Sample records for modified streamlined expanded

  1. STREAMLINE is a range of adsorbents and columns designed for expanded bed adsorption.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    STREAMLINE is a range of adsorbents and columns designed for expanded bed adsorption. In this new for expanded bed adsorption. They allow: · Capture of biomolecules directly from unclarified feedstocks · High and mechanical stability Principle of expanded bed adsorption The bed is expanded by the upward liquid flow

  2. Streamlining Bioenergy Feedstock Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Streamlining Bioenergy Feedstock Engineering The DOE Biomass Program's feedstock research and development tools enable collaboration and sharing of feedstock development knowledge...

  3. Streamlining ENERGY STAR Appliance Testing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To save taxpayer dollars and help lower the costs of innovative energy-efficient technologies, the Energy Department is streamlining ENERGY STAR testing for appliances.

  4. Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark A. Carl

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) engaged in numerous projects outlined under the scope of work discussed in the United States Department of Energy (DOE) grant number DE-FC26-04NT15456 awarded to the IOGCC. Numerous projects were completed that were extremely valuable to state oil and gas agencies as a result of work performed utilizing resources provided by the grant. There are numerous areas in which state agencies still need assistance. This additional assistance will need to be addressed under future scopes of work submitted annually to DOE's Project Officer for this grant. This report discusses the progress of the projects outlined under the grant scope of work for the 2005-2006 areas of interest, which are as follows: Area of Interest No. 1--Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement: This area of interest continues to support IOGCC's regulatory streamlining efforts that include the identification and elimination of unnecessary duplications of efforts between and among state and federal programs dealing with exploration and production on public lands. Area of Interest No. 2--Technology: This area of interest seeks to improve efficiency in states through the identification of technologies that can reduce costs. Area of Interest No. 3--Training and Education: This area of interest is vital to upgrading the skills of regulators and industry alike. Within the National Energy Policy, there are many appropriate training and education opportunities. Education was strongly endorsed by the President's National Energy Policy Development group. Acting through the governors offices, states are very effective conduits for the dissemination of energy education information. While the IOGCC favors the development of a comprehensive, long-term energy education plan, states are also supportive of immediate action on important concerns, such as energy prices, availability and conservation. Area of Interest No. 4--Resource Assessment and Development: This area of interest relates directly to helping maximize production of domestic oil and natural gas resources, including areas that are under explored or have not been adequately defined.

  5. Screen Electrode Materials & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining Optimization of Electrode Screen Electrode Materials & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining Optimization of Electrode 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies...

  6. Streamline coal slurry letdown valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Platt, Robert J. (Dover, NJ); Shadbolt, Edward A. (Basking Ridge, NJ)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A streamlined coal slurry letdown valve is featured which has a two-piece throat comprised of a seat and seat retainer. The two-piece design allows for easy assembly and disassembly of the valve. A novel cage holds the two-piece throat together during the high pressure letdown. The coal slurry letdown valve has long operating life as a result of its streamlined and erosion-resistance surfaces.

  7. Streamline coal slurry letdown valve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, R.J.; Shadbolt, E.A.

    1983-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A streamlined coal slurry letdown valve is featured which has a two-piece throat comprised of a seat and seat retainer. The two-piece design allows for easy assembly and disassembly of the valve. A novel cage holds the two-piece throat together during the high pressure letdown. The coal slurry letdown valve has long operating life as a result of its streamlined and erosion-resistance surfaces. 5 figs.

  8. California - Establishing Transmission Project Review Streamlining...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Supplemental Material: California - Establishing Transmission Project Review Streamlining DirectivesPermitting...

  9. 1. Introduction to Expanded Bed Adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    1. Introduction to Expanded Bed Adsorption This handbook introduces the principles of Expanded Bed Adsorption and serves as a practical guide to the use of STREAMLINE adsorbents and columns available from Adsorption. The majority of biotechnology processes for producing pharmaceutical or diagnostic products

  10. Streamlining of the RELAP5-3D Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mesina, George L; Hykes, Joshua; Guillen, Donna Post

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RELAP5-3D is widely used by the nuclear community to simulate general thermal hydraulic systems and has proven to be so versatile that the spectrum of transient two-phase problems that can be analyzed has increased substantially over time. To accommodate the many new types of problems that are analyzed by RELAP5-3D, both the physics and numerical methods of the code have been continuously improved. In the area of computational methods and mathematical techniques, many upgrades and improvements have been made decrease code run time and increase solution accuracy. These include vectorization, parallelization, use of improved equation solvers for thermal hydraulics and neutron kinetics, and incorporation of improved library utilities. In the area of applied nuclear engineering, expanded capabilities include boron and level tracking models, radiation/conduction enclosure model, feedwater heater and compressor components, fluids and corresponding correlations for modeling Generation IV reactor designs, and coupling to computational fluid dynamics solvers. Ongoing and proposed future developments include improvements to the two-phase pump model, conversion to FORTRAN 90, and coupling to more computer programs. This paper summarizes the general improvements made to RELAP5-3D, with an emphasis on streamlining the code infrastructure for improved maintenance and development. With all these past, present and planned developments, it is necessary to modify the code infrastructure to incorporate modifications in a consistent and maintainable manner. Modifying a complex code such as RELAP5-3D to incorporate new models, upgrade numerics, and optimize existing code becomes more difficult as the code grows larger. The difficulty of this as well as the chance of introducing errors is significantly reduced when the code is structured. To streamline the code into a structured program, a commercial restructuring tool, FOR_STRUCT, was applied to the RELAP5-3D source files. The methodology employed follows Dijkstra's structured programming paradigm, which is based on splitting programs into sub-sections, each with single points of entry and exit and in which control is passed downward through the structure with no unconditional branches to higher levels. GO TO commands are typically avoided, since they alter the flow and control of a program’s execution by allowing a jump from one place in the routine to another. The restructuring of RELAP5-3D subroutines is complicated by several issues. The first is use of code other than standard FORTRAN77. The second is restructuring limitations of FOR_STRUCT. The third is existence of pre-compiler directives and the complication of nested directives. Techniques were developed to overcome all these difficulties and more and these are reported. By implementing these developments, all subroutines of RELAP were restructured. Measures of code improvement relative to maintenance and development are presented.

  11. Exploring Vector Fields with Distribution-based Streamline Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Kewei; Chaudhuri, Abon; Lee, Teng-Yok; Shen, Han-Wei; Wong, Pak C.

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Streamline-based techniques are designed based on the idea that properties of streamlines are indicative of features in the underlying field. In this paper, we show that statistical distributions of measurements along the trajectory of a streamline can be used as a robust and effective descriptor to measure the similarity between streamlines. With the distribution-based approach, we present a framework for interactive exploration of 3D vector fields with streamline query and clustering. Streamline queries allow us to rapidly identify streamlines that share similar geometric features to the target streamline. Streamline clustering allows us to group together streamlines of similar shapes. Based on users selection, different clusters with different features at different levels of detail can be visualized to highlight features in 3D flow fields. We demonstrate the utility of our framework with simulation data sets of varying nature and size.

  12. Impact assessment: Eroding benefits through streamlining?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, Alan, E-mail: alan.bond@uea.ac.uk [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia (United Kingdom) [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia (United Kingdom); School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University (South Africa); Pope, Jenny, E-mail: jenny@integral-sustainability.net [Integral Sustainability (Australia) [Integral Sustainability (Australia); Curtin University Sustainability Policy Institute (Australia); Morrison-Saunders, Angus, E-mail: A.Morrison-Saunders@murdoch.edu.au [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University (South Africa) [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University (South Africa); Environmental Science, Murdoch University (Australia); Retief, Francois, E-mail: francois.retief@nwu.ac.za [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University (South Africa)] [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University (South Africa); Gunn, Jill A.E., E-mail: jill.gunn@usask.ca [Department of Geography and Planning and School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper argues that Governments have sought to streamline impact assessment in recent years (defined as the last five years) to counter concerns over the costs and potential for delays to economic development. We hypothesise that this has had some adverse consequences on the benefits that subsequently accrue from the assessments. This hypothesis is tested using a framework developed from arguments for the benefits brought by Environmental Impact Assessment made in 1982 in the face of the UK Government opposition to its implementation in a time of economic recession. The particular benefits investigated are ‘consistency and fairness’, ‘early warning’, ‘environment and development’, and ‘public involvement’. Canada, South Africa, the United Kingdom and Western Australia are the jurisdictions tested using this framework. The conclusions indicate that significant streamlining has been undertaken which has had direct adverse effects on some of the benefits that impact assessment should deliver, particularly in Canada and the UK. The research has not examined whether streamlining has had implications for the effectiveness of impact assessment, but the causal link between streamlining and benefits does sound warning bells that merit further investigation. -- Highlights: • Investigation of the extent to which government has streamlined IA. • Evaluation framework was developed based on benefits of impact assessment. • Canada, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and Western Australia were examined. • Trajectory in last five years is attrition of benefits of impact assessment.

  13. Solar Industry At Work: Streamlining Home Solar Installation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar Industry At Work: Streamlining Home Solar Installation Solar Industry At Work: Streamlining Home Solar Installation June 12, 2012 - 11:59am Addthis Sunrun is a home solar...

  14. Streamline-based production data integration in naturally fractured reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Harbi, Mishal H.

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Streamline-based models have shown great potential in reconciling high resolution geologic models to production data. In this work we extend the streamline-based production data integration technique to naturally fractured reservoirs. We use a...

  15. A streamline splitting pore-network approach for computationally...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pore-network approach for computationally inexpensive and accurate simulation of transport in porous A streamline splitting pore-network approach for computationally...

  16. A New 'Geothermal Play Type' Catalog: Streamlining Exploration...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Decision Making Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: A New 'Geothermal Play Type' Catalog: Streamlining Exploration...

  17. City of Portland- Streamlined Building Permits for Residential Solar Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Portland's Bureau of Development Services (BDS) developed an electronic permitting process for residential solar energy system installations. With this streamlined, expedited process,...

  18. A streamlined failure mode and effects analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Eric C., E-mail: eford@uw.edu; Smith, Koren; Terezakis, Stephanie; Croog, Victoria; Gollamudi, Smitha; Gage, Irene; Keck, Jordie; DeWeese, Theodore; Sibley, Greg [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Explore the feasibility and impact of a streamlined failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) using a structured process that is designed to minimize staff effort. Methods: FMEA for the external beam process was conducted at an affiliate radiation oncology center that treats approximately 60 patients per day. A structured FMEA process was developed which included clearly defined roles and goals for each phase. A core group of seven people was identified and a facilitator was chosen to lead the effort. Failure modes were identified and scored according to the FMEA formalism. A risk priority number,RPN, was calculated and used to rank failure modes. Failure modes with RPN > 150 received safety improvement interventions. Staff effort was carefully tracked throughout the project. Results: Fifty-two failure modes were identified, 22 collected during meetings, and 30 from take-home worksheets. The four top-ranked failure modes were: delay in film check, missing pacemaker protocol/consent, critical structures not contoured, and pregnant patient simulated without the team's knowledge of the pregnancy. These four failure modes hadRPN > 150 and received safety interventions. The FMEA was completed in one month in four 1-h meetings. A total of 55 staff hours were required and, additionally, 20 h by the facilitator. Conclusions: Streamlined FMEA provides a means of accomplishing a relatively large-scale analysis with modest effort. One potential value of FMEA is that it potentially provides a means of measuring the impact of quality improvement efforts through a reduction in risk scores. Future study of this possibility is needed.

  19. Energy Department Awards First Major Task Order Under Streamlined...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Task Order Under Streamlined Contracting System October 17, 2005 - 11:59am Addthis New Mexico Firm Contracted for Ashtabula Clean-up WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy...

  20. A streamlined real options model for Real Estate Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barman, Baabak

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis introduces a streamlined model that incorporates the value of the real options that exist in real estate development projects. Real options add value to a project by providing developers with flexibility to ...

  1. Inverse modeling of partitioning interwell tracer tests: A streamline approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta-Gupta, Akhil

    computations, inverse modeling 1. Introduction [2] It is recognized that the presence of nonaqueous phaseInverse modeling of partitioning interwell tracer tests: A streamline approach Akhil Datta orders of magnitude. INDEX TERMS: 1832 Hydrology: Groundwater transport; 1829 Hydrology: Groundwater

  2. City of Philadelphia- Streamlined Solar Permitting and Fee Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Photovoltaic systems of 10 kW or less installed on 1- or 2-family residential units are eligible for streamlined permitting and a fee reduction. PV projects can use a [http://www.phila.gov/green...

  3. Zephyr: A secure Internet process to streamline engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, C.W.; Niven, W.A.; Cavitt, R.E. [and others

    1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is implementing an Internet-based process pilot called `Zephyr` to streamline engineering and commerce using the Internet. Major benefits have accrued by using Zephyr in facilitating industrial collaboration, speeding the engineering development cycle, reducing procurement time, and lowering overall costs. Programs at LLNL are potentializing the efficiencies introduced since implementing Zephyr. Zephyr`s pilot functionality is undergoing full integration with Business Systems, Finance, and Vendors to support major programs at the Laboratory.

  4. Expanding Professional Horizons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    expands daily, by leaps and bounds - knowledge turnover must be accompanied by an infusion of new talent that both informs and is informed by existing, experienced staff. With...

  5. Industrial Compositional Streamline Simulation for Efficient and Accurate Prediction of Gas Injection and WAG Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margot Gerritsen

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas-injection processes are widely and increasingly used for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). In the United States, for example, EOR production by gas injection accounts for approximately 45% of total EOR production and has tripled since 1986. The understanding of the multiphase, multicomponent flow taking place in any displacement process is essential for successful design of gas-injection projects. Due to complex reservoir geometry, reservoir fluid properties and phase behavior, the design of accurate and efficient numerical simulations for the multiphase, multicomponent flow governing these processes is nontrivial. In this work, we developed, implemented and tested a streamline based solver for gas injection processes that is computationally very attractive: as compared to traditional Eulerian solvers in use by industry it computes solutions with a computational speed orders of magnitude higher and a comparable accuracy provided that cross-flow effects do not dominate. We contributed to the development of compositional streamline solvers in three significant ways: improvement of the overall framework allowing improved streamline coverage and partial streamline tracing, amongst others; parallelization of the streamline code, which significantly improves wall clock time; and development of new compositional solvers that can be implemented along streamlines as well as in existing Eulerian codes used by industry. We designed several novel ideas in the streamline framework. First, we developed an adaptive streamline coverage algorithm. Adding streamlines locally can reduce computational costs by concentrating computational efforts where needed, and reduce mapping errors. Adapting streamline coverage effectively controls mass balance errors that mostly result from the mapping from streamlines to pressure grid. We also introduced the concept of partial streamlines: streamlines that do not necessarily start and/or end at wells. This allows more efficient coverage and avoids the redundant work generally done in the near-well regions. We improved the accuracy of the streamline simulator with a higher order mapping from pressure grid to streamlines that significantly reduces smoothing errors, and a Kriging algorithm is used to map from the streamlines to the background grid. The higher accuracy of the Kriging mapping means that it is not essential for grid blocks to be crossed by one or more streamlines. The higher accuracy comes at the price of increased computational costs, but allows coarser coverage and so does not generally increase the overall costs of the computations. To reduce errors associated with fixing the pressure field between pressure updates, we developed a higher order global time-stepping method that allows the use of larger global time steps. Third-order ENO schemes are suggested to propagate components along streamlines. Both in the two-phase and three-phase experiments these ENO schemes outperform other (higher order) upwind schemes. Application of the third order ENO scheme leads to overall computational savings because the computational grid used can be coarsened. Grid adaptivity along streamlines is implemented to allow sharp but efficient resolution of solution fronts at reduced computational costs when displacement fronts are sufficiently separated. A correction for Volume Change On Mixing (VCOM) is implemented that is very effective at handling this effect. Finally, a specialized gravity operator splitting method is proposed for use in compositional streamline methods that gives an effective correction of gravity segregation. A significant part of our effort went into the development of a parallelization strategy for streamline solvers on the next generation shared memory machines. We found in this work that the built-in dynamic scheduling strategies of OpenMP lead to parallel efficiencies that are comparable to optimal schedules obtained with customized explicit load balancing strategies as long as the ratio of number of streamlines to number of threads is sufficiently high, which is the case in real-fie

  6. Functionalized expanded porphyrins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sessler, Jonathan L; Pantos, Patricia J

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are functionalized expanded porphyrins that can be used as spectrometric sensors for high-valent actinide cations. The disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins have the advantage over unfunctionalized systems in that they can be immobilized via covalent attachment to a solid support comprising an inorganic or organic polymer or other common substrates. Substrates comprising the disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins are also disclosed. Further, disclosed are methods of making the disclosed compounds (immobilized and free), methods of using them as sensors to detect high valent actinides, devices that comprise the disclosed compounds, and kits.

  7. The expandable network disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muthitacharoen, Athicha, 1976-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a virtual disk cluster called END, the Expandable Network Disk. END aggregates storage on a cluster of servers into a single virtual disk. END's main goals are to offer good performance during normal ...

  8. Stent with expandable foam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Thomas S; Maitland, Duncan J; Small, IV, Ward; Buckley, Patrick R; Benett, William J; Hartman, Jonathan; Saloner, David A

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A stent for treating a physical anomaly. The stent includes a skeletal support structure for expanding in the physical anomaly and a shape memory material coupled to the skeletal support structure.

  9. An Ever Expanding Universe?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Sidharth

    1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    It is pointed out that very recent results based on supernovae observations that the universe will accelerate and expand for ever with ever decreasing density have been predicted in a recent cosmological model which also deduces hitherto purely empirical features like the mysterious relation between the pion mass and the Hubble Constant.

  10. VISMASHUP: streamlining the creation of custom visualization applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrens, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Santos, Emanuele [UNIV OF UTAH; Lins, Lauro [UNIV OF UTAH; Freire, Juliana [UNIV OF UTAH; Silva, Cl'audio T [UNIV OF UTAH

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Visualization is essential for understanding the increasing volumes of digital data. However, the process required to create insightful visualizations is involved and time consuming. Although several visualization tools are available, including tools with sophisticated visual interfaces, they are out of reach for users who have little or no knowledge of visualization techniques and/or who do not have programming expertise. In this paper, we propose VISMASHUP, a new framework for streamlining the creation of customized visualization applications. Because these applications can be customized for very specific tasks, they can hide much of the complexity in a visualization specification and make it easier for users to explore visualizations by manipulating a small set of parameters. We describe the framework and how it supports the various tasks a designer needs to carry out to develop an application, from mining and exploring a set of visualization specifications (pipelines), to the creation of simplified views of the pipelines, and the automatic generation of the application and its interface. We also describe the implementation of the system and demonstrate its use in two real application scenarios.

  11. Streamline Integration using MPI-Hybrid Parallelism on a Large Multi-Core Architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camp, David; Garth, Christoph; Childs, Hank; Pugmire, Dave; Joy, Kenneth I.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Streamline computation in a very large vector field data set represents a significant challenge due to the non-local and datadependentnature of streamline integration. In this paper, we conduct a study of the performance characteristics of hybrid parallel programmingand execution as applied to streamline integration on a large, multicore platform. With multi-core processors now prevalent in clustersand supercomputers, there is a need to understand the impact of these hybrid systems in order to make the best implementation choice.We use two MPI-based distribution approaches based on established parallelization paradigms, parallelize-over-seeds and parallelize-overblocks,and present a novel MPI-hybrid algorithm for each approach to compute streamlines. Our findings indicate that the work sharing betweencores in the proposed MPI-hybrid parallel implementation results in much improved performance and consumes less communication andI/O bandwidth than a traditional, non-hybrid distributed implementation.

  12. Streamline Integration using MPI-Hybrid Parallelism on a Large Multi-Core Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camp, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chen, “Over Two Decades of Integration-Based, Geometric FlowD. Sujudi and R. Haimes, “Integration of Particles andStreamline Integration using MPI-Hybrid Parallelism on a

  13. Streamline-based simulation of water injection in naturally fractured reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Huthali, Ahmed

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    have been added as a source term to the transport equation that describes the saturation evolution along the streamlines. We solved this equation numerically for all types of transfer functions. The numerical solution of the continuity equation with DTF...

  14. A rigorous compressible streamline formulation for black oil and compositional simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osako, Ichiro

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study for the first time we generalize streamline models to compressible flow using a rigorous formulation while retaining most of its computational advantages. Our new formulation is based on three major elements and requires only minor...

  15. Field scale history matching and assisted history matching using streamline simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kharghoria, Arun

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we apply the streamline-based production data integration method to condition a multimillion cell geologic model to historical production response for a giant Saudi Arabian reservoir. The field has been under peripheral water...

  16. Expandable LED array interconnect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Thomas Cheng-Hsin; Keller, Bernd

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A light emitting device that can function as an array element in an expandable array of such devices. The light emitting device comprises a substrate that has a top surface and a plurality of edges. Input and output terminals are mounted to the top surface of the substrate. Both terminals comprise a plurality of contact pads disposed proximate to the edges of the substrate, allowing for easy access to both terminals from multiple edges of the substrate. A lighting element is mounted to the top surface of the substrate. The lighting element is connected between the input and output terminals. The contact pads provide multiple access points to the terminals which allow for greater flexibility in design when the devices are used as array elements in an expandable array.

  17. Grazing incidence beam expander

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  18. Expanding hollow metal rings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peacock, Harold B. (Evans, GA); Imrich, Kenneth J. (Grovetown, GA)

    2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A sealing device that may expand more planar dimensions due to internal thermal expansion of a filler material. The sealing material is of a composition such that when desired environment temperatures and internal actuating pressures are reached, the sealing materials undergoes a permanent deformation. For metallic compounds, this permanent deformation occurs when the material enters the plastic deformation phase. Polymers, and other materials, may be using a sealing mechanism depending on the temperatures and corrosivity of the use. Internal pressures are generated by either rapid thermal expansion or material phase change and may include either liquid or solid to gas phase change, or in the gaseous state with significant pressure generation in accordance with the gas laws. Sealing material thickness and material composition may be used to selectively control geometric expansion of the seal such that expansion is limited to a specific facing and or geometric plane.

  19. Nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, Jae Hoon; Gwak, Kyung Hyun [Hong Ik University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seoul, 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Kun Hyung [Korea Gas Corporation, Incheon, 406-130 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamic study is performed on nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas. In order to substantially increase the capacity, a Brayton refrigeration cycle with nitrogen expander was recently added to the cold end of the reputable propane pre-cooled mixed-refrigerant (C3-MR) process. Similar modifications with a nitrogen expander cycle are extensively investigated on a variety of cycle configurations. The existing and modified cycles are simulated with commercial process software (Aspen HYSYS) based on selected specifications. The results are compared in terms of thermodynamic efficiency, liquefaction capacity, and estimated size of heat exchangers. The combination of C3-MR with partial regeneration and pre-cooling of nitrogen expander cycle is recommended to have a great potential for high efficiency and large capacity.

  20. Streamlined LCA of Wood Pellets: Export and Possible Utilization in UBC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Streamlined LCA of Wood Pellets: Export and Possible Utilization in UBC Boiler House CHBE 573 Ann Pa May 15, 2009 #12;2 | P a g e INTRODUCTION Wood pellets are a type of biofuels and are often made. Like all biofuels, wood pellets are carbon- neutral and renewable and are very popular in Europe

  1. Zephyr: A secure Internet-based process to streamline engineering procurements using the World Wide Web

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, C.W.; Cavitt, R.E.; Niven, W.A.; Warren, F.E.; Taylor, S.S.; Sharick, T.M.; Vickers, D.L.; Mitschkowetz, N.; Weaver, R.L.

    1996-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is piloting an Internet- based paperless process called `Zephyr` to streamline engineering procurements. Major benefits have accrued by using Zephyr in reducing procurement time, speeding the engineering development cycle, facilitating industrial collaboration, and reducing overall costs. Programs at LLNL are benefiting by the efficiencies introduced since implementing Zephyr`s engineering and commerce on the Internet.

  2. Effective Reservoir Management Using Streamline-Based Reservoir Simulation, History Matching and Rate Allocation Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanaka, Shusei

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    of the effectiveness of wells. The rate is updated to maximize the field NPV. The proposed approach avoids the use of complex optimization tools. Instead, we emphasize the visual and the intuitive appeal of streamline methods and utilize flow diagnostic plots...

  3. Growth Temperature and Genome Size in Bacteria Are Negatively Correlated, Suggesting Genomic Streamlining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Andreas

    Growth Temperature and Genome Size in Bacteria Are Negatively Correlated, Suggesting Genomic.wagner@ieu.uzh.ch; nsabath@gmail.com. Accepted: March 25, 2013 Abstract Prokaryotic genomes are small and compact. Either this feature is caused by neutral evolution or by natural selection favoring small genomes--genome streamlining

  4. Flavors in an expanding plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannes Große; Romuald A. Janik; Piotr Surówka

    2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the effect of an expanding plasma on probe matter by determining time-dependent D7 embeddings in the holographic dual of an expanding viscous plasma. We calculate the chiral condensate and meson spectra including contributions of viscosity. The chiral condensate essentially confirms the expectation from the static black hole. For the meson spectra we propose a scheme that is in agreement with the adiabatic approximation. New contributions arise for the vector mesons at the order of the viscosity terms.

  5. The Streamlined Darwin Field method (and a solution technique that makes it practical)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewett, D.W.; Larson, D.J.; Doss, S.

    1990-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The new Streamlined Darwin Field (SDF) model eliminates some Boundary Conditions (BCs) in which plasma-wall boundaries play a significant role in plasma behavior. The new formulation trades difficult BC issues for strongly coupled 2{sup nd}-order partial differential equations. We apply a particular version of ADI called Dynamic ADI (DADI) to this set of equations that is sufficiently fast to make solution of the SDF model practical in an initial-value PIC code.

  6. Inversion of field-scale partitioning tracer response for characterizing oil saturation distribution: a streamline approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliassov, Pavel Alexandrovich

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INVERSION OF FIELD-SCALE PARTITIONING TRACER RESPONSE FOR CHARACTERIZING OIL SATURATION DISTRIBUTION: A STREAMLINE APPROACH A Thesis by PAVEL ALEXANDROVICH ILIASSOV Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... A Thesis by PAVEL ALEXANDROVICH ILIASSOV Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: c 4- Akhil Datta-Gupta (Chair of Committee...

  7. Fast history matching of finite-difference model, compressible and three-phase flow using streamline-derived sensitivities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Hao

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    sensitivity computation of the streamline models with the versatility of finite-difference simulation was developed. Use of finite-difference simulation can account for complex physics. Finally, we developed an approach to history matching three-phase flow...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia Expands an International...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ClimateECAbout ECFacilitiesCRFSandia Expands an International Collaboration and Web Database on Engine Fuel Spray Combustion Research Sandia Expands an International Collaboration...

  9. Is the Universe really expanding?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John G. Hartnett

    2011-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hubble law, determined from the distance modulii and redshifts of galaxies, for the past 80 years, has been used as strong evidence for an expanding universe. This claim is reviewed in light of the claimed lack of necessary evidence for time dilation in quasar and gamma-ray burst luminosity variations and other lines of evidence. It is concluded that the observations could be used to describe either a static universe (where the Hubble law results from some as-yet-unknown mechanism) or an expanding universe described by the standard Lambda cold dark matter model. In the latter case, size evolution of galaxies is necessary for agreement with observations. Yet the simple non-expanding Euclidean universe fits most data with the least number of assumptions. From this review it is apparent that there are still many unanswered questions in cosmology and the title question of this paper is still far from being answered.

  10. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chin, Jason W. (Cambridge, GB); Cropp, T. Ashton (Bethesda, MD); Anderson, J. Christopher (San Francisco, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  11. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chin, Jason W. (Cambridge, GB); Cropp, T. Ashton (Bethesda, MD); Anderson, J. Christopher (San Francisco, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  12. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chin, Jason W. (Cambridge, GB); Cropp, T. Ashton (Bethesda, MD); Anderson, J. Christopher (San Francisco, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  13. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chin, Jason W. (Cambridge, GB); Cropp, T. Ashton (Bethesda, MD); Anderson, J. Christopher (San Francisco, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  14. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chin, Jason W. (Cambridge, GB); Cropp, T. Ashton (Bethesda, MD); Anderson, J. Christopher (San Francisco, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  15. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chin, Jason W. (Cambridge, GB); Cropp, T. Ashton (Bethesda, MD); Anderson, J. Christopher (San Francisco, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  16. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  17. ERBU, Expanding Rubber Band Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soares, Domingos

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I put forward a simple unidimensional mechanical analogue of the three-dimensional universe models of modern relativistic cosmology. The main goal of the proposal is the appropriate appreciation of the intrinsic relationship between Hubble's law and the homogeneity of expanding relativistic models.

  18. Optical Expanders with Applications in Optical Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    Optical Expanders with Applications in Optical Computing John H. Reif \\Lambda Akitoshi Yoshida \\Lambda July 20, 1999 Abstract We describe and investigate an optical system which we call an optical expander. An optical expander elec­ trooptically expands an optical boolean pattern encoded in d bits

  19. Optical Expanders with Applications in Optical Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    Optical Expanders with Applications in Optical Computing John H. Reif Akitoshi Yoshida July 20, 1999 Abstract We describe and investigate an optical system which we call an optical expander. An optical expander elec- trooptically expands an optical boolean pattern encoded in d bits into an optical

  20. Velocity models, material balance and solution convergence in streamline-based simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabir, Kamran

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of {x, y, z) to a unit cube in the pseudo space of (a, P, y). This code also determines the velocity models, and sketches the streamlines in the domain. Calculation of time of flight is also incorporated in the code. Another code was written... be obtained from the velocity components. 2. 2 Five-Spot Waterflooding Pattern Morel-Seytoux shows that the following are the potential (P) and stream (r[r) functions for five-spot waterflooding pattern (quarter five-spot symmetry element): ] 1 ? rn[4x...

  1. Streamline topology and dilute particle dynamics in a Karman vortex street flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Z B

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three types of streamline topology in a Karman vortex street flow are shown under the variation of spatial parameters. For the motion of dilute particles in the K\\'arm\\'an vortex street flow, there exist a route of bifurcation to a chaotic orbit and more attractors in a bifurcation diagram for the proportion of particle density to fluid density. Along with the increase of spatial parameters in the flow filed, the bifurcation process is suspended, as well as more and more attractors emerge. In the motion of dilute particles, a drag term and gravity term dominate and result in the bifurcation phenomenon.

  2. Streamlining the Nuclear Force | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep SlopeStochasticPlanHigh-LevelStreamlining the

  3. New or Expanding Industries Tax Credit (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the New or Expanding Industries Tax Credit, property used by certain new or expanding industries is eligible for reduced taxable valuation (up to 50% of their taxable value for the first 5...

  4. Expanded Pending Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) /EmailMolecular Solids |5Expanded Pending Jobs by

  5. Solution of simultaneous partial differential equations using dynamic ADI: Solution of the streamlined Darwin field equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewett, D.W.; Larson, D.J.; Doss, S. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States))

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply a particular version of ADI called Dynamic ADI (DADI) to the strongly coupled 2nd-order partial differential equations that arise from the streamlined Darwin field (SDF) equations. The DADI method a applied in a form that we show is guaranteed to converge to the desired solution of the finite difference equation. We give overviews of our test case, the SDF problem and the DADI method, with some justification for our choice of operator splitting. Finally, we apply DADI to the strongly coupled SDF equations and present the results from our test case. Our implementation requires a factor of 7 less storage and has proven to be a factor of 4 (in the worst case) to several orders of magnitude faster than competing methods. 13 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. The Expanded Very Large Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perley, R; Jackson, J; Butler, B; Carlson, B; Fort, D; Dewdney, P; Clark, B; Hayward, R; Durand, S; Revnell, M; McKinnon, M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In almost 30 years of operation, the Very Large Array (VLA) has proved to be a remarkably flexible and productive radio telescope. However, the basic capabilities of the VLA have changed little since it was designed. A major expansion utilizing modern technology is currently underway to improve the capabilities of the VLA by at least an order of magnitude in both sensitivity and in frequency coverage. The primary elements of the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) project include new or upgraded receivers for continuous frequency coverage from 1 to 50 GHz, new local oscillator, intermediate frequency, and wide bandwidth data transmission systems to carry signals with 16 GHz total bandwidth from each antenna, and a new digital correlator with the capability to process this bandwidth with an unprecedented number of frequency channels for an imaging array. Also included are a new monitor and control system and new software that will provide telescope ease of use. Scheduled for completion in 2012, the EVLA will prov...

  7. Lipid Peroxidation Induced by Expandable Clay Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Lipid Peroxidation Induced by Expandable Clay Minerals D A R I A K I B A N O V A , A N T O N I O N and toxicity. Herein, potential hazards of clay particle uptake areaddressed.Thispaperreportsthatthecontentanddistribution of structural Fe influence the ability of expandable clay minerals to induce lipid peroxidation (LP), a major

  8. The Ocean's least productive waters are expanding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    The Ocean's least productive waters are expanding Jeffrey Polovina, Evan Howell, Melanie AbecassisWiFS Annual mean depth integrated net primary productivity (data from Behrenfeld 2007) #12;N Pacific Monthly for Pacific and Atlantic oligotrophic gyres expanding 0.79 ­ 4.40 %/yr (6.32- 35.2% increase in 2006 compared

  9. Asymptotically radial solutions in expanding annular domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clapp, Mónica

    Asymptotically radial solutions in expanding annular domains Thomas Bartsch M´onica Clapp Massimo- mail: Thomas.Bartsch@math.uni-giessen.de Instituto de Matem´aticas, Universidad Nacional Aut´onoma de M

  10. Expandability, reversibility, and optimal capacity choice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixit, Avinash K.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop continuous-time models of capacity choice when demand fluctuates stochastically, and the firm's opportunities to expand or contract are limited. Specifically, we consider costs of investing or disinvesting that ...

  11. More production buildings and expanded operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    production buildings and expanded operations The oval shaped Alpha calutrons were designated "Alpha 1" design and were installed in Buildings 9201- 1, 9201-2, and 9201-3. Each...

  12. Gravitational clustering in Static and Expanding Backgrounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Padmanabhan

    2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief summary of several topics in the study of gravitational many body problem is given. The discussion covers both static backgrounds (applicable to astrophysical systems) as well as clustering in an expanding background (relevant for cosmology)

  13. Expanding Robust HCCI Operation (Delphi CRADA)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Expanding Robust HCCI Operation A CRADA project with Delphi Automotive Systems Project ID: ACE053 2011 U.S. DOE Hydrogen and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and...

  14. Expanding the Repertoire of Chalcogenide Nanocrystal Networks...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expanding the Repertoire of Chalcogenide Nanocrystal Networks: Ag2Se Gels and Aerogels by Cation Exchange Reactions Home Author: Q. Yao, I. U. Arachchige, S. L. Brock Year: 2009...

  15. SRS K-AREA MATERIAL STORAGE - EXPANDING CAPABILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koenig, R.

    2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the Department of Energy’s continued plans to de-inventory and reduce the footprint of Cold War era weapons’ material production sites, the K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) facility, located in the K-Area Complex (KAC) at the Savannah River Site reservation, has expanded since its startup authorization in 2000 to accommodate DOE’s material consolidation mission. During the facility’s growth and expansion, KAMS will have expanded its authorization capability of material types and storage containers to allow up to 8200 total shipping containers once the current expansion effort completes in 2014. Recognizing the need to safely and cost effectively manage other surplus material across the DOE Complex, KAC is constantly evaluating the storage of different material types within K area. When modifying storage areas in KAC, the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) must undergo extensive calculations and reviews; however, without an extensive and proven security posture the possibility for expansion would not be possible. The KAC maintains the strictest adherence to safety and security requirements for all the SNM it handles. Disciplined Conduct of Operations and Conduct of Projects are demonstrated throughout this historical overview highlighting various improvements in capability, capacity, demonstrated cost effectiveness and utilization of the KAC as the DOE Center of Excellence for safe and secure storage of surplus SNM.

  16. GNEP Element:Expand Domestic Use of Nuclear Power | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Expand Domestic Use of Nuclear Power GNEP Element:Expand Domestic Use of Nuclear Power A report discussing the intentions of the GNEP. GNEP Element:Expand Domestic Use of Nuclear...

  17. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Expand Domestic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Expand Domestic Use of Nuclear Power Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Expand Domestic Use of Nuclear Power GNEP will build on the recent advances made by the...

  18. activation expanded scope: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nanomaterials. He has,16 The Gibbs free energy for molecular systems at the SSI comprises an enthalpic contribution dominated 137 Expanding the Concept &Expanding the...

  19. DOE Expands, Simplifies Loan Guarantees for Renewable Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE Expands, Simplifies Loan Guarantees for Renewable Energy Projects DOE Expands, Simplifies Loan Guarantees for Renewable Energy Projects October 14, 2009 - 12:39pm Addthis DOE...

  20. Establish and Expand Commercial Production of Graphite Anode...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Expand Commercial Production of Graphite Anode Materials for High Performance Lithium-ion Batteries Establish and Expand Commercial Production of Graphite Anode Materials...

  1. Effects of viscogenic plasma expander on cardiac and vascular function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatpun, Surapong

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma expanders (PEs) are infused fluids which restitutehow viscosity of infused fluid affects cardiac function wasPlasma expanders (PEs) are infused fluids which restitute

  2. Model for Sustainable Urban Design With Expanded Sections on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design With Expanded Sections on Distributed Energy Resources, February 2004 Model for Sustainable Urban Design With Expanded Sections on Distributed Energy Resources, February...

  3. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers This fact sheet describes a supercritical carbon...

  4. Expanding Educational Opportunities for the Wind Energy Workforce...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Expanding Educational Opportunities for the Wind Energy Workforce Expanding Educational Opportunities for the Wind Energy Workforce April 11, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The University...

  5. Project Profile: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers Project Profile: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers SWRI Logo The Southwest Research...

  6. DYNAMICAL MODEL OF AN EXPANDING SHELL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pe'er, Asaf [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, MS-51, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Expanding blast waves are ubiquitous in many astronomical sources, such as supernova remnants, X-ray emitting binaries, and gamma-ray bursts. I consider here the dynamics of such an expanding blast wave, both in the adiabatic and the radiative regimes. As the blast wave collects material from its surroundings, it decelerates. A full description of the temporal evolution of the blast wave requires consideration of both the energy density and the pressure of the shocked material. The obtained equation is different from earlier works in which only the energy was considered. The solution converges to the familiar results in both the ultrarelativistic and the sub-relativistic (Newtonian) regimes.

