2 ft2 Nonoplane cantilever, fu]1 flying, area-67. 2 ft 2 Span-38. 5 f t, length-47. 4 ft, hei ght- 16. 22 ft2 Me1ghts and E, oadiings: landing...

  6. Method for formation of subsurface barriers using viscous colloids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apps, J.A.; Persoff, P.; Moridis, G.; Pruess, K.

    1998-11-17

    A method is described for formation of subsurface barriers using viscous liquids where a viscous liquid solidifies at a controlled rate after injection into soil and forms impermeable isolation of the material enclosed within the subsurface barriers. The viscous liquid is selected from the group consisting of polybutenes, polysiloxanes, colloidal silica and modified colloidal silica of which solidification is controlled by gelling, cooling or cross-linking. Solidification timing is controlled by dilution, addition of brines, coating with alumina, stabilization with various agents and by temperature. 17 figs.

  7. Researching Complex Heat, Air and Moisture Interactions for a Wide-Range of Building Envelope Systems and Environmental Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karagiozis, A.N.

    2007-05-15

    This document serves as the final report documenting work completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Fraunhofer Institute in Building Physics (Holzkirchen, Germany) under an international CRADA No. 0575 with Fraunhofer Institute of Bauphysics of the Federal Republic of Germany for Researching Complex Heat, Air and Moisture Interactions for a Wide Range of Building Envelope Systems and Environmental Loads. This CRADA required a multi-faceted approach to building envelope research that included a moisture engineering approach by blending extensive material property analysis, laboratory system and sub-system thermal and moisture testing, and advanced moisture analysis prediction performance. The Participant's Institute for Building physics (IBP) and the Contractor's Buildings Technology Center (BTC) identified potential research projects and activities capable of accelerating and advancing the development of innovative, low energy and durable building envelope systems in diverse climates. This allowed a major leverage of the limited resources available to ORNL to execute the required Department of Energy (DOE) directives in the area of moisture engineering. A joint working group (ORNL and Fraunhofer IBP) was assembled and a research plan was executed from May 2000 to May 2005. A number of key deliverables were produced such as adoption of North American loading into the WUFI-software. in addition the ORNL Weather File Analyzer was created and this has been used to address environmental loading for a variety of US climates. At least 4 papers have been co-written with the CRADA partners, and a chapter in the ASTM Manual 40 on Moisture Analysis and Condensation Control. All deliverables and goals were met and exceeded making this collaboration a success to all parties involves.

  8. Geothermal(Ground-Source)Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to Overcome Barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Patrick

    2008-12-01

    More effective stewardship of our resources contributes to the security, environmental sustainability, and economic well-being of the nation. Buildings present one of the best opportunities to economically reduce energy consumption and limit greenhouse gas emissions. Geothermal heat pumps (GHPs), sometimes called ground-source heat pumps, have been proven capable of producing large reductions in energy use and peak demand in buildings. However, GHPs have received little attention at the policy level as an important component of a national strategy. Have policymakers mistakenly overlooked GHPs, or are GHPs simply unable to make a major contribution to the national goals for various reasons? This brief study was undertaken at DOE's request to address this conundrum. The scope of the study includes determining the status of global GHP markets and the status of the GHP industry and technology in the United States, assembling previous estimates of GHP energy savings potential, identifying key barriers to application of GHPs, and identifying actions that could accelerate market adoption of GHPs. The findings are documented in this report along with conclusions and recommendations.

  9. Geothermal (Ground-Source) Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to Overcome Barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    More effective stewardship of our resources contributes to the security, environmental sustainability, and economic well-being of the nation. Buildings present one of the best opportunities to economically reduce energy consumption and limit greenhouse gas emissions. Geothermal heat pump systems (GHPs), sometimes called ground-source heat pump or Geo-Exchange systems, have been proven capable of producing large reductions in energy use and peak demand in buildings. However, GHPs have received little attention at the policy level as an important component of a national energy and climate strategy. Have policymakers mistakenly overlooked GHPs, or are GHPs simply unable to make a major contribution to the national goals for various reasons? This brief study was undertaken at DOE s request to address this conundrum. The scope of the study includes determining the status of global GHP markets and the status of the GHP industry and technology in the United States, assembling previous estimates of GHP energy savings potential and other benefits, identifying key barriers to application of GHPs, and identifying actions that could accelerate market adoption of GHPs. The findings are documented in a report along with conclusions and recommendations. This paper summarizes the key information from the report.

