Sample records for moffat montezuma montrose

  1. Delta-Montrose Electric Association- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Delta-Montrose Electric Association (DMEA) offers a variety of rebates for customers who buy energy efficient appliances and equipment. Rebates are available for energy efficient electric water...

  2. Delta-Montrose Electric Association- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Delta-Montrose Electric Association (DMEA) offers a variety of rebates to commercial customers which upgrade to energy efficient equipment. Rebates are available for energy efficient heat pumps,...

  3. Montrose, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,Monterey County,Monticello, Indiana: EnergyMontrose

  4. Montrose, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,Monterey County,Monticello, Indiana: EnergyMontroseWisconsin:

  5. Lake Montezuma, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation,working-groupsIllinois: EnergyFlorida:Montezuma, Arizona: Energy

  6. City of Montezuma, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPowerCityJonesville,Livingston,CityCityCity of Montezuma,

  7. Montrose County, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,Monterey County,Monticello, Indiana: EnergyMontrose County,

  8. The effects of seeing on Sersic profiles. II. The Moffat PSF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Trujillo; A. Aguerri; J. Cepa; C. M. Gutierrez

    2001-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of seeing on Sersic r^{1/n} profile parameters are extensively studied using a Moffat function. This analytical approximation to the point spread function (PSF) is shown to provide the best fit to the PSF predicted from atmospheric turbulence theory when beta=4.765. The Moffat PSF is additionally shown to contain the Gaussian PSF as a limiting case beta->infinity. The Moffat function is also shown to be numerically well behaved when modelling narrow PSFs in HST images. Seeing effects are computed for elliptically symmetric surface brightness distributions. The widely used assumption of circular symmetry when studying the effects of seeing on intrinsically elliptical sources is shown to produce significant discrepancies with respect to the true effects of seeing on these sources. A prescription to correct raw (observed) central intensities, effective radii, index n and mean effective surface brightness is given.

  9. Geologic report on the Sand Wash Drilling Project, Moffat and Routt Counties, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, T.E.; Wayland, T.E.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sand Wash Basin Drilling Project comprises twenty-seven (27) drill holes located in Moffat and Routt Counties, northwest Colorado, having an aggregate depth of 26,107.5 feet (7957.6 m). The holes penetrate the Browns Park Formation of Miocene age, which is a tuffaceous continental sandstone deposited in fluvial, eolian, and lacustrine environments. Partly based on project drilling results, uranium potential resource estimates for this formation in the $50/lb U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ forward-cost category have been increased by 34,476 tons U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ (35,036 metric tons). Three areas between Maybell and Craig, Colorado, considered favorable for uranium occurrences were verified as favorable by project drilling, and a fourth favorable area northwest of Maybell has been expanded. In addition, project drilling results indicate two new favorable areas, one north and northwest and one south of Steamboat Springs, Colorado. Anomalous radioactivity was detected in drill holes in all six study areas of the project. The most important factor in concentrating significant amounts of uranium in the target formation appears to be the availability of gaseous or liquid hydrocarbons and/or hydrogen sulfide gas as reductants. Where subjacent formations supply these reductants to the Browns Park Formation, project drilling encountered 0.05 percent to 0.01 percent uranium concentrations. Potential, though unproven, sources of these reductants are believed to underlie parts of all six project study areas.

  10. Analysis of stream sediment reconnaissance data for mineral resources from the Montrose NTMS Quadrangle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beyth, M.; Broxton, D.; McInteer, C.; Averett, W.R.; Stablein, N.K.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multivariate statistical analysis to support the National Uranium Resource Evaluation and to evaluate strategic and other commercially important mineral resources was carried out on Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance data from the Montrose quadrangle, Colorado. The analysis suggests that: (1) the southern Colorado Mineral Belt is an area favorable for uranium mineral occurrences; (2) carnotite-type occurrences are likely in the nose of the Gunnison Uplift; (3) uranium mineral occurrences may be present along the western and northern margins of the West Elk crater; (4) a base-metal mineralized area is associated with the Uncompahgre Uplift; and (5) uranium and base metals are associated in some areas, and both are often controlled by faults trending west-northwest and north.

  11. Resource characterization for uranium mineralization in the Montrose 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolivar, S.L.; Balog, S.H.; Weaver, T.A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A data-classification scheme was developed to detect potential uranium mineralization in the Montrose 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle, Colorado. The methodology developed is a rapid and efficient method of resource evaluation on a reconnaissance scale. The necessary techniques were developed and refined to digitize, integrate, and register various large geological, geochemical, and geophysical data sets for the Montrose quadrangle, Colorado, using a grid resolution of 1 km. All data sets for the Montrose quadrangle were registered to the Universal Transverse Mercator projection. The data sets include hydrogeochemical and stream sediment analyses for 23 elements, uranium-to-thorium ratios, airborne geophysical survey data, the locations of 90 uranium occurrences, and a geologic map (scale 1:250 000). Geochemical samples were collected from 3965 locations in the 19 200 km/sup 2/ quadrangle; aerial data were collected on flight lines flown with 3 to 5 km spacings. These data sets were smoothed by universal kriging and interpolated to a 179 x 119 rectangular grid (each grid block is 1 km/sup 2/). A mylar transparency of the geologic map was prepared and digitized. All possible combinations of three, for all data sets, were examined for general geologic correlations by utilizing a color microfilm output. Subsets of data were further examined for selected test areas. A classification scheme for uranium mineralization, based on selected test areas in the Cochetopa uranium district, is presented. Areas favorable for uranium mineralization, based on this scheme, were identified and are discussed.