  7. Local symmetries of non-expanding horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudranil Basu; Ayan Chatterjee; Amit Ghosh

    2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Local symmetries of a non-expanding horizon has been investigated in the 1st order formulation of gravity. When applied to a spherically symmetric isolated horizon only a U(1) subgroup of the Lorentz group survives as residual local symmetry that one can make use of in constructing an effective theory on the horizon.

  8. Expanding Earth Sciences Research with Layerscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jakubowski, Mariusz H.

    Expanding Earth Sciences Research with Layerscape In Brief Websites: layerscape Earth in three-dimensional space and time. Oceanographers and earth scientists are using this free set of serious illness in the hospital was pneumonia." The Earth is a vast, complicated system comprised

  9. Expanding and Collapsing Scalar Field Thin Shell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sharif; G. Abbas

    2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with the dynamics of scalar field thin shell in the Reissner-Nordstr$\\ddot{o}$m geometry. The Israel junction conditions between Reissner-Nordstr$\\ddot{o}$m spacetimes are derived, which lead to the equation of motion of scalar field shell and Klien-Gordon equation. These equations are solved numerically by taking scalar field model with the quadratic scalar potential. It is found that solution represents the expanding and collapsing scalar field shell. For the better understanding of this problem, we investigate the case of massless scalar field (by taking the scalar field potential zero). Also, we evaluate the scalar field potential when $p$ is an explicit function of $R$. We conclude that both massless as well as massive scalar field shell can expand to infinity at constant rate or collapse to zero size forming a curvature singularity or bounce under suitable conditions.

  10. Gravitational Dynamics in an Expanding Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Padmanabhan

    1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamical evolution of collisionless particles in an expanding background is described. After discussing qualitatively the key features, the gravitational clustering of collisionless particles in an expanding universe is modelled using some simple physical ideas. I show that it is indeed possible to understand the nonlinear clustering in terms of three well defined regimes: (1) linear regime (2) quasilinear regime which is dominated by scale-invariant radial infall and (3) nonlinear regime dominated by nonradial motions and mergers. Modelling each of these regimes separately I show how the nonlinear two point correlation function can be related to the linear correlation function in hierarchical models. This analysis leads to results which are in good agreement with numerical simulations thereby providing an explanation for numerical results. The ideas presented here will also serve as a powerful analytical tool to investigate nonlinear clustering in different models. Several implications of the result are discussed.

  11. Addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 452: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 452: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, April 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for CASs: • 25-25-09, Spill H940825C (from UST 25-3101-1) • 25-25-14, Spill H940314E (from UST 25-3102-3) • 25-25-15, Spill H941020E (from UST 25-3152-1) These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

  12. Addendum 2 to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 454: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 454: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, April 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for CASs: • 12-25-08, Spill H950524F (from UST 12-B-1) • 12-25-10, Spill H950919A (from UST 12-COMM-1) These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

  13. The "ripples" on relativistically expanding fluid

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shi, Shuzhe [Tsinghua Univ., and Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Liao, Jinfeng [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Zhuang, Pengfei [Tsinghua Univ., and Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China)

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have shown that fluctuations of various types play important roles in the evolution of the fireball created in relativistic heavy ion collisions and bear many phenomenological consequences for experimental observables. The bulk dynamics of the fireball is well described by relativistic hydrodynamic expansion and the fluctuations on top of such expanding background can be studied within the linearized hydrodynamic framework. In this paper we present complete and analytic sound wave solutions on top of both Bjorken flow and Hubble flow backgrounds.

  14. State authority in an expanded territorial sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulbright, Michael Gene

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the United States in the disputed area. The 1950 Texas case concerned claims encompassing the entire extent of the continental shelf off the coast of Texas. Texas conceded that the federal aovernment had paramount powers over this area with respect to nav... development and current status of state authority in the territorial sea. The possi- bility of the United States expanding its territorial sea to twelve miles is then examined. This paper then proceeds with an examination of what types of authoritl...

  15. Production of scalar particles in expanding spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Ng

    2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we investigate cosmological particle production using quantum field theory (QFT). We will consider how production of scalar particles can occur in an expanding universe. By introducing a time-dependent energy parameter representing the time evolution of the universe, the initial vacuum state will be excited. Consequently, creation of particles is present. Here, our focus is mainly creation of minimally coupled scalar particles in Minkowski spacetime.

  16. Thompson Scattering in an Expanding Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James L. Anderson

    1997-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thompson cross section for scattering of electromagnetic waves by a free electron in an expanding universe is derived here. The equations of motion of the electron are obtained using the Einstein-Infeld-Hoffmann (EIH) surface integral method. These integrals are evaluated approximately by perturbing off an Einstein-deSitter cosmological field. It is found that the Thompson cross section varies with time as the inverse square of the cosmic scale factor R(t).

  17. Simulation of spherically expanding turbulent premixed flames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, I.; Swaminathan, N.

    2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    canonically im- portant configuration and its investigation is helpful to understand combustion in prac- tical devices such as the spark ignited internal combustion engine, modern stratified charge engines and accidental explosions of fuel vapour cloud... Simulation of spherically expanding turbulent premixed flames I. Ahmed, N. Swaminathan? Department of Engineering, Cambridge University, Cambridge, CB2 1PZ, UK. ?Corresponding author: Department of Engineering, Cambridge University, Trumpington...

  18. revision:19970323 modified:19970323

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelah, Saharon

    596 revision:1997­03­23 modified:1997­03­23 Some independence results on reflection James Cummings. Publication number 596. 1 #12; 596 revision:1997­03­23 modified:1997­03­23 Baumgartner proved in [1­reflection principle captures 2 #12; 596 revision:1997­03­23 modified:1997­03­23 exactly that part of # which is useful

  19. Expandable Metal Liner For Downhole Components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe R. (Provo, UT)

    2004-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A liner for an annular downhole component is comprised of an expandable metal tube having indentations along its surface. The indentations are formed in the wall of the tube either by drawing the tube through a die, by hydroforming, by stamping, or roll forming and may extend axially, radially, or spirally along its wall. The indentations accommodate radial and axial expansion of the tube within the downhole component. The tube is inserted into the annular component and deformed to match an inside surface of the component. The tube may be expanded using a hydroforming process or by drawing a mandrel through the tube. The tube may be expanded in such a manner so as to place it in compression against the inside wall of the component. The tube is useful for improving component hydraulics, shielding components from contamination, inhibiting corrosion, and preventing wear to the downhole component during use. It may also be useful for positioning conduit and insulated conductors within the component. An insulating material may be disposed between the tube and the component in order to prevent galvanic corrosion of the downhole component.

  20. Measurements of an expanding surface flashover plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, J. R., E-mail: john.harris@colostate.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A better understanding of vacuum surface flashover and the plasma produced by it is of importance for electron and ion sources, as well as advanced accelerators and other vacuum electronic devices. This article describes time-of-flight and biased-probe measurements made on the expanding plasma generated from a vacuum surface flashover discharge. The plasma expanded at velocities of 1.2–6.5?cm/?s, and had typical densities of 10{sup 10}–10{sup 12}?cm{sup ?3}. The expansion velocity of the plasma leading edge often exhibited a sharp increase at distances of about 50?mm from the discharge site. Comparison with biased-probe data suggests that, under most conditions, the plasma leading edge was dominated by negative ions, with the apparent increase in velocity being due to fast H{sup ?} overtaking slower, heavier ions. In some cases, biased-probe data also showed abrupt discontinuities in the plasma energy distribution co-located with large changes in the intercepted plasma current, suggesting the presence of a shock in the leading edge of the expanding plasma.

  1. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration plan, CAU No. 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points landfill Tonopah test range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan was prepared under the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) concept. The SAFER process is employed at Corrective Action Units (CAUs) where enough information exists about the nature and extent of contamination to propose an appropriate corrective action prior to the implementation of a Corrective Action Investigation (CAI). This process combines elements of the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process and the observational approach to help plan and conduct corrective actions. DQOs are used to identify the problem and define the type and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the process. The observational approach provides a framework for managing uncertainty and planning decision-making. The purpose of the investigation in the SAFER process is to document and verify the adequacy of existing information (such as process knowledge); to affirm the decision for clean closure, closure in place, or to take no further action; and to provide sufficient data to implement the corrective action.

  2. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 499: Hydrocarbon Spill Site, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. M. Fitzmaurice

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses the action necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 499, Hydrocarbon Spill Site, Tonopah Test Range (TTR). This CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996). CAU 499 is located on the TTR and consists of the following single Corrective Action Site (CAS) (Figure 1): CAS RG-25-001-RD24 - Radar 24 Diesel Spill Site is a diesel fuel release site that is assumed to have been cased by numerous small historical over fillings, spills and leaks from an above-ground storage tank (AST) over a period of 36 years. The tank was located on the north side of Building 24-50 on the TTR approximately 4.0 kilometers (2.5 miles) southwest of the Area 3 Compound at the end of the Avenue 24.

  3. Energy Department Announces Up to $7 Million to Expand Clean...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Up to 7 Million to Expand Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency on Tribal Lands Energy Department Announces Up to 7 Million to Expand Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency on Tribal...

  4. The "ripples" on relativistically expanding fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuzhe Shi; Jinfeng Liao; Pengfei Zhuang

    2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have shown that fluctuations of various types play important roles in the evolution of the fireball created in relativistic heavy ion collisions and bear many phenomenological consequences for experimental observables. The bulk dynamics of the fireball is well described by relativistic hydrodynamic expansion and the fluctuations on top of such expanding background can be studied within the linearized hydrodynamic framework. In this work we present complete and analytic sound wave solutions on top of both Bjorken flow and Hubble flow backgrounds. We also briefly discuss the applications of these solutions in heavy ion collisions.

  5. Expandable tubulars for use in geologic structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spray, Jeffery A.; Svedeman, Steven; Walter, David; Mckeighan, Peter; Siebanaler, Shane; Dewhurst, Peter; Hobson, Steven; Foss, Doug; Wirz, Holger; Sharpe, Aaron; Apostal, Michael

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An expandable tubular includes a plurality of leaves formed from sheet material that have curved surfaces. The leaves extend around a portion or fully around the diameter of the tubular structure. Some of the adjacent leaves of the tubular are coupled together. The tubular is compressed to a smaller diameter so that it can be inserted through previously deployed tubular assemblies. Once the tubular is properly positioned, it is deployed and coupled or not coupled to a previously deployed tubular assembly. The tubular is useful for all types of wells and boreholes.

  6. Expanded E- Government | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexas EnergyofIdahoExceptions to DOEDepartment ofJanuaryExpanded E-

  7. Modified Newtonian Dynamics as an extra dimensional effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. F. Kao

    2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Modified Newtonian dynamics can be considered as an effect derived from a squeezable extra dimension space. The third law of Newtonian dynamics can be managed to remain valid in the 5-space. The critical acceleration parameter $a_0$ appears naturally as the bulk acceleration that has to do with the expanding universe in this setup. A simple toy model is presented in this Letter to show that consistent theory can be built with the help of the extra dimensional space.

  8. High temperature expanding cement composition and use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Erik B. (Tulsa County, OK); Eilers, Louis H. (Rogers County, OK)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydratable cement composition useful for preparing a pectolite-containing expanding cement at temperatures above about 150.degree. C. comprising a water soluble sodium salt of a weak acid, a 0.1 molar aqueous solution of which salt has a pH of between about 7.5 and about 11.5, a calcium source, and a silicon source, where the atomic ratio of sodium to calcium to silicon ranges from about 0.3:0.6:1 to about 0.03:1:1; aqueous slurries prepared therefrom and the use of such slurries for plugging subterranean cavities at a temperature of at least about 150.degree. C. The invention composition is useful for preparing a pectolite-containing expansive cement having about 0.2 to about 2 percent expansion, by volume, when cured at at least 150.degree. C.

  9. Nonlinear Gravitational Clustering in Expanding Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Padmanabhan

    1996-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The gravitational clustering of collisionless particles in an expanding universe is modelled using some simple physical ideas. I show that it is possible to understand the nonlinear clustering in terms of three well defined regimes: (1) linear regime; (2) quasilinear regime which is dominated by scale-invariant radial infall and (3) nonlinear regime dominated by nonradial motions and mergers. Modelling each of these regimes separately I show how the nonlinear two point correlation function can be related to the linear correlation function in hierarchical models. This analysis leads to results which are in good agreement with numerical simulations thereby providing an explanation for numerical results. Using this model and some simple extensions, it is possible to understand the transfer of power from large to small scales and the behaviour of higher order correlation functions. The ideas presented here will also serve as a powerful analytical tool to investigate nonlinear clustering in different models.

  10. Expandable mixing section gravel and cobble eductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Arthur L. (Kenyon, MN); Krawza, Kenneth I. (Lakeville, MN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a hydraulically powered pump for excavating and transporting slurries in hich it is immersed, the improvement of a gravel and cobble eductor including an expandable mixing section, comprising: a primary flow conduit that terminates in a nozzle that creates a water jet internal to a tubular mixing section of the pump when water pressure is applied from a primary supply flow; a tubular mixing section having a center line in alignment with the nozzle that creates a water jet; a mixing section/exit diffuser column that envelopes the flexible liner; and a secondary inlet conduit that forms an opening at a bas portion of the column and adjacent to the nozzle and water jet to receive water saturated gravel as a secondary flow that mixes with the primary flow inside of the mixing section to form a combined total flow that exits the mixing section and decelerates in the exit diffuser.

  11. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 574: Neptune, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan identifies the activities required for closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 574, Neptune. CAU 574 is included in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996 [as amended March 2010]) and consists of the following two Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 12 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 12-23-10, U12c.03 Crater (Neptune); (2) CAS 12-45-01, U12e.05 Crater (Blanca). This plan provides the methodology for the field activities that will be performed to gather the necessary information for closure of the two CASs. There is sufficient information and process knowledge regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 574 using the SAFER process. Based on historical documentation, personnel interviews, site process knowledge, site visits, photographs, field screening, analytical results, the results of the data quality objective (DQO) process (Section 3.0), and an evaluation of corrective action alternatives (Appendix B), closure in place with administrative controls is the expected closure strategy for CAU 574. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation to verify and support the expected closure strategy and provide a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. This will be presented in a Closure Report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval.

  12. Development of Inexpensive Turbo Compressor/Expanders for Industrial Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacox, J. W.

    DEVELOPMENT OF INEXPENSIVE TURBO COMPRESSOR/EXPANDERS FOR INDUSTRIAL USE JOHN W. Senior Project Manager NUCON International, Columbus, ABSTRACT Use of Turbo Compressor/Expanders (TCEs) as industrial reversed Brayton Cycle Heat Pumps... offers many technical and energy saving advantages. until recently, such devices have been far too expensive in both capital cost and inefficiency mainly because the compressor and expander stages were built for forward Brayton Cycle operation...

  13. Expanding the Allowable TRUPACT-II Payload

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    St. Michel, W. (INEEL); Lott, S. (LANL-Carlsbad Operations)

    2002-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The partnership between the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the TRU and Mixed Waste Focus Area (TMFA) was rewarded when several long-term projects came to fruition. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) removed some of the conservatism in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) with their approval of Revision 19. The SARP strictly limits the payload constituents to ensure that hydrogen gas and other flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) don't build up to flammable/explosive levels while the transuranic (TRU) waste is sealed in the container during shipment. The CBFO/TMFA development program was based on laboratory experiments with surrogate waste materials, real waste experiments, and theoretical modeling that were used to justify payload expansion. Future work to expand the shipping envelope of the TRUPACT-II focuses on increasing the throughput through the waste certification process and reducing the waste operations costs by removing the need for a repack aging and/or treatment capability or reducing the size of the needed repackaging/treatment capability.

  14. Expanding the Allowable TRUPACT-II Payload

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    St Michel, Whitney Dorothea; Lott, Sheila

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The partnership between the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the TRU and Mixed Waste Focus Area (TMFA) was rewarded when several long-term projects came to fruition. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) removed some of the conservatism in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) with their approval of Revision 19. The SARP strictly limits the payload constituents to ensure that hydrogen gas and other flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) don't build up to flammable/explosive levels while the transuranic (TRU) waste is sealed in the container during shipment. The CBFO/TMFA development program was based on laboratory experiments with surrogate waste materials, real waste experiments, and theoretical modeling that were used to justify payload expansion. Future work to expand the shipping envelope of the TRUPACT-II focuses on increasing the throughput through the waste certification process and reducing the waste operations costs by removing the need for a repackaging and/or treatment capability or reducing the size of the needed repackaging/treatment capability.

  15. Accelerated Lambda Iteration in Rapidly Expanding Envelopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Hoeflich

    2002-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the current implementation of the ALI method into our HYDrodynamical RAdiation(HYDRA) code for rapidly expanding, low density envelopes commonly found in core collapse and thermonuclear supernovae, novae and WR stars. Due to the low densities, non-thermal excitation by high energy photons (e.g. by radioactive decays) and the time dependence of the problem, large departures from LTE are common throughout the envelope even at large optical depths. ALI is instrumental for both the coupling of the statistical equations and the hydrodynamical equations with the radiation transport (RT). We employ several concepts to improve the stability, and convergence rate/control including the concept of leading elements, the use of net rates, level locking, reconstruction of global photon redistribution functions, equivalent-2-level approach, and predictive corrector methods. For appropriate conditions, the solution of the time-dependent rate equations can be reduced to the time-independent problem plus an analytic solution of an ODE For the 3-D problem, we solve the radiation transport via the moment equations. To construct the Eddington tensor elements, we use a Monte Carlo scheme to determine the deviation of the solution of the RT equation from the diffusion approximation (ALI of second kind). At the example of a thermonuclear supernova (SN99by),we show an analysis of light light curves, flux and polarization spectra and discuss the limitations of our approach.

  16. Homogeneous cosmology with aggressively expanding civilizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Jay Olson

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In the context of a homogeneous universe, we note that the appearance of aggressively expanding advanced life is geometrically similar to the process of nucleation and bubble growth in a first-order cosmological phase transition. We exploit this similarity to describe the dynamics of life saturating the universe on a cosmic scale, adapting the phase transition model to incorporate probability distributions of expansion and resource consumption strategies. Through a series of numerical solutions covering several orders of magnitude in the input assumption parameters, the resulting cosmological model is used to address basic questions related to the intergalactic spreading of life, dealing with issues such as timescales, observability, competition between strategies, and first-mover advantage. Finally, we examine physical effects on the universe itself, such as reheating and the backreaction on the evolution of the scale factor, if such life is able to control and convert a significant fraction of the available pressureless matter into radiation. We conclude that the existence of life, if certain advanced technologies are practical, could have a significant influence on the future large-scale evolution of the universe.

  17. Helical Screw Expander Evaluation Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKay, R.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A functional 1-MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested in Utah in 1978 to 1979 with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer-equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000-kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Additional testing was performed in Mexico in 1980 under a cooperative test program using the same test array, and machine efficiency was measured at 62% maximum with the rotors partially coated with scale, compared with approximately 54% maximum in Utah with uncoated rotors, confirming the importance of scale deposits within the machine on performance. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  18. Expanded "Green Button" Will Reach Federal Agencies and More...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "Green Button" Will Reach Federal Agencies and More American Energy Consumers Expanded "Green Button" Will Reach Federal Agencies and More American Energy Consumers December 6,...

  19. Vice President Biden Unveils Report Focused on Expanding Green...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Retrofit, a report that builds on the foundation laid in the Recovery Act to expand green job opportunities and boost energy savings by making homes more energy efficient....

  20. Corporate Property Tax Reduction for New/Expanded Generating Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Montana generating plants producing one megawatt (MW) or more with an alternative renewable energy source are eligible for the new or expanded industry property tax reduction. This incentive...

  1. EIS-0310: Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility...

  2. Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman announced today that the Department of Energy has expanded its gas gouging reporting system to include a toll-free telephone...

  3. Cloud Computing and Validation of Expandable In Silico Livers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ropella, Glen EP; Hunt, C Anthony

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    benefit analysis of cloud computing versus desktop grids.as: Ropella and Hunt: Cloud computing and validation ofCloud computing and validation of expandable in silico

  4. Save Energy Now Assessment Helps Expand Energy Management Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    identify significant energy savings opportunities in their Dalton, Georgia, plant's steam system. Save Energy Now Assessment Helps Expand Energy Management Program at Shaw...

  5. Expanding the solar spectrum used by photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Min; Blankenship, R. E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A limiting factor for photosynthetic organisms is their light-harvesting efficiency, that is the efficiency of their conversion of light energy to chemical energy. Small modifications or variations of chlorophylls allow photosynthetic organisms to harvest sunlight at different wavelengths. Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms usually utilize only the visible portion of the solar spectrum. The cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina carries out oxygenic photosynthesis but contains mostly chlorophyll d and only traces of chlorophyll a. Chlorophyll d provides a potential selective advantage because it enables Acaryochloris to use infrared light (700–750 nm) that is not absorbed by chlorophyll a. Recently, an even more red-shifted chlorophyll termed chlorophyll f has been reported. Here, we discuss using modified chlorophylls to extend the spectral region of light that drives photosynthetic organisms.

  6. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 107: Low Impact Soil Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan covers activities associated with Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 107 of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996 [as amended February 2008]). CAU 107 consists of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site. (1) CAS 01-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site - High Alt; (2) CAS 02-23-02, Contaminated Areas (2); (3) CAS 02-23-03, Contaminated Berm; (4) CAS 02-23-10, Gourd-Amber Contamination Area; (5) CAS 02-23-11, Sappho Contamination Area; (6) CAS 02-23-12, Scuttle Contamination Area; (7) CAS 03-23-24, Seaweed B Contamination Area; (8) CAS 03-23-27, Adze Contamination Area; (9) CAS 03-23-28, Manzanas Contamination Area; (10) CAS 03-23-29, Truchas-Chamisal Contamination Area; (11) CAS 04-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site T4-a; (12) CAS 05-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site; (13) CAS 09-23-06, Mound of Contaminated Soil; (14) CAS 10-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site M-10; and (15) CAS 18-23-02, U-18d Crater (Sulky). Based on historical documentation, personnel interviews, site process knowledge, site visits, photographs, engineering drawings, field screening, analytical results, and the results of data quality objectives process (Section 3.0), closure in place with administrative controls or no further action will be implemented for CAU 107. CAU 107 closure activities will consist of verifying that the current postings required under Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835 are in place and implementing use restrictions (URs) at two sites, CAS 03-23-29 and CAS 18-23-02. The current radiological postings combined with the URs are adequate administrative controls to limit site access and worker dose.

  7. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 107: Low Impact Soil Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan covers activities associated with Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 107 of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996 [as amended February 2008]). CAU 107 consists of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site. {sm_bullet} CAS 01-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site - High Alt{sm_bullet} CAS 02-23-02, Contaminated Areas (2){sm_bullet} CAS 02-23-03, Contaminated Berm{sm_bullet} CAS 02-23-10, Gourd-Amber Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 02-23-11, Sappho Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 02-23-12, Scuttle Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 03-23-24, Seaweed B Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 03-23-27, Adze Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 03-23-28, Manzanas Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 03-23-29, Truchas-Chamisal Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 04-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site T4-a{sm_bullet} CAS 05-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site{sm_bullet} CAS 09-23-06, Mound of Contaminated Soil{sm_bullet} CAS 10-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site M-10{sm_bullet} CAS 18-23-02, U-18d Crater (Sulky) Based on historical documentation, personnel interviews, site process knowledge, site visits, photographs, engineering drawings, field screening, analytical results, and the results of data quality objectives process (Section 3.0), closure in place with administrative controls or no further action will be implemented for CAU 107.

  8. A streamline splitting pore-network approach for computationally inexpensive and accurate simulation of transport in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehmani, Yashar; Oostrom, Martinus; Balhoff, Matthew

    2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Several approaches have been developed in the literature for solving flow and transport at the pore-scale. Some authors use a direct modeling approach where the fundamental flow and transport equations are solved on the actual pore-space geometry. Such direct modeling, while very accurate, comes at a great computational cost. Network models are computationally more efficient because the pore-space morphology is approximated. Typically, a mixed cell method (MCM) is employed for solving the flow and transport system which assumes pore-level perfect mixing. This assumption is invalid at moderate to high Peclet regimes. In this work, a novel Eulerian perspective on modeling flow and transport at the pore-scale is developed. The new streamline splitting method (SSM) allows for circumventing the pore-level perfect mixing assumption, while maintaining the computational efficiency of pore-network models. SSM was verified with direct simulations and excellent matches were obtained against micromodel experiments across a wide range of pore-structure and fluid-flow parameters. The increase in the computational cost from MCM to SSM is shown to be minimal, while the accuracy of SSM is much higher than that of MCM and comparable to direct modeling approaches. Therefore, SSM can be regarded as an appropriate balance between incorporating detailed physics and controlling computational cost. The truly predictive capability of the model allows for the study of pore-level interactions of fluid flow and transport in different porous materials. In this paper, we apply SSM and MCM to study the effects of pore-level mixing on transverse dispersion in 3D disordered granular media.

  9. Self-similar expanding solutions for the planar network flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzeo, Rafe

    Self-similar expanding solutions for the planar network flow Rafe Mazzeo Stanford University-similar expanding solutions of the cur- vature flow on planar networks where the initial configuration is any num generally, one might consider the flow by curvature for net- works of curves. Definition 1.1. A planar

  10. Proton corebeam system in the expanding solar wind: Hybrid simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Proton corebeam system in the expanding solar wind: Hybrid simulations Petr Hellinger1,2 and Pavel 9 November 2011. [1] Results of a twodimensional hybrid expanding box simulation of a proton to a decrease of the ratio between the proton perpendicular and parallel temperatures as well as to an increase

  11. Expanded polyglutamine domain possesses nuclear export activity which modulates subcellular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higgins, Darren

    experiments, were ana- lyzed. Mammalian cell culture HEK293 cells were cultured at 378C with 5% CO2 in high,16). To investigate the nuclear transport property of expanded polyQ domain per se, we initially took advantage then focused on elucidating the nuclear export property of an expanded polyQ domain and its associated

  12. Lyapunov optimizing measures for C1 expanding maps of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Francis

    Lyapunov optimizing measures for C1 expanding maps of the circle Oliver Jenkinson and Ian D. Morris Abstract. For a generic C1 expanding map of the circle, the Lyapunov maximizing measure is unique, fully/Z, and let M(T) denote the set of T-invariant Borel probability measures. For any µ M(T), its Lyapunov

  13. Modified Faraday cup

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W. (Pleasanton, CA); Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA); O'Brien, Dennis W. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tomographic technique for measuring the current density distribution in electron beams using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams. The modified Faraday cup includes a narrow slit and is rotated by a stepper motor and can be moved in the x, y and z directions. The beam is swept across the slit perpendicular thereto and controlled by deflection coils, and the slit rotated such that waveforms are taken every few degrees form 0.degree. to 360.degree. and the waveforms are recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. Two-din-tensional and three-dimensional images of the current density distribution in the beam can be reconstructed by computer tomography from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment.

  14. Modified Faraday cup

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, J.W.; Teruya, A.T.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1996-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A tomographic technique for measuring the current density distribution in electron beams using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams is disclosed. The modified Faraday cup includes a narrow slit and is rotated by a stepper motor and can be moved in the x, y and z directions. The beam is swept across the slit perpendicular thereto and controlled by deflection coils, and the slit rotated such that waveforms are taken every few degrees from 0{degree} to 360{degree} and the waveforms are recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional images of the current density distribution in the beam can be reconstructed by computer tomography from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment. 12 figs.

  15. The Modified Dirac Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the behavior of the particles at ultra relativistic energies, for both the Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations. We observe that the usual description is valid for energies such that we are outside the particle's Compton wavelength. For higher energies however, both the Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations get modified and this leads to some new effects for the particles, including the appearance of anti particles with a slightly different energy.

  16. Viscosity in modified gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iver Brevik

    2012-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A bulk viscosity is introduced in the formalism of modified gravity. It is shown that, on the basis of a natural scaling law for the viscosity, a simple solution can be found for quantities such as the Hubble parameter and the energy density. These solutions may incorporate a viscosity-induced Big Rip singularity. By introducing a phase transition in the cosmic fluid, the future singularity can nevertheless in principle be avoided.

  17. Streamlining Bioenergy Feedstock Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol

  18. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 114, Area 25 EMAD Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 114 comprises the following corrective action site (CAS) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site: • 25-41-03, EMAD Facility This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing CAS 25-41-03. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 114 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for CAS 25-41-03. It is anticipated that the results of the field investigation and implementation of corrective actions will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The CAS will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2009, by representatives of NDEP and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAS 25-41-03. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 114: • Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, radiological surveys). • Collect samples of materials to determine whether potential source material (PSM) is present that may cause the future release of a contaminant of concern to environmental media. • If no PSMs are present at the CAS, establish no further action as the corrective action. • If a PSM is present at the CAS, either: - Establish clean closure as the corrective action. The material to be remediated will be removed and disposed of as waste, or - Establish closure in place as the corrective action and implement the appropriate use restrictions. • Confirm the selected closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment.

  19. Expand the Modeling Capabilities of DOE's EnergyPlus Building Energy Simulation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Shirey

    2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    EnergyPlus{trademark} is a new generation computer software analysis tool that has been developed, tested, and commercialized to support DOE's Building Technologies (BT) Program in terms of whole-building, component, and systems R&D (http://www.energyplus.gov). It is also being used to support evaluation and decision making of zero energy building (ZEB) energy efficiency and supply technologies during new building design and existing building retrofits. Version 1.0 of EnergyPlus was released in April 2001, followed by semiannual updated versions over the ensuing seven-year period. This report summarizes work performed by the University of Central Florida's Florida Solar Energy Center (UCF/FSEC) to expand the modeling capabilities of EnergyPlus. The project tasks involved implementing, testing, and documenting the following new features or enhancement of existing features: (1) A model for packaged terminal heat pumps; (2) A model for gas engine-driven heat pumps with waste heat recovery; (3) Proper modeling of window screens; (4) Integrating and streamlining EnergyPlus air flow modeling capabilities; (5) Comfort-based controls for cooling and heating systems; and (6) An improved model for microturbine power generation with heat recovery. UCF/FSEC located existing mathematical models or generated new model for these features and incorporated them into EnergyPlus. The existing or new models were (re)written using Fortran 90/95 programming language and were integrated within EnergyPlus in accordance with the EnergyPlus Programming Standard and Module Developer's Guide. Each model/feature was thoroughly tested and identified errors were repaired. Upon completion of each model implementation, the existing EnergyPlus documentation (e.g., Input Output Reference and Engineering Document) was updated with information describing the new or enhanced feature. Reference data sets were generated for several of the features to aid program users in selecting proper model inputs. An example input data file, suitable for distribution to EnergyPlus users, was created for each new or improved feature to illustrate the input requirements for the model.

  20. Cryogenic expander/recompressor control for maximizing liquids production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batson, B.W.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a new method is described to control cryogenic expander/recompressor units to improve natural gas liquid production. This method employs the antisurge valve associated with the recompressor to load the expander without increasing the flow through it. This method can be applied to continuous control or speed limiting control. A crucial aspect of this method of control is the interaction of the two control loops--expander inlet nozzle control and antisurge valve control. These loops are highly coupled, requiring loop decoupling to assure stable control.

  1. On Modified Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivan Dimitrijevic; Branko Dragovich; Jelena Grujic; Zoran Rakic

    2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider some aspects of nonlocal modified gravity, where nonlocality is of the type $R \\mathcal{F}(\\Box) R$. In particular, using ansatz of the form $\\Box R = c R^\\gamma,$ we find a few $R(t)$ solutions for the spatially flat FLRW metric. There are singular and nonsingular bounce solutions. For late cosmic time, scalar curvature R(t) is in low regime and scale factor a(t) is decelerated. R (t) = 0 satisfies all equations when k = -1.

  2. Expandable house : for disaster relief and flexible dwelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Mimi Ho

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 2011, a devastating earthquake and tsunami struck northern Japan. In addition to the lives lost, thousands of people were dislocated, resulting in an urgent need for housing. My approach is to design the Expandable ...

  3. Environmental assessment, expanded Ponnequin wind energy project, Weld County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has considered a proposal from the State of Colorado, Office of Energy Conservation (OEC), for funding construction of the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project in Weld County, Colorado. OEC plans to enter into a contracting arrangement with Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCo) for the completion of these activities. PSCo, along with its subcontractors and business partners, are jointly developing the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project. The purpose of this Final Environmental Assessment (EA) is to provide DOE and the public with information on potential environmental impacts associated with the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Energy Project. This EA, and public comments received on it, were used in DOE`s deliberations on whether to release funding for the expanded project under the Commercialization Ventures Program.

  4. Y-12 weapons work expands in 1950s

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    weapons work expands in 1950s During the era immediately following the end of World War II, as early as 1946, evidence of the Cold War was emerging. Russia was working on its own...

  5. DOE Takes Next Steps to Expand Strategic Petroleum Reserve to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Richton, DOE also proposes to expand capacity at three existing SPR sites: Big Hill in Texas, and Bayou Choctaw and West Hackberry in Louisiana. Selection of sites is the first...

  6. Emerging information technology and the expanding role of technical communicators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuire, Richard Charles

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emerging information technology is expanding the role of technical communicators. Functionality present in software tools contributes to a re-definition of what tasks technical communicators currently perform and how they will use object management...

  7. Expanding proteome coverage with orthogonal-specificity &alpha...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    350% when the data from trypsin, LysC, WaLP, and MaLP were combined. Citation: Meyer JG, S Kim, DA Maltby, M Ghassemian, N Bandeira, and EA Komives.2014."Expanding...

  8. Is space expanding in the Friedmann universe models?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oyvind Gron; Oystein Elgaroy

    2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The interpretation of the expanding universe as an expansion of space has recently been challenged. From the geodesic equation in Friedmann universe models and the empty Milne model, we argue that a Newtonian or special relativistic analysis is not applicable on large scales, and the general relativistic interpretation in terms of expanding space has the advantage of being globally consistent. We also show that the cosmic redshift, interpreted as an expansion effect, containts both the Doppler effect and the gravitational frequency shift.

  9. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 121: Storage Tanks and Miscellaneous Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 121, Storage Tanks and Miscellaneous Sites. CAU 121 is currently listed in Appendix III of the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO, 1996) and consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS): CAS 12-01-01, Aboveground Storage Tank; CAS 12-01-02, Aboveground Storage Tank; and CAS 12-22-26, Drums; 2 AST's. CASs 12-01-01 and 12-01-02 are located to the west of the Area 12 Camp, and CAS 12-22-26 is located near the U-12g Tunnel, also known as G-tunnel, in Area 12 (Figure 1). The aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) present at CASs 12-01-01 and 12-01-02 will be removed and disposed of at an appropriate facility. Soil below the ASTs will be sampled to identify whether it has been impacted with chemicals or radioactivity above action levels. If impacted soil above action levels is present, the soil will be excavated and disposed of at an appropriate facility. The CAS 12-22-26 site is composed of two overlapping areas, one where drums had formerly been stored, and the other where an AST was used to dispense diesel for locomotives used at G-tunnel. This area is located above an underground radioactive materials area (URMA), and within an area that may have elevated background radioactivity because of containment breaches during nuclear tests and associated tunnel reentry operations. CAS 12-22-26 does not include the URMA or the elevated background radioactivity. An AST that had previously been used to store liquid magnesium chloride (MgCl) was properly disposed of several years ago, and releases from this tank are not an environmental concern. The diesel AST will be removed and disposed of at an appropriate facility. Soil at the former drum area and the diesel AST area will be sampled to identify whether it has been impacted by releases, from the drums or the AST, with chemicals or radioactivity above action levels. CAS 12-22-26 has different potential closure pathways that are dependent upon the concentrations and chemicals detected. If only petroleum hydrocarbons are detected above action levels, then the area will be use-restricted. It will not be excavated because of the more significant hazard of excavating within a URMA. Similarly, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) will only be excavated for concentrations of 50 parts per million (ppm) or greater, if there are no other factors that require excavation. For PCBs at concentrations above 1 ppm, the area will be use-restricted as required by Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 761 for PCBs (CFR, 2006), in the ''Toxic Substances Control Act'' (TSCA). Other chemicals at concentrations above the final action levels (FALs) will be excavated. If radioactivity is above action levels, then the soil will be excavated only to a depth of 1 foot (ft) below ground surface (bgs) and replaced with clean fill. This action is intended to remove the ''hot spot'' on the surface caused by leakage from a drum, and not to remediate the URMA.

  10. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 130: Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 130, Storage Tanks, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996, as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit 130 consists of the seven following corrective action sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 7, 10, 20, 22, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site: • 01-02-01, Underground Storage Tank • 07-02-01, Underground Storage Tanks • 10-02-01, Underground Storage Tank • 20-02-03, Underground Storage Tank • 20-99-05, Tar Residue • 22-02-02, Buried UST Piping • 23-02-07, Underground Storage Tank This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 130 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. This will be presented in a Closure Report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) finalized on April 3, 2008, by representatives of NDEP; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for each CAS in CAU 130. The DQO process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure options: (1) investigation and confirmation that no contamination exists above the final action levels, leading to a no further action declaration; (2) characterization of the nature and extent of contamination, leading to closure in place with use restrictions; or (3) clean closure by remediation and verification. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 130: • Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, geophysical surveys). • Move or remove and dispose of debris at various CASs, as required. • Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., stained soil) to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information. • If no COCs are present at a CAS, establish no further action as the corrective action. • If COCs exist, collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. • If a COC is present at a CAS, either: - Establish clean closure as the corrective action. The material to be remediated will be removed, disposed of as waste, and verification samples will be collected from remaining soil, or - Establish closure in place as the corrective action and implement the appropriate use restrictions. • Obtain consensus from NDEP that the preferred closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment. • Close the underground storage tank(s) and their contents, if any, in accordance with Nevada Administrative Code regulations. • Remove the lead brick(s) found at any CAS in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

  11. Streamlined Approach for (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 566: E-MAD Compound, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 566, EMAD Compound, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 566 comprises the following corrective action site (CAS) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site: • 25-99-20, EMAD Compound This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing CAS 25-99-20. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 566 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action. It is anticipated that the results of the field investigation and implementation of a corrective action of clean closure will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The data quality objective (DQO) strategy for CAU 566 was developed at a meeting on April 30, 2009, by representatives of NDEP and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAU 566. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 566: • Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, radiological surveys). • Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., stained soil) to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information. • Collect samples of materials to determine whether potential source material (PSM) is present that may cause the future release of a COC to environmental media. • If no COCs or PSMs are present at a CAS, establish no further action as the corrective action. • If COCs exist, collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. • If a COC or PSM is present at a CAS, either: - Establish clean closure as the corrective action. The material to be remediated will be removed, disposed of as waste, and verification samples will be collected from remaining soil, or - Establish closure in place as the corrective action and implement the appropriate use restrictions. • Confirm the selected closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment.