  10. Triode carbon nanotube field emission display using barrier rib structure and manufacturing method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Han, In-taek (Yongin, KR); Kim, Jong-min (Seongnam, KR)

    2003-01-01

    A triode carbon nanotube field emission display (FED) using a barrier rib structure and a manufacturing method thereof are provided. In a triode carbon nanotube FED employing barrier ribs, barrier ribs are formed on cathode lines by a screen printing method, a mesh structure is mounted on the barrier ribs, and a spacer is inserted between the barrier ribs through slots of the mesh structure, thereby stably fixing the mesh structure and the spacer within a FED panel due to support by the barrier ribs.

  11. Flexible Residential Test Facility: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Cooling Season Energy and Moisture Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, D.; Kono, J.; Vieira, R.; Fairey, P.; Sherwin, J.; Withers, C.; Hoak, D.; Beal, D.

    2014-05-01

    Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season.

  12. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2003 Progress Report Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2003 Progress Report 1 addresses the following technical barriers from the Hydrogen Production section of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells Photoelectrodes ." #12;Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2003 Progress Report 2

  13. Beyond the Nash Equilibrium Barrier Robert Kleinberg1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ligett, Katrina

    Beyond the Nash Equilibrium Barrier Robert Kleinberg1 Katrina Ligett1 Georgios Piliouras2 ´Eva.piliouras@gmail.com Abstract: Nash equilibrium analysis has become the de facto standard for judging the solution quality is comparable to that of Nash equilibria. By assuming that equilibria are representative of the outcomes

  14. Mercury Oxidation via Catalytic Barrier Filters Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Seames; Michael Mann; Darrin Muggli; Jason Hrdlicka; Carol Horabik

    2007-09-30

    In 2004, the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory awarded the University of North Dakota a Phase II University Coal Research grant to explore the feasibility of using barrier filters coated with a catalyst to oxidize elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas streams. Oxidized mercury is substantially easier to remove than elemental mercury. If successful, this technique has the potential to substantially reduce mercury control costs for those installations that already utilize baghouse barrier filters for particulate removal. Completed in 2004, Phase I of this project successfully met its objectives of screening and assessing the possible feasibility of using catalyst coated barrier filters for the oxidation of vapor phase elemental mercury in coal combustion generated flue gas streams. Completed in September 2007, Phase II of this project successfully met its three objectives. First, an effective coating method for a catalytic barrier filter was found. Second, the effects of a simulated flue gas on the catalysts in a bench-scale reactor were determined. Finally, the performance of the best catalyst was assessed using real flue gas generated by a 19 kW research combustor firing each of three separate coal types.

  15. Vitamin D Enhances Corneal Epithelial Barrier Function Zhaohong Yin,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    Vitamin D Enhances Corneal Epithelial Barrier Function Zhaohong Yin,1 Victorina Pintea,1 Yanping contain mRNA for the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and 1 -hydroxylase, the enzyme required to convert 25(OH)D3 to 1,25(OH)2D3, and measured vitamin D metabolite concentra- tions in aqueous and vitreous humor

  16. Delamination of multilayer thermal barrier coatings Sung Ryul Choi a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, John W.

    Delamination of multilayer thermal barrier coatings Sung Ryul Choi a , John W. Hutchinson b,*, A coatings (TBCs) on superalloy substrates are comprised of an intermetallic bond coat, a thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer, and a porous zirconia top coat that provides thermal protection. The TGO attains

  17. ISU Webinar: Reducing Barriers for Deployment of Offshore Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    1 ISU Webinar: Reducing Barriers for Deployment of Offshore Wind Energy Coastal Ohio Wind Project deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluated 18, 2015 #12;2 Coastal Ohio Wind Project The COWP intended to address problems that impeded

  18. Drivers and Barriers for Implementing Sustainable Development in Higher Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svenningsson, Josef

