National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for modification factor emf

  1. SCIENTIFIC CORRESPONDENCE Ferromagnetism and EMFs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschvink, Joseph L.

    SCIENTIFIC CORRESPONDENCE Ferromagnetism and EMFs such they constitute roughly half of the projects of EMF. However, any effect of EMF exposure on cultured cells, if it is due to the presence of whether weak, extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) can cause cancer always generates

  2. Changes in gene expression following EMF exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Chang-Liu, C.M.; Loberg, L.; Gauger, J.; McCormick, D.

    1997-10-01

    Experiments were designed to examine the effects of electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure on specific gene expression, an effect that can be deleterious, beneficial, or neutral, depending on the long-term consequences; however, the proof of a reproducible, quantitative biological effect (such as change in gene expression) will lead to latter experiments aimed at determining the relative contribution of these changes to cellular consequences. Past work by ourselves and by others has shown that measures of gene expression are extremely sensitive indicators of the cellular and biological effects of ionizing radiation, with transcriptional changes being detected by exposure of cells to doses of {gamma}-rays as low as 0.01 cGy that have no pronounced cellular consequences. On the basis of this work, the authors hypothesized that measures of gene expression will be equally sensitive to EMF effects on cells.

  3. Development of an EMF Measurements Database, EMF Rapid Program, Project #5, Interim Report: April 1995-December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Dan Bracken, Inc.

    1997-04-01

    The EMF measurement data sets in existence today were compiled with varying goals and techniques. Consequently, they have different information content as well as varying logical and physical structure. Future studies will continue to pursue varying goals and utilize techniques that cannot be known in advance. Primary goals for the EMF Measurements Database developed under the Department of Energy EMF RAPID Program are to develop a database structure that can accommodate the diversity of EMF data sets, provide guidance for production of future EMF data sets, and serve as an accessible repository of EMF measurement data. Specific objectives of the EMF Measurements Database are: o to preserve study descriptions, results and data; o to provide readily accessible, well-documented data; and o to facilitate communication among researchers. In addition, the EMF Measurements Database will encourage additional analysis of existing data sets, facilitate analysis of data from multiple projects, support design of new studies, and permit future issues in EMF exposure assessment to be addressed with existing data. Preservation of study descriptions and data is accomplished with a formal, but open, structure. Specifications have been developed for the various elements of the database. Each data set in the database is formally described by a metadata file. The structured metadata file describes the origin, development, logical and physical structure and distribution mechanism for each data set. The metadata for each data set is generated according to a specification developed for the EMF Measurements Database. The actual measurement data is contained in data Products for each data set. The number and type of data product will vary by data set. Most of the data products in the possession of the EMF Measurements Database are available for download from an Internet site. For some data sets, the data products will be maintained by other parties who may have their own access procedures. In addition, data set contributors or users can provide reports that describe results of the study and analysis of the data with text and figures. Guidelines have been developed for preparation of reports. Access to the EMF Measurements Database is provided via an Internet site (http://www.emf-data. erg). The site provides descriptive information in a home page, . . access to data products with a file transfer protocol (ftp) address, and links to other EMF-related sites.

  4. Modification of generalized vector form factors and transverse charge densities of the nucleon in nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Ju-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Chul

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the medium modification of the generalized vector form factors of the nucleon, which include the electromagnetic and energy-momentum tensor form factors, based on an in-medium modified $\\pi$-$\\rho$-$\\omega$ soliton model. We find that the vector form factors of the nucleon in nuclear matter fall off faster than those in free space, which implies that the charge radii of the nucleon become larger in nuclear medium than in free space. We also compute the corresponding transverse charge densities of the nucleon in nuclear matter, which clearly reveal the increasing of the nucleon size in nuclear medium.

  5. Modification of generalized vector form factors and transverse charge densities of the nucleon in nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ju-Hyun Jung; Ulugbek Yakhshiev; Hyun-Chul Kim

    2015-12-23

    We investigate the medium modification of the generalized vector form factors of the nucleon, which include the electromagnetic and energy-momentum tensor form factors, based on an in-medium modified $\\pi$-$\\rho$-$\\omega$ soliton model. We find that the vector form factors of the nucleon in nuclear matter fall off faster than those in free space, which implies that the charge radii of the nucleon become larger in nuclear medium than in free space. We also compute the corresponding transverse charge densities of the nucleon in nuclear matter, which clearly reveal the increasing of the nucleon size in nuclear medium.

  6. Nuclear Energy Response in the EMF27 Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Son H.; Wada, Kenichi; Kurosawa, Atsushi; Roberts, Matthew

    2014-03-25

    The nuclear energy response for mitigating global climate change across eighteen participating models of the EMF27 study is investigated. Diverse perspectives on the future role of nuclear power in the global energy system are evident in the broad range of nuclear power contributions from participating models of the study. In the Baseline scenario without climate policy, nuclear electricity generation and shares span 0 – 66 EJ/ year and 0 - 25% in 2100 for all models, with a median nuclear electricity generation of 39 EJ/year (1,389 GWe at 90% capacity factor) and median share of 9%. The role of nuclear energy increased under the climate policy scenarios. The median of nuclear energy use across all models doubled in the 450 ppm CO2e scenario with a nuclear electricity generation of 67 EJ/year (2,352 GWe at 90% capacity factor) and share of 17% in 2100. The broad range of nuclear electricity generation (11 – 214 EJ/year) and shares (2 - 38%) in 2100 of the 450 ppm CO2e scenario reflect differences in the technology choice behavior, technology assumptions and competitiveness of low carbon technologies. Greater clarification of nuclear fuel cycle issues and risk factors associated with nuclear energy use are necessary for understanding the nuclear deployment constraints imposed in models and for improving the assessment of the nuclear energy potential in addressing climate change.

  7. Subject Title: EMF Radiation Safety Program at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Hue Sun

    of retinal #12;Subject Title: EMF Radiation Safety Program at the University of Toronto Issued by: Senior, such as cognitive processing, can be affected by induced electric fields below the threshold for direct stimulation

  8. Getting from here to there – energy technology transformation pathways in the EMF-27 scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krey, Volker; Luderer, Gunnar; Clarke, Leon E.; Kriegler, Elmar

    2014-04-01

    This apper discusses Getting from here to there – energy technology transformation pathways in the EMF-27 scenarios

  9. Technology and U.S. Emissions Reductions Goals: Results of the EMF 24 Modeling Exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, Leon E.; Fawcett, Allen; Weyant, John; McFarland, Jim; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Zhou, Yuyu

    2014-09-01

    This paper discusses Technology and U.S. Emissions Reductions Goals: Results of the EMF 24 Modeling Exercise

  10. Joint HVAC transmission EMF environmental study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stormshak, F.; Thompson, J. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States))

    1992-05-01

    This document describes the rationale, procedures, and results of a carefully controlled study conducted to establish whether chronic exposure of female (ewe) Suffolk lambs to the environment of a 500-kV 60-Hz transmission line would affect various characteristics of growth, endocrine function, and reproductive development. This experiment used identical housing and management schemes for control and line-exposed ewes, thus minimizing these factors as contributors to between-group experimental error. Further, throughout the 10-month duration of this study, changes in electric and magnetic fields, audible noise, and weather conditions were monitored continuously by a computerized system. Such measurements provided the opportunity to identify any relationship between environmental factors and biological responses. Because of reports in the literature that electric and magnetic fields alter concentrations of melatonin in laboratory animals, the primary objective of this study was to ascertain whether a similar effect occurs in lambs exposed to a 500-kV a-c line in a natural setting. In addition, onset of puberty, changes in body weight, wool growth, and behavior were monitored. To determine whether the environment of a 500-kV line caused stress in the study animals, serum levels of cortisol were measured. The study was conducted at Bonneville Power Administration's Ostrander Substation near Estacada, Oregon.

  11. The process of consensus on EMF: SAB review of the EPA draft document on EMF and cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, B.W.

    1992-06-01

    The EPA Draft Document on EMF and Cancers grew out of an earlier effort by EPA to track biological effects literature relative to radio-frequency (RF) exposure. Scope of the document was broadened to include extremely low frequency electric and magnetic fields prior to an announcement in 1986 that EPA would formally review the whole area of non-ionizing radiation. An extensive survey of the relevant bioeffects and epidemiologic literature was carried out, and writing on the document began in earnest on the document sometime in 1989. In its draft form, the document reviewed the literature on mechanisms of Interaction between electromagnetic fields and biological tissue, EMF epidemiologic studies, supporting evidence for carcinogenicity and research needs. In the early summer of 1990, a draft of the document was reviewed by some 22 individuals within the EPA and other government agencies. It was also sent out for external review to an additional 9 qualified scientists who had worked in the area and were familiar with EMF-related literature in epidemiology, biology, and physics. Many of the comments sent to EPA from this first review, prior to release of the draft for public comment, were strikingly similar to those resulting from the second (public) review process. Thus, it appears that much of the controversy that was later associated with the document could have been avoided had the authors been diligent in following the recommendations of the initial set of reviewers.

  12. Measurements of charged particle spectra and nuclear modification factor in p+Pb collisions with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS detector at the LHC obtained the sample of p+Pb data at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}={}$5.02TeV with integrated luminosity of 25nb${}^{-1}$, which can be compared to the pp data obtained by interpolating pp measurements at $\\sqrt{s}={}$2.76TeV and 7TeV. Due to the excellent capabilities of the ATLAS detector, and its stable operation in heavy ion as well as proton-proton physics runs, the data allow measurements of the nuclear modification factor, ratio of heavy ion charged particle spectra divided by pp reference, in different centrality classes over a wide range of rapidity. The charged particle nuclear modification factor is found to vary significantly as a function of transverse momentum with a stronger dependence in more peripheral collisions.

  13. Measurements of charged particle spectra and nuclear modification factor in p+Pb collisions with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petr Balek

    2015-09-03

    The ATLAS detector at the LHC obtained the sample of p+Pb data at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}={}$5.02TeV with integrated luminosity of 25nb${}^{-1}$, which can be compared to the pp data obtained by interpolating pp measurements at $\\sqrt{s}={}$2.76TeV and 7TeV. Due to the excellent capabilities of the ATLAS detector, and its stable operation in heavy ion as well as proton-proton physics runs, the data allow measurements of the nuclear modification factor, ratio of heavy ion charged particle spectra divided by pp reference, in different centrality classes over a wide range of rapidity. The charged particle nuclear modification factor is found to vary significantly as a function of transverse momentum with a stronger dependence in more peripheral collisions.

  14. Nuclear modification factor for light and heavy flavors within pQCD and recent data from the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Zakharov

    2012-10-15

    We examine the flavor dependence of the nuclear modification factor $R_{AA}$ in the pQCD calculations at LHC energies. The computations are performed accounting for radiative and collisional parton energy loss with running coupling constant. Our results show that the recent LHC data on the $R_{AA}$ for charged hadrons, D-mesons and non-photonic electrons agree reasonably with the pQCD picture of the parton energy loss with the dominating contribution from the radiative mechanism.

  15. Environmental Field Surveys, EMF Rapid Program, Engineering Project No.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enertech Consultants

    1996-04-01

    The EMF Research and Public Information Dissemination Program (RAPID) includes several engineering research in the area of exposure assessment and source characterization. RAPID engineering project No. 3: ''Environmental Field Surveys'' was performed to obtain information on the levels and characteristics of different environments, for which only limited data were available, especially in comparison to magnetic field data for the residential environment and for electric utility facilities, such as power lines and substations. This project was also to provide information on the contribution of various field sources in the surveyed environments. Magnetic field surveys were performed at four sites for each of five environments: schools, hospitals, office buildings, machine shops, and grocery stores. Of the twenty sites surveyed, 11 were located in the San Francisco Bay Area and 9 in Massachusetts. The surveys used a protocol based on magnetic field measurements and observation of activity patterns, designed to provide estimates of magnetic field exposure by type of people and by type of sources. The magnetic field surveys conducted by this project produced a large amount of data which will form a part of the EMF measurement database Field and exposure data were obtained separately for ''area exposure'' and ''at exposure points''. An exposure point is a location where persons engage in fixed, site specific activities near a local source that creates a significant increase in the area field. The area field is produced by ''area sources'', whose location and field distribution is in general not related to the location of the people in the area.

  16. EMF RAPID Program research agenda and communication plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The driving force behind the Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) Research and Public Information Dissemination (RAPID) Program, established by Section 2118 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, is the ``sense of the Congress that remedial action taken by the Government on electric and magnetic fields, if and as necessary, should be based on, and consistent with, scientifically valid research...`` Specifically, the legislation requires the development of a comprehensive program to: determine whether or not exposure to electric and magnetic fields produced by the generation, transmission, and use of electric energy affects human health; carry out research, development, and demonstration with respect to technologies to mitigate any adverse human health effects; and provide for the collection, compilation, publication, and dissemination of scientifically valid information to the public on the following subjects: (a) possible human health effects of electric and magnetic fields; (b) the types and extent of human exposure to electric and magnetic fields in various occupational and residential settings; (c) technologies to measure and characterize electric and magnetic fields; and (d) methods to assess and manage exposure to electric and magnetic fields. The Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the overall administration of the 5-year, and $65 million EMF RAPID Program. The program will be jointly funded by both Federal non-Federal sources with non-Federal contributions accounting for at least 50% of the total funding.

  17. Occupancy by key transcription factors is a more accurate predictor of enhancer activity than histone modifications or chromatin accessibility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dogan, Nergiz; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christapher S.; Chen, Kuan-Bei; Stonestrom, Aaron; Long, Maria; Keller, Cheryl A.; Cheng, Yong; Jain, Deepti; Visel, Axel; et al

    2015-04-23

    Regulated gene expression controls organismal development, and variation in regulatory patterns has been implicated in complex traits. Thus accurate prediction of enhancers is important for further understanding of these processes. Genome-wide measurement of epigenetic features, such as histone modifications and occupancy by transcription factors, is improving enhancer predictions, but the contribution of these features to prediction accuracy is not known. Given the importance of the hematopoietic transcription factor TAL1 for erythroid gene activation, we predicted candidate enhancers based on genomic occupancy by TAL1 and measured their activity. Contributions of multiple features to enhancer prediction were evaluated based on the resultsmore »of these and other studies. Results: TAL1-bound DNA segments were active enhancers at a high rate both in transient transfections of cultured cells (39 of 79, or 56%) and transgenic mice (43 of 66, or 65%). The level of binding signal for TAL1 or GATA1 did not help distinguish TAL1-bound DNA segments as active versus inactive enhancers, nor did the density of regulation-related histone modifications. A meta-analysis of results from this and other studies (273 tested predicted enhancers) showed that the presence of TAL1, GATA1, EP300, SMAD1, H3K4 methylation, H3K27ac, and CAGE tags at DNase hypersensitive sites gave the most accurate predictors of enhancer activity, with a success rate over 80% and a median threefold increase in activity. Chromatin accessibility assays and the histone modifications H3K4me1 and H3K27ac were sensitive for finding enhancers, but they have high false positive rates unless transcription factor occupancy is also included. Conclusions: Occupancy by key transcription factors such as TAL1, GATA1, SMAD1, and EP300, along with evidence of transcription, improves the accuracy of enhancer predictions based on epigenetic features.« less

  18. A Formal Approach to Three-Way Merging of EMF Models Bernhard Westfechtel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westfechtel, Bernhard

    A Formal Approach to Three-Way Merging of EMF Models Bernhard Westfechtel Applied Computer Science a formal ap- proach to three-way merging of models in the EMF frame- work which may be applied to instances detect and resolve merge con- flicts. Furthermore, we present a merge algorithm which produces a valid

  19. Nuclear Modification Factor of prompt ${D}^{\\rm 0}$ in PbPb Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\text{NN}}}}$ = 2.76 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the production cross section of prompt ${D}^{\\rm 0}$ and its antiparticle in PbPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\text{NN}}}}$ = 2.76 TeV are presented. The nuclear modification factor

  20. Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) RAPID Engineering Program, Project 7: Development of Field Exposure Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bracken, T.D.; Rankin, R.F.; Wiley, J.A.

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a conceptual model for estimating magnetic field (EMF) personal exposure (PE) of individuals or groups and construct a working model using existing data.

  1. Nuclear modification factor of nonphotonic electrons in heavy-ion collisions, and the heavy-flavor baryon-to-meson ratio 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Yongseok; Ko, Che Ming.

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear modification factor R(AA) of nonphotonic electrons in Au + Au collisions at root(S)NN = 200 GeV is studied by considering the decays of heavy-flavor hadrons produced in a quark coalescence model. Although an enhanced Lambda(c)/D(0) ratio...

  2. Evolution of the nuclear modification factors with rapidity and centrality in d+Au collisions at root(NN)-N-S=200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Stephen J.

    2004-12-10

    We report on a study of the transverse momentum dependence of nuclear modification factors R-dAu for charged hadrons produced in deuteron + gold collisions at roots(NN) = 200 GeV, as a function of collision centrality and of the pseudorapidity (eta...

  3. Nuclear medium effect on nuclear modification factor of protons and pions in intermediate-energy heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lv, Ming; Chen, Jin-Hui; Fang, De-Qing; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear modification factor ($R_{cp}$) of protons and pions are investigated by simulating Au + Au collisions from 0.8 to 1.8$A$ GeV in a framework of an isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (IQMD) model. $R_{cp}$ of protons rises with the increase of \\pt~ at different beam energies owing to radial flow and Cronin effect. The rate of increase of \\rcp~ is suppressed at higher beam energies. The significant difference of $R_{cp}$ between protons and pions indicates different medium effects between protons and pions. By changing the in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross section, the $R_{cp}$ of protons changes a lot, while the $R_{cp}$ of pions does not. Taking the pion absorption into account, the $R_{cp}$ of pions becomes close to unity without $p_{T}$ dependence after deactivating the reaction $\\pi N \\rightarrow \\Delta$, while there is nearly no change on proton. This suggests that the pion absorption plays a dominant role on pion dynamics and have slight effect for proton dynamics.

  4. Measurement of the charged-hadron spectra and nuclear modification factor in lead-lead collisions with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balek, Petr; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) measures charged hadron spectra obtained in 2010 and 2011 lead-lead LHC data taking periods with total integrated statistics of 0.15nb${}^{-1}$. The results are compared to the pp spectra of charged hadrons at the same centre-of-mass energy based on the data sample with integrated luminosity of 4.2pb${}^{-1}$ obtained by the ATLAS experiment in 2011 and 2013. These allows for a detailed comparison of the two collision systems in a wide transverse momentum ($0.5 < p_\\mathrm{T} < 150$GeV) and pseudorapidity ($|\\eta|<2$) ranges in different centrality intervals of Pb+Pb collision. The nuclear modification factor $R_\\mathrm{AA}$ is presented in detail as a function of centrality, $p_\\mathrm{T}$ and $\\eta$. It shows a distinct $p_\\mathrm{T}$-dependence with a pronounced minimum at about 7GeV. Above 60GeV, it is consistent with a flat, centrality-dependent, value within the uncertainties. The value is $0.55\\pm0.01(stat.)\\pm0.04(syst.)$ in the most cen...

  5. Measurement of the charged hadron spectra and nuclear modification factor in lead-lead collisions with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balek, Petr; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) measures charged hadron spectra obtained in 2010-2011 lead-lead LHC data taking periods with total integrated statistics of 0.15 nb${}^{-1}$. The results are compared to the pp spectra of charged hadrons at the same centre-of-mass energy based on the data sample with integrated luminosity of 4 pb${}^{-1}$ obtained by the ATLAS experiment in 2013. These allows for a detailed comparison of the two collision systems in a wide transverse momentum ($0.5< p_\\mathrm{T}<150$ GeV) and pseudorapidity ($|\\eta|<2$) ranges in different centrality intervals of Pb+Pb collision. The nuclear modification factors $R_\\mathrm{AA}$ and $R_\\mathrm{CP}$ are presented in detail as a function of centrality, $p_\\mathrm{T}$ and $\\eta$. They show a distinct $p_\\mathrm{T}$-dependence with a pronounced minimum at about 7GeV. Above 60GeV, $R_\\mathrm{AA}$ is consistent with a flat, centrality-dependent, value within the uncertainties. The value is 0.55±0.01(stat.)±0.04(syst....

  6. Recommendations for Guidelines for EMF Personal Exposure Measurements, Rapid Project #4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Dan Bracken, Inc.

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of developing guidelines for electric and magnetic field (EMF) personal exposure measurements (lF'EM) is to ensure reliable and comparable data across I?EM studies. Study techniques may vary due to different populations or objectives, but the resulting data should be consistently reported and comparable, to the extent possible. Any guideline must allow creativity by the research-oriented investigator and provide specific guidance to industrial hygienists or other results-oriented investigators, requiring a standard protocol. Recognizing measurement studies with different purposes is an important aspect of these recommendations. The guidelines presented here intend to produce comparable data across studies while remaining flexible. The recommendations for designing and implementing an EMF PEM program describe a three-stage process. The first step is to clearly state the purpose of the PEM program. The next stage addresses the fundamental elements of an EMF PEM study, including an assessment of the scientific and organizational resources that will be required. This process is codified in a written study plan. These stages are described in 1 Section 5 of this report. The third stage of a PEM study involves the design, implementation and documentation of specific procedures and protocols fo~ sampling strategies, selection of measurement parameters; instrumentation, measurement and data collection, data management, data analysis, quality assurance, uncertainty evaluation, and archiving the study methods and results. The methods for designing these elements of an EMF PEM study are described in Section 6: Specific Guidelines for EMF I?EM Study Design.

  7. The role of renewable energy in climate stabilization: results from the EMF27

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The role of renewable energy in climate stabilization: results from the EMF27 scenarios Gunnar the role of renewable energy in climate change mitigation. Renewables currently supply approximately 18, renewables are the most important long-term mitigation option for power supply. Wind energy is competitive

  8. Direct torque control of permanent magnet synchronous motors with non-sinusoidal back-EMF 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozturk, Salih Baris

    2009-05-15

    This work presents the direct torque control (DTC) techniques, implemented in four- and six-switch inverter, for brushless dc (BLDC) motors with non-sinusoidal back- EMF using two and three-phase conduction modes. First of all, the classical direct...

  9. J$?$ nuclear modification factor at mid-rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=$2.76 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ionut-Cristian Arsene; for the ALICE Collaboration

    2012-10-22

    We report on the J$\\psi$ nuclear modification factor $R_{\\rm AA}$ at mid-rapidity ($|y|<0.9$) in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=$2.76 TeV measured by ALICE. J$\\psi$ candidates are reconstructed using their $e^+e^-$ decay channel. The kinematical coverage extends to zero transverse momentum allowing the measurement of integrated cross sections. We show the centrality dependence of the J$\\psi$ $R_{\\rm AA}$ at mid-rapidity compared to the results from PHENIX at mid-rapidity and ALICE results at forward-rapidity. We also discuss comparisons to calculations from theoretical models.

  10. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF THE TURBULENT emf AND TRANSPORT OF MAGNETIC FIELD IN A LIQUID SODIUM EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahbarnia, Kian; Brown, Benjamin P.; Clark, Mike M.; Kaplan, Elliot J.; Nornberg, Mark D.; Rasmus, Alex M.; Taylor, Nicholas Zane; Forest, Cary B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Ave, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Jenko, Frank; Limone, Angelo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (IPP), EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pinton, Jean-Francois; Plihon, Nicolas; Verhille, Gautier, E-mail: kian.rahbarnia@ipp.mpg.de [Laboratoire de Physique de l'Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, CNRS and Universite de Lyon, F-69364 Lyon (France)

    2012-11-10

    For the first time, we have directly measured the transport of a vector magnetic field by isotropic turbulence in a high Reynolds number liquid metal flow. In analogy with direct measurements of the turbulent Reynolds stress (turbulent viscosity) that governs momentum transport, we have measured the turbulent electromotive force (emf) by simultaneously measuring three components of velocity and magnetic fields, and computed the correlations that lead to mean-field current generation. Furthermore, we show that this turbulent emf tends to oppose and cancel out the local current, acting to increase the effective resistivity of the medium, i.e., it acts as an enhanced magnetic diffusivity. This has important implications for turbulent transport in astrophysical objects, particularly in dynamos and accretion disks.

  11. Measurement of the nuclear modification factor of electrons from heavy-flavour decays at mid-rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV with ALICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yvonne Pachmayer for the ALICE Collaboration

    2011-06-30

    We present results on inclusive electrons for 1.5 $ electron sources. The excess of electrons beyond the cocktail at high momenta ({$p_{\\rm T} >$ 3.5 GeV/$c$}) is attributed to electrons from heavy-flavour decays. The corresponding nuclear modification factor indicates heavy-flavour suppression by a factor of 1.5-4.

  12. The role of renewable energy in climate stabilization: results from the EMF 27 scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luderer, Gunnar; Krey, Volker; Calvin, Katherine V.; Merrick, James; Mima, Silvana; Pietzcker, Robert; Van Vliet, Jasper; Wada, Kenichi

    2013-10-15

    This paper uses the EMF27 scenarios to explore the role of renewable energy (RE) in climate change mitigation. Currently RE supplies almost 20 % of global electricity demand. Almost all EMF27 mitigation scenarios show a strong increase in renewable power production, with a substantial ramp-up of wind and solar power deployment. In many scenarios, renewables are the most important long-term mitigation option for power supply. Wind energy is competitive even without climate policy, whereas the prospects of solar photovoltaics (PV) are highly contingent on the ambitiousness of climate policy. Bioenergy is an important and versatile energy carrier; however—with the exception of low temperature heat—there is less scope for renewables other than biomass for non-electric energy supply. Despite the important role of wind and solar power in climate change mitigation scenarios with full technology availability, limiting their deployment has a relatively small effect on mitigation costs, if nuclear and carbon capture and storage (CCS)—which can serve as substitutes in low-carbon power supply—are available. Limited bioenergy availability in combination with limited wind and solar power by contrast, results in a more substantial increase in mitigation costs. While a number of robust insights emerge, the results on renewable energy deployment levels vary considerably across the models. An in-depth analysis of a subset of EMF27 reveals substantial differences in modeling approaches and parameter assumptions. To a certain degree, differences in model results can be attributed to different assumptions about technology costs, resource potentials and systems integration.

  13. Transverse Momentum Distribution and Nuclear Modification Factor of Charged Particles in p-Pb Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, Betty; Adamova, Dagmar; Adare, Andrew Marshall; Aggarwal, Madan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agocs, Andras Gabor; Agostinelli, Andrea; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahmad, Arshad; Ahn, Sang Un; Ahn, Sul-Ah; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Almaraz Avina, Erick Jonathan; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshauser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Arend, Andreas; Armesto, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas Robert; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Asryan, Andzhey; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Aysto, Juha Heikki; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldini Ferroli, Rinaldo; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Ban, Jaroslav; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont-Moreno, Ernesto; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bergognon, Anais Annick Erica; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, Francesco; Blanco, F; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boccioli, Marco; Boettger, Stefan; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubsky, Mikhail; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Botta, Elena; Braidot, Ermes; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brun, Rene; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caballero Orduna, Diego; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Cara Romeo, Giovanni; Carena, Wisla; Carena, Francesco; Carlin Filho, Nelson; Carminati, Federico; Casanova Diaz, Amaya Ofelia; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castillo Hernandez, Juan Francisco; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chawla, Isha; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Coccetti, Fabrizio; Colamaria, Fabio; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contin, Giacomo; Contreras, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortese, Pietro; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Cotallo, Manuel Enrique; Crescio, Elisabetta; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia; Cuautle, Eleazar; Cunqueiro, Leticia; Dainese, Andrea; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; Danu, Andrea; Das, Kushal; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Das, Debasish; Dash, Sadhana; Dash, Ajay Kumar; De, Sudipan; de Barros, Gabriel; De Caro, Annalisa; de Cataldo, Giacinto; de Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; De Marco, Nora; Denes, Ervin; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deppman, Airton; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; de Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Di Bari, Domenico; Dietel, Thomas; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Driga, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The transverse momentum ($p_T$) distribution of primary charged particles is measured in non single-diffractive p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV with the ALICE detector at the LHC. The $p_T$ spectra measured near central rapidity in the range 0.5 < $p_T$ < 20 GeV/c exhibit a weak pseudorapidity dependence. The nuclear modification factor $R_{pPb}$ is consistent with unity for $p_T$ above 2 GeV/c. This measurement indicates that the strong suppression of hadron production at high $p_T$ observed in Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC is not due to an initial-state effect. The measurement is compared to theoretical calculations.

  14. Nuclear Waste Partnership Contract Modifications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Waste Partnership Contract DE-EM0001971 Modifications NWP Modification Index Description Modification 001 Modification 002 Modification 003 Modification 004 Modification 005...

  15. Nuclear Modification Factors of phi Mesons in d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au Collisions at s_NN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A. [University of Colorado, Boulder; Awes, Terry C [ORNL; Cianciolo, Vince [ORNL; Efremenko, Yuri [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Enokizono, Akitomo [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Read Jr, Kenneth F [ORNL; Silvermyr, David O [ORNL; Sorensen, Soren P [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Stankus, Paul W [ORNL; PHENIX, Collaboration [The

    2011-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has performed systematic measurements of {phi} meson production in the K{sup +}K{sup -} decay channel at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Results are presented on the {phi} invariant yield and the nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} for Au+Au and Cu+Cu, and R{sub dA} for d+Au collisions, studied as a function of transverse momentum (1 < p{sub T} < 7 GeV/c) and centrality. In central and midcentral Au+Au collisions, the R{sub AA} of {phi} exhibits a suppression relative to expectations from binary scaled p+p results. The amount of suppression is smaller than that of the {pi}{sup 0} and the {eta} in the intermediate p{sub T} range (2-5 GeV/c), whereas, at higher p{sub T}, the {phi}, {pi}{sup 0}, and {eta} show similar suppression. The baryon (proton and antiproton) excess observed in central Au+Au collisions at intermediate p{sub T} is not observed for the {phi} meson despite the similar masses of the proton and the {phi}. This suggests that the excess is linked to the number of valence quarks in the hadron rather than its mass. The difference gradually disappears with decreasing centrality, and, for peripheral collisions, the R{sub AA} values for both particle species are consistent with binary scaling. Cu+Cu collisions show the same yield and suppression as Au+Au collisions for the same number of N{sub part}. The R{sub dA} of {phi} shows no evidence for cold nuclear effects within uncertainties.

  16. Measurement of the nuclear modification factor of electrons from heavy-flavour hadron decays in Pb-Pb collisions at {\\surd}sNN = 2.76 TeV with ALICE at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Fasel; for the ALICE Collaboration

    2012-02-29

    We present a measurement of the nuclear modification factor of electrons from heavy- flavour hadron decays at midrapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at {\\surd}sNN = 2.76 TeV. Electrons are identified in the pt range 1.5 GeV/c < pt < 6 GeV/c. A suppression is seen for pt larger than 3.5 GeV/c in the most central collisions.

  17. Low-cost, compact, robust laser-based ultrasound sensors using photo-EMF detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pepper, D.M.; Dunning, G.J.; Chiao, M.P.; O`Meara, T.R.; Mitchell, P.V.

    1996-12-31

    There is a great need in the manufacturing, aerospace, commercial, energy, automotive, microelectronics and DoD communities for diagnostic systems that can improve the efficiency, yield and performance of various materials processes--while reducing cost, labor, scrap, and machine downtime. Laser-based ultrasound (LBU) represents a noncontact, reconfigurable, high-bandwidth ultrasonic inspection and process control technology. LBU enables remote ultrasonic sensing by replacing conventional PZT transducers, squirters, and immersion systems with laser beams. One laser beam generates the ultrasound in an opaque workpiece, while a second laser beam probes the sample to sense minute surface displacements, induced by the ultrasound or via other acoustic emission mechanisms. LBU systems have yet to be fielded commercially, owing primarily to the cost, size, and complexity of the system components. The authors have developed a low-cost, compact sensor which can potentially enable LBU systems to become a reality. The sensor employs a semiconductor crystal (GaAs) using a mechanism called nonsteady-state photo-induced emf. When combined with a laser diode as an optical source, the result is a very compact, low-cost robust sensor, which can function under in-factory conditions, including inspection of rough-cut workpieces which undergo rapid platform motion, such as high-speed, scanning laser welders. Experimental results will be discussed, including the potential for optical fiber delivery.

  18. Thermodynamic behavior of high-T sub c oxide systems via EMF and related measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tetenbaum, M.; Tumidajaski, P.; Bloom, I.D.; Brown, D.L.; Blander, M.

    1991-01-01

    EMF measurements of oxygen fugacities as a function of stoichiometry have been made in the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, and NdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, and Nd{sub 1.81}Ce{sub 0.19}CuO{sub x} superconducting systems in the temperature range 400--750{degree}C by means of an oxygen titration technique with an yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte. The object of our current measurements is to investigate the effect of ionic size of Y, Gd and Nd on the thermodynamic behavior and structural transition in the LnBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} system. The shape of the 400{degree}C isotherm for NdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} suggests the presence of a miscibility gap at lower temperatures, at values of x that are higher than those in the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} system. The locations of the miscibility gaps are consistent with the effects of ionic radii on the composition dependence of {Tc} for these systems. Our results explain the two plateaus in measured value of {Tc} as a function of composition for the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} system and appear to be consistent with the less pronounced {Tc} plateaus found for the NdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} system higher stoichiometry values. For a given oxygen stoichiometry, partial pressures of oxygen above NdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} are higher than for the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} system in accord with calculated partial molar thermodynamic quantities. The results of limited measurements on the n-type (electron-doped) superconducting Nd{sub 1.81}Ce{sub 0.19}CuO{sub x} system will be presented. A thermodynamic assessment and intercomparison of our oxygen partial pressure measurements with the results of other measurements will be presented. 34 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Measurements of the Nuclear Modification Factor for Jets in Pb+Pb Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=2.76$ TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-03-06

    Measurements of inclusive jet production are performed in $pp$ and Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=2.76$ TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.0 $\\mathrm{pb}^{-1}$ and 0.14 $\\mathrm{nb}^{-1}$, respectively. The jets are identified with the anti-$k_t$ algorithm with $R=0.4$, and the spectra are measured over the kinematic range of jet transverse momentum $32 < p_{\\mathrm{T}} < 500$ GeV, and absolute rapidity $|y| < 2.1$ and as a function of collision centrality. The nuclear modification factor, $R_{\\mathrm{AA}}$, is evaluated and jets are found to be suppressed by approximately a factor of two in central collisions compared to $pp$ collisions. The $R_{\\mathrm{AA}}$ shows a slight increase with $p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ and no significant variation with rapidity.

  20. Central Safety Factor and #12;ßN Control on NSTX-U via Beam Power and Plasma Boundary Shape Modification, using TRANSP for Closed Loop Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, M. D. [PPPL; Andre, R. [PPPL; Gates, David A. [PPPL; Gerhardt, S. [PPPL; Goumiri, I. R. [Princeton University; Menard, Jon [PPPL

    2014-08-01

    The high-performance operational goals of NSTX-U will require development of advanced feedback control algorithms, including control of ßN and the safety factor profile. In this work, a novel approach to simultaneously controlling #12;ßN and the value of the safety factor on the magnetic axis, q0, through manipulation of the plasma boundary shape and total beam power, is proposed. Simulations of the proposed scheme show promising results and motivate future experimental implementation and eventual integration into a more complex current profile control scheme planned to include actuation of individual beam powers, density, and loop voltage. As part of this work, a flexible framework for closed loop simulations within the high-fidelity code TRANSP was developed. The framework, used here to identify control-design-oriented models and to tune and test the proposed controller, exploits many of the predictive capabilities of TRANSP and provides a means for performing control calculations based on user-supplied data (controller matrices, target waveforms, etc.). The flexible framework should enable high-fidelity testing of a variety of control algorithms, thereby reducing the amount of expensive experimental time needed to implement new control algorithms on NSTX-U and other devices.

  1. Thermodynamic and nonstoichiometric behavior of promising Hi-Tc cuprate systems via EMF measurements : a short review.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tetenbaum, M.

    1999-02-24

    Electromotive force (EMF) measurements of oxygen fugacities as a function of stoichiometry have been made on the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, GdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, NdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and bismuth cuprate systems in the temperature range {approximately}400-750 C by means of an oxygen titration technique with an yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte. The shapes of the 400 C isotherms as a function of oxygen stoichiometry for the Gd and Nd cuprate systems suggest the presence of miscibility gaps at values of x that are higher than those in the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} system. For a given oxygen stoichiometry, oxygen partial pressures above GdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and NdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} are higher (above x=6.5) than that for the promising YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} system. A thermodynamic assessment and intercomparison of our partial pressure measurements with the results of related measurements will be presented.

  2. Joint HVAC Transmission EMF Environmental Study : Final Report on Experiment 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Oregon Regional Primate Research Center

    1992-05-01

    This document describes the rationale, procedures, and results of a carefully controlled study conducted to establish whether chronic exposure of female (ewe) Suffolk lambs to the environment of a 500-kV 60-Hz transmission line would affect various characteristics of growth, endocrine function, and reproductive development. This experiment used identical housing and management schemes for control and line-exposed ewes, thus minimizing these factors as contributors to between-group experimental error. Further, throughout the 10-month duration of this study, changes in electric and magnetic fields, audible noise, and weather conditions were monitored continuously by a computerized system. Such measurements provided the opportunity to identify any relationship between environmental factors and biological responses. Because of reports in the literature that electric and magnetic fields alter concentrations of melatonin in laboratory animals, the primary objective of this study was to ascertain whether a similar effect occurs in lambs exposed to a 500-kV a-c line in a natural setting. In addition, onset of puberty, changes in body weight, wool growth, and behavior were monitored. To determine whether the environment of a 500-kV line caused stress in the study animals, serum levels of cortisol were measured. The study was conducted at Bonneville Power Administration`s Ostrander Substation near Estacada, Oregon.

  3. Permit application modifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This document contains the Permit Application Modifications for the Y-12 Industrial Landfill V site on the Oak Ridge Reservation. These modifications include the assessment of stability of the proposed Landfill V under static and loading conditions. Analyses performed include the general slope stability, veneer stability of the bottom liner and cover system, and a liquefaction potential assessment of the foundation soils.

  4. EMF Rapid Program Engineering Projects, Project 1, Development of Recommendations for Guidelines for Field Source Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Electric Research and Management, Inc.

    1997-03-11

    The goal of this project is to develop a protocol for measuring the electric and magnetic fields around sources. Data from these measurements may help direct future biological effects research by better defining the complexity of magnetic and electric fields to which humanity is exposed, as well asprovide the basis for rigorous field exposure analysis and risk assessment once the relationship between field exposure and biological response. is better understood. The data base also should have sufficient spatial and temporal characteristics to guide electric and magnetic field management. The goal of Task A is to construct a set of characteristics that would be ideal to have for guiding and interpreting biological studies and for focusing any future effort at field management. This ideal set will then be quantified and reduced according to the availability (or possible development of) instrumentation to measure the desired characteristics. Factors that also will be used to define pragmatic data sets will be the cost of collecting the data, the cost of developing an adequate data base, and the needed precision in measuring specific characteristics. A field, electric or magnetic, will always be ,some function of time and space. The first step in this section of the protocol development will be to determine what span of time and what portion of space are required to quantify the electric and magnetic fields around sources such as appliances and electrical apparatus. Constraints on time will be set by examining measurement limitations and biological data requirements.

  5. Maximum-likelihood density modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Structural Biology Group, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2000-08-01

    A likelihood-based density modification approach is developed that can incorporate expected electron-density information from a wide variety of sources. A likelihood-based approach to density modification is developed that can be applied to a wide variety of cases where some information about the electron density at various points in the unit cell is available. The key to the approach consists of developing likelihood functions that represent the probability that a particular value of electron density is consistent with prior expectations for the electron density at that point in the unit cell. These likelihood functions are then combined with likelihood functions based on experimental observations and with others containing any prior knowledge about structure factors to form a combined likelihood function for each structure factor. A simple and general approach to maximizing the combined likelihood function is developed. It is found that this likelihood-based approach yields greater phase improvement in model and real test cases than either conventional solvent flattening and histogram matching or a recent reciprocal-space solvent-flattening procedure [Terwilliger (1999 ?), Acta Cryst. D55, 1863–1871].

  6. EMF cover.final

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear Profile 2010 KansasMarketsHanford Tank |Policy Doc.

  7. Evaluation of plant life extension modifications; A condenser retubing example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lula, J.J.; Kostyk, D.A.; Franceschinis, R.D. (Fluor Daniel, Inc., Chicago, IL (US))

    1989-01-01

    An integral part of plant life extension programs is the development of an implementation plan for the modifications identified during the study phase. A systematic approach for evaluating these modifications and making timing decisions is needed. A methodology must be used to identify and quantify important factors and assign economic parameters to these factors to provide a common basis for an overall evaluation. The development of a cash flow schedule from this analysis provides the technique for quantifying the total value of a modification and also can be used to determine the effect of installation timing. To illustrate this evaluation methodology, a condenser retubing example is presented.

  8. Portage Contract Modifications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access|Post-Polymerization Modifications -Portage, Inc. Contract

  9. ICP Contract Modifications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHussein KhalilResearch &ENERGYWho shouldModifications to

  10. Modifications to Replacement Costs System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godec, M. [ICF Resources, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)

    1989-05-18

    The purpose of this memorandum is to document the improvements and modifications made to the Replacement Costs of Crude Oil (REPCO) Supply Analysis System. While some of this work was performed under our previous support contract to DOE/ASFE, we are presenting all modifications and improvements are presented here for completeness. The memo primarily documents revisions made to the Lower-48 Onshore Model. Revisions and modifications made to other components and models in the REPCO system which are documented elsewhere are only highlighted in this memo. Generally, the modifications made to the Lower-48 Onshore Model reflect changes that have occurred in domestic drilling, oil field costs, and reserves since 1982, the date of the most recent available data used for the original Replacement Costs report, published in 1985.

  11. WEATHER MODIFICATION BY AIRCRAFT CLOUD SEEDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vali, Gabor

    WEATHER MODIFICATION BY AIRCRAFT CLOUD SEEDING BERYULEV G.P. Head, Department of Cloud Physics and Weather Modification Central Aerological Observatory Rosgidromet, Russian Federation #12

  12. Effects of Surface Modification Conditions on Hydrophobicity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effects of Surface Modification Conditions on Hydrophobicity of Silica-based Coating Additives Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effects of Surface Modification...

  13. Polymer Surface Modification for Bioengineering Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Qian

    2011-01-01

    different properties for bioengineering applications. ForSurface Modification for Bioengineering Applications by QianSurface Modification for Bioengineering Applications by Qian

  14. Advances in Chemical Protein Modification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutureira, Omar; Bernardes, Gonçalo J. L.

    2015-02-20

    -selective modification strategies have received partic- ularly attention for the attachment of potent cytotoxic drugs to recombinant antibodies engineered with Cys residues at predetermined sites. Most antibody?drug conjugates (ADCs)5c are built through conjugation of N... -step modification protocol by first creating an unexpectedly stable cyclic sulfonium inter- mediate that is subsequently opened with thiol, selenium, and nitrogen nucleophiles with good conversions (up to >95%) and mild conditions (21?37 °C). Analogously...

  15. Ordred-Modification (1) SOLAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    C-7-2 SOL SOLAR 3 (1) SOLAR (2) (3) (1) SOL Ordred-Modification SOLAR CF SOLAR (2) BDD EM PRISM (3) CF SOLAR () (1) SOLAR SOLAR 2008 2011 20240016 Inference-based Hypothesis-finding and its Application to Systems Biology

  16. Energy conservation potential of surface modification technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le, H.K.; Horne, D.M.; Silberglitt, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    This report assesses the energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries. The energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries is assessed by estimating their friction and wear tribological sinks and the subsequent reduction in these sinks when surface modified tools are used. Ion implantation, coatings, and laser and electron beam surface modifications are considered.