  12. CX-012760: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Danger Tree Management on Hesperus-Montrose 345 Kilovolt Transmission Line, Phase II Montezuma County, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41838 Location(s): ColoradoOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  13. Ecology of Montezuma Quail in Southeast Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chavarria, Pedro Mazier

    2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    and habitat use have remained as knowledge gaps until now. My study overcame these difficulties and I was able to trap and monitor 88 individuals from 2008–2010 at 3 study sites in southeast Arizona. Techniques for trapping and monitoring included the use...

  14. Montezuma Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinutemanVista CapitalMonterey, California:

  15. Montezuma Winds II | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinutemanVista CapitalMonterey, California:Winds II

  16. Delta Montrose Electric Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Delta

  17. The geology of the Cross Mountain anticline, Moffat County, Colorado 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinson, George Larry

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ Parka a south plungtug epaoitual trough area, The mountain ie referral te as Junotion Nountiin in the ear3g e~~ however, it M now knoun as Cross Nountain. Xn the ~ts vicinity Couglas Nountain lies gust eeet oi' M3LP Park aug is a part of the los... Universe@' ef So. 3jiger rsyo'rta are haauii-'to sids4? the sxess psouneain Split emi its' flenhs, -The-'see@on @on the, yse jgsn to loess" QppeN Qnstaeeons (gsneos shale) & . ox' apppoxURate 6~CO feet, has -been. stel$. 8Ii in detail 'ghe post Madison...

  18. The geology of the Cross Mountain anticline, Moffat County, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinson, George Larry

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ttad to the Gradeete Behoof of the @yCosktaraX and, Heshanteal College of ~ jaL ~ fu3XLLlmat of tho ~emeute for ths degree of 1 f I I Alp, , g0%TL'g $9~ L l' I" 1 ~m6 as tm s+Xe a@8 eontm4 bye ' (Chhimnae of %tee) J I , 1 VX' Ce.... Qeta pi, 4hs interimi~ bstxexsn 4he aco~hmen4 of 4' SD. encl 14~8~ degrees hs has xxoztxsd ss a geologis4 fsx' Ths c~r cfX C~ in the 'Rochy Ploxxxtain x'sgion. The anther txx 8 member of the Rocbp Bounta&m Association of Ceolegistex the amrlcan...

  19. Moffat County, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis

  20. City of Montezuma, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban TransportMartinsville,Minidoka, IdahoCity of

  1. Montezuma Hot Spring Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinutemanVista CapitalMonterey, California: EnergyHot

  2. Town of Montezuma, Indiana (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower Station JumpOpenEITownTown of Middletown,Town of

  3. Montezuma County, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,Monterey County, California: Energy Resources JumpPowerCounty,

  4. EIS-0472: Uranium Leasing Program, Mesa, Montrose, and San Miguel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Leasing Program, under which DOE administers tracts of land in western Colorado for exploration, development, and the extraction of uranium and vanadium ores. The cooperating...

  5. La Crescenta-Montrose, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation,working-groups < LEDSGP‎LEE Jump to:LNJLXE Jump

  6. Montrose-Ghent, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,Monterey County,Monticello, Indiana:

  7. Geologic map and coal sections of the Pine Ridge quadrangle, Moffat County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prost, G.L.; Brownfield, M.E.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pine Ridge quadrangle was mapped as part of the US Geological Survey's program of classifying and evaluating mineral lands in the public domain. Coal is the primary resource of econmic interest within the quadrangle and occurs in the Lance and Fort Union Formations. Several unsuccessful oil-and-gas wells have been drilled within the quadrangle. Possible uranium deposits may be found in the Browns Park Formation. Sand and gravel are also present in the quadrangle. The main coal zone in the Lance Formation is found near the middle and contains coal beds ranging in thickness from 0.17 to 0.94 m. These coal beds are discontinuous, grading laterally and vertically into carbonaceous shales. The middle coal zone in the Lance Formation appears to be continuous from east to west across the quadrangle. Coal beds approximately 0.1 m thick occur locally just above the base of the Lance. There are no coal mines or prospects within the formation. Coal beds in the Fort Union Formation, although generally thicker than the Lance coals, are extremely lenticular and irregular in distribution. The Fort Union coal zone is 22 to 51 m thick and the lowermost coal bed is 36 to 177 m above the basal Fort Union contact. Coal beds pinch and swell, are split by shale and sandstone partings, are cut out by river-channel sandstones, and grade laterally and vertically into carbonaceous shales. Inferred coal resources were calculated for the Fort Union Formation coals. An estimated 3278 ha are underlain by approximately 195 million metric tons. Resources were not calculated for coal beds in the Lance Formation.

  8. EIS-0472: Uranium Leasing Program, Mesa, Montrose, and San Miguel Counties, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluated the potential environmental impacts of management alternatives for DOE’s Uranium Leasing Program, under which DOE administers tracts of land in western Colorado for exploration, development, and the extraction of uranium and vanadium ores.