    #12;Drivers and Barriers for Implementing Sustainable Development in Higher Education Göteborg for Sustainable Development through Higher Education. The authors are responsible for the choice and presentation.unesco.org/education/desd Education for Sustainable Development in Action Technical Paper N° 3 - 2006 Cover design: Helmut Langer (ED

  19. Finessing the fracture energy barrier in ballistic seed dispersal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deegan, Robert

    is accomplished by a fast moving crack. However, cracks consume energy and should thus significantly degradeFinessing the fracture energy barrier in ballistic seed dispersal Robert D. Deegan1 Department December 1, 2011) Fracture is a highly dissipative process in which much of the stored elastic energy

  20. The development of surface barriers at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wing, N.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Gee, G.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Engineered barriers are being developed to isolate wastes disposed of near the earth`s surface at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Much of the waste that would be disposed of by in-place stabilization currently is located in relatively shallow subsurface structures such as solid waste burial grounds, tanks, vaults, and cribs. Unless protected in some way, the wastes could be transported to the accessible environment via the following pathways: plant, animal, and human intrusion; water infiltration; erosion; and the exhalation of noxious gases. Permanent isolation surface barriers have been proposed to protect wastes disposed of ``in place`` from the transport pathways identified previously (Figure 1). The protective barrier consists of a variety of different materials (e.g., fine soil, sand, gravel, riprap, asphalt, etc.) placed in layers to form an above-grade mound directly over the waste zone. Surface markers are being considered for placement around the periphery of the waste sites to inform future generations of the nature and hazards of the buried wastes. In addition, throughout the protective barrier, subsurface markers could be placed to warn any inadvertent human intruders of the dangers of the buried wastes (Figure 2).

  1. Fusion at near-barrier energies within quantum diffusion approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Sargsyan; G. G. Adamian; N. V. Antonenko; W. Scheid; H. Q. Zhang

    2013-11-20

    The nuclear deformation and neutron-transfer process have been identified as playing a major role in the magnitude of the sub-barrier fusion (capture) cross sections. There are a several experimental evidences which confirm the importance of nuclear deformation on the fusion. The influence of nuclear deformation is straightforward. If the target nucleus is prolate in the ground state, the Coulomb field on its tips is lower than on its sides, that then increases the capture or fusion probability at energies below the barrier corresponding to the spherical nuclei. The role of neutron transfer reactions is less clear. The importance of neutron transfer with positive Q-values on nuclear fusion (capture) originates from the fact that neutrons are insensitive to the Coulomb barrier and therefore they can start being transferred at larger separations before the projectile is captured by target-nucleus. Therefore, it is generally thought that the sub-barrier fusion cross section will increase because of the neutron transfer. The fusion (capture) dynamics induced by loosely bound radioactive ion beams is currently being extensively studied. However, the long-standing question whether fusion (capture) is enhanced or suppressed with these beams has not yet been answered unambiguously. The study of the fusion reactions involving nuclei at the drip-lines has led to contradictory results.

  2. Microstructural Evolution and interfacial motion in systems with diffusion barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry H. Leo

    2009-03-05

    This research program was designed to model and simulate phase transformations in systems containing diffusion barriers. The modeling work included mass flow, phase formation, and microstructural evolution in interdiffusing systems. Simulation work was done by developing Cahn-Hilliard and phase field equations governing both the temporal and spatial evolution of the composition and deformation fields and other important phase variables.

  3. Quantum Finance Hamiltonian for Coupon Bond European and Barrier Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    Quantum Finance Hamiltonian for Coupon Bond European and Barrier Options Belal E. Baaquie RMI are financial derivatives that can be analyzed in the Hamiltonian formulation of quantum finance. Forward-2963 Fax: (65) 6777-6126 Email: phybeb@nus.edu.sg #12;Quantum Finance Hamiltonian for Coupon Bond European

  4. Experimental investigation of a horizontal flexible-membrane wave barrier 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Hae-Jin

    1997-01-01

    A series of experiments is conducted in a two-dimensional glass-walled wave tank to confirm numerical solutions based on two-dimensional linear hydro-elastic theory for a horizontal flexible-membrane wave barrier. The model test is performed by a...