  17. Nanoparticle modifications of photodefined nanostructures for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    fabrication methods to produce highly porous (meso, micro, and nano) 3-D electrode structures, and (2) conducting polymer and nanoparticle-modification strategies on these...

  18. Modification of Phenolic Oximes for Copper Extraction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forgan, Ross Stewart

    2008-01-01

    The thesis deals with the modification of salicylaldoxime-based reagents used in hydrometallurgical extraction, addressing rational ligand design to tune copper(II) extractant strengths and also the development of reagents ...

  19. Postsynthetic modification of metal-organic frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanabe, Kristine Kimie

    2011-01-01

    gas storage applications via PSM 4.1 Introduction There hasand Robson proposed the idea of PSM and described how a MOFof postsynthetic modification (PSM) as a method for

  20. Firearms Modifications List- June 13, 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document contains the currently-approved protective force "Firearms Modification List" referred to in Department of Energy Order 473.3, Protection Program Operations. This supersedes any previous versions of this document

  1. Mediating Biofuel Complexity through "Mediator" Modification...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Complexity through "Mediator" Modification Research points to more efficient and lower cost routes to high-yield biomass-derived renewable fuels. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe...

  2. Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle organicrankinecycle.pdf More Documents & Publications A...

  3. Surface modification to prevent oxide scale spallation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Elizabeth V; Sun, Xin; Liu, Wenning; Stevenson, Jeffry W; Surdoval, Wayne; Khaleel, Mohammad A

    2013-07-16

    A surface modification to prevent oxide scale spallation is disclosed. The surface modification includes a ferritic stainless steel substrate having a modified surface. A cross-section of the modified surface exhibits a periodic morphology. The periodic morphology does not exceed a critical buckling length, which is equivalent to the length of a wave attribute observed in the cross section periodic morphology. The modified surface can be created using at least one of the following processes: shot peening, surface blasting and surface grinding. A coating can be applied to the modified surface.

  4. Contract Modification Awarded for Legal Support

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cincinnati - The Department of Energy today awarded a contract modification to A R Biddle & Associates, Inc. of Peachtree City, GA to add scope for the contractor to analyze contract claims that are appealed to the Civilian Board of Contract Appeals (CBCA).

  5. ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Modification of Multiple Sclerosis Phenotypes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich, David

    ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Modification of Multiple Sclerosis Phenotypes by African Ancestry at HLA. Oksenberg, PhD Background: In those with multiple sclerosis (MS), Afri- can American individuals have a more ancestry at HLA correlated with dis- ability as measured by the Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (P .001

  6. Modification ofregional groundwater regimes by land reclamation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Modification ofregional groundwater regimes by land reclamation Jiu Jimmy Jiao Department of groundwater regime, in tum causing similar problems. This paper represents the first attempt to address the impact ofreclamation on groundwater regimes. It will be demonstrated that large-scale of reclamation

  7. Modification of starch during malting of sorghum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floyd, Cherie Diane

    1994-01-01

    Five sorghum varieties, Dorado, Malisor 84-7, Tortillero, ATx630*R3338, and ATx623*SC1 03 were malted according to standard procedures and monitored for malting quality and starch modification during a 5 day malting period. Dry matter losses (DML...

  8. Comment re DOE's NOI re continuation or modification of Price...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Comment re DOE's NOI re continuation or modification of Price-Anderson Act Comment re DOE's NOI re continuation or modification of Price-Anderson Act Comments of Kerr-McGee...

  9. Regioselective chemical modification of monoclonal antibodies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ranadive, G.; Rozenzweig, H.S.; Epperly, M.; Bloomer, W.

    1993-05-04

    A method is presented of selectively modifying an immunoglobulin having at least one Fab region and at least one Fc region. Each region has an isoelectric point where the isoelectric point of the Fab fragment of the immunoglobulin is different from the isoelectric point of the Fc fragment of the immunoglobulin. The method comprises of a modification of the immunoglobulin at a pH between the respective isoelectric points of the Fab and Fc fragments of the immunoglobulin.

  10. The London Gas Undertakings (Regulations) Act 1939 (Modification) Order 1965 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Fred

    1965-01-01

    STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS 1965 No. 1560 LONDON GOVERNMENT The London Gas Undertakings (Regulations) Act 1939 (Modification) Order 1965

  11. Particle Distribution Modification by Low Amplitude Modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, R. B.; Gorelenkov, N.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2009-08-28

    Modification of a high energy particle distribution by a spectrum of low amplitude modes is investigated using a guiding center code. Only through resonance are modes effective in modifying the distribution. Diagnostics are used to illustrate the mode-particle interaction and to find which effects are relevant in producing significant resonance, including kinetic Poincare plots and plots showing those orbits with time averaged mode-particle energy transfer. Effects of pitch angle scattering and drag are studied, as well as plasma rotation and time dependence of the equilibrium and mode frequencies. A specific example of changes observed in a DIII-D deuterium beam distribution in the presence of low amplitude experimentally validated Toroidal Alfven (TAE) eigenmodes and Reversed Shear Alfven (RSAE) eigenmodes is examined in detail. Comparison with experimental data shows that multiple low amplitude modes can account for significant modification of high energy beam particle distributions. It is found that there is a stochastic threshold for beam profile modification, and that the experimental amplitudes are only slightly above this threshold.

  12. Surface modification: advantages, techniques, and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natesan, K.

    2000-03-01

    Adequate performance of materials at elevated temperatures is a potential problem in many systems within the chemical, petroleum, process, and power-generating industries. Degradation of materials occurs because of interaction between the structural material and the exposure environment. These interactions are generally undesired chemical reactions that can lead to accelerated wastage and alter the functional requirements and/or structural integrity of the materials. Therefore, material selection for high-temperature applications must be based not only on a material strength properties but also on resistance to the complex environments prevalent in the anticipated exposure environment. As plants become larger, the satisfactory performance and reliability of components play a greater role in plant availability and economics. However, system designers are becoming increasingly concerned with finding the least expensive material that will satisfactorily perform the design function for the desired service life. This present paper addresses the benefits of surface modification and identified several criteria for selection and application of modified surfaces in the power sector. A brief review is presented on potential methods for modification of surfaces, with the emphasis on coatings. In the final section of the paper, several examples address the requirements of different energy systems and surface modification avenues that have been applied to resolve the issues.

  13. Nucleic acid modifications in bacterial pathogens - impact on pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Brandon S. (Brandon Skylur)

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acids are subject to extensive chemical modification by all organisms. These modifications display incredible structural diversity, and some are essential for survival. Intriguingly, several of these modifications ...

  14. Property:Modification date | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation,PropertyPartner7WebsiteCertReqs JumpResCodeModification date

  15. Modifications for Public Comment - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework uses concrete7Modifications for Public Comment Tri-Party Agreement The

  16. Testing and Evaluation of a Power Factor Correction for Power-Savings Potential 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alotaibi, A.

    2011-01-01

    is to develop the electromagnetic fields (EMFs) to ground the induction windings of the motor. In Kuwait, consumers only pay for the active power and energy used in kWh. A PFC unit stores the reactive power needed to create EMFs within the inductive loads...

  17. ADVANCES IN APPLIED PLASMA SCIENCE, Vol.9, 2013 ISAPS '13, Istanbul Dynamic Simulation of Materials Modification and Deuterium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    depends on many factors where consequences of plasma/wall interactions can be considered as the most of Materials Modification and Deuterium Retention in Tokamak Fusion Environment Tatyana Sizyuk and Ahmed various materials for coating of reactor walls, e.g., Be for the first wall and W and C for the divertor

  18. Pnp gene modification for improved xylose utilization in Zymomonas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caimi, Perry G G; Qi, Min; Tao, Luan; Viitanen, Paul V; Yang, Jianjun

    2014-12-16

    The endogenous pnp gene encoding polynucleotide phosphorylase in the Zymomonas genome was identified as a target for modification to provide improved xylose utilizing cells for ethanol production. The cells are in addition genetically modified to have increased expression of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (RPI) activity, as compared to cells without this genetic modification, and are not limited in xylose isomerase activity in the absence of the pnp modification.

  19. Microstructural Modification of a Cast Iron by Magnetic Field Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenik, Edward A [ORNL; Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz- [ORNL; Ludtka, Gerard Michael [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The current study deals with the microstructural modification of a nodular cast iron during solidification under the influence of high magnetic fields (up to 18 tesla).

  20. Controlled Covalent Modification of Epitaxial Single Layer Graphene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Controlled Covalent Modification of Epitaxial Single Layer Graphene on 6H-SiC (0001) with Aryliodonium Salts using Electrochemical Methods. Citation Details In-Document Search...

  1. A Two-factor Authentication Mechanism Using Mobile Phones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -03 Last Modification Date: 2008/08/20 Abstract Mobile devices are becoming more pervasive and more of mobile devices to provide a two-factor authentication method. Our approach uses a combination of one-time passwords, as the first authentication factor, and credentials stored on a mobile device, as the second

  2. Chiral solitons in nuclei: Electromagnetic form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jason R. Smith; Gerald A. Miller

    2004-09-08

    We calculate the electromagnetic form factors of a bound proton. The Chiral Quark-Soliton model provides the quark and antiquark substructure of the proton, which is embedded in nuclear matter. This procedure yields significant modifications of the form factors in the nuclear environment. The sea quarks are almost completely unaffected, and serve to mitigate the valence quark effect. In particular, the ratio of the isoscalar electric to the isovector magnetic form factor decreases by 20% at Q^2=1 GeV^2 at nuclear density, and we do not see a strong enhancement of the magnetic moment.

  3. Permeability Modification Using a Reactive Alkaline-Soluble Biopolymer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snadra L. Fox; X. Xie; K. D. Schaller; E. P. Robertson; G. A. Bala

    2003-10-01

    Polymer injection has been used in reservoirs to alleviate contrasting permeability zones. Current technology relies on the use of cross-linking agents to initiate gelation. The use of biological polymers are advantageous in that they can block high permeability areas, are environmentally friendly, and have potential to form reversible gels without the use of hazardous cross-linkers. Recent efforts at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) have produced a reactive alkaline-soluble biopolymer from Agrobacterium sp. ATCC no. 31749 that gels upon decreasing the pH of the polymeric solution. The focus of this study was to determine the impact an alkaline-soluble biopolymer can have on sandstone permeability. Permeability modification was investigated by injecting solubilized biopolymer into Berea sandstone cores and defining the contribution of pH, salt, temperature, and Schuricht crude oil on biopolymer gelation. The biopolymer was soluble in KOH at a pH greater than 11.4 and gelled when the pH dropped below 10.8. The Berea sandstone core buffered the biopolymer solution, decreasing the pH sufficiently to form a gel, which subsequently decreased the permeability. The effluent pH of the control cores injected with 0.01 {und M} KOH (pH 12.0) and 0.10{und M} KOH (pH 13.0) decreased to 10.6 and 12.7, respectively. The permeability of the sandstone core injected with biopolymer was decreased to greater than 95% of the original permeability at 25 C in the presence of 2% NaCl, and Schuricht crude oil; however, the permeability increased when the temperature of the core was increased to 60 C. Residual resistance factors as high as 792 were seen in Berea cores treated with biopolymer. The buffering capacity of sandstone has been demonstrated to reduce the pH of a biopolymer solution sufficiently to cause the polymer to form a stable in-situ gel. This finding could potentially lead to alternate technology for permeability modification, thus extending the life of a reservoir and preventing premature abandonment.

  4. Nuclear modification and elliptic flow measurements for $?$ mesons at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV d+Au and Au+Au collisions by PHENIX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dipali Pal

    2005-10-06

    We report the first results of the nuclear modification factors and elliptic flow of the phi mesons measured by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC in high luminosity Au+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV. The nuclear modification factors R_AA and R_CP of the phi follow the same trend of suppression as pi0's in Au+Au collisions. In d+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV, the phi mesons are not suppressed. The elliptic flow of the phi mesons, measured in the minimum bias Au+Au events, is statistically consistent with other identified particles.

  5. Iterative model building, structure refinement and density modification with the PHENIX AutoBuild wizard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Zwart, Peter H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hung, Li-Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Read, Randy J. [Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); Adams, Paul D., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The highly automated PHENIX AutoBuild wizard is described. The procedure can be applied equally well to phases derived from isomorphous/anomalous and molecular-replacement methods. The PHENIX AutoBuild wizard is a highly automated tool for iterative model building, structure refinement and density modification using RESOLVE model building, RESOLVE statistical density modification and phenix.refine structure refinement. Recent advances in the AutoBuild wizard and phenix.refine include automated detection and application of NCS from models as they are built, extensive model-completion algorithms and automated solvent-molecule picking. Model-completion algorithms in the AutoBuild wizard include loop building, crossovers between chains in different models of a structure and side-chain optimization. The AutoBuild wizard has been applied to a set of 48 structures at resolutions ranging from 1.1 to 3.2 Å, resulting in a mean R factor of 0.24 and a mean free R factor of 0.29. The R factor of the final model is dependent on the quality of the starting electron density and is relatively independent of resolution.

  6. Iterative model-building, structure refinement, and density modification with the PHENIX AutoBuild Wizard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY, England; Terwilliger, Thomas; Terwilliger, T.C.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf Wilhelm; Afonine, P.V.; Moriarty, N.W.; Zwart, P.H.; Hung, L.-W.; Read, R.J.; Adams, P.D.

    2007-04-29

    The PHENIX AutoBuild Wizard is a highly automated tool for iterative model-building, structure refinement and density modification using RESOLVE or TEXTAL model-building, RESOLVE statistical density modification, and phenix.refine structure refinement. Recent advances in the AutoBuild Wizard and phenix.refine include automated detection and application of NCS from models as they are built, extensive model completion algorithms, and automated solvent molecule picking. Model completion algorithms in the AutoBuild Wizard include loop-building, crossovers between chains in different models of a structure, and side-chain optimization. The AutoBuild Wizard has been applied to a set of 48 structures at resolutions ranging from 1.1 {angstrom} to 3.2 {angstrom}, resulting in a mean R-factor of 0.24 and a mean free R factor of 0.29. The R-factor of the final model is dependent on the quality of the starting electron density, and relatively independent of resolution.

  7. Nuclear modification of forward $J/\\psi$ production in proton-nucleus collisions at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ducloué, B; Mäntysaari, H

    2015-01-01

    We re-evaluate the nuclear suppression of forward $J/\\psi$ production at high energy in the Color Glass Condensate framework. We use the collinear approximation for the projectile proton probed at large $x$ and an up to date dipole cross section fitted to HERA data to describe the target in proton-proton collisions. We show that using the Glauber approach to generalize the proton dipole cross section to the case of a nucleus target leads to a nuclear modification factor much closer to LHC data than previous estimates using the same framework.

  8. Procedure for developing biological input for the design, location, or modification of water-intake structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, D.A.; McKenzie, D.H.

    1981-12-01

    To minimize adverse impact on aquatic ecosystems resulting from the operation of water intake structures, design engineers must have relevant information on the behavior, physiology and ecology of local fish and shellfish. Identification of stimulus/response relationships and the environmental factors that influence them is the first step in incorporating biological information in the design, location or modification of water intake structures. A procedure is presented in this document for providing biological input to engineers who are designing, locating or modifying a water intake structure. The authors discuss sources of stimuli at water intakes, historical approaches in assessing potential/actual impact and review biological information needed for intake design.

  9. Selective posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsao, Meng-Lin; Tian, Feng; Schultz, Peter

    2013-11-19

    The invention relates to posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides. These displayed polypeptides comprise at least one unnatural amino acid, e.g., an aryl-azide amino acid such as p-azido-L-phenylalanine, or an alkynyl-amino acid such as para-propargyloxyphenylalanine, which are incorporated into the phage-displayed fusion polypeptide at a selected position by using an in vivo orthogonal translation system comprising a suitable orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and a suitable orthogonal tRNA species. These unnatural amino acids advantageously provide targets for posttranslational modifications such as azide-alkyne [3+2] cycloaddition reactions and Staudinger modifications.

  10. Technological modifications in the nitrogen oxides tradable permit program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linn, J.

    2008-07-01

    Tradable permit programs allow firms greater flexibility in reducing emissions than command-and-control regulations and encourage firms to use low cost abatement options, including small-scale modifications to capital equipment. This paper shows that firms have extensively modified capital equipment in the Nitrogen Oxides Budget Trading Program, which covers power plants in the eastern United States. The empirical strategy uses geographic and temporal features of the program to estimate counterfactual emissions, finding that modifications have reduced emission rates by approximately 10-15 percent. The modifications would not have occurred under command-and-control regulation and have reduced regulatory costs.

  11. Selective posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsao, Meng-Lin; Tian, Feng; Schultz, Peter

    2013-02-05

    The invention relates to posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides. These displayed polypeptides comprise at least one unnatural amino acid, e.g., an aryl-azide amino acid such as p-azido-L-phenylalanine, or an alkynyl-amino acid such as para-propargyloxyphenylalanine, which are incorporated into the phage-displayed fusion polypeptide at a selected position by using an in vivo orthogonal translation system comprising a suitable orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and a suitable orthogonal tRNA species. These unnatural amino acids advantageously provide targets for posttranslational modifications such as azide-alkyne [3+2]cycloaddition reactions and Staudinger modifications.

  12. Statistical density modification using local pattern matching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2003-10-01

    Statistical density modification can make use of local patterns of density found in protein structures to improve crystallographic phases. A method for improving crystallographic phases is presented that is based on the preferential occurrence of certain local patterns of electron density in macromolecular electron-density maps. The method focuses on the relationship between the value of electron density at a point in the map and the pattern of density surrounding this point. Patterns of density that can be superimposed by rotation about the central point are considered equivalent. Standard templates are created from experimental or model electron-density maps by clustering and averaging local patterns of electron density. The clustering is based on correlation coefficients after rotation to maximize the correlation. Experimental or model maps are also used to create histograms relating the value of electron density at the central point to the correlation coefficient of the density surrounding this point with each member of the set of standard patterns. These histograms are then used to estimate the electron density at each point in a new experimental electron-density map using the pattern of electron density at points surrounding that point and the correlation coefficient of this density to each of the set of standard templates, again after rotation to maximize the correlation. The method is strengthened by excluding any information from the point in question from both the templates and the local pattern of density in the calculation. A function based on the origin of the Patterson function is used to remove information about the electron density at the point in question from nearby electron density. This allows an estimation of the electron density at each point in a map, using only information from other points in the process. The resulting estimates of electron density are shown to have errors that are nearly independent of the errors in the original map using model data and templates calculated at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Owing to this independence of errors, information from the new map can be combined in a simple fashion with information from the original map to create an improved map. An iterative phase-improvement process using this approach and other applications of the image-reconstruction method are described and applied to experimental data at resolutions ranging from 2.4 to 2.8 Å.

  13. A study of housing modification in East Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yokouchi, Toshihito

    1980-01-01

    This thesis deals with inhabitants' modifications of the 19th century sidehall houses in East Boston, now a predominantly Italian neighborhood. On the basis of the data obtained by a survey and observations, the practical ...

  14. TRAC Code Modifications Made for APT Blanket Safety Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07

    This report provides documentation of the necessary source code modifications made to the TRAC-PF1/MOD2 code version 5.4.28a developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  15. Design review report for modifications to RMCS safety class equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbett, J.E.

    1997-05-30

    This report documents the completion of the formal design review for modifications to the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) safety class equipment. These modifications are intended to support core sampling operations in waste tanks requiring flammable gas controls. The objective of this review was to approve the Engineering Change Notices affecting safety class equipment used in the RMCS system. The conclusion reached by the review committee was that these changes are acceptable.

  16. Sensitivity study of explosive nucleosynthesis in Type Ia supernovae: I. Modification of individual thermonuclear reaction rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eduardo Bravo; Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo

    2012-04-09

    We explore the sensitivity of the nucleosynthesis due to type Ia supernovae with respect to uncertainties in nuclear reaction rates. We have adopted a standard one-dimensional delayed detonation model of the explosion of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf, and have post-processed the thermodynamic trajectories of every mass-shell with a nucleosynthetic code, with increases (decreases) by a factor of ten on the rates of 1196 nuclear reactions. We have computed as well hydrodynamic models for different rates of the fusion reactions of 12C and of 16O. For selected reactions, we have recomputed the nucleosynthesis with alternative prescriptions for their rates taken from the JINA REACLIB database, and have analyzed the temperature ranges where modifications of their rates have the strongest effect on nucleosynthesis. The nucleosynthesis resulting from the Type Ia supernova models is quite robust with respect to variations of nuclear reaction rates, with the exception of the reaction of fusion of 12C nuclei. The energy of the explosion changes by less than \\sim4%. The changes in the nucleosynthesis due to the modification of the rates of fusion reactions are as well quite modest, for instance no species with a mass fraction larger than 0.02 experiences a variation of its yield larger than a factor of two. We provide the sensitivity of the yields of the most abundant species with respect to the rates of the most intense reactions with protons, neutrons, and alphas. In general, the yields of Fe-group nuclei are more robust than the yields of intermediate-mass elements. Among the charged particle reactions, the most influential on supernova nucleosynthesis are 30Si + p \\rightleftarrows 31P + {\\gamma}, 20Ne + {\\alpha} \\rightleftarrows 24Mg + {\\gamma}, and 24Mg + {\\alpha} \\rightleftarrows 27Al + p. The temperatures at which a modification of their rate has a larger impact are in the range 2 < T < 4 GK. (abridged)

  17. Evaluation of proposed panel closure modifications at WIPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Lawrence E.; Silva, Matthew K.; Channell, James K.; Abel, John F.; Morgan, Dudley R.

    2001-12-31

    A key component in the design of the WIPP repository is the installation of concrete structures as panel seals in the intake and exhaust drifts after a panel has been filled with waste containers. As noted in the EPA final rule, the panel seal closure system is intended to block brine flow between the waste panels at the WIPP. On April 17, 2001, the DOE proposed seven modifications to the EPA concerning the design of the panel closure system. EPA approval of these modifications is necessary since the details of the panel design are specified in EPA’s final rule as a condition for WIPP certification. However, the EPA has not determined whether a rulemaking would be required for these proposed design modifications. On September 4, 2001, the DOE withdrew the request, noting that it would be resubmitted on a future date. The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) contracted with two engineers, Dr. John Abel and Dr. Rusty Morgan, to evaluate the proposed modifications. The EEG has accepted the conclusions and recommendations from these two experts: 1) replacement of Salado Mass Concrete with a generic salt-based concrete; 2) replacement of the explosion wall with a construction wall; 3) replacement of freshwater grouting with salt-based grouting; 4) option to allow surface or underground mixing; and 5) option to allow up to one year for completion of closure. The proposed modification to allow local carbonate river rock as aggregate is acceptable pending demonstration that no problems will exist in the resulting concrete. The proposed modification to give the contractor discretion in removal of steel forms is not supported. Instead, several recommendations are made to specifically reduce the number of forms left, thereby reducing potential migration pathways.

  18. Statistical density modification with non-crystallographic symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2002-12-01

    Statistical density modification can make use of NCS in a crystal and can include estimates of the deviations from perfect NCS. Statistical density modification is a technique for phase improvement through a calculation of the posterior probability of the phases, given experimental phase information and expectations about features of the electron-density map. The technique can take advantage of both estimates of electron density in the map and uncertainties or probability distributions for those estimates. For crystals with non-crystallographic symmetry (NCS), this allows the use of the expected similarity of electron density at NCS-related points without requiring an implicit assumption that these regions are identical.

  19. JT-60 Modification Plan for Long Pulse Advanced Tokamak Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JT-60 Modification Plan for Long Pulse Advanced Tokamak Research Colloquium of Max Planck Institute as one step to DEMO · Advanced tokamak researches · Scientific achievements of JT-60 and its phase Tokamak Commercializa tion pease JT-60 Decision system of prototype reactor Electricity Generation

  20. Effects of perceptual processing demands on startle eyeblink modification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of perceptual processing demands on startle eyeblink modification ANTHONY J. RISSLING of early perceptual processing demands on startle mod- ification. A startling noise was presented either- ination of degraded visual stimuli and when early perceptual processing demands are high. At 1200 ms

  1. Osmotic Water Permeability of Isolated Protoplasts. Modifications during Development1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chrispeels, Maarten J.

    Osmotic Water Permeability of Isolated Protoplasts. Modifications during Development1 Tiana Sciences, 76821 Mont-Saint-Aignan cedex, France A transference chamber was developed to measure the osmotic by a micropipette and submitted to a steep osmotic gradient created in the transference chamber. Pos was derived

  2. WEATHER MODIFICATION BY CARBON DUST ABSORPTION OF SOLAR ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, William

    WEATHER MODIFICATION BY CARBON DUST ABSORPTION OF SOLAR ENERGY by WM. M. GRAY, WM. M. FRANK, M OF SOLAR ENERGY by w. M. Gray, W. M. Frank, M. L. Corrin and C. A. Stokes Department of Atmospheric Science interception of solar energy. Growing population pressures and predicted future global food shortages dictate

  3. Byzantine Modification Detection in Multicast Networks with Random Network Coding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Médard, Muriel

    network coding. Each exogenous source packet is augmented with a flexible number of hash symbols of the random network code, and can have the same (or greater) transmission capacity compared to the sourceByzantine Modification Detection in Multicast Networks with Random Network Coding Tracey Ho, Ben

  4. Simple modification of Compton polarimeter to redirect synchrotron radiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Benesch, Jay F.; Franklin, Gregg B.; Quinn, Brian P.; Paschke, Kent D.

    2015-11-30

    Synchrotron radiation produced as an electron beam passes through a bending magnet is a significant source of background in many experiments. Using modeling, we show that simple modifications of the magnet geometry can reduce this background by orders of magnitude in some circumstances. Specifically, we examine possible modifications of the four dipole magnets used in Jefferson Lab’s Hall A Compton polarimeter chicane. This Compton polarimeter has been a crucial part of experiments with polarized beams and the next generation of experiments will utilize increased beam energies, up to 11 GeV, requiring a corresponding increase in Compton dipole field to 1.5more »T. In consequence, the synchrotron radiation (SR) from the dipole chicane will be greatly increased. Three possible modifications of the chicane dipoles are studied; each design moves about 2% of the integrated bending field to provide a gentle bend in critical regions along the beam trajectory which, in turn, greatly reduces the synchrotron radiation within the acceptance of the Compton polarimeter photon detector. Each of the modifications studied also softens the SR energy spectrum at the detector sufficiently to allow shielding with 5 mm of lead. Simulations show that these designs are each capable of reducing the background signal due to SR by three orders of magnitude. The three designs considered vary in their need for vacuum vessel changes and in their effectiveness.« less

  5. Short communication Ion-implantation modification of lithiumphosphorus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Byungwoo

    specific energy and low-power consumption of lithium-ion batteries [1­4]. Among all possible anodeShort communication Ion-implantation modification of lithium­phosphorus oxynitride thin to a reaction with the lithium metal, and the performance of a lithium battery starts to degrade [5,6]. Lithium

  6. The study of dense matter through jet modification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Majumder

    2008-01-09

    The use of jet modification to study the properties of dense matter is reviewed. Different sets of jet correlations measurements which may be used to obtain both the space-time and momentum space structure of the produced matter are outlined.

  7. Polymer Surface Modification Using Microwave-Oven-Generated Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinbock, Oliver

    in the processing of materials to deposit films as well as coatings.4-8 In recent years, the modification of elastomer surfaces with oxygen plasma has also become an important tool in microfluidics where elastomers plate at 55 °C for 24 h. The resulting PDMS elastomer is removed from the Petri dish and cut

  8. Design package for fuel retrieval system fuel handling tool modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TEDESCHI, D.J.

    1998-11-09

    This is a design package that contains the details for a modification to a tool used for moving fuel elements during loading of MCO Fuel Baskets for the Fuel Retrieval System. The tool is called the fuel handling tool (or stinger). This document contains requirements, development design information, tests, and test reports.

  9. Design package for fuel retrieval system fuel handling tool modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TEDESCHI, D.J.

    1999-03-17

    This is a design package that contains the details for a modification to a tool used for moving fuel elements during loading of MCO Fuel Baskets for the Fuel Retrieval System. The tool is called the fuel handling tool (or stinger). This document contains requirements, development design information, tests, and test reports.

  10. Design Package for Fuel Retrieval System Fuel Handling Tool Modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TEDESCHI, D.J.

    2000-03-27

    This is a design package that contains the details for a modification to a tool used for moving fuel elements during loading of MCO Fuel Baskets for the Fuel Retrieval System. The tool is called the fuel handling tool (or stinger). This document contains requirements, development design information, tests, and test reports.

  11. Prediction of Transposable Element Derived Enhancers Using Chromatin Modification Profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, King

    Prediction of Transposable Element Derived Enhancers Using Chromatin Modification Profiles Ahsan enhancers derived from transposable element (TE) sequences. To do this, a computational approach was taken hematopoietic cell types, GM12878 and K562. We predicted the locations of 2,107 and 1,448 TE-derived enhancers

  12. Large voltage-induced modification of spin-orbit torques in Pt/Co/GdOx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emori, Satoru Bauer, Uwe; Woo, Seonghoon; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2014-12-01

    We report on large modifications of current-induced spin-orbit torques in a gated Pt/Co/Gd-oxide microstrip due to voltage-driven O{sup 2?} migration. The Slonczewski-like and field-like torques are quantified using a low-frequency harmonic technique based on the polar magneto-optical Kerr effect. Voltage-induced oxidation of Co enhances the Slonczewski-like torque by as much as an order of magnitude and simultaneously reduces the anisotropy energy barrier by a factor of ?5. Such magneto-ionic tuning of interfacial spin-orbit effects may significantly enhance the efficiency of magnetization switching and provide additional degrees of freedom in spintronic devices.

  13. Surface Modifications of Graphene-based Polymer Nanocomposites by Different Synthesis Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    Surface Modifications of Graphene-based Polymer Nanocomposites by Different Synthesis Techniques, polymerization #12;Surface Modifications of Graphene-based Polymer Nanocomposites by Different Synthesis, Turkey ABSTRACT With the appropriate surface treatments, graphene sheets can be separated from graphite

  14. Modification of a biosand filter in the northern region of Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kikkawa, Izumi

    2008-01-01

    Four local plastic design (LPD) BSFs were constructed in Northern Region, Ghana, to test and evaluate an experimental modification of the LPD BSF for treatment of highly turbid water. Modifications of the LPD BSFs were ...

  15. Improving experimental phases for strong reflections prior to density modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin [University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany); University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany); Hilgenfeld, Rolf, E-mail: hilgenfeld@biochem.uni-luebeck.de [University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany); Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zu Chong Zhi Road, Shanghai 201203, People’s Republic of (China); Terwilliger, Thomas C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Read, Randy J. [University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    A genetic algorithm has been developed to optimize the phases of the strongest reflections in SIR/SAD data. This is shown to facilitate density modification and model building in several test cases. Experimental phasing of diffraction data from macromolecular crystals involves deriving phase probability distributions. These distributions are often bimodal, making their weighted average, the centroid phase, improbable, so that electron-density maps computed using centroid phases are often non-interpretable. Density modification brings in information about the characteristics of electron density in protein crystals. In successful cases, this allows a choice between the modes in the phase probability distributions, and the maps can cross the borderline between non-interpretable and interpretable. Based on the suggestions by Vekhter [Vekhter (2005 ?), Acta Cryst. D61, 899–902], the impact of identifying optimized phases for a small number of strong reflections prior to the density-modification process was investigated while using the centroid phase as a starting point for the remaining reflections. A genetic algorithm was developed that optimizes the quality of such phases using the skewness of the density map as a target function. Phases optimized in this way are then used in density modification. In most of the tests, the resulting maps were of higher quality than maps generated from the original centroid phases. In one of the test cases, the new method sufficiently improved a marginal set of experimental SAD phases to enable successful map interpretation. A computer program, SISA, has been developed to apply this method for phase improvement in macromolecular crystallography.

  16. An analysis of two modifications of the Petersburg game

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin-Löf, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Two modifications of the Petersburg game are considered: 1. Truncation, so that the player has a finite capital at his disposal. 2. A cost of borrowing capital, so that the player has to pay interest on the capital needed. In both cases limit theorems for the total net gain are derived, so that it is easy to judge if the game is favourable or not.

  17. Oregon Modification Application Geothermal Wells Form | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program | Open Energy Information|Information Modification

  18. DOE IDIQ ESPC Contract Modifications | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department ofRefrigerators | DepartmentMeetingModifications DOE IDIQ ESPC

  19. TORIC GEOMETRY AND THE SEMPLE-NASH MODIFICATION PEDRO D. GONZALEZ PEREZ AND BERNARD TEISSIER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    González Pérez, Pedro Daniel

    TORIC GEOMETRY AND THE SEMPLE-NASH MODIFICATION PEDRO D. GONZ´ALEZ P´EREZ AND BERNARD TEISSIER. In the second part this is used to show that iterating the Semple-Nash modification or its characteristic]. If the field is of characteristic zero, this blowing-up is isomor- phic to the Semple-Nash modification. Recall

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Histone Modifications: Formaldehyde Is a Source of Pathological N6-Formyllysine That Is Refractory to Histone Deacetylases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edrissi, Bahar

    Aberrant protein modifications play an important role in the pathophysiology of many human diseases, in terms of both dysfunction of physiological modifications and the formation of pathological modifications by reaction ...

  1. Human Factors @ UB Fall 2010 Human Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    . Outsourcing aviation maintenance: Hu- man factors implications, specifically for communications. C. Drury, K. Guy, C. Wenner. International Journal of Aviation Psychology, 2010, 20, 124 ­ 143. #12;2 Human Factors

  2. Advanced Design Mixer Pump Tank 18 Design Modifications Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, B.J.

    2002-12-03

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is preparing to retrieve high level waste (HLW) from Tank 18 in early FY03 to provide feed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and to support tank closure in FY04. As part of the Tank 18 project, WSRC will install a single Advanced Design Mixer Pump (ADMP) in the center riser of Tank 18 to mobilize, suspend, and mix radioactive sludge in preparation for transfer to Tank 7. The use of a single ADMP is a change to the current baseline of four (4) standard slurry pumps used during previous waste retrieval campaigns. The ADMP was originally conceived by Hanford and supported by SRS to provide a more reliable and maintainable mixer pump for use throughout the DOE complex. The ADMP underwent an extensive test program at SRS between 1998 and 2002 to assess reliability and hydraulic performance. The ADMP ran for approximately 4,200 hours over the four-year period. A detailed tear down and inspection of the pump following the 4,2 00-hour run revealed that the gas mechanical seals and anti-friction bearings would need to be refurbished/replaced prior to deployment in Tank 18. Design modifications were also needed to meet current Authorization Basis safety requirements. This report documents the modifications made to the ADMP in support of Tank 18 deployment. This report meets the requirements of Tanks Focus Area (TFA) Milestone 3591.4-1, ''Issue Report on Modifications Made to the ADMP,'' contained in Technical Task Plan (TTP) SR16WT51, ''WSRC Retrieval and Closure.''

  3. Improved LWR Cladding Performance by EPD Surface Modification Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corradini, Michael; Sridharan, Kumar

    2012-11-26

    This project will utilize the electro-phoretic deposition technique (EPD) in conjunction with nanofluids to deposit oxide coatings on prototypic zirconium alloy cladding surfaces. After demonstrating that this surface modification is reproducible and robust, the team will subject the modified surface to boiling and corrosion tests to characterize the improved nucleate boiling behavior and superior corrosion performance. The scope of work consists of the following three tasks: The first task will employ the EPD surface modification technique to coat the surface of a prototypic set of zirconium alloy cladding tube materials (e.g. Zircaloy and advanced alloys such as M5) with a micron-thick layer of zirconium oxide nanoparticles. The team will characterize the modified surface for uniformity using optical microscopy and scanning-electron microscopy, and for robustness using standard hardness measurements. After zirconium alloy cladding samples have been prepared and characterized using the EPD technique, the team will begin a set of boiling experiments to measure the heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux (CHF) limit for each prepared sample and its control sample. This work will provide a relative comparison of the heat transfer performance for each alloy and the surface modification technique employed. As the boiling heat transfer experiments begin, the team will also begin corrosion tests for these zirconium alloy samples using a water corrosion test loop that can mimic light water reactor (LWR) operational environments. They will perform extended corrosion tests on the surface-modified zirconium alloy samples and control samples to examine the robustness of the modified surface, as well as the effect on surface oxidation

  4. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    Transcription Factor Encyclopedia. Genome Biology 2012 13:Factor Encyclopedia. Gen- ome Biology 2012, 13:000. where ‘Biology 2012, 13:R24 http://genomebiology.com/2012/13/3/R24 SOFTWARE Open Access The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

  5. Containment canister for capturing hazardous waste debris during piping modifications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dozier, Stanley B. (North Augusta, SC)

    2001-07-24

    The present invention relates to a capture and containment canister which reduces the risk of radiation and other biohazard exposure to workers, the need for a costly containment hut and the need for the extra manpower associated with the hut. The present invention includes the design of a canister having a specially designed magnetic ring that attracts and holds the top of the canister in place during modifications to gloveboxes and other types of radiological and biochemical hoods. The present invention also provides an improved hole saw that eliminates the need for a pilot bit.

  6. Selective chemical labelling of natural T modifications in DNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardisty, Robyn E.; Kawasaki, Fumiko; Sahakyan, Aleksandr B.; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2015-05-06

    enriched, we carried out experiments exploiting the selective reactions developed for probes 1, 2, and 3. A double-stranded 80-mer bearing two modifications per strand was used as a model for 5-fU (fU-DNA), while an analogous ODN containing 5-fC (f... C-DNA) and a non-modified ODN (GCAT-DNA) were used as controls (Supporting Information, Table S1). These ODNs were subjected to the biotinylation reaction followed by affinity enrichment using streptavidin- coated magnetic beads. fU-DNA was enriched over f...

  7. Protein Modifications as Potential Biomarkers in Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Hongjun; Zangar, Richard C.

    2009-11-30

    A variety of post-translational protein modifications (PTMs) are known to be altered as a result of cancer development. Thus, these PTMs are potentially useful biomarkers for breast cancer. Mass spectrometry, antibody microarrays and immunohistochemistry techniques have shown promise for identifying changes in PTMs. In this review, we summarize the current literature on PTMs identified in the plasma and tumor tissue of breast-cancer patients or in breast cell lines. We also discuss some of the analytical techniques currently being used to evaluate PTMs.

  8. Hydrophobic Modification of Polyethyleneimine Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2001, Vol. 22, No. 10 1069 Hydrophobic Modification of Polyethyleneimine for Gene Transfectants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jong-Sang

    and polycations. Vari- ous kinds of polycationic lipids were prepared by hydro- phobic modification of small derivatives with a small proportion of hydrophobic moiety. As a result of the modification, PEI-Chol and PEI of PEI is molecular weight-dependent and small molecular-weight PEI is reported not to be efficient. We

  9. SURFACE MODIFICATION OF ZIRCALOY-4 SUBSTRATES WITH NICKEL ZIRCONIUM INTERMETALLICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luscher, Walter G.; Gilbert, Edgar R.; Pitman, Stan G.; Love, Edward F.

    2013-02-01

    Surfaces of Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) substrates were modified with nickel-zirconium (NiZr) intermetallics to tailor oxidation performance for specialized applications. Surface modification was achieved by electroplating Zr-4 substrates with nickel (Ni) and then performing thermal treatments to fully react the Ni plating with the substrates, which resulted in a coating of NiZr intermetallics on the substrate surfaces. Both plating thickness and thermal treatment were evaluated to determine the effects of these fabrication parameters on oxidation performance and to identify an optimal surface modification process. Isothermal oxidation tests were performed on surface-modified materials at 290°, 330°, and 370°C under a constant partial pressure of oxidant (i.e., 1 kPa D2O in dry Ar at 101 kPa) for 64 days. Test results revealed an enhanced, transient oxidation rate that decreased asymptotically toward the rate of the Zr-4 substrate. Oxidation kinetics were analyzed from isothermal weight gain data, which were correlated with microstructure, hydrogen pickup, strength, and hardness.

  10. Signatures of initial state modifications on bispectrum statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meerburg, P Daniel; Schaar, Jan Pieter van der; Corasaniti, Pier Stefano E-mail: j.p.vanderschaar@uva.nl

    2009-05-15

    Modifications of the initial-state of the inflaton field can induce a departure from Gaussianity and leave a testable imprint on the higher order correlations of the CMB and large scale structures in the Universe. We focus on the bispectrum statistics of the primordial curvature perturbation and its projection on the CMB. For a canonical single-field action the three-point correlator enhancement is localized, maximizing in the collinear limit, corresponding to enfolded or squashed triangles in comoving momentum space. We show that the available local and equilateral template are very insensitive to this localized enhancement and do not generate noteworthy constraints on initial-state modifications. On the other hand, when considering the addition of a dimension 8 higher order derivative term, we find a dominant rapidly oscillating contribution, which had previously been overlooked and whose significantly enhanced amplitude is independent of the triangle under consideration. Nevertheless, the oscillatory nature of (the sign of) the correlation function implies the signal is nearly orthogonal to currently available observational templates, strongly reducing the sensitivity to the enhancement. Constraints on departures from the standard Bunch-Davies vacuum state can be derived, but also depend on the next-to-leading terms. We emphasize that the construction and application of especially adapted templates could lead to CMB bispectrum constraints on modified initial states already competing with those derived from the power spectrum.

  11. EMF on Rails Rosa Lopez-Landa1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lara, Juan

    , Grails and Spring Roo, for their use within a Model-Driven Engineering process. Our approach automates (Spring Roo1), Ruby (Ruby on Rails2), Python (Django3) and Groovy (Grails4). They accelerate web

  12. Probing the Influence of Stereoelectronic Effects on the Biophysical Properties of Oligonucleotides: Comprehensive Analysis of the RNA Affinity, Nuclease Resistance, and Crystal Structure of Ten 2'-O-Ribonucleic Acid Modifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egli, Martin; Minasov, George; Tereshko, Valentina; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Teplova, Marianna; Inamati, Gopal B.; Lesnik, Elena A.; Owens, Steve R.; Ross, Bruce S.; Prakash, Thazha P.; Manoharan, Muthiah

    2010-03-05

    The syntheses of 10 new RNA 2'-O-modifications, their incorporation into oligonucleotides, and an evaluation of their properties such as RNA affinity and nuclease resistance relevant to antisense activity are presented. All modifications combined with the natural phosphate backbone lead to significant gains in terms of the stability of hybridization to RNA relative to the first-generation DNA phosphorothioates (PS-DNA). The nuclease resistance afforded in particular by the 2'-O-modifications carrying a positive charge surpasses that of PS-DNA. However, small electronegative 2'-O-substituents, while enhancing the RNA affinity, do not sufficiently protect against degradation by nucleases. Similarly, oligonucleotides containing 3'-terminal residues modified with the relatively large 2'-O-[2-(benzyloxy)ethyl] substituent are rapidly degraded by exonucleases, proving wrong the assumption that steric bulk will generally improve protection against nuclease digestion. To analyze the factors that contribute to the enhanced RNA affinity and nuclease resistance we determined crystal structures of self-complementary A-form DNA decamer duplexes containing single 2'-O-modified thymidines per strand. Conformational preorganization of substituents, favorable electrostatic interactions between substituent and sugar-phosphate backbone, and a stable water structure in the vicinity of the 2'-O-modification all appear to contribute to the improved RNA affinity. Close association of positively charged substituents and phosphate groups was observed in the structures with modifications that protect most effectively against nucleases. The promising properties exhibited by some of the analyzed 2'-O-modifications may warrant a more detailed evaluation of their potential for in vivo antisense applications. Chemical modification of RNA can also be expected to significantly improve the efficacy of small interfering RNAs (siRNA). Therefore, the 2'-O-modifications introduced here may benefit the development of RNAi therapeutics.