  9. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PATTERNS AND MORTALITY AT THE MONTEZUMA HILLS WIND RESOURCE AREA JUNE 2013 CEC5002013015 Prepared for

  10. electronic reprint Acta Crystallographica Section A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Marius

    -ray structure determination (Moffat, 1998, 2001). Experiments are of the pump­probe type using ultra-short laser

  11. aoserp study area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the Interior Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: to climate change for the Flint River Basin at Montezuma in Georgia (U.S. Geological Survey streamflow)...

  12. CX-006244: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Craig-Bears Ears-Hayden Substations Fiber Optic and Pole Installation, Moffat and Routt Counties, ColoradoCX(s) Applied: B4.6, B4.7Date: 05/17/2011Location(s): Moffat, ColoradoOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  13. Overview of Rocky Mountain Region's Capital Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Casper Riverton Wyodak Ft. St. Vrain Ault Story Flaming Gorge Lost Canyon Hesperus Lamar (DC Terminal) Hayden Meeker Rifle Bonanza Vernal Osage Lange Spence Platte Montrose...

  14. Unitarity In An Alternative Electroweak Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Moffat

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An electroweak (EW) model has been investigated (Moffat) in which the energy $E energies, and longitudinally polarized $W_L W_L\\rightarrow W_L W_L$ scattering does not violate Born approximation tree graph unitarity.

  15. CX-012769: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Raspberry Microwave Building Footing Removal Montrose County, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B1.19Date: 41860 Location(s): ColoradoOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  16. Cost-allocation-August-24-2011.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Montrose Total Positions 23 AD-303-04 Red Vacant Vacant 4 AD-303-04 Brown - Apprentice Phoenix 11 AD-303-04 Phoenix Loveland 12 AD-303-04 Loveland AD-303-04 Salt Lake City...

  17. CX-012757: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Danger Tree Management on Curecanti-Lost Canyon 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Phase II Montezuma County, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41838 Location(s): ColoradoOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  18. Survey of Rare Plants San Juan Public Lands in Dolores and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Forest--are in the process of revising their management plan. Since one of their missions has beenSurvey of Rare Plants San Juan Public Lands in Dolores and Montezuma Counties, Colorado Colorado #12;EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The San Juan Public Lands agencies--Bureau of Land Management and San Juan

  19. Can we do without ranks in Burrows Wheeler transform compression?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirth, Tony

    Wirth ¡ and Alistair Moffat ¢ Abstract: Compressors based on the Burrows Wheeler transform (BWT) convert of inefficiency. Instead of relying on symbol ranking, we examine the problem of directly encoding the symbols-based compressors. ¤ This work was supported by the Australian Research Council.¥ Department of Computer Science

  20. CX-012347: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Danger Tree Management on Craig-Rifle 230-kilovolt Transmission Line, Moffat, Rio Blanco, and Garfield Counties, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/02/2014 Location(s): Colorado, Colorado, Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  1. Publications Forest Research publishes a wide range of material, from corporate reports and plans, to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    publications catalogue at www.forestry.gov.uk/publications In addition, our researchers publish peer­2009 (online publication, free) Forest Research development strategy 2007­2012 (online publication, free) Books Holt Research Forest by Andy J. Moffat (free) The quest for sustainable energy: woodfuel meets

  2. Assumption-Commitment Support for CSP Model Checking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    AVoCS 2006 Assumption-Commitment Support for CSP Model Checking Nick Moffat1 Systems Assurance using CSP. In our formulation, an assumption-commitment style property of a process SYS takes the form-Guarantee, CSP, Model Checking, Compositional Reasoning 1 Introduction The principle of compositional program

  3. CX-008788: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rifle and Craig Substation Modifications and Approach Spans Re-Conductoring Garfield County, Rifle, Colorado and Moffat County, Craig, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B4.6, B4.13 Date: 05/22/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  4. Energy Fuels REnergy Fuels R PreparePrepare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PrePre Energy Fuels REnergy Fuels R PreparePrepare Energy Fuels REnergy Fuels R 44 Union B44 Union 80228 Telephone: (303) 980-0540 Fax: (303) 985-2080 www.golder.com OFFICES ACROSS AFRICA, ASIA, AUSTRALIA, EUROPE, NORTH AMERICA AND SOUTH AMERICA TAILINGS CELL DESIGN REPORT PIÑON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE

  5. CX-012758: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Danger Tree Management on Curecanti to South Canal and South Canal to Montrose 115 Kilovolt Transmission Lines, Gunnison County, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41855 Location(s): ColoradoOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  6. CX-011233: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Curecanti-Morrow Point 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Danger Tree Management, Montrose County, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 10/17/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  7. CX-012216: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Danger Tree Management on Curecanti-Morrow Point 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line (Amended), Montrose County, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/16/2014 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  8. DDE in Sediments of the Palos Verdes Shelf, California: In Situ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of DDT discharged process wastes into the sewers of Los Angeles County. Roughly 870­1450 t of DDT were on the continental shelf and slope. The most abundant DDT compound in the sediments, p,p-DDE, is degrading. Introduction In 1947 the world's largest producer of technical DDT, Montrose Chemical Corporation, began

  9. URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÃ?ON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO Inc. (Golder) was commissioned by EFRC to evaluate the operations of the uranium mill tailings storage in this report were conducted using the WISE Uranium Mill Tailings Radon Flux Calculator, as updated on November

  10. dh+lib: behind the scenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirazi, Roxanne; Potvin, Sarah; Coble, Zach

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    P res s (WP plugin) Peter ?s Post Notes (WP Plugin) Peter ?s Collaborative Emails (WP Plugin) Google Analytics ? offline development; select the highly- customizable Montezuma theme due to ALA hosting constraints (no file access... of interest. WordPress plugins: Peter?s Post Notes and Peter?s Collaborative Emails allow comments to be communicated alongside the post in the WP dashboard and generate auto-email notifications of comments and status changes (pending review, moved...