  12. Polyoxometalate-Graphene Nanocomposite Modified Electrode for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Polyoxometalate-Graphene Nanocomposite Modified Electrode for Electrocatalytic Detection of Ascorbic Acid. Polyoxometalate-Graphene Nanocomposite Modified Electrode for...

  13. Demoing the Modified TALON Robot

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A technician at Idaho National Laboratory demonstrates the modified TALON robot; which is being sent to assist emergency workers at Japan's Fukishima nuclear reactor.

  14. Recovery Act Expanding the First Significant U.S. ? Based Manufacturi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Publications Recovery Act Expanding the First Significant U.S. Based Manufacturing Expanding U.S.-based Lithium-ion Battery Manufacturing EA-1710: Final Environmental Assessment...

  15. Recovery Act Expanding the First Significant U.S. ? Based Manufacturi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Publications Recovery Act Expanding the First Significant U.S. Based Manufacturing EA-1710: Final Environmental Assessment Expanding U.S.-based Lithium-ion Battery Manufacturing...

  16. SunLine Expands Horizons with Fuel Cell Bus Demo. Hydrogen, Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Expands Horizons with Fuel Cell Bus Demo. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program, Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Projects (Fact Sheet). SunLine Expands Horizons...

  17. Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine...

  18. Automatic Detection of Expanding HI Shells Using Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anik Daigle; Gilles Joncas; Marc Parizeau; Marc-Antoine Miville-Deschenes

    2003-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The identification of expanding HI shells is difficult because of their variable morphological characteristics. The detection of HI bubbles on a global scale therefore never has been attempted. In this paper, an automatic detector for expanding HI shells is presented. The detection is based on the more stable dynamical characteristics of expanding shells and is performed in two stages. The first one is the recognition of the dynamical signature of an expanding bubble in the velocity spectra, based on the classification of an artificial neural network. The pixels associated with these recognized spectra are identified on each velocity channel. The second stage consists in looking for concentrations of those pixels that were firstly pointed out, and to decide if they are potential detections by morphological and 21-cm emission variation considerations. Two test bubbles are correctly detected and a potentially new case of shell that is visually very convincing is discovered. About 0.6% of the surveyed pixels are identified as part of a bubble. These may be false detections, but still constitute regions of space with high probability of finding an expanding shell. The subsequent search field is thus significantly reduced. We intend to conduct in the near future a large scale HI shells detection over the Perseus Arm using our detector.

  19. Non-Singular Cosmology in Modified Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Moffat

    2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-singular cosmology is derived in modified gravity (MOG) with a varying gravitational coupling strength $G(t)=G_N\\xi(t)$. Assuming that the curvature $k$, the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ and $\\rho$ vanish at $t=0$, we obtain a non-singular universe with a negative pressure, $p_G < 0$. Quantum fluctuations at $t\\sim 0$ produce creation of pairs of particles from the vacuum explaining the origin of matter. The universe expands for $t\\to \\infty$ according to the standard radiation and matter dominated solutions. The arrow of time reverses at $t=0$ always pointing in the direction of increasing entropy ${\\cal S}$ and the entropy is at a minimum value at $t=0$, solving the conundrum of the Second Law of Thermodynamics. The Hubble radius $H^{-1}(t)$ is infinite at $t=0$ removing the curvature and particle horizons. The negative pressure $p_G$ generated by the scalar field $\\xi$ at $t\\sim 0$ can produce quantum spontaneous creation of particles explaining the origin of matter and radiation.

  20. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 124: Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Draft), Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 124, Areas 8, 15, and 16 Storage Tanks, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 124 consists of five Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 8, 15, and 16 of the Nevada Test Site as follows: • 08-02-01, Underground Storage Tank • 15-02-01, Irrigation Piping • 16-02-03, Underground Storage Tank • 16-02-04, Fuel Oil Piping • 16-99-04, Fuel Line (Buried) and UST This plan provides the methodology of field activities necessary to gather information to close each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 124 using the SAFER process.

  1. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration plan for corrective action unit 430, buried depleted uranium artillery round No. 1, Tonopah test range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan addresses actions necessary for the restoration and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 430, Buried Depleted Uranium (DU) Artillery Round No. 1 (Corrective Action Site No. TA-55-003-0960), a buried and unexploded W-79 Joint Test Assembly (JTA) artillery test projectile with high explosives (HE), at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in south-central Nevada. It describes activities that will occur at the site as well as the steps that will be taken to gather adequate data to obtain a notice of completion from Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). This plan was prepared under the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) concept, and it will be implemented in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Industrial Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan.

  2. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 113: Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Building Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Smith

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the action necessary for the closure in place of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 113 Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility (R-MAD). CAU 113 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (NDEP, 1996). The CAU is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-04-01, R-MAD Facility (Figures 1-2). This plan provides the methodology for closure in place of CAU 113. The site contains radiologically impacted and hazardous material. Based on preassessment field work, there is sufficient process knowledge to close in place CAU 113 using the SAFER process. At a future date when funding becomes available, the R-MAD Building (25-3110) will be demolished and inaccessible radiologic waste will be properly disposed in the Area 3 Radiological Waste Management Site (RWMS).

  3. Modified Friedmann model in Randers-Finsler space of approximate Berwald type as a possible alternative to dark energy hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Zhe

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational field equations in Randers-Finsler space of approximate Berwald type are investigated. A modified Friedmann model is proposed. It is showed that the accelerated expanding universe is guaranteed by a constrained Randers-Finsler structure without invoking dark energy. The geodesic in Randers-Finsler space is studied. The additional term in the geodesic equation acts as repulsive force against the gravity.

  4. Modified Friedmann model in Randers-Finsler space of approximate Berwald type as a possible alternative to dark energy hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhe Chang; Xin Li

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational field equations in Randers-Finsler space of approximate Berwald type are investigated. A modified Friedmann model is proposed. It is showed that the accelerated expanding universe is guaranteed by a constrained Randers-Finsler structure without invoking dark energy. The geodesic in Randers-Finsler space is studied. The additional term in the geodesic equation acts as repulsive force against the gravity.

  5. NOAA-OakRidgeExpandClimate ORNL,GECollaborateonHigh-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;· NOAA-OakRidgeExpandClimate Modeling · ORNL,GECollaborateonHigh- Efficiency and the Transcontinental Railroad, less because of their function than the unprecedented level of political and operational stories of the Department of Energy. Ironically, the political and operational discipline that made

  6. Emerging information technology and the expanding role of technical communicators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuire, Richard Charles

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    owners. In particular, Chapter III focuses on functionality that supports the use of document style sheets, document templates, macro programming, and object linking to demonstrate how this functionality expands the role of technical communicators... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 III REDEFINING DOCUMENTS, REDEFINING ROLES . . 26 Style Sheets . Using Templates with Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . How Templates and Style Sheets Redefine the Role of Technical Communicators . . . . . . . . . . . Macros Document...

  7. The Energy and Economic Impacts of Expanding International Emissions Trading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Energy and Economic Impacts of Expanding International Emissions Trading Tianyu Qi, Niven Trading Tianyu Qi* , Niven Winchester , Valerie J. Karplus and Xiliang Zhang Abstract Emissions trading of the European Union's Emissions Trading System with a new system in Australia in 2015, this paper simulates

  8. Materials Availability Expands the Opportunity for Large-Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Materials Availability Expands the Opportunity for Large-Scale Photovoltaics Deployment C Y R U S W of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, Department of Materials Science and Engineering

  9. AcuTemp Expands as Appliances Become More Energy Efficient

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    AcuTemp, a small U.S. company that manufactures vacuum insulation panels that are needed to maintain precise temperatures for cold-storage products, is expanding and creating jobs in Dayton, OH thanks in part to the Recovery Act.

  10. A Scalable Digital Library Infrastructure Expands Search and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    A Scalable Digital Library Infrastructure Expands Search and Beyond Min Song1 , Shuyuan Mary Ho a challenge as the number of digital libraries increases, and so does the demand of sophisticated users for searching requirements over several digital libraries and search engines before getting to the desired book

  11. Contagious Sets in Expanders Amin Coja-Oghlan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivelevich, Michael

    Contagious Sets in Expanders Amin Coja-Oghlan1 , Uriel Feige2 , Michael Krivelevich3 , and Daniel, where r > 1 is the activation threshold. A contagious set is a set whose activation results with the entire graph being active. Given a graph G, let m(G, r) be the minimal size of a contagious set

  12. Contagious Sets in Expanders Amin Coja-Oghlan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivelevich, Michael

    Contagious Sets in Expanders Amin Coja-Oghlan Uriel Feige Michael Krivelevich Daniel Reichman§ June physics and viral marketing. A contagious set is a set whose activation results with the entire graph being active. Given a graph G, let m(G, r) be the minimal size of a contagious set. Computing m(G, r

  13. Diuse interface surface tension models in an expanding ow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    Diuse interface surface tension models in an expanding ow Wangyi Liu, Andrea L. Bertozzi , and Theodore Kolokolnikov November 22, 2010 Abstract We consider a diusive interface surface tension model principle. 1 Background There is a need to develop simple computational models for surface tension

  14. Modified acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cahoon, Edgar B. (Shoreham, NY); Shanklin, John (Shoreham, NY); Lindgvist, Ylva (Jarfalla, SE); Schneider, Gunter (Jarfalla, SE)

    1998-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a methods for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity.

  15. Modified Acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cahoon, Edgar B. (Shoreham, NY); Shanklin, John (Shoreham, NY); Lindqvist, Ylva (Jarfalla, SE); Schneider, Gunter (Jarfalla, SE)

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity.

  16. Expanded beam non-imaging fiber optic connector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jannson, T.; Jannson, J.; Yeung, P.

    1990-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    There is disclosed an expanded beam fiber to fiber connector, based on non-imaging optic principles for coupling light beams from one optical fiber to another. The system consists of two identical connector parts, referred to herein as a collimating part and a concentrating part, each having a preferred partially curved reflective boundary surface for minimizing power loss and surrounding either a hollow space or a space filled with a uniform transparent medium. In one embodiment the boundary is metallic while in a second embodiment the boundary is in the form of an interface allowing total internal reflection. In both the hollow and filled case a lens may be located at the expanded end of both the collimator part and the concentrator part forming the connector. The connector is preferably located in a housing in order to protect and preserve the mechanical stability of the coupler. 13 figs.

  17. Expanded beam non-imaging fiber optic connector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jannson, Tommasz (Redondo Beach, CA); Jannson, Joanna (Redondo Beach, CA); Yeung, Peter (Redondo Beach, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is disclosed an expanded beam fiber to fiber connector, based on non-imaging optic principles for coupling light beams from one optical fiber to another. The system consists of two identical connector parts, referred to herein as a collimating part and a concentrating part, each having a preferred partially curved reflective boundary surface for minimizing power loss and surrounding either a hollow space or a space filled with a uniform transparent medium. In one embodiment the boundary is metallic while in a second embodiment the boundary is in the form of an interface allowing total internal reflection. In both the hollow and filled case a lens may be located at the expanded end of both the collimater part and the concentrator part forming the connector. The connector is preferably located in a housing in order to protect and preserve the mechanical stability of the coupler.

  18. Expanding Robust HCCI Operation (Delphi CRADA) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandardGenerationEducationalChemistry ExhaustMarchExpanding

  19. Particle creation and particle number in an expanding universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard Parker

    2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe the logical basis of the method that I developed in 1962 and 1963 to define a quantum operator corresponding to the observable particle number of a quantized free scalar field in a spatially-flat isotropically expanding (and/or contracting) universe. This work also showed for the first time that particles were created from the vacuum by the curved space-time of an expanding spatially-flat FLRW universe. The same process is responsible for creating the nearly scale-invariant spectrum of quantized perturbations of the inflaton scalar field during the inflationary stage of the expansion of the universe. I explain how the method that I used to obtain the observable particle number operator involved adiabatic invariance of the particle number (hence, the name adiabatic regularization) and the quantum theory of measurement of particle number in an expanding universe. I also show how I was led in a surprising way, to the discovery in 1964 that there would be no particle creation by these spatially-flat FLRW universes for free fields of any integer or half-integer spin satisfying field equations that are invariant under conformal transformations of the metric. The methods I used to define adiabatic regularization for particle number, were based on generally-covariant concepts like adiabatic invariance and measurement that were fundamental and determined results that were unique to each given adiabatic order.

  20. Environmental Assessment Expanded Ponnequin Wind Energy Project Weld County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S.Department of Energy (DOE) has considered a proposal from the State of Colorado, Office of Energy Conservation (OEC), for funding construction of the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project in Weld County, Colorado. OEC plans to enter into a contracting arrangement with Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCO) for the completion of these activities. PSCo, along with its subcontractors and business partners, are jointly developing the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project. DOE completed an environmental assessment of the original proposed project in August 1997. Since then, the geographic scope and the design of the project changed, necessitating additional review of the project under the National Environmental Policy Act. The project now calls for the possible construction of up to 48 wind turbines on State and private lands. PSCo and its partners have initiated construction of the project on private land in Weld County, Colorado. A substation, access road and some wind turbines have been installed. However, to date, DOE has not provided any funding for these activities. DOE, through its Commercialization Ventures Program, has solicited applications for financial assistance from state energy offices, in a teaming arrangement with private-sector organizations, for projects that will accelerate the commercialization of emerging renewable energy technologies. The Commercialization Ventures Program was established by the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Technology Competitiveness Act of 1989 (P.L. 101-218) as amended by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486). The Program seeks to assist entry into the marketplace of newly emerging renewable energy technologies, or of innovative applications of existing technologies. In short, an emerging renewable energy technology is one which has already proven viable but which has had little or no operational experience. The Program is managed by the Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The Federal action triggering the preparation of this EA is the need for DOE to decide whether to release the requested funding to support the construction of the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project. The purpose of this Final Environmental Assessment (EA) is to provide DOE and the public with information on potential environmental impacts associated with the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Energy Project. This EA, and public comments received on it, were used in DOE's deliberations on whether to release funding for the expanded project under the Commercialization Ventures Program.

  1. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 425: Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the action necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 425, Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area. This CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). This site will be cleaned up under the SAFER process since the volume of waste exceeds the 23 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) (30 cubic yards [yd{sup 3}]) limit established for housekeeping sites. CAU 425 is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS) 09-08-001-TA09, Construction Debris Disposal Area (Figure 1). CAS 09-08-001-TA09 is an area that was used to collect debris from various projects in and around Area 9. The site is located approximately 81 meters (m) (265 feet [ft]) north of Edwards Freeway northeast of Main Lake on the TTR. The site is composed of concrete slabs with metal infrastructure, metal rebar, wooden telephone poles, and concrete rubble from the Hard Target and early Tornado Rocket sled tests. Other items such as wood scraps, plastic pipes, soil, and miscellaneous nonhazardous items have also been identified in the debris pile. It is estimated that this site contains approximately 2280 m{sup 3} (3000 yd{sup 3}) of construction-related debris.

  2. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 415: Project 57 No. 1 Plutonium Dispersion (NTTR), Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick; Burmeister, Mark

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 415, Project 57 No. 1 Plutonium Dispersion (NTTR). CAU 415 is located on Range 4808A of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) and consists of one corrective action site: NAFR-23-02, Pu Contaminated Soil. The CAU 415 site consists of the atmospheric release of radiological contaminants to surface soil from the Project 57 safety experiment conducted in 1957. The safety experiment released plutonium (Pu), uranium (U), and americium (Am) to the surface soil over an area of approximately 1.9 square miles. This area is currently fenced and posted as a radiological contamination area. Vehicles and debris contaminated by the experiment were subsequently buried in a disposal trench within the surface-contaminated, fenced area and are assumed to have released radiological contamination to subsurface soils. Potential source materials in the form of pole-mounted electrical transformers were also identified at the site and will be removed as part of closure activities.

  3. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 575: Area 15 Miscellaneous Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 575, Area 15 Miscellaneous Sites, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). CAU 575 comprises the following four corrective action sites (CASs) located in Area 15 of the Nevada National Security Site: • 15-19-02, Waste Burial Pit • 15-30-01, Surface Features at Borehole Sites • 15-64-01, Decontamination Area • 15-99-03, Aggregate Plant This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 575 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation to document and verify the adequacy of existing information, to affirm the predicted corrective action decisions, and to provide sufficient data to implement the corrective actions. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval.

  4. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 408: Bomblet Target Area Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 408, Bomblet Target Area (TTR). Corrective Action Unit 408 is located at the Tonopah Test Range and is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 408 comprises Corrective Action Site TA-55-002-TAB2, Bomblet Target Areas. Clean closure of CAU 408 will be accomplished by removal of munitions and explosives of concern within seven target areas and potential disposal pits. The target areas were used to perform submunitions related tests for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The scope of CAU 408 is limited to submunitions released from DOE activities. However, it is recognized that the presence of other types of unexploded ordnance and munitions may be present within the target areas due to the activities of other government organizations. The CAU 408 closure activities consist of: • Clearing bomblet target areas within the study area. • Identifying and remediating disposal pits. • Collecting verification samples. • Performing radiological screening of soil. • Removing soil containing contaminants at concentrations above the action levels. Based on existing information, contaminants of potential concern at CAU 408 include unexploded submunitions, explosives, Resource Conservation Recovery Act metals, and depleted uranium. Contaminants are not expected to be present in the soil at concentrations above the action levels; however, this will be determined by radiological surveys and verification sample results.

  5. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 538: Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 538: Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. It has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. A SAFER may be performed when the following criteria are met: (1) Conceptual corrective actions are clearly identified (although some degree of investigation may be necessary to select a specific corrective action before completion of the Corrective Action Investigation [CAI]). (2) Uncertainty of the nature, extent, and corrective action must be limited to an acceptable level of risk. (3) The SAFER Plan includes decision points and criteria for making data quality objective (DQO) decisions. The purpose of the investigation will be to document and verify the adequacy of existing information; to affirm the decision for either clean closure, closure in place, or no further action; and to provide sufficient data to implement the corrective action. The actual corrective action selected will be based on characterization activities implemented under this SAFER Plan. This SAFER Plan identifies decision points developed in cooperation with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and where DOE will reach consensus with NDEP before beginning the next phase of work.

  6. Hacking Away at Soft Costs: 24-Hour Coding Event Focuses on Expanding...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hacking Away at Soft Costs: 24-Hour Coding Event Focuses on Expanding Solar Market Hacking Away at Soft Costs: 24-Hour Coding Event Focuses on Expanding Solar Market May 7, 2014 -...

  7. Energy Department Announces $4.5 Million to Expand Usage of Alternativ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4.5 Million to Expand Usage of Alternative Fuels Energy Department Announces 4.5 Million to Expand Usage of Alternative Fuels July 16, 2014 - 11:00am Addthis In support of...

  8. H2O and Cation Structure and Dynamics in Expandable Clays: 2H...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H2O and Cation Structure and Dynamics in Expandable Clays: 2H and 39K NMR Investigations of Hectorite. H2O and Cation Structure and Dynamics in Expandable Clays: 2H and 39K NMR...

  9. Avoiding Intellectual Stagnation: The Starship as an Expander of Minds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Ian A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interstellar exploration will advance human knowledge and culture in multiple ways. Scientifically, it will advance our understanding of the interstellar medium, stellar astrophysics, planetary science and astrobiology. In addition, significant societal and cultural benefits will result from a programme of interstellar exploration and colonisation. Most important will be the cultural stimuli resulting from expanding the horizons of human experience, and increased opportunities for the spread and diversification of life and culture through the Galaxy. Ultimately, a programme of interstellar exploration may be the only way for human (and post-human) societies to avoid the intellectual stagnation predicted for the "end of history".

  10. An elementary optical gate for expanding entanglement web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toshiyuki Tashima; Sahin Kaya Ozdemir; Takashi Yamamoto; Masato Koashi; Nobuyuki Imoto

    2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce an elementary optical gate for expanding polarization entangled W states, in which every pair of photons are entangled alike. The gate is composed of a pair of 50:50 beamsplitters and ancillary photons in the two-photon Fock state. By seeding one of the photons in an $n$-photon W state into this gate, we obtain an $(n+2)$-photon W state after post-selection. This gate gives a better efficiency and a simpler implementation than previous proposals for $\\rm W$-state preparation.

  11. Expanding the Frontiers of Visual Analytics and Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dill, John; Earnshaw, Rae; Kasik, David; Vince, John; Wong, Pak C.

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Expanding the Frontiers of Visual Analytics and Visualization contains international contributions by leading researchers from within the field. Dedicated to the memory of Jim Thomas, the book begins with the dynamics of evolving a vision based on some of the principles that Jim and colleagues established and in which Jim’s leadership was evident. This is followed by chapters in the areas of visual analytics, visualization, interaction, modelling, architecture, and virtual reality, before concluding with the key area of technology transfer to industry.

  12. Expanding Options for Nuclear Power | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010Salt |Exelon Generation Company, LLC OrderExpanding Options

  13. Widget:ExpandableTextEnd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to:WestwoodCreatePage Jump to:DisqusHelperExpandableTextEnd

  14. Expanding Science and Energy Literacy with America's Science and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexas EnergyofIdahoExceptions to DOEDepartment ofJanuaryExpanded

  15. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Work Plan for Corrective Action Unit 329: Area 22 Desert Rock Airstrip Fuel Spill, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Draft of Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan was prepared as a characterization and closure report for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 329: Area 22, Desert Rock Airstrip (DRA) Fuel Spill identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The CAU, located on the Nevada Test Site, consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), 22-44-01, which encompasses an area contaminated by three recorded spills from a 25,000-gallon underground fuel storage tank. The tank was installed in 1980 and was imbedded in sand and gravel approximately 16 feet below the ground surface. Historically, the DRA consisted of a single runway, several portable buildings, two underground storage tanks containing aviation jet fuel, and plumbing to several refueling areas on the ramp. The constituents of potential concern from the spill were total petroleum hydrocarbons as gasoline or JP-4. This provides the methodology for sampling contaminated soil-vapor and soil to determine what activities, if any, are required for closure of this si te. In addition, there is sufficient process knowledge of the tank's historical use to recommend closure of CAU 329 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process. This process combines elements of the Data Quality Objectives process and the observational approach to help plan and conduct corrective actions. The study concluded that the spill is localized; therefore, it is very unlikely that the underground water supply has been or will be affected by these spills. In addition, there were high levels of carbon dioxide detected above the release which indicate that the spill is currently in the process of undergoing biological degradation and is not migrating. This CAU has been approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) to be moved into Appendix III of the FFACO. Closure is expected to be in-place with administrative controls and soil-vapor sampling. A closure report will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval upo n completion of the field activities.

  16. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 540: Spill Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0, with Errata

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, Laura

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 540, Spill Sites, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 540 consists of the nine following Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 12 and 19 of the Nevada Test Site: (1) 12-44-01, ER 12-1, Well Site Release; (2) 12-99-01, Oil Stained Dirt; (3) 19-25-02, Oil Spill; (4) 19-25-04, Oil Spill; (5) 19-25-05, Oil Spill; (6) 19-25-06, Oil Spill; (7) 19-25-07, Oil Spill; (8) 19-25-08, Oil Spills (3); and (9) 19-44-03, U-19bf Drill Site Release. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 540 using the SAFER process. The data quality objective process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure options: (1) investigation and confirmation that no contamination exists above the final action levels (FALs), leading to a no further action declaration; (2) characterization of the nature and extent of contamination, leading to closure in place with use restrictions; or (3) clean closure by remediation and verification. The expected closure options were selected based on available information including contaminants of potential concern (COPC), future land use, and assumed risks. A decision flow process was developed to define an approach necessary to achieve closure. There are two decisions that need to be resolved for closure. Decision I is to conduct an investigation to determine whether COPCs are present in concentrations exceeding the FALs. If COPCs are found to be present above FALs, excavation of the contaminated material will occur with the collection of confirmation samples to ensure removal of contaminants below FALs.

  17. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada With Errata Sheets, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pat Matthews

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117, Pluto Disassembly Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 117 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), CAS 26-41-01, located in Area 26 of the Nevada Test Site. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing CAS 26-41-01. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 117 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before finalizing the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary following SAFER activities. This will be presented in a Closure Report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval. The site will be investigated to meet the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 27, 2007, by representatives of NDEP; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAS 26-41-01 in CAU 117.

  18. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Strand

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 118, Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 118 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), 27-41-01, located in Area 27 of the Nevada Test Site. Corrective Action Site 27-41-01 consists of the following four structures: (1) Building 5400A, Reactor High Bay; (2) Building 5400, Reactor Building and access tunnel; (3) Building 5410, Mechanical Building; and (4) Wooden Shed, a.k.a. ''Brock House''. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing the CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and site confirmation data collected in 2005 and 2006 to recommend closure of CAU 118 using the SAFER process. The Data Quality Objective process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure option: closure in place with use restrictions. This expected closure option was selected based on available information including contaminants of potential concern, future land use, and assumed risks. There are two decisions that need to be answered for closure. Decision I is to determine the nature of contaminants of concern in environmental media or potential source material that could impact human health or the environment. Decision II is to determine whether or not sufficient information has been obtained to confirm that closure objectives were met. This decision includes determining whether the extent of any contamination remaining on site has been defined, and whether actions have been taken to eliminate exposure pathways.

  19. Invited Article: Expanded and improved traceability of vibration measurements by laser interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martens, Hans-Jürgen von [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)] [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Traceability to the International System of Units has been established for vibration and shock measurements as specified in international document standards, recommendations, and regulations to ensure product quality, health, and safety. New and upgraded laser methods and techniques developed by national metrology institutes and by leading manufacturers in the past two decades have been swiftly specified as standard methods in the ISO 16063 series of international document standards. In ISO 16063-11:1999, three interferometric methods are specified for the primary calibration of vibration transducers (reference standard accelerometers) in a frequency range from 1 Hz to 10 kHz. In order to specify the same (modified) methods for the calibration of laser vibrometers (ISO 16063-41:2011), their applicability in an expanded frequency range was investigated. Steady-state sinusoidal vibrations were generated by piezoelectric actuators at specific frequencies up to 347 kHz (acceleration amplitudes up to 376 km/s{sup 2}). The displacement amplitude, adjusted by the special interferometric method of coincidence to 158.2 nm (quarter the wavelength of the He-Ne laser light), was measured by the standardized interferometric methods of fringe counting and sine-approximation. The deviations between the measurement results of the three interferometric methods applied simultaneously were smaller than 1 %. The limits of measurement uncertainty specified in ISO 16063-11 between 1 Hz to 10 kHz were kept up to frequencies, which are orders of magnitude greater; the uncertainty limit 0.5 % specified at the reference frequency 160 Hz was not exceeded at 160 kHz. The reported results were considered during the development of ISO 16063-41 by specifying the instrumentation and procedures for performing calibrations of rectilinear laser vibrometers in the frequency range typically between 0.4 Hz and 50 kHz—the interferometric methods may be applied within expanded frequency ranges using refined techniques and procedures. It is concluded that calibration frequencies up to 0.5 MHz are attainable in compliance with the first international document standard for the calibration of laser vibrometers.

  20. Battery energy storage market feasibility study -- Expanded report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraft, S. [Frost and Sullivan, Mountain View, CA (United States); Akhil, A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Energy Storage Systems Analysis and Development Dept.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies, the Energy Storage Systems Analysis and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) contracted Frost and Sullivan to conduct a market feasibility study of energy storage systems. The study was designed specifically to quantify the battery energy storage market for utility applications. This study was based on the SNL Opportunities Analysis performed earlier. Many of the groups surveyed, which included electricity providers, battery energy storage vendors, regulators, consultants, and technology advocates, viewed battery storage as an important technology to enable increased use of renewable energy and as a means to solve power quality and asset utilization issues. There are two versions of the document available, an expanded version (approximately 200 pages, SAND97-1275/2) and a short version (approximately 25 pages, SAND97-1275/1).

  1. Distance determination to eight galaxies using expanding photosphere method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bose, Subhash; Kumar, Brijesh, E-mail: email@subhashbose.com, E-mail: bose@aries.res.in [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences, Manora Peak, Nainital 263002 (India)

    2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Type IIP supernovae (SNe) are recognized as independent extragalactic distance indicators; however, keeping in mind the diverse nature of their observed properties as well as the availability of good quality data, more and newer events need to be tested for their applicability as reliable distance indicators. We use early photometric and spectroscopic data of eight Type IIP SNe to derive distances to their host galaxies by using the expanding photosphere method (EPM). For five of these, the EPM is applied for the first time. In this work, we improved EPM application by using SYNOW estimated velocities and by semi-deconvolving the broadband filter responses while deriving color temperatures and blackbody angular radii. We find that the derived EPM distances are consistent with that derived using other redshift-independent methods.

  2. Selection of nanoparticles using CO.sub.2-expanded liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, Christopher B; McLeod, Marshall Chandler; Anand, Madhu

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for size selection of nanostructures comprising utilizing a gas-expanded liquids (GEL) and controlled pressure to precipitate desired size populations of nanostructures, e.g., monodisperse. The GEL can comprise CO.sub.2 antisolvent and an organic solvent. The method can be carried out in an apparatus comprising a first open vessel configured to allow movement of a liquid/particle solution to specific desired locations within the vessel, a second pressure vessel, a location controller for controlling location of the particles and solution within the first vessel, a inlet for addition of antisolvent to the first vessel, and a device for measuring the amount of antisolvent added. Also disclosed is a method for forming nanoparticle thin films comprising utilizing a GEL containing a substrate, pressurizing the solution to precipitate and deposit nanoparticles onto the substrate, removing the solvent thereby leaving a thin nanoparticle film, removing the solvent and antisolvent, and drying the film.

  3. Modelling the Nonlinear Gravitational Clustering in the Expanding Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Padmanabhan

    1995-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The gravitational clustering of collisionless particles in an expanding universe is modelled using some simple physical ideas. I show that it is indeed possible to understand the nonlinear clustering in terms of three well defined regimes: (1) linear regime (2) quasilinear regime which is dominated by scale-invariant radial infall and (3) nonlinear regime dominated by nonradial motions and mergers. Modelling each of these regimes separately I show how the nonlinear two point correlation function can be related to the linear correlation function in heirarchical models. This analysis leads to results which are in good agreement with numerical simulations thereby providing an explanation for numerical results. The ideas presented here will also serve as a powerful anlytical tool to investigate nonlinear clustering in different models. Several implications of the result are discussed.

  4. Double-ended ceramic helical-rotor expander

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohr, P.B.; Myers, W.B.

    1995-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic helical rotor expander is disclosed using a double-ended or tandem herringbone type rotor arrangement with bearing and seal assemblies remote from the hot gas inlets and especially capable of operating at an inlet temperature of above 1,100 C. The rotors are solid or hollow and bonded to hollow metal shafts, and mounted in a composite or simple prismatic casing. The rotors, casing and shafts are constructed from low expansivity materials. In the preferred embodiment the rotors are constructed of silicon nitride and the shafts constructed of an molybdenum alloy, with the metal shafts being supported in bearings and secured to synchronizing gears. The rotors and casing may be provided with coolant channels therein, and are constructed to eliminate the problem of end leakages at inlet temperature and pressure, and the need for high temperature bearings and seals. 3 figs.

  5. Vacuum quantum fluctuation energy in expanding universe and dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shun-Jin Wang

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is based on the Planckon densely piled vacuum model and the principle of cosmology. With the Planck era as initial conditions and including the early inflation, we have solved the Einstein-Friedmann equations to describe the evolution of the universe. The results are: 1) the ratio of the dark energy density to the vacuum quantum fluctuation energy density is $\\frac{{{\\rho }_{de}}}{{{\\rho }_{vac}}}\\sim{{(\\frac{{{t}_{P}}}{{{T}_{0}}})}^{2}}\\sim{{10}^{-122}} $; 2) at the inflation time ${{t}_{\\inf }}={{10}^{-35}}s$, the calculated universe radiation energy density is $\\rho ({{t}_{\\inf }})\\sim{{10}^{-16}}{{\\rho }_{vac}}$ and the corresponding temperature is ${{E}_{c}}\\sim{{10}^{15}}GeV$ consistent with the GUT phase transition temperature; 3) the expanding universe with vacuum as its environment is a non-equilibrium open system constantly exchanging energy with vacuum; during its expansion, the Planckons in the universe lose quantum fluctuation energy and create the cosmic expansion quanta-cosmons, the energy of cosmons is the lost part of the vacuum quantum fluctuation energy and contributes to the universe energy with the calculated value ${{E}_{\\cos mos}}={{10}^{22}}{{M}_{\\otimes }}{{c}^{2}}$ (where ${{M}_{\\otimes }}$ is solar mass); 4) the total energy of the universe, namely the negative gravity energy plus the positive universe energy is zero; 5) the negative gravity potential and the gravity acceleration related to the creation of cosmons are derived with the nature of outward repulsive force, indicating that the cosmon may be the candidate of the dark energy quantum; 6) both the initial Planck era solution and the infinite asymptotic solution of the Einstein-Friedman equations are unstable: the former tends to expand and the latter tends to shrink, so that the Einstein-Friedman universe will undergo a cyclic evolution of successive expansion and shrinking.

  6. SCIENCE AT THE CROSSROADS Genetically Modified Foods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Stuart A.

    SCIENCE AT THE CROSSROADS Genetically Modified Foods and the Attack on Nature Stuart A. NewmanBy:[Newman,StuartA.]At:16:493July2009 #12;about, genetically modified (GM) food as scientifically ignorant, economically and Arpad Pusztai, ``Effect of Diets Containing Genetically Modified Potatoes Expressing galanthus nivalis

  7. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sun, Susan (Manhattan, KS); Wang, Donghai (Manhattan, KS); Zhong, Zhikai (Manhattan, KS); Yang, Guang (Shanghai, CN)

    2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The, present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  8. Reservoir management using streamline simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choudhary, Manoj Kumar

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of information and sparsity of data. Quantifying this uncertainty in terms of reservoir performance forecast poses a major reservoir management challenge. One solution to this problem is flow simulation of a large number of these plausible reservoir descriptions...

  9. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 553: Areas 19, 20 Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehlecke, Robert F.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 553: Areas 19, 20 Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. It has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. A SAFER may be performed when the following criteria are met: (1) Conceptual corrective actions are clearly identified (although some degree of investigation may be necessary to select a specific corrective action before completion of the Corrective Action Investigation [CAI]); (2) Uncertainty of the nature, extent, and corrective action must be limited to an acceptable level of risk; (3) The SAFER Plan includes decision points and criteria for making data quality objective (DQO) decisions. The purpose of the investigation will be to document and verify the adequacy of existing information; to affirm the decision for clean closure, closure in place, or no further action; and to provide sufficient data to implement the corrective action. The actual corrective action selected will be based on characterization activities implemented under this SAFER Plan. This SAFER Plan identifies decision points developed in cooperation with the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection (NDEP), where the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) will reach consensus with the NDEP before beginning the next phase of work. Corrective Action Unit 553 is located in Areas 19 and 20 of the NTS, approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 553 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: 19-99-01, Mud Spill; 19-99-11, Mud Spill; 20-09-09, Mud Spill; and 20-99-03, Mud Spill. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites (i.e., the expected nature and extent of contaminants of potential concern [COPCs]) to recommend closure of CAU 553 using the SAFER process (FFACO, 1996).

  10. The fragmentation of expanding shells II: Thickness matters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunsch, Richard; Palous, Jan; Whitworth, Anthony P

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study analytically the development of gravitational instability in an expanding shell having finite thickness. We consider three models for the radial density profile of the shell: (i) an analytic uniform-density model, (ii) a semi-analytic model obtained by numerical solution of the hydrostatic equilibrium equation, and (iii) a 3D hydrodynamic simulation. We show that all three profiles are in close agreement, and this allows us to use the first model to describe fragments in the radial direction of the shell. We then use non-linear equations describing the time-evolution of a uniform oblate spheroid to derive the growth rates of shell fragments having different sizes. This yields a dispersion relation which depends on the shell thickness, and hence on the pressure confining the shell. We compare this dispersion relation with the dispersion relation obtained using the standard thin-shell analysis, and show that, if the confining pressure is low, only large fragments are unstable. On the other hand, if the...

  11. Experimental investigation of double layers in expanding plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plihon, N; Corr, C S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Double layers (DLs) have been observed in a plasma reactor composed of a source chamber attached to a larger expanding chamber. Positive ion beams generated across the DL were characterized in the low plasma potential region using retarding field energy analyzers. In electropositive gases, DLs were formed at very low pressures between 0.1 and 1 mTorr with the plasma expansion forced by a strongly diverging magnetic field. The DL remains static, robust to changes in boundary conditions, and its position is related to the magnetic field lines. The voltage drop across the DL increases with decreasing pressure, i.e., with increasing electron temperature around 20 V at 0.17 mTorr. DLs were also observed in electronegative gases without a magnetic field over a greater range of pressure 0.5 to 10 mTorr. The actual profile of the electronegative DL is very sensitive to external parameters and intrusive elements, and they propagate at high negative ion fraction. Electrostatic probes measurements and laser-induced phot...

  12. Use of proton beams with breast prostheses and tissue expanders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyers, Michael F., E-mail: MFMoyers@roadrunner.com [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, NJ (United States); Mah, Dennis; Boyer, Sean P.; Chang, Chang [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, NJ (United States); Pankuch, Mark [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Warrenville, IL (United States)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the early 2000s, a small but rapidly increasing number of patients with breast cancer have been treated with proton beams. Some of these patients have had breast prostheses or tissue expanders in place during their courses of treatment. Procedures must be implemented to plan the treatments of these patients. The density, kilovoltage x-ray computed tomography numbers (kVXCTNs), and proton relative linear stopping powers (pRLSPs) were calculated and measured for several test sample devices. The calculated and measured kVXCTNs of saline were 1% and 2.4% higher than the values for distilled water while the calculated RLSP for saline was within 0.2% of the value for distilled water. The measured kVXCTN and pRLSP of the silicone filling material for the test samples were approximately 1120 and 0.935, respectively. The conversion of kVXCTNs to pRLSPs by the treatment planning system standard tissue conversion function is adequate for saline-filled devices but for silicone-filled devices manual reassignment of the pRLSPs is required.