  13. Reduction of Glass Surface Reflectance by Ion Beam Surface Modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Spitzer

    2011-03-11

    This is the final report for DOE contract DE-EE0000590. The purpose of this work was to determine the feasibility of the reduction of the reflection from the front of solar photovoltaic modules. Reflection accounts for a power loss of approximately 4%. A solar module having an area of one square meter with an energy conversion efficiency of 18% generates approximately 180 watts. If reflection loss can be eliminated, the power output can be increased to 187 watts. Since conventional thin-film anti-reflection coatings do not have sufficient environmental stability, we investigated the feasibility of ion beam modification of the glass surface to obtain reduction of reflectance. Our findings are generally applicable to all solar modules that use glass encapsulation, as well as commercial float glass used in windows and other applications. Ion implantation of argon, fluorine, and xenon into commercial low-iron soda lime float glass, standard float glass, and borosilicate glass was studied by implantation, annealing, and measurement of reflectance. The three ions all affected reflectance. The most significant change was obtained by argon implantation into both low-iron and standard soda-lime glass. In this way samples were formed with reflectance lower than can be obtained with a single-layer coatings of magnesium fluoride. Integrated reflectance was reduced from 4% to 1% in low-iron soda lime glass typical of the glass used in solar modules. The reduction of reflectance of borosilicate glass was not as large; however borosilicate glass is not typically used in flat plate solar modules. Unlike conventional semiconductor ion implantation doping, glass reflectance reduction was found to be tolerant to large variations in implant dose, meaning that the process does not require high dopant uniformity. Additionally, glass implantation does not require mass analysis. Simple, high current ion implantation equipment can be developed for this process; however, before the process can be employed on full scale solar modules, equipment must be developed for ion implanting large sheets of glass. A cost analysis shows that the process can be economical. Our finding is that the reduction of reflectance by ion beam surface modification is technically and economically feasible. The public will benefit directly from this work by the improvement of photovoltaic module efficiency, and indirectly by the greater understanding of the modification of glass surfaces by ion beams.

  14. Modifications to the FCHART/SLR version 2. 0 program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, J. M.

    1981-07-01

    A number of errors have been detected in the FCHART/SLR computer code as it pertains to the thermal performance of passive solar energy systems. Along with minor coding changes, major revisions in the code have been made to improve the computer models used to predict the effects of overhangs on incident solar radiation and the radiation absorbed in attached sunspaces. Modifications to the code were also made to improve the handling of mullions and to reduce the effort required to describe the placement of overhangs. The theoretical basis of these changes, along with the associated alterations to the code, are given. For the cases examined, the program as modified now agrees to within 15% of published LANL passive system performance correlations. This new code has been designated as Version 2.1 and is presently operational at SSEC.

  15. Surface modification of low density silica and bridged polysilsesquioxane aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeFriend, K. A. (Kimberly A.); Loy, D. A. (Douglas A.); Salazar, K. V. (Kenneth V.); Wilson, K. V. (Kennard V.)

    2004-01-01

    Silica and bridged polysilsesquioxane aerogels are low density materials that are attractive for applications such as, thermal insulation, porous separation media or catalyst supports, adsorbents. However, aerogels are notoriously weak and brittle making it difficult to handle and machine monoliths into desired forms. This prevents the development of many applications that would otherwise benefit from the use of the low density materials. We will describe our efforts to chemically modify and mechanically enhance silica-based aerogels using chemical vapor techniques without sacrificing their characteristic low densities. Monolithic silica and organically bridged polysilsesquioxane aerogels were prepared by sol-gel polymerization of the respective methoxysilane monomers followed by supercritical carbon dioxide drying of the gels. Reactive modification of the gels with volatile silylating compounds during and after the drying process and these effects on the mechanical properties and density of the aerogels will be described.

  16. 327 Building liquid waste handling options modification project plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ham, J.E.

    1998-03-28

    This report evaluates the modification options for handling radiological liquid waste (RLW) generated during decontamination and cleanout of the 327 Building. The overall objective of the 327 Facility Stabilization Project is to establish a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration of the 327 Facility. The issue of handling of RLW from the 327 Facility (assuming the 34O Facility is not available to accept the RLW) has been conceptually examined in at least two earlier engineering studies (Parsons 1997a and Hobart l997). Each study identified a similar preferred alternative that included modifying the 327 Facility RLWS handling systems to provide a truck load-out station, either within the confines of the facility or exterior to the facility. The alternatives also maximized the use of existing piping, tanks, instrumentation, controls and other features to minimize costs and physical changes. An issue discussed in each study involved the anticipated volume of the RLW stream. Estimates ranged between 113,550 and 387,500 liters in the earlier studies. During the development of the 324/327 Building Stabilization/Deactivation Project Management Plan, the lower estimate of approximately 113,550 liters was confirmed and has been adopted as the baseline for the 327 Facility RLW stream. The goal of this engineering study is to reevaluate the existing preferred alternative and select a new preferred alternative, if appropriate. Based on the new or confirmed preferred alternative, this study will also provide a conceptual design and cost estimate for required modifications to the 327 Facility to allow removal of RLWS and treatment of the RLW generated during deactivation.

  17. Modification of quinone electrochemistry by the proteins in the biological electron transfer chains: examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunner, Marilyn

    Modification of quinone electrochemistry by the proteins in the biological electron transfer chains . Electrochemistry Quinones are the primary intramembrane, mobile, electron carriers in the energy-coupling electron

  18. Seismic bridge response modification due to degradation of viscous dampers performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graziotti, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring of Isolated Bridges: Parametric Analysis of theidentification procedure for bridge structures with energyUCSD. Cendron. (2008). Bridge response modification due to

  19. Evaluation of the Cask Transportation Facility Modifications (CTFM) compliance to DOE order 6430.1A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ARD, K.E.

    1999-07-14

    This report was prepared to evaluate the compliance of Cask Transportation Facility Modifications (CTFM) to DOE Order 6430.1A.

  20. Sorbent preparation/modification/additives. Final report, September 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prudich, M.E.; Venkataramakrishnan, R. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States)

    1994-02-01

    Sorbent preparation techniques used today have generally been adapted from techniques traditionally used by the lime industry. Traditional dry hydration and slaking processes have been optimized to produce materials intended for use in the building industry. These preparation techniques should be examined with an eye to optimization of properties important to the SO{sub 2} capture process. The study of calcium-based sorbents for sulfur dioxide capture is complicated by two factors: (1) little is known about the chemical mechanisms by which the standard sorbent preparation and enhancement techniques work, and (2) a sorbent preparation technique that produces a calcium-based sorbent that enjoys enhanced calcium utilization in one regime of operation [flame zone (>2400 F), in-furnace (1600--2400 F), economizer (800--1100 F), after air preheater (<350 F)] may not produce a sorbent that enjoys enhanced calcium utilization in the other reaction zones. Again, an in-depth understanding of the mechanism of sorbent enhancement is necessary if a systematic approach to sorbent development is to be used. As a long-term goal, an experimental program is being carried out for the purpose of (1) defining the effects of slaking conditions on the properties of calcium-based sorbents, (2) determining how the parent limestone properties of calcium-based sorbents, and (3) elucidating the mechanism(s) relating to the activity of various dry sorbent additives. An appendix contains a one-dimensional duct injection model with modifications to handle the sodium additives.

  1. Run-time Modification of the Class Hierarchy in a Live Java Development Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Kenneth J.

    1 Run-time Modification of the Class Hierarchy in a Live Java Development Environment Joel R. Louis {jbrandt, kjg}@wustl.edu Abstract Class hierarchy design is central to object-oriented software work on live development environments to allow run-time modification of the class hierarchy. The result

  2. DOI: 10.1002/asia.200800427 Chemical Modification of Proteins at Cysteine: Opportunities in Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Ben G.

    ;Abstract: Chemical modification of proteins is a rapidly expanding area in chemical biology. SelectiveDOI: 10.1002/asia.200800427 Chemical Modification of Proteins at Cysteine: Opportunities and macromolecular func- tion. In other cases such chemical alterations have changed the protein function entirely

  3. Jet Quenching: the medium modification of the single and double fragmentation functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Majumder

    2005-01-11

    The physics of the quenching of hard jets in dense matter is briefly reviewed. This is presented within the framework of the partonic medium modification of the fragmentation functions. Modifications in both deeply inelastic scattering (DIS) off large nuclei and high-energy heavy-ion collisions are presented.

  4. Summary of Modifications to the Designated Suppliers Program September 29, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Summary of Modifications to the Designated Suppliers Program September 29, 2006 The following summarizes modifications that the Designated Suppliers Program (DSP) Working Group has made to the DSP1 Suppliers Program ­ Revised". #12;2 Enforcement of the Fair Price Standard The problem: Objections have been

  5. IMPROVING CONTROL ROOM DESIGN AND OPERATIONS BASED ON HUMAN FACTORS ANALYSES OR HOW MUCH HUMAN FACTORS UPGRADE IS ENOUGH ?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HIGGINS,J.C.; OHARA,J.M.; ALMEIDA,P.

    2002-09-19

    THE JOSE CABRERA NUCLEAR POWER PLANT IS A ONE LOOP WESTINGHOUSE PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR. IN THE CONTROL ROOM, THE DISPLAYS AND CONTROLS USED BY OPERATORS FOR THE EMERGENCY OPERATING PROCEDURES ARE DISTRIBUTED ON FRONT AND BACK PANELS. THIS CONFIGURATION CONTRIBUTED TO RISK IN THE PROBABILISTIC SAFETY ASSESSMENT WHERE IMPORTANT OPERATOR ACTIONS ARE REQUIRED. THIS STUDY WAS UNDERTAKEN TO EVALUATE THE IMPACT OF THE DESIGN ON CREW PERFORMANCE AND PLANT SAFETY AND TO DEVELOP DESIGN IMPROVEMENTS.FIVE POTENTIAL EFFECTS WERE IDENTIFIED. THEN NUREG-0711 [1], PROGRAMMATIC, HUMAN FACTORS, ANALYSES WERE CONDUCTED TO SYSTEMATICALLY EVALUATE THE CR-LA YOUT TO DETERMINE IF THERE WAS EVIDENCE OF THE POTENTIAL EFFECTS. THESE ANALYSES INCLUDED OPERATING EXPERIENCE REVIEW, PSA REVIEW, TASK ANALYSES, AND WALKTHROUGH SIMULATIONS. BASED ON THE RESULTS OF THESE ANALYSES, A VARIETY OF CONTROL ROOM MODIFICATIONS WERE IDENTIFIED. FROM THE ALTERNATIVES, A SELECTION WAS MADE THAT PROVIDED A REASONABLEBALANCE BE TWEEN PERFORMANCE, RISK AND ECONOMICS, AND MODIFICATIONS WERE MADE TO THE PLANT.

  6. Regulation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced apoptosis via posttranslational modifications in a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ji-Eun, 1974-

    2004-01-01

    (cont.) phosphoproteomics technology, IMAC/LC/MS/MS, [approximately] 200 phosphosites were identified from HT-29 cells, some of which were detected only from insulin-treated cells. Our phosphoproteomics approach also enabled ...

  7. Just enough inflation: power spectrum modifications at large scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cicoli, Michele [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Università di Bologna, via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Downes, Sean [Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Dutta, Bhaskar [Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States); Pedro, Francisco G.; Westphal, Alexander, E-mail: mcicoli@ictp.it, E-mail: ssdownes@phys.ntu.edu.tw, E-mail: dutta@physics.tamu.edu, E-mail: francisco.pedro@desy.de, E-mail: alexander.westphal@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Theory Group, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-12-01

    We show that models of 'just enough' inflation, where the slow-roll evolution lasted only 50- 60 e-foldings, feature modifications of the CMB power spectrum at large angular scales. We perform a systematic analytic analysis in the limit of a sudden transition between any possible non-slow-roll background evolution and the final stage of slow-roll inflation. We find a high degree of universality since most common backgrounds like fast-roll evolution, matter or radiation-dominance give rise to a power loss at large angular scales and a peak together with an oscillatory behaviour at scales around the value of the Hubble parameter at the beginning of slow-roll inflation. Depending on the value of the equation of state parameter, different pre-inflationary epochs lead instead to an enhancement of power at low ?, and so seem disfavoured by recent observational hints for a lack of CMB power at ??< 40. We also comment on the importance of initial conditions and the possibility to have multiple pre-inflationary stages.

  8. Lysine carboxylation: unveiling a spontaneous post-translational modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Adamian, Larisa; Shi, Dashuang; Liang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    A computational method for the prediction of lysine carboxylation (KCX) in protein structures is described. The method accurately identifies misreported KCXs and predicts previously unknown KCX sites. The carboxylation of lysine residues is a post-translational modification (PTM) that plays a critical role in the catalytic mechanisms of several important enzymes. It occurs spontaneously under certain physicochemical conditions, but is difficult to detect experimentally. Its full impact is unknown. In this work, the signature microenvironment of lysine-carboxylation sites has been characterized. In addition, a computational method called Predictor of Lysine Carboxylation (PreLysCar) for the detection of lysine carboxylation in proteins with available three-dimensional structures has been developed. The likely prevalence of lysine carboxylation in the proteome was assessed through large-scale computations. The results suggest that about 1.3% of large proteins may contain a carboxylated lysine residue. This unexpected prevalence of lysine carboxylation implies an enrichment of reactions in which it may play functional roles. The results also suggest that by switching enzymes on and off under appropriate physicochemical conditions spontaneous PTMs may serve as an important and widely used efficient biological machinery for regulation.

  9. Some modifications to the design of a parabolic solar concentrator for construction in Lesotho and their effects on power production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Toni (Toni Jolene)

    2005-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to test the effectiveness of design modifications terms of efficiency and power production in an existing parabolic solar concentrator. The proposed modifications included limiting the ...

  10. Modification of Thermal Emission via Metallic Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, David J.; Stein, Andreas; George, Steven M.

    2012-07-30

    Photonic crystals are materials that are periodically structured on an optical length scale. It was previously demonstrated that the glow, or thermal emission, of tungsten photonic crystals that have a specific structure - known as the 'woodpile structure' - could be modified to reduce the amount of infrared radiation from the material. This ability has implications for improving the efficiency of thermal emission sources and for thermophotovoltaic devices. The study of this effect had been limited because the fabrication of metallic woodpile structures had previously required a complex fabrication process. In this project we pursued several approaches to simplify the fabrication of metallic photonic crystals that are useful for modification of thermal emission. First, we used the self-assembly of micrometer-scale spheres into colloidal crystals known as synthetic opals. These opals can then be infiltrated with a metal and the spheres removed to obtain a structure, known as an inverse opal, in which a three-dimensional array of bubbles is embedded in a film. Second, we used direct laser writing, in which the focus of an infrared laser is moved through a thin film of photoresist to form lines by multiphoton polymerization. Proper layering of such lines can lead to a scaffold with the woodpile structure, which can be coated with a refractory metal. Third, we explored a completely new approach to modified thermal emission - thin metal foils that contain a simple periodic surface pattern, as shown in Fig. 1. When such a foil is heated, surface plasmons are excited that propagate along the metal interface. If these waves strike the pattern, they can be converted into thermal emission with specific properties.

  11. Modification of the Carbon and Beryllium Walls in JET by Erosion, Redeposition and Deuterium Trapping after the 1991 Discharge Period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modification of the Carbon and Beryllium Walls in JET by Erosion, Redeposition and Deuterium Trapping after the 1991 Discharge Period

  12. Modifications to incorporate competitive electricity prices in the annual energy outlook 1998 - electricity market module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe modifications to the Electricity Market Module (EMM) for the Annual Energy Outlook 1998. It describes revisions necessary to derive competitive electricity prices and the corresponding reserve margins.

  13. Synoptic weather patterns and modification of the association between air pollution and human mortality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Synoptic weather patterns and modification of the association between air pollution and human pollution and mortality, an examination of air pollution and human mortality associations (ecologic) using hybrid spatial synoptic classification procedures was conducted. Concentrations of air pollutants

  14. Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Major Stationary Sources and Major Modifications (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section of the air quality standards applies to all major sources and major modifications and outlines the required control technology to achieve the most stringent emission rate. Emission...

  15. Contract Number: DE-AC05-76RL01830 Modification M412

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Health Services H-22 Lobbying Restriction (Energy & Water Development Appropriations Act, 2003) (AL- 2003-03) #12;Contract Number: DE-AC05-76RL01830 Modification M412 H-13 Care Of Laboratory Animals H-14

  16. Top-down modification of bottom-up processes: selective grazing reduces macroalgal nitrogen uptake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bracken, MES; Stachowicz, J J

    2007-01-01

    flow and clear plastic tops to maximize light penetration.RC, Kohrs DG, Alberte RS (1996) Top-down im- pact through aSer Published January 25 Top-down modification of bottom-up

  17. Control Scheme Modifications Increase Efficiency of Steam Generation System at Exxon Mobil Gas Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2002-01-01

    This case study highlights control scheme modifications made to the steam system at ExxonMobil's Mary Ann Gas Plant in Mobile, Alabama, which improved steam flow efficiency and reduced energy costs.

  18. Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification M508

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Modification M508 Attachment 1 SECTION J APPENDIX C Special Bank Account Agreement (Updated Mod M271, M461, M497, M508) Intentionally left blank for Internet posting purposes....

  19. ForPeerReview Effect of Chemical Modification of Oil Fly Ash and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.

    ForPeerReview Effect of Chemical Modification of Oil Fly Ash and compatibilization Polymer Science #12;For Peer Review Figure 1: Fly ash grains at magnified view Page 1 of 47 John Wiley

  20. Automatic and controlled attentional processes in startle eyeblink modification: Effects of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Automatic and controlled attentional processes in startle eyeblink modification: Effects with the hypothesis that passive PPI and PPF are primarily automatic processes, whereas attentional modulation for investigating both automatic and controlled attentional processes ~for reviews see Blumenthal, 1999; Filion

  1. N?-formylation of lysine : a pathological secondary modification of proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edrissi, Bahar

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that aberrant protein modifications play an important role in the pathophysiology of inflammation and oxidative stress in cells. We recently discovered that N?-formylation of lysine is an ...

  2. Controlled levels of protein modification through a chromatography-mediated bioconjugation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kwant, Richard L.; Jaffe, Jake; Palmere, Peter J.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetically modified proteins are increasingly finding applications as well-defined scaffolds for materials. In practice it remains difficult to construct bioconjugates with precise levels of modification because of the limited number of repeated functional groups on proteins. This article describes a method to control the level of protein modification in cases where there exist multiple potential modification sites. A protein is first tagged with a handle using any of a variety of modification chemistries. This handle is used to isolate proteins with a particular number of modifications via affinity chromatography, and then the handle is elaborated with a desired moiety usingmore »an oxidative coupling reaction. This method results in a sample of protein with a well-defined number of modifications, and we find it particularly applicable to systems like protein homomultimers in which there is no way to discern between chemically identical subunits. We demonstrate the use of this method in the construction of a protein-templated light-harvesting mimic, a type of system which has historically been difficult to make in a well-defined manner.« less

  3. Controlled levels of protein modification through a chromatography-mediated bioconjugation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwant, Richard L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry.; Jaffe, Jake [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry.; Palmere, Peter J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry.; Francis, Matthew B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetically modified proteins are increasingly finding applications as well-defined scaffolds for materials. In practice it remains difficult to construct bioconjugates with precise levels of modification because of the limited number of repeated functional groups on proteins. This article describes a method to control the level of protein modification in cases where there exist multiple potential modification sites. A protein is first tagged with a handle using any of a variety of modification chemistries. This handle is used to isolate proteins with a particular number of modifications via affinity chromatography, and then the handle is elaborated with a desired moiety using an oxidative coupling reaction. This method results in a sample of protein with a well-defined number of modifications, and we find it particularly applicable to systems like protein homomultimers in which there is no way to discern between chemically identical subunits. We demonstrate the use of this method in the construction of a protein-templated light-harvesting mimic, a type of system which has historically been difficult to make in a well-defined manner.

  4. The MX Factor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MX Factor Test films played a strategic-planning role in the debates of the late 1970s and early 1980s about where and how to deploy the MX intercontinental ballistic missile...

  5. Power Factor Improvement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viljoen, T. A.

    1979-01-01

    and disadvantages of various locations in the electrical network are described including the cost of installation and network capacity improvement. Sizing of capacitors is also covered. Finally, some case studies involving power factor improvement are presented...

  6. Reducing Power Factor Cost

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Before PF 100142 0.70 or 70% After PF 100105 0.95 or 95% PB References: B.C. Hydro. Power Factor. The GEM Series. October 1989. Commonwealth Sprague Capacitor, Inc....

  7. Electromagetic proton form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Y Hussein

    2006-10-31

    The electromagnetic form factors are crucial to our understanding of the proton internal structure, and thus provide a strong constraint of the distributions of the charge and magnetization current within the proton. We adopted the quark-parton model for calculating and understanding the charge structure of the proton interms of the electromagnetic form factors. A remarkable agreement with the available experimental evidence is found.

  8. Optimizing Power Factor Correction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, R. K.; Burmeister, L. C.

    1986-01-01

    FACTOR CORRECTION Robert K. Phillips and Louis C. Burmeister, Mechanical Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS The optimal investment for power factor correcting capacitors for Kansas Power and Light Company large power contract customers... consumer of electricity were made for demands of 200, 400, 800, 1,600, 3,200, and 6,400 k\\~ and monthly energy consumption periods of 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, and 500 hours for several capacitor purchase and installation costs. The results...

  9. FGF growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Takahashi, Kazuyuki (Germantown, MD)

    2012-07-24

    The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

  10. Improving macromolecular atomic models at moderate resolution by automated iterative model building, statistical density modification and refinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2003-07-01

    A procedure for iterative model-building, statistical density modification and refinement at moderate resolution (up to about 2.8 Å) is described. An iterative process for improving the completeness and quality of atomic models automatically built at moderate resolution (up to about 2.8 Å) is described. The process consists of cycles of model building interspersed with cycles of refinement and combining phase information from the model with experimental phase information (if any) using statistical density modification. The process can lead to substantial improvements in both the accuracy and completeness of the model compared with a single cycle of model building. For eight test cases solved by MAD or SAD at resolutions ranging from 2.0 to 2.8 Å, the fraction of models built and assigned to sequence was 46–91% (mean of 65%) after the first cycle of building and refinement, and 78-95% (mean of 87%) after 20 cycles. In an additional test case, an incorrect model of gene 5 protein (PDB code 2gn5; r.m.s.d. of main-chain atoms from the more recent refined structure 1vqb at 1.56 Å) was rebuilt using only structure-factor amplitude information at varying resolutions from 2.0 to 3.0 Å. Rebuilding was effective at resolutions up to about 2.5 Å. The resulting models had 60-80% of the residues built and an r.m.s.d. of main-chain atoms from the refined structure of 0.20 to 0.62 Å. The algorithm is useful for building preliminary models of macromolecules suitable for an experienced crystallographer to extend, correct and fully refine.

  11. Multi-factor authentication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-10-21

    Detection and deterrence of spoofing of user authentication may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a user of the hardware device. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a PUF value. Combining logic is coupled to receive the PUF value, combines the PUF value with one or more other authentication factors to generate a multi-factor authentication value. A key generator is coupled to generate a private key and a public key based on the multi-factor authentication value while a decryptor is coupled to receive an authentication challenge posed to the hardware device and encrypted with the public key and coupled to output a response to the authentication challenge decrypted with the private key.

  12. Geothermal Plant Capacity Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Mines; Jay Nathwani; Christopher Richard; Hillary Hanson; Rachel Wood

    2015-01-01

    The capacity factors recently provided by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) indicated this plant performance metric had declined for geothermal power plants since 2008. Though capacity factor is a term commonly used by geothermal stakeholders to express the ability of a plant to produce power, it is a term frequently misunderstood and in some instances incorrectly used. In this paper we discuss how this capacity factor is defined and utilized by the EIA, including discussion on the information that the EIA requests from operations in their 923 and 860 forms that are submitted both monthly and annually by geothermal operators. A discussion is also provided regarding the entities utilizing the information in the EIA reports, and how those entities can misinterpret the data being supplied by the operators. The intent of the paper is to inform the facility operators as the importance of the accuracy of the data that they provide, and the implications of not providing the correct information.

  13. ALARA input into the design of modifications at Philadelphia Electric Company

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robb, J.T.; Mallon, J.

    1988-01-01

    The engineering and research department of Philadelphia Electric Company (PECo) has recently instituted changes in the design process for major plant modifications at the company's nuclear units. These changes support the design engineer and allow for greater input of as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) considerations in the design of modifications. At PECo the input of ALARA considerations in the design of modifications has always been a part of design practices as provided in engineering procedures. The need to establish a more formal framework for the input of ALARA criteria into the design of modifications was identified by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). In order to address the INPO concerns and in keeping with PECo's strong commitment to maintaining ALARA plant personnel radiation exposures, the engineering and research department has formalized a procedure to allow for an ALARA review of major plant modifications. A formal framework for the input of ALARA criteria aids the design engineer by clearly identifying systems or areas that generally represent the greatest ALARA concern.

  14. Maximum likelihood density modification by pattern recognition of structural motifs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2004-04-13

    An electron density for a crystallographic structure having protein regions and solvent regions is improved by maximizing the log likelihood of a set of structures factors {F.sub.h } using a local log-likelihood function: (x)+p(.rho.(x).vertline.SOLV)p.sub.SOLV (x)+p(.rho.(x).vertline.H)p.sub.H (x)], where p.sub.PROT (x) is the probability that x is in the protein region, p(.rho.(x).vertline.PROT) is the conditional probability for .rho.(x) given that x is in the protein region, and p.sub.SOLV (x) and p(.rho.(x).vertline.SOLV) are the corresponding quantities for the solvent region, p.sub.H (x) refers to the probability that there is a structural motif at a known location, with a known orientation, in the vicinity of the point x; and p(.rho.(x).vertline.H) is the probability distribution for electron density at this point given that the structural motif actually is present. One appropriate structural motif is a helical structure within the crystallographic structure.

  15. Fast Factoring of Integers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon Chalmers

    2005-09-20

    An algorithm is given to factor an integer with $N$ digits in $\\ln^m N$ steps, with $m$ approximately 4 or 5. Textbook quadratic sieve methods are exponentially slower. An improvement with the aid of an a particular function would provide a further exponential speedup.

  16. Matrix Factorization and Matrix Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, Lester

    2012-01-01

    PCA 3 Mixed Membership Matrix Factorization 3.15.2 Matrix concentration3.3 Mixed Membership Matrix Factorization . . . 3.4

  17. Cutting through form factors and cross sections of non-protected operators in N=4 SYM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhritiman Nandan; Christoph Sieg; Matthias Wilhelm; Gang Yang

    2015-03-30

    We study the form factors of the Konishi operator, the prime example of non-protected operators in N=4 SYM theory, via the on-shell unitarity methods. Since the Konishi operator is not protected by supersymmetry, its form factors share many features with those in QCD, such as the occurrence of rational terms and of UV divergences that require renormalization. A subtle point is that this operator depends on the spacetime dimension. This requires a modification when calculating its form factors via unitarity methods. We derive a rigorous prescription that implements this modification to all loop orders and obtain the two-point form factor up to two-loop order and the three-point form factor to one-loop order. From these form factors, we construct an IR-finite cross section type quantity, namely the inclusive decay rate of the (off-shell) Konishi operator to any final (on-shell) state. Via the optical theorem, it is connected to the imaginary part of the two-point correlation function. We extract the Konishi anomalous dimension up to two-loop order from it.

  18. On the relationship between the modifications to the Raychaudhuri equation and the canonical Hamiltonian structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Parampreet

    2015-01-01

    The problem of obtaining canonical Hamiltonian structures from the equations of motion is studied in the context of the spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker models. Modifications to Raychaudhuri equation are implemented independently as quadratic and cubic terms of energy density without introducing additional degrees of freedom. Depending on its sign, modifications make gravity repulsive above a curvature scale for matter satisfying strong energy condition, or more attractive than in the classical theory. Canonical structure of the modified theories is determined demanding that the total Hamiltonian be a linear combination of gravity and matter Hamiltonians. Both of the repulsive modifications are found to yield singularity avoidance. In the quadratic repulsive case, the modified canonical phase space of gravity is a polymerized phase space with canonical momentum as inverse trigonometric function of Hubble rate; the canonical Hamiltonian can be identified with the effective Hamiltonian in loop quantum ...

  19. Chromium(III) sorption enhancement through NTA - modification of biological materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Low, K.S.; Lee, C.K.; Lee, P.L. [Univ. of Agriculture, Selangor (Malaysia)] [Univ. of Agriculture, Selangor (Malaysia)

    1997-03-01

    The use of low-cost biological materials for the removal and recovery of heavy metals from solution has been investigated extensively in recent times. To enhance their sorption capacities various chemical modifications on the sorbents were attempted. Freer et al. showed that bark from the Pinus radiata (D. Don) had a greater sorption capacity for metals after treatment with both inorganic acid and formaldehyde. Apple wastes treated with phosphorus oxychloride improved the efficiency of removing metal ions. Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA)-modified groundnut, Arachis hypogea, was reported to improve the sorption of cadmium and lead ions. Modifications with the aid of dyes also enhanced metal sorption. Moss and coconut husk (CH) are readily obtainable in Malaysia. Their sorption potential for metals has been reported. This paper reports on the metal sorption enhancement of these two biosorbents after chemical modification with nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA). 13 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Nucleosome-mediated cooperativity between transcription factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonid A. Mirny

    2009-01-19

    Cooperative binding of transcription factors (TFs) to cis-regulatory regions (CRRs) is essential for precision of gene expression in development and other processes. The classical model of cooperativity requires direct interactions between TFs, thus constraining the arrangement of TFs sites in a CRR. On the contrary, genomic and functional studies demonstrate a great deal of flexibility in such arrangements with variable distances, numbers of sites, and identities of the involved TFs. Such flexibility is inconsistent with the cooperativity by direct interactions between TFs. Here we demonstrate that strong cooperativity among non-interacting TFs can be achieved by their competition with nucleosomes. We find that the mechanism of nucleosome-mediated cooperativity is mathematically identical to the Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) model of cooperativity in hemoglobin. This surprising parallel provides deep insights, with parallels between heterotropic regulation of hemoglobin (e.g. Bohr effect) and roles of nucleosome-positioning sequences and chromatin modifications in gene regulation. Characterized mechanism is consistent with numerous experimental results, allows substantial flexibility in and modularity of CRRs, and provides a rationale for a broad range of genomic and evolutionary observations. Striking parallels between cooperativity in hemoglobin and in transcription regulation point at a new design principle that may be used in range of biological systems.

  1. Human Factors Aspects of Operating Small Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Deem, R.; Xing, J.; DAgostino, A.

    2010-11-07

    The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. They are considering small modular reactors (SMRs) as one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can be designed to generate hydrogen, or to process heat. Many characteristics of SMRs are quite different from those of current plants, and so may require a concept of operations (ConOps) that also is different. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has begun examining the human factors engineering- (HFE) and ConOps- aspects of SMRs; if needed, they will formulate guidance to support SMR licensing reviews. We developed a ConOps model, consisting of the following dimensions: Plant mission; roles and responsibilities of all agents; staffing, qualifications, and training; management of normal operations; management of off-normal conditions and emergencies; and, management of maintenance and modifications. We are reviewing information on SMR design to obtain data about each of these dimensions, and have identified several preliminary issues. In addition, we are obtaining operations-related information from other types of multi-module systems, such as refineries, to identify lessons learned from their experience. Here, we describe the project's methodology and our preliminary findings.

  2. Impact of curriculum modifications on access to the general education curriculum for students with disabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Suk-Hyang; Wehmeyer, Michael L.; Soukup, Jane Helen; Palmer, Susan B.

    2010-01-01

    Vol. 76. No. Z fp. ¿O-JJ3. ©2010 CounrilfoT Excfptieittl Children. Impact of Curriculum Modifications on Access to the General Education Curriculum for Students With Disabilities SUK-HVANG L.Ee Ewim Womans University MICHAEL L. WEHMEYER JANE H...Vol. 76. No. Z fp. ¿O-JJ3. ©2010 CounrilfoT Excfptieittl Children. Impact of Curriculum Modifications on Access to the General Education Curriculum for Students With Disabilities SUK-HVANG L.Ee Ewim Womans University MICHAEL L. WEHMEYER JANE H...

  3. Deuteron Form Factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, G.R.; Huleihel, K.; Zhang, H. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08855 (United States))

    1995-01-30

    We obtain the perturbative QCD (PQCD) prediction for the leading twist deuteron form factor, treated as a pair of nucleons in nonrelativistic bound state. It is [lt]10[sup [minus]3] times experiment at [ital Q][sup 2]=4 GeV[sup 2], suggesting that PQCD is not relevant to the deuteron form factor at present values of [ital Q][sup 2], or that non-nucleon (e.g., hidden color'') degrees of freedom must be included for a correct description of the deuteron. The tree-level amplitude [similar to][ital eg][sup 10] and is the sum of several 10[sup 6] Feynman diagrams, making it an interesting case study in the behavior of perturbation theory.

  4. Journal Information Journal Impact Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejcí, Pavel

    Journal Information Journal Impact Factor 5-Year Journal Impact Factor Journal Self Cites Journal Immediacy Index Journal Cited Half-Life 2014 JCR Science Edition Journal: CZECHOSLOVAK MATHEMATICAL JOURNAL Mark Journal Title ISSN Total Cites Impact Factor 5-Year Impact Factor Immediacy Index Citable Items

  5. Journal Information Journal Impact Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejcí, Pavel

    Journal Information Journal Impact Factor 5-Year Journal Impact Factor Journal Self Cites Journal Immediacy Index Journal Cited Half-Life 2012 JCR Science Edition Journal: CZECHOSLOVAK MATHEMATICAL JOURNAL Mark Journal Title ISSN Total Cites Impact Factor 5-Year Impact Factor Immediacy Index Citable Items

  6. Effects of perceptual load on startle reflex modification at a long lead interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of perceptual load on startle reflex modification at a long lead interval GARY L. THORNE Abstract Inhibition of the startle eyeblink response at long lead intervals has been hypothesized to occur the lead and startle stimuli are in different modalities under conditions of high perceptual load

  7. Modification of graphene properties due to electron-beam irradiation D. Teweldebrhan and A. A. Balandina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modification of graphene properties due to electron-beam irradiation D. Teweldebrhan and A. A of changes in the single and bilayer graphene crystal lattice induced by the low and medium energy electron-beam and device fabrication, which rely on the electron microscopy and focused ion beam processing. © 2009

  8. EIS-0435: Modification of the Groton Generation Station Interconnection Agreement, Brown County, South Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for DOE's Western Area Power Administration to modify its Large Generator Connection Agreement for the Groton Generation Station in Brown County, South Dakota. The modification would allow Basin Electric Power Cooperative, which operates the generation station, to produce power above the current operating limit of 50 average megawatts.

  9. Vacuum 82 (2008) 872879 Surface erosion and modification by energetic ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    2008-01-01

    Vacuum 82 (2008) 872­879 Surface erosion and modification by energetic ions Z. Insepova,Ã, J vacuum breakdown of rf-cavities. GCIB can also mitigate Q-slope drop in superconducting Nb of large clusters can be generated in supersonic expansions of gas into vacuum through a nozzle, ionized

  10. Surface Modifications of Graphene-based Polymer Nanocomposites by Different Synthesis Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    conductive composites than the other composites obtained by conventional methods. In this work, graphene as filler in conducting polypyrrole matrix in order to fabricate polymer-based nanocomposites. The effectSurface Modifications of Graphene-based Polymer Nanocomposites by Different Synthesis Techniques

  11. Effects of molecular interface modification in hybrid organic-inorganic photovoltaic cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGehee, Michael

    Effects of molecular interface modification in hybrid organic-inorganic photovoltaic cells Chiatzun in hybrid TiO2/regioregular poly 3-hexylthiophene P3HT photovoltaic cells. By employing a series of para in the field of organic photovoltaic PV cells1­7 and dye-sensitized solar cells DSSCs Refs. 7­10 as part

  12. Modification of boundary lubrication by oil-soluble friction modifier Yingxi Zhua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granick, Steve

    Modification of boundary lubrication by oil-soluble friction modifier additives Yingxi Zhua in lubricants of the type used at the wet clutch interface in automatic transmissions has been studied using in the boundary lubrication regime and compared to a fully-formulated automatic transmission fluid (ATF). 1

  13. Modification of boiler operating conditions for mercury emissions reductions in coal-fired utility boilers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ying

    Modification of boiler operating conditions for mercury emissions reductions in coal-fired utility's studies have determined that mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants pose significant hazards to public health and must be reduced. Coal-fired power plants represent a significant fraction

  14. Modifications in the AA5083 Johnson-Cook Material Model for Use in Friction Stir Welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    Modifications in the AA5083 Johnson-Cook Material Model for Use in Friction Stir Welding, material microstructure and properties in friction stir welding welds of AA5083 (a non welding, Johnson-Cook material model 1. Introduction In this study, an attempt is made to modify

  15. Layout modification for library cell Alt-PSM composability Ke Cao, Jiang Hu, Mosong Cheng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Jiang

    Layout modification for library cell Alt-PSM composability Ke Cao, Jiang Hu, Mosong Cheng Dept-wavelength lithography, light field Alt-PSM (Alternating Phase Shifting Mask) is an essential technology for poly layer printability. In a standard cell based design, the problem of obtaining Alt-PSM compliance for an individual

  16. Assisting Web Search Using Query Suggestion Based on Word Similarity Measure and Query Modification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Yiu-Kai Dennis

    . For example, when the word "Tiger" is entered by a user, current web search engines are mostly focusedAssisting Web Search Using Query Suggestion Based on Word Similarity Measure and Query Modification search engines is query suggestion (QS), which assists users in formulating keyword queries by suggesting

  17. Enhancement of CO2/N2 selectivity in a metal-organic framework by cavity modification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are a strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from industrial processes. Burning of fossil fuel to generate electricity is a major source of CO2 in the atmosphere, but the capture and sequestration of CO2 from flue gasEnhancement of CO2/N2 selectivity in a metal-organic framework by cavity modification Youn-Sang Bae

  18. Deep-Sea Research I 49 (2002) 681705 Modification and pathways of Southern Ocean Deep Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    2002-01-01

    Deep-Sea Research I 49 (2002) 681­705 Modification and pathways of Southern Ocean Deep Waters of the deep water masses flowing through the region, and to quantify changes in their properties as they cross and pathways of deep water masses in the Scotia Sea had remained poorly documented despite their global

  19. Labeling Proteins with Small Molecules by Site-Specific Posttranslational Modification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Jun

    Labeling Proteins with Small Molecules by Site-Specific Posttranslational Modification Jun Yin, Fei of proteins with small synthetic molecules has been an important approach for the elucidation of protein probes into proteins allows the detection of protein conformational dynamics and the real-time tracking

  20. Sonochemical modification of the superconducting properties of MgB2 Tanya Prozorov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    examples of the chemical tuning of superconducting materials. Systematic modification of super- conductor interparticle melting and ``neck'' formation.27­29 The esti- mated speed of colliding particles approaches half was filtered, washed repeatedly with pentane, and air-dried overnight. Magnetic measurements were conducted

  1. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 22922299 Modifications of degradation-resistant soil organic matter by soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miksik, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 2292­2299 Modifications of degradation-resistant soil organic matter by soil saprobic microfungi Veronika R eza´ c ova´ a,b,Ã, Hana Hrs elova´ a , Hana Gryndlerova in their solutions and in sterile soil by microfungal species and two well-known HA degraders were studied

  2. A novel strategy for surface modification of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for lung cancer imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jinming

    A novel strategy for surface modification of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for lung-step procedure for the surface functionalization of SPIO nanoparticles with a lung cancer-targeting peptide and demonstrate high T2 relaxivity. The nanoprobes are specific in targeting avb6­expressing lung cancer cells

  3. A New Method for Improving Solar Cell Conversion: Side Selective Modification of Photosystem I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A New Method for Improving Solar Cell Conversion: Side Selective Modification of Photosystem I efficiency faced by current solar cells by utilizing the light converting plant protein, Photosystem I (PSI in biomolecular applications. o Aminothiophenol - improved conductivity o Multilayer crosslinking · Complete solar

  4. Housing/Dining/Meal Plan Modifications/Accommodations Disability Support Services Housing Office Dining Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    Housing/Dining/Meal Plan Modifications/Accommodations Procedure Disability Support Services Housing.581.4712 Fax: 207.581.9420 Fax: 207.581.3663 Fax: 207.581.4714 At the University of Maine campus housing variation in noise level. For medical reasons, students request a variety of housing accommodations

  5. Sapphire (0 0 0 1) surface modifications induced by long-pulse 1054 nm laser irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Chi

    Sapphire (0 0 0 1) surface modifications induced by long-pulse 1054 nm laser irradiation Sheng fluences. Due to high temperature and elevated non-hydrostatic stresses upon laser irradiation, damage Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Sapphire; Laser irradiation; Spall; Fracture; Twinning

  6. Gated Si nanowires for large thermoelectric power factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neophytou, Neophytos, E-mail: N.Neophytou@warwick.ac.uk [School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Kosina, Hans [Institute for Microelectronics, Vienna University of Technology, Gusshausstrasse 27-29/E360, Vienna A-1040 (Austria)

    2014-08-18

    We investigate the effect of electrostatic gating on the thermoelectric power factor of p-type Si nanowires (NWs) of up to 20?nm in diameter in the [100], [110], and [111] crystallographic transport orientations. We use atomistic tight-binding simulations for the calculation of the NW electronic structure, coupled to linearized Boltzmann transport equation for the calculation of the thermoelectric coefficients. We show that gated NW structures can provide ?5× larger thermoelectric power factor compared to doped channels, attributed to their high hole phonon-limited mobility, as well as gating induced bandstructure modifications which further improve mobility. Despite the fact that gating shifts the charge carriers near the NW surface, surface roughness scattering is not strong enough to degrade the transport properties of the accumulated hole layer. The highest power factor is achieved for the [111] NW, followed by the [110], and finally by the [100] NW. As the NW diameter increases, the advantage of the gated channel is reduced. We show, however, that even at 20?nm diameters (the largest ones that we were able to simulate), a ?3× higher power factor for gated channels is observed. Our simulations suggest that the advantage of gating could still be present in NWs with diameters of up to ?40?nm.

  7. Tiled QR factorization algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouwmeester, Henricus; Langou, Julien; Robert, Yves

    2011-01-01

    This work revisits existing algorithms for the QR factorization of rectangular matrices composed of p-by-q tiles, where p >= q. Within this framework, we study the critical paths and performance of algorithms such as Sameh and Kuck, Modi and Clarke, Greedy, and those found within PLASMA. Although neither Modi and Clarke nor Greedy is optimal, both are shown to be asymptotically optimal for all matrices of size p = q^2 f(q), where f is any function such that \\lim_{+\\infty} f= 0. This novel and important complexity result applies to all matrices where p and q are proportional, p = \\lambda q, with \\lambda >= 1, thereby encompassing many important situations in practice (least squares). We provide an extensive set of experiments that show the superiority of the new algorithms for tall matrices.

  8. Electrical and Production Load Factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, T.; Heffington, W. M.

    2009-01-01

    factors and operating hours of small and medium-sized industrial plants are analyzed to classify shift-work patterns and develop energy conservation diagnostic tools. This paper discusses two types of electric load factors for each shift... The purpose of this paper is to analyze operating hours of small and medium-sized manufacturing plants in the United States and develop ranges of load factors for use as diagnostic tools for effective energy management. Load factor is defined...

  9. Nuclear methods for surface modifications of polymers by ion induced cografting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzei, R O; Smolko, E; Tadey, D

    1996-01-01

    Polymer surface modifications are obtained by the application of radiation treatments and other physic-chemical methods: fission fragment irradiation (ff) or ion implantation and etching and/or grafting procedures. A method of surface modification consisting in the physical adsorption of protein after radiation was assayed. The biocompatibility of the surface was observed by cell seeding and cell adhesion experiments. Track membranes were prepared by ff radiation treatment, etching and grafting techniques of commercial foil polymers. PC, PET, PVDF, CTA, PMMA and PS were assayed as bulk polymers and NIPAAm, AAc, VP, Styrene, MMA and HEMA as grafting monomers. Fission fragment radiation from Cf-252, alpha-particles from Am-241, 25 MeV protons particles from CAE cyclotron accelerator and gamma-rays from Co-60 sources were employed in the experiments.

