Sample records for modern pit facility

  1. EIS-0236-S2: Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on Stockpile Stewardship and Management for a Modern Pit Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's NNSA is responsible for the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile, including production readiness required to maintain that stockpile. Pursuant to National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, NNSA has prepared a Supplement to the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on: (1) whether to proceed with a Modern Pit Facility (MPF); and (2) if so, where to locate a MPF.

  2. Double contingency controls in the pit disassembly and conversion facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, L. (Lowell); Brady-Raap, M. (Michaele)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) will be built and operated at DOE'S Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. The facility will process over three metric tons of plutonium per year. There will be a significant amount of special nuclear material (SNM) moving through the various processing modules in the facility, and this will obviously require well-designed engineering controls to prevent criticality accidents. The PDCF control system will interlock glovebox entry doors closed if the correct amount of SNM has not been removed from the exit enclosure. These same engineering controls will also be used to verify that only plutonium goes to plutonium processing gloveboxes, enriched uranium goes to enriched uranium processing, and that neither goes into non-SNM processing gloveboxes.

  3. Design-only conceptual design report for pit disassembly and conversion facility. Rev 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zygmunt, S.; Christensen, L.; Richardson, C.

    1997-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This design-only conceptual design report (DOCDR) was prepared to support a funding request by the Department of Energy (DOE)-Office of Fissile Material Disposition (OFMD) for engineering design of the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) Project No. 99-D-141. The PDCF will be used to disassemble the nation`s inventory of surplus nuclear weapons pits and convert the plutonium recovered from those pits into a form suitable for storage, international inspection, and final disposition. The PDCF is a complex consisting of a hardened building that will contain the plutonium processes in a safe and secure manner, and conventional buildings and structures that will house support personnel, systems, and equipment. The PDCF uses the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES), a low waste, modular pyroprocessing system to convert pits to plutonium oxide. The PDCF project consists of engineering and design, and construction of the buildings and structures, and engineering and design, procurement, installation, testing and start-up of equipment to disassemble pits and convert plutonium in pits to oxide form. The facility is planned to operate for 10 years, averaging 3.5 metric tons (3.86 tons) of plutonium metal per year. On conclusion of operations, the PDCF will be decontaminated and decommissioned.

  4. Item No. 3 process facilities cost estimates and schedules for facilities capability assurance program nuclear facilities modernization - FY 1989 line item, authorization No. D79

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data is presented concerning cost estimates and schedules for process facilities and nuclear facilities modernization.

  5. Mobile Pit verification system design based on passive special nuclear material verification in weapons storage facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, J. N.; Chin, M. R.; Sjoden, G. E. [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering Program, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 770 State St, Atlanta, GA 30332-0745 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mobile 'drive by' passive radiation detection system to be applied in special nuclear materials (SNM) storage facilities for validation and compliance purposes has been designed through the use of computational modeling and new radiation detection methods. This project was the result of work over a 1 year period to create optimal design specifications to include creation of 3D models using both Monte Carlo and deterministic codes to characterize the gamma and neutron leakage out each surface of SNM-bearing canisters. Results were compared and agreement was demonstrated between both models. Container leakages were then used to determine the expected reaction rates using transport theory in the detectors when placed at varying distances from the can. A 'typical' background signature was incorporated to determine the minimum signatures versus the probability of detection to evaluate moving source protocols with collimation. This established the criteria for verification of source presence and time gating at a given vehicle speed. New methods for the passive detection of SNM were employed and shown to give reliable identification of age and material for highly enriched uranium (HEU) and weapons grade plutonium (WGPu). The finalized 'Mobile Pit Verification System' (MPVS) design demonstrated that a 'drive-by' detection system, collimated and operating at nominally 2 mph, is capable of rapidly verifying each and every weapon pit stored in regularly spaced, shelved storage containers, using completely passive gamma and neutron signatures for HEU and WGPu. This system is ready for real evaluation to demonstrate passive total material accountability in storage facilities. (authors)

  6. Rough order of magnitude cost estimate for immobilization of 50 MT of plutonium sharing existing facilities at Hanford with pit disassembly {ampersand} conversion facility: alternative 11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiSabatino, A., LLNL

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Cost Estimate Report is to identify preliminary capital and operating costs for a facility to immobilize 50 metric tons (nominal) of plutonium as a ceramic in an existing facility at Hanford, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF). The Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF), which is being costed in a separate report by LANL, will also be located in the FMEF in this co-location option.

  7. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit (631-16G) - March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit is located on the west side of SRS. In the early to mid 1980`s, while work was being performed in this area, nine empty, partially buried drums, labeled `du Pont Freon 11`, were found. As a result, Gunsite 720 became one of the original waste units specified in the SRS RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA). The drums were excavated on July 30, 1987 and placed on a pallet at the unit. Both the drums and pallet were removed and disposed of in October 1989. The area around the drums was screened during the excavation and the liquid (rainwater) that collected in the excavated drums was sampled prior to disposal. No evidence of hazardous materials was found. Based on the review of the analytical data and screening techniques used to evaluate all the chemicals of potential concern at Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit, it is recommended that no further remedial action be performed at this unit.

  8. Rough order of magnitude cost estimate for immobilization of 18.2 MT of plutonium sharing existing facilities at Hanford with pit disassembly {ampersand} conversion facility: alternative 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiSabatino, A., LLNL