  13. Regulatory Considerations Associated with the Expanded Adoption of Distributed Solar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; McLaren, J.; Heeter, J.; Linvill, C.; Shenot, J.; Sedano, R.; Migden-Ostrander, J.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increased adoption of distributed PV, and other forms of distributed generation, have the potential to affect utility-customer interactions, system costs recovery, and utility revenue streams. If a greater number of electricity customers choose to self-generate, demand for system power will decrease and utility fixed costs will have to be recovered over fewer kilowatt hours of sales. As such, regulators will need to determine the value and cost of additional distributed PV and determine the appropriate allocation of the costs and benefits among consumers. The potential for new business models to emerge also has implications for regulation and rate structures that ensure equitable solutions for all electricity grid users. This report examines regulatory tools and rate designs for addressing emerging issues with the expanded adoption of distributed PV and evaluates the potential effectiveness and viability of these options going forward. It offers the groundwork needed in order for regulators to explore mechanisms and ensure that utilities can collect sufficient revenues to provide reliable electric service, cover fixed costs, and balance cost equity among ratepayers -- while creating a value proposition for customers to adopt distributed PV.

  14. HERS: An expanding program in a shrinking world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, W.M.; Godfrey, G.L.; Yazzie, J. [Haskell Indian Nations Univ., Lawrence, KS (United States). Dept. of Natural and Social Sciences; Grant, S.C. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). Great Plains/Rocky Mountain Hazardous Substance Research Center

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    When the Haskell Environmental Research Studies Center (HERS) was established in 1994, it was responsible for administering the Native American and Other Minority Institutions (NAOMI) program in conjunction with the Great Plains/Rocky Mountain Hazardous Substance Research Center (HSRC). Today, HERS is involved in myriad programs with several different organizations. In addition to continuing its close relationship with the HSRC, HERS has worked with the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP), the National Institute for Land Management and Training (NILMT) at Kansas State University, and the Technical outreach Services for Communities Program. Partnerships have also been formed with several corporate entities including the Boeing Commercial Airplane Group, Stone and Webster Environmental Technology and Services, and Roy F. Weston. HERS has worked with these organizations and companies in striving to reach its goals of (1) increasing the level of involvement of Native American faculty and students in research and training relating to hazardous substances and other environmental issues; and (2) expanding the knowledge base of tribal environmental professions. Programs and projects designed to achieve this goal include the Pesticide Technology Curriculum for Native Americans, the NAOMI Seminar Series, and ITEP`s Air Quality Workshop.

  15. SUMMARY OF 2009 RHEOLOGY MODIFIER PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, E.

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the EM-31 Rheological Modifiers and Wetting Agents program is to utilize commercially available rheology modifiers to increase the solids fraction of radioactive sludge based waste streams, resulting in an increase in throughput and decreasing the overall processing time. The program first investigates the impact of rheology modifiers on slurry simulants and then utilizes the most effective rheology modifiers on radioactive slurries. The work presented in this document covers the initial investigation of rheology modifier testing with simulants. This task is supported by both the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The SRNL EM-31 task, for this year, was to investigate the use of rheology modifiers on simulant Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter feeds. The task is to determine, based on the impact of the rheology modifier, if there are rheology modifiers that could reduce the water content of the slurry going to the DWPF melter, hence increasing the melt rate by decreasing the water loading. The rheology modifier in essence would allow a higher solids content slurry to have the same type of rheology or pumpability of a lower solids slurry. The modifiers selected in this report were determined based on previous modifiers used in high level waste melter feed simulants, on-going testing performed by counterparts at PNNL, and experiences gain through use of modifiers in other Department of Energy (DOE) processes such as grout processing. There were 12 rheology modifiers selected for testing, covering both organic and inorganic types and they were tested at four different concentrations for a given melter feed. Five different DWPF melter feeds were available and there was adequate material in one of the melter feeds to increase the solids concentration, resulting in a total of six simulants for testing. The mass of melter feed available in each simulant was not adequate for testing each rheology modifier, hence based on the changes in rheology for a given rheology modifier, rheology modifiers were either dropped or added between simulants. Three rheology modifiers were used on all simulants. The results from this testing indicate that citric acid or polycarboxylate based rheology modifiers are the most effective in reducing the yield stress, by as much as 70% at the higher rheology modifier additions and were effective on most of the tested simulants. These rheology modifiers are organic, hence the can also be used as reductants in melter operations. The most effective non-organic rheology modifiers, sodium metasilicate reduced the yield stress by 10%. It is recommended that both citric acid and commercially available polycarboxylate rheology modifiers be further investigated. Different molecular weight polycarboxylates and different types of polycarboxylates used in other industries must be considered. These polycarboxylates are extensively utilized in the cement, ceramic, and water treatment processes, hence readily available. Future work on DWPF melter feeds involving rheology modifiers should include, assuming the present method of processing sludge through DPWF does not change, is: (1) Investigate the use of polycarboxylate in various processes and procure polycarboxylates for testing. Limit rheology modifier selection and future testing between four and eight different types. (2) Test rheology modifiers on at least two different chemical types or bounding DWPF SME product simulants. Test to include the impact of boiling and the effectiveness in reducing water content via rheology versus weight percent curves. (3) Based on selected modifiers, perform testing on actual radioactive melter feed based on results from simulant testing.

  16. Expanded Application of a Two-Phase Partitioning Bioreactor through Strain Development and New Feeding Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugulis, Andrew J.

    Expanded Application of a Two-Phase Partitioning Bioreactor through Strain Development and New bioreactor (TPPB). TPPBs are characterized by a cell- containing aqueous phase and an immiscible

  17. Tip sheet: Expanded Library of Congress Call Number Classification system Call Number Subject Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kambhampati, Patanjali

    Tip sheet: Expanded Library of Congress Call Number Classification system Call Number Subject R: Medicine T: Technology U: Military Science Z: Bibliography. Library Science. Information

  18. Expanding, axisymmetric pure-radiation gravitational fields with a simple twist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Ivanov

    2001-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    New expanding, axisymmetric pure-radiation solutions are found, exploiting the analogy with the Euler-Darboux equation for aligned colliding plane waves.

  19. Agriculture, Forestry expand outreach programs UBC's two renewable-resources fac-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    Agriculture, Forestry expand outreach programs UBC's two renewable-resources fac- ulties by providing ad- ministrative services and classroom spaceforanexpandedagricultural sciences

  20. Method of modifying a surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Renk, Timothy J. (Albuquerque, NM); Sorensen, Neil R. (Albuquerque, NM); Senft, Donna Cowell (Albuquerque, NM); Buchheit, Jr., Rudolph G. (Columbus, OH); Thompson, Michael O. (Ithaca, NY); Grabowski, Kenneth S. (Alexandria, VA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a surface modification method that provides beneficial changes in surface properties, can modify a surface to a greater depth than previous methods, and that is suitable for industrial application. The present method comprises applying a thin-film coating to a surface of a substrate, then subjecting the coated surface to an ion beam. The ion beam power pulse heats the coated surface, leading to alloying between the material in the coating and the material of the substrate. Rapid cooling of the alloyed layer after an ion beam pulse can lead to formation of metastable alloys and microstructures not accessible by conventional alloying methods or intense ion beam treatment of the substrate alone.

  1. Charged black holes in expanding Einstein-de Sitter universes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuela G. Rodrigues; Vilson T. Zanchin

    2015-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Inspired in a previous work by McClure and Dyer (Classical Quantum Gravity 23, 1971 (2006)), we analyze some solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations which were originally written to describe charged black holes in cosmological backgrounds. A detailed analysis of the electromagnetic sources for a sufficiently general metric is performed, and then we focus on deriving the electromagnetic four-current as well as the conserved electric charge of each metric. The charged McVittie solution is revisited and a brief study of its causal structure is performed, showing that it may represent a charged black hole in an expanding universe, with the black hole horizon being formed at infinite late times. Charged versions of solutions originally put forward by Vaidya (Vd) and Sultana and Dyer (SD) are also analyzed. It is shown that the charged Sultana-Dyer metric requires a global electric current, besides a central (pointlike) electric charge. With the aim of comparing to the charged McVittie metric, new charged solutions of Vd and SD type are considered. In these cases, the original mass and charge parameters are replaced by particular functions of the cosmological time. In the new generalized charged Vaidya metric the black hole horizon never forms, whereas in the new generalized Sultana-Dyer case both the Cauchy and the black hole horizons develop at infinite late times. A charged version of the Thakurta metric is also studied here. It is also a new solution. As in the charged Sultana-Dyer case, the natural source of the electromagnetic field is a central electric charge with an additional global electric current. The global structure is briefly studied and it is verified that the corresponding spacetime may represent a charged black hole in a cosmological background. All the solutions present initial singularities as found in the McVittie metric.

  2. Empirical modeling of a Lysholm helical screw expander

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, K.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing of a Lysholm helical screw expander having a rotor diameter of 5.12 inches and an expansion ratio of 5.3 was performed with simulated geothermal fluid at an inlet pressure of 120 psia. The inlet quality, engine speed and pressure ratio were independently varied to produce a three-dimensional data matrix of 104 data points. Statistical curve fitting methods were adapted to produce equations for mass flow rate and power output in terms of the three variables associated with the data matrix. These explicit equations were combined with a steam table subroutine to produce a computer model for prediction of mass flow rate, power, efficiency and exhaust quality at a given set of operating conditions. The predictive ability observed during validation of the model is adequate for use in modeling of hybrid geothermal energy conversion systems. Mass flow rates werre predicted to within 2.7% of the measured values. For most conditions, predictions of power were within 3.3% of the measured values. Predictions of efficiency reflected the combined errors in prediction of power and mass flow rate. Efficiency predictions were in error by as much as 5% of the measured values. The predictions for exhaust quality were within 0.4% of the measured values. Isentropic engine efficiencies of over 43% were measured during the tests. An observed peak in efficiency represented an optimum pressure ratio and a trade-off between lower leakage fractions at high speeds and low inlet qualities, increasing frictional losses at high speeds, and increasing fluid and power densities at low qualities.

  3. Guidance Regarding Refinancing, Restructuring, or Modifying Loan...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    addresses potential refinancing, restructuring, or modifying of a loan agreement entered into by an energy services company under a federal energy savings performance contract....

  4. Guidance Regarding Refinancing, Restructuring, or Modifying ESPC...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    or modifying of a loan agreement entered into by an energy services company (ESCO) under a Federal energy savings performance contract (ESPC). 14idiqrefinance.pdf More...

  5. Modified Accelerated Cost-Recovery System (MACRS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the federal Modified Accelerated Cost-Recovery System (MACRS), businesses may recover investments in certain property through depreciation deductions. The MACRS establishes a set of class l...

  6. Optimizing Data Replication for Expanding Ring-based Queries in Wireless Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamachari, Bhaskar

    Optimizing Data Replication for Expanding Ring-based Queries in Wireless Sensor Networks Bhaskar are disseminated using expand- ing rings. We obtain closed-form approximations for the expected energy costs such as changes, movements and failures of nodes in the net- work). Randomized storage can also provide for a more

  7. Taylor relaxation and decay of unbounded, freely-expanding J. Yee and P.M. Bellan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellan, Paul M.

    Taylor relaxation and ¸ decay of unbounded, freely-expanding spheromaks J. Yee and P.M. BellanJÁ=BÁ indicate that the spheromak is decaying and expanding in a manner analogous to a self's relaxation model [1,2] has been successfully applied to many fusion related plasmas, especially spheromaks

  8. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 356: Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Revision No. 0, August 2001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV)

    2001-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions necessary for the characterization and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 356, Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, as identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The CAU, located on the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 03-04-01, Area 3 Change House Septic System; CAS 03-09-01, Mud Pit Spill Over; CAS 03-09-03, Mud Pit; CAS 03-09-04, Mud Pit; CAS 03-09-05, Mud Pit; CAS 20-16-01, Landfill; CAS 20-22-21, Drums. Sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations are the basis for the development of the phased approach chosen to address the data collection activities prior to implementing the preferred closure alternative for each CAS. The Phase I investigation will determine through collection of environmental samples from targeted populations (i.e., mud/soil cuttings above textural discontinuity) if contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) are present in concentrations exceeding preliminary action levels (PALs) at each of the CASs. If COPCs are present above PALs, a Phase II investigation will be implemented to determine the extent of contamination to support the appropriate corrective action alternative to complete closure of the site. Groundwater impacts from potentially migrating contaminants are not expected due to the depths to groundwater and limiting hydrologic drivers of low precipitation and high evaporation rates. Future land-use scenarios limit future uses to industrial activities; therefore, future residential uses are not considered. Potential exposure routes to site workers from contaminants of concern in septage and soils include oral ingestion, inhalation, or dermal contact (absorption) through in-advertent disturbance of contaminated structures and/or soils. Diesel within drilling muds is expected to be the primary COPC based on process knowledge. Recirculation processes within the mud pits enhance volatilization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), thereby reducing the potential concentrations of any VOCs that may be present. A secondary source of contaminants from random truck dumping activities and leaking vehicle discharge may have released fuels, grease, motor oil, and hydraulic fluids into the mud pit effluent stream. Radionuclide contamination is not expected at these CASs based on historical information. The primary radioisotopes that could be expected, if present, are cesium-137, tritium, and strontium-90. The SAFER process ends with closure of the site based on the laboratory analytical results of the environmental samples. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 356 using the SAFER process. On completion of the field activities, a Closure Report will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for review and approval.

  9. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 465: Hydronuclear Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, with ROTC 1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 465, Hydronuclear, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 465 comprises the following four corrective action sites (CASs) located in Areas 6 and 27 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) 00-23-01, Hydronuclear Experiment; (2) 00-23-02, Hydronuclear Experiment; (3) 00-23-03, Hydronuclear Experiment; (4) 06-99-01, Hydronuclear. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 6, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for each CAS in CAU 465. For CAU 465, two potential release components have been identified. The subsurface release component includes potential releases of radiological and nonradiological contaminants from the subsurface hydronuclear experiments and disposal boreholes. The surface release component consists of other potential releases of radiological and nonradiological contaminants to surface soils that may have occurred during the pre- and post-test activities. This plan provides the methodology for collection of the necessary information for closing each CAS component. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation, contaminant characteristics, existing regional and site groundwater models, and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 465 using the SAFER process. For potential subsurface releases, flow and transport models will be developed to integrate existing data into a conservative description of contaminant migration in the unsaturated zone from the hydronuclear experiments and disposal boreholes. For the potential surface releases, additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS component. It is anticipated that results of the flow and transport models, the field investigation, and implementation of the corrective action of closure in place will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 465: (1) Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, and radiological and visual surveys). (2) Move or remove and dispose of debris at various CASs, as required. (3) Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., stained soil) to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern as necessary to supplement existing information. (4) Evaluate and analyze existing data to develop conservative flow and transport models to simulate the potential for contaminant migration from the hydronuclear experiments and disposal boreholes to the water table within 1,000 years. (5) Confirm the preferred closure option (closure in place with use restrictions) is sufficient to protect human health and the environment.

  10. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 177: Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 177, Mud Pits and Cellars, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 177 consists of the 12 following Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 8, 9, 19, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site: (1) 08-23-01, Mud Pit and Cellar; (2) 09-09-41, Unknown No.3 Mud Pit/Disposal Area; (3) 09-09-45, U-9bz PS No.1A Mud Pit (1) and Cellar; (4) 09-23-05, Mud Pit and Cellar; (5) 09-23-08, Mud Pit and Cellar; (6) 09-23-09, U-9itsx20 PS No.1A Cellar; (7) 10-23-02, Mud Pit and Cellar; (8) 10-23-03, Mud Pit and Cellar; (9) 19-23-01, Mud Pit and Cellar; (10) 19-23-02, Cellar and Waste Storage Area; (11) 19-23-03, Cellar with Casing; and (12) 20-23-07, Cellar. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 177 using the SAFER process. The data quality objective process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure options: (1) investigation and confirmation that no contamination exists above the preliminary action levels (PALs), leading to a no further action declaration, or (2) characterization of the nature and extent of contamination, leading to closure in place with use restrictions. The expected closure options were selected based on available information including contaminants of potential concern, future land use, and assumed risks. A decision flow process was developed to outline the collection of data necessary to achieve closure. There are two decisions that need to be answered for closure. Decision I is to determine whether contaminants of potential concern are present in concentrations exceeding the PALs. If contaminants of potential concern are found to be present above PALs, Decision II will be to determine the extent of contamination and generate the information necessary to close the site in place and implement the appropriate administrative controls (i.e., use restrictions). The following text summarizes the types of activities that will support the closure of CAU 177: (1) Perform site preparation activities (e.g., boundary setup, utility clearances, vegetation removal, movement/removal of fencing and debris). (2) Remove non-hazardous debris at various CASs, as required. (3) Collect environmental samples of residual drilling mud and soil using probabilistic (mud pits) and judgmental (cellars) sampling to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) (i.e., nature of contamination) if these data do not already exist. Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil if COCs exist) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. (4) Establish no further action as the corrective action if no contaminants are detected above final action levels. (5) If COCs are present at a CAS, establish the corrective action and implement appropriate use restrictions. (6) Confirm the preferred closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment. (7) Document all closure activities for CAU 177 in a Closure Report.

  11. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Burmeister

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 114, Area 25 EMAD Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 114 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site: • 25-41-03, EMAD Facility • 25-99-20, EMAD Facility Exterior Releases This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 114 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. It is anticipated that the results of the field investigation and implementation of a corrective action of clean closure will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2009, by representatives of NDEP; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for each CAS in CAU 114. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 114: • Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, radiological surveys). • Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., stained soil) to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information. • Collect samples of materials to determine whether potential source material (PSM) is present that may cause the future release of a COC to environmental media. • If no COCs or PSMs are present at a CAS, establish no further action as the corrective action. • If COCs exist, collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. • If a COC or PSM is present at a CAS, either: - Establish clean closure as the corrective action. The material to be remediated will be removed, disposed of as waste, and verification samples will be collected from remaining soil, or - Establish closure in place as the corrective action and implement the appropriate use restrictions. • Confirm the selected closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment.

  12. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 539: Area 25 and Area 26 Railroad Tracks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 539, Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks, as identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). A modification to the FFACOwas approved in May 2010 to transfer the two Railroad Tracks corrective action sites (CASs) from CAU 114 into CAU539. The two CASs are located in Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada Test Site: • 25-99-21, Area 25 Railroad Tracks • 26-99-05, Area 26 Railroad Tracks This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing the two CASs. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of the CAU 539 Railroad Tracks CASs using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation should support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place with use restrictions. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to the NDEP for review and approval. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 14, 2009, by representatives of U.S.Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Navarro Nevada Environmental Services, LLC (NNES); and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process has been used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for each Railroad Tracks CAS in CAU 539. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 539: • Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, radiological surveys). • Collect in situ dose measurements. • Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., lead bricks) to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information. • If no COCs are present at a CAS, establish no further action as the corrective action. • If COCs exist, collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. If a COC is present at a CAS, NNES will consult NDEP to determine the path forward, then either: • Establish clean closure as the corrective action. The material to be remediated will be removed, disposed of as waste, and verification samples will be collected from remaining soil, or • Establish closure in place as the corrective action and implement the appropriate use restrictions.

  13. Measuring the Plasma Density of a Ferroelectric Plasma Source in an Expanding Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Dunaevsky; N.J. Fisch

    2003-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial density and electron temperature at the surface of a ferroelectric plasma source were deduced from floating probe measurements in an expanding plasma. The method exploits negative charging of the floating probe capacitance by fast flows before the expanding plasma reaches the probe. The temporal profiles of the plasma density can be obtained from the voltage traces of the discharge of the charged probe capacitance by the ion current from the expanding plasma. The temporal profiles of the plasma density, at two different distances from the surface of the ferroelectric plasma source, could be further fitted by using the density profiles for the expanding plasma. This gives the initial values of the plasma density and electron temperature at the surface. The method could be useful for any pulsed discharge, which is accompanied by considerable electromagnetic noise, if the initial plasma parameters might be deduced from measurements in expanding plasma.

  14. HYPERION/ODS MODIFYING CANNED QUERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    HYPERION/ODS MODIFYING CANNED QUERIES **Quick review of the Hyperion Query Pane: Sections: Where, Criteria, Views and Joins. Hyperion/ODS ­ Modifying Canned Queries 1 #12;What Canned Queries are Available Note: Go to http://ods.binghamton.edu to view the canned query support documentation for detailed

  15. Structure Growth and the CMB in Modified Gravity (MOG)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Moffat

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An important piece of evidence for dark matter is the need to explain the growth of structure from the time of horizon entry and radiation-matter equality to the formation of stars and galaxies. This cannot be explained by using general relativity without dark matter. So far, dark matter particles have not been detected in laboratory measurements or at the LHC. We demonstrate that enhanced structure growth can happen in a modified gravity theory (MOG). The vector field and particle introduced in the theory to explain galaxy and cluster dynamics plays an important role in generating the required structure growth. The particle called the phion (a light hidden photon) is neutral and is a dominant, pressureless component in the MOG Friedmann equations, before the time of decoupling. The dominant energy density of the phion particle in the early universe, generates an explanation for the growth of density perturbations. The angular acoustical power spectrum due to baryon-photon pressure waves is in agreement with the Planck 2013 data. As the universe expands and large scale structures are formed, the density of baryons dominates and the rotation curves of galaxies and the dynamics of clusters are explained in MOG, when the phion particle in the present universe is ultra-light. The matter power spectrum determined by the theory is in agreement with current galaxy redshift surveys.

  16. Nanoparticles modified with multiple organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cook, Ronald Lee (Lakewood, CO); Luebben, Silvia DeVito (Golden, CO); Myers, Andrew William (Arvada, CO); Smith, Bryan Matthew (Boulder, CO); Elliott, Brian John (Superior, CO); Kreutzer, Cory (Brighton, CO); Wilson, Carolina (Arvada, CO); Meiser, Manfred (Aurora, CO)

    2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface-modified nanoparticles of boehmite, and methods for preparing the same. Aluminum oxyhydroxide nanoparticles are surface modified by reaction with selected amounts of organic acids. In particular, the nanoparticle surface is modified by reactions with two or more different carboxylic acids, at least one of which is an organic carboxylic acid. The product is a surface modified boehmite nanoparticle that has an inorganic aluminum oxyhydroxide core, or part aluminum oxyhydroxide core and a surface-bonded organic shell. Organic carboxylic acids of this invention contain at least one carboxylic acid group and one carbon-hydrogen bond. One embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with two or more acids one of which additional carries at least one reactive functional group. Another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with multiple acids one of which has molecular weight or average molecular weight greater than or equal to 500 Daltons. Yet, another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that are surface modified with two or more acids one of which is hydrophobic in nature and has solubility in water of less than 15 by weight. The products of the methods of this invention have specific useful properties when used in mixture with liquids, as filler in solids, or as stand-alone entities.

  17. Review Of Rheology Modifiers For Hanford Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J. M.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)'s strategic development scope for the Department of Energy - Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste feed acceptance and product qualification scope, the SRNL has been requested to recommend candidate rheology modifiers to be evaluated to adjust slurry properties in the Hanford Tank Farm. SRNL has performed extensive testing of rheology modifiers for use with Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) simulated melter feed - a high undissolved solids (UDS) mixture of simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank Farm sludge, nitric and formic acids, and glass frit. A much smaller set of evaluations with Hanford simulated waste have also been completed. This report summarizes past work and recommends modifiers for further evaluation with Hanford simulated wastes followed by verification with actual waste samples. Based on the review of available data, a few compounds/systems appear to hold the most promise. For all types of evaluated simulated wastes (caustic Handford tank waste and DWPF processing samples with pH ranging from slightly acidic to slightly caustic), polyacrylic acid had positive impacts on rheology. Citric acid also showed improvement in yield stress on a wide variety of samples. It is recommended that both polyacrylic acid and citric acid be further evaluated as rheology modifiers for Hanford waste. These materials are weak organic acids with the following potential issues: The acidic nature of the modifiers may impact waste pH, if added in very large doses. If pH is significantly reduced by the modifier addition, dissolution of UDS and increased corrosion of tanks, piping, pumps, and other process equipment could occur. Smaller shifts in pH could reduce aluminum solubility, which would be expected to increase the yield stress of the sludge. Therefore, it is expected that use of an acidic modifier would be limited to concentrations that do not appreciably change the pH of the waste; Organics are typically reductants and could impact glass REDOX if not accounted for in the reductant addition calculations; Stability of the modifiers in a caustic, radioactive environment is not known, but some of the modifiers tested were specifically designed to withstand caustic conditions; These acids will add to the total organic carbon content of the wastes. Radiolytic decomposition of the acids could result in organic and hydrogen gas generation. These potential impacts must be addressed in future studies with simulants representative of real waste and finally with tests using actual waste based on the rheology differences seen between SRS simulants and actual waste. The only non-organic modifier evaluated was sodium metasilicate. Further evaluation of this modifier is recommended if a reducing modifier is a concern.

  18. Chemically modified graphite for electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greinke, R.A.; Lewis, I.C.

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to chemically modified graphite particles: (a) that are useful in alkali metal-containing electrode of a electrochemical cell comprising: (1) the electrode, (2) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent which solvent tends to decompose when the electrochemical cell is in use, and an electrically conductive salt of an alkali metal, and (3) a counter electrode; and (b) that are chemically modified with fluorine, chlorine, iodine or phosphorus to reduce such decomposition. This invention also relates to electrodes comprising such chemically modified graphite and a binder and to electrochemical cells containing such electrodes. 3 figs.

  19. Liquid over-feeding refrigeration system and method with integrated accumulator-expander-heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mei, Viung C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Chen, Fang C. (Knoxville, TN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A refrigeration system having a vapor compression cycle utilizing a liquid over-feeding operation with an integrated accumulator-expander-heat exchanger. Hot, high-pressure liquid refrigerant from the condenser passes through one or more lengths of capillary tubing substantially immersed in a pool liquid refrigerant in the accumulator-expander-heat exchanger for simultaneously sub-cooling and expanding the liquid refrigerant while vaporizing liquid refrigerant from the pool for the return thereof to the compressor as saturated vapor. The sub-cooling of the expanded liquid provides for the flow of liquid refrigerant into the evaporator for liquid over-feeding the evaporator and thereby increasing the efficiency of the evaporation cycle.

  20. Liquid over-feeding refrigeration system and method with integrated accumulator-expander-heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mei, V.C.; Chen, F.C.

    1997-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A refrigeration system is described having a vapor compression cycle utilizing a liquid over-feeding operation with an integrated accumulator-expander-heat exchanger. Hot, high-pressure liquid refrigerant from the condenser passes through one or more lengths of capillary tubing substantially immersed in a pool liquid refrigerant in the accumulator-expander-heat exchanger for simultaneously sub-cooling and expanding the liquid refrigerant while vaporizing liquid refrigerant from the pool for the return thereof to the compressor as saturated vapor. The sub-cooling of the expanded liquid provides for the flow of liquid refrigerant into the evaporator for liquid over-feeding the evaporator and thereby increasing the efficiency of the evaporation cycle. 4 figs.

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Heavy Duty Roots Expander Heat Energy Recovery (HD-REHER)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Eaton Corporation at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about heavy duty roots expander...

  2. FMC-Argonne project could expand use of company's lithium technology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FMC-Argonne project could expand use of company's lithium technology May 28, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory...

  3. Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is to develop the scroll expander for ORC systems to be used in industrial and commercial medium-grade waste heat recovery applications, and to validate and quantify the benefits...

  4. From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hallam, Steven

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Steven Hallam of the University of British Columbia talks "From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones" on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  5. IFC HVAC interface to EnergyPlus - A case of expanded interoperability for energy simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazjanac, Vladimir; Maile, Tobias

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. Sucic and P. Xu. 2002. HVAC Component Data Modeling Using2001. BS-8 project: IFC HVAC extension schemata. http://IFC HVAC INTERFACE TO ENERGYPLUS – A CASE OF EXPANDED

  6. Analogue Cosmological Particle Creation: Quantum Correlations in Expanding Bose Einstein Condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angus Prain; Serena Fagnocchi; Stefano Liberati

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the structure of quantum correlations in an expanding Bose Einstein Condensate (BEC) through the analogue gravity framework. We consider both a 3+1 isotropically expanding BEC as well as the experimentally relevant case of an elongated, effectively 1+1 dimensional, expanding condensate. In this case we include the effects of inhomogeneities in the condensate, a feature rarely included in the analogue gravity literature. In both cases we link the BEC expansion to a simple model for an expanding spacetime and then study the correlation structure numerically and analytically (in suitable approximations). We also discuss the expected strength of such correlation patterns and experimentally feasible BEC systems in which these effects might be detected in the near future.

  7. Gender differences in psychopathology examined under an expanded transactional theory of stress framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jillian April

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    – and examines gender differences within a transactional theory of stress that takes into account levels of cognitive processing (an expanded transactional theory of stress). Both studies found that men are more physiologically reactive to disorder...

  8. EXPANDED MIXED FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR QUASILINEAR SECOND ORDER ELLIPTIC PROBLEMS, II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPANDED MIXED FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR QUASILINEAR SECOND ORDER ELLIPTIC PROBLEMS, II Zhangxin coefficient times the gradient). Based on this formulation, mixed finite element approximations with low permeability and to the transport equation with small dispersion in groundwater modeling

  9. Poplar trees could be genetically modified to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for bioethanol production Flickr/Robert Crum OPINIONS Are new biofuels the ethical answer? Joyce Tait and Banji-modified poplar tree that is a more accessible source of cellulose for bioethanol production. And the emerging

  10. Test particle motion in modified gravity theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahmood Roshan

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the equations of motion of an electrically neutral test particle for modified gravity theories in which the covariant divergence of the ordinary matter energy-momentum tensor dose not vanish (i.e. $\

  11. Compatibilizer for crumb rubber modified asphalt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Labib, M.E. [New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ (United States); Memon, G.M.; Chollar, B.H. [Federal Highway Administration, McLean, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States of America discards more than 300 million tires each year, and out of that a large fraction of the tires is dumped into stock piles. This large quantity of tires creates an environmental problem. The use of scrap tires is limited. There is a usage potential in such fields as fuel for combustion and Crumb Rubber-Modified Asphalt binder (CRMA). The use of crumb rubber in modifying asphalt is not a new technique; it is been used since early 1960 by pavement engineers. Crumb rubber is a composite of different blends of natural and synthetic rubber (natural rubber, processing oils, polybutadiene, polystyrene butadiene, and filler). Prior research had concluded that the performance of crumb rubber modified asphalt is asphalt dependent. In some cases it improves the Theological properties and in some cases it degrades the properties of modified asphalt.

  12. Modified Fourier expansions: theory, construction and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adcock, Ben

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Modified Fourier expansions present an alternative to more standard algorithms for the approximation of nonperiodic functions in bounded domains. This thesis addresses the theory of such expansions, their effective construction and computation...

  13. Electron Diamagnetic Effect on Axial Force in an Expanding Plasma: Experiments and Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Kazunori [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Lafleur, Trevor; Charles, Christine; Alexander, Peter; Boswell, Rod W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The axial force imparted from a magnetically expanding current-free plasma is directly measured for three different experimental configurations and compared with a two-dimensional fluid theory. The force component solely resulting from the expanding field is directly measured and identified as an axial force produced by the azimuthal current due to an electron diamagnetic drift and the radial component of the magnetic field. The experimentally measured forces are well described by the theory.

  14. Modified Boltzmann Transport Equation and Freeze Out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csernai, L P; Molnár, E; Nyiri, A; Tamosiunas, K

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study Freeze Out process in high energy heavy ion reaction. The description of the process is based on the Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE). We point out the basic limitations of the BTE approach and introduce Modified BTE. The Freeze Out dynamics is presented in the 4-dimensional space-time in a layer of finite thickness, and we employ Modified BTE for the realistic Freeze Out description.

  15. Modified Boltzmann Transport Equation and Freeze Out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. P. Csernai; V. K. Magas; E. Molnar; A. Nyiri; K. Tamosiunas

    2005-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We study Freeze Out process in high energy heavy ion reaction. The description of the process is based on the Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE). We point out the basic limitations of the BTE approach and introduce Modified BTE. The Freeze Out dynamics is presented in the 4-dimensional space-time in a layer of finite thickness, and we employ Modified BTE for the realistic Freeze Out description.

  16. Performance characteristics of a turbo expander substituted for expansion valve on air-conditioner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Soo-Yong [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (ReCAPT), Gyeongsang National University, 900 Gajoa-dong, Jinju 660-701 (Korea); Cho, Chong-Hyun [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Gyeongsang National University, 900 Gajoa-dong, Jinju 660-701 (Korea); Kim, Chaesil [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Changwon National University, 9 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study is conducted on a small turbo expander which could be applied to the expansion process in place of expansion valves in refrigerator or air-conditioner to improve the cycle efficiency by recovering energy from the throttling process. The operating gas is HFC134a and the maximum cooling capacity of experiment apparatus is 32.7 kW. Four different turbo expanders are tested to find the performance characteristics of the turbo expander when they operate at a low partial admission rate. The partial admission rate is 1.70% or 2.37, and expanders are operated in the supersonic flow. In the experiment, pressure and temperature are measured at 10 different locations in the experimental apparatus. In addition to these measurements, output power at the turbo expander is measured through a generator installed on a rotor shaft with the rotational speed. Performance data of the turbo expander are obtained at many part load operations by adjusting the output power of the generator. A maximum of 15.8% total-to-static efficiency is obtained when the pressure ratio and the partial admission ratio are 2.37 and 1.70%, respectively. Experimental results show that the optimal velocity ratio decreases when the pressure ratio is decreased, and peak efficiencies, which are obtained at locally maximized efficiency depending on the operating condition, vary linearly against the subcooling temperature or the pressure ratio. (author)

  17. DNA polymerase having modified nucleotide binding site for DNA sequencing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tabor, Stanley (Cambridge, MA); Richardson, Charles (Chestnut Hill, MA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modified gene encoding a modified DNA polymerase wherein the modified polymerase incorporates dideoxynucleotides at least 20-fold better compared to the corresponding deoxynucleotides as compared with the corresponding naturally-occurring DNA polymerase.

  18. DNA polymerase having modified nucleotide binding site for DNA sequencing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tabor, S.; Richardson, C.

    1997-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A modified gene encoding a modified DNA polymerase is disclosed. The modified polymerase incorporates dideoxynucleotides at least 20-fold better compared to the corresponding deoxynucleotides as compared with the corresponding naturally-occurring DNA polymerase. 6 figs.

  19. Separation of Peptide Isomers with Variant Modified Sites by...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Isomers with Variant Modified Sites by High-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry. Separation of Peptide Isomers with Variant Modified Sites by High-Resolution...

  20. Glucose oxidase-graphene-chitosan modified electrode for direct...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oxidase-graphene-chitosan modified electrode for direct electrochemistry and glucose sensing. Glucose oxidase-graphene-chitosan modified electrode for direct electrochemistry and...

  1. Disposable Carbon Nanotube Modified Screen-Printed Biosensor...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Nanotube Modified Screen-Printed Biosensor for Amperometric Detection of Organophosphorus Pesticides and Nerve Disposable Carbon Nanotube Modified Screen-Printed Biosensor...

  2. EXPANDING THE MODIFIED GAUSSIAN MODEL TO INCLUDE THE SPACE WEATHERING EFFECTS: ESTIMATION OF THE WEATHERING DEGREES OF PULSE-LASER TREATED OLIVINE SAMPLES. Y.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroi, Takahiro

    OF THE WEATHERING DEGREES OF PULSE-LASER TREATED OLIVINE SAMPLES. Y. Ueda1, 2 , T. Hiroi2 , C. M. Pieters2 and M creating the npFe0 by treating olivine (Fo91) pow- der samples with pulse laser at 1064 nm in wavelength of their olivine samples treated with laser energies of 0, 15, and 30 mJ. The refractive index spectra of Fe

  3. U.S.-India Collaboration Expands Indian Market for U.S. Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    electricity reliability by managing how electricity consumers interact with the grid. Demand Response (DR), which is widely used in the United States (U.S.) modifies...

  4. 2009 Cellulosomes, Cellulases & Other Carbohydrate Modifying Enzymes GRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harry Gilbert

    2009-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2009 Gordon Conference on Cellulosomes, Cellulases & Other Carbohydrate Modifying Enzymes will present cutting-edge research on the enzymatic degradation of cellulose and other plant cell wall polysaccharides. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics that includes the enzymology of plant structural degradation, regulation of the degradative apparatus, the mechanism of protein complex assembly, the genomics of cell wall degrading organisms, the structure of the substrate and the industrial application of the process particularly within the biofuel arena. Indeed the deployment of plant cell wall degrading enzymes in biofuel processes will be an important feature of the meeting. It should be emphasized that the 2009 Conference will be expanded to include, in addition to cellulase research, recent advances in other plant cell wall degrading enzymes, and contributions from people working on hemicellulases and pectinases will be particularly welcome. Invited speakers represent a variety of scientific disciplines, including biochemistry, structural biology, genetics and cell biology. The interplay between fundamental research and its industrial exploitation is a particularly important aspect of the meeting, reflecting the appointment of the chair and vice-chair from academia and industry, respectively. The meeting will provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present their work in poster format and exchange ideas with more established figures in the field. Indeed, some poster presenters will be selected for short talks. The collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with programmed discussion sessions as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings, provides an avenue for scientists from different disciplines to brainstorm and promotes cross-disciplinary collaborations in the various research areas represented. The Conference is likely to be heavily subscribed so we would recommend that you submit your application/abstract to the GRC web site as soon as possible.

  5. Plants having modified response to ethylene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyerowitz, E.M.; Chang, C.; Bleecker, A.B.

    1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype. 31 figs.

  6. Plants having modified response to ethylene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyerowitz, E.M.; Chang, C.; Bleecker, A.B.

    1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype. 67 figs.