  11. Depositional environment of upper cretaceous Lewis sandstones, Sand Wash Basin, Colorado 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinarts, Mary Susan

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    areas, Moffat County, Colorado. Structure contours are top of Mesaverde. Contour interval is 1, 000 ft ( 305 m). Modified from Whi tley (1962) Generalized subsurface section of the Upper Cretaceous formations in the Sand Wash basin depicting gross... Correlation section parallel to depositional dip, North Craig field area, showing inclined time- stratigraphic units in the Lewis shale which con- tain thick sandstone intervals. Location of section shown in Fig. 23 Strike correlation section, North Craig...

  12. Lake Morton-Berrydale, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation,working-groupsIllinois: EnergyFlorida:Montezuma, Arizona:

  13. Lake Orion, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  14. Lake Oswego, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  15. Lake Park, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  16. Lake Pocotopaug, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  17. Lake Quivira, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation,working-groupsIllinois: EnergyFlorida:Montezuma,Park,Quivira,

  18. City of Monticello, Georgia (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPowerCityJonesville,Livingston,CityCityCity of Montezuma,City

  19. Fish Fingers and Custard Issue 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish Fingers and Custard Issue 8 2 D Is For… I was actually going to put this in the Series 6 reviews bit, but I repeat myself far too much in this issue as it is! We’re at the end of another series, the reactions of fans... are as mixed as always, and I think the key word that we’re all looking for here is development. Doctor Who will always change and develop. I genuinely think the Moffat era will really kick off next year, as we're getting the supposed series...

  20. Finding of No Significant Impact, proposed remediation of the Maybell Uranium Mill Processing Site, Maybell, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-0347) on the proposed surface remediation of the Maybell uranium mill processing site in Moffat County, Colorado. The mill site contains radioactively contaminated materials from processing uranium ore that would be stabilized in place at the existing tailings pile location. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, Public Law 91-190 (42 U.S.C. {section}4321 et seq.), as amended. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  1. An Electrical Spinning Particle In Einstein's Unified Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. N. Pandey; B. K. Sinha; Raj Kumar

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous work on exact solutions has been shown that sources need to be appended to the field equation of Einstein's unified field theory in order to achieve physically meaningful results,such sources can be included in a variational formulation by Borchsenius and moffat.The resulting field equations and conservation identities related to the theory that can be used to derive the equations of structure and motion of a pole-dipole particle according to an explicitly covariant approach by Dixon6.In this present paper it is shown that,under certain conditions for the energy tensor of the spinning particle,the equations of structure and motion in an electromagnetic field turn out to be formly identical to those occurring in Einstein-Maxwell theory.

  2. Evaluation of integrated data sets: four examples. [Uranium deposits (exploration)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolivar, S.L.; Freeman, S.B.; Weaver, T.A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several large data sets have been integrated and utilized for rapid evaluation on a reconnaissance scale for the Montrose 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle, Colorado. The data sets include Landsat imagery, hydrogeochemical and stream sediment analyses, airborne geophysical data, known mineral occurrences, and a geologic map. All data sets were registered to a 179 x 119 rectangular grid and projected onto Universal Transverse Mercator coordinates. A grid resolution of 1 km was used. All possible combinations of three, for most data sets, were examined for general geologic correlations by utilizing a color microfilm output. In addition, gray-level pictures of statistical output, e.g., factor analysis, have been employed to aid evaluations. Examples for the data sets dysprosium-calcium, lead-copper-zinc, and equivalent uranium-uranium in water-uranium in sediment are described with respect to geologic applications, base-metal regimes, and geochemical associations.

  3. Environmental assessment: South microwave communication facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to construct, operate, and maintain eight microwave repeater stations in southwestern Colorado, southeastern Utah, and northern Arizona, in order to meet the minimum fade criteria established by the Western Systems Coordinating Council (WSCC) for the operation and protection of electric power systems. The proposed microwave facilities would increase the reliability of communication. This environmental assessment (EA) describes the existing environmental conditions and the impacts from construction of the eight microwave communication facilities. The EA was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the Department of Energy Guidelines (52 FR 47662, December 15, 1987). The proposed project would consist of constructing eight microwave facilities, each of which would include a self-supported lattice tower, an equipment building, a propane tank, distribution lines to provide electric power to the sites, and access roads to the sites. The facilities would be constructed in San Miguel and Montezuma Counties in Colorado, San Juan County, Utah, and Navajo, Apache, Coconino, and Yavapai Counties in Arizona. 20 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Long-term surveillance plan for the Maybell, Colorado Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Maybell disposal site in Moffat County, Colorado. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed regulations for the issuance of a general license for the custody and long-term care of UMTRA Project disposal sites in 10 CFR Part 40. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA Project disposal sites are cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed, the NRC requires the DOE to submit a site-specific LTSP. The DOE prepared this LTSP to meet this requirement for the Maybell disposal site. The general license becomes effective when the NRC concurs with the DOE`s determination that remedial action is complete for the Maybell site and the NRC formally accepts this LTSP. This document describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Maybell disposal site performs as designed. The program is based on site inspections to identify threats to disposal cell integrity. The LTSP is based on the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program guidance document and meets the requirements of 10 CFR {section}40.27(b) and 40 CFR {section}192.03.