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Cost Estimate Report is to identify preliminary capital and operating costs for a facility to immobilize 18.2 metric tons (nominal) of plutonium as a ceramic in an existing facility at Hanford, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF). The Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF), which is being costed in a separate report will also be located in the FMEF in this co- location option. The technical engineering data used as the basis for this study is presented in the EIS Data Call Input Report, `Plutonium Immobilization Plant Using Ceramic in Existing Facilities at Hanford.` The FMEF will require minimal facility modifications to accommodate the Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP). Adequate space is available within the FMEF for installation of the immobilization process equipment. Facility HVAC, utility, and support systems exist to support the immobilization operations. Building modifications are primarily the removal of the SAF line (gloveboxes and support equipment) on the 70` level and building interior changes. The plutonium immobilization equipment will primarily occupy the 42` and 70` levels of the FMEF, with the same equipment layout as in the sole occupancy case. The Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility would occupy the 21` and O` (Entry) levels. Elements of the FMEF and adjacent Fuel Assembly Area (FAA) that will be shared by PIP and PDCF include shipping and receiving, laboratory, waste handling, security, offices, maintenance shops, SNM storage vault, and utilities. It was assumed that the existing utilities and support systems are adequate or only need minor upgrades to support both the PIP and PDCF. The PIP cost estimate was reconciled with the PDCF cost estimate to confirm the use and costs of shared systems and personnel. The facility design for a 50 metric ton plutonium throughput plant will be used for the 18.2 metric ton facility. Plutonium conversion operations will operate at the same design rate as the 50 metric ton facility over the 10 year operating period. Some of the process equipment will operate for a shorter period of time and fewer operators will be required. The assumptions, missions, design bases, facility and process descriptions, and accident analyses are the same. Therefore it is assumed that the capital cost for the 18.2 metric ton facility is identical to that of the 50 metric ton facility. However, the following operating costs will be less: consumable materials, equipment replacement and maintenance labor, employment requirements, and waste generation.

  9. Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on Stockpile Stewardship and Management for a Modern Pit Facility

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy,Policy ActDetroit7471Site-Wide Environmental ImpactFRONT

  10. Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on Stockpile Stewardship and Management for a Modern Pit Facility

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy,Policy ActDetroit7471Site-Wide Environmental ImpactFRONTModern

  11. Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on Stockpile Stewardship and Management for a Modern Pit Facility

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy,Policy ActDetroit7471Site-Wide Environmental

  12. Modern tornado design of nuclear and other potentially hazardous facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevenson, J.D. [J.D. Stevenson Consulting Engineer, Cleveland, OH (United States); Zhao, Y. [Battele Energy Systems Group, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tornado wind loads and other tornado phenomena, including tornado missiles and differential pressure effects, have not usually been considered in the design of conventional industrial, commercial, or residential facilities in the United States; however, tornado resistance has often become a design requirement for certain hazardous facilities, such as large nuclear power plants and nuclear materials and waste storage facilities, as well as large liquefied natural gas storage facilities. This article provides a review of current procedures for the design of hazardous industrial facilities to resist tornado effects. 23 refs., 19 figs., 13 tabs.

  13. Modern Solar Facilities Advanced Solar Science, 18 F. Kneer, K. G. Puschmann, A. D. Wittmann (eds.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    physics in the United States are periodically evaluated by panels of the National Research Council (ParkerModern Solar Facilities ­ Advanced Solar Science, 1­8 F. Kneer, K. G. Puschmann, A. D. Wittmann (eds.) c Universit¨atsverlag G¨ottingen 2007 Ground-Based Solar Facilities in the U.S.A. Carsten Denker

  14. MODERN FACILITIES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    program will create contemporary physical infrastructure that enhances research productivity and collaboration. A revitalized campus will be welcoming and sustainable, and will...

  15. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Waste Lot Profile 155.5 for K-1015-A Laundry Pit, East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs, Raymer J.E.

    2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989, the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), which includes the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) National Priorities List. The Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (DOE 1992), effective January 1, 1992, now governs environmental restoration activities conducted under CERCLA at the ORR. Following signing of the FFA, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the state of Tennessee signed the Oak Ridge Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement on June 18, 2003. The purpose of this agreement is to define a streamlined decision-making process to facilitate the accelerated implementation of cleanup, to resolve ORR milestone issues, and to establish future actions necessary to complete the accelerated cleanup plan by the end of fiscal year 2008. While the FFA continues to serve as the overall regulatory framework for remediation, the Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement supplements existing requirements to streamline the decision-making process. The disposal of the K-1015 Laundry Pit waste will be executed in accordance with the 'Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone, 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee' (DOB/ORAH-2161&D2) and the 'Waste Handling Plan for the Consolidated Soil and Waste Sites with Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee' (DOE/OR/01-2328&D1). This waste lot consists of a total of approximately 50 cubic yards of waste that will be disposed at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) as non-containerized waste. This material will be sent to the EMWMF in dump trucks. This profile is for the K-1015-A Laundry Pit and includes debris (e.g., concrete, metal rebar, pipe), incidental soil, plastic and wood, and secondary waste (such as plastic sheeting, hay bales and other erosion control materials, wooden pallets, contaminated equipment, decontamination materials, etc.).

  16. Tritium Facilities Modernization and Consolidation Project Process Waste Assessment (Project S-7726)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, R.H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Oji, L.N.

    1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the Tritium Facility Modernization {ampersand} Consolidation (TFM{ampersand}C) Project (S-7726) at the Savannah River Site (SS), all tritium processing operations in Building 232-H, with the exception of extraction and obsolete/abandoned systems, will be reestablished in Building 233-H. These operations include hydrogen isotopic separation, loading and unloading of tritium shipping and storage containers, tritium recovery from zeolite beds, and stripping of nitrogen flush gas to remove tritium prior to stack discharge. The scope of the TFM{ampersand}C Project also provides for a new replacement R&D tritium test manifold in 233-H, upgrading of the 233- H Purge Stripper and 233-H/234-H building HVAC, a new 234-H motor control center equipment building and relocating 232-H Materials Test Facility metallurgical laboratories (met labs), flow tester and life storage program environment chambers to 234-H.

  17. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit (631-6G), Volume 1 Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Burning/Rubble Pits at the Savannah River Site were usually shallow excavations approximately 3 to 4 meters in depth. Operations at the pits consisted of collecting waste on a continuous basis and burning on a monthly basis. The Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631- 6G (BRP6G) was constructed in 1951 as an unlined earthen pit in surficial sediments for disposal of paper, lumber, cans and empty galvanized steel drums. The unit may have received other materials such as plastics, rubber, rags, cardboard, oil, degreasers, or drummed solvents. The BRP6G was operated from 1951 until 1955. After disposal activities ceased, the area was covered with soil. Hazardous substances, if present, may have migrated into the surrounding soil and/or groundwater. Because of this possibility, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has designated the BRP6G as a Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) subject to the Resource Conservation Recovery Act/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (RCRA/CERCLA) process.