  7. Plants having modified response to ethylene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyerowitz, Elliott M. (Pasadena, CA); Chang, Caren (Pasadena, CA); Bleecker, Anthony B. (Madison, WI)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype.

  8. Plants having modified response to ethylene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyerowitz, Elliot M. (Pasadena, CA); Chang, Caren (Pasadena, CA); Bleecker, Anthony B. (Madison, WI)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype.

  9. Electrochemical apparatus comprising modified disposable rectangular cuvette

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dattelbaum, Andrew M; Gupta, Gautam; Morris, David E

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical apparatus includes a disposable rectangular cuvette modified with at least one hole through a side and/or the bottom. Apparatus may include more than one cuvette, which in practice is a disposable rectangular glass or plastic cuvette modified by drilling the hole(s) through. The apparatus include two plates and some means of fastening one plate to the other. The apparatus may be interfaced with a fiber optic or microscope objective, and a spectrometer for spectroscopic studies. The apparatus are suitable for a variety of electrochemical experiments, including surface electrochemistry, bulk electrolysis, and flow cell experiments.

  10. Modified discrete random walk with absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theo van Uem

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain expected number of arrivals, probability of arrival, absorption probabilities and expected time before absorption for a modified discrete random walk on the (sub)set of integers. In a [pqrs] random walk the particle can move one step forward or backward, stay for a moment in the same state or it can be absorbed immediately in the current state. M[pqrs] is a modified version, where probabilities on both sides of a multiple function barrier M are of different [pqrs] type.

  11. Development of a Hybrid Compressor/Expander Module for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McTaggart, Paul

    2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this program TIAX LLC conducted the development of an advanced technology compressor/expander for supplying compressed air to Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells in transportation applications. The overall objective of this program was to develop a hybrid compressor/expander module, based on both scroll and high-speed turbomachinery technologies, which will combine the strengths of each technology to create a concept with superior performance at minimal size and cost. The resulting system was expected to have efficiency and pressure delivery capability comparable to that of a scroll-only machine, at significantly reduced system size and weight when compared to scroll-only designs. Based on the results of detailed designs and analyses of the critical system elements, the Hybrid Compressor/Expander Module concept was projected to deliver significant improvements in weight, volume and manufacturing cost relative to previous generation systems.

  12. Influence of processing conditions on the morphology of expanded perlite/polypropylene composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattausch, H., E-mail: hannelore.mattausch@unileoben.ac.at, E-mail: stephan.laske@unileoben.ac.at; Laske, S., E-mail: hannelore.mattausch@unileoben.ac.at, E-mail: stephan.laske@unileoben.ac.at; Holzer, C., E-mail: clemens.holzer@unileoben.ac.at [Chair of Polymer Processing, Department of Polymer Engineering and Science, Montanuniversitaet Leoben (Austria); Cirar, K., E-mail: kristin.cirar@unileoben.ac.at, E-mail: helmut.flachberger@unileoben.ac.at; Flachberger, H., E-mail: kristin.cirar@unileoben.ac.at, E-mail: helmut.flachberger@unileoben.ac.at [Chair of Mineral Processing, Department Mineral Resources and Petroleum Engineering , Montanuniversitaet Leoben (Austria)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Perlite is an oversaturated, volcanic, glassy rock, which has chemically bound water from 2 to 5 wt%. Upon heating, perlite can be expanded up to 20 times of its original volume. Important applications are in the field of building industry, in refrigeration engineering or the pharmaceutical industry. As mineral filler in polymers, expanded perlite can increase the thermal conductivity, the viscosity and the mechanical properties of polypropylene composites. But there are still many challenges that must be analyzed to reach the full potential of those composites. This research work focuses on the morphology of expanded perlite/polypropylene (PP) compounds and the interactions between filler and polymer. To achieve good performance a homogenous dispersion of the filler in the polymer matrix is needed because the enhancement of the material correlates strongly with the morphology of the composite. Therefore it is necessary to characterize the microstructure of these materials in order to establish adequate structure-process-property relationships. The expanded perlite/PP composites were compounded with a co-rotating twin screw extruder Theysohn TSK 30/40D. For producing the closed cell expanded perlite a new technology, the bublon process, was used. For the material characterization two particles sizes were chosen and the filler content was varied at 5, 10 and 15 wt%. For the analysis of the effects of the screw geometry, two setups have been chosen for the processing of the materials. The produced materials were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and tensile testing. The results show a reinforcement effect of the filler and differences in the inner structure of expanded perlite and in the morphology.

  13. Double-layer ion acceleration triggered by ion magnetization in expanding radiofrequency plasma sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Kazunori [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Fujiwara, Tamiya [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan)

    2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion energy distribution functions downstream of the source exit in magnetically expanding low-pressure plasmas are experimentally investigated for four source tube diameters ranging from about 5 to 15 cm. The magnetic-field threshold corresponding to a transition from a simple expanding plasma to a double layer-containing plasma is observed to increase with a decrease in the source tube diameter. The results demonstrate that for the four geometries, the double layer and the accelerated ion beam form when the ion Larmour radius in the source becomes smaller than the source tube radius, i.e., when the ions become magnetized in the source tube.

  14. Preparation of transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified with (CO) polymers synthesized by RAFT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCormick, III, Charles L. (Hattiesburg, MS); Lowe, Andrew B. (Hattiesburg, MS); Sumerlin, Brent S. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A new, facile, general one-phase method of generating thiol-functionalized transition metal nanoparticles and surface modified by (co)polymers synthesized by the RAFT method is described. The method includes the steps of forming a (co)polymer in aqueous solution using the RAFT methodology, forming a collidal transition metal precursor solution from an appropriate transition metal; adding the metal precursor solution or surface to the (co)polymer solution, adding a reducing agent into the solution to reduce the metal colloid in situ to produce the stabilized nanoparticles or surface, and isolating the stabilized nanoparticles or surface in a manner such that aggregation is minimized. The functionalized surfaces generated using these methods can further undergo planar surface modifications, such as fuctionalization with a variety of different chemical groups, expanding their utility and application.

  15. Preparation of transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified with (CO)polymers synthesized by RAFT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCormick, III., Charles L.; Lowe, Andrew B.; Sumerlin, Brent S.

    2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A new, facile, general one-phase method of generating thio-functionalized transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified by (co)polymers synthesized by the RAFT method is described. The method includes the stops of forming a (co)polymer in aqueous solution using the RAFT methodology, forming a colloidal transition metal precursor solution from an appropriate transition metal; adding the metal precursor solution or surface to the (co)polymer solution, adding a reducing agent into the solution to reduce the metal colloid in situ to produce the stabilized nanoparticles or surface, and isolating the stabilized nanoparticles or surface in a manner such that aggregation is minimized. The functionalized surfaces generated using these methods can further undergo planar surface modifications, such as functionalization with a variety of different chemical groups, expanding their utility and application.

  16. Preparation of transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified with (co)polymers synthesized by RAFT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCormick, III, Charles L. (Hattiesburg, MS); Lowe, Andrew B. (Hattiesburg, MS); Sumerlin, Brent S. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A new, facile, general one-phase method of generating thiol-functionalized transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified by (co)polymers synthesized by the RAFT method is described. The method includes the steps of forming a (co)polymer in aqueous solution using the RAFT methodology, forming a colloidal transition metal precursor solution from an appropriate transition metal; adding the metal precursor solution or surface to the (co)polymer solution, adding a reducing agent into the solution to reduce the metal colloid in situ to produce the stabilized nanoparticles or surface, and isolating the stabilized nanoparticles or surface in a manner such that aggregation is minimized. The functionalized surfaces generated using these methods can further undergo planar surface modifications, such as functionalization with a variety of different chemical groups, expanding their utility and application.

  17. A New Model of Nonlocal Modified Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivan Dimitrijevic; Branko Dragovich; Jelena Grujic; Zoran Rakic

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a new modified gravity model with nonlocal term of the form $R^{-1} \\mathcal{F}(\\Box) R. $ This kind of nonlocality is motivated by investigation of applicability of a few unusual ans\\"atze to obtain some exact cosmological solutions. In particular, we find attractive and useful quadratic ansatz $\\Box R = q R^{2}.$

  18. Modified 2/11/2003 PATENT CERTIFICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    DOE/ORO Modified 2/11/2003 PATENT CERTIFICATION Interim Certification Subcontractor Final and disclosing subject inventions as required by the patent clause of the subcontract have been followed. The completion date of this Subcontract is as follows: . The following period is covered by this patent

  19. Organic electroanalysis with chemically modified electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guadalupe, A.R.; Abruna, H.D.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytical utility of electrodes modified with functionalized polymer films for the determination of aromatic amines is demonstrated. The analysis is based on the preconcentration of the protonated amines into a functionalized polymer film that contains styrene sulfonate groups. Good sensitivity and high reproducibility were obtained for concentrations down to 10/sup -5/ M. Aliphatic amines do not interfere in the determination.

  20. Exergy analysis of transcritical carbon dioxide refrigeration cycle with an expander

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    Exergy analysis of transcritical carbon dioxide refrigeration cycle with an expander Jun Lan Yang Tianjin, People's Republic of China Received 1 June 2003 Abstract In this paper, a comparative study is performed for the transcritical carbon dioxide refrigeration cycles with a throttling valve

  1. Measuring the plasma density of a ferroelectric plasma source in an expanding plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measuring the plasma density of a ferroelectric plasma source in an expanding plasma A. Dunaevsky and N. J. Fisch Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New temperature at the surface of a ferroelectric plasma source were deduced from floating probe measurements

  2. Informing Science Expanding the Focus Volume 5 No 1, 2002 Paper Editor: Elizabeth Boyd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walden, Eric

    Informing Science Expanding the Focus Volume 5 No 1, 2002 Paper Editor: Elizabeth Boyd TToowwaarrdd, Informing Sciences. Introduction The meaning of "information systems" has been growing in diversity of fields, Informing Science" (Cohen, 2000). Our objective in this paper is to participate in the process

  3. Department of Plant Biology and Pathology Expanded Course Description for 11:015:440

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    Department of Plant Biology and Pathology Expanded Course Description for 11:015:440 Agroecology including traditional and organic farming, plant and animal production, energy, pest management, specialized Business · Native Bees Provide Insurance Against Ongoing Honey Bee Losses · Solar Options in Agriculture

  4. The Ecological Society of America www.frontiersinecology.org Natural gas drilling has dramatically expanded with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entrekin, Sally

    to address these threats. n Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing Gas-well drilling has historically dramatically expanded with advances in extraction technology and the need for cleaner burning fuels], sulfur oxide [SOx]) than compared with that of coal or petroleum. Horizontal drilling and hydraulic

  5. Origins and accumulation of organic matter in expanded Albian to Santonian black shale sequences on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Origins and accumulation of organic matter in expanded Albian to Santonian black shale sequences laminated, Cenoma- nian­Santonian black shale sequences contain between 2% and 15% organic carbon about the depositional conditions leading to the black shale accumulations. The low d13 Corg values

  6. ACARYOCHLORIS EXPLAINING THE RIDDLE OF CHLOROPHYLL D IN RED ALGAE AND EXPANDING PAR FOR OXYGENIC PHOTOSYNTHESIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    ACARYOCHLORIS ­ EXPLAINING THE RIDDLE OF CHLOROPHYLL D IN RED ALGAE AND EXPANDING PAR FOR OXYGENIC strain is shown to live epi- phytically on the red alga Gelidium caulacantheum, which itself is harvested by the red alga. Availability of far red light, however, is relatively unaffected by DOM or red

  7. Expanding the Paradigms of Plant Pathogen Life History and Evolution of Parasitic Fitness beyond Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    research in medical epide- miology has elucidated the impact of pathogen ecology in environmental reserOpinion Expanding the Paradigms of Plant Pathogen Life History and Evolution of Parasitic Fitness concepts of the life history of plant pathogens and the drivers of pathogen evolution beyond the current

  8. Divergence of a Propulsive Plasma Flow Expanding through a Magnetic Nozzle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choueiri, Edgar

    Divergence of a Propulsive Plasma Flow Expanding through a Magnetic Nozzle IEPC-2009-260 Presented frequency waves have renewed interest in magnetic nozzles for plasma propulsion applications in space.1 at the 31st International Electric Propulsion Conference, University of Michigan · Ann Arbor, Michigan · USA

  9. Cite this: Lab Chip, 2013, 13, 1457 Unconventional microfluidics: expanding the discipline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cite this: Lab Chip, 2013, 13, 1457 Unconventional microfluidics: expanding the discipline DOI: 10*a Since its inception, the discipline of microfluidics has been harnessed for innovations-effect of stereotyping microfluidics as a platform for medical diagnostics and miniaturized lab processes

  10. CECM Day 2009 IRMACS Expanding HAART to Control the Spread of HIV Among Injection Drug Users

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CECM Day 2009 ­ IRMACS Expanding HAART to Control the Spread of HIV Among Injection Drug Users showed, using a risk behaviour-driven, individual-based (cellular automaton) model of injection drug is likely to be unrealistic for many drug treatment programs, where support is provided that may reduce risk

  11. Resonant ion-dip infrared spectroscopy of benzene,,water...9: Expanding the cube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zwier, Timothy S.

    Resonant ion-dip infrared spectroscopy of benzene­,,water...9: Expanding the cube Christopher J the hydrogen-bonding topologies of three isomers of benzene­ water 9. Isomers I and II, with R2PI transitions shifted, respectively, by 77 and 63 cm 1 from the benzene monomer, have similar intensities in the R2PI

  12. Expanded solid matter: Two-dimensional LJ modeling F.H. Stillinger *, D.K. Stillinger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillinger, Frank

    and technological importance of expanded solid forms of matter such as aerogels indicate the need for related. Keywords: Aerogels; Lennard-Jones model; Inherent structures; Fractal clusters; Burgers vector solid matter is provided by the family of silica-based aerogels (``solid smoke'') that can have mass

  13. THE LYAPUNOV AND DIMENSION SPECTRA OF EQUILIBRIUM MEASURES FOR CONFORMAL EXPANDING MAPS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE LYAPUNOV AND DIMENSION SPECTRA OF EQUILIBRIUM MEASURES FOR CONFORMAL EXPANDING MAPS. HOWARD the dimension spectrum for equilibrium measures and the Lyapunov spectrum for conformal repellers. We explicitly compute the Lyapunov spectrum and show that it is a delta function. We observe that while the Lyapunov

  14. Black Hole Thermodynamics in Modified Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonas R. Mureika; John W. Moffat; Mir Faizal

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the thermodynamics of a non-rotating and rotating black hole in a modified theory of gravity that includes scalar and vector modifications to general relativity, which results in a modified gravitational constant $G = G_N(1+\\alpha)$ and a new gravitational charge $Q = \\sqrt{\\alpha G_N}M$. The influence of the parameter $\\alpha$ alters the non-rotating black hole's lifetime, temperature and entropy profiles from the standard Schwarzschild case. The thermodynamics of a rotating black hole is analyzed and it is shown to possess stable, cold remnants. The thermodynamic properties of a vacuum solution regular at $r=0$ are investigated and the solution without a horizon called a "gray hole" is not expected to possess an information loss problem.

  15. Cosmology of modified (but second order) gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomi S. Koivisto

    2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a brief review of modified gravity cosmologies. Generically extensions of gravity action involve higher derivative terms, which can result in ghosts and instabilities. There are three ways to circumvent this: Chern-Simons terms, first order variational principle and nonlocality. We consider recent cosmological applications of these three classes of modified gravity models, in particular to the dark energy problem. The viable parameter spaces can be very efficiently constrained by taking into account cosmological data from all epochs in addition to Solar system tests and stability considerations. We make some new remarks concerning so called algebraic scalar-tensor theories, biscalar reformulation of nonlocal actions involving the inverse d'Alembertian, and a possible covariant formulation holographic cosmology with nonperturbative gravity.

  16. Modified Newtonian dynamics from acceleration fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas F. Jordan

    2004-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A speculative mathematical model is used to generate the modified Newtonian dynamics called MOND from fluctuations of the number of quanta of quantized acceleration. The one new parameter can be chosen either to make the transition to modification comparable to that obtained from the functions used to fit data with MOND, or to make the modification at larger accelerations comparable in magnitude to the unexplained accelerations of Pioneer 10 and 11.

  17. Modified Empirical Parametrization of Fragmentation Cross Sections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Sümmerer; B. Blank

    1999-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    New experimental data obtained mainly at the GSI/FRS facility allow to modify the empirical parametrization of fragmentation cross sections, EPAX. It will be shown that minor modifications of the parameters lead to a much better reproduction of measured cross sections. The most significant changes refer to the description of fragmentation yields close to the projectile and of the memory effect of neutron-deficient projectiles.

  18. Characterization of electrochemically modified polycrystalline platinum surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krebs, L.C.; Ishida, Takanobu

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The characterization of electrochemically modified polycrystalline platinum surfaces has been accomplished through the use of four major electrochemical techniques. These were chronoamperometry, chronopotentiommetry, cyclic voltammetry, and linear sweep voltammetry. A systematic study on the under-potential deposition of several transition metals has been performed. The most interesting of these were: Ag, Cu, Cd, and Pb. It was determined, by subjecting the platinum electrode surface to a single potential scan between {minus}0.24 and +1.25 V{sub SCE} while stirring the solution, that the electrocatalytic activity would be regenerated. As a consequence of this study, a much simpler method for producing ultra high purity water from acidic permanganate has been developed. This method results in water that surpasses the water produced by pyrocatalytic distillation. It has also been seen that the wettability of polycrystalline platinum surfaces is greatly dependent on the quantity of oxide present. Oxide-free platinum is hydrophobic and gives a contact angle in the range of 55 to 62 degrees. We have also modified polycrystalline platinum surface with the electrically conducting polymer poly-{rho}-phenylene. This polymer is very stable in dilute sulfuric acid solutions, even under applied oxidative potentials. It is also highly resistant to electrochemical hydrogenation. The wettability of the polymer modified platinum surface is severely dependent on the choice of supporting electrolyte chosen for the electrochemical polymerization. Tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate produces a film that is as hydrophobic as Teflon, whereas tetraethylammonium perchlorate produces a film that is more hydrophilic than oxide-free platinum.

  19. Spectrum of Cosmic Microwave Fluctuations and the Formation of Galaxies in a Modified Gravity Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Moffat

    2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A modified gravity (MOG) possesses a light, neutral vector particle called a ``phion'' associated with a vector field $\\phi^\\mu$, which forms a cold fluid of Bose-Einstein condensates before recombination with zero pressure and zero shear viscosity. The energy density associated with this Bose-Einstein condensate fluid dominates the energy density before recombination and produces a density parameter, $\\Omega_\\phi\\sim 0.3$, that together with the fractional baryon density $\\Omega_b\\sim 0.04$, and a cosmological constant parameter $\\Omega_\\Lambda\\sim 0.7$ yields an approximate fit to the data for the acoustical oscillations in the CMB power spectrum. The quantum phion condensate fluid is abundant well before recombination and can clump and form the primordial structure for galaxies. At late times in the expanding universe, in local bound systems such as galaxies ordinary baryonic matter dominates the matter density. For galactic systems in the present epoch, the modified Newtonian acceleration law determined by MOG describes well galaxy rotation curve data and X-ray cluster mass profile data.

  20. Dust-shell Universe in the modified gravity scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Maziashvili

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of the dust-shell model of universe is exactly solved for the modified Schwarzschild solution. This solution is used to derive the cosmology corresponding to the modified gravity.

  1. Organically modified silicate coatings for optical fibers A. B. Wojcik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Organically modified silicate coatings for optical fibers A. B. Wojcik L. C. Klein V. V. Rondinella 909 Piscataway, NJ 08855-0909 ABSTRACT Three kinds of UV-curable organically modified silicates have linked to inorganics. In particular, organically modified silicates were investigated. In the search

  2. The fragmentation of expanding shells I: Limitations of the thin--shell approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dale, James E; Whitworth, Anthony; Palous, Jan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the gravitational fragmentation of expanding shells in the context of the linear thin--shell analysis. We make use of two very different numerical schemes; the FLASH Adaptive Mesh Refinement code and a version of the Benz Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code. We find that the agreement between the two codes is excellent. We use our numerical results to test the thin--shell approximation and we find that the external pressure applied to the shell has a strong effect on the fragmentation process. In cases where shells are not pressure--confined, the shells thicken as they expand and hydrodynamic flows perpendicular to the plane of the shell suppress fragmentation at short wavelengths. If the shells are pressure--confined internally and externally, so that their thickness remains approximately constant during their expansion, the agreement with the analytical solution is better.

  3. Axial force imparted by a current-free magnetically expanding plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Kazunori [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Lafleur, Trevor; Charles, Christine; Alexander, Peter; Boswell, Rod W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The axial force imparted from a magnetically expanding, current-free, radiofrequency plasma is directly measured. For an argon gas flow rate of 25 sccm and an effective rf input power of {approx}800W, a maximum force of {approx}6mN is obtained; {approx}3mN of which is transmitted via the expanding magnetic field. The measured forces are reasonably compared with a simple fluid model associated with the measured electron pressure. The model suggests that the total force is the sum of an electron pressure inside the source and a Lorentz force due to the electron diamagnetic drift current and the applied radial magnetic field. It is shown that the Lorentz force is greatest near the magnetic nozzle surface where the radial pressure gradient is largest.

  4. The effect of 150?m expandable graphite on char expansion of intumescent fire retardant coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullah, Sami, E-mail: samichemist1@gmail.com; Shariff, A. M., E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my; Bustam, M. A., E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my [Research Center for Carbon Dioxide Capture, Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Techologi PETRONAS, Bandar Sri Iskandar, Tronoh 31750 Perak (Malaysia); Ahmad, Faiz, E-mail: faizahmadster@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Techologi PETRONAS, Bandar Sri Iskandar, Tronoh 31750 Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Intumescent is defined as the swelling of certain substances to insulate the underlying substrate when they are heated. In this research work the effect of 150?m expandable graphite (EG) was studied on char expansion, char morphology and char composition of intumescent coating formulations (ICFs). To study the expansion and thermal properties of the coating, nine different formulations were prepared. The coatings were tested at 500 °C for one hour and physically were found very stable and well bound with the steel substrate. The morphology was studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The char composition was analysed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. EG above than 10.8wt% expands the char abruptly with uniform network structure and affect the outer surface of the char.

  5. Chaoticity parameter $?$ in two-pion interferometry in an expanding boson gas model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jie Liu; Peng Ru; Wei-Ning Zhang; Cheuk-Yin Wong

    2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the chaoticity parameter $\\lambda$ in two-pion interferometry in an expanding boson gas model. The degree of Bose-Einstein condensation of identical pions, density distributions, and Hanbury-Brown-Twiss (HBT) correlation functions are calculated for the expanding gas within the mean-field description with a harmonic oscillator potential. The results indicate that a sources with thousands of identical pions may exhibit a degree of Bose-Einstein condensation at the temperatures during the hadronic phase in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. This finite condensation may decrease the chaoticity parameter $\\lambda$ in the two-pion interferometry measurements at low pion pair momenta, but influence only slightly the $\\lambda$ value at high pion pair momentum.

  6. Expanding the Industrial Assessment Center Program: Building an Industrial Efficiency Workforce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trombley, D.; Elliott, R. N.; Chittum, A.

    Expanding the Industrial Assessment Center Program: Building an Industrial Efficiency Workforce Daniel Trombley Engineering Associate R. Neal Elliott, Ph.D., P.E. Associate Director of Research American Council for an Energy-Efficient... of access to technical information and trained workforce. One of the most successful programs for achieving energy efficiency savings in the manufacturing sector is the US Department of Energy (DOE)'s Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) program...

  7. VUV generation by adiabatically expanded and excited by a DC electrical discharge Argon gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pipergias, K.; Yasemidis, D.; Reppa, E.; Pentaris, D.; Efthimiopoulos, T. [Laser, Non linear and Quantum Optics Labs, Physics Department University of Patras, Patras, Greece 26500 (Greece); Merlemis, N. [Laser, Non linear and Quantum Optics Labs, Physics Department University of Patras, Patras, Greece 26500 (Greece); TEI of Athens, Phys. Chem. and Mater. Tech. Department, Athens, Greece, 12 210 (Greece); Giannetas, V. [Physics Department, University of Patras, Patras, Greece 26500 (Greece)

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the emission of Argon (Ar) gas which is adiabatically expanded through a nozzle and excited using a DC electrical discharge. Because of the expansion and the electronic excitation, Ar dimers and clusters are formed, which give radiation in the second (2nd) and in the third (3rd) continua of Ar, centered at about 126 and 254 nm respectively. We particularly focus our study on the 2nd continuum, in order to develop a laser at this wavelength.

  8. Radiative parton energy loss in expanding quark-gluon plasma with magnetic monopoles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Zakharov

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study radiative parton energy loss in an expanding quark-gluon plasma with magnetic monopoles. We find that for realistic number density of thermal monopoles obtained in lattice simulations parton rescatterings on monopoles can considerably enhance energy loss for plasma produced in $AA$ collisions at RHIC and LHC energies. However, contrary to previous expectations, monopoles do not lead to the surface dominance of energy loss.

  9. Work distribution of an expanding gas and transverse energy production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Bin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work distribution of an expanding extreme relativistic gas is shown to be a gamma distribution with a different shape parameter as compared with its non-relativistic counterpart. This implies that the shape of the transverse energy distribution in relativistic heavy ion collisions depends on the particle contents during the evolution of the hot and dense matter. Therefore, transverse energy fluctuations provide additional insights into the Quark-Gluon Plasma produced in these collisions.

  10. Work distribution of an expanding gas and transverse energy production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bin Zhang; Jay P. Mayfield

    2014-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The work distribution of an expanding extreme relativistic gas is shown to be a gamma distribution with a different shape parameter as compared with its non-relativistic counterpart. This implies that the shape of the transverse energy distribution in relativistic heavy ion collisions depends on the particle contents during the evolution of the hot and dense matter. Therefore, transverse energy fluctuations provide additional insights into the Quark-Gluon Plasma produced in these collisions.

  11. A possible approach to understand nonlinear gravitational clustering in expanding background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Padmanabhan

    2005-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach to study the nonlinear phase of gravitational clustering in an expanding universe is explored. This approach is based on an integro-differential equation, for the evolution of the gravitational potential in the Fourier space, which is obtained by using a physically motivated closure condition. I show how this equation allows one to understand several aspects of nonlinear gravitational clustering and provides insight in to the transfer of power from one scale to another through nonlinear mode coupling.

  12. Renormalizability and Phenomenology of theta-expanded Noncommutative Gauge Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Josip Trampetic

    2008-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we consider theta-expanded noncommutative gauge field theory, constructed at the first order in noncommutative parameter theta, as an effective, anomaly free theory, with one-loop renormalizable gauge sector. Related phenomenology with emphasis on the standard model forbidden decays, is discussed. Experimental possibilities of Z -> gamma gamma decay are analyzed and a firm bound to the scale of the noncommutativity parameter is set around few TeV's.

  13. A dynamic kernel modifier for linux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minnich, R. G. (Ronald G.)

    2002-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic Kernel Modifier, or DKM, is a kernel module for Linux that allows user-mode programs to modify the execution of functions in the kernel without recompiling or modifying the kernel source in any way. Functions may be traced, either function entry only or function entry and exit; nullified; or replaced with some other function. For the tracing case, function execution results in the activation of a watchpoint. When the watchpoint is activated, the address of the function is logged in a FIFO buffer that is readable by external applications. The watchpoints are time-stamped with the resolution of the processor high resolution timers, which on most modem processors are accurate to a single processor tick. DKM is very similar to earlier systems such as the SunOS trace device or Linux TT. Unlike these two systems, and other similar systems, DKM requires no kernel modifications. DKM allows users to do initial probing of the kernel to look for performance problems, or even to resolve potential problems by turning functions off or replacing them. DKM watchpoints are not without cost: it takes about 200 nanoseconds to make a log entry on an 800 Mhz Pentium-Ill. The overhead numbers are actually competitive with other hardware-based trace systems, although it has less 'Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated by the University of California for the National Nuclear Security Administration of the United States Department of Energy under contract W-7405-ENG-36. accuracy than an In-Circuit Emulator such as the American Arium. Once the user has zeroed in on a problem, other mechanisms with a higher degree of accuracy can be used.

  14. Treatment of Benign Tracheal Stenosis Utilizing Self-Expanding Nitinol Stents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sesterhenn, Andreas M. [Philipps University, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (Germany)], E-mail: wagnerh@med.uni-marburg.de; Wagner, Hans-Joachim; Alfke, Heiko [Philipps-University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany); Werner, Jochen A.; Lippert, Burkard M. [Philipps University, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (Germany)

    2004-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We assessed the results of self-expanding metallic stent insertion into benign proximal tracheal stenosis in patients not appropriate or unfit for surgical repair. Proximal benign tracheal stenoses had occurred in 11 patients (7 men, 4 women, mean age 68.8 years) after long-time intubation (n = 6), tracheostomy (n = 4), or chondropathia (n = 1). Fourteen self-expanding nitinol stents were placed in the patients under general anesthesia with endoscopical and fluoroscopical guidance. Stent insertion was successful in all cases and led to immediate relief of the morphological and functional airway obstruction. No immediate complications were noted. During the mean follow-up period of 67.5 weeks we observed one recurrent dyspnea 3 months after implantation and granuloma formation at the stent insertion site in another patient. Both complications were successfully treated with additional stent insertion in one case and laser resection of granulomas in the other. Self-expanding nitinol stents should be considered for the treatment of benign proximal tracheal obstruction in selected patients for whom surgical repair is contraindicated.

  15. Ideal quantum gas in expanding cavity: nature of non-adiabatic force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Nakamura; S. K. Avazbaev; Z. A. Sobirov; D. U. Matrasulov; T. Monnai

    2011-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a quantum gas of non-interacting particles confined in the expanding cavity, and investigate the nature of the non-adiabatic force which is generated from the gas and acts on the cavity wall. Firstly, with use of the time-dependent canonical transformation which transforms the expanding cavity to the non-expanding one, we can define the force operator. Secondly, applying the perturbative theory which works when the cavity wall begins to move at time origin, we find that the non-adiabatic force is quadratic in the wall velocity and thereby does not break the time-reversal symmetry, in contrast with the general belief. Finally, using an assembly of the transitionless quantum states, we obtain the nonadiabatic force exactly. The exact result justifies the validity of both the definition of force operator and the issue of the perturbative theory. The mysterious mechanism of nonadiabatic transition with use of transitionless quantum states is also explained. The study is done on both cases of the hard-wall and soft-wall confinement with the time-dependent confining length.

  16. Evaluation of polyethylene-modified asphalt blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Consuegra Granger, Fernando

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aggregate and asphalt modified with LDPE (binder contents of 4. 8%%u and 5. 87'). 42 Table 9. Summary of statistical parameters derived from IDT testing on crushed granite mixtures bound with AC-20 + LDPE (4. 8%, and 5. 8/ binder). 46 Table 10. Summary... of creep to rupture data for crushed granite mixtures. 71 Table 11. Summary of the results of IDT repeated load fatigue testing of river gravel mixtures bound with Texaco asphalt: AC- 10, AC-10 + LDPE and AC-20. Table 12. K, ' and n, values of river...

  17. Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novick, Scott J; Alvizo, Oscar

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

  18. Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novick, Scott; Alvizo, Oscar

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

  19. Boron modified molybdenum silicide and products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, Mitchell K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Akinc, Mufit (Ames, IA)

    1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A boron-modified molybdenum silicide material having the composition comprising about 80 to about 90 weight % Mo, about 10 to about 20 weight % Si, and about 0.1 to about 2 weight % B and a multiphase microstructure including Mo.sub.5 Si.sub.3 phase as at least one microstructural component effective to impart good high temperature creep resistance. The boron-modified molybdenum silicide material is fabricated into such products as electrical components, such as resistors and interconnects, that exhibit oxidation resistance to withstand high temperatures in service in air as a result of electrical power dissipation, electrical resistance heating elements that can withstand high temperatures in service in air and other oxygen-bearing atmospheres and can span greater distances than MoSi.sub.2 heating elements due to improved creep resistance, and high temperature structural members and other fabricated components that can withstand high temperatures in service in air or other oxygen-bearing atmospheres while retaining creep resistance associated with Mo.sub.5 Si.sub.3 for structural integrity.

  20. Boron modified molybdenum silicide and products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, M.K.; Akinc, M.

    1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A boron-modified molybdenum silicide material is disclosed having the composition comprising about 80 to about 90 weight % Mo, about 10 to about 20 weight % Si, and about 0.1 to about 2 weight % B and a multiphase microstructure including Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} phase as at least one microstructural component effective to impart good high temperature creep resistance. The boron-modified molybdenum silicide material is fabricated into such products as electrical components, such as resistors and interconnects, that exhibit oxidation resistance to withstand high temperatures in service in air as a result of electrical power dissipation, electrical resistance heating elements that can withstand high temperatures in service in air and other oxygen-bearing atmospheres and can span greater distances than MoSi{sub 2} heating elements due to improved creep resistance, and high temperature structural members and other fabricated components that can withstand high temperatures in service in air or other oxygen-bearing atmospheres while retaining creep resistance associated with Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} for structural integrity. 7 figs.

  1. Low-income consumers, though less aware of genetically modified foods, are concerned and want labels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Nicelma J.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sentiment about genetically modified food. Pew Initia- tiveless aware of genetically modified foods, are concerned andattitudes about genetically modified foods have been

  2. CRADA Final Report: Properties of Vacuum Deposited Thin Films of Lithium Phosphorous Oxynitride (Lipon) with an Expanded Composition Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudney, N.J.

    2003-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin films of an amorphous, solid-state, lithium electrolyte, referred to as ''Lipon'', were first synthesized and characterized at ORNL in 1991. This material is typically prepared by magnetron sputtering in a nitrogen plasma, which allows nitrogen atoms to substitute for part of the oxygen ions of Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Lipon is the key component in the successful fabrication of ORNL's rechargeable thin film microbatteries. Cymbet and several other US Companies have licensed this technology for commercialization. Optimizing the properties of the Lipon material, particularly the lithium ion conductivity, is extremely important, yet only a limited range of compositions had been explored prior to this program. The goal of this CRADA was to develop new methods to prepare Lipon over an extended composition range and to determine if the film properties might be significantly improved beyond those previously reported by incorporating a larger N component into the film. Cymbet and ORNL investigated different deposition processes for the Lipon thin films. Cymbet's advanced deposition process not only achieved a higher deposition rate, but also permitted independent control the O and N flux to the surface of the growing film. ORNL experimented with several modified sputtering techniques and found that by using sectored sputter targets, composed of Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and Li{sub 3}N ceramic disks, thin Lipon films could be produced over an expanded composition range. The resulting Lipon films were characterized by electrical impedance, infrared spectroscopy, and several complementary analytical techniques to determine the composition. When additional N plus Li are incorporated into the Lipon film, the lithium conductivity was generally degraded. However, the addition of N accompanied by a slight loss of Li gave an increase in the conductivity. Although the improvement in the conductivity was only very modest and was a disappointing conclusion of this study, forcing a higher N content in the Lipon may alleviate some of the run-to-run variations in the Lipon quality that have been problematical for years.

  3. Nitroimidazoles as modifiers of nitrosourea pharmacokinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, F.Y.F.; Workman, P.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of a number of nitroimidazole sensitizers of varying lipophilicity has been studied on the pharmacokinetics of CCNU in mice. It was found that the effectiveness of these compounds in producing pharmacokinetic effects correlated directly with their lipophilicity. The effects of MISO on the pharmacokinetics of 4 nitrosoureas of differing lipophilicity were also investigated. The plasma clearances of CCNU, BCNU and MeCCNU (high lipophilicity) were slowed by MISO whereas that of chlorozotocin (Chlz) (low lipophilicity) was unaffected. Thus, it seems that for a pharmacokinetic interaction to occur between a nitroimidazole and a nitrosourea, both the modifier and the cytotoxic agent must have a requisite degree of lipophilicity. As the same requirement appears to hold for enhancement of tumor response, these data provide further evidence that pharmacokinetic modification plays a major role in chemosensitization.

  4. Dynamical friction in modified Newtonian dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Nipoti; L. Ciotti; J. Binney; P. Londrillo

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have tested a previous analytical estimate of the dynamical friction timescale in Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) with fully non-linear N-body simulations. The simulations confirm that the dynamical friction timescale is significantly shorter in MOND than in equivalent Newtonian systems, i.e. systems with the same phase-space distribution of baryons and additional dark matter. An apparent conflict between this result and the long timescales determined for bars to slow and mergers to be completed in previous N-body simulations of MOND systems is explained. The confirmation of the short dynamical-friction timescale in MOND underlines the challenge that the Fornax dwarf spheroidal poses to the viability of MOND.

  5. The Magellanic Stream in Modified Newtonian Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hossein Haghi; Sohrab Rahvar; Akram Hasani-Zonooz

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of the Magellanic Stream (MS) as a series of clouds extending from the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) to the south Galactic pole is affected by the distribution and the amount of matter in the Milky Way. We calculate the gravitational effect of the Galactic disk on the MS in the framework of modified Newtonian dynamics(MOND) and compare with observations of the Stream's radial velocity. We consider the tidal force of the Galaxy, which strips material from the MCs to form the MS, and, using a no-halo model of the Galaxy, we ignore the effect of the drag of the Galactic halo on the MS. We also compare the MONDian dynamics with that in logarithmic and power-law dark halo models and show that the MOND theory seems plausible for describing the dynamics of satellite galaxies such as the MCs. Finally, we perform a maximum likelihood analysis to obtain the best MOND parameters for the Galactic disk.

  6. Modified Newtonian Dynamics In Dimensionless Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. F. Kao

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modified Newtonian dynamics proposed that gravitational field needs modifications when the field strength $g$ is weaker than a critical value $g_0$. This has been shown to be a good candidate as an alternative to cosmic dark matter. There is another way to look at this theory as a length scale dependent theory. One will show that modification of the Newtonian field strength depends on the mass distribution and the coordinate scale of the system. It is useful to separate the effective gravitation field $g(r)$ into a small scale (or short-distance)$g_s$ field and a large scale (or a long-distance) $g_l$ field that should be helpful for a better understanding of the underlying physics. The effective potential is also derived.