  5. Summary of Workshop: Barriers to Energy Efficient Residential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary of Workshop: Barriers to Energy Efficient Residential Ventilation Held on January 10, 2008. LBNL-41 1 This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State, and Community Programs, of the U.S. Department of Energy under

  6. Assessment of Critical Barriers and Opportunities to Accelerate Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Assessment of Critical Barriers and Opportunities to Accelerate Biofuels and Biomethane 93 (735 Mgge) Feedstock Amount Technically Available Biomethane Potential (billion cubic feet) CNG (gge) Williams et al., CBC, 2015.; (7.74 GGE/MMBTU) Fraction in use Table ES.2. Biogas Technical

  7. Implied Migration Rates from Credit Barrier Models Claudio Albanese

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albanese, Claudio

    Implied Migration Rates from Credit Barrier Models Claudio Albanese , Oliver X. Chen Department The risk neutral credit migration process captures quantitative information which is relevant to the pricing theory and risk management of credit derivatives. In this article, we derive implied migration

  8. Distributions of methyl group rotational barriers in polycrystalline organic solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckmann, Peter A. E-mail: wangxianlong@uestc.edu.cn; Conn, Kathleen G.; Division of Education and Human Services, Neumann University, One Neumann Drive, Aston, Pennsylvania 19014-1298 ; Mallory, Clelia W.; Department of Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 101 North Merion Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010-2899 ; Mallory, Frank B.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Rotkina, Lolita; Wang, Xianlong E-mail: wangxianlong@uestc.edu.cn

    2013-11-28

    We bring together solid state {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate measurements, scanning electron microscopy, single crystal X-ray diffraction, and electronic structure calculations for two methyl substituted organic compounds to investigate methyl group (CH{sub 3}) rotational dynamics in the solid state. Methyl group rotational barrier heights are computed using electronic structure calculations, both in isolated molecules and in molecular clusters mimicking a perfect single crystal environment. The calculations are performed on suitable clusters built from the X-ray diffraction studies. These calculations allow for an estimate of the intramolecular and the intermolecular contributions to the barrier heights. The {sup 1}H relaxation measurements, on the other hand, are performed with polycrystalline samples which have been investigated with scanning electron microscopy. The {sup 1}H relaxation measurements are best fitted with a distribution of activation energies for methyl group rotation and we propose, based on the scanning electron microscopy images, that this distribution arises from molecules near crystallite surfaces or near other crystal imperfections (vacancies, dislocations, etc.). An activation energy characterizing this distribution is compared with a barrier height determined from the electronic structure calculations and a consistent model for methyl group rotation is developed. The compounds are 1,6-dimethylphenanthrene and 1,8-dimethylphenanthrene and the methyl group barriers being discussed and compared are in the 2–12 kJ?mol{sup ?1} range.

  9. Delamination resistance of thermal barrier coatings containing embedded ductile layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    of oxidation and hot corrosion of inter- nally cooled superalloy structures in gas turbine engines [1­ 4Delamination resistance of thermal barrier coatings containing embedded ductile layers Matthew R 93106, USA b Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903, USA

  10. Molecular assemblies as protective barriers and adhesion promotion interlayer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, David E. (Lakewood, CO); Czanderna, Alvin W. (Denver, CO); Kennedy, Cheryl E. (Lafayette, CO)

    1996-01-01

    A protective diffusion barrier having adhesive qualifies for metalized surfaces is provided by a passivating agent having the formula HS--(CH.sub.2).sub.11 --COOH Which forms a very dense, transparent organized molecular assembly or layer that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack metal surfaces.

  11. Molecular assemblies as protective barriers and adhesion promotion interlayer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, D.E.; Czanderna, A.W.; Kennedy, C.E.

    1996-01-30

    A protective diffusion barrier having adhesive qualities for metalized surfaces is provided by a passivating agent having the formula HS--(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}--COOH which forms a very dense, transparent organized molecular assembly or layer that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack metal surfaces. 8 figs.