  18. FPGA-based Particle Recognition in the HADES Abstract--Modern FPGA technologies are often employed in nuclear and particle physics experimental facilities to accelerate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jantsch, Axel

    are often employed in nuclear and particle physics experimental facilities to accelerate application the emission direction, the en- ergy, and the mass of the produced particles when the accelerated beam hits1 FPGA-based Particle Recognition in the HADES Experiment Abstract--Modern FPGA technologies

  19. State Waste Discharge Permit application: 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, B.P.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the US Department and Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-E Powerhouse Ash Waste Water discharges to the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit via dedicated pipelines. The 200-E Ash Waste Water is the only discharge to the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-E Powerhouse is a steam generation facility consisting of a coal-handling and preparation section and boilers.

  20. State Waste Discharge Permit application: 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, B.P.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations; the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water discharges to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit via dedicated pipelines. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water is the only discharge to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse is a steam generation facility consisting of a coal-handling and preparation section and boilers.

  1. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 544: Cellars, Mud Pits, and Oil Spills, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss and Catherine Birney

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 544: Cellars, Mud Pits, and Oil Spills, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The corrective action sites (CASs) within CAU 544 are located within Areas 2, 7, 9, 10, 12, 19, and 20 of the Nevada National Security Site. Corrective Action Unit 544 comprises the following CASs: 02-37-08, Cellar & Mud Pit 02-37-09, Cellar & Mud Pit 07-09-01, Mud Pit 09-09-46, U-9itsx20 PS #1A Mud Pit 10-09-01, Mud Pit 12-09-03, Mud Pit 19-09-01, Mud Pits (2) 19-09-03, Mud Pit 19-09-04, Mud Pit 19-25-01, Oil Spill 19-99-06, Waste Spill 20-09-01, Mud Pits (2) 20-09-02, Mud Pit 20-09-03, Mud Pit 20-09-04, Mud Pits (2) 20-09-06, Mud Pit 20-09-07, Mud Pit 20-09-10, Mud Pit 20-25-04, Oil Spills 20-25-05, Oil Spills The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and data confirming that the closure objectives for CASs within CAU 544 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 544 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection.

  2. Description of work for 216-U-Pond test pits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelty, G.G.

    1993-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This description of work (DOW) details the field activities associated with the test pit excavation and soil sampling at the 216- U-10 Pond (U-10 Pond) in the 200 West Area and will serve as a field guide for those performing the work. It will be used in conjunction with the 200-UP-2 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Facility Investigation/Corrective Measures Study (DOE-RL 1993a, [LFI]) and Site Characterization Manual (WHC 1988a). Test pits will be constructed to characterize the vertical extent of contaminants in sediments within and beneath the former U-10 pond.

  3. Introduction to Pits and Weapons Systems (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kautz, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A Nuclear Explosive Package includes the Primary, Secondary, Radiation Case and related components. This is the part of the weapon that produces nuclear yield and it converts mechanical energy into nuclear energy. The pit is composed of materials that allow mechanical energy to be converted to electromagnetic energy. Fabrication processes used are typical of any metal fabrication facility: casting, forming, machining and welding. Some of the materials used in pits include: Plutonium, Uranium, Stainless Steel, Beryllium, Titanium, and Aluminum. Gloveboxes are used for three reasons: (1) Protect workers and public from easily transported, finely divided plutonium oxides - (a) Plutonium is very reactive and produces very fine particulate oxides, (b) While not the 'Most dangerous material in the world' of Manhattan Project lore, plutonium is hazardous to health of workers if not properly controlled; (2) Protect plutonium from reactive materials - (a) Plutonium is extremely reactive at ambient conditions with several components found in air: oxygen, water, hydrogen, (b) As with most reactive metals, reactions with these materials may be violent and difficult to control, (c) As with most fabricated metal products, corrosion may significantly affect the mechanical, chemical, and physical properties of the product; and (3) Provide shielding from radioactive decay products: {alpha}, {gamma}, and {eta} are commonly associated with plutonium decay, as well as highly radioactive materials such as {sup 241}Am and {sup 238}Pu.

  4. School Facility Program- Modernization Grants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: California voters approved [Note: California voters approved Ballot Proposition 39 in November 2012. The new law closes a tax loophole, which is expected to provide $1 billion in additional...

  5. Pit disassembly and conversion demonstration environmental assessment and research and development activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A significant portion of the surplus plutonium is in the form of pits, a nuclear weapons component. Pits are composed of plutonium which is sealed in a metallic shell. These pits would need to be safely disassembled and permanently converted to an unclassified form that would be suitable for long-term disposition and international inspection. To determine the feasibility of an integrated pit disassembly and conversion system, a Pit Disassembly and Conversion Demonstration is proposed to take place at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This demonstration would be done in existing buildings and facilities, and would involve the disassembly of up to 250 pits and conversion of the recovered plutonium to plutonium metal ingots and plutonium dioxide. This demonstration also includes the conversion of up to 80 kilograms of clean plutonium metal to plutonium dioxide because, as part of the disposition process, some surplus plutonium metal may be converted to plutonium dioxide in the same facility as the surplus pits. The equipment to be used for the proposed demonstration addressed in this EA would use some parts of the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) capability, other existing equipment/capacities, plus new equipment that was developed at other sites. In addition, small-scale R and D activities are currently underway as part of the overall surplus plutonium disposition program. These R and D activities are related to pit disassembly and conversion, MOX fuel fabrication, and immobilization (in glass and ceramic forms). They are described in Section 7.0. On May 16, 1997, the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) notified potentially affected states and tribes that this EA would be prepared in accordance with NEPA. This EA has been prepared to provide sufficient information for DOE to determine whether a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) is warranted or whether an EIS must be prepared.

  6. Comparison study of solid-liquid separation techniques for oilfield pit closures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wojtanowicz, A.C.; Field, S.D.; Osterman, M.C.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive bench-scale and full-scale experiments were conducted at the LSU Solids Control Environmental Laboratory in order to evaluate application of the solids-liquid separation technology to oilfield waste pit volume reduction. The experiments addressed chemical conditioning of various pit slurries such as water-base and oil-base mud reserve pit slurries, mixed sludge from offshore operations, and oil production pit slurry. Effective treatment was found for the majority of the waste samples with pH adjustment and with nonionic and low-charge anionic, high molecular weight polymers. Ultimate dewaterability of various samples was determined by use of the belt press bench simulator. Bench simulators of belt press filtration, vacuum filtration and centrifuge sedimentation were used for design and optimization of the full-scale tests. Alternative solid-liquid separation techniques such as vacuum filtration, belt press filtration, screw press filtration and centrifuging were pilot-tested using field-size equipment and 200 bbls samples of water-base mud, reserve pit slurry and production pit sludge. The test data were analyzed at various operating conditions using a new graphical technique. Also, four typical oilfield solid-bowl centrifuges and a modern solid-bowl dewatering decanter were compared in a series of full-scale tests. Finally a preliminary process study on the mechanism of centrifuge separation of flocculated sludges was performed.