  7. Time-resolved measurements of double layer evolution in expanding plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scime, E. E.; Biloiu, I. A.; Carr, J. Jr.; Thakur, S. Chakraborty; Galante, M.; Hansen, A.; Houshmandyar, S.; Keesee, A. M.; McCarren, D.; Sears, S. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Biloiu, C. [Varian Associates, Gloucester, Massachusetts 01930 (United States); Sun, X. [Tri-Alpha Corporation, Foothill Ranch, California 92610 (United States)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations in steady-state plasmas confirm predictions that formation of a current-free double layer in a plasma expanding into a chamber of larger diameter is accompanied by an increase in ionization upstream of the double layer. The upstream plasma density increases sharply at the same driving frequency at which a double layer appears. For driving frequencies at which no double layer appears, large electrostatic instabilities are observed. Time-resolved measurements in pulsed discharges indicate that the double layer initially forms for all driving frequencies. However, for particularly strong double layers, instabilities appear early in the discharge and the double layer collapses.

  8. Large Scale Impact of the Cosmological Population of Expanding Radio Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paramita Barai

    2008-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We seek to compute the fraction of the volume of the Universe filled by expanding cocoons of the cosmological population of radio galaxies over the Hubble time as well as the magnetic field infused by them, in order to assess their importance in the cosmic evolution of the Universe. Using N-body $\\Lambda$CDM simulations, radio galaxies distributed according to the observed radio luminosity function are allowed to evolve in a cosmological volume as using well defined prescriptions for their expansion. We find that the radio galaxies permeate $10 - 30%$ of the total volume with $\\sim 10^{-8}$ G magnetic field by the present epoch.

  9. Combination nickel foam expanded nickel screen electrical connection supports for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, Robert; Prevish, Thomas; Bronson, Angela; George, Raymond A.

    2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel assembly is made, wherein rows (14, 25) of fuel cells (17, 19, 21, 27, 29, 31), each having an outer interconnection (20) and an outer electrode (32), are disposed next to each other with corrugated, electrically conducting expanded metal mesh member (22) between each row of cells, the corrugated mesh (22) having top crown portions and bottom portions, where the top crown portion (40) have a top bonded open cell nickel foam (51) which contacts outer interconnections (20) of the fuel cells, said mesh and nickel foam electrically connecting each row of fuel cells, and where there are no more metal felt connections between any fuel cells.

  10. Transport properties of CO2-expanded acetonitrile from molecular dynamics simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houndonougbo, Yao; Laird, Brian Bostian; Kuczera, Krzysztof

    2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    .37±0.04 0.897 34.45 0.80 102 410 52.0 0.8205±0.0072 35.57±0.11 0.893 34.58 0.90 410 102 55.0 0.8043±0.0162 35.88±0.24 0.878 34.85 1.00 512 0 64.0 0.7819±0.0094 36.31±0.15 0.713 37.44 074507-3 Transport properties of CO2-expanded CH3CN J. Chem. Phys. 126...

  11. Large Scale Impact of the Cosmological Population of Expanding Radio Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barai, Paramita

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We seek to compute the fraction of the volume of the Universe filled by expanding cocoons of the cosmological population of radio galaxies over the Hubble time as well as the magnetic field infused by them, in order to assess their importance in the cosmic evolution of the Universe. Using N-body $\\Lambda$CDM simulations, radio galaxies distributed according to the observed radio luminosity function are allowed to evolve in a cosmological volume as using well defined prescriptions for their expansion. We find that the radio galaxies permeate $10 - 30%$ of the total volume with $\\sim 10^{-8}$ G magnetic field by the present epoch.

  12. On the reachable cycles via the unified perspective of cryocoolers. Part B: Cryocoolers with isentropic expanders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maytal, Ben-Zion [Rafael, Ltd., P.O. Box 2250, Haifa 3102102 (Israel); Pfotenhauer, John M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Solvay, Stirling and Gifford-McMahon types of cryocoolers employ an isentropic expander which is their elementary mechanism for temperature reduction (following the unified model of cryocoolers as described in a previous paper, Part A). Solvay and Stirling cryocoolers are driven by a larger temperature reduction than that of the Gifford-McMahon cycle, for a similar compression ratio. These cryocoolers are compared from the view of the unified model, in terms of the lowest attainable temperature, compression ratio, the size of the interchanger and the applied heat load.

  13. Expand your horizons! | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR57451 CleanFORTechnical Information Expand

  14. Expanding the Repertoire of Chalcogenide Nanocrystal Networks: Ag2Se Gels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) /EmailMolecular Solids |5Expanded Pending Jobs byand

  15. EXPANDED VERY LARGE ARRAY DETECTION OF 36.2 GHz CLASS I METHANOL MASERS IN SAGITTARIUS A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sjouwerman, Loránt O.

    We report on the interferometric detection of 36.2 GHz Class I methanol emission with the new 27-40 GHz Ka-band receivers available on the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA). The brightness temperatures of the interferometric ...

  16. CORNELL'S QUARTERLY MAGAZINE WINTER 2012 4 -CORNELL NOW EXPANDS 14 -NEW HUMANITIES BUILDING 24 -EINAUDI CENTERS 50TH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    and more CORNELL NOW `Cornell Now' campaign expands to fuel access, opportunity and solutions by 2015. That challenge rests crucially on the issue of sustainability ­ limiting fossil fuel emissions through "clean, and alleviating poverty and p

  17. The environmental effects of expanded trade: a firm-level simulation analysis o investment in Texas grapefruit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmer,Nicole Audra

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research is about the future of the Texas citrus industry and, in particular, whether rapid growth and development associated with expanded trade are likely to be significant factors affecting future investment in the industry. The Dixit...

  18. Use of coal tar pitch and petroleum bitumen in the production of thermally expanded graphite (Short Communication)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.P. Miloshenko; O.Yu. Fetisova; M.L. Shchipko; B.N. Kuznetsov [Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk (Russia). Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The applicability of coal tar pitch and petroleum bitumen to the production of thermally expanded graphite was studied. The dependence of the coefficient of thermal expansion and the specific surface area on the amount of added substances was examined.

  19. The role of biotechnology training partnerships in expanding local employment opportunities for community college graduates in California's biotechnology industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agia, Aziza Eugenie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study addresses a gap in the policy and planning literature regarding the extent to which public workforce intermediaries in a knowledge-intensive industry expand employment opportunities for a nontraditional, i.e., ...

  20. Minnesota DOT Environmental Stewardship & Streamlining Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    disclosure of impacts of proposed actions & possible mitigation § Created basis for environmental impact not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment § Environmental Impact environment § Environmental Assessment (EA) ­ significance of environmental impacts is not clearly established

  1. Minnesota DOT Environmental Stewardship & Streamlining Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    for environmental impact statements (EIS) for major Federal actions Created Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ a significant effect on the human environment Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) ­ detailed written statement) ­ significance of environmental impact is not clearly established; to determine the appropriate environmental

  2. Eight National Labs Offer Streamlined Partnership Agreements...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Savannah River National Laboratory DOE's laboratories have a long tradition of working with...

  3. A numerical sensitivity analysis of streamline simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaban Habib, Fady Ruben

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    of the finite-difference flow equations. In order to find the position of the particle, its movement through a three- dimensional finite-difference cell must be considered. Let?s start with the rate of change in the particle?s x-component of velocity... were performed to determine the effects of various influential elements on the stability and results of the solution. Those experiments were applied to various models to identify the impact of factors such as mobility ratios, mapping of saturation...

  4. Streamline simulation of Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tunison, Douglas Irvin

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and cumulative production histories. The model is three dimensional and capable of modeling heterogeneity anisotropy. The SEAR simulator models mobilization of residual NAPL through the effects of surfactant on the relative permeability curves. The solubilization...

  5. New Metadata Organizer Streamlines JGI Data Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Archive (DnA) file system went live, started as a collaboration between the Sequence Data Management (SDM), Quality Assurance and Quality Control and Genome Assembly groups at JGI....

  6. A numerical sensitivity analysis of streamline simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaban Habib, Fady Ruben

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    .9.................................................................................................. 88 4.60 Homogeneous with qinj=50 Bbls/D varying SegIT value.............................. 89 4.61 Homogeneous line to line with qinj=50 Bbls/D using different ? t. ............... 90 4.62 Homogeneous line to block at same PVI using ? t=20... days........................... 92 4.63 Homogeneous line to block at same PVI using ? t=5 days............................. 93 4.64 PermX distribution for heterogeneous model in gravity cases....................... 94 4.65 Heterogeneous line...

  7. Streamline simulation of Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tunison, Douglas Irvin

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLS) are a recognized source of groundwater contamination. Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation (SEAR) shows promise in increasing the efficiency and effectiveness over traditional "pump and treat" NAPL remediation...

  8. Streamlining the Title V application process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, P. [Dames and Moore, Rolling Meadows, IL (United States); DeCesar, R. [Dames and Moore, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Companies in some US states face 1997 deadlines to apply for permits required by Title V of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Consultants assisting in the preparation of these applications for a variety of facilities have gleaned numerous cost-effective, time-saving approaches for performing the task. Some of the lessons that have been learned are given. Title V applications are often prepared by teams composed of members of a facility`s corporate environmental staff, plant environment staff, plant production staff and an outside consultant. Understanding the role of each team member and delineating lines of communication are keys to working efficiently. Because the focus is on demonstrating existing and future compliance, applicants should define at the outset which regulatory requirements apply to each emissions unit.

  9. PNNL streamlines energy-guzzling computers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckman, Mary T.; Marquez, Andres

    2008-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In a room the size of a garage, two rows of six-foot-tall racks holding supercomputer hard drives sit back-to-back. Thin tubes and wires snake off the hard drives, slithering into the corners. Stepping between the rows, a rush of heat whips around you -- the air from fans blowing off processing heat. But walk farther in, between the next racks of hard drives, and the temperature drops noticeably. These drives are being cooled by a non-conducting liquid that runs right over the hardworking processors. The liquid carries the heat away in tubes, saving the air a few degrees. This is the Energy Smart Data Center at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The bigger, faster, and meatier supercomputers get, the more energy they consume. PNNL's Andres Marquez has developed this test bed to learn how to train the behemoths in energy efficiency. The work will help supercomputers perform better as well. Processors have to keep cool or suffer from "thermal throttling," says Marquez. "That's the performance threshold where the computer is too hot to run well. That threshold is an industry secret." The center at EMSL, DOE's national scientific user facility at PNNL, harbors several ways of experimenting with energy usage. For example, the room's air conditioning is isolated from the rest of EMSL -- pipes running beneath the floor carry temperature-controlled water through heat exchangers to cooling towers outside. "We can test whether it's more energy efficient to cool directly on the processing chips or out in the water tower," says Marquez. The hard drives feed energy and temperature data to a network server running specially designed software that controls and monitors the data center. To test the center’s limits, the team runs the processors flat out – not only on carefully controlled test programs in the Energy Smart computers, but also on real world software from other EMSL research, such as regional weather forecasting models. Marquez's group is also developing "power aware computing", where the computer programs themselves perform calculations more energy efficiently. Maybe once computers get smart about energy, they'll have tips for their users.

  10. California Streamlines Approvals for Renewable Energy Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    between the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the California Department of Fish and Game to create a "one-stop" permitting process. The collaboration, called the...

  11. New Metadata Organizer Streamlines JGI Data Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilverNephelineNeuralNewIdeas Springgains inSkyNew

  12. California - Establishing Transmission Project Review Streamlining

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL Gas Recovery Biomass16 2013 Next57973°,

  13. California Permit Streamlining Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL Gas Recovery Biomass16 2013Management86Use1998-2013

  14. NNSA Streamlines Operations | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14 FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTHN

  15. Use of a Hydrogel-Coated Self-Expandable Coil to Salvage a Failed Transcatheter Embolization of a Mesenteric Hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bui, James T.; West, Derek L.; Pai, Rajiv; Owens, Charles A. [University of Illinois Medical Center, Department of Radiology (M/C 931) (United States)], E-mail: cowens@uic.edu

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    HydroCoil (MicroVention, Aliso Viejo, CA, USA) is a self-expanding detachable coil developed to improve the endovascular occlusion of intracranial aneurysms. The hydrogel polymer covering the microcoil expands to several times its original diameter to enhance thrombosis of the intended vessel. We made use of this new technology to occlude a mesenteric artery pseudoaneurysm that failed superselective embolization with standard microcoils.

  16. Method of modifying a volume mesh using sheet insertion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borden, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM); Shepherd, Jason F. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and machine-readable medium provide a technique to modify a hexahedral finite element volume mesh using dual generation and sheet insertion. After generating a dual of a volume stack (mesh), a predetermined algorithm may be followed to modify (refine) the volume mesh of hexahedral elements. The predetermined algorithm may include the steps of locating a sheet of hexahedral mesh elements, determining a plurality of hexahedral elements within the sheet to refine, shrinking the plurality of elements, and inserting a new sheet of hexahedral elements adjacently to modify the volume mesh. Additionally, another predetermined algorithm using mesh cutting may be followed to modify a volume mesh.

  17. Neutrino Flavor Ratios Modified by Cosmic Ray Re-acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawanaka, Norita

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Re-acceleration of $\\pi$'s and $\\mu$'s modifies the flavor ratio at Earth (at astrophysical sources) of neutrinos produced by $\\pi$ decay, $\

  18. A globally convergent modified conjugate-gradient line-search ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenwen Zhou

    2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 23, 2009 ... Further, we provide a new variant of modified conjugate gradient algorithms ... optimization, trust region methods, conjugate gradient method.

  19. activated carbons modified: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    polymer Composite Materials Modified by Carbon Nanotube is introduced, it contains composite materials based ester, composite materials based resin matrix, composite materials...

  20. acid modified carbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    polymer Composite Materials Modified by Carbon Nanotube is introduced, it contains composite materials based ester, composite materials based resin matrix, composite materials...

  1. activated carbon modified: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    polymer Composite Materials Modified by Carbon Nanotube is introduced, it contains composite materials based ester, composite materials based resin matrix, composite materials...

  2. Guidance Regarding Refinancing, Restructuring, or Modifying ESPC Loan Agreements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document addresses potential refinancing, restructuring, or modifying of a loan agreement entered into by an energy services company (ESCO) under a Federal energy savings performance contract (ESPC).

  3. aqueous nickel-nitrilotriacetate modified: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    we examine the effective interactions introduced between the droplets of an oil in water microemulsion upon progressive addition of hydrophobically modified water soluble...

  4. Institute of Computer Science A modified limited-memory BNS ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Institute of Computer Science. Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. A modified limited-memory BNS method for unconstrained minimization based on ...

  5. arabica genetically modified: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modified Foods and the Attack on Nature Stuart A. Newman to improve foods and other crop plants by introducing exogenous genes (experi- mental transgenesis, a type Newman,...

  6. An expanded framework for the advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marques, Osni A.; Drummond, Leroy A.

    2003-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) Toolkit is a set of computational tools developed primarily at DOE laboratories and is aimed at simplifying the solution of common and important computational problems. The use of the tools reduces the development time for new codes and the tools provide functionality that might not otherwise be available. This document outlines an agenda for expanding the scope of the ACTS Project based on lessons learned from current activities. Highlights of this agenda include peer-reviewed certification of new tools; finding tools to solve problems that are not currently addressed by the Toolkit; working in collaboration with other software initiatives and DOE computer facilities; expanding outreach efforts; promoting interoperability, further development of the tools; and improving functionality of the ACTS Information Center, among other tasks. The ultimate goal is to make the ACTS tools more widely used and more effective in solving DOE's and the nation's scientific problems through the creation of a reliable software infrastructure for scientific computing.

  7. Production of Heavy Clusters with an Expanded Coalescence Model in CEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leslie M. Kerby; Stepan G. Mashnik

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of heavy clusters in nuclear reactions is important in a wide variety of applications: radiation shielding, space engineering and design, medical physics, accelerator design, and more. According to the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM), there are three ways high-energy heavy clusters can be produced. The first way is via coalescence of nucleons produced in the IntraNuclear Cascade (INC). The second way is via the preequilibrium model. The last way is via Fermi breakup. Previous work in CEM examines the impact of expansions of the preequilibrium model and Fermi breakup model on heavy cluster production. The present work studies the impact of expanding the coalescence model on heavy cluster spectra. CEM03.03, the default event generator in the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code version 6 (MCNP6) for intermediate-energy nuclear reactions, is capable of producing light fragments up to He4 in its coalescence model. In the present study, we have expanded the coalescence model to be able to produce up to Be7. Preliminary results are promising.

  8. An Investigation of the Applicability and Limitations of the ORNL Expanded Plug Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAfee, Wallace J. [ORNL] [ORNL; Hemrick, James G. [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The expanded plug test technique for measuring the circumferential tensile properties of irradiated nuclear fuel cladding was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and has been used successfully in several applications. The primary advantage of this technique over other procedures is its simplicity for application in the complex hot cell environment. During the development stage, efforts were made to both qualify the technique as much as possible regarding its experimental application and to develop and validate the data reduction procedures. However, since this is a new technique, the technical community is cautious in adopting a procedure that has not been fully vetted. The purpose of this effort was to address several baseline issues regarding the applicability of the technique and the precision of the use of experimental expanded ring load-deformation data to calculate material circumferential stress-strain properties. The tests performed, in conjunction with the developed data reduction procedures, demonstrate good reliability in the prediction of ring material stress-strain behavior for several materials of widely different strengths.

  9. Calibration of a Modified Californium Shuffler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadowski, E.T.; Armstrong, F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Oldham, R. [USDOE New Brunswick Lab., Argonne, IL (United States); Ceo, R.; Williams, N. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A californium shuffler originally designed to assay hollow cylindrical pieces of UA1 has been modified to assay solid cylinders. Calibration standards were characterized via chemical analysis of the molten UA1 taken during casting of the standards. The melt samples yielded much more reliable characterization data than drill samples taken from standards after the standards had solidified. By normalizing one well-characterized calibration curve to several standards at different enrichments, a relatively small number of standards was required to develop an enrichment-dependent calibration. The precision of this shuffler is 0.65%, and the typical random and systematic uncertainties are 0.53% and 0.73%, respectively, for a six minute assay of an ingot containing approximately 700 grams of {sup 235}U. This paper will discuss (1) the discrepancies encountered when UA1 standards were characterized via melt samples versus drill samples, (2) a calibration methodology employing a small number of standards, and (3) a comparison of results from a previously unused shuffler with an existing shuffler. A small number of UA1 standards have been characterized using samples from the homogeneous molten state and have yielded enrichment-dependent and enrichment-independent calibration curves on two different shufflers.

  10. Additional reductions in the k-constrained modified KP hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleksandr Chvartatskyi; Yuriy Sydorenko

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Additional reductions in the modified k-constrained KP hierarchy are proposed. As a result we obtain generalizations of Kaup-Broer system, Korteweg-de Vries equation and a modification of Korteweg-de Vries equation that belongs to modified k-constrained KP hierarchy. We also propose solution generating technique based on binary Darboux transformations for the obtained equations.

  11. Role of Modified Chaplygin Gas in Accelerated Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ujjal Debnath; Asit Banerjee; Subenoy Chakraborty

    2004-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we have considered a model of modified Chaplygin gas and its role in accelerating phase of the universe. We have assumed that the equation of state of this modified model is valid from the radiation era to $\\Lambda$CDM model. We have used recently developed statefinder parameters in characterizing different phase of the universe diagrammatically.

  12. Modified Fresnel zone plates that produce sharp Gaussian focal spots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahns, Jürgen

    Modified Fresnel zone plates that produce sharp Gaussian focal spots Qing Cao and Ju¨rgen Jahns Fresnel zone plate that can produce an approximate Gaussian focal spot is proposed for the focusing of 7.7 nm can be produced by a modified Fresnel zone plate with a minimum structure size of 30 nm

  13. Kaluza-Klein Cosmology With Modified Holographic Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sharif; Farida Khanum

    2011-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the compact Kaluza-Klein cosmology in which modified holographic dark energy is interacting with dark matter. Using this scenario, we evaluate equation of state parameter as well as equation of evolution of the modified holographic dark energy. Further, it is shown that the generalized second law of thermodynamics holds without any constraint.

  14. Modified Dry Grind Ethanol Process Vijay Singh1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modified Dry Grind Ethanol Process Vijay Singh1 , Kent D. Rausch1 *, Ping Yang2 , Hosein Shapouri3-265-0697). #12;Modified Dry Grind Ethanol Process ­ University of Illinois 2 Table of Contents 1. Introductory.....................................................................................................7 3.2. Dry Grind Ethanol

  15. The fragmentation of expanding shells III: Oligarchic accretion and the mass spectrum of fragments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dale, James E; Smith, Rowan J; Whitworth, Anthony; Palous, Jan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use SPH simulations to investigate the gravitational fragmentation of expanding shells through the linear and non--linear regimes. The results are analysed using spherical harmonic decomposition to capture the initiation of structure during the linear regime; the potential-based method of Smith et al. (2009) to follow the development of clumps in the mildly non-linear regime; and sink particles to capture the properties of the final bound objects during the highly non-linear regime. In the early, mildly non--linear phase of fragmentation, we find that the clump mass function still agrees quite well with the mass function predicted by the analytic model. However, the sink mass function is quite different, in the sense of being skewed towards high-mass objects. This is because, once the growth of a condensation becomes non-linear, it tends to be growing non-competitively from its own essentially separate reservoir; we call this Oligarchic Accretion.

  16. Energy Momentum Pseudo-Tensor of Relic Gravitational Wave in Expanding Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daiqin Su; Yang Zhang

    2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the energy-momentum pseudo-tensor of gravitational wave, and examine the one introduced by Landau-Lifshitz for a general gravitational field and the effective one recently used in literature. In short wavelength limit after Brill-Hartle average, both lead to the same gauge invariant stress tensor of gravitational wave. For relic gravitational waves in the expanding universe, we examine two forms of pressure, $p_{gw}$ and $\\mathcal{P}_{gw}$, and trace the origin of their difference to a coupling between gravitational waves and the background matter. The difference is shown to be negligibly small for most of cosmic expansion stages starting from inflation. We demonstrate that the wave equation is equivalent to the energy conservation equation using the pressure $\\mathcal{P}_{gw}$ that includes the mentioned coupling.

  17. Double layer formation in the expanding region of an inductively coupled electronegative plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plihon, N; Chabert, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Double-layers (DLs) were observed in the expanding region of an inductively coupled plasma with $\\text{Ar}/\\text{SF}\\_6$ gas mixtures. No DL was observed in pure argon or $\\text{SF}\\_6$ fractions below few percent. They exist over a wide range of power and pressure although they are only stable for a small window of electronegativity (typically between 8\\% and 13\\% of $\\text{SF}\\_6$ at 1mTorr), becoming unstable at higher electronegativity. They seem to be formed at the boundary between the source tube and the diffusion chamber and act as an internal boundary (the amplitude being roughly 1.5$\\frac{kT\\_e}{e}$)between a high electron density, high electron temperature, low electronegativity plasma upstream (in the source), and a low electron density, low electron temperature, high electronegativity plasma downstream.

  18. The Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) System: An Expanding Comparative Analysis Resource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markowitz, Victor M.; Chen, I-Min A.; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chu, Ken; Szeto, Ernest; Grechkin, Yuri; Ratner, Anna; Anderson, Iain; Lykidis, Athanasios; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2009-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The integrated microbial genomes (IMG) system serves as a community resource for comparative analysis of publicly available genomes in a comprehensive integrated context. IMG contains both draft and complete microbial genomes integrated with other publicly available genomes from all three domains of life, together with a large number of plasmids and viruses. IMG provides tools and viewers for analyzing and reviewing the annotations of genes and genomes in a comparative context. Since its first release in 2005, IMG's data content and analytical capabilities have been constantly expanded through regular releases. Several companion IMG systems have been set up in order to serve domain specific needs, such as expert review of genome annotations. IMG is available at .

  19. Expanded nickel screen electrical connection supports for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, Robert (Pittsburgh, PA); Antol, Ronald F. (North Huntingdon, PA); Zafred, Paolo R. (Murrysville, PA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel assembly is made, wherein rows (14, 24) of fuel cells (16, 18, 20, 26, 28, 30), each having an outer interconnection (36) and an outer electrode (32), are disposed next to each other with corrugated, electrically conducting expanded metal mesh (22) between each row of cells, the corrugated mesh (22) having top crown portions (40) and bottom shoulder portions (42), where the top crown portion (40) contacts outer interconnections (36) of the fuel cells (16, 18, 20) in a first row (14), and the bottom shoulder portions (42) contacts outer electrodes (32) of the fuel cells in a second row (24), said mesh electrically connecting each row of fuel cells, and where there are no metal felt connections between any fuel cells.

  20. Selection and deposition of nanoparticles using CO.sub.2-expanded liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, Christopher B. (Auburn, AL); McLeod, Marshall Chandler (Hillsboro, OR); Anand, Madhu (Auburn, AL)

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for size selection of nanostructures comprising utilizing a gas-expanded liquids (GEL) and controlled pressure to precipitate desired size populations of nanostructures, e.g., monodisperse. The GEL can comprise CO.sub.2 antisolvent and an organic solvent. The method can be carried out in an apparatus comprising a first open vessel configured to allow movement of a liquid/particle solution to specific desired locations within the vessel, a second pressure vessel, a location controller for controlling location of the particles and solution within the first vessel, a inlet for addition of antisolvent to the first vessel, and a device for measuring the amount of antisolvent added. Also disclosed is a method for forming nanoparticle thin films comprising utilizing a GEL containing a substrate, pressurizing the solution to precipitate and deposit nanoparticles onto the substrate, removing the solvent thereby leaving a thin nanoparticle film, removing the solvent and antisolvent, and drying the film.

  1. Vacuum non-expanding horizons and shear-free null geodesic congruences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. M. Adamo; E. T. Newman

    2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the geometry of a particular class of null surfaces in space-time called vacuum Non-Expanding Horizons (NEHs). Using the spin-coefficient equation, we provide a complete description of the horizon geometry, as well as fixing a canonical choice of null tetrad and coordinates on a NEH. By looking for particular classes of null geodesic congruences which live exterior to NEHs but have the special property that their shear vanishes at the intersection with the horizon, a good cut formalism for NEHs is developed which closely mirrors asymptotic theory. In particular, we show that such null geodesic congruences are generated by arbitrary choice of a complex world-line in a complex four dimensional space, each such choice induces a CR structure on the horizon, and a particular world-line (and hence CR structure) may be chosen by transforming to a privileged tetrad frame.

  2. LIQUID PROPANE GAS (LPG) STORAGE AREA BOILING LIQUID EXPANDING VAPOR EXPLOSION (BLEVE) ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PACE, M.E.

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHA and the FHAs for the SWOC MDSA (HNF-14741) identified multiple accident scenarios in which vehicles powered by flammable gases (e.g., propane), or combustible or flammable liquids (e.g., gasoline, LPG) are involved in accidents that result in an unconfined vapor cloud explosion (UVCE) or in a boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE), respectively. These accident scenarios are binned in the Bridge document as FIR-9 scenarios. They are postulated to occur in any of the MDSA facilities. The LPG storage area will be in the southeast corner of CWC that is relatively remote from store distaged MAR. The location is approximately 30 feet south of MO-289 and 250 feet east of 2401-W by CWC Gate 10 in a large staging area for unused pallets and equipment.

  3. Experimental investigation of over-expanded supersonic steam jet submerged in quiescent water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xin-Zhuang; Yan, Jun-Jie; Li, Wen-Jun; Pan, Dong-Dong; Liu, Guang-Yao [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was designed to determine the behaviour of an over-expanded supersonic steam jet in quiescent water. Only two shapes of steam plume were observed and an analytical model was constructed. The axial and radial temperature distributions were measured in the steam plume and in the surrounding water. The flow pattern and temperature distributions were influenced mainly by steam mass flux and water temperature. The results confirmed the occurrence of compression and expansion waves in the steam plume, and indicated that the temperature distributions reflected the steam plume shapes. The axial temperature distributions in the forepart of the steam plume were independent of water temperature. Empirical correlations were found that predicted the dimensionless axial and radial temperatures of the turbulent jet region. Moreover, prediction of the steam plume length by the dimensionless axial temperature showed good agreement with the experimental results. (author)

  4. Conformation of Adjacent Self-expanding Stents: A Cross-Sectional In Vitro Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Marion; Forauer, Andrew R. [University of Michigan Medical Center, Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States)], E-mail: andrew.r.forauer@hitchcock.org; Lindh, Mats [University Hospital MAS, Radiology Department (Sweden); Cwikiel, Wojciech [University of Michigan Medical Center, Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We examined the proximal conformation of three commonly used self-expanding stents when the stents were deployed adjacent to one another in a tubular model, simulating a 'kissing' stent technique. The stent pairs were evaluated by computed tomogrphy to determine the cross-sectional area excluded by the stents within the model. The mean areas associated with each stent pair were compared and significance evaluated by a t-test. A statistically significant difference was found when the area excluded by adjacent Wallstents was compared with both the Luminexx and SMART stents (p < 0.001 and p < 0.002, respectively). The difference in the area excluded and differences in conformation might play a role in the lower patencies that have been observed in 'kissing' stent series.

  5. Creation of quantized particles, gravitons and scalar perturbations by the expanding universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard Parker

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum creation processes during the very rapid early expansion of the universe are believed to give rise to temperature anisotropies and polarization patterns in the CMB radiation. These have been observed by satellites such as COBE, WMAP, and PLANCK, and by bolometric instruments placed near the South Pole by the BICEP collaborations. The expected temperature anisotropies are well-confirmed. The B-mode polarization patterns in the CMB are currently under measurement jointly by the PLANCK and BICEP groups to determine the extent to which the B-modes can be attributed to gravitational waves from the creation of gravitons in the earliest universe. It was during 1962 that I proved that quanta of the minimally-coupled scalar field were created by the general expanding FLRW universe. This was relevant also to the creation of quantized perturbations of the gravitational field, since these perturbations satisfied linear field equations that could be quantized in the same way as the minimally-coupled scalar field equation. In fact, in 1946, E.M. Lifshitz had considered the classical Einstein gravitational field in FLRW expanding universes and had shown that the classical linearized Einstein field equations reduced, in what is now known as the Lifshitz gauge, to two separate classical minimally-coupled massless scalar field equations. These field equations of Lifshitz, when quantized, correspond to the field equations for massless gravitons, one equation for each of the two independent polarization components of the spin-2 massless graviton. I will discuss this further in this article.1 1 Plenary Lecture given September 2, 2014 at the ERE2014 Conference in Valencia, Spain

  6. Expanded Analysis of Hot Isostatic Pressed Iodine-Loaded Silver-Exchanged Mordenite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jubin, R. T. [ORNL; Bruffey, S. H. [ORNL; Patton, K. K. [ORNL

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduced silver-exchanged mordenite (Ag0Z) is being evaluated as a potential material to control the release of radioactive iodine that is released during the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel into the plant off-gas streams. The purpose of this study was to determine if hot pressing could directly convert this iodine loaded sorbent into a waste form suitable for long-term disposition. The minimal pretreatment required for production of pressed pellets makes hot pressing a technically and economically desirable process. Initial scoping studies utilized hot uniaxial pressing (HUPing) to prepare samples of non-iodine-loaded reduced silver exchanged mordenite (Ag0Z). The resulting samples were very fragile due to the low pressure (~ 28 MPa) used. It was recommended that hot isostatic pressing (HIPing), performed at higher temperatures and pressures, be investigated. HIPing was carried out in two phases, with a third and final phase currently underway. Phase I evaluated the effects of pressure and temperature conditions on the manufacture of a pressed sample. The base material was an engineered form of silver zeolite. Six samples of Ag0Z and two samples of I-Ag0Z were pressed. It was found that HIPing produced a pressed pellet of high density. Analysis of each pressed pellet by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrophotometry (SEM-EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) demonstrated that under the conditions used for pressing, the majority of the material transforms into an amorphous structure. The only crystalline phase observed in the pressed Ag0Z material was SiO2. For the samples loaded with iodine (I-Ag0Z) iodine was present as AgI clusters at low temperatures, and transformed into AgIO4 at high temperatures. Surface mapping and EDS demonstrate segregation between silver iodide phases and silicon dioxide phases. Based on the results of the Phase I study, an expanded test matrix was developed to examine the effects of multiple source materials, compositional variations, and an expanded temperature range. Each sample was analyzed with the approach used in Phase I. In all cases, there is nothing in the SEM or XRD analyses that indicates creation of any AgI-containing silicon phase, with the samples being found to be largely amorphous. Phase III of this study has been initiated and is the final phase of scoping tests. It will expand upon the test matrix completed in Phase II and will examine the durability of the pressed pellets through product consistency testing (PCT) studies. Transformation of the component material into a well-characterized iodine-containing mineral phase would be desirable. This would limit the additional experimental testing and modeling required to determine the long-term stability of the pressed pellet, as much of that information has already been learned for several common iodine-containing minerals. However, this is not an absolute requirement, especially if pellets produced by hot isostatic pressing can be demonstrated through initial PCT studies to retain iodine well despite their amorphous composition.

  7. Idaho Application for Permit to Construct Modify or Maintain...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Idaho Application for Permit to Construct Modify or Maintain an Injection Well - Form 42-39-1Legal Published NA...

  8. Modified Ricci flow and asymptotically non-flat spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shubhayu Chatterjee; Narayan Banerjee

    2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work extends the application of a modified Ricci flow equation to an asymptotically non flat space, namely Marder's cylindrially symmetric space. It is found that the flow equation has a solution at least in a particular case.

  9. TR-031 Ecology March 2004 A modified timber cruise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TR-031 Ecology March 2004 A modified timber cruise for the inventory of dead wood in Coastal-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife 2004 Research Section, Coast Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology

  10. Modified Advection-Aridity Model of Evapotranspiration Jozsef Szilagyi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    Modified Advection-Aridity Model of Evapotranspiration Jozsef Szilagyi1 ; Michael T. Hobbins2=empirically derived constant correction factor. Szilagyi 2007 suggested a temperature-dependent expression for b

  11. Genetically modified food and crops: perceptions of risks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Clare R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The debate around genetically modified food and crops has proved to be complex and far-reaching, involving diverse stakeholder groups and many issues. Although the extent of global uptake of GM crops has been substantial (23 countries and 114...

  12. Modified shielding jet model for twin-jet shielding analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbride, Jennifer Frances

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MODIFIED SHIELDING JET MODEL FOR TWIN-JET SHIELDING ANALYSIS A Thesis by JENNIFER FRANCES GILBRIDE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1983 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering MODIFIED SHIELDING JET MODEL FOR TWIN-JET SHIELDING ANALYSIS A Thesis by JENNIFER FRANCES GILBRIDE Approved as to stvle and content by: 'Carl H. Gerhold (Chairman of Committee) J. Craag Dutton...

  13. Solar System experiments do not yet veto modified gravity models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valerio Faraoni

    2006-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamical equivalence between modified and scalar-tensor gravity theories is revisited and it is concluded that it breaks down in the limit to general relativity. A gauge-independent analysis of cosmological perturbations in both classes of theories lends independent support to this conclusion. As a consequence, the PPN formalism of scalar-tensor gravity and Solar System experiments do not veto modified gravity, as previously thought.

  14. Method for modifying trigger level for adsorber regeneration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, Michael J.; Cunningham, Michael J.

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for modifying a NO.sub.x adsorber regeneration triggering variable. Engine operating conditions are monitored until the regeneration triggering variable is met. The adsorber is regenerated and the adsorbtion efficiency of the adsorber is subsequently determined. The regeneration triggering variable is modified to correspond with the decline in adsorber efficiency. The adsorber efficiency may be determined using an empirically predetermined set of values or by using a pair of oxygen sensors to determine the oxygen response delay across the sensors.

  15. Faculty and Student Teams and National Laboratories: Expanding the Reach of Research Opportunities and Workforce Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackburn,N.; White, K.; Stegman, M.

    2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Faculty and Student Teams (FaST) Program, a cooperative effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and the National Science Foundation (NSF), brings together collaborative research teams composed of a researcher at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and a faculty member with two or three undergraduate students from a college or university. Begun by the Department of Energy in 2000 with the primary goal of building research capacity at a faculty member's home institution, the FaST Program focuses its recruiting efforts on faculty from colleges and universities with limited research facilities and those institutions that serve populations under-represented in the fields of science, engineering and technology, particularly women and minorities. Once assembled, a FaST team spends a summer engaged in hands-on research working alongside a laboratory scientist. This intensely collaborative environment fosters sustainable relationships between the faulty members and BNL that allow faculty members and their BNL colleagues to submit joint proposals to federal agencies, publish papers in peer-reviewed journals, reform local curriculum, and develop new or expand existing research labs at their home institutions.

  16. Expanded breadth of the T-cell response to mosaic HIV-1 envelope DNA vaccination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korber, Bette [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fischer, William [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wallstrom, Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An effective AIDS vaccine must control highly diverse circulating strains of HIV-1. Among HIV -I gene products, the envelope (Env) protein contains variable as well as conserved regions. In this report, an informatic approach to the design of T-cell vaccines directed to HIV -I Env M group global sequences was tested. Synthetic Env antigens were designed to express mosaics that maximize the inclusion of common potential Tcell epitope (PTE) 9-mers and minimize the inclusion of rare epitopes likely to elicit strain-specific responses. DNA vaccines were evaluated using intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in inbred mice with a standardized panel of highly conserved 15-mer PTE peptides. I, 2 and 3 mosaic sets were developed that increased theoretical epitope coverage. The breadth and magnitude ofT-cell immunity stimulated by these vaccines were compared to natural strain Env's; additional comparisons were performed on mutant Env's, including gpl60 or gpl45 with or without V regions and gp41 deletions. Among them, the 2 or 3 mosaic Env sets elicited the optimal CD4 and CD8 responses. These responses were most evident in CD8 T cells; the 3 mosaic set elicited responses to an average of 8 peptide pools compared to 2 pools for a set of3 natural Env's. Synthetic mosaic HIV -I antigens can therefore induce T-cell responses with expanded breadth and may facilitate the development of effective T -cell-based HIV -1 vaccines.