  5. Long-term surveillance plan for the Maybell, Colorado Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Maybell disposal site in Moffat County, Colorado. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed regulations for the issuance of a general license for the custody and long-term care of UMTRA Project disposal sites in 10 CFR Part 40. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA Project disposal sites are cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed, the NRC requires the DOE to submit a site-specific LTSP. The DOE prepared this LTSP to meet this requirement for the Maybell disposal site. The general license becomes effective when the NRC concurs with the DOE`s determination that remedial action is complete for the Maybell site and the NRC formally accepts this LTSP. This document describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Maybell disposal site performs as designed. The program is based on site inspections to identify threats to disposal cell integrity. The LTSP is based on the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program guidance document and meets the requirements of 10 CFR {section}40.27(b) and 40 CFR {section}192.03.

  6. Monticello Mill Tailings Site environmental report for calendar year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains information pertaining to environmental activities conducted during calendar year 1992 at and near the inactive uranium millsite in Monticello, Utah. Environmental activities conducted at the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) during 1992 included those associated with remedial action and compliance monitoring. Compliance monitoring consisted of both radiological and nonradiological monitoring of air, surface water, and ground water. Radiological and nonradiological air monitoring at the MMTS included measurements of atmospheric radon, particulate matter, and gamma radiation. Air particulate monitoring for radiological and nonradiological constituents was conducted at one location on and two locations off the millsite with high-volume particulate samplers. The maximum airborne concentrations of radium-226, thorium-230, and total uranium at all locations were several orders of magnitude below the regulatory limits specified by DOE Order 5400.5. Surface water monitoring included water quality measurements within Montezuma Creek. During 1992, maximum levels of selenium; gross alpha, gross beta, total dissolved solids, and iron exceeded their respective state standards in one or more samples collected from upstream, on-site, and downstream locations. Ground-water monitoring was conducted for two aquifers underlying the millsite. The shallow aquifer is contaminated by leached products of uranium mill tailings. During 1992, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act and state of Utah ground-water standards for arsenic, barium, nitrate, chromium, lead, selenium, molybdenum, uranium-234 and -238, gross alpha particle activity, and radium-226 and -228 were exceeded in one or more alluvial wells. This well will continue to be sampled to determine if the presence of these constituents was anomalous or if the measurements represented contamination in the aquifer.

  7. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Cortez quadrangle, Colorado and Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J A

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Six stratigraphic units are recognized as favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits that meet the minimum size and grade requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy in the Cortez 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ Quadrangle, Utah and Colorado. These units include the Jurassic Salt Wash, Recapture, and Brushy Basin Members of the Morrison Formation and the Entrada Sandstone, the Late Triassic Chinle Formation, and the Permian Cutler Formation. Four areas are judged favorable for the Morrison members which include the Slick Rock, Montezuma Canyon, Cottonwood Wash and Hatch districts. The criteria used to determine favorability include the presence of the following (1) fluvial sandstone beds deposited by low-energy streams; (2) actively moving major and minor structures such as the Paradox Basin and the many folds within it; (3) paleostream transport directions approximately perpendicular to the trend of many of the paleofolds; (4) presence of favorable gray lacustrine mudstone beds; and (5) known uranium occurrences associated with the favorable gray mudstones. Two areas of favorability are recognized for the Chinle Formation. These areas include the Abajo Mountain and Aneth-Ute Mountain areas. The criteria used to determine favorability include the sandstone-to-mudstone ratio for the Chinle Formation and the geographic distribution of the Petrified Forest Member of the Chinle Formation. Two favorable areas are recognized for the Cutler Formation. Both of these areas are along the northern border of the quadrangle between the Abajo Mountains and the Dolores River Canyon area. Two areas are judged favorable for the Entrada Sandstone. One area is in the northeast corner of the quadrangle in the Placerville district and the second is along the eastern border of the quadrangle on the southeast flank of the La Plata Mountains.