  12. Processing and Gas Barrier Behavior of Multilayer Thin Nanocomposite Films 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, You-Hao

    2012-10-19

    montmorillonite (MMT) or laponite (LAP) clays paired with PEI. Film growth and microstructure suggests that smaller aspect ratio LAP clay is more dip-time dependent than MMT and larger aspect ratio MMT has better oxygen barrier. A 30 BL PEI/MMT film made with 10...

  13. Nanoscale mapping of the W/Si(001) Schottky barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durcan, Chris A.; Balsano, Robert; LaBella, Vincent P., E-mail: vlabella@albany.edu [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2014-07-14

    The W/Si(001) Schottky barrier was spatially mapped with nanoscale resolution using ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) and ballistic hole emission microscopy (BHEM) using n-type and p-type silicon substrates. The formation of an interfacial tungsten silicide is observed utilizing transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The BEEM and BHEM spectra are fit utilizing a linearization method based on the power law BEEM model using the Prietsch Ludeke fitting exponent. The aggregate of the Schottky barrier heights from n-type (0.71?eV) and p-type (0.47?eV) silicon agrees with the silicon band gap at 80?K. Spatially resolved maps of the Schottky barrier are generated from grids of 7225 spectra taken over a 1??m?×?1??m area and provide insight into its homogeneity. Histograms of the barrier heights have a Gaussian component consistent with an interface dipole model and show deviations that are localized in the spatial maps and are attributed to compositional fluctuations, nanoscale defects, and foreign materials.

  14. Overcoming Barriers to Ground Source Heat Pumps in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overcoming Barriers to Ground Source Heat Pumps in California Geothermal Resources Development Account http://www.energy.ca.gov/geothermal/ grda.html May 2011 The Issue Ground source heat pumps can far made little impact in California. Estimates are that adoption of ground source heat pumps

  15. Renewable Energy Permitting Barriers in Hawaii: Experience from the Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busche, S.; Donnelly, C.; Atkins, D.; Fields, R.; Black, C.

    2013-03-01

    This white paper presents a summary of the solicited input from permitting agencies and renewable energy developers on the permitting process in Hawaii to provide stakeholders in Hawaii, particularly those involved in permitting, with information on current permitting barriers that renewable energy developers are experiencing.

  16. LOUISIANA COASTAL AREA (LCA) BARATARIA BASIN BARRIER SHORELINE RESTORATION (BBBS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Island would restore the natural hydrologic function of the systems. The barrier islands influence and on Shell Island in Plaquemines Parish. The plan increases the longevity of the geomorphologic form and function of the Caminada Headland and Shell Island by creating or restoring 1,197 acres of dune and beach

  17. Internal transport barriers in NSTX H. Y. Yuh,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Internal transport barriers in NSTX H. Y. Yuh,1 R. E. Bell,2 J. C. Hosea,2 S. M. Kaye,2 B. P. Le General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608, USA 4 University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616, USA 5 POSTECH, Pohang 790-784, Korea (Dated: December 5, 2008) In the National Spherical

  18. Improved HEPA Filter Technology for Flexible and Rigid Containment Barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. A. Pinson

    1998-07-01

    Safety and reliability in glovebox operations can be significantly improved and waste packaging efficiencies can be increased by inserting flexible, lightweight, high capacity HEPA filters into the walls of plastic sheet barriers. This HEPA filter/barrier technology can be adapted to a wide variety of applications: disposable waste bags, protective environmental barriers for electronic equipment, single or multiple use glovebag assemblies, flexible glovebox wall elements, and room partitions. These reliable and inexpensive filtered barriers have many uses in fields such as radioactive waste processing, HVAC filter changeout, vapor or grit blasting, asbestos cleanup, pharmaceutical, medical, biological, and electronic equipment containment. The applications can result in significant cost savings, improved operational reliability and safety, and total waste volume reduction. This technology was developed at the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in 1993 and has been used at ANL-W since then at the TRU Waste Characterization Chamber Gloveboxes. Another 1998 AGS Conference paper titled "TRU Waste Characterization Gloveboxes", presented by Mr. David Duncan of ANL-W, describes these boxes.