  17. Emission dynamics of an expanding ultrafast-laser produced Zn plasma under different ambient pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smijesh, N.; Philip, Reji [Raman Research Institute, C.V. Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India)] [Raman Research Institute, C.V. Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India)

    2013-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report time and space resolved spectral measurements of neutral Zn emission from an ultrafast laser produced plasma, generated by the irradiation of a Zn target with laser pulses of 100 femtoseconds duration, carried out in a broad ambient pressure range of 0.05 to 100 Torr. The measurement is done for three different axial positions in the expanding plume. The spectra are rich in neutral Zn (Zn I) emissions at 334.5 nm, 468 nm, 472 nm, 481 nm, and 636 nm, respectively, depicting the characteristic triplet structure of Zn. Fast as well as slow peaks are observed in the time of flight data of 481 nm emission, which arise from recombination and atomic contributions, respectively, occurring at different time scales. Average speeds of the fast atomic species do not change appreciably with ambient pressure. The plasma parameters (electron temperature and number density) are evaluated from the measured optical emission spectra. The rates of ionization and recombination can be enhanced by a double-pulse excitation configuration in which optical energy is coupled to the ultrafast plasma through a delayed laser pulse.

  18. On the cosmic ray spectrum from type II Supernovae expanding in their red giant presupernova wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardillo, Martina; Blasi, Pasquale

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While from the energetic point of view SNRs are viable sources of Galactic CRs, the issue of whether they can accelerate protons up to PeV remains unsolved. Here we discuss particle acceleration at the forward shock of SN and discuss the possibility that the escaping particle current may excite a non-resonant instability that in turn leads to the formation of resonant modes confining particles close to the shock and increasing the maximum energy. This mechanism works throughout the expansion of the SN explosion, from the ejecta dominated (ED) to the Sedov-Taylor (ST) phase. Because of their higher explosion rate,we focus on type II SNae expanding in the slow, dense red supergiant wind. When the explosion occurs in such winds, the transition between the ED and the ST phase is likely to take place within a few tens of years. As a result, the spectrum of accelerated particles shows a break in the slope, at the maximum energy (Em) achieved at the beginning of the ST phase. Above this energy, the spectrum becomes ...

  19. Metallurgical failure analysis of a propane tank boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilgo, Alice C.; Eckelmeyer, Kenneth Hall; Susan, Donald Francis

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A severe fire and explosion occurred at a propane storage yard in Truth or Consequences, N.M., when a truck ran into the pumping and plumbing system beneath a large propane tank. The storage tank emptied when the liquid-phase excess flow valve tore out of the tank. The ensuing fire engulfed several propane delivery trucks, causing one of them to explode. A series of elevated-temperature stress-rupture tears developed along the top of a 9800 L (2600 gal) truck-mounted tank as it was heated by the fire. Unstable fracture then occurred suddenly along the length of the tank and around both end caps, along the girth welds connecting the end caps to the center portion of the tank. The remaining contents of the tank were suddenly released, aerosolized, and combusted, creating a powerful boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE). Based on metallography of the tank pieces, the approximate tank temperature at the onset of the BLEVE was determined. Metallurgical analysis of the ruptured tank also permitted several hypotheses regarding BLEVE mechanisms to be evaluated. Suggestions are made for additional work that could provide improved predictive capabilities regarding BLEVEs and for methods to decrease the susceptibility of propane tanks to BLEVEs.

  20. MHD compressor---expander conversion system integrated with GCR inside a deployable reflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuninetti, G. (Ansaldo S.p.A., Genoa (Italy). Research Div.); Botta, E.; Criscuolo, C.; Riscossa, P. (Ansaldo S.p.A., Genoa (Italy). Nuclear Div.); Giammanco, F. (Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica); Rosa-Clot, M. (Florence Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica)

    1989-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This work originates from the proposal MHD Compressor-Expander Conversion System Integrated with a GCR Inside a Deployable Reflector''. The proposal concerned an innovative concept of nuclear, closed-cycle MHD converter for power generation on space-based systems in the multi-megawatt range. The basic element of this converter is the Power Conversion Unit (PCU) consisting of a gas core reactor directly coupled to an MHD expansion channel. Integrated with the PCU, a deployable reflector provides reactivity control. The working fluid could be either uranium hexafluoride or a mixture of uranium hexafluoride and helium, added to enhance the heat transfer properties. The original Statement of Work, which concerned the whole conversion system, was subsequently redirected and focused on the basic mechanisms of neutronics, reactivity control, ionization and electrical conductivity in the PCU. Furthermore, the study was required to be inherently generic such that the study was required to be inherently generic such that the analysis an results can be applied to various nuclear reactor and/or MHD channel designs''.

  1. Community Net Energy Metering: How Novel Policies Expand Benefits of Net Metering to Non-Generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, James; Varnado, Laurel

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As interest in community solutions to renewable energy grows, more states are beginning to develop policies that encourage properties with more than one meter to install shared renewable energy systems. State net metering policies are evolving to allow the aggregation of multiple meters on a customer���¢��������s property and to dissolve conventional geographical boundaries. This trend means net metering is expanding out of its traditional function as an enabling incentive to offset onsite customer load at a single facility. This paper analyzes community net energy metering (CNEM) as an emerging vehicle by which farmers, neighborhoods, and municipalities may more easily finance and reap the benefits of renewable energy. Specifically, it aims to compare and contrast the definition of geographical boundaries among different CNEM models and examine the benefits and limitations of each approach. As state policies begin to stretch the geographic boundaries of net metering, they allow inventive solutions to encourage renewable energy investment. This paper attempts to initiate the conversation on this emerging policy mechanism and offers recommendations for further development of these policies.

  2. Robust protocols for securely expanding randomness and distributing keys using untrusted quantum devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl A. Miller; Yaoyun Shi

    2015-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Randomness is a vital resource for modern day information processing, especially for cryptography. A wide range of applications critically rely on abundant, high quality random numbers generated securely. Here we show how to expand a random seed at an exponential rate without trusting the underlying quantum devices. Our approach is secure against the most general adversaries, and has the following new features: cryptographic quality output security, tolerating a constant level of implementation imprecision, requiring only a constant size quantum memory for the honest implementation, and allowing a large natural class of constructions. In conjunct with a recent work by Chung, Shi and Wu (QIP 2014), it also leads to robust unbounded expansion using just 2 multi-part devices. When adapted for distributing cryptographic keys, our method achieves, for the first time, exponential expansion combined with cryptographic security and noise tolerance. The proof proceeds by showing that the Renyi divergence of the outputs of the protocol (for a specific bounding operator) decreases linearly as the protocol iterates. At the heart of the proof are a new uncertainty principle on quantum measurements, and a method for simulating trusted measurements with untrusted devices.

  3. Redirection of the spherical expanding shock wave on the interface with plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markhotok, A.; Popovic, S. [Physics Department, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States)] [Physics Department, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a strong spherical expanding shock wave interacting with the finite-gradient interface between neutral cold gas and weakly ionized plasma. We want to see how the interaction with the interface can alter the shock structure compared to the case of its free propagation through the media with the exponentially varying density. From our comparative calculations based on the 2D model, we found substantial difference in the shock structure including strong deformation of the shock front followed with its gradual flattening and the redirection in its propagation. There are a number of factors that can be used to control this phenomenon in order to strengthen or lessen the effect. The calculations can be made on any scale, limited with the requirement for the shock wave to be strong. The study points at the possibility in certain applications to avoid the shock wave with its redirection rather than attenuation. The results can be applicable to optimization of the energy deposition into the supersonic flux, the drag reduction in hypersonic flight, in the detonation theory, and combustion through the control of the ignition conditions, and for environmental improvements through sonic boom reduction. Cartesian coordinates were used in order to visualize the phenomenon.

  4. Double layer in an expanding plasma: Simultaneous upstream and downstream measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byhring, H. S.; Fredriksen, A. [Institute of Science and Technology, University of Tromsoe, NO-9037 Tromsoe (Norway); Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion energy measurements were taken simultaneously using one retarding field energy analyzer placed at the open end of the plasma source, and one in the plasma diffusion region of an expanding low pressure argon plasma. An electric double layer was found, which is well separated from the region of high magnetic field and which is downstream of the maximum in the magnetic field gradient. An axially movable analyzer was used to determine the position of the double layer. It appears to be more closely connected to the rapid change in diameter from the source to the diffusion chamber, but still has a radial dimension close to that of the source diameter. These results suggest that the double layer forms, not as much as a result of a magnetic nozzle, but rather as a reaction to a dramatic change in boundary conditions. Still, a magnetic field of at least a few tens of Gauss in the double layer region is necessary for its spontaneous formation.

  5. DETECTING THE RAPIDLY EXPANDING OUTER SHELL OF THE CRAB NEBULA: WHERE TO LOOK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Xiang; Ferland, G. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Baldwin, J. A.; Loh, E. D.; Richardson, C. T., E-mail: xiang.wang@uky.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-2320 (United States)

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a range of steady-state photoionization simulations, corresponding to different assumed shell geometries and compositions, of the unseen postulated rapidly expanding outer shell to the Crab Nebula. The properties of the shell are constrained by the mass that must lie within it, and by limits to the intensities of hydrogen recombination lines. In all cases the photoionization models predict very strong emissions from high ionization lines that will not be emitted by the Crab's filaments, alleviating problems with detecting these lines in the presence of light scattered from brighter parts of the Crab. The near-NIR [Ne VI] {lambda}7.652 {mu}m line is a particularly good case; it should be dramatically brighter than the optical lines commonly used in searches. The C IV {lambda}1549 doublet is predicted to be the strongest absorption line from the shell, which is in agreement with Hubble Space Telescope observations. We show that the cooling timescale for the outer shell is much longer than the age of the Crab, due to the low density. This means that the temperature of the shell will actually ''remember'' its initial conditions. However, the recombination time is much shorter than the age of the Crab, so the predicted level of ionization should approximate the real ionization. In any case, it is clear that IR observations present the best opportunity to detect the outer shell and so guide future models that will constrain early events in the original explosion.

  6. The Market Effect of a Food Scare: The Case of Genetically Modified StarLink Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Colin A.; Smith, Aaron

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    risk from genetically modified (GM) food. We analyze theof a Food Scare: The Case of Genetically Modified StarLinkof a Food Scare: The Case of Genetically Modified StarLink

  7. Shielding, Levitation, Propulsion G. W. Jewell, Chariman Method for expanding the uniformly shielded area in a short-length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paperno, Eugene

    Shielding, Levitation, Propulsion G. W. Jewell, Chariman Method for expanding the uniformly shielded area in a short-length open-ended cylindrical magnetic shield K. Oshita, I. Sasada,a) H. Naka shielded area of the axial magnetic field in a relatively short, open-structure axial magnetic shield can

  8. Expanding the scope of the nucleophile catalyzed aldol lactonization (NCALl) process and transformations of the resulting beta-lactones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matla, Andrea Slava

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . Substrates for cuprate additions have been expanded to bulkier and multi-cyclic Beta-lactones and applied to the synthesis of a Merck IND intermediate. Additions to bi- and tri-chloro Beta-lactones due to the presence of the resulting moity in natural...

  9. Studying technology will change the way you think and expand your opportunities. Our students and faculty are breaking new

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Studying technology will change the way you think ­ and expand your opportunities. Our students information technology. SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AND COMPUTING Undergraduate Programs #12;Make your future with the School of Informatics and Computing Technology is everywhere. In today's world, everyone needs

  10. EIS-0407: Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of the Environmental Impact Statement Abengoa Refinery Project near Hugoton, Kansas Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of the...

  11. The chemical and functional properties of commercial and modified lecithins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Fan

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylinositol (PI), were determined using a HPLC-UV analysis technique. The lecithin produced by the expander process had lower PE and PI contents than by the conventional process... are the major functional ingredients in soybean lecithin. They consist mainly of phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and Phosphatidylinositol (PI). Each phosphatide has a different acyl chain and a polar head group, which influence...

  12. Secreted factors from olfactory mucosa cells expanded as free-floating spheres increase neurogenesis in olfactory bulb neurosphere cultures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barraud, Perrine; He, Xiao-ling; Caldwell, Maeve; Franklin, Robin J M

    2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    ) containing Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM; Gibco) prior to mechanical disso- ciation to a cell suspension. Remaining cell aggregates were removed after filtration through a 40 µm cell strainer (BD Falcon) and cell numbers were estimated using...

  13. Dynamical Evolution and Ionization Structure of an Expanding Superbubble: Application to W4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shantanu Basu; Doug Johnstone; P. G. Martin

    1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations have revealed a superbubble associated with the young stellar cluster OCl 352 near the W4 H II region: a void in H I emission (Normandeau, Taylor, and Dewdney), and a bright shell in H alpha emission (Dennison, Topasna, and Simonetti). We investigate the hypothesis that the bubble is blown by stellar winds from the O-type stars in the association. The Kompaneets approximation is adapted to model a wind-blown bubble in a stratified interstellar medium. We describe some general principles necessary for understanding the dynamics of an expanding bubble and the associated ionization structure in a stratified atmosphere. The Kompaneets model can be used to determine the mean scale height of the ambient medium as well as the age of the bubble. The ionization structure also places constraints on the ambient density near the cluster. We also estimate the surface brightness of the shell and the fraction of ionizing photons which escape the bubble. The prescription we use can be applied to any observed bubble that is blown by the effectively continuous energy output of stellar winds or multiple supernovae. Application to the W4 superbubble shows that the mean scale height of the ambient gas around the cluster is remarkably small, 25 pc for a cluster distance of 2.35 kpc. The age of the bubble is estimated to be about 2.5 Myr, consistent with the notion that the bubble is blown by stellar winds from a very young cluster in which no supernovae have yet occurred.

  14. ANALYSIS OF OUT OF DATE MCU MODIFIER LOCATED IN SRNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C.

    2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    SRNL recently completed density measurements and chemical analyses on modifier samples stored in drums within SRNL. The modifier samples date back to 2008 and are in various quantities up to 40 gallons. Vendor information on the original samples indicates a shelf life of 5 years. There is interest in determining if samples that have been stored for more than the 5 year shelf life are still acceptable for use. The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Solvent component Cs-7SB [(2,2,3,3- tetraflouropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol, CAS #308362-88-1] is used as a diluent modifier to increase extractant solubility and provide physical characteristics necessary for diluent trimming.

  15. Thermal cracking of rubber modified pavements, May 1995. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raad, L.; Yuan, X.; Saboundjian, S.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the original ISTEA mandate (1991) to use crumb tire rubber in pavements, Alaska would be required to use about 250 tons of used tire rubber starting in 1994 and increasing to about 1,000 tons of rubber in 1997 and each year thereafter. A number of pavements using crumb rubber modifiers have been built in the state and have been in service for periods of 8 to 15 years. Knowledge of the behavior of these rubber-modified pavements under extreme climate conditions, particularly in relation to their low temperature cracking resistance, is necessary for future design and construction of rubberized pavements in Alaska. This report presents results of a study to determine the low temperature cracking resistance of rubber modified pavements in Alaska in comparison with conventional asphalt concrete pavements.

  16. Method of detecting luminescent target ions with modified magnetic microspheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Kaminski, Michael D

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides methods of using modified magnetic microspheres to extract target ions from a sample in order to detect their presence in a microfluidic environment. In one or more embodiments, the microspheres are modified with molecules on the surface that allow the target ions in the sample to form complexes with specific ligand molecules on the microsphere surface. In one or more embodiments, the microspheres are modified with molecules that sequester the target ions from the sample, but specific ligand molecules in solution subsequently re-extract the target ions from the microspheres into the solution, where the complexes form independent of the microsphere surface. Once the complexes form, they are exposed to an excitation wavelength light source suitable for exciting the target ion to emit a luminescent signal pattern. Detection of the luminescent signal pattern allows for determination of the presence of the target ions in the sample.

  17. Impedimetric investigation of gold nanoparticles - guanine modified electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vulcu, A.; Pruneanu, S.; Berghian-Grosan, C.; Olenic, L. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Muresan, L. M. [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Barbu-Tudoran, L. [Faculty of Biology and Geology, Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Faculty of Biology and Geology, Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we report the preparation of a modified electrode with gold nanoparticles and guanine. The colloidal suspension of gold nanoparticles was obtained by Turkevich method and was next analyzed by UV-Vis spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The gold electrode was modified by self-assembling the gold nanoparticles with guanine, the organic molecule playing also the role of linker. The electrochemical characteristics of the bare and modified electrode were investigated by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). A theoretical model was developed based on an electrical equivalent circuit which contain solution resistance (R{sub s}), charge transfer resistance (R{sub ct}), Warburg impedance (Z{sub W}) and double layer capacitance (C{sub dl})

  18. Fracture and Collapse of Balloon-Expandable Stents in the Bilateral Common Iliac Arteries Due to Shiatsu Massage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ichihashi, Shigeo, E-mail: shigeoichihashi@yahoo.co.jp; Higashiura, Wataru; Itoh, Hirofumi; Sakaguchi, Shoji; Kichikawa, Kimihiko [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a case of stent fracture and collapse of balloon-expandable stents caused by shiatsu massage. A 76-year-old man presented with complaints of intermittent claudication of the right lower extremity. Stenoses of the bilateral common iliac arteries (CIAs) were detected. Balloon-expandable stents were deployed in both CIAs, resulting in resolution of symptoms. Five months later, pelvis x-ray showed collapse of both stents. Despite the stent collapse, the patient was asymptomatic, and his ankle brachial index values were within the normal range. Further history showed that the patient underwent daily shiatsu therapy in the umbilical region, which may have triggered collapse of the stent. Physicians should advise patients to avoid compression of the abdominal wall after implantation of a stent in the iliac artery.

  19. Miniature modified Faraday cup for micro electron beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA); Elmer, John W. (Danville, CA); Palmer, Todd A. (Livermore, CA); Walton, Chris C. (Berkeley, CA)

    2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A micro beam Faraday cup assembly includes a refractory metal layer with an odd number of thin, radially positioned traces in this refractory metal layer. Some of the radially positioned traces are located at the edge of the micro modified Faraday cup body and some of the radially positioned traces are located in the central portion of the micro modified Faraday cup body. Each set of traces is connected to a separate data acquisition channel to form multiple independent diagnostic networks. The data obtained from the two diagnostic networks are combined and inputted into a computed tomography algorithm to reconstruct the beam shape, size, and power density distribution.

  20. Time Delay Predictions in a Modified Gravity Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Moffat

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The time delay effect for planets and spacecraft is obtained from a fully relativistic modified gravity theory including a fifth force skew symmetric field by fitting to the Pioneer 10/11 anomalous acceleration data. A possible detection of the predicted time delay corrections to general relativity for the outer planets and future spacecraft missions is considered. The time delay correction to GR predicted by the modified gravity is consistent with the observational limit of the Doppler tracking measurement reported by the Cassini spacecraft on its way to Saturn, and the correction increases to a value that could be measured for a spacecraft approaching Neptune and Pluto.

  1. Differentiating Between Modified Gravity Theories in the Solar System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali Mozaffari

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Building on previous work, we re-examine the possibility of testing MOdified Newtonian Dynamics near the saddle points of gravitational potentials in the Solar System, through an extension of the forthcoming LISA Pathfinder mission. We extend present analysis to include quasi-linear formulations of these theories, resulting from fully relativistic modified gravity theories. Using similar quantitative and qualitative tools, we demonstrate that in general, both the instrumental response and typical Signal to Noise Ratios for such a test will be different. Finally we investigate constraints from a negative result and parameterised free functions.

  2. Modified gaseous atmospheres for storage of beef, lamb and pork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, George Theodore

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) ( Member ) (He d of Depar ent) December 1979 ABSTRACT Modified Gaseous Atmospheres for Storage of Bee f, Pork and Lamb (December 1979) George Theodore Davis III, B. S. , Texas AsM University Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. Z. L. Carpenter...MODIFIED G'~. ' . . OUS ATMOSPHERI. S FOR STORAGE OI REEF, I. PMB AND PORK A Thesis by GEORGE THEODORE DAVIS I II Submitted to thc. graduate college of Texas AsM University in partial fulfillment of the rec, u. 'rement fox the degree...

  3. A one-time opportunity to expand the market for premium efficiency motors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, F.; Tumidaj, L.; Hoernlein, D.; Coakley, S.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mid-Atlantic utility conducted a detailed research study on their motors market. The study showed that their motor loads come mostly from motors under 50 horsepower, and predominantly from industry. The proportion of premium-efficiency motor sales is very low relative to other areas which, unlike this utility's service territory, have a history of rebate programs. Most sales in this utility's territory are for replacement motors. Manufacturers are planning to create new lines of motors which meet the 1997 federal minimum motor-efficiency manufacturing standard, but are less efficient than premium motors. Few of these motors are on the market yet. The mandatory federal efficiency standard creates a unique, one-time situation where premium-efficiency motors will be a better-established and more familiar product among customers and vendors than less efficient motors. The utility has begun a motors rebate and technical assistance program which is intended to use this one-time opportunity to significantly expand the market for premium motors. Rebates are tied to the new Consortium for Energy Efficiency motor standards to ensure a common message to manufacturers among utilities. While the majority of premium motors available locally already meet the standard, this will encourage manufacturers to bring the rest of their offerings in line. Like many motors programs, this program will offer rebates, marketing, and technical assistance. However, the program design calls for a short-term (three year), very intense effort, including a rebate set at 100% of incremental cost, a short-term vendor bonus, and intensive marketing to large customers. Additionally, the large savings per motor in 1997 (when the baseline is inefficient standard motors) will justify a more generous payment in the first year. Many other US utility motor rebate programs have offered less generous incentives and used less intensive marketing, but have had only marginal impacts on markets (often 20--30%), or have taken many years to have an impact. This program will test the theory that it is better to strike hard at the right moment than to gnaw at the edges of a market for many years. While the program was designed for one utility, the overall approach would be more effective at working with vendors and customers if utilities joined together to sponsor a similar program with common terms and single redemption centers. This may be an option in the coming months.

  4. Expanded Prussian Blue Analogues Incorporating [Re6Se8(CN)6]3-/4-Clusters: Adjusting Porosity via Charge Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shores, Matthew P.

    Expanded Prussian Blue Analogues Incorporating [Re6Se8(CN)6]3-/4- Clusters: Adjusting Porosity via of octahedral [M(CN)6]3-/4- complexes for the synthesis of microporous Prussian blue type solids with adjustable to be a direct expansion of Prussian blue (Fe4[Fe(CN)6]3,14H2O), with [Re6Se8(CN)6]4- clusters connected through

  5. Situation and outlook for foreign and domestic rice trade: recommendations to expand U.S. market share 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, Kathy

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SITUATION AND OUTLOOK FOR FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC RICE TRADE: RECOMMENDATIONS TO EXPAND U. S. MARKET SHARE A Professional Paper by Kathy Bates Submitted to the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences of Texas A&M University in partial... was compiled, I created a 157 page circular which was approved by the World Agricultural Outlook Board and published in October of 1989. This publication contains the latest available supply and distribution estimates for each country in the Foreign...

  6. Harmonic polynomials for expanding the fluctuations of the Cosmic Microwave Background: The Poincare and the 3-sphere model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Kramer

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluctuations of the Cosmic Microwave Background CMB are observed by the WMAP. When expanded into the harmonic eigenmodes of the space part of a cosmological model, they provide insight into the large-scale topology of space. All harmonic polynomials on the multiply connected dodecahedral Poincare space are constructed. Strong and specific selection rules are given by comparing the polynomials to those on the 3-sphere, its simply connected cover.

  7. Gibbons-Hawking Effect in the Sonic de Sitter Space-Time of an Expanding Bose-Einstein-Condensed Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petr O. Fedichev; Uwe R. Fischer

    2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose an experimental scheme to observe the Gibbons-Hawking effect in the acoustic analog of a 1+1-dimensional de Sitter universe, produced in an expanding, cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate. It is shown that a two-level system created at the center of the trap, an atomic quantum dot interacting with phonons, observes a thermal Bose distribution at the de Sitter temperature.

  8. Patterned Assembly of Genetically Modified Viral Nanotemplates via

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    arrangements of charged amino acids along the surface of the TMV virion can function in the nucleationPatterned Assembly of Genetically Modified Viral Nanotemplates via Nucleic Acid Hybridization The patterning of nanoparticles represents a significant obstacle in the assembly of nanoscale materials

  9. Method of storing radioactive wastes using modified tobermorite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Komarneni, Sridhar (State College, PA); Roy, Della M. (State College, PA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new cation exchanger is a modified tobermorite containing aluminum isomorphously substituted for silicon and containing sodium or potassium. The exchanger is selective for lead, rubidium, cobalt and cadmium and is selective for cesium over calcium or sodium. The tobermorites are compatable with cement and are useful for the long-term fixation and storage of radioactive nuclear wastes.

  10. Computer software engineers design, create, and modify computer applications.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computer software engineers design, create, and modify computer applications. Computer Software Engineers (0*NET 15-1031.00, 15-1032.00) Significant Points Computer software engineers are projected are expected for college graduates with at least a bachelor's degree in computer engineering or computer

  11. A test of Taylor- and modified Taylor-expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Max Wilfling; Christof Gattringer

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare Taylor expansion and a modified variant of Taylor expansion, which incorporates features of the fugacity series, for expansions in the chemical potential around a zero-density lattice field theory. As a first test we apply both series to the cases of free fermions and free bosons. Convergence and other properties are analyzed.

  12. A Modified Reactive Control Framework for Cooperative Mobile Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Modified Reactive Control Framework for Cooperative Mobile Robots J. Salido a , J.M. Dolan a , J Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Carnegie Mellon Univ. Pittsburgh, PA 15213­3890 USA. Purely reactive approaches such as that of Brooks are efficient, but lack a mechanism for global control

  13. On the test of the modified BCS at finite temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen Dinh Dang; Akito Arima

    2006-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The results and conclusions by Ponomarev and Vdovin [Phys. Rev. C {\\bf 72}, 034309 (2005)] are inadequate to judge the applicability of the modified BCS because they were obtained either in the temperature region, where the use of zero-temperature single-particle spectra is no longer justified, or in too limited configuration spaces.

  14. Tracking and Modifying Upper-body Human Motion Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zordan, Victor

    of humanlike characters affect the believability, aesthetic, and impact of an animation or virtual environment the dynamics of the animated character. Figure 1 shows a human actor and two animated characters tracking hisTracking and Modifying Upper-body Human Motion Data with Dynamic Simulation Victor B. Zordan

  15. Particle Acceleration in Rotating Modified Hayward and Bardeen Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behnam Pourhassan; Ujjal Debnath

    2015-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we consider rotating modified Hayward and Bardeen black holes as particle accelerators. We investigate the the center of mass energy of two colliding neutral particles with same rest masses falling from rest at infinity to near the horizons of the mentioned black holes. We also investigate the range of the particle's angular momentum and the orbit of the particle.

  16. Particle Acceleration in Rotating Modified Hayward and Bardeen Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pourhassan, Behnam

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we consider rotating modified Hayward and Bardeen black holes as particle accelerators. We investigate the the center of mass energy of two colliding neutral particles with same rest masses falling from rest at infinity to near the horizons of the mentioned black holes. We also investigate the range of the particle's angular momentum and the orbit of the particle.

  17. SURFACE CHARACTERIZATION OF CHEMICALLY MODIFIED WOOD: DYNAMIC WETTABILITY1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wetting slope and K value) were used to illustrate the dynamic wetting process. Dynamic contact angle the dynamic wettability of wood surfaces modified with different coupling agents. Keywords: Chemical articles on dynamic wetting process for wood adhesion have been published (Scheikl and Dunky 1998

  18. ORIGINAL PAPER Genetically modified crops and aquatic ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Daniel S.

    of genetically modified (GM) crops. The ERA for terrestrial agroecosystems is well-developed, whereas guidance for ERA of GM crops in aquatic ecosystems is not as well-defined. The purpose of this document studies are necessary to inform the risk assessment for a specific GM crop should be done on a case

  19. Investigating plasma motion of magnetic clouds at 1 AU through a velocity-modified cylindrical force-free flux rope model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuming; Shen, Chenglong; Liu, Rui; Wang, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are the interplanetary counterparts of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and usually modeled by a flux rope. By assuming the quasi-steady evolution and self-similar expansion, we introduce three types of global motion into a cylindrical force-free flux rope model, and developed a new velocity-modified model for MCs. The three types of the global motion are the linear propagating motion away from the Sun, the expanding and the poloidal motion with respect to the axis of the MC. The model is applied to 72 MCs observed by Wind spacecraft to investigate the properties of the plasma motion of MCs. First, we find that some MCs had a significant propagation velocity perpendicular to the radial direction, suggesting the direct evidence of the CME's deflected propagation and/or rotation in interplanetary space. Second, we confirm the previous results that the expansion speed is correlated with the radial propagation speed and most MCs did not expand self-similarly at 1 AU. In our statistics, about 6...

  20. SOLUBILITIES OF CO AND H2 IN NEAT AND CO2-EXPANDED HYDROFORMYLATION REACTION MIXTURES CONTAINING 1-OCTENE AND NONANAL UP TO 80 °C AND 90 BARS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Zhuanzhuan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate knowledge of the phase equilibria of CO2-expanded hydroformylation reaction mixtures is essential to rational process design and development. Vapor liquid equilibria of the following systems were measured in a variable volume view cell...

  1. Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2014738 Published: J. M. Pearce, "Expanding Photovoltaic Penetration with Residential Distributed Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Photovoltaic Penetration with Residential Distributed Generation from Hybrid Solar Photovoltaic + Combined Heat.08.012 Expanding Photovoltaic Penetration with Residential Distributed Generation from Hybrid Solar Photovoltaic and power (CHP) systems has provided the opportunity for inhouse power backup of residentialscale

  2. Carbon-nitrogen bond-forming reactions in supercritical and expanded-liquid carbon dioxide media : green synthetic chemistry with multiscale reaction and phase behavior modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciccolini, Rocco P

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this work was to develop a detailed understanding of carbon-nitrogen (C-N) bond-forming reactions of amines carried out in supercritical and expanded-liquid carbon dioxide (CO2) media. Key motivations behind ...

  3. A Modified Equation for Neural Conductance and Resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Robert Showalter

    1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A modified equation, the S-K equation, fits data that the current neural conduction equation, the K-R equation, does not. The S-K equation is a modified Heaviside equation, based on a new interpretation of cross terms. Elements of neural anatomy and function are reviewed to put the S-K equation into context. The fit between S-K and resonance-like neural data is then shown. Appendix 1: Derivation of crossterms that represent combinations of physical laws for a line conductor of finite length. Appendix 2: Evaluation of crossterms that represent combinations of physical laws according to consistency arguments. Appendix 3: Some background on resonance. Appendix 4: Web access to some brain modeling, correspondence with NATURE, and discussion of the work in George Johnson's New York Times forums.

  4. Computing modified Newton directions using a partial Cholesky factorization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsgren, A. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Mathematics; Gill, P.E. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Murray, W. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Systems Optimization Lab.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effectiveness of Newton`s method for finding an unconstrained minimizer of a strictly convex twice continuously differentiable function has prompted the proposal of various modified Newton inetliods for the nonconvex case. Linesearch modified Newton methods utilize a linear combination of a descent direction and a direction of negative curvature. If these directions are sufficient in a certain sense, and a suitable linesearch is used, the resulting method will generate limit points that satisfy the second-order necessary conditions for optimality. We propose an efficient method for computing a descent direction and a direction of negative curvature that is based on a partial Cholesky factorization of the Hessian. This factorization not only gives theoretically satisfactory directions, but also requires only a partial pivoting strategy, i.e., the equivalent of only two rows of the Schur complement need be examined at each step.

  5. Computing modified Newton directions using a partial Cholesky factorization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsgren, A. (Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Mathematics); Gill, P.E. (California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)); Murray, W. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Systems Optimization Lab.)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effectiveness of Newton's method for finding an unconstrained minimizer of a strictly convex twice continuously differentiable function has prompted the proposal of various modified Newton inetliods for the nonconvex case. Linesearch modified Newton methods utilize a linear combination of a descent direction and a direction of negative curvature. If these directions are sufficient in a certain sense, and a suitable linesearch is used, the resulting method will generate limit points that satisfy the second-order necessary conditions for optimality. We propose an efficient method for computing a descent direction and a direction of negative curvature that is based on a partial Cholesky factorization of the Hessian. This factorization not only gives theoretically satisfactory directions, but also requires only a partial pivoting strategy, i.e., the equivalent of only two rows of the Schur complement need be examined at each step.

  6. Environment Dependence of Dark Matter Halos in Symmetron Modified Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans A. Winther; David F. Mota; Baojiu Li

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the environment dependence of dark matter halos in the symmetron modified gravity scenario. The symmetron is one of three known mechanisms for screening a fifth-force and thereby recovering General Relativity in dense environments. The effectiveness of the screening depends on both the mass of the object and the environment it lies in. Using high-resolution N-body simulations we find a significant difference, which depends on the halos mass and environment, between the lensing and dynamical masses of dark matter halos similar to the f(R) modified gravity. The symmetron can however yield stronger signatures due to a freedom in the strength of the coupling to matter.

  7. Galactic space-times in modified theories of gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dipanjan Dey; Kaushik Bhattacharya; Tapobrata Sarkar

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study Bertrand space-times (BSTs), which have been proposed as viable models of space-times seeded by galactic dark matter, in modified theories of gravity. We first critically examine the issue of galactic rotation curves in General Relativity, and establish the usefulness of BSTs to fit experimental data in this context. We then study BSTs in metric $f(R)$ gravity and in Brans-Dicke theories. For the former, the nature of the Newtonian potential is established, and we also compute the effective equation of state and show that it can provide good fits to some recent experimental results. For the latter, we calculate the Brans-Dicke scalar analytically in some limits and numerically in general, and find interesting constraints on the parameters of the theory. Our results provide evidence for the physical nature of Bertrand space-times in modified theories of gravity.

  8. N-body simulations in modified Newtonian dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlo Nipoti; Pasquale Londrillo; Luca Ciotti

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe some results obtained with N-MODY, a code for N-body simulations of collisionless stellar systems in modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND). We found that a few fundamental dynamical processes are profoundly different in MOND and in Newtonian gravity with dark matter. In particular, violent relaxation, phase mixing and galaxy merging take significantly longer in MOND than in Newtonian gravity, while dynamical friction is more effective in a MOND system than in an equivalent Newtonian system with dark matter.

  9. Resorption Rate Tunable Bioceramic: Si, Zn-Modified Tricalcium Phosphate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiang Wei

    2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is organized in an alternate format. Several manuscripts which have already been published or are to be submitted for publication have been included as separate chapters. Chapter 1 is a general introduction which describes the dissertation organization and introduces the human bone and ceramic materials as bone substitute. Chapter 2 is the background and literature review on dissolution behavior of calcium phosphate, and discussion of motivation for this research. Chapter 3 is a manuscript entitled ''Si,Zn-modified tricalcium phosphate: a phase composition and crystal structure study'', which was published in ''Key Engineering Materials'' [1]. Chapter 4 gives more crystal structure details by neutron powder diffraction, which identifies the position for Si and Zn substitution and explains the stabilization mechanism of the structure. A manuscript entitled ''Crystal structure analysis of Si, Zn-modified Tricalcium phosphate by Neutron Powder Diffraction'' will be submitted to Biomaterials [2]. Chapter 5 is a manuscript, entitled ''Dissolution behavior and cytotoxicity test of Si, Zn-modified tricalcium phosphate'', which is to be submitted to Biomaterials [3]. This paper discusses the additives effect on the dissolution behavior of TCP, and cytotoxicity test result is also included. Chapter 6 is the study of hydrolysis process of {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate in the simulated body fluid, and the phase development during drying process is discussed. A manuscript entitled ''Hydrolysis of {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate in simulated body fluid and phase transformation during drying process'' is to be submitted to Biomaterials [4]. Ozan Ugurlu is included as co-authors in these two papers due to his TEM contributions. Appendix A is the general introduction of the materials synthesis, crystal structure and preliminary dissolution result. A manuscript entitled ''Resorption rate tunable bioceramic: Si and Zn-modified tricalcium phosphate'' was published in Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings (the 29th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites - Advances in Bioceramics and Biocomposites) [5].

  10. Qubits entanglement dynamics modified by an effective atomic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Sainz; A. B. Klimov; Luis Roa

    2005-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study entanglement dynamics of a couple of two-level atoms resonantly interacting with a cavity mode and embedded in a dispersive atomic environment. We show that in the absence of the environment the entanglement reaches its maximum value when only one exitation is involved. Then, we find that the atomic environment modifies that entanglement dynamics and induces a typical collapse-revival structure even for an initial one photon Fock state of the field.

  11. Electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical properties of polyviologen complex modified electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akahoshi, H.; Toshima, S.; Itaya, K.

    1981-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrochemistry and the spectroelectrochemistry of the polymer complex polyviologens-poly(styrenesulfonate) modified electrodes were examined in an aqueous solution. The surface waves observed at -0.65 and -1.20 V vs. SCE were due to reductions of the electrochemical active centers (viologen moieties) in the polymer layer. Excellent stability of the polymer complex modified electrodes was obtained on repeated scanning over the first wave, between +0.5 and -0.8 V vs. SCE, causing only a 5% decrease in the peak height after 100 cycles at a scan rate of 50 mV/s. The redox behavior of Fe(CN)/sub 6//sup 3-/4-/ was examined at the modified electrodes, demonstrating a mediated electron-transfer reaction through the redox centers in the polymer film. The change of the color of the polymer film on electrodes could be seen as red-purple. The absorption coefficient (..cap alpha..) at 560 nm of the polymer film was obtained as 1.7 x 10/sup 4/ cm/sup -1/.

  12. Diffusivity anomaly in modified Stillinger-Weber liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, Shiladitya [TIFR Centre for Interdisciplinary Sciences, 21 Brundavan Colony, Narsingi, Hyderabad 500089 (India)] [TIFR Centre for Interdisciplinary Sciences, 21 Brundavan Colony, Narsingi, Hyderabad 500089 (India); Vasisht, Vishwas V. [Theoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur Campus, Bangalore 560064 (India)] [Theoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur Campus, Bangalore 560064 (India); Sastry, Srikanth [TIFR Centre for Interdisciplinary Sciences, 21 Brundavan Colony, Narsingi, Hyderabad 500089 (India) [TIFR Centre for Interdisciplinary Sciences, 21 Brundavan Colony, Narsingi, Hyderabad 500089 (India); Theoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur Campus, Bangalore 560064 (India)

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    By modifying the tetrahedrality (the strength of the three body interactions) in the well-known Stillinger-Weber model for silicon, we study the diffusivity of a series of model liquids as a function of tetrahedrality and temperature at fixed pressure. Previous work has shown that at constant temperature, the diffusivity exhibits a maximum as a function of tetrahedrality, which we refer to as the diffusivity anomaly, in analogy with the well-known anomaly in water upon variation of pressure at constant temperature. We explore to what extent the structural and thermodynamic changes accompanying changes in the interaction potential can help rationalize the diffusivity anomaly, by employing the Rosenfeld relation between diffusivity and the excess entropy (over the ideal gas reference value), and the pair correlation entropy, which provides an approximation to the excess entropy in terms of the pair correlation function. We find that in the modified Stillinger-Weber liquids, the Rosenfeld relation works well above the melting temperatures but exhibits deviations below, with the deviations becoming smaller for smaller tetrahedrality. Further we find that both the excess entropy and the pair correlation entropy at constant temperature go through maxima as a function of the tetrahedrality, thus demonstrating the close relationship between structural, thermodynamic, and dynamical anomalies in the modified Stillinger-Weber liquids.