  8. Remedial Action Plan and Site Design for Stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Maybell, Colorado. Remedial action selection report: Attachment 2, Geology report, Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maybell uranium mill tailings site is 25 miles (mi) (40 kilometers [km]) west of the town of Craig, Colorado, in Moffat County, in the northwestern part of the state. The unincorporated town of Maybell is 5 road mi (8 km) southwest of the site. The designated site covers approximately 110 acres (ac) (45 hectares [ha]) and consists of a concave-shaped tailings pile and rubble from the demolition of the mill buildings buried in the former mill area. Contaminated materials at the Maybell processing site include the tailings pile, which has an average depth of 20 feet (ft) (6 meters [m]) and contains 2.8 million cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (2.1 million cubic meters [m{sup 3}]) of tailings. The former mill processing area is on the north side of the site and contains 20,000 yd{sup 3} (15,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated demolition debris. Off-pile contamination is present and includes areas adjacent to the tailings pile, as well as contamination dispersed by wind and surface water flow. The volume of off-pile contamination to be placed in the disposal cell is 550,000 yd{sup 3} (420,000 m{sup 3}). The total volume of contaminated materials to be disposed of as part of the remedial action is estimated to be 3.37 million yd{sup 3} (2.58 million m{sup 3}). Information presented in this Final Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and referenced in supporting documents represents the current disposal cell design features and ground water compliance strategy proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the Maybell, Colorado, tailings site. Both the disposal cell design and the ground water compliance strategy have changed from those proposed prior to the preliminary final RAP document as a result of prudent site-specific technical evaluations.

  9. Biological assessment of remedial action at the abandoned uranium mill tailings site near Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pursuant to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to conduct remedial action to clean up the residual radioactive materials (RRM) at the Naturita uranium processing site in Colorado. The Naturita site is in Montrose County, Colorado, and is approximately 2 miles (mi) (3 kilometer [km]) from the unincorporated town of Naturita. The proposed remedial action is to remove the RRM from the Naturita site to the Upper Burbank Quarry at the Uravan disposal site. To address the potential impacts of the remedial action on threatened and endangered species, the DOE prepared this biological assessment. Informal consultations with the U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) were initiated in 1986, and the FWS provided a list of the threatened and endangered species that may occur in the Naturita study area. This list was updated by two FWS letters in 1988 and by verbal communication in 1990. A biological assessment was included in the environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed remedial action that was prepared in 1990. This EA addressed the impacts of moving the Naturita RRM to the Dry Flats disposal site. In 1993, the design for the Dry Flats disposal alternative was changed. The FWS was again consulted in 1993 and provided a new list of threatened and endangered species that may occur in the Naturita study area. The Naturita EA and the biological assessment were revised in response to these changes. In 1994, remedial action was delayed because an alternate disposal site was being considered. The DOE decided to move the FIRM at the Naturita site to the Upper Burbank Quarry at the Uravan site. Due to this delay, the FWS was consulted in 1995 and a list of threatened and endangered species was provided. This biological assessment is a revision of the assessment attached to the Naturita EA and addresses moving the Naturita RRM to the Upper Burbank Quarry disposal site.

  10. Final Report for Phase I Northern California CO2 Reduction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagoner, J

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    On June 8, 2009, the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory released a Funding Opportunity Announcement (DE-FOA 0000015) with the title, Recovery Act: Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Industrial Sources and Innovative Concepts for Beneficial CO{sub 2} Use. C6 Resources (C6), an affiliate of Shell Oil Company, responded with a proposal for Technology Area 1: Large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) projects from industrial sources. As DOE Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC) Contractors, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LBNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LLNL) proposed to collaborate with C6 and perform technical tasks, which C6 included in the C6 proposal, titled the Northern California CO{sub 2} Reduction Project. The proposal was accepted for Phase I funding and C6 received DOE Award DEFE0002042. LLNL and LBNL each received Phase I funding of $200,000, directly from DOE. The essential task of Phase I was to prepare a proposal for Phase II, which would be a five-year, detailed technical proposal, budget, and schedule for a complete carbon capture, transportation, and geologic storage project, with the objective of starting the injection of 1 million tons per year of industrial CO2 by the end of FY2015. LLNL and LBNL developed technical proposals (and DOE Field Work Proposals [FWPs]) for many aspects of the geologic testing and CO{sub 2} monitoring that were included in the C6 Phase II proposal, which C6 submitted by the deadline of April 16, 2010. This document is the Final Report for LLNL's Phase I efforts and is presented in two parts. Part 1 is the complete text of the technical proposal provided to C6 by LLNL and LBNL for inclusion in the C6 Phase II proposal. Because of space limitations, however, C6 may not have included all of this information in their proposal. In addition to developing the proposal presented below, LLNL's Bill Foxall and Laura Chiarmonte, in collaboration with LBNL, undertook preliminary technical work evaluating the potential for induced seismicity in Solano County. Part 2 presents technical work preformed during Phase I in the development of a preliminary Certification Framework: Leakage Risk Assessment for CO{sub 2} Injection at the Montezuma Hills Site, Solano County, California, co-authored by LLNL and LBNL collaborators.