  7. Drilling fluids and reserve pit toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leuterman, A.J.J.; Jones, F.V.; Chandler, J.E. (M-I Drilling Fluids Co. (US))

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drilling fluids are now classified as exempt under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste laws. Since 1986, however, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been studying reserve pit contents to determine whether oilfield wastes should continue under this exemption. Concerns regarding reserve pit contents and disposal practices have resulted in state and local governmental regulations that limit traditional methods of construction, closure, and disposal of reserve pit sludge and water. A great deal of attention and study has been focused on drilling fluids that eventually reside in reserve pits. In-house studies show that waste from water-based drilling fluids plays a limited role (if any) in possible hazards associated with reserve pits. Reserve pit water samples and pit sludge was analyzed and collated. Analyses show that water-soluble heavy metals (Cr, Pb, Zn and Mn) in reserve pits are generally undetectable or, if found in the total analysis, are usually bound to clays or organics too tightly to exceed the limitations as determined by the EPA toxicity leachate test. The authors' experience is that most contamination associated with reserve pits involves high salt content from produced waters and/or salt formations, lead contamination from pipe dope, or poorly designed pits, which could allow washouts into surface waters or seepage into groundwater sources. The authors' analyses show that reserve its associated with water-based drilling fluid operations should not be classified as hazardous; however, careful attention attention should be paid to reserve pit construction and closure to help avoid any adverse environmental impact.

  8. KINETICS OF PITTING CORROSION IN GELS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ISAACS, H.S.; ADZIC, G.

    2000-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation has been carried out on stainless steel to determine the important parameters that related the changes in pH around pits to the current coming from the pits. Potentiodynamic measurements at 1 mV/s were made on Type 302 stainless steel in agar containing 1M NaCl and a wide range pH indicator. Many pits suddenly appeared at the pitting potential, as indicated by the red, low pH region around the pits. Simulations of the changes in pH were based on diffusion from a point current source. The results also were considered in terms of the effects of a minimum detectable thickness of pH change within the gel.

  9. Sycamore Canyon Modernization

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Santee, CA The Sycamore Canyon Elementary School is one of five schools in the Santee district that has completed a modernization program. This first round of projects has helped inform the district's ongoing effort to modernize all of their facilities. The total energy use at Sycamore Canyon was successfully reduced by more than one-third, as compared to the pre-retrofit consumption. The school is currently operating with an energy use intensity of only 23 kBtu/SqFt, placing it in the top 99% of schools (per the EnergyStar rating system).

  10. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 357: Mud Pits and Waste Dump, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laura A. Pastor

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 357: Mud Pits and Waste Dump, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. The CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 357 is comprised of 14 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 4, 7, 8, 10, and 25 of the NTS (Figure 1-1). The NTS is located approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 357 consists of 11 CASs that are mud pits located in Areas 7, 8, and 10. The mud pits were associated with drilling activities conducted on the NTS in support of the underground nuclear weapons testing. The remaining three CASs are boxes and pipes associated with Building 1-31.2el, lead bricks, and a waste dump. These CAS are located in Areas 1, 4, and 25, respectively. The following CASs are shown on Figure 1-1: CAS 07-09-02, Mud Pit; CAS 07-09-03, Mud Pit; CAS 07-09-04, Mud Pit; CAS 07-09-05, Mud Pit; CAS 08-09-01, Mud Pit; CAS 08-09-02, Mud Pit; CAS 08-09-03, Mud Pit; CAS 10-09-02, Mud Pit; CAS 10-09-04, Mud Pit; CAS 10-09-05, Mud Pit; CAS 10-09-06, Mud Pit, Stains, Material; CAS 01-99-01, Boxes, Pipes; CAS 04-26-03, Lead Bricks; and CAS 25-15-01, Waste Dump. The purpose of the corrective action activities was to obtain analytical data that supports the closure of CAU 357. Environmental samples were collected during the investigation to determine whether contaminants exist and if detected, their extent. The investigation and sampling strategy was designed to target locations and media most likely to be contaminated (biased sampling). A general site conceptual model was developed for each CAS to support and guide the investigation as outlined in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2003b). This CR summarizes the results of corrective action activities, provides the data confirming the selection of corrective actions, and provides documentation of the completed closure activities conducted in accordance with the SAFER Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2003b). A brief description of the CAU and associated CASs is provided in the following section. A more detailed history of each CAS is provided in the SAFER Plan for CAU 357 (NNSA/NSO, 2003b).

  11. Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES): The United State's demonstration line for pit disassembly and conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Timothy O.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) is a pit disassembly and conversion demonstration line at Los Alamos National Laboratory's plutonium facility. Pits are the core of a nuclear weapon that contains fissile material. With the end of the cold war, the United States began a program to dispose of the fissile material contained in surplus nuclear weapons. In January of 1997, the Department of Energy's Office of Fissile Material Disposition issued a Record of Decision (ROD) on the disposition of surplus plutonium. This decision contained a hybrid option for disposition of the plutonium, immobilization and mixed oxide fuel. ARIES is the cornerstone of the United States plutonium disposition program that supplies the pit demonstration plutonium feed material for either of these disposition pathways. Additionally, information from this demonstration is being used to design the United States Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility. AH of the ARIES technologies were recently developed and incorporate waste minimization. The technologies include pit bisection, hydride/dehydride, metal to oxide conversion process, packaging, and nondestructive assay (NDA). The current schedule for the ARIES integrated Demonstration will begin in the Spring of 1998. The ARIES project involves a number of DOE sites including Los Alamos National Laboratory as the lead laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Sandia National Laboratories. Moreover, the ARIES team is heavily involved in working with Russia in their pit disassembly and conversion activities.