  13. Measurement and control system for cryogenic helium gas bearing turbo-expander experimental platform based on Siemens PLC S7-300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J.; Xiong, L. Y.; Peng, N.; Dong, B.; Liu, L. Q. [Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China); Wang, P. [Beijing Sciample Technology Co., Ltd., Beijing, 100190 (China)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental platform for cryogenic Helium gas bearing turbo-expanders is established at the Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences. This turbo-expander experimental platform is designed for performance testing and experimental research on Helium turbo-expanders with different sizes from the liquid hydrogen temperature to the room temperature region. A measurement and control system based on Siemens PLC S7-300 for this turbo-expander experimental platform is developed. Proper sensors are selected to measure such parameters as temperature, pressure, rotation speed and air flow rate. All the collected data to be processed are transformed and transmitted to S7-300 CPU. Siemens S7-300 series PLC CPU315-2PN/DP is as master station and two sets of ET200M DP remote expand I/O is as slave station. Profibus-DP field communication is established between master station and slave stations. The upper computer Human Machine Interface (HMI) is compiled using Siemens configuration software WinCC V6.2. The upper computer communicates with PLC by means of industrial Ethernet. Centralized monitoring and distributed control is achieved. Experimental results show that this measurement and control system has fulfilled the test requirement for the turbo-expander experimental platform.

  14. Technical and economic assessment of the use of ammonia expanders for energy recovery in air-cooled power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, S.G.; Hane, G.J.; Johnson, B.M.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Binary cycle power plants have been the subject of much discussion among engineers and scientists for nearly 100 years. Current economic and environmental concerns have stimulated new interest and research. Ammonia has been recommended by other studies as the leading contender for use as simply the heat rejection medium in an air-cooled power plant. This study investigates the technical feasibility and economic potential of including an expander in the heat rejection system of an air-cooled power plant. The expander would be used during certain parts of the year to increase the total output of the power plant. Five different plant locations (Miami, San Francisco, Bakersfield, Chicago, Anchorage) were investigated to show the effect which climate has on the economic potential of this ammonia bottoming cycle. The study shows that the expected energy costs for the bottoming cycle only will be less than 50 mills/kWh for any of the five plant locations. This cost assumes that an ammonia phase-change heat rejection system is already a part of the existing plant. The colder climates of Chicago and Anchorage demonstrate an even smaller energy cost of less than 15 mills/kWh. Further investigation of the concept is merited to substantiate these costs and determine the needed technology.

  15. The geological distribution of mixed-layered kaolinite/expandables (K/E) and its importance within the kaolin group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, R.E.; Moore, D.M. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kaolin-group minerals form in soils by at least three alteration pathways: (1) halloysite forms under pH and ionic extremes, and continues to increase in crystallinity and crystallite sizes along its alteration pathway; (2) mixed-layered kaolinite/smectite or kaolinite/expandables (K/S or K/E) forms from 2:1 layer silicates and contains true expandable layers and inherited Fe[sup VI] and Al[sup IV] within its 7[angstrom] layers. Minor increases in crystallinity and crystallite size accompany further alteration along the K/E pathway; and (3) well-crystallized kaolinites, dickites, and nacrites precipitate from solution, mostly in reducing environments where Fe[sup 2+] is removed from solution by crystallization of sulfides or carbonates. Kaolinite formed along pathways 1 and 2 retains attributes of parent material, whereas kaolinite from pathway 3 retains little. K/E occurs in Recent loessal soils of the Midwest and in related glacigenic paleosols, Quaternary-Pliocene paleosols, Eocene ball clays and their source paleosols on the Porters Creek Clay, Jurassic paleosols in Ireland, and Pennsylvanian underclays. The characteristic properties of K/E imprint kaolinite formed along this pathway. The frequency with which this imprint is being found suggests that K/E is spatially and chronologically more widespread than previously reported and that wider recognition of this imprint will increase the understanding of many kaolin occurrences.

  16. Thin Metal Oxide Films to Modify a Window Layer in CdTe-Based...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thin Metal Oxide Films to Modify a Window Layer in CdTe-Based Solar Cells for Improved Performance. Thin Metal Oxide Films to Modify a Window Layer in CdTe-Based Solar Cells for...

  17. Degradation of perchloroethylene and nitrate by high-activity modified green rusts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jeong Yun

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    produce high-activity modified green rusts (HMGRs) that demonstrate higher degradation rates. Methods of modifying GRs to obtain high reactivity for degradation of PCE and nitrate were developed and reduction kinetics of PCE and nitrate by HMGRs were...

  18. South Korea Public Preferences for Genetically Modified Foods: a Random Parameter Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    South Korea Public Preferences for Genetically Modified Foods: a Random Parameter Model Benjamin for Genetically Modified Foods: a Random Parameter Model Abstract Food biotechnology promises to deliver a wide foods for Southern Korea. #12;South Korea public Preferences for Genetically Modified Foods: a Random

  19. 96 Journal of Student Research in Environmental Science at Appalachian Genetically Modified Maize (Bt corn) and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    to produce their own pesticides or insecticides. The engineering of genetically modified food is a rel96 Journal of Student Research in Environmental Science at Appalachian Genetically Modified Maize the short-term effects of genetically modified (GM) maize, specifically MON810 and MON863, on laboratory

  20. Consumer Acceptance of Genetically Modified Foods in Korea: Factor and Cluster Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    Consumer Acceptance of Genetically Modified Foods in Korea: Factor and Cluster Analysis Benjamin #12;Consumer Acceptance of Genetically Modified Foods In Korea: Factor and Cluster Analysis Abstract and desirability of food biotechnology 2 #12;Introduction Consumer acceptance of genetically modified (GM) 1 food

  1. 596revision:1997-03-23modified:1997-03-23 Some independence results on reflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelah, Saharon

    596revision:1997-03-23modified:1997-03-23 Some independence results on reflection James Cummings;596revision:1997-03-23modified:1997-03-23 Baumgartner proved in [1] that if is weakly compact, GCH holds sense the strong non-reflection principle captures 2 #12;596revision:1997-03-23modified:1997

  2. Hydrogen peroxide modified sodium titanates with improved sorption capabilities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nyman, May D. (Albuquerque, NM); Hobbs, David T. (North Augusta, SC)

    2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The sorption capabilities (e.g., kinetics, selectivity, capacity) of the baseline monosodium titanate (MST) sorbent material currently being used to sequester Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radioisotopes at the Savannah River Site are significantly improved when treated with hydrogen peroxide; either during the original synthesis of MST, or, as a post-treatment step after the MST has been synthesized. It is expected that these peroxide-modified MST sorbent materials will have significantly improved sorption capabilities for non-radioactive cations found in industrial processes and waste streams.

  3. Spherical thin-shell wormholes and modified Chaplygin gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharif, M.; Azam, M., E-mail: msharif.math@pu.edu.pk, E-mail: azammath@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, University of the Punjab, Quaid-e-Azam Campus, Lahore-54590 (Pakistan)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to construct spherical thin-shell wormhole solutions through cut and paste technique and investigate the stability of these solutions in the vicinity of modified Chaplygin gas. The Darmois-Israel formalism is used to formulate the stresses of the surface concentrating the exotic matter. We explore the stability of the wormhole solutions by using the standard potential method. We conclude that there exist more stable as well as unstable solutions than the previous study with generalized Chaplygin gas [19].

  4. Quantized Media with Absorptive Scatterers and Modified Atomic Emission Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. G. Suttorp; A. J. van Wonderen

    2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Modifications in the spontaneous emission rate of an excited atom that are caused by extinction effects in a nearby dielectric medium are analyzed in a quantummechanical model, in which the medium consists of spherical scatterers with absorptive properties. Use of the dyadic Green function of the electromagnetic field near a a dielectric sphere leads to an expression for the change in the emission rate as a series of multipole contributions for which analytical formulas are obtained. The results for the modified emission rate as a function of the distance between the excited atom and the dielectric medium show the influence of both absorption and scattering processes.

  5. Modified GBIG Scenario as a Successful Alternative for Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nozari, Kourosh

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a DGP-inspired braneworld model where induced gravity on the brane is modified in the spirit of $f(R)$ gravity and stringy effects are taken into account by incorporation of the Gauss-Bonnet term in the bulk action. We explore cosmological dynamics of this model and we show that this scenario is a successful alternative for dark energy proposal. Interestingly, it realizes the phantom-like behavior without introduction of any phantom field on the brane and the effective equation of state parameter crosses the cosmological constant line naturally in the same way as observational data suggest.

  6. Cosmological Exact Solutions in Some Modified Gravitational Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yousef Bisabr

    2015-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In a homogenous and isotropic cosmology, we introduce general exact solutions for some modified gravity models. In particular, we introduce exact solutions for power-law $f(R)$ gravity and Brans-Dicke theory in Einstein and Jordan conformal frames. In the Brans-Dicke case, the solutions are presented for both single and double exponential potentials in Einstein frame which correspond to power-law potentials in Jordan frame. Our analysis for extracting general exact solutions can also be generalized to those scalar-tensor theories in which the scalar field has an exponential coupling to Ricci scalar.

  7. Modified GBIG Scenario as an Alternative for Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kourosh Nozari; Narges Rashidi

    2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a DGP-inspired braneworld model where induced gravity on the brane is modified in the spirit of $f(R)$ gravity and stringy effects are taken into account by incorporation of the Gauss-Bonnet term in the bulk action. We explore cosmological dynamics of this model and we show that this scenario is a successful alternative for dark energy proposal. Interestingly, it realizes the phantom-like behavior without introduction of any phantom field on the brane and the effective equation of state parameter crosses the cosmological constant line naturally in the same way as observational data suggest.

  8. Modified definition of group velocity and electromagnetic energy conservation equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changbiao Wang

    2015-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The classical definition of group velocity has two flaws: (a) the group velocity can be greater than the phase velocity in a non-dispersive, lossless, non-conducting, anisotropic uniform medium; (b) the definition is not consistent with the principle of relativity for a plane wave in a moving isotropic uniform medium. To remove the flaws, a modified definition is proposed. A criterion is set up to identify the justification of group velocity definition. A "superluminal power flow" is constructed to show that the electromagnetic energy conservation equation cannot uniquely define the power flow if the principle of Fermat is not taken into account.

  9. High temperature performance of scrap tire rubber modified asphalt concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coomarasamy, A. [Ministry of Transportation, Downsview, Ontario (Canada); Manolis, S.; Hesp, S. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Wheel track rutting tests on mixes modified with 30 mesh, 80 mesh, and very fine colloidal crumb rubber particles show that a very significant improvement in performance occurs with a reduction in the rubber particle size. The SHRP binder test for rutting, which was originally developed for homogeneous systems only, does not predict the performance improvement for smaller rubber particles. If these new scrap rubber binder systems are to be used in pavements then rutting tests on the asphalt-aggregate mixture should be conducted in order to accurately predict high temperature performance.

  10. On the vacuum fluctuations, Pioneer Anomaly and Modified Newtonian Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dragan Slavkov Hajdukovic

    2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue that the so-called "Pioneer Anomaly" is related to the quantum vacuum fluctuations. Our approach is based on the hypothesis of the gravitational repulsion between matter and antimatter, what allows considering, the virtual particle-antiparticle pairs in the physical vacuum, as gravitational dipoles. Our simplified calculations indicate that the anomalous deceleration of the Pioneer spacecrafts could be a consequence of the vacuum polarization in the gravitational field of the Sun. At the large distances, the vacuum polarization by baryonic matter could mimic dark matter what opens possibility that dark matter do not exist, as advocated by the Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND).

  11. Modified SIMD architecture suitable for single-chip implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junichiro Makino

    2005-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a modified SIMD architecture suitable for single-chip integration of a large number of processing elements, such as 1,000 or more. Important differences from traditional SIMD designs are: a) The size of the memory per processing elements is kept small. b) The processors are organized into groups, each with a small buffer memory. Reduction operation over the groups is done in hardware. The first change allows us to integrate a very large number of processing elements into a single chip. The second change allows us to achieve a close-to-peak performance for many scientific applications like particle-based simulations and dense-matrix operations.

  12. Cosmological Exact Solutions in Some Modified Gravitational Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yousef Bisabr

    2015-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In a homogenous and isotropic cosmology, we introduce general exact solutions for some modified gravity models. In particular, we introduce exact solutions for power-law $f(R)$ gravity and Brans-Dicke theory in Einstein and Jordan conformal frames. In the Brans-Dicke case, the solutions are presented for both single and double exponential potentials in Einstein frame which correspond to power-law potentials in Jordan frame. Our analysis for extracting general exact solutions can also be generalized to those scalar-tensor theories in which the scalar field has an exponential coupling to Ricci scalar.

  13. Cosmological Exact Solutions in Some Modified Gravitational Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bisabr, Yousef

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a homogenous and isotropic cosmology, we introduce general exact solutions for some modified gravity models. In particular, we introduce exact solutions for power-law $f(R)$ gravity and Brans-Dicke theory in Einstein and Jordan conformal frames. In the Brans-Dicke case, the solutions are presented for both single and double exponential potentials in Einstein frame which correspond to power-law potentials in Jordan frame. Our analysis for extracting general exact solutions can also be generalized to those scalar-tensor theories in which the scalar field has an exponential coupling to Ricci scalar.

  14. Regulating the Regulators: The Increased Role for the Federal Judiciary in Monitoring the Debate over Genetically Modified Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denton, Blake

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regulation of Genetically Modified Foods, 35 U. MICH. J.L.Over Labeling of Genetically Modified Foods in the UnitedPolicy on Genetically Modified Food and Agriculture, 44 B.C.

  15. Shrinking cloaks in expanding spacetimes: the role of coordinates and the meaning of transformations in Transformation Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert T. Thompson; Mohsen Fathi

    2015-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The fully covariant formulation of transformation optics is used to find the configuration of a cloaking device operating in an expanding universe modelled by a Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Robertson-Walker spacetime. This spacetime cloak is used as a platform for probing the covariant formulation of transformation optics, thereby rigorously enhancing the conceptual understanding of the theory. By studying the problem in both comoving and physical coordinates we explicitly demonstrate the preservation of general covariance of electrodynamics under the transformation optics procedure. This platform also enables a detailed study of the various transformations that arise in transformation optics. We define a corporeal transformation as the "transformation" of transformation optics, and distinguish it from coordinate and frame transformations. We find that corporeal transformations considered in the literature have generally been restricted to a subset of all possible corporeal transformations, providing a potential mechanism for increased functionality of transformation optics.

  16. ENVIROCARE OF UTAH: EXPANDING WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA TO PROVIDE LOW-LEVEL AND MIXED WASTE DISPOSAL OPTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, B.; Loveland, K.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Envirocare of Utah operates a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility 80 miles west of Salt Lake City in Clive, Utah. Accepted waste types includes NORM, 11e2 byproduct material, Class A low-level waste, and mixed waste. Since 1988, Envirocare has offered disposal options for environmental restoration waste for both government and commercial remediation projects. Annual waste receipts exceed 12 million cubic feet. The waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for the Envirocare facility have significantly expanded to accommodate the changing needs of restoration projects and waste generators since its inception, including acceptable physical waste forms, radiological acceptance criteria, RCRA requirements and treatment capabilities, PCB acceptance, and liquids acceptance. Additionally, there are many packaging, transportation, and waste management options for waste streams acceptable at Envirocare. Many subcontracting vehicles are also available to waste generators for both government and commercial activities.

  17. Sequential melting of charmonium states in an expanding Quark Gluon Plasma and $J/?$ suppression at RHIC and LHC energy collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2008-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a hydrodynamic model to study sequential melting of charmonium states in an expanding QGP medium. According to the initial fluid temperature profile, $J/\\psi$'s are randomly distributed in the transverse plane. As the fluid evolve in time, the free streaming $J/\\psi$'s are suppressed if the local fluid temperature exceed a critical temperature. PHENIX data on the centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression in Au+Au collisions at mid-rapidity are explained by sequential melting of the charmonium states, $\\chi_c$, $\\psi\\prime$ and $J/\\psi$, in the expanding medium. The critical temperatures $T_{J/\\psi} \\approx2.09T_c$ and $T_\\chi=T_{\\chi_c}=T_{\\psi\\prime} \\approx 1.1T_c$ agree with lattice motivated calculations. The feed-down fraction $F$ depend on whether the cold nuclear matter effect is included or not. It changes from $F=0.3$ with cold nuclear matter effect included to $F=0.5$ when the effect is neglected. Model fails to reproduce the PHENIX data on the centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression in Cu+Cu collisions at mid-rapidity, indicating that the mechanism of $J/\\psi$ suppression is different in Au+Au and in Cu+Cu collisions. We also use the model to predict for the centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression in Pb+Pb collisions at LHC energy, $\\sqrt{s}$=5500 GeV. In LHC energy, $J/\\psi$'s are more suppressed in mid central collisions than in Au+Au collisions at RHIC energy.

  18. Modified Gravity N-body Code Comparison Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans A. Winther; Fabian Schmidt; Alexandre Barreira; Christian Arnold; Sownak Bose; Claudio Llinares; Marco Baldi; Bridget Falck; Wojciech A. Hellwing; Kazuya Koyama; Baojiu Li; David F. Mota; Ewald Puchwein; Robert Smith; Gong-Bo Zhao

    2015-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-consistent ${\\it N}$-body simulations of modified gravity models are a key ingredient to obtain rigorous constraints on deviations from General Relativity using large-scale structure observations. This paper provides the first detailed comparison of the results of different ${\\it N}$-body codes for the $f(R)$, DGP, and Symmetron models, starting from the same initial conditions. We find that the fractional deviation of the matter power spectrum from $\\Lambda$CDM agrees to better than $1\\%$ up to $k \\sim 5-10~h/{\\rm Mpc}$ between the different codes. These codes are thus able to meet the stringent accuracy requirements of upcoming observational surveys. All codes are also in good agreement in their results for the velocity divergence power spectrum, halo abundances and halo profiles. We also test the quasi-static limit, which is employed in most modified gravity ${\\it N}$-body codes, for the Symmetron model for which the most significant non-static effects among the models considered are expected. We conclude that this limit is a very good approximation for all of the observables considered here.

  19. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaffney, T.R.; Golden, T.C.; Mayorga, S.G.; Brzozowski, J.R.; Taylor, F.W.

    1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO[sub 2] from a gaseous mixture containing CO[sub 2] comprises introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100 C and 500 C to adsorb CO[sub 2] to provide a CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent and a CO[sub 2] depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO[sub 2] laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO[sub 2] from the CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100 C and 600 C, is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions. 1 fig.

  20. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaffney, Thomas Richard (Allentown, PA); Golden, Timothy Christopher (Allentown, PA); Mayorga, Steven Gerard (Allentown, PA); Brzozowski, Jeffrey Richard (Bethlehem, PA); Taylor, Fred William (Allentown, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO.sub.2 from a gaseous mixture containing CO.sub.2 comprising introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. to adsorb CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent and a CO.sub.2 depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO.sub.2 laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO.sub.2 from the CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 600.degree. C., is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions.

  1. Introduction to Modified Gravity and Gravitational Alternative for Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Nojiri; S. D. Odintsov

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We review various modified gravities considered as gravitational alternative for dark energy. Specifically, we consider the versions of $f(R)$, $f(G)$ or $f(R,G)$ gravity, model with non-linear gravitational coupling or string-inspired model with Gauss-Bonnet-dilaton coupling in the late universe where they lead to cosmic speed-up. It is shown that some of such theories may pass the Solar System tests. On the same time, it is demonstrated that they have quite rich cosmological structure: they may naturally describe the effective (cosmological constant, quintessence or phantom) late-time era with a possible transition from decceleration to acceleration thanks to gravitational terms which increase with scalar curvature decrease. The possibility to explain the coincidence problem as the manifestation of the universe expansion in such models is mentioned. The late (phantom or quintessence) universe filled with dark fluid with inhomogeneous equation of state (where inhomogeneous terms are originated from the modified gravity) is also described.

  2. Unscreening modified gravity in the matter power spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas Lombriser; Fergus Simpson; Alexander Mead

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Viable modifications of gravity that may produce cosmic acceleration need to be screened in high-density regions such as the Solar System, where general relativity is well tested. Screening mechanisms also prevent strong anomalies in the large-scale structure and limit the constraints that can be inferred on these gravity models from cosmology. We find that by suppressing the contribution of the screened high-density regions in the matter power spectrum, allowing a greater contribution of unscreened low densities, modified gravity models can be more readily discriminated from the concordance cosmology. Moreover, by variation of density thresholds, degeneracies with other effects may be dealt with more adequately. Specializing to chameleon gravity as a worked example for screening in modified gravity, employing N-body simulations of f(R) models and the halo model of chameleon theories, we demonstrate the effectiveness of this method. We find that a percent-level measurement of the clipped power at k Solar System tests or distance indicators in unscreened dwarf galaxies.

  3. Unscreening modified gravity in the matter power spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombriser, Lucas; Mead, Alexander

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Viable modifications of gravity that may produce cosmic acceleration need to be screened in high-density regions such as the Solar System, where general relativity is well tested. Screening mechanisms also prevent strong anomalies in the large-scale structure and limit the constraints that can be inferred on these gravity models from cosmology. We find that by suppressing the contribution of the screened high-density regions in the matter power spectrum, allowing a greater contribution of unscreened low densities, modified gravity models can be more readily discriminated from the concordance cosmology. Moreover, by variation of density thresholds, degeneracies with other effects may be dealt with more adequately. Specializing to chameleon gravity as a worked example for screening in modified gravity, employing N-body simulations of f(R) models and the halo model of chameleon theories, we demonstrate the effectiveness of this method. We find that a percent-level measurement of the clipped power at k < 0.3 h...

  4. ECOSMOG: An Efficient Code for Simulating Modified Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baojiu Li; Gong-Bo Zhao; Romain Teyssier; Kazuya Koyama

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a new code, ECOSMOG, to run N-body simulations for a wide class of modified gravity and dynamical dark energy theories. These theories generally have one or more new dynamical degrees of freedom, the dynamics of which are governed by their (usually rather nonlinear) equations of motion. Solving these non-linear equations has been a great challenge in cosmology. Our code is based on the RAMSES code, which solves the Poisson equation on adaptively refined meshes to gain high resolutions in the high-density regions. We have added a solver for the extra degree(s) of freedom and performed numerous tests for the f(R) gravity model as an example to show its reliability. We find that much higher efficiency could be achieved compared with other existing mesh/grid-based codes thanks to two new features of the present code: (1) the efficient parallelisation and (2) the usage of the multigrid relaxation to solve the extra equation(s) on both the regular domain grid and refinements, giving much faster convergence even under much more stringent convergence criteria. This code is designed for performing high-accuracy, high-resolution and large-volume cosmological simulations for modified gravity and general dark energy theories, which can be utilised to test gravity and the dark energy hypothesis using the upcoming and future deep and high-resolution galaxy surveys.

  5. Morphological studies on block copolymer modified PA 6 blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poindl, M., E-mail: marcus.poindl@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de, E-mail: christian.bonten@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de; Bonten, C., E-mail: marcus.poindl@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de, E-mail: christian.bonten@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut für Kunststofftechnik, University of Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies show that compounding polyamide 6 (PA 6) with a PA 6 polyether block copolymers made by reaction injection molding (RIM) or continuous anionic polymerization in a reactive extrusion process (REX) result in blends with high impact strength and high stiffness compared to conventional rubber blends. In this paper, different high impact PA 6 blends were prepared using a twin screw extruder. The different impact modifiers were an ethylene propylene copolymer, a PA PA 6 polyether block copolymer made by reaction injection molding and one made by reactive extrusion. To ensure good particle matrix bonding, the ethylene propylene copolymer was grafted with maleic anhydride (EPR-g-MA). Due to the molecular structure of the two block copolymers, a coupling agent was not necessary. The block copolymers are semi-crystalline and partially cross-linked in contrast to commonly used amorphous rubbers which are usually uncured. The combination of different analysis methods like atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) gave a detailed view in the structure of the blends. Due to the partial cross-linking, the particles of the block copolymers in the blends are not spherical like the ones of ethylene propylene copolymer. The differences in molecular structure, miscibility and grafting of the impact modifiers result in different mechanical properties and different blend morphologies.

  6. Modified Newton's law, braneworlds, and the gravitational quantum well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Buisseret; B. Silvestre-Brac; V. Mathieu

    2007-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the theories involving extra dimensions assume that only the gravitational interaction can propagate in them. In such approaches, called brane world models, the effective, 4-dimensional, Newton's law is modified at short as well as at large distances. Usually, the deformation of Newton's law at large distances is parametrized by a Yukawa potential, which arises mainly from theories with compactified extra dimensions. In many other models however, the extra dimensions are infinite. These approaches lead to a large distance power-law deformation of the gravitational newtonian potential $V_N(r)$, namely $V(r)=(1+k_b/r^b)V_N(r)$, which is less studied in the literature. We investigate here the dynamics of a particle in a gravitational quantum well with such a power-law deformation. The effects of the deformation on the energy spectrum are discussed. We also compare our modified spectrum to the results obtained with the GRANIT experiment, where the effects of the Earth's gravitational field on quantum states of ultra cold neutrons moving above a mirror are studied. This comparison leads to upper bounds on $b$ and $k_b$.

  7. Packaging design criteria modified fuel spacer burial box. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, P.F.

    1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Various Hanford facilities must transfer large radioactively contaminated items to burial/storage. Presently, there are eighteen Fuel Spacer Burial Boxes (FSBBs) available on the Hanford Site for transport of such items. Previously, the FSBBS were transported from a rail car to the burial trench via a drag-off operation. To allow for the lifting of the boxes into the burial trench, it will be necessary to improve the packagings lifting attachments and provide structural reinforcement. Additional safety improvements to the packaging system will be provided by the addition of a positive closure system and package ventilation. FSBBs that are modified in such a manner are referred to as Modified Fuel Spacer Burial Boxes (MFSBs). The criteria provided by this PDC will be used to demonstrate that the transfer of the MFSB will provide an equivalent degree of safety as would be provided by a package meeting offsite transportation requirements. This fulfills the onsite transportation safety requirements implemented in WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping. A Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) will be prepared to evaluate the safety of the transfer operation. Approval of the SARP is required to authorize transfer. Criteria are also established to ensure burial requirements are met.

  8. Identification of toroidal field errors in a modified betatron accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loschialpo, P. (Beam Physics Branch, Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)); Marsh, S.J. (SFA Inc., Landover, Maryland 20785 (United States)); Len, L.K.; Smith, T. (FM Technologies Inc., 10529-B Braddock Road, Fairfax, Virginia 22032 (United States)); Kapetanakos, C.A. (Beam Physics Branch, Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States))

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A newly developed probe, having a 0.05% resolution, has been used to detect errors in the toroidal magnetic field of the NRL modified betatron accelerator. Measurements indicate that the radial field components (errors) are 0.1%--1% of the applied toroidal field. Such errors, in the typically 5 kG toroidal field, can excite resonances which drive the beam to the wall. Two sources of detected field errors are discussed. The first is due to the discrete nature of the 12 single turn coils which generate the toroidal field. Both measurements and computer calculations indicate that its amplitude varies from 0% to 0.2% as a function of radius. Displacement of the outer leg of one of the toroidal field coils by a few millimeters has a significant effect on the amplitude of this field error. Because of uniform toroidal periodicity of these coils this error is a good suspect for causing the excitation of the damaging [ital l]=12 resonance seen in our experiments. The other source of field error is due to the current feed gaps in the vertical magnetic field coils. A magnetic field is induced inside the vertical field coils' conductor in the opposite direction of the applied toroidal field. Fringe fields at the gaps lead to additional field errors which have been measured as large as 1.0%. This source of field error, which exists at five toroidal locations around the modified betatron, can excite several integer resonances, including the [ital l]=12 mode.

  9. On the stability of a galactic disk in modified gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshan, Mahmood

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We find the dispersion relation for tightly wound spiral density waves in the surface of rotating, self-gravitating disks in the framework of Modified Gravity (MOG). Also, the Toomre-like stability criterion for differentially rotating disks has been derived for both fluid and stellar disks. More specifically, the stability criterion can be expressed in terms of a matter density threshold over which the instability occurs. In other words the local stability criterion can be written as $\\Sigma_0sound speed), $\\kappa$ (epicycle frequency) and $\\alpha$ and $\\mu_0$ are the free parameters of the theory. In the case of a stellar disk the radial velocity dispersion $\\sigma_r$ appears in $\\Sigma_{\\text{crit}}$ instead of $v_s$. We find the exact form of the function $\\Sigma_{\\text{crit}}$ for both stellar and fluid self-gravitating disks. Also, we use a sub-sample of THINGS catalog of spiral galaxies in order to ...

  10. Modified Magnicon for High-Gradient Accelerator R&D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis, and low-power cold tests are described on a modified design intended for the Ka-band pulsed magnicon now in use for high-gradient accelerator R and D and rare elementary particle searches at the Yale University Beam Physics Laboratory. The modification is mainly to the output cavity of the magnicon, which presently operates in the TM310 mode. It is proposed to substitute for this a dual-chamber TE311 cavity structure. The first chamber is to extract about 40% of the beam power (about 25 MW) at 34.272 GHz, while the second chamber is to convey the power to four WR-28 output waveguides. Minor design changes are also proposed for the penultimate 11.424 GHz cavity and the beam collector. The intention of these design changes is to allow the magnicon to operate reliably 24/7, with minor sensitivity to operating parameters.

  11. Structure formation in modified gravity models alternative to dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuya Koyama

    2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study structure formation in phenomenological models in which the Friedmann equation receives a correction of the form $H^{\\alpha}/r_c^{2-\\alpha}$, which realize an accelerated expansion without dark energy. In order to address structure formation in these model, we construct simple covariant gravitational equations which give the modified Friedmann equation with $\\alpha=2/n$ where $n$ is an integer. For $n=2$, the underlying theory is known as a 5D braneworld model (the DGP model). Thus the models interpolate between the DGP model ($n=2, \\alpha=1$) and the LCDM model in general relativity ($n \\to \\infty, \\alpha \\to 0$). Using the covariant equations, cosmological perturbations are analyzed. It is shown that in order to satisfy the Bianchi identity at a perturbative level, we need to introduce a correction term $E_{\\mu \

  12. Structure formation in modified gravity models alternative to dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koyama, K

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study structure formation in phenomenological models in which the Friedmann equation receives a correction of the form $H^{\\alpha}/r_c^{2-\\alpha}$, which realize an accelerated expansion without dark energy. In order to address structure formation in these model, we construct simple covariant gravitational equations which give the modified Friedmann equation with $\\alpha=2/n$ where $n$ is an integer. For $n=2$, the underlying theory is known as a 5D braneworld model (the DGP model). Thus the models interpolate between the DGP model ($n=2, \\alpha=1$) and the LCDM model in general relativity ($n \\to \\infty, \\alpha \\to 0$). Using the covariant equations, cosmological perturbations are analyzed. It is shown that in order to satisfy the Bianchi identity at a perturbative level, we need to introduce a correction term $E_{\\mu \

  13. Introduction to Modified Gravity and Gravitational Alternative for Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nojiri, S

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review various modified gravities considered as gravitational alternative for dark energy. Specifically, we consider the versions of $f(R)$, $f(G)$ or $f(R,G)$ gravity, model with non-linear gravitational coupling or string-inspired model with Gauss-Bonnet-dilaton coupling in the late universe where they lead to cosmic speed-up. It is shown that some of such theories may pass the Solar System tests. On the same time, it is demonstrated that they have quite rich cosmological structure: they may naturally describe the effective (cosmological constant, quintessence or phantom) late-time era with a possible transition from decceleration to acceleration thanks to gravitational terms which increase with scalar curvature decrease. The possibility to explain the coincidence problem as the manifestation of the universe expansion in such models is mentioned. The late (phantom or quintessence) universe filled with dark fluid with inhomogeneous equation of state (where inhomogeneous terms are originated from the modif...

  14. Planck 2015 results. XIV. Dark energy and modified gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Battye, R; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Désert, F -X; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Fergusson, J; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Heavens, A; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huang, Z; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Lewis, A; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Ma, Y -Z; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Marchini, A; Martin, P G; Martinelli, M; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Narimani, A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Popa, L; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Salvatelli, V; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Schaefer, B M; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Viel, M; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; White, M; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the implications of Planck data for models of dark energy (DE) and modified gravity (MG), beyond the cosmological constant scenario. We start with cases where the DE only directly affects the background evolution, considering Taylor expansions of the equation of state, principal component analysis and parameterizations related to the potential of a minimally coupled DE scalar field. When estimating the density of DE at early times, we significantly improve present constraints. We then move to general parameterizations of the DE or MG perturbations that encompass both effective field theories and the phenomenology of gravitational potentials in MG models. Lastly, we test a range of specific models, such as k-essence, f(R) theories and coupled DE. In addition to the latest Planck data, for our main analyses we use baryonic acoustic oscillations, type-Ia supernovae and local measurements of the Hubble constant. We further show the impact of measurements of the cosmological perturbations, such as redshif...

  15. Thermodynamics of Modified Chaplygin Gas and Tachyonic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samarpita Bhattacharya; Ujjal Debnath

    2010-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we generalize the results of the work of ref. [10] in modified Chaplygin gas model and tachyonic field model. Here we have studied the thermodynamical behaviour and the equation of state in terms of volume and temperature for both models. We have used the solution and the corresponding equation of state of our previous work [12] for tachyonic field model. We have also studied the thermodynamical stability using thermal equation of state for the tachyonic field model and have shown that there is no critical points during thermodynamical expansion. The determination of $T_{*}$ due to expansion for the tachyonic field have been discussed by assuming some initial conditions. Here, the thermal quantities have been investigated using some reduced parameters.

  16. Thermodynamics of apparent horizon and modified Friedman equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad Sheykhi

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting from the first law of thermodynamics, $dE=T_hdS_h+WdV$, at apparent horizon of a FRW universe, and assuming that the associated entropy with apparent horizon has a quantum corrected relation, $S=\\frac{A}{4G}-\\alpha \\ln \\frac{A}{4G}+\\beta \\frac{4G}{A}$, we derive modified Friedmann equations describing the dynamics of the universe with any spatial curvature. We also examine the time evolution of the total entropy including the quantum corrected entropy associated with the apparent horizon together with the matter field entropy inside the apparent horizon. Our study shows that, with the local equilibrium assumption, the generalized second law of thermodynamics is fulfilled in a region enclosed by the apparent horizon.

  17. The Metastability Threshold for Modified Bootstrap Percolation in d Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander E. Holroyd

    2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In the modified bootstrap percolation model, sites in the cube {1,...,L}^d are initially declared active independently with probability p. At subsequent steps, an inactive site becomes active if it has at least one active nearest neighbour in each of the d dimensions, while an active site remains active forever. We study the probability that the entire cube is eventually active. For all d>=2 we prove that as L\\to\\infty and p\\to 0 simultaneously, this probability converges to 1 if L=exp^{d-1} (lambda+epsilon)/p, and converges to 0 if L=exp^{d-1} (lambda-epsilon)/p, for any epsilon>0. Here exp^n denotes the n-th iterate of the exponential function, and the threshold lambda equals pi^2/6 for all d.

  18. Test of modified BCS model at finite temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Yu. Ponomarev; A. I. Vdovin

    2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently suggested modified BCS (MBCS) model has been studied at finite temperature. We show that this approach does not allow the existence of the normal (non-superfluid) phase at any finite temperature. Other MBCS predictions such as a negative pairing gap, pairing induced by heating in closed-shell nuclei, and ``superfluid -- super-superfluid'' phase transition are discussed also. The MBCS model is tested by comparing with exact solutions for the picket fence model. Here, severe violation of the internal symmetry of the problem is detected. The MBCS equations are found to be inconsistent. The limit of the MBCS applicability has been determined to be far below the ``superfluid -- normal'' phase transition of the conventional FT-BCS, where the model performs worse than the FT-BCS.

  19. Fusion-fission reactions with modified Woods-Saxon potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ning Wang; Kai Zhao; Werner Scheid; Xizhen Wu

    2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A modified Woods-Saxon potential model is proposed for a unified description of the entrance channel fusion barrier and the fission barrier of fusion-fission reactions based on the Skyrme energy-density functional approach. The fusion excitation functions of 120 reactions have been systematically studied. The fusion (capture) cross sections are well described with the calculated potential and an empirical barrier distribution. Incorporating a statistical model (HIVAP code) for describing the decay of the compound nucleus, the evaporation residue (and fission) cross sections of 51 fusion-fission reactions have been systematically investigated. Optimal values of some key parameters of the HIVAP code are obtained based on the experimental data of these reactions. The experimental data are reasonably well reproduced by the calculated results. The upper and lower confidence limits of the systematic errors of the calculated results are given.

  20. Surface modified stainless steels for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Wang, Heli [Littleton, CO; Turner, John A [Littleton, CO

    2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A nitridation treated stainless steel article (such as a bipolar plate for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell) having lower interfacial contact electrical resistance and better corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel article is disclosed. The treated stainless steel article has a surface layer including nitrogen-modified chromium-base oxide and precipitates of chromium nitride formed during nitridation wherein oxygen is present in the surface layer at a greater concentration than nitrogen. The surface layer may further include precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide. The surface layer in the treated article is chemically heterogeneous surface rather than a uniform or semi-uniform surface layer exclusively rich in chromium, titanium or aluminum. The precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide are formed by the nitriding treatment wherein titanium and/or aluminum in the stainless steel are segregated to the surface layer in forms that exhibit a low contact resistance and good corrosion resistance.