  10. Photo-induced modifications of the substrate-adsorbate interaction in K-loaded porous glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marmugi, Luca; Burchianti, Alessia; Veronesi, Stefano; Moi, Luigi; Marinelli, Carmela

    2015-01-01

    The effects of visible and infrared light on potassium atoms embedded in a nanoporous glass matrix are investigated. Photodesorption by visible light enhances the atomic mobility and causes the formation of metallic nanoparticles. Two different populations of metastable clusters with absorption bands in the near-infrared and infrared are grown as a consequence of illumination. Atoms can move between the two groups through sequences of adsorption/desorption events at the pore surface. Irradiation with infrared light, instead, does not significantly enhance the atomic diffusion inside the pores. However, it induces relevant modifications of the substrate, thus changing its interaction with the assembled clusters. Consequently, infrared light alters the dynamics of the system, affecting also the evolution of non-resonant nanoparticles populations, even after the illumination sequence. These results provide new insights on the photo-induced modifications of the substrate-adsorbate interaction in nano-sized confin...

  11. Behavioral Modification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuPlessis, J.

    2012-01-01

    Education & Understanding Create a mutual effort to understand Energy Committee Activities Saved 5,174,305 kWh of electricity ? 13% of electricity usage Saved 18,873 MCF of natural gas ? 18% of natural gas usage Competition Results November 2011... with Select Principals Kicked Off Committee in One High School Cluster Expanded to All 6 Clusters Added Auxiliary Facilities Involving Every Department The Arlington ISD Energy Committee includes one member from each building...

  12. A spherically symmetric and stationary universe from a weak modification of general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Corda; Herman J. Mosquera Cuesta

    2009-04-01

    It is shown that a weak modification of general relativity, in the linearized approach, renders a spherically symmetric and stationary model of the universe. This is due to the presence of a third mode of polarization in the linearized gravity in which a "curvature" energy term is present. Such an energy can, in principle, be identified as the Dark Energy. The model can also help to a better understanding of the framework of the Einstein-Vlasov system.

  13. Jet-induced modifications of the characteristic of the bulk nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcinkowski, P; Kiko?a, D; Sikorski, J; Porter-Sobieraj, J; Gawryszewski, P; Zygmunt, B

    2015-01-01

    We present our studies on jet-induced modifications of the characteristic of the bulk nuclear matter. To describe such a matter, we use efficient relativistic hydrodynamic simulations in (3+1) dimensions employing the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) in the parallel programming framework. We use Cartesian coordinates in the calculations to ensure a high spatial resolution that is constant throughout the evolution of the system. We show our results on how jets modify the hydrodynamics fields and discuss the implications.

  14. Surface modification to improve fireside corrosion resistance of Fe-Cr ferritic steels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, Jong-Hee (Clarendon Hills, IL); Natesan, Krishnamurti (Naperville, IL); Rink, David L. (Mokena, IL)

    2010-03-16

    An article of manufacture and a method for providing an Fe--Cr ferritic steel article of manufacture having a surface layer modification for corrosion resistance. Fe--Cr ferritic steels can be modified to enhance their corrosion resistance to liquid coal ash and other chemical environments, which have chlorides or sulfates containing active species. The steel is modified to form an aluminide/silicide passivating layer to reduce such corrosion.

  15. Maximum-likelihood density modification using pattern recognition of structural motifs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Bioscience Division, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2001-12-01

    A likelihood-based density-modification method is extended to include pattern recognition of structural motifs. The likelihood-based approach to density modification [Terwilliger (2000 ?), Acta Cryst. D56, 965–972] is extended to include the recognition of patterns of electron density. Once a region of electron density in a map is recognized as corresponding to a known structural element, the likelihood of the map is reformulated to include a term that reflects how closely the map agrees with the expected density for that structural element. This likelihood is combined with other aspects of the likelihood of the map, including the presence of a flat solvent region and the electron-density distribution in the protein region. This likelihood-based pattern-recognition approach was tested using the recognition of helical segments in a largely helical protein. The pattern-recognition method yields a substantial phase improvement over both conventional and likelihood-based solvent-flattening and histogram-matching methods. The method can potentially be used to recognize any common structural motif and incorporate prior knowledge about that motif into density modification.

  16. Plasma control by modification of helicon wave propagation in low magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lafleur, T.; Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia)

    2010-07-15

    By making use of nonuniform magnetic fields, it is shown experimentally that control of helicon wave propagation can be achieved in a low pressure (0.08 Pa) expanding plasma. The m=1 helicon waves are formed during a direct capacitive to wave mode transition that occurs in a low diverging magnetic field (B{sub 0}<3 mT). In this initial configuration, waves are prevented from reaching the downstream region, but slight modifications to the magnetic field allows the axial distance over which waves can propagate to be controlled. By changing the effective propagation distance in this way, significant modification of the density and plasma potential profiles can be achieved, showing that the rf power deposition can be spatially controlled as well. Critical to the modification of the wave propagation behavior is the magnetic field strength (and geometry) near the exit of the plasma source region, which gives electron cyclotron frequencies close to the wave frequency of 13.56 MHz.

  17. Liquid phase methanol LaPorte process development unit: Modification, operation, and support studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-23

    The objectives of this program are to implement and test the process improvements identified through the engineering studies of the current program to demonstrate the capability of long-term catalyst activity maintenance, and to perform process and design engineering work that can be applied to a scaled-up Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH) facility. An optional series of PDU runs is offered to extend the testing of the process improvements. A parallel research program will be performed to enhance the LPMEOH technical data base to improve the likelihood of commercialization of the LPMEOH process. Activities this quarter include: Flow sheet development for La Porte PDU modifications continues. A preliminary P ID review was completed and flow sheet modifications were identified and are being incorporated. A preliminary hazards review was completed on 22 May. Some minor flow sheet modifications resulted and a number of action items were identified. The most significant action item is to develop a materials reactivity and compatibility grid for the different alcohols, ethers, and esters which will be produced at the PDU. Heat and material balances were completed for the maximum production case of the mixed DME/MEOH synthesis campaign. An improved rate expression was developed. 1 fig.

  18. 10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for Advanced Test Reactor LEU Fuel Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd D. Christensen; Michael A. Lehto; Noel R. Duckwitz

    2012-05-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located in the ATR Complex of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), was constructed in the 1960s for the purpose of irradiating reactor fuels and materials. Other irradiation services, such as radioisotope production, are also performed at ATR. The ATR is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) matrix (UAlx) in an aluminum sandwich plate cladding. The National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) strategic mission includes efforts to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material at civilian sites around the world. Converting research reactors from using HEU to low-enriched uranium (LEU) was originally started in 1978 as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. Within this strategic mission, GTRI has three goals that provide a comprehensive approach to achieving this mission: The first goal, the driver for the modification that is the subject of this determination, is to convert research reactors from using HEU to LEU. Thus the mission of the ATR LEU Fuel Conversion Project is to convert the ATR and Advanced Test Reactor Critical facility (ATRC) (two of the six U.S. High-Performance Research Reactors [HPRR]) to LEU fuel by 2017. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project pre-conceptual design identified several issues that lead to the conclusion that the project is a major modification.

  19. TMD theory, factorization and evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Collins

    2013-07-10

    The concepts and methods of factorization using transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) parton densities and/or fragmentation functions are summarized.

  20. Filling factors and Braid group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellington Cruz

    1998-02-25

    We extract the Braid group structure of a recently derived hierarchy scheme for the filling factors proposed by us which related the Hausdorff dimension, $h$, to statistics, $\

  1. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Phage Resistance Is Not Impeded by the DNA Modifications of Phage T4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaung, Stephanie J.

    Bacteria rely on two known DNA-level defenses against their bacteriophage predators: restriction-modification and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated (Cas) systems. Certain ...

  2. Submitted to 2003 ACM Symposium on Solid Modeling and Applications Constrained modifications of non-manifold b-reps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caumon, Guillaume

    Submitted to 2003 ACM Symposium on Solid Modeling and Applications Constrained modifications of non submitted to the 8th ACM Symposium on Solid Modeling and Applications (June 2003). Web Page: http

  3. A systems-level analysis of dynamic reprogramming of RNA modifications in the translational control of cellular responses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Tsz Yan Clement

    2011-01-01

    In addition to the four canonical ribonucleosides (adenosine, uridine, guanosine, cytosine), transfer RNAs (tRNA) and ribosomal RNAs (rRNA) are comprised of more than 100 enzyme-catalyzed modifications, with about 20-35 ...

  4. Consumer approval of genetic modification of food products: a comparison of United States and South Korean perspectives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillett, Mary Caperton

    2004-09-30

    risks and benefits posed by this new technology.? Overview of Genetic Modification Uzogara discusses the impact genetic modification has had on human foods in the 21st century. The study examines the potential risks and benefits of GM technology... products made known, only half of participants in the study were willing to consume genetically modified foods (Onyango et al.). Additionally, consumers under 35 and those with greater than a high school diploma were more willing to consume GM food...

  5. Journal Information Journal Impact Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejcí, Pavel

    Journal Information Journal Impact Factor 5-Year Journal Impact Factor Journal Self Cites Journal Immediacy Index 2014 JCR Science Edition Journal: Applications of Mathematics Mark Journal Title ISSN Total- life APPL MATH-CZECH 0862-7940 241 0.400 0.430 0.024 42 8.9 >10.0 Cited Journal Citing Journal Source

  6. Journal Information Journal Impact Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejcí, Pavel

    Journal Information Journal Impact Factor 5-Year Journal Impact Factor Journal Self Cites Journal Immediacy Index 2012 JCR Science Edition Journal: Applications of Mathematics Mark Journal Title ISSN Total- life APPL MATH-CZECH 0862-7940 240 0.222 0.549 0.054 37 7.3 >10.0 Cited Journal Citing Journal Source

  7. Mining proteomic data to expose protein modifications in Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Leon, Deborah R.; Ytterberg, A. Jimmy; Boontheung, Pinmanee; Kim, Unmi; Loo, Joseph A.; Gunsalus, Robert P.; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R.

    2015-03-05

    Proteomic tools identify constituents of complex mixtures, often delivering long lists of identified proteins. The high-throughput methods excel at matching tandem mass spectrometry data to spectra predicted from sequence databases. Unassigned mass spectra are ignored, but could, in principle, provide valuable information on unanticipated modifications and improve protein annotations while consuming limited quantities of material. Strategies to “mine” information from these discards are presented, along with discussion of features that, when present, provide strong support for modifications. In this study we mined LC-MS/MS datasets of proteolytically-digested concanavalin A pull down fractions from Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 cell lysates. Analyses identified 154more »proteins. Many of the observed proteins displayed post-translationally modified forms, including O-formylated and methyl-esterified segments that appear biologically relevant (i.e., not artifacts of sample handling). Interesting cleavages and modifications (e.g., S-cyanylation and trimethylation) were observed near catalytic sites of methanogenesis enzymes. Of 31 Methanosarcina protein N-termini recovered by concanavalin A binding or from a previous study, only M. mazei S-layer protein MM1976 and its M. acetivorans C2A orthologue, MA0829, underwent signal peptide excision. Experimental results contrast with predictions from algorithms SignalP 3.0 and Exprot, which were found to over-predict the presence of signal peptides. Proteins MM0002, MM0716, MM1364, and MM1976 were found to be glycosylated, and employing chromatography tailored specifically for glycopeptides will likely reveal more. This study supplements limited, existing experimental datasets of mature archaeal N-termini, including presence or absence of signal peptides, translation initiation sites, and other processing. Methanosarcina surface and membrane proteins are richly modified.« less

  8. 10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for Emergency Firewater Injection System Replacement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-05-01

    The continued safe and reliable operation of the ATR is critical to the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) mission. While ATR is safely fulfilling current mission requirements, a variety of aging and obsolescence issues challenge ATR engineering and maintenance personnel’s capability to sustain ATR over the long term. First documented in a series of independent assessments, beginning with an OA Environmental Safety and Health Assessment conducted in 2003, the issues were validated in a detailed Material Condition Assessment (MCA) conducted as a part of the ATR Life Extension Program in 2007.Accordingly, near term replacement of aging and obsolescent original ATR equipment has become important to ensure ATR capability in support of NE’s long term national missions. To that end, a mission needs statement has been prepared for a non-major system acquisition which is comprised of three interdependent sub-projects. The first project will replace the existent diesel-electrical bus (E-3), switchgear, and the fifty year old antiquated marine diesels with commercial power that is backed with safety-related emergency diesel generators (EDGs), switchgear, and uninterruptible power supply. The second project will replace the four, obsolete, original primary coolant pumps and motors. The third project, the subject of this major modification determination, will replace the current emergency firewater injection system (EFIS). The replacement water injection system will function as the primary emergency water injection system with the EFIS being retained as a defense-in-depth backup. Completion of this and the two other age-related projects (replacement of the ATR diesel bus (E-3) and switchgear and replacement of the existent aged primary coolant pumps and motors) will resolve major age-related operational issues plus make a significant contribution in sustaining the ATR safety and reliability profile. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project pre-conceptual design identified several issues that lead to the conclusion that the project is a major modification.

  9. 10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for Advanced Test Reactor RDAS and LPCIS Replacement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David E. Korns

    2012-05-01

    The replacement of the ATR Control Complex's obsolete computer based Reactor Data Acquisition System (RDAS) and its safety-related Lobe Power Calculation and Indication System (LPCIS) software application is vitally important to ensure the ATR remains available to support this national mission. The RDAS supports safe operation of the reactor by providing 'real-time' plant status information (indications and alarms) for use by the reactor operators via the Console Display System (CDS). The RDAS is a computer support system that acquires analog and digital information from various reactor and reactor support systems. The RDAS information is used to display quadrant and lobe powers via a display interface more user friendly than that provided by the recorders and the Control Room upright panels. RDAS provides input to the Nuclear Engineering ATR Surveillance Data System (ASUDAS) for fuel burn-up analysis and the production of cycle data for experiment sponsors and the generation of the Core Safety Assurance Package (CSAP). RDAS also archives and provides for retrieval of historical plant data which may be used for event reconstruction, data analysis, training and safety analysis. The RDAS, LPCIS and ASUDAS need to be replaced with state-of-the-art technology in order to eliminate problems of aged computer systems, and difficulty in obtaining software upgrades, spare parts, and technical support. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project design did not lead to the conclusion that the project is a major modification. The negative major modification determination is driven by the fact that the project requires a one-for-one equivalent replacement of existing systems that protects and maintains functional and operational requirements as credited in the safety basis.

  10. Modification of turbulent structure in channel flows by microbubble injection close to the wall 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutierrez Torres, Claudia del Carmen

    2005-11-01

    stream_source_info etd-tamu-2004B-MEEN-Gutierrez.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 185058 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name etd-tamu-2004B-MEEN-Gutierrez.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859...-1 MODIFICATION OF TURBULENT STRUCTURE IN CHANNEL FLOWS BY MICROBUBBLE INJECTION CLOSE TO THE WALL A Dissertation by CLAUDIA DEL CARMEN GUTIERREZ TORRES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  11. Study of in-medium mass modification at J-PARC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuya Aoki; for the J-PARC E16 Collaboration

    2015-02-03

    Study of in-medium mass modification has attracted interest in terms of the restoration of the spontaneously broken chiral symmetry, which is responsible for the generation of hadron mass. Many experiments were performed to measure in-medium property of hadrons but there is no consensus yet. J-PARC E16 has been proposed to study in-medium property of vector mesons via dilepton decay channel. The status of spectrometer R \\& D is explained. Other related experiments planned at J-PARC are also introduced.

  12. Contract No.: DE-AC02-07CH11358 Contract Modification No. 0159

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingConcentrating DepartmentOIRVI4136 Modification No. 248 SF-30:

  13. Contract Number DE-AC27-08RV14800 Continuation Page, Modification 138

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingConcentrating DepartmentOIRVI4136 Modification No. 248

  14. Contract Number DE-EM0003383, Modification 006 Section J Workers' Compensation Claims Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingConcentrating DepartmentOIRVI4136 Modification No.B Workers'F6

  15. Modification and Application of a New Method for Retrieving Water-Cloud Microphysics Vertical Profile

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMission MissionModeling distributed generationModification

  16. Modifications to the VV PHTS RELAP5 Model (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(JournalspectroscopyReport)Fermentative Activity onConnectConnect Modifications

  17. Co-repressor activity of scaffold attachment factor B1 requires sumoylation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garee, Jason P.; Meyer, Rene; Systems Biology of Signal Transduction, German Cancer Research Center , INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg ; Oesterreich, Steffi

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} SAFB1 is sumoylated to two lysine residues K231 and K294. {yields} SAFB1 sumoylation is regulated by PIAS1 and SENP1. {yields} Sumoylation of SAFB1 regulates its transcriptional repressor activity. {yields} Mutation of sumoylation sites leads to decreased SAFB1 binding to HDAC3. -- Abstract: Sumoylation is an emerging modification associated with a variety of cellular processes including the regulation of transcriptional activities of nuclear receptors and their coregulators. As SUMO modifications are often associated with transcriptional repression, we examined if sumoylation was involved in modulation of the transcriptional repressive activity of scaffold attachment factor B1. Here we show that SAFB1 is modified by both the SUMO1 and SUMO2/3 family of proteins, on lysine's K231 and K294. Further, we demonstrate that SAFB1 can interact with PIAS1, a SUMO E3 ligase which mediates SAFB1 sumoylation. Additionally, SENP1 was identified as the enzyme desumoylating SAFB1. Mutation of the SAFB1 sumoylation sites lead to a loss of transcriptional repression, at least in part due to decreased interaction with HDAC3, a known transcriptional repressor and SAFB1 binding partner. In summary, the transcriptional repressor SAFB1 is modified by both SUMO1 and SUMO2/3, and this modification is necessary for its full repressive activity.

  18. Modifications to WRFs dynamical core to improve the treatment of moisture for large-eddy simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiao, Heng; Endo, Satoshi; Wong, May; Skamarock, William C.; Klemp, Joseph B.; Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, Jr., William I.; Vogelmann, Andrew; Wang, Hailong; Liu, Yangang; et al

    2015-10-29

    Yamaguchi and Feingold (2012) note that the cloud fields in their large-eddy simulations (LESs) of marine stratocumulus using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model exhibit a strong sensitivity to time stepping choices. In this study, we reproduce and analyze this sensitivity issue using two stratocumulus cases, one marine and one continental. Results show that (1) the sensitivity is associated with spurious motions near the moisture jump between the boundary layer and the free atmosphere, and (2) these spurious motions appear to arise from neglecting small variations in water vapor mixing ratio (qv) in the pressure gradient calculation in themore »acoustic sub-stepping portion of the integration procedure. We show that this issue is remedied in the WRF dynamical core by replacing the prognostic equation for the potential temperature ? with one for the moist potential temperature ?m=?(1+1.61qv), which allows consistent treatment of moisture in the calculation of pressure during the acoustic sub-steps. With this modification, the spurious motions and the sensitivity to the time stepping settings (i.e., the dynamic time step length and number of acoustic sub-steps) are eliminated in both of the example stratocumulus cases. In conclusion, this modification improves the applicability of WRF for LES applications, and possibly other models using similar dynamical core formulations, and also permits the use of longer time steps than in the original code.« less

  19. Electrical and Production Load Factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Tapajyoti

    2010-07-14

    Load factors are an important simplification of electrical energy use data and depend on the ratio of average demand to peak demand. Based on operating hours of a facility they serve as an important benchmarking tool for the industrial sector...

  20. Efficient Networks for Quantum Factoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Beckman; Amalavoyal N. Chari; Srikrishna Devabhaktuni; John Preskill

    1996-02-21

    We consider how to optimize memory use and computation time in operating a quantum computer. In particular, we estimate the number of memory qubits and the number of operations required to perform factorization, using the algorithm suggested by Shor. A $K$-bit number can be factored in time of order $K^3$ using a machine capable of storing $5K+1$ qubits. Evaluation of the modular exponential function (the bottleneck of Shor's algorithm) could be achieved with about $72 K^3$ elementary quantum gates; implementation using a linear ion trap would require about $396 K^3$ laser pulses. A proof-of-principle demonstration of quantum factoring (factorization of 15) could be performed with only 6 trapped ions and 38 laser pulses. Though the ion trap may never be a useful computer, it will be a powerful device for exploring experimentally the properties of entangled quantum states.

  1. Human Factors of Reporting Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, C.W.

    Johnson,C.W. P. Carayon (ed.), A Handbook of Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare and Patient Safety, Lawrence Erlbaum, London, UK. pp 715-750 Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

  2. Measurements of the Nuclear Modification Factor for Jets in Pb + Pb Collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    Measurements of inclusive jet production are performed in pp and Pb + Pb collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 2.76?TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.0 and 0.14??nb[superscript ...

  3. Modification of chemical and physical factors in steamflood to increase heavy oil recovery. Annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yortsos, Y.C.

    1994-10-01

    Thermal methods, and particularly steam injection, are currently recognized as the most promising for the efficient recovery of heavy oil. Despite significant progress, however, important technical issues remain open. Specifically, still inadequate is our knowledge of the complex interaction between porous media and the various fluids of thermal recovery (steam, water, heavy oil, gases, and chemicals). While, the interplay of heat transfer and fluid flow with pore- and macro-scale heterogeneity is largely unexplored. Objectives of this work contract are to carry out new studies in the following areas: displacement and flow properties of fluids involving phase change in porous media; flow properties of mobility control fluids (such as foam); and the effect of reservoir heterogeneity on thermal recovery. Specific projects address the need to improve heavy oil recovery from typical reservoirs as well as less conventional fractured reservoirs producing from vertical or horizontal wells. In the area of vapor-liquid flow, we present the continuation of work on the pore network modeling of bubble growth in porous media driven by the application of a prescribed heat flux or superheat. The scaling of bubble growth in porous media is also discussed. In another study we study the problem of steam injection in fractured systems using visualization in micromodels. The interplay of drainage, imbibition and bubble growth problems is discussed.

  4. Modification of chemical and physical factors in steamflood in increase heavy oil recovery. Annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yortsos, Y.C

    1996-10-01

    The objectives of this contract is to carry our fundamental research in heavy oil recovery in the following areas: displacement and flow properties of fluids involving phase change (condensation-evaporation) in porous media; flow properties of mobility control fluids (such as foam); and the effect of reservoir heterogeneity on oil recovery. The specific projects are motivated by and address the need to improve heavy oil recovery from typical reservoirs as well as less conventional fractured reservoirs. This report covers the work performed in these three areas in the past year. In the area of vapor-liquid flow we present a theoretical and numerical study of steam injection in a pore network. We characterize the displacement in terms of an effective mobility ratio and heat transfer parameters. Displacement patterns axe identified in the parameter space. In another study we discuss the problem of steam injection in fractured systems using visualization with micromodels. The interplay of drainage, imbibition and bubble growth is visualized. Conclusions are reached regarding the potential for steamflooding fractured systems. A third study focuses on the development of a pore-network model for foam formation and propagation in porous media. This model, for the first time, accounts for the fundamental mechanisms of foam propagation at the microscale and leads to the determination of various parameters that are currently treated empirically. The effect of viscous forces in displacements in heterogeneous media is described in two separate studies, one involving an extension of percolation theory to account for viscous effects, and another discussing the effect of geometry in general displacement processes.

  5. Nuclear modification factors of phi mesons in d plus Au, Cu plus Cu, and Au plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Al-Jamel, A.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Borggren, N.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chai, J. -S; Chang, B. S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chen, C. H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chiba, J.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cleven, C. R.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; del Valle, Z. Conesa; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanad, M.; Csoergo, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deaton, M. B.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M., Jr.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Forestier, B.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S. Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Garishvili, I.; Gastineau, F.; Germain, M.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; de Cassagnac, R. Granier; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Perdekamp, M. Grosse; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H. -A; Hachiya, T.; Henni, A. Hadj; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hagiwara, M. N.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hanks, J.; Han, R.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Harvey, M.; Haslum, E.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Heuser, J. M.; He, X.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Holmes, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Hur, M. G.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneta, M.; Kang, J. H.; Kanou, H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawagishi, T.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, Y. -J; Kim, Y. -S; Kinney, E.; Kiss, A.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Kral, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Le Bornec, Y.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Lenzi, B.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, H.; Levy, L. A. Linden; Liska, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Li, X.; Li, X. H.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masek, L.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCain, M. C.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikes, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mishra, G. C.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitrovski, M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Norman, B. E.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Okada, K.; Oka, M.; Omiwade, O. O.; Onuki, Y.

    2011-01-01

    COMMUNICATIONS PHYSICAL REVIEW C 66, 061901~R! ~2002! K*?892?0 production in relativistic heavy ion collisions at AsNN?130 GeV C. Adler,11 Z. Ahammed,23 C. Allgower,12 J. Amonett,14 B. D. Anderson,14 M. Anderson,5 G. S. Averichev,9 J. Balewski,12 O...?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,2 A. Cardenas,23 J. Carroll,15 J. Castillo,26 M. Castro,31 D. Cebra,5 P. Chaloupka,20 S. Chattopadhyay,31 Y. Chen,6 S. P. Chernenko,9 M. Cherney,8 A. Chikanian,33 B. Choi,28 W. Christie,2 J. P. Coffin,13 T. M. Cormier,31 J. G...

  6. Human Factors Guidance for Control Room and Digital Human-System Interface Design and Modification, Guidelines for Planning, Specification, Design, Licensing, Implementation, Training, Operation and Maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Fink, D. Hill, J. O'Hara

    2004-11-30

    Nuclear plant operators face a significant challenge designing and modifying control rooms. This report provides guidance on planning, designing, implementing and operating modernized control rooms and digital human-system interfaces.

  7. Covalent modification and intrinsic disorder in the stability of the proneural protein Neurogenin 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDowell, Gary Steven

    2011-10-11

    Neurogenin 2 (Ngn2) is a basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factor regulating differentiation and cell cycle exit in the developing brain. By transcriptional upregulation of a cascade of other bHLH factors, neural progenitor cells exit...

  8. Likelihood-based modification of experimental crystal structure electron density maps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Terwilliger, Thomas C. (Sante Fe, NM)

    2005-04-16

    A maximum-likelihood method for improves an electron density map of an experimental crystal structure. A likelihood of a set of structure factors {F.sub.h } is formed for the experimental crystal structure as (1) the likelihood of having obtained an observed set of structure factors {F.sub.h.sup.OBS } if structure factor set {F.sub.h } was correct, and (2) the likelihood that an electron density map resulting from {F.sub.h } is consistent with selected prior knowledge about the experimental crystal structure. The set of structure factors {F.sub.h } is then adjusted to maximize the likelihood of {F.sub.h } for the experimental crystal structure. An improved electron density map is constructed with the maximized structure factors.

  9. Origin of mechanical modifications in poly (ether ether ketone)/carbon nanotube composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavlenko, Ekaterina; Puech, Pascal; Bacsa, Wolfgang; Boyer, François; Olivier, Philippe; Sapelkin, Andrei; King, Stephen; Heenan, Richard; Pons, François; Gauthier, Bénédicte; Cadaux, Pierre-Henri

    2014-06-21

    Variations in the hardness of a poly (ether ether ketone) beam electrically modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT, 0.5%-3%) are investigated. It is shown that both rupture and hardness variations correlate with the changes in carbon nanotube concentration when using micro indentation and extended Raman imaging. Statistical analysis of the relative spectral intensities in the Raman image is used to estimate local tube concentration and polymer crystallinity. We show that the histogram of the Raman D band across the image provides information about the amount of MWCNTs and the dispersion of MWCNTs in the composite. We speculate that we have observed a local modification of the ordering between pure and modified polymer. This is partially supported by small angle neutron scattering measurements, which indicate that the agglomeration state of the MWCNTs is the same at the concentrations studied.

  10. Testing long-distance modifications of gravity to 100 astronomical units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandon Buscaino; Daniel DeBra; Peter W. Graham; Giorgio Gratta; Timothy D. Wiser

    2015-09-09

    There are very few direct experimental tests of the inverse square law of gravity at distances comparable to the scale of the Solar System and beyond. Here we describe a possible space mission optimized to test the inverse square law at a scale of up to 100 AU. For example, sensitivity to a Yukawa correction with a strength of $10^{-7}$ times gravity and length scale of 100 AU is within reach, improving the current state of the art by over two orders of magnitude. This experiment would extend our understanding of gravity to the largest scale that can be reached with a direct probe using known technology. This would provide a powerful test of long-distance modifications of gravity including many theories motivated by dark matter or dark energy.

  11. Precision shape modification of nanodevices with a low-energy electron beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alex (Kensington, CA); Yuzvinsky, Thomas David (Berkeley, CA); Fennimore, Adam (Berkeley, CA)

    2010-03-09

    Methods of shape modifying a nanodevice by contacting it with a low-energy focused electron beam are disclosed here. In one embodiment, a nanodevice may be permanently reformed to a different geometry through an application of a deforming force and a low-energy focused electron beam. With the addition of an assist gas, material may be removed from the nanodevice through application of the low-energy focused electron beam. The independent methods of shape modification and material removal may be used either individually or simultaneously. Precision cuts with accuracies as high as 10 nm may be achieved through the use of precision low-energy Scanning Electron Microscope scan beams. These methods may be used in an automated system to produce nanodevices of very precise dimensions. These methods may be used to produce nanodevices of carbon-based, silicon-based, or other compositions by varying the assist gas.

  12. Testing long-distance modifications of gravity to 100 astronomical units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buscaino, Brandon; Graham, Peter W; Gratta, Giorgio; Wiser, Timothy D

    2015-01-01

    There are very few direct experimental tests of the inverse square law of gravity at distances comparable to the scale of the Solar System and beyond. Here we describe a possible space mission optimized to test the inverse square law at a scale of up to 100 AU. For example, sensitivity to a Yukawa correction with a strength of $10^{-7}$ times gravity and length scale of 100 AU is within reach, improving the current state of the art by over two orders of magnitude. This experiment would extend our understanding of gravity to the largest scale that can be reached with a direct probe using known technology. This would provide a powerful test of long-distance modifications of gravity including many theories motivated by dark matter or dark energy.

  13. Enhancement of local electrical conductivities in SiC by femtosecond laser modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deki, Manato; Ito, Takuto; Yamamoto, Minoru; Tomita, Takuro; Matsuo, Shigeki; Hashimoto, Shuichi [Department of Ecosystem Engineering, The University of Tokushima, Tokushima 770-8506 (Japan); Kitada, Takahiro; Isu, Toshiro [Center for Frontier Research of Engineering, University of Tokushima, Tokushima 770-8506 (Japan); Onoda, Shinobu; Ohshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki 370-1292 (Japan)

    2011-03-28

    Enhancement of local electric conductivities induced by femtosecond laser modification in silicon carbide was studied. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the laser-modified regions were measured between the ion-implanted metal contacts. Interestingly, the resistance sharply decreased in the fluence range from 5.0 to 6.7 J/cm{sup 2}. The resistance at the irradiation fluence of 53 J/cm{sup 2} decreased by more than six orders of magnitude compared with the nonirradiated one. From the I-V characteristics and the scanning electron microscope observations, we conclude that the phase separation associate with the formation of classical laser induced periodic structure causes the drastic increase in electric conductivity.

  14. Modification of plasma flows with gas puff in the scrape-off layer of ADITYA tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sangwan, Deepak; Jha, Ratneshwar; Brotankova, Jana; Gopalkrishna, M. V. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-06-15

    The parallel Mach numbers are measured at three locations in the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma of ADITYA tokamak by using Mach probes. The flow pattern is constructed from these measurements and the modification of flow pattern is observed by introducing a small puff of working gas. In the normal discharge, there is an indication of shell structure in the SOL plasma flows, which is removed during the gas puff. The plasma parameters, particle flux and Reynolds stress are also measured in the normal discharge and in the discharge with gas puff. It is observed that Reynolds stress and Mach number are coupled in the near SOL region and decoupled in the far SOL region. The coupling in the near SOL region gets washed away during the gas puff.

  15. Surface Modification of Material by Irradiation of Low Power Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akamatsu, Hiroshi; Ichikawa, Kazunori [Kobe City College of Technology, 8-3 Gakuenhigashimachi, Kobe, Hyogo, 651-2194 (Japan); Azuma, Kingo [University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosya, Himeji, Hyogo, 671-2280 (Japan); Onoi, Masahiro [Metal Technology Co., Ltd., 713 Shake Aza Narihira, Ebina, Kanagawa, 243-0424 (Japan)

    2010-10-13

    Application of a low power atmospheric pressure plasma jet for surface modifications of acrylic, aluminum, and highly crystalline graphite has been carried out experimentally. The plasma jet was generated with batteries-driven high voltage modulator. The power consumed for the plasma generation was estimated to be 0.12 W. The plasma had hydroxyl radicals, which is known as a strong oxider from an observation of optical emission spectrum. After the irradiation of the plasma, the surfaces of acrylic and aluminum became to be hydrophilic from the compartment of contact angle of water on these surfaces. The surface of highly crystalline graphite irradiated by the plasma jet had oxygen-rich functional groups such as C-O, C = O, and O = C-O.

  16. On polar air modification over the Gulf of Mexico during periods of return flow and development of low clouds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karnavas, Gary Ray

    1978-01-01

    QN POLAR AIR MODIFICATION OVER THE GULF OF MEXICO DURING PERIODS OF RETURN FLOW AND DEVELOPMENT OF LOW CLOUDS A Thesis by Gary Ray Karnavas Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Meteorology ON POLAR AIR MODIFICATION OVER THE GULF OF MEXICO DURING PERIODS OF RETURN FLOW AND DEVELOPMENT OF LOW CLOUDS A Thesis by Gary Ray Karnavas Approved as to style and content by...

  17. Critical overview of Nitinol surfaces and their modifications for medical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shabalovskaya, S.; Anderegg, J.; Van Humbeeck, J.

    2008-02-06

    Nitinol, a group of nearly equiatomic shape memory and superelastic NiTi alloys, is being extensively explored for medical applications. Release of Ni in the human body, a potential problem with Nitinol implant devices, has stimulated a great deal of research on its surface modifications and coatings. In order to use any of the developed surfaces in implant designs, it is important to understand whether they really have advantages over bare Nitinol. This paper overviews the current situation, discusses the advantages and disadvantages of new surfaces as well as the limitations of the studies performed. It presents a comprehensive analysis of surface topography, chemistry, corrosion behavior, nickel release and biological responses to Nitinol surfaces modified mechanically or using such methods as etching in acids and alkaline solutions, electropolishing, heat and ion beam treatments, boiling in water and autoclaving, conventional and ion plasma implantations, laser melting and bioactive coating deposition. The analysis demonstrates that the presently developed surfaces vary in thickness from a few nanometers to micrometers, and that they can effectively prevent Ni release if the surface integrity is maintained under strain and if no Ni-enriched sub-layers are present. Whether it is appropriate to use various low temperature pre-treatment protocols ({le} 160 C) developed originally for pure titanium for Nitinol surface modifications and coatings is also discussed. The importance of selection of original Nitinol surfaces with regard to the performance of coatings and comparative performance of controls in the studies is emphasized. Considering the obvious advantages of bare Nitinol surfaces for superelastic implants, details of their preparation are also outlined.

  18. A Halotyrosine Antibody that Detects Increased Protein Modifications in Asthma Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Hongjun; Hallstrand, Teal S.; Daly, Don S.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Nair, Parameswaran; Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2014-01-31

    Background-Airway inflammation plays an important pathophysiological role in asthma. Eosinophils produce hypobromite and bromotyrosine while neutrophils produce hypochlorite and chlorotyrosine. Objective-To evaluate halotyrosine modifications of individual airway proteins as a marker of inflammation in asthma using an antibody-based assay. Methods-We developed a novel monoclonal antibody (BTK-94C) that binds halogenated tyrosine residues, and used this antibody in a custom enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray platform to examine halotyrosine levels in 23 proteins in three independent sets of sputum samples (52 samples total). Results-In 15 subjects with either no asthma, or with asthma characterized by high or low sputum eosinophil counts, we found associations between increased halotyrosine levels of at least three proteins and severity of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Treatment with mepolizumab in 17 patients with sputum eosinophilia markedly reduced the sputum eosinophilia and significantly reduced halotyrosine levels in one sputum protein. Further analysis of 10 subjects with neutrophilic asthma and 10 health controls demonstrated a broad increase in halotyrosine in the patients with airway neutrophilia. Conclusions-Significantly higher levels of halotyrosine are associated with asthma in the asthma phenotypes we examined. The halotyrosine levels correlated with indirect AHR in the form of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Clinical Implication-An antibody-based assay for tyrosine halogenation in specific proteins may prove useful for assessing airway inflammation in asthma. Capsule Summary-An antibody to measure protein monobrominated tyrosine and other halotyrosine modifications was developed and used to evaluate halogenation in specific proteins in the airways for the first time. Associations were found between levels of halotyrosine and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, and eosinophil and neutrophil inflammation in sputum from asthma patients. The ELISA developed here can be easily translated into a clinical test.

  19. An indoorâ??outdoor building energy simulator to study urban modification effects on building energy use â?? Model description and validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghoobian, Neda; Kleissl, Jan

    2012-01-01

    climates and heat islands: Albedo, evapotranspiration, and  of urban modifications and heat island mitigation measures.of Surface Urban Heat Islands  under ‘Ideal’ Conditions at 

  20. Modification of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells with CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptors as a novel approach for cancer immunotherapy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    of the human- ized mice. Tumor challenge experiments withexperiments. Differentiation cultures of primary human cellsexperiments and error bars represent mean + SEM. MODIFICATION OF HUMAN

  1. Effects of Al2O3 support modifications on MoOx and VOx catalysts for dimethyl ether oxidation to formaldehyde

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    to formaldehyde Haichao Liu, Patricia Cheung and Enrique Iglesia* Department of Chemical Engineering, University from support modifications in oxidation catalysts. 1. Introduction Formaldehyde (HCHO) is produced via

  2. Hydrothermally Stable, Sulfur-Tolerant Platinum-Based Oxidation Catalysts via Surface Modification of SiO2 with TiO2 and ZrO2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of developing highly stable, sulfur-tolerant oxidation catalysts that use less Pt via surface modification of silica supports with transition metal oxides.

  3. A BLAS-3 version of the QR factorization with column pivoting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quintana-Orti, G.; Sun, X.; Bischof, C.H.

    1998-09-01

    The QR factorization with column pivoting (QRP), originally suggested by Golub is a popular approach to computing rank-revealing factorizations. Using Level 1 BLAS, it was implemented in LINPACK, and, using Level 2 BLAS, in LAPACK. While the Level 2 BLAS version delivers superior performance in general, it may result in worse performance for large matrix sizes due to cache effects. The authors introduce a modification of the QRP algorithm which allows the use of Level 3 BLAs kernels while maintaining the numerical behavior of the LINPACK and LAPACK implementations. Experimental comparisons of this approach with the LINPACK and LAPACK implementations on IBM RS/6000, SGI R8000, and DEC AXP platforms show considerable performance improvements.

  4. Human factors in software development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, B.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents an overview of ergonomics/human factors in software development, recent research, and classic papers. Articles are drawn from the following areas of psychological research on programming: cognitive ergonomics, cognitive psychology, and psycholinguistics. Topics examined include: theoretical models of how programmers solve technical problems, the characteristics of programming languages, specification formats in behavioral research and psychological aspects of fault diagnosis.

  5. Nonnegative matrix factorization with -divergence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cichocki, Andrzej

    Nonnegative matrix factorization with -divergence Andrzej Cichocki a , Hyekyoung Lee b , Yong of Science and Technology San 31 Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784, Korea Abstract Nonnegative matrix reduction, the goal of which is to decompose nonnegative data matrix X into a product of basis matrix

  6. Transfer Factors for Contaminant Uptake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of supply, upon written request as follows: Address: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission OfficeTransfer Factors for Contaminant Uptake by Fruit and Nut Trees Office of Nuclear Regulatory; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments. NRC publications in the NUREG series

  7. Occupancy by key transcription factors is a more accurate predictor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    United States Language: English Subject: 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES functional genomics; gene regulation; TAL1; GATA1; histone modifications; enhancer assay Word Cloud More...

  8. Occupancy by key transcription factors is a more accurate predictor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Univ., University Park, PA (United States) 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES functional genomics; gene regulation; TAL1; GATA1; histone modifications; enhancer assay functional...