  11. Volume 9: A Review of Socioeconomic Impacts of Oil Shale Development WESTERN OIL SHALE DEVELOPMENT: A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotariu,, G. J.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of an oil shale industry in northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah has been forecast at various times since early this century, but the comparatively easy accessibility of other oil sources has forestalled development. Decreasing fuel supplies, increasing energy costs, and the threat of a crippling oil embargo finally may launch a commercial oil shale industry in this region. Concern for the possible impacts on the human environment has been fostered by experiences of rapid population growth in other western towns that have hosted energy resource development. A large number of studies have attempted to evaluate social and economic impacts of energy development and to determine important factors that affect the severity of these impacts. These studies have suggested that successful management of rapid population growth depends on adequate front-end capital for public facilities, availability of housing, attention to human service needs, long-range land use and fiscal planning. This study examines variables that affect the socioeconomic impacts of oil shale development. The study region is composed of four Colorado counties: Mesa, Moffat, Garfield and Rio Blanco. Most of the estimated population of 111 000 resides in a handful of urban areas that are separated by large distances and rugged terrain. We have projected the six largest cities and towns and one planned company town (Battlement Mesa) to be the probable centers for potential population impacts caused by development of an oil shale industry. Local planners expect Battlement Mesa to lessen impacts on small existing communities and indeed may be necessary to prevent severe regional socioeconomic impacts. Section II describes the study region and focuses on the economic trends and present conditions in the area. The population impacts analyzed in this study are contingent on a scenario of oil shale development from 1980-90 provided by the Department of Energy and discussed in Sec. III. We recognize that the rate of development, the magnitude of development, and the technology mix that will actually take place remain uncertain. Although we emphasize that other energy and mineral resources besides oil shale may be developed, the conclusions reached in this study reflect only those impacts that would be felt from the oil shale scenario. Socioeconomic impacts in the region reflect the uneven growth rate implied by the scenario and will be affected by the timing of industry developments, the length and magnitude of the construction phase of development, and the shift in employment profiles predicted in the scenario. The facilities in the southern portion of the oil shale region, those along the Colorado River and Parachute Creek, show a peak in the construction work force in the mid-1980s, whereas those f acil it i es in the Piceance Creek Bas into the north show a construction peak in the late 1980s. Together, the facilities will require a large construction work force throughout the decade, with a total of 4800 construction workers required in 1985. Construction at the northern sites and second phase construction in the south will require 6000 workers in 1988. By 1990, the operation work force will increase to 7950. Two important characteristics of oil shale development emerge from the work force estimates: (1) peak-year construction work forces will be 90-120% the size of the permanent operating work force; and (2) the yearly changes in total work force requirements will be large, as much as 900 in one year at one facility. To estimate population impacts on individual communities, we devised a population distribution method that is described in Sec. IV. Variables associated with the projection of population impacts are discussed and methodologies of previous assessments are compared. Scenario-induced population impacts estimated by the Los Alamos method are compared to projections of a model employed by the Colorado West Area Council of Governments. Oil shale development in the early decade, as defined by the scenario, will produce growth primarily

  12. FORT UNION DEEP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyle A. Johnson Jr.

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed methane (CBM) is currently the hottest area of energy development in the Rocky Mountain area. The Powder River Basin (PRB) is the largest CBM area in Wyoming and has attracted the majority of the attention because of its high permeability and relatively shallow depth. Other Wyoming coal regions are also being targeted for development, but most of these areas have lower permeability and deeper coal seams. This project consists of the development of a CBM stimulation system for deep coal resources and involves three work areas: (1) Well Placement, (2) Well Stimulation, and (3) Production Monitoring and Evaluation. The focus of this project is the Washakie Basin. Timberline Energy, Inc., the cosponsor, has a project area in southern Carbon County, Wyoming, and northern Moffat County, Colorado. The target coal is found near the top of the lower Fort Union formation. The well for this project, Evans No.1, was drilled to a depth of 2,700 ft. Three coal seams were encountered with sandstone and some interbedded shale between seams. Well logs indicated that the coal seams and the sandstone contained gas. For the testing, the upper seam at 2,000 ft was selected. The well, drilled and completed for this project, produced very little water and only occasional burps of methane. To enhance the well, a mild severity fracture was conducted to fracture the coal seam and not the adjacent sandstone. Fracturing data indicated a fracture half-length of 34 ft, a coal permeability of 0.2226 md, and permeability of 15.3 md. Following fracturing, the gas production rate stabilized at 10 Mscf/day within water production of 18 bpd. The Western Research Institute (WRI) CBM model was used to design a 14-day stimulation cycle followed by a 30-day production period. A maximum injection pressure of 1,200 psig to remain well below the fracture pressure was selected. Model predictions were 20 Mscf/day of air injection for 14 days, a one-day shut-in, then flowback. The predicted flowback was a four-fold increase over the prestimulation rate with production essentially returning to prestimulation rates after 30 days. The physical stimulation was conducted over a 14-day period. Problems with the stimulation injection resulted in a coal bed fire that was quickly quenched when production was resumed. The poststimulation, stabilized production was three to four times the prestimulation rate. The methane content was approximately 45% after one day and increased to 65% at the end of 30 days. The gas production rate was still two and one-half times the prestimulation rate at the end of the 30-day test period. The field results were a good match to the numerical simulator predictions. The physical stimulation did increase the production, but did not produce a commercial rate.