  19. Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-1335E Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California A.T. Mc of Global Energy Partners. This work described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Demand Response in California. PIER Industrial/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency Program. CEC

  20. Optimizing Thermoelectric Power Factor by Means of a Potential Barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Optimizing Thermoelectric Power Factor by Means of a Potential Barrier Neophytos Neophytou}@iue.tuwien.ac.at Abstract Large efforts in improving thermoelectric energy conversion are devoted to energy filtering design, ~40% improvement in the thermoelectric power factor can be achieved if the following conditions

  1. Abstraction of Models for Pitting and Crevice Corrosion of Drip Shield and Waste Package Outer Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Mon

    2001-08-29

    This analyses and models report (AMR) was conducted in response to written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999a). ICN 01 of this AMR was developed following guidelines provided in TWP-MGR-MD-000004 REV 01, ''Technical Work Plan for: Integrated Management of Technical Product Input Department'' (BSC 2001, Addendum B). The purpose and scope of this AMR is to review and analyze upstream process-level models (CRWMS M and O 2000a and CRWMS M and O 2000b) and information relevant to pitting and crevice corrosion degradation of waste package outer barrier (Alloy 22) and drip shield (Titanium Grade 7) materials, and to develop abstractions of the important processes in a form that is suitable for input to the WAPDEG analysis for long-term degradation of waste package outer barrier and drip shield in the repository. The abstraction is developed in a manner that ensures consistency with the process-level models and information and captures the essential behavior of the processes represented. Also considered in the model abstraction are the probably range of exposure conditions in emplacement drifts and local exposure conditions on drip shield and waste package surfaces. The approach, method, and assumptions that are employed in the model abstraction are documented and justified.

  2. Interface Science of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Besmann, Theodore M

    2009-01-01

    The drive for greater efficiency in propulsion and industrial/power production machinery has pushed metallurgy to develop ever better alloys and taken existing metallic components to their reliability threshold. Nowhere is that better illustrated than in turbine engine materials. The nickel-based superalloys currently in use for the most demanding areas of the engines melt at 1230-1315 aC and yet see combustion environments >1600 aC. The result is that these components require thermal protection to avoid failure from phenomena such as melting, creep, oxidation, thermal fatigue, and so on [1]. The stakes are high as the equipment must remain reliable for thousands of take-offs and landings for aircraft turbine engines, and up to 40,000 hours of operation in power generating land-based gas turbines [2, 3]. One of the most critical items that see both the greatest temperatures and experience the highest stresses is the hot-section turbine blades. Two strategies have been adopted to help the superalloy turbine blades survive the demanding environment: Active air cooling and ceramic thermal protection coatings, which together can reduce metal surface temperatures by >300 aC.[2]. The combination of turbine blade external film cooling and internal air cooling requires an exceptionally complex structure with flow passages and sets of small holes in the blades where air bled from a matching stage of the compressor is directed over the surface. Stecura [4] was among the first to describe a successful coating system, and today s the ceramic insulating layer alone is credited with reducing metal temperatures as much as 165 aC [1, 5].

  3. Acoustic wave (AW) based moisture sensor for use with corrosive gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM); Frye, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Schneider, Thomas W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01

    Moisture corrosive gas stream is measured as a function of the difference in resonant frequencies between two acoustic wave (AW) devices, each with a film which accepts at least one of the components of the gas stream. One AW is located in the gas stream while the other is located outside the gas stream but in the same thermal environment. In one embodiment, the film is a hydrophilic material such as SiO.sub.2. In another embodiment, the SiO.sub.2 is covered with another film which is impermeable to the corrosive gas, such that the AW device in the gas stream measures only the water vapor. In yet another embodiment, the film comprises polyethylene oxide which is hydrophobic and measures only the partial pressure of the corrosive gas. Other embodiments allow for compensation of drift in the system.

  4. Acoustic wave (AW) based moisture sensor for use with corrosive gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, K.B.; Frye, G.C.; Schneider, T.W.