  9. Centrality-dependent modification of jet-production rates in deuteron-gold collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Adare; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; H. Al-Bataineh; J. Alexander; M. Alfred; A. Angerami; K. Aoki; N. Apadula; Y. Aramaki; H. Asano; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; M. Bai; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; N. S. Bandara; B. Bannier; K. N. Barish; B. Bassalleck; A. T. Basye; S. Bathe; V. Baublis; C. Baumann; A. Bazilevsky; M. Beaumier; S. Beckman; S. Belikov; R. Belmont; R. Bennett; A. Berdnikov; Y. Berdnikov; J. H. Bhom; D. S. Blau; J. S. Bok; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; J. Bryslawskyj; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; S. Butsyk; S. Campbell; A. Caringi; C. -H. Chen; C. Y. Chi; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; J. B. Choi; R. K. Choudhury; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; P. Chung; O. Chvala; V. Cianciolo; Z. Citron; B. A. Cole; Z. Conesa del Valle; M. Connors; M. Csanád; T. Csörg?; T. Dahms; S. Dairaku; I. Danchev; D. Danley; K. Das; A. Datta; M. S. Daugherity; G. David; M. K. Dayananda; K. DeBlasio; K. Dehmelt; A. Denisov; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; K. V. Dharmawardane; O. Dietzsch; A. Dion; P. B. Diss; J. H. Do; M. Donadelli; L. D'Orazio; O. Drapier; A. Drees; K. A. Drees; J. M. Durham; A. Durum; D. Dutta; S. Edwards; Y. V. Efremenko; F. Ellinghaus; T. Engelmore; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; S. Esumi; B. Fadem; N. Feege; D. E. Fields; M. Finger; M. Finger; \\, Jr.; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; T. Fusayasu; C. Gal; P. Gallus; P. Garg; I. Garishvili; H. Ge; F. Giordano; A. Glenn; H. Gong; M. Gonin; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; G. Grim; M. Grosse Perdekamp; T. Gunji; H. -Å. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; J. S. Haggerty; K. I. Hahn; H. Hamagaki; J. Hamblen; H. F. Hamilton; R. Han; S. Y. Han; J. Hanks; S. Hasegawa; T. O. S. Haseler; K. Hashimoto; E. Haslum; R. Hayano; X. He; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; J. C. Hill; M. Hohlmann; R. S. Hollis; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; D. Hornback; T. Hoshino; N. Hotvedt; J. Huang; S. Huang; T. Ichihara; R. Ichimiya; Y. Ikeda; K. Imai; M. Inaba; A. Iordanova; D. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; M. Issah; D. Ivanishchev; Y. Iwanaga; B. V. Jacak; M. Jezghani; J. Jia; X. Jiang; J. Jin; B. M. Johnson; T. Jones; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; D. S. Jumper; F. Kajihara; J. Kamin; S. Kanda; J. H. Kang; J. Kapustinsky; K. Karatsu; M. Kasai; D. Kawall; M. Kawashima; A. V. Kazantsev; T. Kempel; J. A. Key; V. Khachatryan; A. Khanzadeev; K. M. Kijima; J. Kikuchi; A. Kim; B. I. Kim; C. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. -J. Kim; G. W. Kim; M. Kim; Y. -J. Kim; B. Kimelman; E. Kinney; Á. Kiss; E. Kistenev; R. Kitamura; J. Klatsky; D. Kleinjan; P. Kline; T. Koblesky; L. Kochenda; B. Komkov; M. Konno; J. Koster; D. Kotov; A. Král; A. Kravitz; G. J. Kunde; K. Kurita; M. Kurosawa; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y. S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; D. M. Lee; J. Lee; K. B. Lee; K. S. Lee; S Lee; S. H. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; X. Li; P. Lichtenwalner; P. Liebing; S. H. Lim; L. A. Linden Levy; T. Liška; H. Liu; M. X. Liu; B. Love; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; M. Makek; M. D. Malik; A. Manion; V. I. Manko; E. Mannel; Y. Mao; H. Masui; F. Matathias; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; D. McGlinchey; C. McKinney; N. Means; A. Meles; M. Mendoza; B. Meredith; Y. Miake; T. Mibe; A. C. Mignerey; K. Miki; A. Milov; D. K. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; S. Miyasaka; S. Mizuno; A. K. Mohanty; P. Montuenga; H. J. Moon; T. Moon; Y. Morino; A. Morreale; D. P. Morrison; T. V. Moukhanova; T. Murakami; J. Murata; A. Mwai; S. Nagamiya; K. Nagashima; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; M. I. Nagy; I. Nakagawa; H. Nakagomi; Y. Nakamiya; K. R. Nakamura; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; S. Nam; C. Nattrass; P. K. Netrakanti; J. Newby; M. Nguyen; M. Nihashi; T. Niida; S. Nishimura; R. Nouicer; T. Novak; N. Novitzky; A. S. Nyanin; C. Oakley; E. O'Brien; S. X. Oda; C. A. Ogilvie; M. Oka; K. Okada; Y. Onuki; J. D. Orjuela Koop; J. D. Osborn; A. Oskarsson; M. Ouchida; K. Ozawa; R. Pak; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; I. H. Park; J. S. Park; S. Park; S. K. Park; W. J. Park; S. F. Pate; M. Patel; H. Pei; J. -C. Peng; H. Pereira; D. V. Perepelitsa; G. D. N. Perera; D. Yu. Peressounko; J. Perry; R. Petti; C. Pinkenburg; R. Pinson; R. P. Pisani; M. Proissl; M. L. Purschke; H. Qu; J. Rak; B. J. Ramson; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; S. Rembeczki; K. Reygers; D. Reynolds; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; E. Richardson; T. Rinn; D. Roach; G. Roche; S. D. Rolnick; M. Rosati; C. A. Rosen; S. S. E. Rosendahl; Z. Rowan; J. G. Rubin; P. Ruži?ka; B. Sahlmueller; N. Saito; T. Sakaguchi; K. Sakashita; H. Sako; V. Samsonov; S. Sano; M. Sarsour; S. Sato; T. Sato; S. Sawada; B. Schaefer; B. K. Schmoll; K. Sedgwick; J. Seele; R. Seidl; A. Sen; R. Seto; P. Sett; A. Sexton; D. Sharma; I. Shein; T. -A. Shibata; K. Shigaki; M. Shimomura; K. Shoji; P. Shukla; A. Sickles; C. L. Silva; D. Silvermyr; C. Silvestre; K. S. Sim; B. K. Singh; C. P. Singh; V. Singh; M. Slune?ka

    2015-09-15

    Jet production rates are measured in $p$$+$$p$ and $d$$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=200 GeV recorded in 2008 with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Jets are reconstructed using the $R=0.3$ anti-$k_{t}$ algorithm from energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter and charged tracks in multi-wire proportional chambers, and the jet transverse momentum ($p_T$) spectra are corrected for the detector response. Spectra are reported for jets with $12modification factor ($R_{d{\\rm Au}}$) values for 0\\%--100\\% $d$$+$Au events are found to be consistent with unity, constraining the role of initial state effects on jet production. However, the centrality-selected $R_{d{\\rm Au}}$ values and central-to-peripheral ratios ($R_{\\rm CP}$) show large, $p_T$-dependent deviations from unity, which challenge the conventional models that relate hard-process rates and soft-particle production in collisions involving nuclei.

  10. Centrality-dependent modification of jet-production rates in deuteron-gold collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adare, A; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Alfred, M; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aramaki, Y; Asano, H; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bandara, N S; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Beckman, S; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Bryslawskyj, J; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Chen, C -H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; del Valle, Z Conesa; Connors, M; Csanád, M; Csörg?, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Danley, D; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; Dayananda, M K; DeBlasio, K; Dehmelt, K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Diss, P B; Do, J H; Donadelli, M; D'Orazio, L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Feege, N; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gal, C; Gallus, P; Garg, P; Garishvili, I; Ge, H; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hamilton, H F; Han, R; Han, S Y; Hanks, J; Hasegawa, S; Haseler, T O S; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Hoshino, T; Hotvedt, N; Huang, J; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Ivanishchev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kamin, J; Kanda, S; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D J; Kim, E -J; Kim, G W; Kim, M; Kim, Y -J; Kimelman, B; Kinney, E; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kitamura, R; Klatsky, J; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotov, D; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S; Lee, S H; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J T; Miyasaka, S; Mizuno, S; Mohanty, A K; Montuenga, P; Moon, H J; Moon, T; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Mwai, A; Nagamiya, S; Nagashima, K; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakagomi, H; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Nattrass, C; Netrakanti, P K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Niida, T; Nishimura, S; Nouicer, R; Novak, T; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Koop, J D Orjuela; Osborn, J D; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J S; Park, S; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, M; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Perepelitsa, D V; Perera, G D N; Peressounko, D Yu; Perry, J; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pinson, R; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ramson, B J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Reynolds, D; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Rinn, T; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rowan, Z; Rubin, J G; Ruži?ka, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Sako, H; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sarsour, M; Sato, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Schaefer, B; Schmoll, B K; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Sen, A; Seto, R; Sett, P; Sexton, A; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T -A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slune?ka, M; Snowball, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A

    2015-01-01

    Jet production rates are measured in $p$$+$$p$ and $d$$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=200 GeV recorded in 2008 with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Jets are reconstructed using the $R=0.3$ anti-$k_{t}$ algorithm from energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter and charged tracks in multi-wire proportional chambers, and the jet transverse momentum ($p_T$) spectra are corrected for the detector response. Spectra are reported for jets with $12right|<0.3$. The nuclear-modification factor ($R_{d{\\rm Au}}$) values for 0\\%--100\\% $d$$+$Au events are found to be consistent with unity, constraining the role of initial state effects on jet production. However, the centrality-selected $R_{d{\\rm Au}}$ values and central-to-peripheral ratios ($R_{\\rm CP}$) show large, $p_T$-dependent deviations from unity, which challenge the conventional models that relate hard-process rates and soft-particle production in ...

  11. Optimization Online - Integer Factorization is in P

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuly Shipilevsky

    2012-08-31

    Aug 31, 2012 ... Integer Factorization is in P. Yuly Shipilevsky (yulysh2000 ***at*** yahoo.ca). Abstract: A polynomial-time algorithm for integer factorization, ...

  12. Role of calcium calmodulin kinases in modification of the p53 signalling pathway 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulkner, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    P53 is a tetrameric transcription factor which exhibits DNA binding activity through its core domain which encompasses the conserved domains (known as Box II, III, IV and V). The N-terminal domain of p53 provides a ...

  13. Common Genetic Variants and Modification of Penetrance of BRCA2-Associated Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Todd

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors.1 To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we ...

  14. Mechanism of surface modification in the plasma-surface interaction in electrical arcs CERN, CH-1211 Genve 23, Switzerland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordlund, Kai

    Mechanism of surface modification in the plasma-surface interaction in electrical arcs H. Timko received 22 February 2010; published 25 May 2010 Electrical sparks and arcs are plasma discharges the given conditions in the plasma sheath to kiloelectron volt energies, on surfaces. The flux in arcs is so

  15. Modification of emission from the X-mode at the third electron cyclotron harmonic from mode conversion and reflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    Modification of emission from the X-mode at the third electron cyclotron harmonic from mode (Received 1 August 1994; accepted 31 October 1994) Both absorption and emission of the X and emission. The transmission is shown to be independent of absorption, and the emission is related

  16. September 15, 1997 / Vol. 22, No. 18 / OPTICS LETTERS 1385 Modification of solitary waves by third-harmonic generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the wave's third harmonic. Indeed, if a slightly mismatched process of third-harmonic generation leadsSeptember 15, 1997 / Vol. 22, No. 18 / OPTICS LETTERS 1385 Modification of solitary waves by third-harmonic generation Rowland A. Sammut and Alexander V. Buryak School of Mathematics and Statistics, University College

  17. Modification of the Hepatitis B Virus Envelope Protein Glycosylation Pattern Interferes with Secretion of Viral Particles, Infectivity, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    Modification of the Hepatitis B Virus Envelope Protein Glycosylation Pattern Interferes Transfusion Sanguine (INTS), Paris, France ABSTRACT The envelope proteins of hepatitis B virus (HBV) bear an N protein synthesis and stability and to secretion of subviral particles (SVPs) and hepatitis delta virus

  18. Epigenetic modifications and conserved, non-coding DNA play a role in regulation of type IV collagen gene expression 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moody, Jessica Ashley

    2009-05-15

    Summary of diseases involving the type IV collagens .............................. 2 2 Summary of histone post-translational modifications................................ 13 3 Primers for TaqMan? q...RT-PCR ............................................................... 22 4 Primers for Syber Green qRT-PCR............................................................ 23 5 Primers to amplify conserved, non-coding sequences ............................... 25 6 Primers for ChIP analysis...

  19. Orographic Modification of Convection and Flow Kinematics by the Oregon Coast Range and Cascades during IMPROVE-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    of research. The analysis of recent field datasets has revealed many complex physical mechanisms that canOrographic Modification of Convection and Flow Kinematics by the Oregon Coast Range and Cascades 2008) ABSTRACT This paper describes the kinematic and precipitation evolution accompanying the passage

  20. EMF 13 (2009) 31 LES MODES DE FINANCEMENT PUBLIC DES PERFORMANCES AVIGNON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2009-01-01

    hommage tout particulier au Dr Pierre Pansier, ophtalmologue et historien d'Avignon du début du XXe siècle citer un article de Paul Achard sur « Les anciens trésoriers de la ville d'Avignon », un autre de

  1. BOEMRE 2011-09 EFFECTS OF EMFS FROM UNDERSEA POWER CABLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tricas, Timothy C.

    MARINE SPECIES Final Report U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation Cables on Elasmobranchs and Other Marine Species. U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Ocean Energy MARINE SPECIES Final Report Prepared by NORMANDEAU ASSOCIATES, INC. EXPONENT, INC. DR. TIMOTHY TRICAS DR

  2. 10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for Replacement of ATR Primary Coolant Pumps and Motors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-05-01

    The continued safe and reliable operation of the ATR is critical to the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) mission. While ATR is safely fulfilling current mission requirements, a variety of aging and obsolescence issues challenge ATR engineering and maintenance personnel’s capability to sustain ATR over the long term. First documented in a series of independent assessments, beginning with an OA Environmental Safety and Health Assessment conducted in 2003, the issues were validated in a detailed Material Condition Assessment (MCA) conducted as a part of the ATR Life Extension Program in 2007.Accordingly, near term replacement of aging and obsolescent original ATR equipment has become important to ensure ATR capability in support of NE’s long term national missions. To that end, a mission needs statement has been prepared for a non-major system acquisition which is comprised of three interdependent subprojects. The first project will replace the existent diesel-electrical bus (E-3), switchgear, and the 50-year-old obsolescent marine diesels with commercial power that is backed with safety related emergency diesel generators, switchgear, and uninterruptible power supply (UPS). The second project, the subject of this major modification determination, will replace the four, obsolete, original primary coolant pumps (PCPs) and motors. Completion of this and the two other age-related projects (replacement of the ATR diesel bus [E-3] and switchgear and replacement of the existent emergency firewater injection system) will resolve major age-related operational issues plus make a significant contribution in sustaining the ATR safety and reliability profile. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project pre-conceptual design identified several issues that lead to the conclusion that the project is a major modification: 1. Evaluation Criteria #3 (Change of existing process). The proposed strategy for equipping the replacement PCPs with VFDs and having the PCPs also function as ECPs will require significant safety basis changes requiring DOE approval. 2. Evaluation Criteria #4 (Use of new technology). The use of VFD and VFD “pump catcher” technology for the PCPs is not currently in use and has not been previously formally reviewed/approved by DOE for ATR. It is noted that VFD technology has several decades of commercial use and experience. However, the ATR probabilistic risk assessment will have to be updated, reflecting the changes for supplying ECP flows including VFD reliability, to confirm that the proposed activity maintains or reduces the CDF for the ATR. 3. Evaluation Criteria #5 (Create the need for new or revised safety SSCs). It is expected that the proposed activity will result in a revised list of safety-related SSCs. Specifically, as currently proposed, the existing ECPs will be deleted from the list. The PCPs and their associated components, picking up the ECP function, will be classified as safety-related active Seismic Category I.

  3. Efficiency of plasma actuator ionization in shock wave modification in a rarefied supersonic flow over a flat plate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joussot, Romain; Lago, Viviana; Parisse, Jean-Denis

    2014-12-09

    This paper describes experimental and numerical investigations focused on the shock wave modification, induced by a dc glow discharge, of a Mach 2 flow under rarefied regime. The model under investigation is a flat plate equipped with a plasma actuator composed of two electrodes. The glow discharge is generated by applying a negative potential to the upstream electrode, enabling the creation of a weakly ionized plasma. The natural flow (i.e. without the plasma) exhibits a thick laminar boundary layer and a shock wave with a hyperbolic shape. Images of the flow obtained with an ICCD camera revealed that the plasma discharge induces an increase in the shock wave angle. Thermal effects (volumetric, and at the surface) and plasma effects (ionization, and thermal non-equilibrium) are the most relevant processes explaining the observed modifications. The effect induced by the heating of the flat plate surface is studied experimentally by replacing the upstream electrode by a heating element, and numerically by modifying the thermal boundary condition of the model surface. The results show that for a similar temperature distribution over the plate surface, modifications induced by the heating element are lower than those produced by the plasma. This difference shows that other effects than purely thermal effects are involved with the plasma actuator. Measurements of the electron density with a Langmuir probe highlight the fact that the ionization degree plays an important role into the modification of the flow. The gas properties, especially the isentropic exponent, are indeed modified by the plasma above the actuator and upstream the flat plate. This leads to a local modification of the flow conditions, inducing an increase in the shock wave angle.

  4. Modifications of the exciton lifetime and internal quantum efficiency for organic light-emitting devices with a weak/strong microcavity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wai, Ping-kong Alexander

    to their applications in display and lighting.1­4 Considering the microcavity effect, OLEDs can be roughly categorizedModifications of the exciton lifetime and internal quantum efficiency for organic light on the modifications of the exciton lifetime and internal quantum efficiency int for organic light-emitting devices

  5. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine: Parasitic Loss Control through Surface Modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farshid Sadeghi; Chin-Pei Wang

    2008-12-31

    This report presents results of our investigation on parasitic loss control through surface modification in reciprocating engine. In order to achieve the objectives several experimental and corresponding analytical models were designed and developed to corroborate our results. Four different test rigs were designed and developed to simulate the contact between the piston ring and cylinder liner (PRCL) contact. The Reciprocating Piston Test Rig (RPTR) is a novel suspended liner test apparatus which can be used to accurately measure the friction force and side load at the piston-cylinder interface. A mixed lubrication model for the complete ring-pack and piston skirt was developed to correlate with the experimental measurements. Comparisons between the experimental and analytical results showed good agreement. The results revealed that in the reciprocating engines higher friction occur near TDC and BDC of the stroke due to the extremely low piston speed resulting in boundary lubrication. A Small Engine Dynamometer Test Rig was also designed and developed to enable testing of cylinder liner under motored and fired conditions. Results of this study provide a baseline from which to measure the effect of surface modifications. The Pin on Disk Test Rig (POD) was used in a flat-on-flat configuration to study the friction effect of CNC machining circular pockets and laser micro-dimples. The results show that large and shallow circular pockets resulted in significant friction reduction. Deep circular pockets did not provide much load support. The Reciprocating Liner Test Rig (RLTR) was designed to simplifying the contact at the PRCL interface. Accurate measurement of friction was obtained using 3-axis piezoelectric force transducer. Two fiber optic sensors were used to measure the film thickness precisely. The results show that the friction force is reduced through the use of modified surfaces. The Shear Driven Test Rig (SDTR) was designed to simulate the mechanism of the piston ring pass through the liner. Micro PIV system was provided to observing the flow of lubricant in the cavity (pocket). The Vorticity-Stream Function Code was developed to simulate the incompressible fluid flow in the rectangular cavity.

  6. Environmentally Benign and Permanent Modifications to Prevent Biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Zhang

    2012-04-19

    Semprus Biosciences is developing environmentally benign and permanent modifications to prevent biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Biofouling, including growth on external surfaces by bacteria, algae, barnacles, mussels, and other marine organisms, accumulate quickly on MHK devices, causing mechanical wear and changes in performance. Biofouling on crucial components of hydrokinetic devices, such as rotors, generators, and turbines, imposes substantial mass and hydrodynamic loading with associated efficiency loss and maintenance costs. Most antifouling coatings leach toxic ingredients, such as copper and tributyltin, through an eroding process, but increasingly stringent regulation of biocides has led to interest in the development of non-biocidal technologies to control fouling. Semprus Biosciences research team is developing modifications to prevent fouling from a broad spectrum of organisms on devices of all shapes, sizes, and materials for the life of the product. The research team designed and developed betaine-based polymers as novel underwater coatings to resist the attachment of marine organisms. Different betaine-based monomers and polymers were synthesized and incorporated within various coating formulations. The formulations and application methods were developed on aluminum panels with required adhesion strength and mechanical properties. The coating polymers were chemically stable under UV, hydrolytic and oxidative environments. The sulfobetaine formulations are applicable as nonleaching and stable underwater coatings. For the first time, coating formulations modified with highly packed sulfobetaine polymers were prepared and demonstrated resistance to a broad spectrum of marine organisms. Assays for comparing nonfouling performance were developed to evaluate protein adsorption and bacteria attachment. Barnacle settlement and removal were evaluated and a 60-day field test was performed. Silicone substrates including a commercial fouling release coating were used for comparison. Compared with the unmodified silicone substrates, the sulfobetaine-modified formulations were able to exhibit a 98% reduction in fibrinogen adsorption, 97.0% (E. coli), 99.6% (S. aureus), and 99.5% (C. lytica) reduction in bacteria attachment, and 100% reduction in barnacles cyprid attachment. In addition to the significant improvement in fouling resistance of various organisms, the 60-day field test also showed an evident efficacy from visual assessment, foul rating, and fouling removal test. The research confirmed that the novel antifouling mechanism of betaine polymers provides a new avenue for marine coating development. The developed coatings out-performed currently used nontoxic underwater coatings in a broad spectrum of fouling resistance. By further developing formulations and processing methods for specific devices, the technology is ready for the next stage of development with demonstration in MHK systems.

  7. 10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for the ATR Diesel Bus (E-3) and Switchgear Replacement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel Duckwtiz

    2011-05-01

    Near term replacement of aging and obsolescent original ATR equipment has become important to ensure ATR capability in support of NE’s long term national missions. To that end, a mission needs statement has been prepared for a non-major system acquisition which is comprised of three interdependent subprojects. The first project, subject of this determination, will replace the existent diesel-electrical bus (E-3) and associated switchgear. More specifically, INL proposes transitioning ATR to 100% commercial power with appropriate emergency backup to include: • Provide commercial power as the normal source of power to the ATR loads currently supplied by diesel-electric power. • Provide backup power to the critical ATR loads in the event of a loss of commercial power. • Replace obsolescent critical ATR power distribution equipment, e.g., switchgear, transformers, motor control centers, distribution panels. Completion of this and two other age-related projects (primary coolant pump and motor replacement and emergency firewater injection system replacement) will resolve major age related operational issues plus make a significant contribution in sustaining the ATR safety and reliability profile. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project pre-conceptual design identified several issues make the project a major modification: 1. Evaluation Criteria #2 (Footprint change). The addition of a new PC-4 structure to the ATR Facility to house safety-related SSCs requires careful attention to maintaining adherence to applicable engineering and nuclear safety design criteria (e.g., structural qualification, fire suppression) to ensure no adverse impacts to the safety-related functions of the housed equipment. 2. Evaluation Criteria #3 (Change of existing process). The change to the strategy for providing continuous reliable power to the safety-related emergency coolant pumps requires careful attention and analysis to ensure it meets a project primary object to maintain or reduce CDF and does not negatively affect the efficacy of the currently approved strategy. 3. Evaluation Criteria #5 (Create the need for new or revised safety SSCs). The change to the strategy for providing continuous reliable power to the safety-related emergency coolant pumps, based on the pre-conceptual design, will require the addition of two quick start diesel generators, their associated power coordination/distribution controls, and a UPS to the list of safety-related SSCs. Similarly to item 1 above, the addition of these active SSCs to the list of safety-related SSCs and replacement of the E-3 bus requires careful attention to maintaining adherence to applicable engineering and nuclear safety design criteria (e.g., seismic qualification, isolation of redundant trains from common fault failures) to ensure no adverse impacts to the safety-related functions.

  8. On Factorization of Molecular Wavefunctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thierry Jecko; Brian T. Sutcliffe; R. Guy Woolley

    2015-07-18

    Recently there has been a renewed interest in the chemical physics literature of factorization of the position representation eigenfunctions \\{$\\Phi$\\} of the molecular Schr\\"odinger equation as originally proposed by Hunter in the 1970s. The idea is to represent $\\Phi$ in the form $\\varphi\\chi$ where $\\chi$ is \\textit{purely} a function of the nuclear coordinates, while $\\varphi$ must depend on both electron and nuclear position variables in the problem. This is a generalization of the approximate factorization originally proposed by Born and Oppenheimer, the hope being that an `exact' representation of $\\Phi$ can be achieved in this form with $\\varphi$ and $\\chi$ interpretable as `electronic' and `nuclear' wavefunctions respectively. We offer a mathematical analysis of these proposals that identifies ambiguities stemming mainly from the singularities in the Coulomb potential energy.

  9. On Factorization of Molecular Wavefunctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thierry Jecko; Brian T. Sutcliffe; R. Guy Woolley

    2015-09-05

    Recently there has been a renewed interest in the chemical physics literature of factorization of the position representation eigenfunctions \\{$\\Phi$\\} of the molecular Schr\\"odinger equation as originally proposed by Hunter in the 1970s. The idea is to represent $\\Phi$ in the form $\\varphi\\chi$ where $\\chi$ is \\textit{purely} a function of the nuclear coordinates, while $\\varphi$ must depend on both electron and nuclear position variables in the problem. This is a generalization of the approximate factorization originally proposed by Born and Oppenheimer, the hope being that an `exact' representation of $\\Phi$ can be achieved in this form with $\\varphi$ and $\\chi$ interpretable as `electronic' and `nuclear' wavefunctions respectively. We offer a mathematical analysis of these proposals that identifies ambiguities stemming mainly from the singularities in the Coulomb potential energy.

  10. On Factorization of Molecular Wavefunctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thierry Jecko; Brian T. Sutcliffe; R. Guy Woolley

    2015-10-13

    Recently there has been a renewed interest in the chemical physics literature of factorization of the position representation eigenfunctions \\{$\\Phi$\\} of the molecular Schr\\"odinger equation as originally proposed by Hunter in the 1970s. The idea is to represent $\\Phi$ in the form $\\varphi\\chi$ where $\\chi$ is \\textit{purely} a function of the nuclear coordinates, while $\\varphi$ must depend on both electron and nuclear position variables in the problem. This is a generalization of the approximate factorization originally proposed by Born and Oppenheimer, the hope being that an `exact' representation of $\\Phi$ can be achieved in this form with $\\varphi$ and $\\chi$ interpretable as `electronic' and `nuclear' wavefunctions respectively. We offer a mathematical analysis of these proposals that identifies ambiguities stemming mainly from the singularities in the Coulomb potential energy.

  11. Factors Impacting Decommissioning Costs - 13576

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Karen; McGrath, Richard [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)] [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied United States experience with decommissioning cost estimates and the factors that impact the actual cost of decommissioning projects. This study gathered available estimated and actual decommissioning costs from eight nuclear power plants in the United States to understand the major components of decommissioning costs. Major costs categories for decommissioning a nuclear power plant are removal costs, radioactive waste costs, staffing costs, and other costs. The technical factors that impact the costs were analyzed based on the plants' decommissioning experiences. Detailed cost breakdowns by major projects and other cost categories from actual power plant decommissioning experiences will be presented. Such information will be useful in planning future decommissioning and designing new plants. (authors)

  12. Human factors in waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moray, N.

    1994-10-01

    This article examines the role of human factors in radioactive waste management. Although few problems and ergonomics are special to radioactive waste management, some problems are unique especially with long term storage. The entire sociotechnical system must be looked at in order to see where improvement can take place because operator errors, as seen in Chernobyl and Bhopal, are ultimately the result of management errors.

  13. Hausdorff dimension and filling factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellington Cruz

    1998-02-25

    We propose a new hierarchy scheme for the filling factor, a parameter which characterizes the occurrence of the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect (FQHE). We consider the Hausdorff dimension, $h$, as a parameter for classifying fractional spin particles, such that, it is written in terms of the statistics of the collective excitations. The number $h$ classifies these excitations with different statistics in terms of its homotopy class.

  14. Investigation of electromagnetic welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pressl, Daniel G. (Daniel Gerd)

    2009-01-01

    We propose several methodologies to study and optimize the electromagnetic process for Electromagnetic Forming (EMF) and Welding (EMW), thereby lowering the necessary process energy up to a factor of three and lengthening ...

  15. Frey, H.C., and K. Zhang, "Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Real-World Empirical Fuel Use and Emissions," Paper No. 2007-AWMA-285, Proceedings, 100th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    strategies in order to reduce both local and total trip emissions. Emission factor models (EMFs database. Road grade was estimated using a Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) data-based method.4

  16. Process chemistry monitoring at the HGP-A power plant: analytical results, process problems and modifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D.M.

    1982-10-01

    The HGP-A generator plant began operations on June 12, 1981 and came on-line on a continuous basis on March 1, 1982. During this period process problems were identified and, in most cases, plant modifications have eliminated the difficulties. Silica in the brine was stable at a pH 7.5, however, at a pH above 9.5 deposition of silica was triggered in a brine disposal system and required abandonment of the hydrogen sulfide abatement process originally proposed for the brine system. The steam phase sulfide abatement system for standby conditions was 90% effective, although superheat in the treatment system reduced abatement efficiency. Brine carryover through the separator was very low; however, scale deposition on the turbine blades resulted in substantial damage to the turbine. Non-condensable gases in the condenser were weakly partitioned into the liquid phase, and about 99% were carried into the off-gas treatment system which was found to be approximately 99% effective.

  17. Plasma processing of large curved surfaces for superconducting rf cavity modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upadhyay, J; Im, Do; Popovi??, S; Valente-Feliciano, A -M; Phillips, L; Vuskovic, L

    2014-12-01

    Plasma based surface modification of niobium is a promising alternative to wet etching of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The development of the technology based on Cl2/Ar plasma etching has to address several crucial parameters which influence the etching rate and surface roughness, and eventually, determine cavity performance. This includes dependence of the process on the frequency of the RF generator, gas pressure, power level, the driven (inner) electrode configuration, and the chlorine concentration in the gas mixture during plasma processing. To demonstrate surface layer removal in the asymmetric non-planar geometry, we are using a simple cylindrical cavity with 8 ports symmetrically distributed over the cylinder. The ports are used for diagnosing the plasma parameters and as holders for the samples to be etched. The etching rate is highly correlated with the shape of the inner electrode, radio-frequency (RF) circuit elements, chlorine concentration in the Cl2/Ar gas mixtures, residence time of reactive species and temperature of the cavity. Using cylindrical electrodes with variable radius, large-surface ring-shaped samples and d.c. bias implementation in the external circuit we have demonstrated substantial average etching rates and outlined the possibility to optimize plasma properties with respect to maximum surface processing effect.

  18. Modification of Coulomb law and energy levels of the hydrogen atom in a superstrong magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno Machet; M. I. Vysotsky

    2011-01-06

    We obtain the following analytical formula which describes the dependence of the electric potential of a point-like charge on the distance away from it in the direction of an external magnetic field B: \\Phi(z) = e/|z| [ 1- exp(-\\sqrt{6m_e^2}|z|) + exp(-\\sqrt{(2/\\pi) e^3 B + 6m_e^2} |z|) ]. The deviation from Coulomb's law becomes essential for B > 3\\pi B_{cr}/\\alpha = 3 \\pi m_e^2/e^3 \\approx 6 10^{16} G. In such superstrong fields, electrons are ultra-relativistic except those which occupy the lowest Landau level (LLL) and which have the energy epsilon_0^2 = m_e^2 + p_z^2. The energy spectrum on which LLL splits in the presence of the atomic nucleus is found analytically. For B > 3 \\pi B_{cr}/\\alpha, it substantially differs from the one obtained without accounting for the modification of the atomic potential.

  19. Modification of Coulomb law and energy levels of the hydrogen atom in superstrong magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machet, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    We obtain the following analytical formula which describes the dependence of the electric potential of a point-like charge on the distance away from it in the direction of an external magnetic field B: \\Phi(z) = e/|z| [ 1- exp(-\\sqrt{6m_e^2}|z|) + exp(-\\sqrt{(2/\\pi) e^3 B + 6m_e^2} |z|) ]. The deviation from Coulomb's law becomes essential for B > 3 \\pi m_e^2/e^3 = 6 10^{16} G. In such superstrong fields, electrons are ultra-relativistic except those which occupy the lowest Landau level (LLL) and which have the energy epsilon_0^2 = m_e^2 + p_z^2. The energy spectrum on which LLL splits in the presence of the atomic nucleus is found analytically. For B > 3 \\pi m_e^2/e^3, it substantially differs from the one obtained without accounting for the modification of the atomic potential.

  20. Plasma Processing of Large Surfaces with Application to SRF Cavity Modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upadhyay, Janardan; Popovic, Svetozar; Vuskovic, Leposova; Im, Do; Valente, Anne-Marie; Phillips, H.

    2013-09-01

    Plasma based surface modifications of SRF cavities present promising alternatives to the wet etching technology currently applied. To understand and characterize the plasma properties and chemical kinetics of plasma etching processes inside a single cell cavity, we have built a specially-designed cylindrical cavity with 8 observation ports. These ports can be used for holding niobium samples and diagnostic purposes simultaneously. Two frequencies (13.56 MHz and 2.45 GHz) of power source are used for different pressure, power and gas compositions. The plasma parameters were evaluated by a Langmuir probe and by an optical emission spectroscopy technique based on the relative intensity of two Ar 5p-4s lines at 419.8 and 420.07 nm. Argon 5p-4s transition is chosen to determine electron temperature in order to optimize parameters for plasma processing. Chemical kinetics of the process was observed using real-time mass spectroscopy. The effect of these parameters on niobium surface would be measured, presented at this conference, and used as guidelines for optimal design of SRF etching process.

  1. Original Contribution Effect Modification by Community Characteristics on the Short-term Effects of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominici, Francesca

    , number of ozone monitors, weather, and use of air conditioning. Their study included data on 98 US urban pollution. air conditioning; air pollution; continental population groups; income; mortality; ozone, use of air conditioning, population characteristics, or other factors. Given the highly reactive

  2. Dissecting Soft Radiation with Factorization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iain W. Stewart; Frank J. Tackmann; Wouter J. Waalewijn

    2015-02-10

    An essential part of high-energy hadronic collisions is the soft hadronic activity that underlies the primary hard interaction. It includes soft radiation from the primary hard partons, secondary multiple parton interactions (MPI), and factorization-violating effects. The invariant mass spectrum of the leading jet in $Z$+jet and $H$+jet events is directly sensitive to these effects, and we use a QCD factorization theorem to predict its dependence on the jet radius $R$, jet $p_T$, jet rapidity, and partonic process for both the perturbative and nonperturbative components of primary soft radiation. We prove that the nonperturbative contributions involve only odd powers of $R$, and the linear $R$ term is universal for quark and gluon jets. The hadronization model in PYTHIA8 agrees well with these properties. The perturbative soft initial state radiation (ISR) has a contribution that depends on the jet area in the same way as the underlying event, but this degeneracy is broken by dependence on the jet $p_T$. The size of this soft ISR contribution is proportional to the color state of the initial partons, yielding the same positive contribution for $gg\\to Hg$ and $gq\\to Zq$, but a negative interference contribution for $q\\bar q\\to Z g$. Hence, measuring these dependencies allows one to separate hadronization, soft ISR, and MPI contributions in the data.

  3. Review results of a BWR standard plant PRA and an assessment of potential benefits from design modifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiu, K.; Hanan, N.; Rubin, M.

    1985-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has participated in the review of the GESSAR II Standard Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Plant probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). One major objective of this review was to utilize the PRA as a tool for investigation of the relative benefits available for incorporation of various proposed modifications to the baseline design. This paper presents the findings of the BNL review and assessment of the impact upon core damage frequency from two suggested design modifications. This work was restricted to consideration of interal events only. Review results indicated that the point estimate core damage frequency of the GESSAR II plant is equal to 2.2 x 10/sup -5//reactor-year for a plant site located within the Mid-Atlantic Area Council Grid (MAAC) and 3.8 x 10/sup -5//reactor-year if the national average loss of offsite power initiator frequency is used.

  4. LENS repair and modification of metal NW components:materials and applications guide.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smugeresky, John E. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Gill, David Dennis; Oberhaus, Jason (BWXT Y-12); Adams, Thad (Savannah River National Laboratory); VanCamp, Chad (Kansas City Plant)

    2006-11-01

    Laser Engineered Net Shaping{trademark} (LENS{reg_sign}) is a unique, layer additive, metal manufacturing technique that offers the ability to create fully dense metal features and components directly from a computer solid model. LENS offers opportunities to repair and modify components by adding features to existing geometry, refilling holes, repairing weld lips, and many other potential applications. The material deposited has good mechanical properties with strengths typically slightly higher that wrought material due to grain refinement from a quickly cooling weld pool. The result is a material with properties similar to cold worked material, but without the loss in ductility traditionally seen with such treatments. Furthermore, 304L LENS material exhibits good corrosion resistance and hydrogen compatibility. This report gives a background of the LENS process including materials analysis addressing the requirements of a number of different applications. Suggestions are given to aid both the product engineer and the process engineer in the successful utilization of LENS for their applications. The results of testing on interface strength, machinability, weldability, corrosion resistance, geometric effects, heat treatment, and repair strategy testing are all included. Finally, the qualification of the LENS process is briefly discussed to give the user confidence in selecting LENS as the process of choice for high rigor applications. The testing showed LENS components to have capability in repair/modification applications requiring complex castings (W80-3 D-Bottle bracket), thin wall parts requiring metal to be rebuilt onto the part (W87 Firing Set Housing and Y-12 Test Rings), the filling of counterbores for use in reservoir reclamation welding (SRNL hydrogen compatibility study) and the repair of surface defects on pressure vessels (SRNL gas bottle repair). The material is machinable, as testing has shown that LENS deposited material machines similar to that of welded metal. Tool wear is slightly higher in LENS material than in wrought material, but not so much that one would be concerned with increased tooling cost. The LENS process achieved process qualification for the AY1E0125 D-Bottle Bracket from the W80-3 LEP program, and in the effort, also underwent testing in weapons environments. These tests included structural dynamic response testing and drop testing. The LENS deposited parts were compared in these tests with conventionally machined parts and showed equivalency to such an extent that the parts were accepted for use in parallel path subsystem-level weapon environment testing. The evaluation of LENS has shown that the process can be a viable option when either complete metal parts are needed or existing metal parts require modification or repair. The LENS Qualification Technology Investment team successfully investigated new applications for the LENS process and showed that it has great applicability across the Nuclear Weapons Complex as well as in other high rigor applications.

  5. Self-oscillating AB diblock copolymer developed by post modification strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueki, Takeshi E-mail: ryo@cross.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Onoda, Michika; Tamate, Ryota; Yoshida, Ryo E-mail: ryo@cross.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2015-06-15

    We prepared AB diblock copolymer composed of hydrophilic poly(ethylene oxide) segment and self-oscillating polymer segment. In the latter segment, ruthenium tris(2,2?-bipyridine) (Ru(bpy){sub 3}), a catalyst of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, is introduced into the polymer architecture based on N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm). The Ru(bpy){sub 3} was introduced into the polymer segment by two methods; (i) direct random copolymerization (DP) of NIPAAm and Ru(bpy){sub 3} vinyl monomer and (ii) post modification (PM) of Ru(bpy){sub 3} with random copolymer of NIPAAm and N-3-aminopropylmethacrylamide. For both the diblock copolymers, a bistable temperature region (the temperature range; ?T{sub m}), where the block copolymer self-assembles into micelle at reduced Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} state whereas it breaks-up into individual polymer chain at oxidized Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 3+} state, monotonically extends as the composition of the Ru(bpy){sub 3} increases. The ?T{sub m} of the block copolymer prepared by PM is larger than that by DP. The difference in ?T{sub m} is rationalized from the statistical analysis of the arrangement of the Ru(bpy){sub 3} moiety along the self-oscillating segments. By using the PM method, the well-defined AB diblock copolymer having ?T{sub m} (ca. 25?°C) large enough to cause stable self-oscillation can be prepared. The periodic structural transition of the diblock copolymer in a dilute solution ([Polymer]?=?0.1?wt.?%) is closely investigated in terms of the time-resolved dynamic light scattering technique at constant temperature in the bistable region. A macroscopic viscosity oscillation of a concentrated polymer solution (15?wt.?%) coupled with the periodic microphase separation is also demonstrated.

  6. Liquid phase methanol LaPorte process development unit: Modification, operation, and support studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-02

    Liquid-entrained operations at the LaPorte Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH) Process Development Unit (PDU) continued during June and July 1988 under Tasks 2.1 and 2.2 of Contract No. DE-AC22-87PC90005 for the US Department of Energy. The primary focus of this PDU operating program was to prepare for a confident move to the next scale of operation with an optimized and simplified process. Several new design options had been identified and thoroughly evaluated in a detailed process engineering study completed under the LPMEOH Part-2 contract (DE-AC22-85PC80007), which then became the basis for the current PDU modification/operating program. The focus of the Process Engineering Design was to optimize and simplifications focused on the slurry loop, which consists of the reactor, vapor/liquid separator, slurry heat exchanger, and slurry circulation pump. Two-Phase Gas Holdup tests began at LaPorte in June 1988 with nitrogen/oil and CO- rich gas/oil systems. The purpose of these tests was to study the hydrodynamics of the reactor, detect metal carbonyl catalyst poisons, and train operating personnel. Any effect of the new gas sparger and the internal heat exchanger would be revealed by comparing the hydrodynamic data with previous PDU hydrodynamic data. The Equipment Evaluation'' Run E-5 was conducted at the LaPorte LPMEOH PDU in July 1988. The objective of Run E-5 was to systematically evaluate each new piece of equipment (sparger, internal heat exchanger, V/L disengagement zone, demister, and cyclone) which had been added to the system, and attempt to run the reactor in an internal-only mode. In addition, a successful catalyst activation with a concentrated (45 wt % oxide) slurry was sought. 9 refs., 26 figs., 15 tabs.

  7. Request for modification of 200 Area effluent treatment facility final delisting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOWMAN, R.C.

    1998-11-19

    A Delisting Petition submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in August 1993 addressed effluent to be generated at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility from treating Hanford Facility waste streams. This Delisting Petition requested that 71.9 million liters per year of treated effluent, bearing the designation 'F001' through 'F005', and/or 'F039' that is derived from 'F001' through 'F005' waste, be delisted. On June 13, 1995, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency published the final rule (Final Delisting), which formally excluded 71.9 million liters per year of 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility effluent from ''being listed as hazardous wastes'' (60 FR 31115 now promulgated in 40 CFR 261). Given the limited scope, it is necessary to request a modification of the Final Delisting to address the management of a more diverse multi-source leachate (F039) at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility. From past operations and current cleanup activities on the Hanford Facility, a considerable amount of both liquid and solid Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 regulated mixed waste has been and continues to be generated. Ultimately this waste will be treated as necessary to meet the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Land Disposal Restrictions. The disposal of this waste will be in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act--compliant permitted lined trenches equipped with leachate collection systems. These operations will result in the generation of what is referred to as multi-source leachate. This newly generated waste will receive the listed waste designation of F039. This waste also must be managed in compliance with the provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

  8. Using Pinch Technology to Explore Trade-Offs Between Energy Cost, Capital Cost, Process Modifications, and Utility Selection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMullan, A. S.

    1988-01-01

    TECHNOLOGY TO EXPLORE TRADE-OFFS BETWEEN ENERGY COST, CAPITAL COST, PROCESS MODIFICATIONS, AND UTILITY SELECTION A.S. McMullan, Consultant and H.D. Spriggs, President Linnhoff March, Inc., Leesburg, Virginia ABSTRACT Process design is a complex task... and operatlng a process. Understanding the impact of these decisions in the context of the overall process can lead to significant savings in both capital and operating costs. Full investigation of these interactions through engineering studies is expensive...

  9. Capacity Factor Risk At Nuclear Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Yangbo

    We develop a model of the dynamic structure of capacity factor risk. It incorporates the risk that the capacity factor may vary widely from year-to-year, and also the risk that the reactor may be permanently shutdown prior ...

  10. Cone Penetrometer N Factor Determination Testing Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2014-03-05

    This document contains the results of testing activities to determine the empirical 'N Factor' for the cone penetrometer in kaolin clay simulant. The N Factor is used to releate resistance measurements taken with the cone penetrometer to shear strength.

  11. Common risk factors in bank stocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viale, Ariel Marcelo

    2007-09-17

    This dissertation provides evidence on the risk factors that are priced in bank equities. Alternative empirical models with precedent in the nonfinancial asset pricing literature are tested, including the single-factor Capital Asset Pricing Model...

  12. Industrial Equipment Demand and Duty Factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, E. S.; Heffington, W. M.

    1998-01-01

    Demand and duty factors have been measured for selected equipment (air compressors, electric furnaces, injection molding machines, centrifugal loads, and others) in industrial plants. Demand factors for heavily loaded air ...

  13. Guidelines for Power Factor Improvement Projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, G. W.

    1999-01-01

    Power factor is an indication of electrical system efficiency. Low power factor, or low system efficiency, may be due to one or more causes, including lightly loaded transformers, oversized electric motors, and harmonic-generating non-linear loads...

  14. Identification and modification of dynamical regions in proteins for alteration of enzyme catalytic effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Pratul K.

    2015-11-24

    A method for analysis, control, and manipulation for improvement of the chemical reaction rate of a protein-mediated reaction is provided. Enzymes, which typically comprise protein molecules, are very efficient catalysts that enhance chemical reaction rates by many orders of magnitude. Enzymes are widely used for a number of functions in chemical, biochemical, pharmaceutical, and other purposes. The method identifies key protein vibration modes that control the chemical reaction rate of the protein-mediated reaction, providing identification of the factors that enable the enzymes to achieve the high rate of reaction enhancement. By controlling these factors, the function of enzymes may be modulated, i.e., the activity can either be increased for faster enzyme reaction or it can be decreased when a slower enzyme is desired. This method provides an inexpensive and efficient solution by utilizing computer simulations, in combination with available experimental data, to build suitable models and investigate the enzyme activity.

  15. Identification and modification of dynamical regions in proteins for alteration of enzyme catalytic effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Pratul K.

    2013-04-09

    A method for analysis, control, and manipulation for improvement of the chemical reaction rate of a protein-mediated reaction is provided. Enzymes, which typically comprise protein molecules, are very efficient catalysts that enhance chemical reaction rates by many orders of magnitude. Enzymes are widely used for a number of functions in chemical, biochemical, pharmaceutical, and other purposes. The method identifies key protein vibration modes that control the chemical reaction rate of the protein-mediated reaction, providing identification of the factors that enable the enzymes to achieve the high rate of reaction enhancement. By controlling these factors, the function of enzymes may be modulated, i.e., the activity can either be increased for faster enzyme reaction or it can be decreased when a slower enzyme is desired. This method provides an inexpensive and efficient solution by utilizing computer simulations, in combination with available experimental data, to build suitable models and investigate the enzyme activity.