  12. Baseline Risk Assessment for the F-Area Burning/Rubble Pits and Rubble Pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an overview of the Savannah River Site (SRS) and a description of the F-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (BRPs) and Rubble Pit (RP) unit. It also describes the objectives and scope of the baseline risk assessment (BRA).

  13. U.S. Plutonium "Pit" Production: Additional Facilities, Production

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    missions, at considerable cost. Two are at LANL, one at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and two at the Savannah River Site (SRS). NNSA (and possibly also DOE...

  14. Energy saving ideas for open pit mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rixen, W. (Krupp Industrie-Und Stahlbau, Duisberg, Germany); Benecke, K.J.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing cost of diesel fuel is making truck haulage in open pit mines less economic. Belt conveyor systems have much lower operating costs but are not as flexible in their application and require more detailed pit planning. The possibility of combining the flexibility of trucks with the low cost of conveyors is offered by the application of semi-mobile crushing plants followed by belt conveyors for the main haul out of the pit. In the first part of this article. Dr.-Ing W. Rixen describes some of the semi-mobile plants already in operation, while in the second section. Dr.-Ing K.J. Benecke discusses a theoretical case study involving trucks, crushers, and conveyors. Since a belt conveyor cannot transport rocks of a size often produced when blasting hard strata, a crusher must be installed before the belt conveyor to reduce the material to a transportable size. This also serves as a primary crusher. The crushing plant is positioned centrally in the mine and trucks haul overburden and ore from the individual faces to the crusher without having to climb long gradients. Therefore, truck haul distances and operating costs are significantly reduced. The resulting savings in operating costs greatly exceeds the additional capital costs for the crushing plant. The use of fully mobile crushers directly fed by the face shovel is well established. Whereas the partial elimination of truck haulage by semi-mobile in-pit crushers is a more recent development. This latter method restricts truck haulage to in-pit operation only, saving costly haulage of material up-grade out of the pit to the crusher or overburden dump. It is particularly applicable to operations where blending is required. In such cases, the flexibility and adaptability of trucks to frequently changing faces is essential, while the semi-mobile crusher reduces haul distances to a minimum.

  15. Cyberspace modernization :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keliiaa, Curtis M.; McLane, Victor N.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A common challenge across the communications and information technology (IT) sectors is Internet + modernization + complexity + risk + cost. Cyberspace modernization and cyber security risks, issues, and concerns impact service providers, their customers, and the industry at large. Public and private sectors are struggling to solve the problem. New service opportunities lie in mobile voice, video, and data, and machine-to-machine (M2M) information and communication technologies that are migrating not only to predominant Internet Protocol (IP) communications, but also concurrently integrating IP, version 4 (IPv4) and IP, version 6 (IPv6). With reference to the Second Internet and the Internet of Things, next generation information services portend business survivability in the changing global market. The planning, architecture, and design information herein is intended to increase infrastructure preparedness, security, interoperability, resilience, and trust in the midst of such unprecedented change and opportunity. This document is a product of Sandia National Laboratories Tribal Cyber and IPv6 project work. It is a Cyberspace Modernization objective advisory in support of bridging the digital divide through strategic partnership and an informed path forward.

  16. Slag pit practices to improve slag quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mertdogan, A. [Metal Enterprises, Research and Technology, Inc., Homewood, IL (United States); Gambol, F.C.; Spaeth, J.R.; Zbos, J.; Batka, R. [Acme Steel Co., Chicago, IL (United States); Tolliver, D. [Heckett MultiServ, Whiting, IN (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Slag quality had deteriorated recently. Without the explicit approval for slag quality by the Illinois Department of Transportation, the slag would not be saleable. Disposal of slag to landfills was going to be an expensive solution and rife with environmental concerns. A slag quality control program embarked on in mid-1994 restored slag quality to desired specifications. This paper describes the changes in slag pit practice adopted following extensive tests performed on cooling slag under controlled conditions.

  17. Introduction: Modern Energy and Modern Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    by a sudden technological breakthrough. As to the former, low- entropy energy from the sun was (and isIntroduction: Modern Energy and Modern Society John Byrne, Noah Toly, and Young-Doo Wang Spiking of the global energy system. Rising in importance are headlines that associate modern energy with modern

  18. Coordinate Measuring Machine Pit Artifact Inspection Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montano, Joshua D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this document is to outline a procedure for dimensional measurement of Los Alamos National Laboratory's CMM Pit Artifact. This procedure will be used by the Manufacturing Practice's Inspection Technology Subgroup of the Interagency Manufacturing Operations Group and Joint Operations Weapon Operations Group (IMOG/JOWOG 39) round robin participants. The intent is to assess the state of industry within the Nuclear Weapons Complex for measurements made on this type of part and find which current measurement strategies and techniques produce the best results.

  19. Plutonium Pits | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoidLabPhysicsPits | National Nuclear Security

  20. A strengthened formulation for the open pit mine production ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natashia Boland

    2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 26, 2007 ... Abstract: We present a strengthened integer programming formulation for the open pit mine production scheduling problem, where the...

  1. acid pit chemical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    corrosion is high because Braatz, Richard D. 67 AnimalChemical Pits and Glass Holes Remedial Action Closure Report Addendum Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

  2. 241-AY-102 Leak Detection Pit Drain Line Inspection Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boomer, Kayle D. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Engeman, Jason K. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Gunter, Jason R. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Joslyn, Cameron C. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Vazquez, Brandon J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Venetz, Theodore J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Garfield, John S. [AEM Consulting (United States)

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a description of the design components, operational approach, and results from the Tank AY-102 leak detection pit drain piping visual inspection. To perform this inspection a custom robotic crawler with a deployment device was designed, built, and operated by IHI Southwest Technologies, Inc. for WRPS to inspect the 6-inch leak detection pit drain line.