  13. FORT UNION DEEP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyle A. Johnson Jr.

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed methane (CBM) is currently the hottest area of energy development in the Rocky Mountain area. The Powder River Basin (PRB) is the largest CBM area in Wyoming and has attracted the majority of the attention because of its high permeability and relatively shallow depth. Other Wyoming coal regions are also being targeted for development, but most of these areas have lower permeability and deeper coal seams. This project consists of the development of a CBM stimulation system for deep coal resources and involves three work areas: (1) Well Placement, (2) Well Stimulation, and (3) Production Monitoring and Evaluation. The focus of this project is the Washakie Basin. Timberline Energy, Inc., the cosponsor, has a project area in southern Carbon County, Wyoming, and northern Moffat County, Colorado. The target coal is found near the top of the lower Fort Union formation. The well for this project, Evans No.1, was drilled to a depth of 2,700 ft. Three coal seams were encountered with sandstone and some interbedded shale between seams. Well logs indicated that the coal seams and the sandstone contained gas. For the testing, the upper seam at 2,000 ft was selected. The well, drilled and completed for this project, produced very little water and only occasional burps of methane. To enhance the well, a mild severity fracture was conducted to fracture the coal seam and not the adjacent sandstone. Fracturing data indicated a fracture half-length of 34 ft, a coal permeability of 0.2226 md, and permeability of 15.3 md. Following fracturing, the gas production rate stabilized at 10 Mscf/day within water production of 18 bpd. The Western Research Institute (WRI) CBM model was used to design a 14-day stimulation cycle followed by a 30-day production period. A maximum injection pressure of 1,200 psig to remain well below the fracture pressure was selected. Model predictions were 20 Mscf/day of air injection for 14 days, a one-day shut-in, then flowback. The predicted flowback was a four-fold increase over the prestimulation rate with production essentially returning to prestimulation rates after 30 days. The physical stimulation was conducted over a 14-day period. Problems with the stimulation injection resulted in a coal bed fire that was quickly quenched when production was resumed. The poststimulation, stabilized production was three to four times the prestimulation rate. The methane content was approximately 45% after one day and increased to 65% at the end of 30 days. The gas production rate was still two and one-half times the prestimulation rate at the end of the 30-day test period. The field results were a good match to the numerical simulator predictions. The physical stimulation did increase the production, but did not produce a commercial rate.

  14. Potential for Induced Seismicity Related to the Northern California CO2 Reduction Project Pilot Test, Solano County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, L.; Chiaramonte, L.; Daley, T.M.; Wilson, D.; Foxall, W.; Beyer, J.H.

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this technical report is to analyze the potential for induced seismicity due to a proposed small-scale CO{sub 2} injection project in the Montezuma Hills. We reviewed currently available public information, including 32 years of recorded seismic events, locations of mapped faults, and estimates of the stress state of the region. We also reviewed proprietary geological information acquired by Shell, including seismic reflection imaging in the area, and found that the data and interpretations used by Shell are appropriate and satisfactory for the purpose of this report. The closest known fault to the proposed injection site is the Kirby Hills Fault. It appears to be active, and microearthquakes as large as magnitude 3.7 have been associated with the fault near the site over the past 32 years. Most of these small events occurred 9-17 miles (15-28 km) below the surface, which is deep for this part of California. However, the geographic locations of the many events in the standard seismicity catalog for the area are subject to considerable uncertainty because of the lack of nearby seismic stations; so attributing the recorded earthquakes to motion along any specific fault is also uncertain. Nonetheless, the Kirby Hills Fault is the closest to the proposed injection site and is therefore our primary consideration for evaluating the potential seismic impacts, if any, from injection. Our planned installation of seismic monitoring stations near the site will greatly improve earthquake location accuracy. Shell seismic data also indicate two unnamed faults more than 3 miles east of the project site. These faults do not reach the surface as they are truncated by an unconformity at a depth of about 2,000 feet (610 m). The unconformity is identified as occurring during the Oligocene Epoch, 33.9-23.03 million years ago, which indicates that these faults are not currently active. Farther east are the Rio Vista Fault and Midland Fault at distances of about 6 miles (10 km) and 10 miles (16 km), respectively. These faults have been identified as active during the Quaternary (last 1.6 million years), but without evidence of displacement during the Holocene (the last 11,700 years). The stress state (both magnitude and direction) in the region is an important parameter in assessing earthquake potential. Although the available information regarding the stress state is limited in the area surrounding the injection well, the azimuth of the mean maximum horizontal stress is estimated at 41{sup o} and it is consistent with strike-slip faulting on the Kirby Hills Fault, unnamed fault segments to the south, and the Rio Vista Fault. However, there are large variations (uncertainty) in stress estimates, leading to low confidence in these conclusions regarding which fault segments are optimally oriented for potential slip induced by pressure changes. Uncertainty in the stress state can be substantially reduced by measurements planned when wells are drilled at the site. Injection of CO{sub 2} at about two miles depth will result in a reservoir fluid pressure increase, which is greatest at the well and decreases with distance from the well. After the injection stops, reservoir fluid pressures will decrease rapidly. Pressure changes have been predicted quantitatively by numerical simulation models of the injection. Based on these models, the pressure increase on the Kirby Hills Fault at its closest approach to the well due to the injection of 6,000 metric tons of CO{sub 2} would be a few pounds per square inch (psi), which is a tiny fraction of the natural pressure of approximately 5,000 psi at that depth. The likelihood of such a small pressure increase triggering a slip event is very small. It is even more unlikely that events would be induced at the significantly greater depths where most of the recorded earthquakes are concentrated, because it is unlikely that such a small pressure pulse would propagate downwards any appreciable distance. Therefore, in response to the specific question of the likelihood of the CO{sub 2} injection caus