  16. Closing a Loophole in Factorization Proofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodwin, Geoffrey T. [HEP Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois, 60439 (United States); Garcia i Tormo, Xavier [HEP Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois, 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G7 (Canada); Lee, Jungil [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-23

    We address the possibility in factorization proofs that low-energy collinear gluons can couple to soft gluons.

  17. Design of a Surface Albedo Modification Payload for Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Mitigation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Shen

    2011-10-21

    Atmospheric Oxygen AU Astronomical Unit ETF Effective Thickness Factor FF1 Far-field 1 FPTE First Pass Transfer Efficiency GCR Galactic Cosmic Radiation JPL Jet Propulsion Laboratory KACST King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology LEO Low Earth... ....................................................... 73 4-9 Maximum Normalized Torque vs. Temperature Plot ................................ 73 4-10 Maximum Torque vs. Temperature Plot .................................................... 74 4-11 Maximum Force vs. Tilt Angle...

  18. http://erg.sagepub.com/ Factors Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    http://erg.sagepub.com/ Factors Applications Ergonomics in Design: The Quarterly of Human httpErgonomics in Design: The Quarterly of Human Factors Applications Peter A. Hancock, Richard J. Jagacinski: Human Factors and Ergonomics Society can be found at:Ergonomics in Design: The Quarterly of Human

  19. Human factors: a necessary tool for industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starcher, K.O.

    1984-03-09

    The need for human factors (ergonomics) input in the layout of a ferroelectric ceramics laboratory is presented as an example of the overall need for human factors professionals in industry. However, even in the absence of one trained in human factors, knowledge of a few principles in ergonomics will provide many possibilities for improving performance in the industrial environment.

  20. Note on Integer Factoring Algorithms II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. A. Carella

    2007-02-08

    This note introduces a new class of integer factoring algorithms. Two versions of this method will be described, deterministic and probabilistic. These algorithms are practical, and can factor large classes of balanced integers N = pq, p < q < 2p in superpolynomial time. Further, an extension of the Fermat factoring method is proposed.

  1. Journal influence factors6 Massimo Franceschet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franceschet, Massimo

    Journal influence factors6 Massimo Franceschet Department of Mathematics and Computer Science of journal influence, namely 2- year impact factor, 5-year impact factor, eigenfactor and article influence. These indicators have been recently added by Thomson Reuters to the Journal Citation Reports, in both science

  2. Antenna factorization in strongly ordered limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosower, David A.

    2005-02-15

    When energies or angles of gluons emitted in a gauge-theory process are small and strongly ordered, the emission factorizes in a simple way to all orders in perturbation theory. I show how to unify the various strongly ordered soft, mixed soft-collinear, and collinear limits using antenna factorization amplitudes, which are generalizations of the Catani-Seymour dipole factorization function.

  3. Methodology development for imaging histone modifications and for site-specific protein labeling in vitro and on the surface of living cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Chi-Wang

    2006-01-01

    A new methodology for monitoring post-translational modifications of histone H3 in living cells was developed using genetically encoded fluorescent reporters. These reporters were constructed for sensing histone phosphorylation ...

  4. Applying Human Factors during the SIS Life Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avery, K.

    2010-05-05

    Safety Instrumented Systems (SIS) are widely used in U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) nonreactor nuclear facilities for safety-critical applications. Although use of the SIS technology and computer-based digital controls, can improve performance and safety, it potentially introduces additional complexities, such as failure modes that are not readily detectable. Either automated actions or manual (operator) actions may be required to complete the safety instrumented function to place the process in a safe state or mitigate a hazard in response to an alarm or indication. DOE will issue a new standard, Application of Safety Instrumented Systems Used at DOE Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities, to provide guidance for the design, procurement, installation, testing, maintenance, operation, and quality assurance of SIS used in safety significant functions at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities. The DOE standard focuses on utilizing the process industry consensus standard, American National Standards Institute/ International Society of Automation (ANSI/ISA) 84.00.01, Functional Safety: Safety Instrumented Systems for the Process Industry Sector, to support reliable SIS design throughout the DOE complex. SIS design must take into account human-machine interfaces and their limitations and follow good human factors engineering (HFE) practices. HFE encompasses many diverse areas (e.g., information display, user-system interaction, alarm management, operator response, control room design, and system maintainability), which affect all aspects of system development and modification. This paper presents how the HFE processes and principles apply throughout the SIS life cycle to support the design and use of SIS at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities.

  5. Dissolution-induced surface modifications and permeability changes associated with fluid flow through an abraded saw-cut in single crystal quartz 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowman, James Albert

    1992-01-01

    DISSOLUTION-INDUCED SURFACE MODIFICATIONS AND PERMEABILITY CHANGES ASSOCIATED WITH FLUID FLOW THROUGH AN ABRADED SAW-CUT IN SINGLE CRYSTAL QUARTZ A Thesis by JAlvlES ALBERT BOWMAN, JR, Submined to the Oflice of Graduate Studies of Texas A8r...M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Xiay I992 Major Subject: Geology DISSOLUTION-INDUCED SURFACE MODIFICATIONS AND PERMEABILITY CHANGES ASSOCIATED WITH FLUID FLOW THROUGH AN ABRADED SAW...

  6. Factors fragmenting the Russian Federation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, E.

    1993-10-06

    This paper examines the factors that threaten the future of the Russian Federation (RF). The observations are based on a study that focused on eight republics: Mordova, Udmurtia, Tatarstan, Mari El, Bashkortostan, Kabardino-Balkaria, Buryatia, and Altay Republic. These republics were selected for their geographic and economic significance to the RF. Tatarstan, Bashkortostan, Udmurtia, and Mari El are located on important supply routes, such as the Volga River and the trans-Siberian railroad. Some of these republics are relatively wealthy, with natural resources such as oil (e.g., Tatarstan and Bashkortostan), and all eight republics play significant roles in the military-industrial complex. The importance of these republics to the RF contrasts to the relative insignificance of the independence-minded Northern Caucasus area. The author chose not to examine the Northern Caucasus region (except Kabardino-Balkaria) because these republics may have only a minor impact on the rest of the RF if they secede. Their impact would be minimized because they lie on the frontiers of the RF. Many Russians believe that {open_quotes}it might be best to let such a troublesome area secede.{close_quotes}

  7. Cholix Toxin, a Novel ADP-ribosylating Factor from Vibrio cholerae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, Rene; Purdy, Alexandra E.; Fieldhouse, Robert J.; Kimber, Matthew S.; Bartlett, Douglas H.; Merrill, A. Rod

    2008-07-15

    The ADP-ribosyltransferases are a class of enzymes that display activity in a variety of bacterial pathogens responsible for causing diseases in plants and animals, including those affecting mankind, such as diphtheria, cholera, and whooping cough. We report the characterization of a novel toxin from Vibrio cholerae, which we call cholix toxin. The toxin is active against mammalian cells (IC50 = 4.6 {+-} 0.4 ng/ml) and crustaceans (Artemia nauplii LD50 = 10 {+-} 2 {mu}g/ml). Here we show that this toxin is the third member of the diphthamide-specific class of ADP-ribose transferases and that it possesses specific ADP-ribose transferase activity against ribosomal eukaryotic elongation factor 2. We also describe the high resolution crystal structures of the multidomain toxin and its catalytic domain at 2.1- and 1.25-{angstrom} resolution, respectively. The new structural data show that cholix toxin possesses the necessary molecular features required for infection of eukaryotes by receptor-mediated endocytosis, translocation to the host cytoplasm, and inhibition of protein synthesis by specific modification of elongation factor 2. The crystal structures also provide important insight into the structural basis for activation of toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. These results indicate that cholix toxin may be an important virulence factor of Vibrio cholerae that likely plays a significant role in the survival of the organism in an aquatic environment.

  8. GENETIC MODIFICATION OF GIBBERELLIC ACID SIGNALING TO PROMOTE CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN TREE ROOTS AND STEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busov, Victor

    2013-03-05

    Semidwarfism has been used extensively in row crops and horticulture to promote yield, reduce lodging, and improve harvest index, and it might have similar benefits for trees for short-rotation forestry or energy plantations, reclamation, phytoremediation, or other applications. We studied the effects of the dominant semidwarfism transgenes GA Insensitive (GAI) and Repressor of GAI-Like, which affect gibberellin (GA) action, and the GA catabolic gene, GA 2-oxidase, in nursery beds and in 2-year-old high-density stands of hybrid poplar (Populus tremula ? Populus alba). Twenty-nine traits were analyzed, including measures of growth, morphology, and physiology. Endogenous GA levels were modified in most transgenic events; GA(20) and GA(8), in particular, had strong inverse associations with tree height. Nearly all measured traits varied significantly among genotypes, and several traits interacted with planting density, including aboveground biomass, root-shoot ratio, root fraction, branch angle, and crown depth. Semidwarfism promoted biomass allocation to roots over shoots and substantially increased rooting efficiency with most genes tested. The increased root proportion and increased leaf chlorophyll levels were associated with changes in leaf carbon isotope discrimination, indicating altered water use efficiency. Semidwarf trees had dramatically reduced growth when in direct competition with wild-type trees, supporting the hypothesis that semidwarfism genes could be effective tools to mitigate the spread of exotic, hybrid, and transgenic plants in wild and feral populations. We modified gibberellin (GA) metabolism and signaling in transgenic poplars using dominant transgenes and studied their effects for 3 years under field conditions. The transgenes that we employed either reduced the bioactive GAs, or attenuated their signaling. The majority of transgenic trees had significant and in many cases dramatic changes in height, crown architecture, foliage morphology, flowering onset, floral structure, and vegetative phenology. Most transgenes elicited various levels of height reduction consistent with the roles of GA in elongation growth. Several other growth traits were proportionally reduced, including branch length, internode distance, and leaf length. In contrast to elongation growth, stem diameter growth was much less affected, suggesting that semi-dwarf trees in dense stands might provide high levels of biomass production and carbon sequestration. The severity of phenotypic effects was strongly correlated with transgene expression among independent transgenic events, but often in a non-linear manner, the form of which varied widely among constructs. The majority of semi-dwarfed, transgenic plants showed delayed bud flush and early bud set, and expression of a native GAI transgene accelerated first time flowering in the field. All of the phenotypic changes observed in multiple years were stable over the 3 years of field study. Our results suggest that transgenic modification of GA action may be useful for producing semi-dwarf trees with modified growth and morphology for horticulture and other uses. We studied the poplar C(19) gibberellin 2-oxidase (GA2ox) gene subfamily. We show that a set of paralogous gene pairs differentially regulate shoot and root development. ? PtGA2ox4 and its paralogous gene PtGA2ox5 are primarily expressed in aerial organs, and overexpression of PtGA2ox5 produced a strong dwarfing phenotype characteristic of GA deficiency. Suppression of PtGA2ox4 and PtGA2ox5 led to increased biomass growth, but had no effect on root development. By contrast, the PtGA2ox2 and PtGA2ox7 paralogous pair was predominantly expressed in roots, and when these two genes were RNAi-suppressed it led to a decrease of root biomass. ? The morphological changes in the transgenic plants were underpinned by tissue-specific increases in bioactive GAs that corresponded to the predominant native expression of the targeted paralogous gene pair. Although RNAi suppression of both paralogous pairs led to changes in wood developmen

  9. INJECTION PROFILE MODIFICATION IN A HOT, DEEP MINNELUSA WATER INJECTION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyle A. Johnson Jr.

    2001-09-01

    As oil fields in the United States age, production enhancements and modifications will be needed to increase production from deeper and hotter oil reservoirs. New techniques and products must be tested in these areas before industry will adapt them as common practice. The Minnelusa fields of northeastern Wyoming are relatively small, deep, hot fields that have been developed in the past ten to twenty years. As part of the development, operators have established waterfloods early in the life of the fields to maximize cumulative oil production. However, channeling between injectors and producers does occur and can lead to excessive water production and bypassed oil left in the reservoir. The project evaluated the use of a recently developed, high-temperature polymer to modify the injection profiles in a waterflood project in a high-temperature reservoir. The field is the Hawk Point field in Campbell County, Wyoming. The field was discovered in 1986 and initially consisted of eight producing wells with an average depth of 11,500 feet and a temperature of 260 F (127 C). The polymer system was designed to plug the higher permeable channels and fractures to provide better conformance, i.e. sweep efficiency, for the waterflood. The project used a multi-well system to evaluate the treatment. Injection profile logging was used to evaluate the injection wells both before and after the polymer treatment. The treatment program was conducted in January 2000 with a treatment of the four injection wells. The treatment sizes varied between 500 bbl and 3,918 bbl at a maximum allowable pressure of 1,700 psig. Injection in three of the wells was conducted as planned. However, the injection in the fourth well was limited to 574 bbl instead of the planned 3,750 bbl because of a rapid increase in injection pressure, even at lower than planned injection rates. Following completion of polymer placement, the injection system was not started for approximately one week to permit the gel to set. The system then returned to operation as before the test with no major change in the fieldwide injection. The injection and production rates for the field were monitored for approximately one year to give the production side of the system time to stabilize. The polymer treatment conducted on the injection wells in Hawk Point is believed to be the largest treatment of a hot, deep reservoir to date. These injection well treatments did produce some change in the injection profile of the injection wells. However, it is very disappointing that there was no significant improvement in the performance of the field. There was no noticeable reduction in the water production, the water-oil ratio (WOR), or an increase in oil production. The cosponsor has determined that the field is currently at its economic limit because of the high cost of this deep operation and the continual downhole problems. A restructuring of the injection-production pattern is presently being done to prolong the life of the field.

  10. Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2007-01-23

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  11. Lower bounds for approximate factorizations via semidefinite ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT The problem of approximately factoring a real or complex multivariate polynomial f seeks minimal perturbations ? f to the coefficients of the input ...

  12. Industrial Power Factor Analysis Guidebook. Electrotek Concepts...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    low power factors, increased conductor and transformer losses, and lower voltages. Utilities must supply both active and reactive power and compensate for these losses. Power...

  13. Emerging alternatives to the impact factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banks, Marcus A.; Dellavalle, Robert

    2008-01-01

    abs/0709.0896. 12. Public Library of Science Medicineimpact factor game,” Public Library of Science Medicine Voljournals published by the Public Library of Science, follows

  14. Tetrahydroquinoline Derivatives as Potent and Selective Factor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Derivatives as Potent and Selective Factor XIa Inhibitors Authors: Quan, Mimi L. ; Wong, Pancras C. ; Wang, Cailan ; Woerner, Francis ; Smallheer, Joanne M. ; Barbera, Frank...

  15. CONTROL OF MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED POLYMERSOME FUSION: FACTORS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED POLYMERSOME FUSION: FACTORS AFFECTING FUSION. Henderson, Ian M.; Paxton, Walter F Abstract not provided. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque,...

  16. Factorization for hadronic heavy quarkonium production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Wei Qiu

    2006-10-31

    We briefly review several models of heavy quarkonium production in hadronic collisions, and discuss the status of QCD factorization for these production models.

  17. CONTROL OF MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED POLYMERSOME FUSION: FACTORS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CONTROL OF MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED POLYMERSOME FUSION: FACTORS AFFECTING FUSION. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: CONTROL OF MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED POLYMERSOME FUSION:...

  18. GENOME ENABLED MODIFICATION OF POPLAR ROOT DEVELOPMENT FOR INCREASED CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busov, Victor

    2013-03-05

    DR5 as a reporter system to study auxin response in Populus Plant Cell Reports 32:453-463 Auxin responsive promoter DR5 reporter system is functional in Populus to monitor auxin response in tissues including leaves, roots, and stems. We described the behavior of the DR5::GUS reporter system in stably transformed Populus plants. We found several similarities with Arabidopsis, including sensitivity to native and synthetic auxins, rapid induction after treatment in a variety of tissues, and maximal responses in root tissues. There were also several important differences from Arabidopsis, including slower time to maximum response and lower induction amplitude. Young leaves and stem sections below the apex showed much higher DR5 activity than did older leaves and stems undergoing secondary growth. DR5 activity was highest in cortex, suggesting high levels of auxin concentration and/or sensitivity in this tissue. Our study shows that the DR5 reporter system is a sensitive and facile system for monitoring auxin responses and distribution at cellular resolution in poplar. The Populus AINTEGUMENTA LIKE 1 homeotic transcription factor PtAIL1 controls the formation of adventitious root primordia. Plant Physiol. 160: 1996-2006 Adventitious rooting is an essential but sometimes rate-limiting step in the clonal multiplication of elite tree germplasm, because the ability to form roots declines rapidly with age in mature adult plant tissues. In spite of the importance of adventitious rooting, the mechanism behind this developmental process remains poorly understood. We have described the transcriptional profiles that are associated with the developmental stages of adventitious root formation in the model tree poplar (Populus trichocarpa). Transcriptome analyses indicate a highly specific temporal induction of the AINTEGUMENTA LIKE1 (PtAIL1) transcription factor of the AP2 family during adventitious root formation. Transgenic poplar samples that overexpressed PtAIL1 were able to grow an increased number of adventitious roots, whereas RNA interference mediated the down-expression of PtAIL1 expression, which led to a delay in adventitious root formation. Microarray analysis showed that the expression of 15 genes, including the transcription factors AGAMOUS-Like6 and MYB36, was overexpressed in the stem tissues that generated root primordia in PtAIL1-overexpressing plants, whereas their expression was reduced in the RNA interference lines. These results demonstrate that PtAIL1 is a positive regulator of poplar rooting that acts early in the development of adventitious roots. Genomes. 7: 91-101 Knowledge of the functional relationship between genes and organismal phenotypes in perennial plants is extremely limited. Using a population of 627 independent events, we assessed the feasibility of activation tagging as a forward genetics tool for Populus. Mutant identification after 2 years of field testing was nearly sevenfold (6.5%) higher than in greenhouse studies that employed Arabidopsis and identical transformation vectors. Approximately two thirds of all mutant phenotypes were not seen in vitro and in the greenhouse; they were discovered only after the second year of field assessment. The trees? large size (5-10 m in height), perennial growth, and interactions with the natural environment are factors that are thought to have contributed to the high rate of observable phenotypes in the field. The mutant phenotypes affected a variety of morphological and physiological traits, including leaf size and morphology, crown architecture, stature, vegetative dormancy, and tropic responses. Characterization of the insertion in more than 100 events with and without mutant phenotypes showed that tags predominantly (70%) inserted in a 13-Kbp region up- and downstream of the genes? coding regions with approximately even distribution among the 19 chromosomes. Transcriptional activation was observed in many proximal genes studied. Successful phenotype recapitulation was observed in 10 of 12 retransformed genes tested, indicating true tagging and a functiona

  19. Timed Nuclear Import of a Transcription Factor During Erythropoiesis Erythroid Krppel-like factor (EKLF) is an erythroid transcription factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    Timed Nuclear Import of a Transcription Factor During Erythropoiesis Erythroid Krüppel-like factor. The regulatory mechanisms of the nuclear transport of EKLF during erythroid differentiation have remained unclear provided essential new insights into this process. They show that nuclear import of EKLF in erythroid cells

  20. Factors Affecting PMU Installation Costs (October 2014) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Factors Affecting PMU Installation Costs (October 2014) Factors Affecting PMU Installation Costs (October 2014) The Department of Energy investigated the major cost factors that...

  1. The Conversion of CESR to Operate as the Test Accelerator, CesrTA, Part 2: Vacuum Modifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billing, M G

    2015-01-01

    Cornell's electron/positron storage ring (CESR) was modified over a series of accelerator shutdowns beginning in May 2008, which substantially improves its capability for research and development for particle accelerators. CESR's energy span from 1.8 to 5.6 GeV with both electrons and positrons makes it ideal for the study of a wide spectrum of accelerator physics issues and instrumentation related to present light sources and future lepton damping rings. Additionally a number of these are also relevant for the beam physics of proton accelerators. This paper, the second in a series of four, discusses the modifications of the vacuum system necessary for the conversion of CESR to the test accelerator, CesrTA, enhanced to study such subjects as low emittance tuning methods, electron cloud (EC) effects, intra-beam scattering, fast ion instabilities as well as general improvements to beam instrumentation. A separate paper describes the vacuum system modifications of the superconducting wigglers to accommodate the ...

  2. Dark matter vs. modifications of the gravitational inverse-square law. Results from planetary motion in the solar system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sereno; Ph. Jetzer

    2006-06-08

    Dark matter or modifications of the Newtonian inverse-square law in the solar-system are studied with accurate planetary astrometric data. From extra-perihelion precession and possible changes in the third Kepler's law, we get an upper limit on the local dark matter density, rho_{DM} gravitational acceleration are really small. We examined the MOND interpolating function mu in the regime of strong gravity. Gradually varying mu suggested by fits of rotation curves are excluded, whereas the standard form mu(x)= x/(1+x^2)^{1/2} is still compatible with data. In combination with constraints from galactic rotation curves and theoretical considerations on the external field effect, the absence of any significant deviation from inverse square attraction in the solar system makes the range of acceptable interpolating functions significantly narrow. Future radio ranging observations of outer planets with an accuracy of few tenths of a meter could either give positive evidence of dark matter or disprove modifications of gravity.

  3. Psychology 4330, Spring 2011. Human Factors Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Matthew

    with an interest in design should remember that it is not really possible to teach ergonomic design per se without: Guastello, S. J. (2006). Human factors engineering and ergonomics: A systems approach. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence/19 Introduction to human factors (T1) 1/24 Usability evaluation methods (T2) 1/31 Systems that change over time (T

  4. Photon impact factor in the NLO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balitsky, Ian [JLAB

    2013-04-01

    The photon impact factor for the BFKL pomeron is calculated in the next-to-leading order (NLO) approximation using the operator expansion in Wilson lines. The result is represented as a NLO k{sub T}-factorization formula for the structure functions of small-x deep inelastic scattering.

  5. Gauss Sum Factorization with Cold Atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilowski, M.; Wendrich, T.; Mueller, T.; Ertmer, W.; Rasel, E. M. [Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Welfengarten 1, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Jentsch, Ch. [Astrium GmbH-Satellites, 88039 Friedrichshafen (Germany); Schleich, W. P. [Institut fuer Quantenphysik, Universitaet Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2008-01-25

    We report the first implementation of a Gauss sum factorization algorithm by an internal state Ramsey interferometer using cold atoms. A sequence of appropriately designed light pulses interacts with an ensemble of cold rubidium atoms. The final population in the involved atomic levels determines a Gauss sum. With this technique we factor the number N=263193.

  6. Platelet-derived growth factor and transforming growth factor beta synergistically potentiate inflammatory mediator synthesis by fibroblast-like synoviocytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosengren, Sanna; Corr, Maripat; Boyle, David L

    2010-01-01

    et al. , Platelet-derived growth factor and transformingactivated by platelet-derived growth factor. Clin Expmesylate inhibits platelet derived growth factor stimulated

  7. Characterization of Interlayer Cs+ in Clay Samples Using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry with Laser Sample Modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. S. Groenewold; R. Avci; C. Karahan; K. Lefebre; R. V. Fox; M. M. Cortez; A. K. Gianotto; J. Sunner; W. L. Manner

    2004-04-01

    Ultraviolet laser irradiation was used to greatly enhance the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) detection of Cs+ adsorbed to soil consisting of clay and quartz. Imaging SIMS showed that the enhancement of the Cs+ signal was spatially heterogeneous: the intensity of the Cs+ peak was increased by factors up to 100 for some particles but not at all for others. Analysis of standard clay samples exposed to Cs+ showed a variable response to laser irradiation depending on the type of clay analyzed. The Cs+ abundance was significantly enhanced when Cs+-exposed montmorillonite was irradiated and then analyzed using SIMS, which contrasted with the behavior of Cs+-exposed kaolinite, which displayed no Cs+ enhancement. Exposed illitic clays displayed modest enhancement of Cs+ upon laser irradiation, intermediate between that of kaolinite and montmorillonite. The results for Cs+ were rationalized in terms of adsorption to interlayer sites within the montmorillonite, which is an expandable phyllosilicate. In these locations, Cs+ was not initially detectable using SIMS. Upon irradiation, Cs+ was thermally redistributed, which enabled detection using SIMS. Since neither the illite nor the kaolinite is an expandable clay, adsorption to inner-layer sites does not occur, and either modest or no laser enhancement of the Cs+ signal is observed. Laser irradiation also produced unexpected enhancement of Ti+ from illite and kaolinite clays that contained small quantities of Ti, which indicates the presence of microscopic titanium oxide phases in the clay materials.

  8. Factors controlling reservoir quality in tertiary sandstones and their significance to geopressured geothermal production. Annual report, May 1, 1979-May 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loucks, R.G.; Richmann, D.L.; Milliken, K.L.

    1980-07-01

    Differing extents of diagenetic modification is the factor primarily responsible for contrasting regional reservoir quality of Tertiary sandstones from the Upper and Lower Texas Gulf Coast. Detailed comparison of Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury Dome area, Brazoria County, and Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area, Hidalgo County, reveals that extent of diagenetic modification is most strongly influenced by (1) detrital mineralogy and (2) regional geothermal gradients. Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area are less stable, chemically and mechanically, than Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury dome area. Vicksburg sandstones are mineralogically immature and contain greater proportions of feldspars and rock fragments than do Frio sandstones. Thr reactive detrital assemblage of Vicksubrg sandstones is highly susceptible to diagenetic modification. Susceptibility is enhanced by higher than normal geothermal gradients in the McAllen Ranch Field area. Thus, consolidation of Vicksburg sandstones began at shallower depth of burial and precipitation of authigenic phases (especially calcite) was more pervasive than in Frio sandstones. Moreover, the late-stage episode of ferroan calcite precipitation that occluded most secondary porosity in Vicksburg sandstones did not occur significantly in Frio sandstones. Therefore, regional reservoir quality of Frio sandstones from Brazoria County is far better than that characterizing Vicksburg sandstones from Hidalgo County, especially at depths suitable for geopressured geothermal energy production.

  9. Effects of friction factor and slip factor on the performance of a centrifugal slurry pump 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheth, Ketankumar Kantilal

    1985-01-01

    EFFECTS OF FRICTION FACTOR AND SLIP FACTOR ON THE PERFORMANCE OF A CENTRIFUGAL SLURRY PUMP A Thesis by KETANKUMAR KANTILAL SHETH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Ma]or Sub]ect: Mechanical Engineering EFFECTS OF FRICTION FACTOR AND SLIP FACTOR ON THE PERFORMANCE OF A CENTRIFUGAL SLURRY PUMP A Thesis by KETANKUMAR KANTILAL SHETH Approved as to style and content by...

  10. Electric power high-voltage transmission lines: Design options, cost, and electric and magnetic field levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoffel, J.B.; Pentecost, E.D.; Roman, R.D.; Traczyk, P.A.

    1994-11-01

    This report provides background information about (1) the electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) of high-voltage transmission lines at typical voltages and line configurations and (2) typical transmission line costs to assist on alternatives in environmental documents. EMF strengths at 0 {+-} 200 ft from centerline were calculated for ac overhead lines, and for 345 and 230-kV ac underground line and for a {+-}450-kV dc overhead line. Compacting and height sensitivity factors were computed for the variation in EMFs when line conductors are moved closer or raised. Estimated costs for the lines are presented and discussed so that the impact of using alternative strategies for reducing EMF strengths and the implications of implementing the strategies can be better appreciated.

  11. High-resolution study of photoinduced modification in fused silica produced by a tightly focused femtosecond laser beam in the presence of aberrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hnatovsky, C.; Taylor, R.S.; Simova, E.; Bhardwaj, V.R.; Rayner, D.M.; Corkum, P.B.

    2005-07-01

    An ultrahigh-resolution (20 nm) technique of selective chemical etching and atomic force microscopy has been used to study the photoinduced modification in fused silica produced at various depths by tightly focused femtosecond laser radiation affected by spherical aberration. We demonstrate that shapes of the irradiated zones near the threshold for modification can be predicted by taking proper account of spherical aberration caused by the refractive index mismatched air-silica interface. We establish a depth dependence of the pulse energy required to initiate modification and characterize the relationship between numerical aperture of the writing lens and practically achievable writing depth. We also show that spatial characteristics of the laser-modified zones can be controlled by a specially designed focusing system which allows correction for a variable amount of spherical aberration.

  12. Suberoylanilide Hydroxyamic Acid Modification of Chromatin Architecture Affects DNA Break Formation and Repair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Sheetal; Le Hongan; Shih, S.-J.; Ho, Bay [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California at Davis, 4501 X St., Sacramento, California 95817 (United States); Vaughan, Andrew T., E-mail: andrew.vaughan@ucdmc.ucdavis.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California at Davis, 4501 X St., Sacramento, California 95817 (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs, Mather, California 95655 (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Chromatin-modifying compounds that inhibit the activity of histone deacetylases have shown potency as radiosensitizers, but the action of these drugs at a molecular level is not clear. Here we investigated the effect of suberoylanilide hydroxyamic acid (SAHA) on DNA breaks and their repair and induction of rearrangements. Methods and Materials: The effect of SAHA on both clonogenic survival and repair was assessed using cell lines SCC-25, MCF7, and TK6. In order to study unique DNA double-strand breaks, anti-CD95 antibody was employed to introduce a DNA double-strand break at a known location within the 11q23 region. The effects of SAHA on DNA cleavage and rearrangements were analyzed by ligation-mediated PCR and inverse PCR, respectively. Results: SAHA acts as radiosensitizer at 1 {mu}M, with dose enhancement factors (DEFs) at 10% survival of: SCC-25 - 1.24 +- 0.05; MCF7 - 1.16 +- 0.09 and TK6 - 1.17 +- 0.05, and it reduced the capacity of SCC-25 cells to repair radiation induced lesions. Additionally, SAHA treatment diffused site-specific fragmentation over at least 1 kbp in TK6 cells. Chromosomal rearrangements produced in TK6 cells exposed to SAHA showed a reduction in microhomology at the breakpoint between 11q23 and partner chromosomes. Conclusions: SAHA shows efficacy as a radiosensitizer at clinically obtainable levels. In its presence, targeted DNA strand breaks occur over an expanded region, indicating increased chromatin access. The rejoining of such breaks is degraded by SAHA when measured as rearrangements at the molecular level and rejoining that contributes to cell survival.

  13. Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Glass, John D. (Shoreham, NY)

    2010-04-20

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  14. Modifications of the hydrogen bond network of liquid water in a cylindrical SiO_2 pore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Hartnig; W. Witschel; E. Spohr; P. Gallo; M. A. Ricci; M. Rovere

    2000-02-29

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of water confined in a silica pore. A cylindrical cavity is created inside a vitreous silica cell with geometry and size similar to the pores of real Vycor glass. The simulations are performed at different hydration levels. At all hydration levels water adsorbs strongly on the Vycor surface; a double layer structure is evident at higher hydrations. At almost full hydration the modifications of the confinement-induced site-site pair distribution functions are in qualitative agreement with neutron diffraction experiment. A decrease in the number of hydrogen bonds between water molecules is observed along the pore radius, due to the tendency of the molecules close to the substrate to form hydrogen-bonds with the hydrophilic pore surface. As a consequence we observe a substrate induced distortion of the H-bond tetrahedral network of water molecules in the regions close to the surface.

  15. Structural Modification of Single Wall and Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes under Carbon, Nickel and Gold Ion Beam Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeet, Kiran; Jindal, V. K.; Dharamvir, Keya; Bharadwaj, L. M.

    2011-12-12

    Thin film samples of carbon nanotubes were irradiated with ion beam of carbon, nickel and gold. The irradiation results were characterized using Raman Spectroscopy. Modifications of the disorder mode (D mode) and the tangential mode (G mode) under different irradiation fluences were studied in detail. Raman results of carbon ion beam indicate the interesting phenomenon of ordering of the system under irradiation. Under the effect of nickel and gold ion irradiation, the structural evolution of CNTs occurs in three different stages. At lower fluences the process of healing occurs; at intermediate fluences damages on the surface of CNTs occurs and finally at very high fluences of the order of 1x10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} the system gets amorphised.

  16. Effect of Surface Modification by Chelating Agents on Fischer- Tropsch Performance of Co/SiO{sub 2} Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bambal, Ashish S.; Kugler, Edwin L.; Gardner, Todd H.; Dadyburjor, Dady B.

    2013-11-27

    The silica support of a Co-based catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis was modified by the chelating agents (CAs) nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). After the modification, characterization of the fresh and spent catalysts show reduced crystallite sizes, a better-dispersed Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase on the calcined samples, and increased metal dispersions for the reduced samples. The CA-modified catalysts display higher CO conversions, product yields, reaction rates and rate constants. The improved FT performance of CA-modified catalysts is attributed to the formation of stable complexes with Co. The superior performance of the EDTA-modified catalyst in comparison to the NTA-modified catalyst is due to the higher affinity of the former for complex formation with Co ions.

  17. A mixed formulation for a modification to Darcy equation with applications to enhanced oil recovery and carbon-dioxide sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakshatrala, K B

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider a modification to Darcy equation by taking into account the dependence of viscosity on the pressure. We present a stabilized mixed formulation for the resulting governing equations. Equal-order interpolation for the velocity and pressure is considered, and shown to be stable (which is not the case under the classical mixed formulation). The proposed mixed formulation is tested using a wide variety of numerical examples. The proposed formulation is also implemented in a parallel setting, and the performance of the formulation for large-scale problems is illustrated using a representative problem. Two practical and technologically important problems, one each on enhanced oil recovery and carbon-dioxide sequestration, are solved using the proposed formulation. The numerical results clearly indicate the importance of considering the role of dependence of viscosity on the pressure.

  18. Modification of laminar flow ultrafine condensation particle counters for the enhanced detection of 1 nm condensation nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuang, C.; Chen, M.; McMurry, P. H.; Wang, J.

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes simple modifications to thermally diffusive laminar flow ultrafine condensation particle counters (UCPCs) that allow detection of {approx}1 nm condensation nuclei with much higher efficiencies than have been previously reported. These nondestructive modifications were applied to a commercial butanol based UCPC (TSI 3025A) and to a diethylene glycol-based UCPC (UMN DEG-UCPC). Size and charge dependent detection efficiencies using the modified UCPCs (BNL 3025A and BNL DEGUCPC) were measured with high resolution mobility classified aerosols composed of NaCl, W, molecular ion standards of tetraalkyl ammonium bromide, and neutralizer-generated ions. With negatively charged NaCl aerosol, the BNL 3025A and BNL DEGUCPC achieved detection efficiencies of 37% (90x increase over TSI 3025A) at 1.68 nm mobility diameter (1.39 nm geometric diameter) and 23% (8x increase over UMN DEG-UCPC) at 1.19 nm mobility diameter (0.89 nm geometric diameter), respectively. Operating conditions for both UCPCs were identified that allowed negatively charged NaCl and W particles, but not negative ions of exactly the same mobility size, to be efficiently detected. This serendipitous material dependence, which is not fundamentally understood, suggests that vapor condensation might sometimes allow for the discrimination between air 'ions' and charged 'particles.' As a detector in a scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS), a UCPC with this strong material dependence would allow for more accurate measurements of sub-2 nm aerosol size distributions due to the reduced interference from neutralizer-generated ions and atmospheric ions, and provide increased sensitivity for the determination of nucleation rates and initial particle growth rates.

  19. Factors and Feeds for Supplementing Beef Cows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Stephen P.; Gill, Ronald J.

    2000-05-03

    A beef cow requires energy, protein, minerals and vitamins in its diet. Many factors, including forage quantity and quality and animal body condition, affect the amounts of required nutrients....

  20. Parametrizing Compton form factors with neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kresimir Kumericki; Dieter Mueller; Andreas Schafer

    2011-12-08

    We describe a method, based on neural networks, of revealing Compton form factors in the deeply virtual region. We compare this approach to standard least-squares model fitting both for a simplified toy case and for HERMES data.

  1. Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Coal

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1994-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has developed factors for estimating the amount of carbon dioxide emitted, accounting for differences among coals, to reflect the changing "mix" of coal in U.S. coal consumption.

  2. Factors favorable to public participation success

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peelle, E.; Schweitzer, M.; Munro, J.; Carnes, S.; Wolfe, A.

    1996-05-01

    Categories of factors linked to successful public participation (PP) program outcomes include PP process, organizational context, sociopolitical context, strategic considerations and unique (special circumstances) factors. We re-order the long list factors according to how essential, important, and unique they are and discuss their significance and interrelationships. It is argued that bureacratic structure and operational modes are basically in conflict with features of successful PP programs (openness, two-way education, communication with nonexpert outsiders). If this is so, then it is not surprising that the factors essential for PP success in bureacracies involve extraordinary management efforts by agencies to bypass, compensate for, or overcome structural constraints. We conclude by speculating about the long-term viability of PP practices in the agency setting as well as the consequences for agencies that attempt the problematic task of introducing PP into their complex, mission-oriented organizations.

  3. Factors Involved in Search Dog Training 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Michael B.

    2010-07-14

    Events of significant impact as recent as hurricane Ike yielded a consistent disturbing truth: we lack sufficient numbers of competent search dog [Canis familiaris] teams. This study was conceived to provide information in identifying factors...

  4. Distributed naming in a factored operating system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckmann, Nathan (Nathan Zachary)

    2010-01-01

    A factored operating system (fos) is a new operating system design for manycore and cloud computers. In fos, OS services are separated from application code and run on distinct cores. Furthermore, each service is split ...

  5. Enabling Factors in Successful Product Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Victor

    2005-08-15

    The research literature and industry best-practices report a vast number of enabling factors that contribute to successful product development (PD). Collectively this body of work also establishes the causal linkages between ...

  6. Human Factors of Healthcare Reporting Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, C.W.

    Johnson,C.W. P. Carayon (ed), A Handbook of Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare and Patient Safety, Lawrence Erlbaum, London, UK pp 525-560 Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

  7. Modifications of Carbonate Fracture Hydrodynamic Properties by CO{sub 2}-Acidified Brine Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Hang; Ellis, Brian R.; Peters, Catherine A.; Fitts, Jeffrey P.; Crandall, Dustin; Bromhal, Grant S.

    2013-08-01

    Acidic reactive flow in fractures is relevant in subsurface activities such as CO{sub 2} geological storage and hydraulic fracturing. Understanding reaction-induced changes in fracture hydrodynamic properties is essential for predicting subsurface flows such as leakage, injectability, and fluid production. In this study, x-ray computed tomography scans of a fractured carbonate caprock were used to create three dimensional reconstructions of the fracture before and after reaction with CO{sub 2}-acidified brine (Ellis et al., 2011, Greenhouse Gases: Sci. Technol., 1:248-260). As expected, mechanical apertures were found to increase substantially, doubling and even tripling in some places. However, the surface geometry evolved in complex ways including ‘comb-tooth’ structures created from preferential dissolution of calcite in transverse sedimentary bands, and the creation of degraded zones, i.e. porous calcite-depleted areas on reacted fracture surfaces. These geometric alterations resulted in increased fracture roughness, as measured by surface Z{sub 2} parameters and fractal dimensions D{sub f}. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted to quantify the changes in hydraulic aperture, fracture transmissivity and permeability. The results show that the effective hydraulic apertures are smaller than the mechanical apertures, and the changes in hydraulic apertures are nonlinear. Overestimation of flow rate by a factor of two or more would be introduced if fracture hydrodynamic properties were based on mechanical apertures, or if hydraulic aperture is assumed to change proportionally with mechanical aperture. The differences can be attributed, in part, to the increase in roughness after reaction, and is likely affected by contiguous transverse sedimentary features. Hydraulic apertures estimated by the 1D statistical model and 2D local cubic law (LCL) model are consistently larger than those calculated from the CFD simulations. In addition, a novel ternary segmentation method was devised to handle the degraded zones, allowing for a bounding analysis of the effects on hydraulic properties. We found that the degraded zones account for less than 15% of the fracture volume, but cover 70% to 80% of the fracture surface. When the degraded zones are treated as part of the fracture, the fracture transmissivities are two to four times larger because the fracture surfaces after reaction are not as rough as they would be if one considers the degraded zone as part of the rock. Therefore, while degraded zones created during geochemical reactions may not significantly increase mechanical aperture, this type of feature cannot be ignored and should be treated with prudence when predicting fracture hydrodynamic properties.

  8. Proton form factor effects in hydrogenic atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daza, F. Garcia; Kelkar, N. G.; Nowakowski, M.

    2011-10-21

    The proton structure corrections to the hyperfine splittings in electronic and muonic hydrogen are evaluated using the Breit potential with electromagnetic form factors. In contrast to other methods, the Breit equation with q{sup 2} dependent form factors is just an extension of the standard Breit equation which gives the hyperfine splitting Hamiltonian. Precise QED corrections are comparable to the structure corrections which therefore need to be evaluated ab initio.

  9. Rice Quality Factors: Implications For Management Decisions. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Warren R.; Rister, Edward, M.; Brorsen, B. Wade

    1986-01-01

    . Review comments and suggestions from Bill Black, Bart Drees, Arthur Gerlow, Melvin Parker, James Stansel, Mo Way, Bill Webb, and Michael Wohlgenant are also appreciated. A special thanks to Kim Trant for editorial assistance. ... Rice Quality Factors... that grades are intended to measure are red rice, weed seeds, damaged kernels (including peck), off-color, chalk, and off-types of rice kernels. These factors should be negatively related to price, since they are all undesirable characteristics. 1 Graders...

  10. Factors affecting robust retail energy markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelman, T.S.

    1999-04-01

    This paper briefly defines an active retail market, details the factors that influence market activity and their relative importance, compares activity in various retail energy markets to date, and predicts future retail energy market activity. Three primary factors translate into high market activity: supplier margins, translated into potential savings for actively shopping customers; market size; and market barriers. The author surveys activity nationwide and predicts hot spots for the coming year.

  11. The factor 2 in fundamental physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Rowlands

    2001-10-24

    A brief history is given of the factor 2, starting in the most elementary considerations of geometry and kinematics of uniform acceleration, and moving to relativity, quantum mechanics and particle physics. The basic argument is that in all the significant cases in which the factor 2 or 1/2 occurs in fundamental physics, whether classical, quantum or relativistic, the same physical operation is taking place.

  12. Odd orders in Shor's factoring algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Lawson

    2015-01-13

    Shor's factoring algorithm (SFA) finds the prime factors of a number, $N=p_1 p_2$, exponentially faster than the best known classical algorithm. Responsible for the speed-up is a subroutine called the quantum order finding algorithm (QOFA) which calculates the order -- the smallest integer, $r$, satisfying $a^r \\mod N =1$, where $a$ is a randomly chosen integer coprime to $N$ (meaning their greatest common divisor is one, $\\gcd(a, N) =1$). Given $r$, and with probability not less than $1/2$, the factors are given by $p_1 = \\gcd (a^{\\frac{r}{2}} - 1, N)$ and $p_2 = \\gcd (a^{\\frac{r}{2}} + 1, N)$. For odd $r$ it is assumed the factors cannot be found (since $a^{\\frac{r}{2}}$ is not generally integer) and the QOFA is relaunched with a different value of $a$. But a recent paper [E. Martin-Lopez: Nat Photon {\\bf 6}, 773 (2012)] noted that the factors can sometimes be found from odd orders if the coprime is square. This raises the question of improving SFA's success probability by considering odd orders. We show that an improvement is possible, though it is small. We present two techniques for retrieving the order from apparently useless runs of the QOFA: not discarding odd orders; and looking out for new order finding relations in the case of failure. In terms of efficiency, using our techniques is equivalent to avoiding square coprimes and disregarding odd orders, which is simpler in practice. Even still, our techniques may be useful in the near future, while demonstrations are restricted to factoring small numbers. The most convincing demonstrations of the QOFA are those that return a non-power-of-two order, making odd orders that lead to the factors attractive to experimentalists.