    1996-11-05

    Moisture corrosive gas stream is measured as a function of the difference in resonant frequencies between two acoustic wave (AW) devices, each with a film which accepts at least one of the components of the gas stream. One AW is located in the gas stream while the other is located outside the gas stream but in the same thermal environment. In one embodiment, the film is a hydrophilic material such as SiO{sub 2}. In another embodiment, the SiO{sub 2} is covered with another film which is impermeable to the corrosive gas, such that the AW device in the gas stream measures only the water vapor. In yet another embodiment, the film comprises polyethylene oxide which is hydrophobic and measures only the partial pressure of the corrosive gas. Other embodiments allow for compensation of drift in the system. 8 figs.

  5. Hygric Redistribution in Insulated Assemblies: Retrofitting Residential Envelopes Without Creating Moisture Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smegal, J.; Lstiburek, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Building America program has recognized that most of the current housing stock is in need of energy related retrofits. One of the best ways of reducing the space conditioning energy consumption is to improve the thermal performance of the enclosure by adding exterior board foam insulation. This report quantifies the amount of water that can become trapped in the drainage cavity of typical wall systems, and measures the effect of water trapped in the drainage cavity on the moisture content of the sheathing. This study also attempts to explain the discrepancy between hygrothermal simulations and field performance of low permeance, low R-value exterior insulation (e.g. 3/4-in. foil faced polyisocyanurate) in cold climates.

  6. Sidewall tensiometer and method of determining soil moisture potential in below-grade earthen soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2001-01-01

    A sidewall tensiometer to in situ determine below-grade soil moisture potential of earthen soil includes, a) a body adapted for insertion into an opening in earthen soil below grade, the body having lateral sidewalls; b) a laterally oriented porous material provided relative to the body lateral sidewalls, the laterally oriented porous material at least in part defining a fluid chamber within the body; c) a pressure a sensor in fluid communication with the fluid chamber; and d) sidewall engaging means for engaging a portion of a sidewall of an earth opening to laterally urge the porous material into hydraulic communication with earthen soil of another portion of the opening sidewall. Methods of taking tensiometric measurements are also disclosed.

  7. Hygric Redistribution in Insulated Assemblies. Retrofitting Residential Envelopes Without Creating Moisture Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smegal, J.; Lstiburek, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Building America program has recognized that most of the current housing stock is in need of energy related retrofits. One of the best ways of reducing the space conditioning energy consumption is to improve the thermal performance of the enclosure by adding exterior board foam insulation. This report quantifies the amount of water that can become trapped in the drainage cavity of typical wall systems, and measures the effect of water trapped in the drainage cavity on the moisture content of the sheathing. This study also attempts to explain the discrepancy between hygrothermal simulations and field performance of low permeance, low R-value exterior insulation (e.g. ¾-in. foil faced polyisocyanurate) in cold climates.

  8. In situ changes in the moisture content of heated, welded tuff based on thermal neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Carlson, R.C.; Buscheck, T.A.

    1991-07-01

    Thermal neutron logs were collected to monitor changes in moisture content within a welded tuff rock mass heated from a borehole containing an electrical heater which remained energized for 195 days. Thermal neutron measurements were made in sampling boreholes before, during and after heating. The results generally corroborated our conceptual understanding of hydrothermal flow as well as most of the numerical modeling conducting for this study. Conceptual models have been developed in conjunction with the numerical model calculations to explain differences in the drying and re-wetting behavior above and below the heater. Numerical modeling indicated that the re-wetting of the dried-out zone was dominated by the binary diffusion of water vapor through fractures. Saturation gradients in the rock matrix resulted in relative humidity gradients which drove water vapor (primarily along fractures) back to the dried-out zone where it condensed along the fracture walls and was imbibed by the matrix. 4 refs., 28 figs.

  9. Characterization of the solid, airborne materials created by the interaction of UF/sub 6/ with atmospheric moisture in a contained volume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickrell, P.W.

    1982-04-30

    Several experiments have been performed in which UF/sub 6/ has been released into air under static conditions and contained in small release chambers (the largest was 8 cu ft) in order to characterize the solid product(s) created by reaction of the UF/sub 6/ with moisture in the air. Relative humidity of the air was varied, experiment to experiment, from < 2 to 100% and the amount of UF/sub 6/ released, experiment to experiment, varied from 5 to 230 mg. The releases were effected by rupture from internal pressure of the UF/sub 6/ containers (some were glass and some were metal) and the solids produced were collected and characterized by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, laser light scattering, and a cascaded impactor which used mass measurement to evaluate aerodynamic behavior. Various morphologies and several compounds, dependent upon conditions of release, were observed, i.e., particle size and degree of agglomeration were dependent upon the relative humidity of the air into which the UF/sub 6/ was released and the temperature of the UF/sub 6/ at time of release.