  3. INTERGRANULAR CORROSION OF SINGLE PHASE ALUMINIUM AS A PITTING PHENOMENON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    INTERGRANULAR CORROSION OF SINGLE PHASE ALUMINIUM AS A PITTING PHENOMENON M. METZGER Department of pitting corrosion in sulfuric acid containing sodium chloride were described. Intergranular fissuring in producing this type of attack. The intergranular corrosion phenomena which are exhibited by high purity

  4. Network technology for depot modernization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostick, C.J.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to summarize existing and emerging information system technology and standards applicable to Depot System Command (DESCOM) modernization efforts. The intent of this summarization is to provide the Revitalization of Army Depots for the Year 2000 (READY 2000) team a clear understanding of the enabling information system technologies required to support effective modernization activities. Much of the information contained in this report was acquired during the last year in support of the US Army Armament, Munitions, and Chemical Command (AMCCOM) Facility Integrated Manufacturing Management System (FIMMS) project at PNL, which is targeting the modernization of plant-wide information systems at Army Ammunition Plants. The objective of information system modernization is to improve the effectiveness of an organization in performing its mission. Information system modernization strives to meet this objective by creating an environment where data is electronically captured near the source and readily available to all areas of the organization. Advanced networks, together with related information system technology, are the enabling mechanisms that make modern information system infrastructures possible. The intent of this paper is to present an overview of advanced information system network technology to support depot modernization planners in making technology management decisions. Existing and emerging Open System Interconnection (OSI) and Government Open System Interconnection Profile (GOSIP) standards are explained, as well as a brief assessment of existing products compliant with these standards. Finally, recommendations for achieving plant-wide integration using existing products are presented, and migration strategies for full OSI compliance are introduced. 5 refs., 16 figs. (JF)

  5. White phosphorus pits focused feasibility study final July 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, B.; Martino, L.

    2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The White Phosphorus Burning Pits (WPP) Area of Concern (AOC) is a site of about 5.5 acres (2.2 ha) located in the J-Field Study Area, in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland (Figure 1.1). Considerable information about the WPP exists as a result of efforts to characterize the hazards associated with J-Field. Contamination in the J-Field Study Area was first detected during an environmental survey of the APG Edgewood Area conducted in 1977 and 1978 (Nemeth et al. 1983) by the U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA; predecessor to the U.S. Army Environmental Center). As part of a subsequent USATHAMA environmental survey, 11 wells were installed and sampled at J-Field (three of them at the WPP) (Nemeth 1989). Contamination was also detected in 1983 during a munitions disposal survey conducted by Princeton Aqua Science (1984). The Princeton Aqua Science investigation involved installing and sampling nine wells (four at the WPP) and collecting and analyzing surficial and deep composite soil samples (including samples from the WPP area). In 1986, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit (MD3-21-002-1355) requiring a post-wide RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) and a hydrogeologic assessment of J-Field. In 1987, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a two-phase hydrogeologic assessment in which data were collected to model groundwater flow at J-Field. Soil-gas investigations were conducted, several well clusters were installed (four at the WPP), a groundwater flow model was developed, and groundwater and surface water monitoring programs were established that continue today. The results of the USGS study were published by Hughes (1993).

  6. PIT Tag Elimination from Management Questions Hatchery .............................................1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .............................................1 Habitat................................................2 Hydro Tag Type ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? (2013-3-4)_FTF_PIT_Elimination 2 #12;Hydro 5A hydro passage performance Hydro passage conditions adult passage standards and targets Conditions of in

  7. american pit viper: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vipers and raises doubts that any other sense plays a major role in this behaviour. 1999 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour When disturbed, venomous pit vipers...

  8. Mastering the art of plutonium pit production to ensure national security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of unusable pits. In addition, efficiency is lost. Pit manufacturing is a "use it or lose it" endeavor;- 2 - #12;- 3 - Plutonium pit manufacturing meets goals, prepares for future needs: reviving a lost director for the Plutonium Sustainment Program. Since 2007, the Laboratory has manufactured new pits

  9. Method and computer program product for maintenance and modernization backlogging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattimore, Bernard G; Reynolds, Paul E; Farrell, Jill M

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    According to one embodiment, a computer program product for determining future facility conditions includes a computer readable medium having computer readable program code stored therein. The computer readable program code includes computer readable program code for calculating a time period specific maintenance cost, for calculating a time period specific modernization factor, and for calculating a time period specific backlog factor. Future facility conditions equal the time period specific maintenance cost plus the time period specific modernization factor plus the time period specific backlog factor. In another embodiment, a computer-implemented method for calculating future facility conditions includes calculating a time period specific maintenance cost, calculating a time period specific modernization factor, and calculating a time period specific backlog factor. Future facility conditions equal the time period specific maintenance cost plus the time period specific modernization factor plus the time period specific backlog factor. Other embodiments are also presented.

  10. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristensen, Hans M. [Federation of American Scientists, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  11. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 177: Mud Pits and Cellars Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU)177: Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This Closure Report complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The Corrective Action Sites (CASs) within CAU 177 are located within Areas 8, 9, 19, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of this Closure Report is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and data that confirm the corrective actions implemented for CAU 177 CASs.

  12. Perchlorate reduction using electrochemically induced pitting corrosion of zero-valent titanium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Chun Woo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    reduced to chloride using electrochemically developed pitting corrosion on Ti(0). Perchlorate reduction was believed to be caused by an active reductant (dissolved Ti(II)) during the pitting corrosion of Ti(0). The rate of perchlorate reduction...

  13. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 234: Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 234, Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills, located in Areas 2, 3, 4, 12, and 15 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO,1996; as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit 234 is comprised of the following 12 corrective action sites: 02-09-48, Area 2 Mud Plant #1 02-09-49, Area 2 Mud Plant #2 02-99-05, Mud Spill 03-09-02, Mud Dump Trenches 04-44-02, Mud Spill 04-99-02, Mud Spill 12-09-01, Mud Pit 12-09-04, Mud Pit 12-09-08, Mud Pit 12-30-14, Cellar 12-99-07, Mud Dump 15-09-01, Mud Pit The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 234 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 234: Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: Determine whether contaminants of concern are present. If contaminants of concern are present, determine their extent. Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 234 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs.

  14. accelerated pitting corrosion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accelerated pitting corrosion First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Standard guide for...