  13. Characterization of electron beam induced modification of thermally J. R. Barnes, A. C. F. Hoole, M. P. Murrell, M. E. Welland, and A. N. Broers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Matthew

    Characterization of electron beam induced modification of thermally grown SiO2 J. R. Barnes, A. C to characterize electron beam e-beam induced changes in thin oxides on silicon. Primary effects of the 1 nm wide accumulation in an insulating SiO2 layer using high-energy electron beams poses several scientific

  14. Procdure de configuration d'Outlook 2010 pour Exchange 2010 Procdure de modification d'un compte d'Outlook 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charette, André

    Procédure de configuration d'Outlook 2010 pour Exchange 2010 1 Procédure de modification d'un compte d'Outlook 2010 pour Exchange 2010 1. Cliquez sur l'onglet « Fichier » et sur le bouton compte », cliquez sur le bouton « Nouveau... ». #12;Procédure de configuration d'Outlook 2010 pour

  15. Effects of urban land cover modifications in a mesoscale meteorological model on surface temperature and heat fluxes in the Phoenix metropolitan area.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Effects of urban land cover modifications in a mesoscale meteorological model on surface between the two simulations. Mesoscale atmospheric models such as the Pennsylvania State University for the Phoenix metropolitan area was implemented in the fifth- generation PSU/NCAR mesoscale meteorological model

  16. Modification of Low Quality Dairy Manure Compost with Organic Amendments Cecilia Gerngross, Randy Bow, Ron Alexander, Mark McFarland and James Supak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Modification of Low Quality Dairy Manure Compost with Organic Amendments Cecilia Gerngross, Randy Bow, Ron Alexander, Mark McFarland and James Supak Summary Marketing compost to governmental entities an option for exporting dairy manure out of the impaired North Bosque River watershed. Composts produced

  17. Achievement of Low Emissions by Engine Modification to Utilize Gas-to-Liquid Fuel and Advanced Emission Controls on a Class 8 Truck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alleman, T. L.; Tennant, C. J.; Hayes, R. R.; Miyasato, M.; Oshinuga, A.; Barton, G.; Rumminger, M.; Duggal, V.; Nelson, C.; Ray, M.; Cherrillo, R. A.

    2005-11-01

    A 2002 Cummins ISM engine was modified to be optimized for operation on gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuel and advanced emission control devices. The engine modifications included increased exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), decreased compression ratio, and reshaped piston and bowl configuration.

  18. Risk evaluation of the alternate-3A modification to the ATWS prevention/mitigation system in a BWR-4, Mark-II power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papazoglou, I.A.; Karol, R.; Shiu, K.; Bari, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose of this paper is to present a risk evaluation of the ATWS Alternate 3A modification (ATWS-3A) proposed by NRC staff in NUREG-0460 to the ATWS prevention/mitigation system in a BWR nuclear power plant. The evaluation is done relative to three risk indices: the frequency of core damage, the expected early fatalities, and the expected latent fatalities.

  19. [CANCER RESEARCH 61, 54205424, July 15, 2001] Modification of BRCA1-and BRCA2-associated Breast Cancer Risk by AIB1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Myles

    [CANCER RESEARCH 61, 5420­5424, July 15, 2001] Modification of BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated Breast/2) genes have a greatly increased risk of developing breast cancer compared with the general population. However, there is also substantial interindividual variability in the occurrence of breast cancer among

  20. Impact of the In-medium Nucleon-nucleon Cross Section Modification on Early-reaction-phase Dynamics Below 100 A MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basrak, Z.; Zoric, M.; Eudes, P.; Sebille, F.

    2009-08-26

    With a semi-classical transport model studied is the impact of the in-medium NN cross section modifications on the early energy transformation, dynamical emission and quasiprojectile properties of the Ar+Ni and Ni+Ni reactions at 52, 74 and 95(90) A MeV.

  1. Simulating Factorization with a Quantum Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose Luis Rosales

    2015-05-12

    Modern cryptography is largely based on complexity assumptions, for example, the ubiquitous RSA is based on the supposed complexity of the prime factorization problem. Thus, it is of fundamental importance to understand how a quantum computer would eventually weaken these algorithms. In this paper, one follows Feynman's prescription for a computer to simulate the physics corresponding to the algorithm of factoring a large number $N$ into primes. Using Dirac-Jordan transformation theory one translates factorization into the language of quantum hermitical operators, acting on the vectors of the Hilbert space. This leads to obtaining the ensemble of factorization of $N$ in terms of the Euler function $\\varphi(N)$, that is quantized. On the other hand, considering $N$ as a parameter of the computer, a Quantum Mechanical Prime Counting Function $\\pi_{QM}(x)$, where $x$ factorizes $N$, is derived. This function converges to $\\pi(x)$ when $N\\gg x$. It has no counterpart in analytic number theory and its derivation relies on semiclassical quantization alone.

  2. AFS-2 FLOWSHEET MODIFICATIONS TO ADDRESS THE INGROWTH OF PU(VI) DURING METAL DISSOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crapse, K.; Rudisill, T.; O'Rourke, P.; Kyser, E.

    2014-07-02

    In support of the Alternate Feed Stock Two (AFS-2) PuO{sub 2} production campaign, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted a series of experiments concluding that dissolving Pu metal at 95°C using a 6–10 M HNO{sub 3} solution containing 0.05–0.2 M KF and 0–2 g/L B could reduce the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to dissolving Pu metal under the same conditions but at or near the boiling temperature. This flowsheet was demonstrated by conducting Pu metal dissolutions at 95°C to ensure that PuO{sub 2} solids were not formed during the dissolution. These dissolution parameters can be used for dissolving both Aqueous Polishing (AP) and MOX Process (MP) specification materials. Preceding the studies reported herein, two batches of Pu metal were dissolved in the H-Canyon 6.1D dissolver to prepare feed solution for the AFS-2 PuO{sub 2} production campaign. While in storage, UV-visible spectra obtained from an at-line spectrophotometer indicated the presence of Pu(VI). Analysis of the solutions also showed the presence of Fe, Ni, and Cr. Oxidation of Pu(IV) produced during metal dissolution to Pu(VI) is a concern for anion exchange purification. Anion exchange requires Pu in the +4 oxidation state for formation of the anionic plutonium(IV) hexanitrato complex which absorbs onto the resin. The presence of Pu(VI) in the anion feed solution would require a valence adjustment step to prevent losses. In addition, the presence of Cr(VI) would result in absorption of chromate ion onto the resin and could limit the purification of Pu from Cr which may challenge the purity specification of the final PuO{sub 2} product. Initial experiments were performed to quantify the rate of oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) (presumed to be facilitated by Cr(VI)) as functions of the HNO{sub 3} concentration and temperature in simulated dissolution solutions containing Cr, Fe, and Ni. In these simulated Pu dissolutions studies, lowering the temperature from near boiling to 95 °C reduced the oxidation rate of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI). For 8.1 M HNO{sub 3} simulated dissolution solutions, at near boiling conditions >35% Pu(VI) was present in 50 h while at 95 °C <10% Pu(VI) was present at 50 h. At near boiling temperatures, eliminating the presence of Cr and varying the HNO{sub 3} concentration in the range of 7–8.5 M had little effect on the rate of conversion of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI). HNO{sub 3} oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) in a pure solution has been reported previously. Based on simulated dissolution experiments, this study concluded that dissolving Pu metal at 95°C using a 6 to 10 M HNO{sub 3} solution 0.05–0.2 M KF and 0–2 g/L B could reduce the rate of oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to near boiling conditions. To demonstrate this flowsheet, two small-scale experiments were performed dissolving Pu metal up to 6.75 g/L. No Pu-containing residues were observed in the solutions after cooling. Using Pu metal dissolution rates measured during the experiments and a correlation developed by Holcomb, the time required to completely dissolve a batch of Pu metal in an H-Canyon dissolver using this flowsheet was estimated to require nearly 5 days (120 h). This value is reasonably consistent with an estimate based on the Batch 2 and 3 dissolution times in the 6.1D dissolver and Pu metal dissolution rates measured in this study and by Rudisill et al. Data from the present and previous studies show that the Pu metal dissolution rate decreases by a factor of approximately two when the temperature decreased from boiling (112 to 116°C) to 95°C. Therefore, the time required to dissolve a batch of Pu metal in an H-Canyon dissolver at 95°C would likely double (from 36 to 54 h) and require 72 to 108 h depending on the surface area of the Pu metal. Based on the experimental studies, a Pu metal dissolution flowsheet utilizing 6–10 M HNO{sub 3} containing 0.05–0.2 M KF (with 0–2 g/L B) at 95°C is recommended to reduce the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to near boiling conditions. The time required to completely di

  3. Class 1 Permit Modification Notification Addition of Structures within Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11, Dome 375 Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, July 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R.; Lechel, Robert A.

    2012-08-31

    The purpose of this letter is to notify the New Mexico Environment Department-Hazardous Waste Bureau (NMED-HWB) of a Class 1 Permit Modification to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit issued to the Department of Energy (DOE) and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) in November 2010. The modification adds structures to the container storage unit at Technical Area (TA) 54 Area G, Pad 11. Permit Section 3.1(3) requires that changes to the location of a structure that does not manage hazardous waste shall be changed within the Permit as a Class 1 modification without prior approval in accordance with Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 (40 CFR), {section}270.42(a)(1). Structures have been added within Dome 375 located at TA-54, Area G, Pad 11 that will be used in support of waste management operations within Dome 375 and the modular panel containment structure located within Dome 375, but will not be used as waste management structures. The Class 1 Permit Modification revises Figure 36 in Attachment N, Figures; and Figure G.12-1 in Attachment G.12, Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11 Outdoor Container Storage Unit Closure Plan. Descriptions of the structures have also been added to Section A.4.2.9 in Attachment A, TA - Unit Descriptions; and Section 2.0 in Attachment G.12, Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11 Outdoor Container Storage Unit Closure Plan. Full description of the permit modification and the necessary changes are included in Enclosure 1. The modification has been prepared in accordance with 40 CFR {section}270.42(a)(l). This package includes this letter and an enclosure containing a description of the permit modification, text edits of the Permit sections, and the revised figures (collectively LA-UR-12-22808). Accordingly, a signed certification page is also enclosed. Three hard copies and one electronic copy of this submittal will be delivered to the NMED-HWB.

  4. A Comparison of Modifications to MELCOR versions 1.8.2 and 1.8.6 for ITER Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. J. Merrill; P. W. Humrickhouse

    2010-06-01

    During the Engineering Design Activity of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), the MELCOR 1.8.2 code was selected as one of several codes to be used to perform ITER safety analyses [1]. MELCOR was chosen because it has the capability of predicting coolant pressure, temperature, mass flow rate, and radionuclide and aerosol transport in nuclear facilities and reactor cooling systems. MELCOR can also predict structural temperatures (e.g. first wall, blanket, divertor, and vacuum vessel) resulting from energy produced by radioactive decay heat and/or chemical reactions (oxidation). The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Fusion Safety Program (FSP) made fusion specific modifications to the MELCOR 1.8.2 code [2-6], including models for water freezing, air condensation, beryllium, carbon, and tungsten oxidation in steam and air environments, flow boiling in coolant loops, and radiation in enclosures, that allowed MELCOR to assess the thermal hydraulic response of ITER cooling systems and the transport of radionuclides as aerosols during accident conditions. Recently, the ITER International Organization (IO) used a “pedigreed” version of MELCOR 1.8.2 [7] to perform accident analyses for ITER’s “Rapport Préliminaire de Sûreté” (Report Preliminary on Safety - RPrS). The MELCOR thermal-hydraulics code [8] is currently under development at the Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). MELCOR is used to model the progression of severe accidents in light water fission reactors. Because MELCOR has undergone many improvements between version 1.8.2 and 1.8.6, the INL FSP decided to introduce fusion modifications into MELCOR 1.8.6, and thereby produce a version of MELCOR 1.8.6 with similar capabilities to the pedigreed version of MELCOR 1.8.2 used for the ITER RPrS. We have applied this version of MELCOR 1.8.6 to the same set of problems used in the MELCOR 1.8.2 pedigree analysis [7]. Section 2 describes a non-regression analysis that involves comparing the results from the modified version of MELCOR 1.8.6 against those predicted by the original, unmodified version of MELCOR 1.8.6. The purpose of this non-regression analysis is to demonstrate that the modifications made to the MELCOR 1.8.6 code do not drastically alter the intended functions of the MELCOR base code, and if they do to explain why the departure occurs and if the change is needed. The analysis was performed using the demonstration problem that came with the MELCOR 1.8.6 source distribution. Section 3 makes a comparison between the pedigreed version of MELCOR 1.8.2 and the new modified version of MELCOR 1.8.6 on a set of accident problems used by the ITER Joint Central Team (JCT) in the Generic Site Safety Report (GSSR) [9]. Finally, in section 4, the two versions of the code are compared on a series of developmental test problems described in the change documents [2-4, 6].

  5. Chiral extrapolation of nucleon magnetic form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Wang; D. Leinweber; A. W. Thomas; R.Young

    2007-04-01

    The extrapolation of nucleon magnetic form factors calculated within lattice QCD is investigated within a framework based upon heavy baryon chiral effective-field theory. All one-loop graphs are considered at arbitrary momentum transfer and all octet and decuplet baryons are included in the intermediate states. Finite range regularization is applied to improve the convergence in the quark-mass expansion. At each value of the momentum transfer (Q{sup 2}), a separate extrapolation to the physical pion mass is carried out as a function of m{sub {pi}} alone. Because of the large values of Q{sup 2} involved, the role of the pion form factor in the standard pion-loop integrals is also investigated. The resulting values of the form factors at the physical pion mass are compared with experimental data as a function of Q{sup 2} and demonstrate the utility and accuracy of the chiral extrapolation methods presented herein.

  6. Human factors in nuclear technology - a history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, D.B. )

    1992-01-01

    Human factors, human factors engineering (HFE), or ergonomics did not receive much formal attention in nuclear technology prior to the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) incident. Three principal reasons exist for this lack of concern. First, emerging technologies show little concern with how people will use a new system. Making the new technology work is considered more important than the people who will use it. Second, the culture of the users of nuclear power did not recognize a need for human factors. Traditional utilities had well established and effective engineering designs for control of electric power generation, while medicine considered the use of nuclear isotopes another useful tool, not requiring special ergonomics. Finally, the nuclear industry owed much to Admiral Rickover. He was definitely opposed.

  7. Hadronic form factors in kaon photoproduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syukurilla, L. Mart, T.

    2014-09-25

    We have revisited the effect of hadronic form factors in kaon photoproduction process by utilizing an isobaric model developed for kaon photoproduction off the proton. The model is able to reproduce the available experimental data nicely as well as to reveal the origin of the second peak in the total cross section, which was the main source of confusion for decades. Different from our previous study, in the present work we explore the possibility of using different hadronic form factors in each of the K?N vertices. The use of different hadronic form factors, e.g. dipole, Gaussian, and generalized dipole, has been found to produce a more flexible isobar model, which can provide a significant improvement in the model.

  8. Modification of vortex dynamics and transport properties of transitional axisymmetric jets using zero-net-mass-flux actuation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Önder, Asim; Meyers, Johan

    2014-07-15

    We study the near field of a zero-net-mass-flux (ZNMF) actuated round jet using direct numerical simulations. The Reynolds number of the jet Re{sub D} = 2000 and three ZNMF actuators are used, evenly distributed over a circle, and directed towards the main jet. The actuators are triggered in phase, and have a relatively low momentum coefficient of C{sub ?} = 0.0049 each. We study four different control frequencies with Strouhal numbers ranging from St{sub D} = 0.165 to St{sub D} = 1.32; next to that, also two uncontrolled baseline cases are included in the study. We find that this type of ZNMF actuation leads to strong deformations of the near-field jet region that are very similar to those observed for non-circular jets. At the end of the jet's potential core (x/D = 5), the jet-column cross section is deformed into a hexagram-like geometry that results from strong modifications of the vortex structures. Two mechanisms lead to these modifications, i.e., (i) self-deformation of the jet's primary vortex rings started by distortions in their azimuthal curvature by the actuation, and (ii) production of side jets by the development and subsequent detachment of secondary streamwise vortex pairs. Further downstream (x/D = 10), the jet transforms into a triangular pattern, as the sharp corner regions of the hexagram entrain fluid and spread. We further investigate the global characteristics of the actuated jets. In particular when using the jet preferred frequency, i.e., St{sub D} = 0.33, parameters such as entrainment, centerline decay rate, and mean turbulent kinetic energy are significantly increased. Furthermore, high frequency actuation, i.e., St{sub D} = 1.32, is found to suppress the mechanisms leading to large scale structure growth and turbulent kinetic energy production. The simulations further include a passive scalar equation, and passive scalar mixing is also quantified and visualized.

  9. Human factors challenges for advanced process control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stubler, W.F.; O`Hara, J..M.

    1996-08-01

    New human-system interface technologies provide opportunities for improving operator and plant performance. However, if these technologies are not properly implemented, they may introduce new challenges to performance and safety. This paper reports the results from a survey of human factors considerations that arise in the implementation of advanced human-system interface technologies in process control and other complex systems. General trends were identified for several areas based on a review of technical literature and a combination of interviews and site visits with process control organizations. Human factors considerations are discussed for two of these areas, automation and controls.

  10. Unidentified factors in the nutrition of chickens 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dieckert, Julius Walter

    1951-01-01

    of the factor were described? The factor was found to be stable to heat and acid, Xn fact? ths activity of liver?L" wac increased several?4'oi14 by autoclaving at pH 1 for thirty xdxxutes? RecentIy? Tovs& Lslor+ and RLvsbgem {'%) reported that mink required...~ The idea was expressed explicitly by Hapson ('3&? '33) and hy ByerIy et aI ('33) ~ Hapson in working with rats found that these animals required something associated with animal protein for normal growthI unfortunate+? he did not con~us the study, ByurIy...

  11. Momentum compaction and phase slip factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Section 2.3.11 of the Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering on Landau damping is updated. The slip factor and its higher orders are given in terms of the various orders of the momentum compaction. With the aid of a simplified FODO lattice, formulas are given for the alteration of the lower orders of the momentum compaction by various higher multipole magnets. The transition to isochronicity is next demonstrated. Formulas are given for the extraction of the first three orders of the slip factor from the measurement of the synchrotron tune while changing the rf frequency. Finally bunch-length compression experiments in semi-isochronous rings are reported.

  12. Annotated bibliography of human factors applications literature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCafferty, D.B.

    1984-09-30

    This bibliography was prepared as part of the Human Factors Technology Project, FY 1984, sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Safety, US Department of Energy. The project was conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, with Essex Corporation as a subcontractor. The material presented here is a revision and expansion of the bibliographic material developed in FY 1982 as part of a previous Human Factors Technology Project. The previous bibliography was published September 30, 1982, as Attachment 1 to the FY 1982 Project Status Report.

  13. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). The modifications are proposed to: (1) revise the current text for two of the Permit Conditions included in Permit Section II - General Facility Conditions, and (2) update the PCP with revised versions of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) technical field procedures included in several of the Permit Attachments. The updated field procedures and editorial revisions are Class 1 permit modifications, as specified in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) {section}270.42; Appendix I - Classification of Permit Modifications. These modifications are summarized below.

  14. Photon impact factor and k{sub T} factorization in the next-to-leading order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Balitsky

    2012-12-01

    The photon impact factor for the BFKL pomeron is calculated in the next-to-leading order (NLO) approximation using the operator expansion in Wilson lines. The result is represented as a NLO k{sub T}-factorization formula for the structure functions of small-x deep inelastic scattering.

  15. Domain Assignment to Transcription FactorsDomain Assignment to Transcription Factors 412 Proteins with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, M. Madan

    Domain Assignment to Transcription FactorsDomain Assignment to Transcription Factors 412 Proteins with at least one SCOP DBD assignment 412 Proteins with at least one SCOP DBD assignment 7 proteins with PFAM DBD assignment 7 proteins with PFAM DBD assignment 419 proteins with DBD assignment419 proteins

  16. Deep Mixtures of Factor Analysers Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Deep Mixtures of Factor Analysers Introduction Experiments - High dimensional data (avg. log An efficient way to learn deep density models is to greedily learn one layer at a time using one layer latent Graphical Model of Deep MFA Illustration with 2D data Each ellipse is a Gaussian Component Aggregated

  17. Integrating Human Factors with Software Engineering Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the 38th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, Nashville, TN, October, 1994. Also to the design, development, and evaluation of usable and useful interactive systems, and presents a rationale Ergonomics and Safety Technology, Inc. Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA jtr001@delphi.com 1. Introduction The design

  18. Unit Conversion Factors Quantity Equivalent Values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashurst, W. Robert

    Unit Conversion Factors Quantity Equivalent Values Mass 1 kg = 1000 g = 0.001 metric ton = 2·R 10.73 psia·ft3 lbmol·R 62.36 liter·torr mol·K 0.7302 ft3·atm lbmol·R Temperature Conversions: T

  19. Singular subfactors of II_1 factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiggins, Alan Daniel

    2007-09-17

    II1 factor and G is a countable discrete group acting on P by outer automorphisms, we characterize the elements x of PoG such that x(PoH)x0 PoH for some subgroup H of G. We establish that proper finite index singular subfactors do not have the weak...

  20. Distributed QR Factorization Based on Randomized Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zemen, Thomas

    Distributed QR Factorization Based on Randomized Algorithms Hana Strakov´a1 , Wilfried N. Gansterer of Algorithms Hana.Strakova@univie.ac.at, Wilfried.Gansterer@univie.ac.at 2 Forschungszentrum Telekommunication Wien, Austria Thomas.Zemen@ftw.at Abstract. Most parallel algorithms for matrix computations assume

  1. GRIDONOMICS An Introduction to the Factors Shaping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    GRIDONOMICS An Introduction to the Factors Shaping Electric Industry Transformation White Paper industry is at a tipping point where the pace of change and opportunity for disruption is accelerating. Thirty years of energy policy and industry structural changes are combining with accelerating social

  2. Derivation of dose conversion factors for tritium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killough, G. G.

    1982-03-01

    For a given intake mode (ingestion, inhalation, absorption through the skin), a dose conversion factor (DCF) is the committed dose equivalent to a specified organ of an individual per unit intake of a radionuclide. One also may consider the effective dose commitment per unit intake, which is a weighted average of organ-specific DCFs, with weights proportional to risks associated with stochastic radiation-induced fatal health effects, as defined by Publication 26 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This report derives and tabulates organ-specific dose conversion factors and the effective dose commitment per unit intake of tritium. These factors are based on a steady-state model of hydrogen in the tissues of ICRP's Reference Man (ICRP Publication 23) and equilibrium of specific activities between body water and other tissues. The results differ by 27 to 33% from the estimate on which ICRP Publication 30 recommendations are based. The report also examines a dynamic model of tritium retention in body water, mineral bone, and two compartments representing organically-bound hydrogen. This model is compared with data from human subjects who were observed for extended periods. The manner of combining the dose conversion factors with measured or model-predicted levels of contamination in man's exposure media (air, drinking water, soil moisture) to estimate dose rate to an individual is briefly discussed.

  3. Pion form factor with twisted mass QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou M. Abdel-Rehim; Randy Lewis

    2004-09-10

    The pion form factor is calculated using quenched twisted mass QCD with beta=6.0 and maximal twisting angle omega=pi/2. Two pion masses and several values of momentum transfer are considered. The momentum averaging procedure of Frezzotti and Rossi is used to reduce lattice spacing errors, and numerical results are consistent with the expected O(a) improvement.

  4. Factors Influencing Succession: Lessons from Large, Infrequent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    intense disturbances of large and small extent. Key words: disturbance frequency; disturbance intensityFactors Influencing Succession: Lessons from Large, Infrequent Natural Disturbances Monica G ABSTRACT Disturbance events vary in intensity, size, and fre- quency, but few opportunities exist to study

  5. Factored Language Models for Statistical Machine Translation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koehn, Philipp

    Factored Language Models for Statistical Machine Translation Amittai E. Axelrod TH E U N I V E R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 2.4.3 Log-Linear, Phrase-Based Translation Models . . . . . . . . . 11 3 Statistical Language S ITY OF E D I N B U R G H Master of Science by Research Institute for Communicating and Collaborative

  6. Structure Functions, Form Factors, and Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Wilcox; B. Andersen-Pugh

    1993-12-07

    We present results towards the calculation of the pion electric form factor and structure function on a $16^3\\times 24$ lattice using charge overlap. By sacrificing Fourier transform information in two directions, it is seen that the longitudinal four point function can be extracted with reasonable error bars at low momentum.

  7. Development of modifications to the material point method for the simulation of thin membranes, compressible fluids, and their interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    York, A.R. II [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Engineering and Process Dept.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Engineering and Process Dept.

    1997-07-01

    The material point method (MPM) is an evolution of the particle in cell method where Lagrangian particles or material points are used to discretize the volume of a material. The particles carry properties such as mass, velocity, stress, and strain and move through a Eulerian or spatial mesh. The momentum equation is solved on the Eulerian mesh. Modifications to the material point method are developed that allow the simulation of thin membranes, compressible fluids, and their dynamic interactions. A single layer of material points through the thickness is used to represent a membrane. The constitutive equation for the membrane is applied in the local coordinate system of each material point. Validation problems are presented and numerical convergence is demonstrated. Fluid simulation is achieved by implementing a constitutive equation for a compressible, viscous, Newtonian fluid and by solution of the energy equation. The fluid formulation is validated by simulating a traveling shock wave in a compressible fluid. Interactions of the fluid and membrane are handled naturally with the method. The fluid and membrane communicate through the Eulerian grid on which forces are calculated due to the fluid and membrane stress states. Validation problems include simulating a projectile impacting an inflated airbag. In some impact simulations with the MPM, bodies may tend to stick together when separating. Several algorithms are proposed and tested that allow bodies to separate from each other after impact. In addition, several methods are investigated to determine the local coordinate system of a membrane material point without relying upon connectivity data.

  8. Effect of surface modification by chelating agents on Fischer-Tropsch performance of Co/SiO2 catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bambal, Ashish S. [WVU; Kyugler, Edwin L. [WVU; Gardner, Todd H. [U.S. DOE; Dadyburjor, Dady B. [WVU

    2013-01-01

    The silica support of a Co-based catalyst for Fischer?Tropsch (FT) synthesis was modified by the chelating agents (CAs) nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). After the modification, characterization of the fresh and spent catalysts shows reduced crystallite sizes, a better-dispersed Co3O4 phase on the calcined samples, and increased metal dispersions for the reduced samples. The CA-modified catalysts display higher CO conversions, product yields, reaction rates, and rate constants. The improved FT performance of CA-modified catalysts is attributed to the formation of stable complexes with Co. The superior performance of the EDTA-modified catalyst in comparison to the NTA-modified catalyst is due to the higher affinity of the former for complex formation with Co ions. 1. INTRODUCTION Fischer?Tropsch (FT) synthesis has been recognized as one of the most promising technologies for the conversion of coal, natural gas, and biomass-derived syngas into liquid fuels and chemicals.1 Limited oil reserves, energy supply security concerns, carbon credits,1 pollution abatement laws, and, most notably, uncertainty about fuel prices have increased the prospect of commercializing the FT process. Catalysts that are typically used for FT synthesis include supported Co or Fe. Cobased catalysts have the advantage of higher syngas conversion, more high-

  9. The use Na, Li, K cations for modification of ZSM-5 zewolite to control hydrocarbon cold-start emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golubeva V.; Rohatgi U.; Korableva, A.; Anischenko, O.; Kustov, L.; Nissenbaum, V; Viola, M.B.

    2012-08-29

    This paper addresses the problem of controlling hydrocarbon emissions from cold-start of engines by investigating the adsorbents which could adsorb the hydrocarbons at cold temperatures and hold them to 250-300 ?. The materials, that has been studied, are based on the modification of ZSM-5 (SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} = 35) zeolite with Li, K, Na cations. It has been shown that the introduction of Li, Na and K in an amount that is equivalent to the content of Al in zeolite results in occurrence of toluene temperature desorption peaks at high-temperatures. The toluene temperature desorption curves for 5%Li-ZSM-5 and 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 zeolites are identical and have peak toluene desorption rate between 200 to 400 ?. Upon analysis of toluene adsorption isotherms for 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 and 5%Li-ZSM-5, it was concluded that the toluene diffusion inside of the modified zeolites channels is extremely slow and the sorption capacity of 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 is higher than with 5%Li-ZSM-5. The 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 didn't change toluene temperature programmed desorption (TPD) rate of curve after the treatment in environment with 10% ?{sub 2}? at 750-800 ? for about 28 h. The 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 zeolite is very promising as adsorbent to control the cold-start hydrocarbon emissions.

  10. SHIPS: A new setup for the investigation of swift heavy ion induced particle emission and surface modifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meinerzhagen, Florian; Bukowska, Hanna; Bender, Markus; Severin, Daniel; Herder, Matthias; Lebius, Henning; Schleberger, Marika; Wucher, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The irradiation with fast ions with kinetic energies of > 10 MeV leads to the deposition of a high amount of energy along their trajectory (up to several ten keV/nm). The energy is mainly transferred to the electronic subsystem and induces different secondary processes of excitations which result in significant material modifications. A new setup to study these ion induced effects on surfaces will be described in this paper. The setup combines a variable irradiation chamber with different techniques of surface characterizations like scanning probe microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion and neutral mass spectrometry, as well as low energy electron diffraction under ultra high vacuum conditions, and is mounted at a beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) of the GSI facility in Darmstadt, Germany. Here, samples can be irradiated with high-energy ions with a total kinetic energy up to several GeVs under different angles of incidence. Our setup enables the preparation and in-situ analysis of differ...

  11. Survival probability and energy modification of hydrogen Energetic Neutral Atoms on their way from the termination shock to Earth orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bzowski, M

    2008-01-01

    Contect: With the forthcoming launch of a NASA SMEX mission IBEX devoted to imaging of heliospheric interface by in-situ detection of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA) an important issue becomes recognizing of transport of these atoms from the termination shock of the solar wind to Earth orbit. Aims: Investigate modifications of energy and of survival probability of the H ENA detectable by IBEX (0.01 -- 6 keV) between the termination shock and Earth orbit taking into account the influence of the variable and anisotropic solar wind and solar EUV radiation. Methods: Energy change of the atoms is calculated by numerical simulations of orbits of the H ENA atoms from ~100 AU from the Sun down to Earth orbit, taking into account solar gravity and Lyman-$\\alpha$ radiation pressure, which is variable in time and depends on radial velocity of the atom. To calculate survival probabilities of the atoms against onization, a detailed 3D and time-dependent model of H ENA ionization based on observations of the solar wind and E...

  12. Nucleon and $?$ elastic and transition form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorge Segovia; Ian C. Cloet; Craig D. Roberts; Sebastian M. Schmidt

    2014-09-03

    We compute nucleon and Delta elastic and transition form factors, and compare predictions made using a framework built upon a Faddeev equation kernel and interaction vertices that possess QCD-like momentum dependence with results obtained using a vector-vector contact-interaction. The comparison emphasises that experiment is sensitive to the momentum dependence of the running couplings and masses in the strong interaction sector of the Standard Model and highlights that the key to describing hadron properties is a veracious expression of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking in the bound-state problem. Amongst the results we describe, the following are of particular interest: $G_E^p(Q^2)/G_M^p(Q^2)$ possesses a zero at $Q^2=9.5GeV^2$; any change in the interaction which shifts a zero in the proton ratio to larger $Q^2$ relocates a zero in $G_E^n(Q^2)/G_M^n(Q^2)$ to smaller $Q^2$; and there is likely a value of momentum transfer above which $G_E^n>G_E^p$. Regarding the $\\Delta(1232)$-baryon, we find that, inter alia: the electric monopole form factor exhibits a zero; the electric quadrupole form factor is negative, large in magnitude, and sensitive to the nature and strength of correlations in the $\\Delta(1232)$ Faddeev amplitude; and the magnetic octupole form factor is negative so long as rest-frame P- and D-wave correlations are included. In connection with the N-to-Delta transition, the momentum-dependence of the magnetic transition form factor, $G_M^\\ast$, matches that of $G_M^n$ once the momentum transfer is high enough to pierce the meson-cloud; and the electric quadrupole ratio is a keen measure of diquark and orbital angular momentum correlations.

  13. Spatiotemporal Distribution of NOx Storage: a Factor Controlling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Spatiotemporal Distribution of NOx Storage: a Factor Controlling NH3 and N2O Selectivities over a Commercial LNT Catalyst Spatiotemporal Distribution of NOx Storage: a Factor...

  14. High Quality Factor Fano-Resonant All-Dielectric Metamaterials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High Quality Factor Fano-Resonant All-Dielectric Metamaterials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High Quality Factor Fano-Resonant All-Dielectric Metamaterials Authors:...

  15. Test of factorization in diffractive deep inelastic scattering...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Test of factorization in diffractive deep inelastic scattering and photoproduction at HERA Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Test of factorization in diffractive deep...

  16. Multilevel Factor Analysis of Class and Student Achievement Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bengt O. Muthén

    2011-01-01

    Multilevel Factor Analysis of Class and Student AchievementMultilevel Factor Analysis of Class and Student Achievementof students observed within classes, classes within schools,

  17. Major Risk Factors to the Integrated Facility Disposition Project...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Major Risk Factors to the Integrated Facility Disposition Project Major Risk Factors to the Integrated Facility Disposition Project The scope of the Integrated Facility Disposition...

  18. A Framework for Geometric Reasoning About Human Figures and Factors in Assembly Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calton, Terri L.

    1999-07-20

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be perfectly valid operations, but in reality some operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. For example, the use of a ratchet may be reasoned feasible for an assembly operation; however, when a hand is placed on the tool the operation is no longer feasible, perhaps because of inaccessibility, insufficient strength or human interference with assembly components. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications, however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem, HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning which allows engineers to quickly verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. This paper presents a framework for integrating geometry-based assembly planning algorithms with commercially available human figure modeling software packages. Experimental results to selected applications along with lessons learned are presented.

  19. HUMAN FACTORS GUIDANCE FOR CONTROL ROOM EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHARA,J.; BROWN,W.; STUBLER,W.; HIGGINS,J.; WACHTEL,J.; PERSENSKY,J.J.

    2000-07-30

    The Human-System Interface Design Review Guideline (NUREG-0700, Revision 1) was developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to provide human factors guidance as a basis for the review of advanced human-system interface technologies. The guidance consists of three components: design review procedures, human factors engineering guidelines, and a software application to provide design review support called the ``Design Review Guideline.'' Since it was published in June 1996, Rev. 1 to NUREG-0700 has been used successfully by NRC staff, contractors and nuclear industry organizations, as well as by interested organizations outside the nuclear industry. The NRC has committed to the periodic update and improvement of the guidance to ensure that it remains a state-of-the-art design evaluation tool in the face of emerging and rapidly changing technology. This paper addresses the current research to update of NUREG-0700 based on the substantial work that has taken place since the publication of Revision 1.

  20. Measurement of the ??*?? and ??*??' transition form factors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; et al

    2011-09-06

    We study the reactions e?e??e?e??(') in the single-tag mode and measure the ??*??(') transition form factors in the momentum-transfer range from 4 to 40 GeV². The analysis is based on 469 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected at PEP-II with the BABAR detector at e?e? center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV.

  1. Measurement of the ??*?? and ??*??' transition form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu.?G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Botov, A. A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu.?I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K.?Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Jasper, H.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Perez, A.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, L.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Anderson, J.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Zhao, M.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Buenger, C.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.

    2011-09-06

    We study the reactions e?e??e?e??(') in the single-tag mode and measure the ??*??(') transition form factors in the momentum-transfer range from 4 to 40 GeV². The analysis is based on 469 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected at PEP-II with the BABAR detector at e?e? center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV.

  2. Suppression of electric and magnetic fluctuations and improvement of confinement due to current profile modification by biased electrode in Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Debjyoti; Pal, Rabindranath [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF-Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Ghosh, Joydeep; Chattopadhyay, Prabal K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2012-07-15

    Improvement of plasma confinement is achieved in normal q{sub a} discharges of SINP-tokamak by introducing a biased electrode inside the last closed flux surface. All the important features of high confinement mode are observed biasing the electrode negatively with respect to the vacuum vessel. Arrays of electric and magnetic probes introduced in the edge plasma region reveal suppression of electric and magnetic fluctuations over distinct frequency ranges as well as modification of the toroidal current profile due to biasing. Further analysis identifies the electrostatic fluctuations to be due to drift mode and the magnetic fluctuations may be of slow compressional Alfven waves. Both get suppressed due to current profile modification during biasing, hence leading to the improvement of plasma confinement.

  3. Surface modification to waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ); Ruzic, David N. (Kendall Park, NJ); Moore, Richard L. (Princeton, NJ); Cohen, Samuel A. (Pennington, NJ); Manos, Dennis M. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1983-01-01

    A method of treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1.mu. to 5.mu. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

  4. Surface modification to waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Timberlake, J.R.; Ruzic, D.N.; Moore, R.L.; Cohen, S.A.; Manos, D.M.

    1982-06-16

    A method is described for treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1..mu.. to 5..mu.. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

  5. AMWTP Contract Modifications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See Energy Level79AJ01)19^560AMERICA'S NATIONAL LABSPROJECT

  6. Modification No. M074

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 2012 Guidance for High TemperatureO, No. M074

  7. Visionary Solutions Contract Modifications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN A CountyFeet) Cooley Policies GARRMission

  8. INL Contract Modifications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHussein KhalilResearch8 IEEE

  9. Survival probability and energy modification of hydrogen Energetic Neutral Atoms on their way from the termination shock to Earth orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bzowski

    2008-06-14

    Context: With the forthcoming launch of a NASA SMEX mission IBEX devoted to imaging of heliospheric interface by in-situ detection of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA) an important issue becomes recognizing of transport of these atoms from the termination shock of the solar wind to Earth orbit. Aims: Investigate modifications of energy and of survival probability of the H ENA detectable by IBEX (0.01 -- 6 keV) between the termination shock and Earth orbit taking into account the influence of the variable and anisotropic solar wind and solar EUV radiation. Methods: Energy change of the atoms is calculated by numerical simulations of orbits of the H ENA atoms from ~100 AU from the Sun down to Earth orbit, taking into account solar gravity and Lyman-$\\alpha$ radiation pressure, which is variable in time and depends on radial velocity of the atom. To calculate survival probabilities of the atoms against onization, a detailed 3D and time-dependent model of H ENA ionization based on observations of the solar wind and EUV ionizing radiation is constructed, and wth the use of this model probabilities of survival of the atoms are calculated by numerical integration along the previously calculated orbits. Results: Owing to the radiation pressure, H ENA reach the Earth orbit practically without energy and direction change except the atoms with energy lower than 0.1 keV during high solar activity. For a given energy at Earth orbit one expects fluctuations of survival probability from ~20% at 0.01 keV down to just a few percent at 6 keV and a modulation of survival probability as a function of the location at Earth orbit, ecliptic latitude of the arrival direction, and the phase of solar cycle with an amplitude of a few dozen percent for 0.1 keV atoms at solar minimum to a few percent for 6 keV atoms at solar maximum.

  10. Elimination of hydrogenase post-translational modification blocks H2 production and increases ethanol yield in Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Ranjita; Zheng, Tianyong; Olson, Daniel G.; Lynd, Lee R; Guss, Adam M

    2015-01-01

    The native ability of Clostridium thermocellum to rapidly consume cellulose and produce ethanol makes it a leading candidate for a consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) biofuel production strategy. C. thermocellum also synthesizes lactate, formate, acetate, H2, and amino acids that compete with ethanol production for carbon and electrons. Elimination of H2 production could redirect carbon flux towards ethanol production by making more electrons available for acetyl-CoA reduction to ethanol. C. thermocellum encodes four hydrogenases and rather than delete each individually, we targeted a hydrogenase maturase gene (hydG), involved in converting the three [FeFe] hydrogenase apoenzymes into holoenzymes. Further deletion of the [NiFe] hydrogenase (ech) resulted in a mutant that functionally lacks all four hydrogenases. H2 production in hydG ech was undetectable and ethanol yield increased nearly 2-fold compared to wild type. Interestingly, mutant growth improved upon the addition of acetate, which led to increased expression of genes related to sulfate metabolism, suggesting these mutants may use sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor to balance redox reactions. Genomic analysis of hydG revealed a mutation in adhE, resulting in a strain with both NADH- and NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase activities. While this same adhE mutation is found in ethanol tolerant C. thermocellum strain E50C, hydG and hydG ech are not more ethanol tolerant than wild type, illustrating the complicated interactions between redox balancing and ethanol tolerance in C. thermocellum. The dramatic increase in ethanol production here suggests that targeting protein post-translational modification is a promising new approach for inactivation of multiple enzymes simultaneously for metabolic engineering.

  11. Factor Analysis for Skewed Data and Skew-Normal Maximum Likelihood Factor Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaucher, Beverly Jane

    2013-04-04

    This research explores factor analysis applied to data from skewed distributions for the general skew model, the selection-elliptical model, the selection-normal model, the skew-elliptical model and the skew-normal model ...

  12. Transcription factor-based biosensors for detecting dicarboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dietrich, Jeffrey; Keasling, Jay

    2014-02-18

    The invention provides methods and compositions for detecting dicarboxylic acids using a transcription factor biosensor.

  13. 3.5. EFFICIENCY FACTORS 63 3.5 Efficiency factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, R. A.

    3.5. EFFICIENCY FACTORS 63 3.5 Efficiency factors For comparison we consider a complete) and the variance of the estimator of x is (x L-x)2 CBD, which is equal to r-1x x2 CBD. Definition The efficiency to a complete-block design with variance 2 CBD and the same replication is x x rx L-x 2 CBD 2 and the efficiency

  14. Lorentz Coherence and the Proton Form Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young S. Kim

    2015-02-28

    The dipole cutoff behavior for the proton form factor has been and still is one of the major issues in high-energy physics. It is shown that this dipole behavior comes from the coherence between the Lorentz contraction of the proton size and the decreasing wavelength of the incoming photon signal. The contraction rates are the same for both cases. This form of coherence is studied also in the momentum-energy space. The coherence effect in this space can be explained in terms of two overlapping wave functions.

  15. Factors for design of dips for roadways 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCasland, William Richard

    1957-01-01

    limit is sub]ect to mot1on which may cause considerable discomfort to be experienced by the oocupants. If a dip is particularly critical, the vehicle may even incur damages. The most important consideration, however, 1s the fact that the driver may... lose control of the vehicle momentarily and be involved in a traffic accident. These three factors indicate the need for all dips in roadways to be nrop- erly designed, whether they are to be temporary or oermanent. The use of dips as speed checks...

  16. Prime number generation and factor elimination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vineet Kumar

    2014-10-06

    We have presented a multivariate polynomial function termed as factor elimination function,by which, we can generate prime numbers. This function's mapping behavior can explain the irregularities in the occurrence of prime numbers on the number line. Generally the different categories of prime numbers found till date, satisfy the form of this function. We present some absolute and probabilistic conditions for the primality of the number generated by this method. This function is capable of leading to highly efficient algorithms for generating prime numbers.

  17. Emission Factors (EMFAC) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of theClimateElgin, Illinois:JV JumpFactors (EMFAC) Jump to:

  18. The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in cortical motor learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Von dem Bussche, Mary

    2007-01-01

    T. , and Nakamura, S. , Brain-derived neurotrophic factor-dependent transfer of brain-derived neurotrophic factor toneurotrophic factors brain-derived neurotrophic factor and

  19. Human factors engineering program review model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is performing nuclear power plant design certification reviews based on a design process plan that describes the human factors engineering (HFE) program elements that are necessary and sufficient to develop an acceptable detailed design specification and an acceptable implemented design. There are two principal reasons for this approach. First, the initial design certification applications submitted for staff review did not include detailed design information. Second, since human performance literature and industry experiences have shown that many significant human factors issues arise early in the design process, review of the design process activities and results is important to the evaluation of an overall design. However, current regulations and guidance documents do not address the criteria for design process review. Therefore, the HFE Program Review Model (HFE PRM) was developed as a basis for performing design certification reviews that include design process evaluations as well as review of the final design. A central tenet of the HFE PRM is that the HFE aspects of the plant should be developed, designed, and evaluated on the basis of a structured top-down system analysis using accepted HFE principles. The HFE PRM consists of ten component elements. Each element in divided into four sections: Background, Objective, Applicant Submittals, and Review Criteria. This report describes the development of the HFE PRM and gives a detailed description of each HFE review element.