  10. Pottery Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Paul T.

    2009-01-01

    Paul T. Nicholson. ) Pottery Production, Nicholson, UEE 2009Short Citation: Nicholson 2009, Pottery Production. UEE.Paul T. , 2009, Pottery Production. In Willeke Wendrich (

  11. Cordage Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veldmeijer, André J.

    2009-01-01

    294: fig. 15-3). Cordage Production, Veldmeijer, UEE 2009Short Citation: Veldmeijer, 2009, Cordage Production. UEE.André J. , 2009, Cordage Production. In Willeke Wendrich (

  12. Glass Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shortland, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    40, pp. 162 - 186. Glass Production, Shortland, UEE 2009AINES Short Citation: Shortland 2009, Glass Production. UEE.Andrew, 2009, Glass Production. In Willeke Wendrich (ed. ),

  13. Influence of Attic Radiant Barrier Systems on Air Conditioning Demand in an Utility Pilot Project 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    A utility monitoring project has evaluated radiant barrier systems (RBS) as a new potential demand site management (DSM) program. The study examined how the retrofit of attic radiant barriers can be expected to alter utility residential space...

  14. Photoinitiated decomposition of HNCO near the H NCO threshold: Centrifugal barriers and channel competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanov, Andrei

    Photoinitiated decomposition of HNCO near the H NCO threshold: Centrifugal barriers and channel. These constraints are associated with long range 4­7 Å centrifugal barriers, which are significant even near

  15. Process Improvements for Gas Barrier Thin Films Deposited Via Layer-By-Layer Assembly 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagen, David Austin

    2015-05-04

    Thin layers of aluminum have provided good oxygen barrier for food packaging for many years, but aluminum coatings can easily crack, are completely opaque, and are not environmentally friendly. One gas barrier solution for food, to flexible...

  16. Quantifying overwash flux in barrier systems : an example from Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carruthers, Emily A

    2011-01-01

    Coastal barriers are particularly susceptible to the predicted effects of accelerated of sea-level rise and the potential for increased impacts of intense storms. Over centennial scales, barriers are maintained via overtopping ...

  17. Effects of Hurricane Katrina on the Mammalian and Vegetative Communities of the Barrier Islands of Mississippi 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scoggin, Annaliese K.

    2010-01-14

    The barrier islands of the gulf coast of the U.S. have been shaped and changed by hurricanes for centuries. These storms can alter the vegetation of the barrier islands by redistributing sediments, scouring off vegetation, physical damage...

  18. Retrieval of Moisture from Simulated GPS Slant-Path Water Vapor Observations Using 3DVAR with Anisotropic Recursive Filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Ming

    Retrieval of Moisture from Simulated GPS Slant-Path Water Vapor Observations Using 3DVAR with Anisotropic Recursive Filters HAIXIA LIU AND MING XUE Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms, and School) ABSTRACT Anisotropic recursive filters are implemented within a three-dimensional variational data

  19. Environmental, Economic, and Energy Assessment of the Ultimate Analysis and Moisture Content of Municipal Solid Waste in a Parallel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    -combustion is a waste-to-energy technology that can use MSW and coal as co-fuels, offering potential energy recoveryEnvironmental, Economic, and Energy Assessment of the Ultimate Analysis and Moisture Content ABSTRACT: Use of municipal solid waste (MSW) as fuel for electricity generation reduces landfill disposal

  20. Interactive effects of vegetation, soil moisture and bulk density on depth of burning of thick organic soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benscoter, Brian W.

    5, Canada. D University of Alberta, Department of Renewable Resources, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2H1, Canada consumption. We experimentally altered soil moisture profiles of peat monoliths collected from several. Additional keywords: bog, boreal, carbon, fire, ground-layer fuels, peat, peatland, Sphagnum, smouldering