  15. Global Methane Emissions from Pit Latrines Matthew C. Reid,*,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    to 944 $/ton carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2e) in Africa and 46 to 97 $/ton CO2e in Asia. INTRODUCTION in pits. In this study, we develop a spatially explicit approach to account for local hydrological control with other CH4 mitigation measures in organic waste sectors, with marginal abatement costs ranging from 57

  16. Stainless steel pitting and early-stage stress corrosion cracking under ultra-low elastic load

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    in the nuclear power plants, petrochemical and aerospace industries, bridges and ships. Much effort has been of the reasons is that the mechanisms of SCC crack initiation and propagation are possibly altered in the process, when pitting precedes SCC, the fundamental steps in the overall process include: pit initiation, pit

  17. The pitting behavior of structural electrodeposits used in MEMS applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, Frederick Douglas; Serna, Lysle M.; Martinez, Michael A.

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIGA is an acronym for the German terms Lithographie, Galvanoformung, Abformung, which describe a microfabrication process for high aspect ratio, structural parts based on electrodeposition of a metal into a poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) mold. LIGA produced parts have very high dimensional tolerances (on the order of a micron) and can vary in size from microns to centimeters. These properties make LIGA parts ideal for incorporation into MEMS devices or for other applications where strict tolerances must be met; however, functionality of the parts can only be maintained if they remain dimensionally stable throughout their lifetime. It follows that any form of corrosion attack (e.g., uniform dissolution, localized pitting, environmental cracking, etc.) cannot be tolerated. This presentation focuses on the pitting behavior of Ni electrodeposits, specifically addressing the influence of the following: grain structure, alloy composition, impurities, plating conditions, post plating processing (including chemical and thermal treatment), galvanic interactions and environment (aqueous vs. atmospheric). A small subset of these results is summarized. A typical LIGA part is shown in Figure 1. Due to the small size scale, electrochemical testing was performed using a capillary based test system. Although very small test areas can be probed with this system (e.g., Figure 2), typically capillaries on the order of 80 to 90 ?m's were used in the testing. All LIGA parts tested in the as-received condition had better pitting resistance than the high purity wrought Ni material used as a control. In the case of LIGA-Ni and LIGA-Ni-Mn, no detrimental effects were observed due to aging at 700C. Ni-S (approximately 500 ppm S), showed good as-received pitting behavior but decreased pitting resistance with thermal aging. Aged Ni-S showed dramatic increases in grain size (from single {micro}m's to 100's of {micro}m's), and significant segregation of S to the boundaries. The capillary test cell was used to measure pitting potentials at the boundaries and within grains (Figure 3) with the results clearly showing the lowered pit resistance being due to the S-rich boundaries. It is believed that the process used to release the LIGA parts from the Cu substrate acts as a pickling agent for the LIGA parts, resulting in removal of surface impurities and detrimental alloying additions. EIS data from freshly polished samples exposed to the release bath support this hypothesis; RP values for all LIGA materials and for wrought Ni, continuously increase during exposure. Mechanical polishing of LIGA parts prior to electrochemical testing consistently resulted in lowering the pitting potentials to a range bounded by Ni 201 and high purity Ni. The as-received vs. polished behavior also effects the galvanic interactions with noble metals. When as-produced material is coupled to Au, initially the LIGA material acts as the cathode, though eventually the behavior switches such that the LIGA becomes the anode. Overall, the LIGA produced Ni and Ni alloys examined in this work demonstrated pitting behavior similar to wrought Ni, only showing reduced resistance when specific metallurgical and environmental conditions were met.

  18. Pitting behavior of type 17-4 PH stainless steel weldments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raja, K.S. [EWAC Alloys Limited, Bombay (India); Rao, K.P. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Madras (India). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical methods of measuring pitting potentials (E{sub pit}) were used to study the pitting resistance of type 17% Cr-4% Ni (17-4, UNS S17400) precipitation hardenable (PH) stainless steel (SS) weldments. The main objectives were to evaluate the pitting resistance of the base metal, the heat-affected zone (HAZ), and the weld metal portions of 17-4 PH SS welds welded autogenously using the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. Effects of different preweld and postweld heat treatments (PWHT) and of the weld heat input on pitting resistance were studied. Results showed a solution-treated base metal had a relatively lower pitting resistance. In contrast, aging preceded by solution treatment improved pitting resistance. Direct peak aging after welding improved pitting resistance of the weld metals, but it decreased resistance of the HAZ. Welding with relatively lower weld heat input decreased the pitting resistance of the weld metals, but the reverse occurred in the case of the HAZ. Solution treatment followed by peak aging nullified effects of the weld heat input and the preweld heat treatments on pitting resistance of the different portions of the weldment. This heat treatment produced relatively higher pitting resistance in all portions of the weldment.

  19. Closed loop drilling systems can eliminate reserve pit costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Astrella, L.; Wiemers, R. [Environmental Equipment Corp., Denver, CO (United States)

    1996-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Closed loop systems have become more dependable and efficient, making drilling without a mud pit an economically attractive alternative in many drilling programs. A closed loop system is defined simply as a mechanical and chemical system which will allow an operator to drill a well without using a reserve pit. A closed loop system includes some solids control equipment (such as the shaker, desander, desilter, and proper centrifuge), which may already be on the rig, and a polymer flocculation unit, which is not part of a conventional rig`s solids control system. This paper reviews the various methods of flocculation and the performance of the different units. It then goes on to describe costs and regulations associated with both methods of handling drilling wastes.

  20. Geologic report for the Weldon Spring Raffinate Pits Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary geologic site characterization study was conducted at the Weldon Spring Raffinate Pits Site, which is part of the Weldon Spring Site, in St. Charles County, Missouri. The Raffinate Pits Site is under the custody of the Department of Energy (DOE). Surrounding properties, including the Weldon Spring chemical plant, are under the control of the Department of the Army. The study determined the following parameters: site stratigraphy, lithology and general conditions of each stratigraphic unit, and groundwater characteristics and their relation to the geology. These parameters were used to evaluate the potential of the site to adequately store low-level radioactive wastes. The site investigation included trenching, geophysical surveying, borehole drilling and sampling, and installing observation wells and piezometers to monitor groundwater and pore pressures.

  1. Data Summary Report D-Area Burning/Rubble Pits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to verify that all analytical data collected at the D-Area Burning/Rubble Pits at the Savannah River Site for use in developing risk assessment and potential remediation procedures have been validated at the appropriate level. Any discrepancies or reasons why the data should be rejected for this purpose will be addressed. This report documents the data validation procedures used by Environmental Monitoring Section, Exploration Resources, and RUST Environment {ampersand} Infrastructure for Assigning qualifiers.