  20. Various factors affect coiled tubing limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Y.S.

    1996-01-15

    Safety and reliability remain the primary concerns in coiled tubing operations. Factors affecting safety and reliability include corrosion, flexural bending, internal (or external) pressure and tension (or compression), and mechanical damage due to improper use. Such limits as coiled tubing fatigue, collapse, and buckling need to be understood to avoid disaster. With increased use of coiled tubing, operators will gain more experience. But at the same time, with further research and development of coiled tubing, the manufacturing quality will be improved and fatigue, collapse, and buckling models will become more mature, and eventually standard specifications will be available. This paper reviews the uses of coiled tubing and current research on mechanical behavior of said tubing. It also discusses several models used to help predict fatigue and failure levels.

  1. Chiral corrections to hyperon axial form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Fujiun; Tiburzi, B. C.

    2008-05-01

    We study the complete set of flavor-changing hyperon axial-current matrix elements at small momentum transfer. Using partially quenched heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory, we derive the chiral and momentum behavior of the axial and induced pseudoscalar form factors. The meson pole contributions to the latter posses a striking signal for chiral physics. We argue that the study of hyperon axial matrix elements enables a systematic lattice investigation of the efficacy of three-flavor chiral expansions in the baryon sector. This can be achieved by considering chiral corrections to SU(3) symmetry predictions, and their partially quenched generalizations. In particular, despite the presence of eight unknown low-energy constants, we are able to make next-to-leading order symmetry breaking predictions for two linear combinations of axial charges.

  2. Factors that influence follow-up after an abnormal mammogram 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copeland, Valerie Anne

    2009-05-15

    The focus of this study was to explore women’s experiences with follow-up after an abnormal mammogram, and factors that influence follow-up. Factors, including health status, found in the cancer screening and treatment ...

  3. Factors Analysis on Safety of Indoor Air Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Q.; Liu, Z.; Xiong, J.

    2006-01-01

    Influence factors on safety of indoor air quality (IAQ) were analyzed in this paper. Some regeneration compositions resulting from potential indoor chemical reactions may be more harmful to habitants. A few building flaws may be key factors...

  4. The Dirac Form Factor Predicts the Pauli Form Factor in the Endpoint Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sumeet Dagaonkar; Pankaj Jain; John P. Ralston

    2015-03-24

    We compute the momentum-transfer dependence of the proton Pauli form factor $F_{2}$ in the endpoint overlap model. We find the model correctly reproduces the scaling of the ratio of $F_{2}$ with the Dirac Form factor $F_{1}$ observed at the Jefferson Laboratory. The calculation uses the leading-power, leading twist Dirac structure of the quark light-cone wave function, and the same endpoint dependence previously determined from the Dirac form factor $F_{1}$. There are no parameters and no adjustable functions in the endpoint model's prediction for $F_{2}$. The model's predicted ratio $F_{2}(Q^{2})/F_{1}(Q^{2})$ is quite insensitive to the endpoint wave function, which explains why the observed ratio scales like $1/Q$ down to rather low momentum transfers. The endpoint model appears to be the only comprehensive model consistent with all form factor information as well as reproducing fixed-angle proton-proton scattering at large momentum transfer. Any one of the processes is capable of predicting the others.

  5. 2008 Guidelines to Defra's GHG Conversion Factors Guidelines to Defra's GHG Conversion Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2457 x 2457 kWh x 0.347 x 0.330 Domestic Coal 3 tonnes x 2523 x 2523 kWh x 0.313 x 0.298 Wood Pellets 4 stations or for industrial purposes have different emission factors. Wood pellets are used in domestic

  6. Iteration of Target Matrices in Exploratory Factor Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Tyler Maxwell

    2013-01-01

    extraction methods .Performance of factor extraction methods Several methodshere. How well an extraction method performs is influenced

  7. Annihilation Poles for Form Factors in XXZ Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Pakuliak

    1993-07-14

    The annihilation poles for the form factors in XXZ model are studied using vertex operators introduced in \\cite{DFJMN}. An annihilation pole is the property of form factors according to which the residue of the $2n$-particle form factor in such a pole can be expressed through linear combination of the $2n-2$-particle form factors. To prove this property we use the bosonization of the vertex operators in XXZ model which was invented in \\cite{JMMN}.

  8. SUCCESS FACTORS IN INFORMATION SECURITY IMPLEMENTATION IN ORGANIZATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, John

    SUCCESS FACTORS IN INFORMATION SECURITY IMPLEMENTATION IN ORGANIZATIONS Maryam Al-Awadi University This paper will explore and identify success factors related to the implementation of information security was to identify those factors required to ensure successful implementation of information security, particularly

  9. http://rev.sagepub.com/ Reviews of Human Factors and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    http://rev.sagepub.com/ Ergonomics Reviews of Human Factors and http://rev.sagepub.com/content/7 Factors and Ergonomics Michael A. Nees and Bruce N. Walker Auditory Displays for In-Vehicle Technologies Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com On behalf of: Human Factors and Ergonomics Society at: can

  10. SHORT COMMUNICATION Rhizobium Nod factors induce increases in intracellular free

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkel, Joseph G.

    SHORT COMMUNICATION Rhizobium Nod factors induce increases in intracellular free calcium of Massachusetts, Box 35810, Amherst MA 01003±5810, USA Summary Application of Nod factors to growing, responsive region after 10±15 min treatment with Nod factors. The extracellular Ca2+ ¯ux, detected with the non

  11. Human Factors Aspects of Power System Flow Animation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human Factors Aspects of Power System Flow Animation Douglas A. Wiegmann, Gavin R. Essenberg experimental results associated with human factors aspects of using animation to display electric power system. Index Terms--Power System Operations and Planning, Power System Visualization, Animation, Human Factors

  12. The Multivariate Merit Factor of a Boolean T. Aaron Gulliver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Matthew Geoffrey

    The Multivariate Merit Factor of a Boolean Function T. Aaron Gulliver Dept. of Electrical, the multivariate merit factor (MMF) of a Boolean function, is presented, and various infinite recursive quadratic sequence constructions are given for which both uni- variate and multivariate merit factors can be computed

  13. Bayesian CP Factorization of Incomplete Tensors with Automatic Rank Determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Liqing

    IEEEProof Bayesian CP Factorization of Incomplete Tensors with Automatic Rank Determination Qibin--CANDECOMP/PARAFAC (CP) tensor factorization of incomplete data is a powerful technique for tensor completion through explicitly capturing the multilinear latent factors. The existing CP algorithms require the tensor rank

  14. Prediction and Informative Risk Factor Selection of Bone Diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buffalo, State University of New York

    --Electronic health records (EHRs); risk factor analysis; integrated feature extraction; risk factor selection1 Prediction and Informative Risk Factor Selection of Bone Diseases Hui Li, Xiaoyi Li, Murali and the overwhelming amount of electronic health records (EHRs) shared by healthcare institutions and practitioners, we

  15. Electron-phonon coupling modification and carrier mobility enhancement in poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(4-styrenesulfonate) films by ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Yow-Jon, E-mail: rzr2390@yahoo.com.tw; Chin, Yi-Min [Institute of Photonics, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China); Wu, Cheng-You [Department of Physics, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China); Liu, Day-Shan [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Huwei 632, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-07

    The effect of ultraviolet irradiation on the electrical property of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(4-styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) films was examined. It is shown that the carrier mobility increases while the carrier density does not change substantially. The carrier mobility in PEDOT:PSS samples exhibits strong temperature dependence, indicating the dominance of tunneling (hopping) at low (high) temperatures. The results demonstrate that changes in the chemical structure may lead to the modification of the electron-phonon coupling, thus increasing the carrier mobility in PEDOT:PSS.

  16. Rabi Waves and Peculiarities of Raman Scattering in Carbon Nanotubes, Produced by High Energy Ion Beam Modification of Diamond Single Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry Yearchuck; Alla Dovlatova

    2011-03-06

    QED-model for multichain coupled qubit system, proposed in \\cite{Part1}, was confirmed by Raman scattering studies of carbon zigzag-shaped nanotubes, produced by high energy ion beam modification of natural diamond single crystals. New quantum optics phenomenon - Rabi waves - has been experimentally identified for the first time. Raman spectra in perfect quasi-1D carbon nanotubes are quite different in comparison with well known Raman spectra in 2D carbon nanotubes of larger diameter. They characterized by vibronic mode of Su-Schriffer-Heeger $\\sigma$-polaron lattice and its revival part in frequency representation, which is the consequence of Rabi wave packet formation.

  17. Confinement and the safety factor profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batha, S.H.; Levinton, F.M.; Scott, S.D.

    1995-12-01

    The conjecture that the safety factor profile, q(r), controls the improvement in tokamak plasmas from poor confinement in the Low (L-) mode regime to improved confinement in the supershot regime has been tested in two experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). First, helium was puffed into the beam-heated phase of a supershot discharge which induced a degradation from supershot to L-mode confinement in about 100 msec, far less than the current relaxation time. The q and shear profiles measured by a motional Stark effect polarimeter showed little change during the confinement degradation. Second, rapid current ramps in supershot plasmas altered the q profile, but were observed not to change significantly the energy confinement. Thus, enhanced confinement in supershot plasmas is not due to a particular q profile which has enhanced stability or transport properties. The discharges making a continuous transition between supershot and L-mode confinement were also used to test the critical-electron-temperature-gradient transport model. It was found that this model could not reproduce the large changes in electron and ion temperature caused by the change in confinement.

  18. Commissioning of output factors for uniform scanning proton beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Yuanshui; Ramirez, Eric; Mascia, Anthony; Ding Xiaoning; Okoth, Benny; Zeidan, Omar; Hsi Wen; Harris, Ben; Schreuder, Andries N.; Keole, Sameer [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Treatment Centers, 420 North Walnut Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: Current commercial treatment planning systems are not able to accurately predict output factors and calculate monitor units for proton fields. Patient-specific field output factors are thus determined by either measurements or empirical modeling based on commissioning data. The objective of this study is to commission output factors for uniform scanning beams utilized at the ProCure proton therapy centers. Methods: Using water phantoms and a plane parallel ionization chamber, the authors first measured output factors with a fixed 10 cm diameter aperture as a function of proton range and modulation width for clinically available proton beams with ranges between 4 and 31.5 cm and modulation widths between 2 and 15 cm. The authors then measured the output factor as a function of collimated field size at various calibration depths for proton beams of various ranges and modulation widths. The authors further examined the dependence of the output factor on the scanning area (i.e., uncollimated proton field), snout position, and phantom material. An empirical model was developed to calculate the output factor for patient-specific fields and the model-predicted output factors were compared to measurements. Results: The output factor increased with proton range and field size, and decreased with modulation width. The scanning area and snout position have a small but non-negligible effect on the output factors. The predicted output factors based on the empirical modeling agreed within 2% of measurements for all prostate treatment fields and within 3% for 98.5% of all treatment fields. Conclusions: Comprehensive measurements at a large subset of available beam conditions are needed to commission output factors for proton therapy beams. The empirical modeling agrees well with the measured output factor data. This investigation indicates that it is possible to accurately predict output factors and thus eliminate or reduce time-consuming patient-specific output measurements for proton treatments.

  19. Modifications to toxic CUG RNAs induce structural stability, rescue mis-splicing in a myotonic dystrophy cell model and reduce toxicity in a myotonic dystrophy zebrafish model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    deLorimier, Elaine; Coonrod, Leslie A.; Copperman, Jeremy; Taber, Alex; Reister, Emily E.; Sharma, Kush; Todd, Peter K.; Guenza, Marina G.; Berglund, J. Andrew

    2014-10-10

    In this study, CUG repeat expansions in the 3' UTR of dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) cause myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). As RNA, these repeats elicit toxicity by sequestering splicing proteins, such as MBNL1, into protein–RNA aggregates. Structural studies demonstrate that CUG repeats can form A-form helices, suggesting that repeat secondary structure could be important in pathogenicity. To evaluate this hypothesis, we utilized structure-stabilizing RNA modifications pseudouridine (?) and 2'-O-methylation to determine if stabilization of CUG helical conformations affected toxicity. CUG repeats modified with ? or 2'-O-methyl groups exhibited enhanced structural stability and reduced affinity for MBNL1. Molecular dynamics and X-ray crystallography suggest a potential water-bridging mechanism for ?-mediated CUG repeat stabilization. ? modification of CUG repeats rescued mis-splicing in a DM1 cell model and prevented CUG repeat toxicity in zebrafish embryos. This study indicates that the structure of toxic RNAs has a significant role in controlling the onset of neuromuscular diseases.

  20. Modifications to toxic CUG RNAs induce structural stability, rescue mis-splicing in a myotonic dystrophy cell model and reduce toxicity in a myotonic dystrophy zebrafish model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    deLorimier, Elaine; Coonrod, Leslie A.; Copperman, Jeremy; Taber, Alex; Reister, Emily E.; Sharma, Kush; Todd, Peter K.; Guenza, Marina G.; Berglund, J. Andrew

    2014-10-10

    In this study, CUG repeat expansions in the 3' UTR of dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) cause myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). As RNA, these repeats elicit toxicity by sequestering splicing proteins, such as MBNL1, into protein–RNA aggregates. Structural studies demonstrate that CUG repeats can form A-form helices, suggesting that repeat secondary structure could be important in pathogenicity. To evaluate this hypothesis, we utilized structure-stabilizing RNA modifications pseudouridine (?) and 2'-O-methylation to determine if stabilization of CUG helical conformations affected toxicity. CUG repeats modified with ? or 2'-O-methyl groups exhibited enhanced structural stability and reduced affinity for MBNL1. Molecular dynamicsmore »and X-ray crystallography suggest a potential water-bridging mechanism for ?-mediated CUG repeat stabilization. ? modification of CUG repeats rescued mis-splicing in a DM1 cell model and prevented CUG repeat toxicity in zebrafish embryos. This study indicates that the structure of toxic RNAs has a significant role in controlling the onset of neuromuscular diseases.« less

  1. LPS-inducible factor(s) from activated macrophages mediates cytolysis of Naegleria fowleri amoebae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleary, S.F.; Marciano-Cabral, F.

    1986-03-01

    Soluble cytolytic factors of macrophage origin have previously been described with respect to their tumoricidal activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism and possible factor(s) responsible for cytolysis of the amoeba Naegleria fowleri by activated peritoneal macrophages from B6C3F1 mice. Macrophages or conditioned medium (CM) from macrophage cultures were incubated with /sup 3/H-Uridine labeled amoebae. Percent specific release of label served as an index of cytolysis. Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and Corynebacterium parvum macrophages demonstrated significant cytolysis of amoebae at 24 h with an effector to target ratio of 10:1. Treatment of macrophages with inhibitors of RNA or protein synthesis blocked amoebicidal activity. Interposition of a 1 ..mu..m pore membrane between macrophages and amoebae inhibited killing. Inhibition in the presence of the membrane was overcome by stimulating the macrophages with LPS. CM from SPS-stimulated, but not unstimulated, cultures of activated macrophages was cytotoxic for amoebae. The activity was heat sensitive and was recovered from ammonium sulfate precipitation of the CM. Results indicate that amoebicidal activity is mediated by a protein(s) of macrophage origin induced by target cell contact or stimulation with LPS.

  2. Issues and Factors of Train Air-conditioning System Design and Operation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, P.; Li, D.

    2006-01-01

    -conditioning. Modifications to the air-conditioning system and some advanced air conditioning systems are introduced, which are helpful for system optimization. In this paper, based on analysis of the characteristics of the air - conditioning system in foreign high speed...

  3. Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasiolek, Maryla A.

    2000-12-21

    The purpose of this report was to document the process leading to development of the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) for the postclosure nominal performance of the potential repository at Yucca Mountain. BDCF calculations concerned twenty-four radionuclides. This selection included sixteen radionuclides that may be significant nominal performance dose contributors during the compliance period of up to 10,000 years, five additional radionuclides of importance for up to 1 million years postclosure, and three relatively short-lived radionuclides important for the human intrusion scenario. Consideration of radionuclide buildup in soil caused by previous irrigation with contaminated groundwater was taken into account in the BDCF development. The effect of climate evolution, from the current arid conditions to a wetter and cooler climate, on the BDCF values was evaluated. The analysis included consideration of different exposure pathway's contribution to the BDCFs. Calculations of nominal performance BDCFs used the GENII-S computer code in a series of probabilistic realizations to propagate the uncertainties of input parameters into the output. BDCFs for the nominal performance, when combined with the concentrations of radionuclides in groundwater allow calculation of potential radiation doses to the receptor of interest. Calculated estimates of radionuclide concentration in groundwater result from the saturated zone modeling. The integration of the biosphere modeling results (BDCFs) with the outcomes of the other component models is accomplished in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) to calculate doses to the receptor of interest from radionuclides postulated to be released to the environment from the potential repository at Yucca Mountain.

  4. Dose factor entry and display tool for BNCT radiotherapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wessol, Daniel E. (Bozeman, MT); Wheeler, Floyd J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Cook, Jeremy L. (Greeley, CO)

    1999-01-01

    A system for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) radiotherapy planning where a biological distribution is calculated using a combination of conversion factors and a previously calculated physical distribution. Conversion factors are presented in a graphical spreadsheet so that a planner can easily view and modify the conversion factors. For radiotherapy in multi-component modalities, such as Fast-Neutron and BNCT, it is necessary to combine each conversion factor component to form an effective dose which is used in radiotherapy planning and evaluation. The Dose Factor Entry and Display System is designed to facilitate planner entry of appropriate conversion factors in a straightforward manner for each component. The effective isodose is then immediately computed and displayed over the appropriate background (e.g. digitized image).

  5. Fractionation studies on the unidentified growth factor(s) in distillers dried solubles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dannenburg, Warren Nathaniel

    1955-01-01

    "rltrr ro?v toJ oy itunler urr- . r. roan i ')1, in wn'ch aport it;~ ue. on tr, ited t. iuu whole liver anu dried bre er= yeast ai ?cured to oe . ", o~d s . urces oi tai- l'aCtOr Wnile dried Wiiej, di tiller= dried ~ui Oie-, nid ter. ontat. on s... c: ?ein . ilu . ~@i allan , irotein u' tne, rotein - dice; ? iid . o?cd that it le?t two i'ctur- . . ere required bg tiie cuici. &or og, . imum?io, t i . . )ne factor . ; suyfilied bg liver z ictiun= iii uriod oie, ers yea. . t, while t?= ot...

  6. An overview of the facilities, activities, and developments at the University of North Texas Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rout, Bibhudutta; Dhoubhadel, Mangal S.; Poudel, Prakash R.; Kummari, Venkata C.; Pandey, Bimal; Deoli, Naresh T.; Lakshantha, Wickramaarachchige J.; Mulware, Stephen J.; Baxley, Jacob; Manuel, Jack E.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Szilasi, Szabolcs; Weathers, Duncan L.; Reinert, Tilo; Glass, Gary A.; Duggan, Jerry L.; McDaniel, Floyd D. [Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory, University of North Texas, Department of Physics, 1155 Union Circle 311427, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)

    2013-07-03

    The Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL) at the University of North Texas includes several accelerator facilities with capabilities of producing a variety of ion beams from tens of keV to several MeV in energy. The four accelerators are used for research, graduate and undergraduate education, and industrial applications. The NEC 3MV Pelletron tandem accelerator has three ion sources for negative ions: He Alphatross and two different SNICS-type sputter ion sources. Presently, the tandem accelerator has four high-energy beam transport lines and one low-energy beam transport line directly taken from the negative ion sources for different research experiments. For the low-energy beam line, the ion energy can be varied from {approx}20 to 80 keV for ion implantation/modification of materials. The four post-acceleration beam lines include a heavy-ion nuclear microprobe; multi-purpose PIXE, RBS, ERD, NRA, and broad-beam single-event upset; high-energy ion implantation line; and trace-element accelerator mass spectrometry. The NEC 3MV single-ended Pelletron accelerator has an RF ion source mainly for hydrogen, helium and heavier inert gases. We recently installed a capacitive liner to the terminal potential stabilization system for high terminal voltage stability and high-resolution microprobe analysis. The accelerator serves a beam line for standard RBS and RBS/C. Another beamline for high energy focused ion beam application using a magnetic quadrupole lens system is currently under construction. This beam line will also serve for developmental work on an electrostatic lens system. The third accelerator is a 200 kV Cockcroft-Walton accelerator with an RF ion source. The fourth accelerator is a 2.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which was in operation for last several decades is currently planned to be used mainly for educational purpose. Research projects that will be briefly discussed include materials synthesis/modification for photonic, electronic, and magnetic applications, surface sputtering and micro-fabrication of materials, development of high-energy ion microprobe systems, and educational and outreach activities.

  7. Prenatal and Perinatal Risk Factors for Autism in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    and perinatal risk factors for autism. Journal of PerinatalB. (1979). Viral exposure and autism. American Journal ofage and the risk of autism spectrum disorder. American

  8. Factors driving wind power development in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bird, Lori A.; Parsons, Brian; Gagliano, Troy; Brown, Matthew H.; Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark

    2003-01-01

    s Largest Purchase of Wind Power,” September 17, 2001.FACTORS DRIVING WIND POWER DEVELOPMENT IN THE UNITED STATESthe United States third in wind power capacity globally,

  9. Electromagnetic form factors and the hypercentral constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanctis, M. De; Giannini, M. M.; Santopinto, E.; Vassallo, A.

    2007-12-15

    We present new results concerning the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon using a relativistic version of the hypercentral constituent quark model and a relativistic current.

  10. Towards large-cohort comparative studies to define the factors...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Towards large-cohort comparative studies to define the factors influencing the gut microbial community structure of ASD patients Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  11. Planar superconducting resonators with internal quality factors above one million

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinis, John M.

    Planar superconducting resonators with internal quality factors above one million A. Megrant,1,2 C criti- cal elements for superconducting electromagnetic radiation detectors,1 quantum memories,2

  12. Factors influencing photocurrent generation in organic bulk heterojunc...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Factors influencing photocurrent generation in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells: interfacial energetics and blend microstructure April 29, 2009 at 3pm36-428 Jenny Nelson...

  13. Factors Associated with Hepatitis B Testing Among Vietnamese Americans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Asian American adults for hepatitis B: a cross-sectionalFactors Associated with Hepatitis B Testing Among VietnameseBACKGROUND: Chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis B- associated

  14. Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by the chemistry of the ejecta on which the relict encrustations are found. This matrix chemistry factor illustrates that the primary fumarolic minerals surrounding the...

  15. Method for determining formation quality factor from well log...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    determining formation quality factor from well log data and its application to seismic reservoir characterization Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Method for...

  16. Factors governing sustainable groundwater pumping near a river

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    study the interplay between riverbed clogging and infiltration.study various factors that can potentially impact infiltrationthat affect infiltration processes. Our study is performed

  17. Factors Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and Dual-Stage Chemistry Factors Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and Dual-Stage Chemistry 2004...

  18. Analyticity properties and unitarity constraints of heavy meson form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Rafael, E; Eduardo de Rafael; Josep Taron; Rafael, Eduardo de; Taron, Josep

    1994-01-01

    We derive new bounds on the b-number form factor $F(q^2)$ of the B meson. (Revised version of hep-ph/9306214).

  19. A NOTE ON THE FACTORIZATION THEOREM OF TORIC ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1999-01-20

    In this section, we harvest the fruit “Weak Factorization Theorem” grown upon the tree of the ...... chatov Institute Atomic Energy preprint (1989). [Sumihiro] H.

  20. Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life Cycle Cost...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Life Cycle Cost Analysis, 2013 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life Cycle Cost Analysis, 2013 Handbook describes the annual supplements to the NIST Handbook 135 and...

  1. Critical Factors Driving the High Volumetric Uptake of Methane...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Factors Driving the High Volumetric Uptake of Methane in Cu-3(btc)(2) Previous Next List Hulvey, Zeric; Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Mason, Jarad A.; Tsivion, Ehud; Dougherty,...

  2. Regulation of MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation by GSK-3? involves epigenetic modifications under high glucose conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Chanchal; Kaur, Jasmine; Tikoo, Kulbhushan

    2014-05-15

    Hyperglycemia is a critical risk factor for development and progression of breast cancer. We have recently reported that high glucose induces phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser 10 as well as de-phosphorylation of GSK-3? at Ser 9 in MDA-MB-231 cells. Here, we elucidate the mechanism underlying hyperglycemia-induced proliferation in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. We provide evidence that hyperglycemia led to increased DNA methylation and DNMT1 expression in MDA-MB-231 cells. High glucose condition led to significant increase in the expression of PCNA, cyclin D1 and decrease in the expression of PTPN 12, p21 and PTEN. It also induced hypermethylation of DNA at the promoter region of PTPN 12, whereas hypomethylation at Vimentin and Snail. Silencing of GSK-3? by siRNA prevented histone H3 phosphorylation and reduced DNMT1 expression. We show that chromatin obtained after immunoprecipitation with phospho-histone H3 was hypermethylated under high glucose condition, which indicates a cross-talk between DNA methylation and histone H3 phosphorylation. ChIP-qPCR analysis revealed up-regulation of DNMT1 and metastatic genes viz. Vimentin, Snail and MMP-7 by phospho-histone H3, which were down-regulated upon GSK-3? silencing. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report which shows that interplay between GSK-3? activation, histone H3 phosphorylation and DNA methylation directs proliferation of breast cancer cells. - Highlights: • High glucose induces phosphorylation of histone H3 and dephosphorylation of GSK-3?. • Moreover, hyperglycemia also leads to increased DNA methylation in MDA-MB-231 cells. • Inhibition of GSK-3? prevented histone H3 phosphorylation and reduced DNMT1 levels. • Interplay exists between GSK-3?, histone H3 phosphorylation and DNA methylation.

  3. Role of the endopeptidase 24. 11 in the disposition and metabolism of endogenous atrial natriuretic factor in the rabbit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marleau, S.; Nguyen, T.T.; Du Souich, P.; Bellemare, M.; De Lean, A.; Ong, H. (Universite de Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1991-01-01

    The neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (NEP) has been shown to inactivate the atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) by opening the ring structure. To document the role of NEP in the metabolic fate of ANF in vivo, the effects of an infusion of thiorphan (25 micrograms/min/kg), a specific NEP inhibitor, on the kinetics and metabolism of endogenous ANF were studied in conscious rabbits. A bolus of ({sup 125}I)ANF(99-126) was injected 50 min after the beginning of the infusion of thiorphan. Plasma samples containing the radioactive peptides were separated by reverse-phase HPLC. The parent compound could be separated from at least two other minor metabolites, corresponding to the elution position of ({sup 125}I)ANF(99-105/106-126), the inactive ring-opened metabolite, and of ({sup 125}I)ANF(103-126), an N-truncated analog. The generation of the N-truncated metabolite was increased by thiorphan. Thiorphan also induced an increase in plasma ANF (29%) that was closely associated with a 32% reduction in the systemic clearance of ({sup 125}I)ANF(99-126), whereas no modification in the estimated secretion rate was detected. These results support a role for NEP in the regulation of endogenous ANF plasma levels. These results also suggest that specific inhibition of NEP may result in an increase in the apparent activity of alternative metabolic pathways.

  4. A high-pass detunable quadrature birdcage coil at high-field 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kampani, Vishal Virendra

    2008-10-10

    *coswt*C [2.30] Where, C is the area of the horizontal loop. EMF generated in horizontal loop=EMF1= )sin(** 1 wtCB dt d ?= ? [2.31] EMF generated in vertical loop=EMF2= )cos(** 2 wtCB dt d = ? [2....32] EMF1 and EMF2 passes through quad hybrid on receive side and add in amplitude and the phase of EMF2 is delayed by 90degrees and phase of EMF1 is the same. Thus, signal received at “R” =EMF1+EMF2=-B*C*sinwt + B*C*cos(wt-90) =-B...

  5. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor rescues synaptic plasticity in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    in mice lacking brain- derived neurotrophic factor. Procterm potentiation by brain- derived neurotrophic factor. JCM, Simmons DA (2007b) Brain-derived neurotrophic factor

  6. Overview of recent studies and modifications being made to RHIC to mitigate the effects of a potential failure to the helium distribution system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuozzolo, J.; Bruno, D.; DiLieto, A.; Heppner, G.; Karol, R.; Lessard,E.; Liaw, C-J; McIntyre, G; Mi, C.; Reich, J.; Sandberg, J.; Seberg, S.; Smart, L.; Tallerico, T.; Theisen, C.; Todd, R.; Zapasek R.

    2011-03-28

    In order to cool the superconducting magnets in RHIC, its helium refrigerator distributes 4.5 K helium throughout the tunnel along with helium distribution for the magnet line recoolers, the heat shield, and the associated return lines. The worse case for failure would be a release from the magnet distribution line which operates at 3.5 to 4.5 atmospheres and contains the energized magnet but with a potential energy of 70 MJoules should the insulation system fail or an electrical connection opens. Studies were done to determine release rate of the helium and the resultant reduction in O{sub 2} concentration in the RHIC tunnel and service buildings. Equipment and components were also reviewed for design and reliability and modifications were made to reduce the likelihood of failure and to reduce the volume of helium that could be released.

  7. Constraints on the range lambda of Yukawa-like modifications to the Newtonian inverse-square law of gravitation from Solar System planetary motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2007-09-25

    In this paper we use the latest corrections to the Newton-Einstein secular perihelion rates of some planets of the Solar System, phenomenologically estimated with the EPM2004 ephemerides by the Russian astronomer E.V. Pitjeva, to put severe constraints on the range parameter lambda characterizing the Yukawa-like modifications of the Newtonian inverse-square law of gravitation. It turns out that the range cannot exceed about one tenth of an Astronomical Unit. We assumed neither equivalence principle violating effects nor spatial variations of $\\alpha$ and $\\lambda$. This finding may have important consequences on all the modified theories of gravity involving Yukawa-type terms with range parameters much larger than the Solar System size. However, caution is advised since we, currently have at our disposal only the periehlion extra-rates estimated by Pitjeva: if and when other groups will estimate their own corrections to the secular motion of perihelia, more robust and firm tests may be conducted.

  8. Transverse-momentum dependent modification of dynamic texture in central Au+Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV RID B-7517-2009 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, AK; Bhatia, VS; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopdhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; de Moura, MM; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, SM; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Mazumder, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, G.; Gonzalez, JE; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, VY; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, DK; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Morozov, DA; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Skoro, G.; Smimov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suite, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, OD; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Urkinbaev, A.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, AM; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, SA; Vznuzdaev, M.; Waggoner, WT; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Weiis, R.; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yarevich, VI; Zanevsky, YV; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, ZP; Zolnierczuk, PA; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, AN; STAR Collaboration.

    2005-01-01

    COMMUNICATIONS PHYSICAL REVIEW C 71, 031901(R) (2005) Transverse-momentum dependent modification of dynamic texture in central Au+Au collisions at?sNN = 200 GeV J. Adams,3 M. M. Aggarwal,29 Z. Ahammed,43 J. Amonett,20 B. D. Anderson,20 D. Arkhipkin,13 G. S.... Billmeier,46 L. C. Bland,4 C. O. Blyth,3 B. E. Bonner,34 M. Botje,27 A. Boucham,38 A. Brandin,25 A. Bravar,4 M. Bystersky,11 R. V. Cadman,1 X. Z. Cai,37 H. Caines,48 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,17 J. Castillo,21 D. Cebra,7 Z. Chajecki,44 P. Chaloupka...

  9. Improvement of Carbon Dioxide Sweep Efficiency by Utilization of Microbial Permeability Profile Modification to Reduce the Amount of Oil Bypassed During Carbon Dioxide Flood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darrel Schmitz; Lewis Brown F. Leo Lynch; Brenda Kirkland; Krystal Collins; William Funderburk

    2010-12-31

    The objective of this project was to couple microbial permeability profile modification (MPPM), with carbon dioxide flooding to improve oil recovery from the Upper Cretaceous Little Creek Oil Field situated in Lincoln and Pike counties, MS. This study determined that MPPM technology, which improves production by utilizing environmentally friendly nutrient solutions to simulate the growth of the indigenous microflora in the most permeable zones of the reservoir thus diverting production to less permeable, previously unswept zones, increased oil production without interfering with the carbon dioxide flooding operation. Laboratory tests determined that no microorganisms were produced in formation waters, but were present in cores. Perhaps the single most significant contribution of this study is the demonstration that microorganisms are active at a formation temperature of 115?C (239?F) by using a specially designed culturing device. Laboratory tests were employed to simulate the MPPM process by demonstrating that microorganisms could be activated with the resulting production of oil in coreflood tests performed in the presence of carbon dioxide at 66?C (the highest temperature that could be employed in the coreflood facility). Geological assessment determined significant heterogeneity in the Eutaw Formation, and documented relatively thin, variably-lithified, well-laminated sandstone interbedded with heavily-bioturbated, clay-rich sandstone and shale. Live core samples of the Upper Cretaceous Eutaw Formation from the Heidelberg Field, MS were quantitatively assessed using SEM, and showed that during MPPM permeability modification occurs ubiquitously within pore and throat spaces of 10-20 ?m diameter. Testing of the MPPM procedure in the Little Creek Field showed a significant increase in production occurred in two of the five production test wells; furthermore, the decline curve in each of the production wells became noticeably less steep. This project greatly extends the number of oil fields in which MPPM can be implemented.

  10. Synthesis, crystal structure, and properties of the rhombohedral modification of the thiospinel CuZr{sub 1.86(1)}S{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Yongkwan; McGuire, Michael A.; Yun, Hoseop; DiSalvo, Francis J.

    2010-03-15

    The rhombohedral modification of the thiospinel, CuZr{sub 1.86(1)}S{sub 4}, has been synthesized by the reaction of the constituent elements in an alkali metal halide flux and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The title compound crystallizes in the rhombohedral space group D{sub 3d}{sup 5}-R3-barm (no. 166, a=7.3552(2) A, c=35.832(2) A, V=1678.76(13) A{sup 3}, Z=12, and R/wR=0.0239/0.0624). The structure is composed of close packed S layers, with a stacking order of ...ABCBCABABCACAB....along the c axis. The Zr and Cu atoms occupy the octahedral and tetrahedral holes between S layers, respectively. Three different kinds of S-M-S layers exist in the structure: layer I has fully occupied Zr and Cu sites, layer II has fully occupied Zr sites but no Cu, and layer III has partially occupied Zr and fully occupied Cu sites. Transport and optical properties indicate that the title compound is a small band gap (1.26 eV) n-type semiconductor. - Graphical abstract: The projected view of the rhombohedral modification, CuZr{sub 1.86(1)}S{sub 4}, down the [100] direction. Large letters denote the packing sequence of the S atoms (yellow circles) along the c axis. Zr (black circles) and Cu (red circles) atoms occupy the octahedral and tetrahedral holes, respectively, between close packed S layers.

  11. c-Myc alters substrate utilization and O-GlcNAc protein posttranslational modifications without altering cardiac function during early aortic constriction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ledee, Dolena R.; Smith, Lincoln; Bruce, Margaret; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.; Olson, Aaron

    2015-08-12

    Pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy alters substrate metabolism. Prior work showed that myocardial inactivation of c-Myc (Myc) attenuated hypertrophy and decreased expression of metabolic genes after aortic constriction. Accordingly, we hypothesize that Myc regulates substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during pressure overload hypertrophy from transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and that these metabolic changes impact cardiac function and growth. To test this hypothesis, we subjected mice with cardiac specific, inducible Myc inactivation (MycKO-TAC) and non-transgenic littermates (Cont-TAC) to transverse aortic constriction (TAC; n=7/group). A separate group underwent sham surgery (Sham, n=5). After two weeks, function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate with 13C labeled mixed fatty acids, lactate, ketone bodies and unlabeled glucose and insulin. Cardiac function was similar between groups after TAC although +dP/dT and -dP/dT trended towards improvement in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC. Compared to Sham, Cont-TAC had increased free fatty acid fractional contribution with a concurrent decrease in unlabeled (predominately glucose) contribution. The changes in free fatty acid and unlabeled fractional contributions were abrogated by Myc inactivation during TAC (MycKO-TAC). Additionally, protein posttranslational modification by O-GlcNAc was significantly greater in Cont-TAC versus both Sham and MycKO-TAC. In conclusion, Myc alters substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during early pressure overload hypertrophy without negatively affecting cardiac function. Myc also affects protein posttranslational modifications by O-GlcNAc during hypertrophy.

  12. c-Myc alters substrate utilization and O-GlcNAc protein posttranslational modifications without altering cardiac function during early aortic constriction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ledee, Dolena; Smith, Lincoln; Bruce, Margaret; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy; Portman, Michael A.; Olson, Aaron K.; Bertrand, Luc

    2015-08-12

    Hypertrophic stimuli cause transcription of the proto-oncogene c-Myc (Myc). Prior work showed that myocardial knockout of c-Myc (Myc) attenuated hypertrophy and decreased expression of metabolic genes after aortic constriction. Accordingly, we assessed the interplay between Myc, substrate oxidation and cardiac function during early pressure overload hypertrophy. Mice with cardiac specific, inducible Myc knockout (MycKO-TAC) and non-transgenic littermates (Cont-TAC) were subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC; n = 7/group). Additional groups underwent sham surgery (Cont-Sham and MycKO-Sham, n = 5 per group). After two weeks, function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate with ¹³C labeled mixed fatty acids, lactate, ketone bodies and unlabeled glucose and insulin. Cardiac function was similar between groups after TAC although +dP/dT and -dP/dT trended towards improvement in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC. In sham hearts, Myc knockout did not affect cardiac function or substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle. However, Myc knockout altered fractional contributions during TAC. The unlabeled fractional contribution increased in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC, whereas ketone and free fatty acid fractional contributions decreased. Additionally, protein posttranslational modifications by O-GlcNAc were significantly greater in Cont-TAC versus both Cont-Sham and MycKO-TAC. In conclusion, Myc alters substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during early pressure overload hypertrophy without negatively affecting cardiac function. Myc also affects protein post-translational modifications by O-GlcNAc during hypertrophy, which may regulate Mycinduced metabolic changes.

  13. c-Myc alters substrate utilization and O-GlcNAc protein posttranslational modifications without altering cardiac function during early aortic constriction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ledee, Dolena; Smith, Lincoln; Bruce, Margaret; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy; Portman, Michael A.; Olson, Aaron K.; Bertrand, Luc

    2015-08-12

    Hypertrophic stimuli cause transcription of the proto-oncogene c-Myc (Myc). Prior work showed that myocardial knockout of c-Myc (Myc) attenuated hypertrophy and decreased expression of metabolic genes after aortic constriction. Accordingly, we assessed the interplay between Myc, substrate oxidation and cardiac function during early pressure overload hypertrophy. Mice with cardiac specific, inducible Myc knockout (MycKO-TAC) and non-transgenic littermates (Cont-TAC) were subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC; n = 7/group). Additional groups underwent sham surgery (Cont-Sham and MycKO-Sham, n = 5 per group). After two weeks, function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions to the citric acidmore »cycle by using perfusate with ¹³C labeled mixed fatty acids, lactate, ketone bodies and unlabeled glucose and insulin. Cardiac function was similar between groups after TAC although +dP/dT and -dP/dT trended towards improvement in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC. In sham hearts, Myc knockout did not affect cardiac function or substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle. However, Myc knockout altered fractional contributions during TAC. The unlabeled fractional contribution increased in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC, whereas ketone and free fatty acid fractional contributions decreased. Additionally, protein posttranslational modifications by O-GlcNAc were significantly greater in Cont-TAC versus both Cont-Sham and MycKO-TAC. In conclusion, Myc alters substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during early pressure overload hypertrophy without negatively affecting cardiac function. Myc also affects protein post-translational modifications by O-GlcNAc during hypertrophy, which may regulate Mycinduced metabolic changes.« less

  14. Investigating the reversibility of structural modifications of LixNiyMnzCo1-y-zO? cathode materials during initial charge/discharge, at multiple length scales

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hwang, Sooyeon; Bak, Seong -Min; Kim, Seung Min; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Chang, Wonyoung

    2015-08-11

    In this work, we investigate the structural modifications occurring at the bulk, subsurface, and surface scales of LixNiyMnzCo1-y-zO? (NMC; y, z = 0.8, 0.1 and 0.4, 0.3, respectively) cathode materials during the initial charge/discharge. Various analytical tools, such as X-ray diffraction, selected-area electron diffraction, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and high-resolution electron microscopy, are used to examine the structural properties of the NMC cathode materials at the three different scales. Cut-off voltages of 4.3 and 4.8 V are applied during the electrochemical tests as the normal and extreme conditions, respectively. The high-Ni-content NMC cathode materials exhibit unusual behaviors, which is deviate frommore »the general redox reactions during the charge or discharge. The transition metal (TM) ions in the high-Ni-content NMC cathode materials, which are mostly Ni ions, are reduced at 4.8 V, even though TMs are usually oxidized to maintain charge neutrality upon the removal of Li. It was found that any changes in the crystallographic and electronic structures are mostly reversible down to the sub-surface scale, despite the unexpected reduction of Ni ions. However, after the discharge, traces of the phase transitions remain at the edges of the NMC cathode materials at the scale of a few nanometers (i.e., surface scale). This study demonstrates that the structural modifications in NMC cathode materials are induced by charge as well as discharge at multiple length scales. These changes are nearly reversible after the first cycle, except at the edges of the samples, which should be avoided because these highly localized changes can initiate battery degradation.« less

  15. Applying Human Factors to the Design of Performance Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pancake, Cherri M.

    Applying Human Factors to the Design of Performance Tools Cherri M. Pancake Oregon State University Abstract. After two decades of research in parallel tools for perfor- mance tuning, why are users still dissatis ed? This paper outlines the human factors issues that determine how performance tools

  16. Factors influencing digital technology use in early childhood education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    Factors influencing digital technology use in early childhood education Courtney K. Blackwell extrinsic and intrinsic factors that influence early childhood educators' digital technology use. Survey data from 1234 early childhood educators indicate that attitudes toward the value of technology to aid

  17. Matrix Factorizations for Information Retrieval Dianne P. O'Leary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Dianne P.

    Matrix Factorizations for Information Retrieval Dianne P. O'Leary Computer Science Dept that is predominantly linear algebra · Conclusions A Catalog of Matrix Factorizations c 2006 Dianne P. O'Leary 1 or oscillation · understanding Markov chains c 2006 Dianne P. O'Leary 2 University of Maryland, College Park #12

  18. Scaling factor inconsistencies in neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowell, S. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2006-02-15

    The modern theory of neutrinoless double beta decay includes a scaling factor that has often been treated inconsistently in the literature. The nuclear contribution to the decay half-life can be suppressed by 15%-20% when scaling factors are mismatched. Correspondingly, is overestimated.

  19. Scaling Factor Inconsistencies in Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Cowell

    2005-12-05

    The modern theory of neutrinoless double beta decay includes a scaling factor that has often been treated inconsistently in the literature. The nuclear contribution to the decay half life can be suppressed by 15-20% when scaling factors are mismatched. Correspondingly, $$ is overestimated.

  20. Journal Diffusion Factors a measure of diffusion? Tove Faber Frandsen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Journal Diffusion Factors ­ a measure of diffusion? Tove Faber Frandsen Royal School of Library In this paper we show that the measure of diffusion introduced by Ian Rowlands called the Journal Diffusion Factor (JDF) is highly negatively correlated with the number of citations, leading highly cited journals