  2. Conditions of Employment Modern Apprentice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    Conditions of Employment Modern Apprentice 1. GENERAL CONDITIONS Members of staff are subject. Modern Apprentices are required under this agreement to undertake training, attend courses and carry out

  3. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 356: Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with Errata Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NNSA /NV

    2002-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 356, Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. This CAU is located in Areas 3 and 20 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 356 consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 03-04-01, Area 3 Change House Septic System; 03-09-01, Mud Pit Spill Over; 03-09-03, Mud Pit; 03-09-04, Mud Pit; 03-09-05, Mud Pit; 20-16-01, Landfill; and 20-22-21, Drums. This CR identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's (NNSA/NV's) recommendation that no further corrective action and closure in place is deemed necessary for CAU 356. This recommendation is based on the results of field investigation/closure activities conducted November 20, 2001, through January 3, 2002, and March 11 to 14, 2002. These activities were conducted in accordance with the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan (SAFER) for CAU 356. For CASs 03-09-01, 03-09-03, 20-16-01, and 22-20-21, analytes detected in soil during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against Preliminary Action Levels (PALs) and it was determined that no Contaminants of Concern (COCs) were present. Therefore, no further action is necessary for the soil at these CASs. For CASs 03-04-01, 03-09-04, and 03-09-05, analytes detected in soil during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against PALs and identifies total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) and radionuclides (i.e., americium-241 and/or plutonium 239/240) as COCs. The nature, extent, and concentration of the TPH and radionuclide COCs were bounded by sampling and shown to be relatively immobile. Therefore, closure in place is recommended for these CASs in CAU 356. Further, use restrictions are not required at this CAU beyond the NTS use restrictions identified in the SAFER Plan. In addition, the septic tank associated with CAU 356 will be closed in accordance with applicable regulations.

  4. LANSCE | Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LINAC Outreach Affiliations Visiting LANSCE Facilities Isotope Production Facility Lujan Neutron Scattering Center MaRIE Proton Radiography Ultracold Neutrons Weapons Neutron...

  5. Sandia Energy - Grid Modernization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel - XI International Workshop (356 downloads ) ECIS SMU Key Facilities 2011 (427 downloads ) Economic and Policy Analyses Provide Key...

  6. Explanation of Significant Difference (ESD) for the A-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (731-A/1A) and Rubble Pit (731-2A) (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, Randall

    2000-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The A-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (731-A/1A) and Rubble Pit (731-2A) (ABRP) operable unit (OU) is located in the northwest portion of Savannah River Site (SRS), approximately 2.4 kilometers (1.5 miles) south of the A/M Area operations. Between 1951 and 1973, Pits 731-A and 731-1A were used to burn paper, plastics, wood, rubber, rags, cardboard, oil, degreasers, and solvents. Combustible materials were burned monthly. After burning was discontinued in 1973, Pits 731-A and 731-1A were also converted to rubble pits and used to dispose of concrete rubble, bricks, tile, asphalt, plastics, metal, wood products, and rubber until about 1978. When the pits were filled to capacity, there were covered with compacted clay-rich native soils and vegetation was established. Pit 731-2A was only used as a rubble pit until 1983 after which the area was backfilled and seeded. Two other potential source areas within the OU were investigated and found to be clean. The water table aquifer (M-Area aquifer) was also investigated.

  7. Effect of annealing temperature on the pitting corrosion resistance of super duplex stainless steel UNS S32750

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan Hua; Jiang Yiming; Deng Bo; Sun Tao; Xu Juliang [Department of Material Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Li Jin, E-mail: jinli@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Material Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The pitting corrosion resistance of commercial super duplex stainless steels SAF2507 (UNS S32750) annealed at seven different temperatures ranging from 1030 deg. C to 1200 deg. C for 2 h has been investigated by means of potentiostatic critical pitting temperature. The microstructural evolution and pit morphologies of the specimens were studied through optical/scanning electron microscope. Increasing annealing temperature from 1030 deg. C to 1080 deg. C elevates the critical pitting temperature, whereas continuing to increase the annealing temperature to 1200 deg. C decreases the critical pitting temperature. The specimens annealed at 1080 deg. C for 2 h exhibit the best pitting corrosion resistance with the highest critical pitting temperature. The pit morphologies show that the pit initiation sites transfer from austenite phase to ferrite phase as the annealing temperature increases. The aforementioned results can be explained by the variation of pitting resistance equivalent number of ferrite and austenite phase as the annealing temperature changes.

  8. Facility Microgrids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

  9. Electronic structures of GeSi nanoislands grown on pit-patterned Si(001) substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Han, E-mail: Dabombyh@aliyun.com; Yu, Zhongyuan [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876, P.R.China (China)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Patterning pit on Si(001) substrate prior to Ge deposition is an important approach to achieve GeSi nanoislands with high ordering and size uniformity. In present work, the electronic structures of realistic uncapped pyramid, dome, barn and cupola nanoislands grown in (105) pits are systematically investigated by solving Schrdinger equation for heavy-hole, which resorts to inhomogeneous strain distribution and nonlinear composition-dependent band parameters. Uniform, partitioned and equilibrium composition profile (CP) in nanoisland and inverted pyramid structure are simulated separately. We demonstrate the huge impact of composition profile on localization of heavy-hole: wave function of ground state is confined near pit facets for uniform CP, at bottom of nanoisland for partitioned CP and at top of nanoisland for equilibrium CP. Moreover, such localization is gradually compromised by the size effect as pit filling ratio or pit size decreases. The results pave the fundamental guideline of designing nanoislands on pit-patterned substrates for desired applications.

  10. Method to prevent/mitigate steam explosions in casting pits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam explosions can be prevented or mitigated during a metal casting process by the placement of a perforated flooring system in the casting pit. An upward flow of compressed gas through this perforated flooring system is introduced during the casting process to produce a buffer layer between any spilled molten metal and the cooling water in the reservoir. This buffer layer provides a hydrodynamic layer which acts to prevent or mitigate steam explosions resulting from hot, molten metal being spilled into or onto the cooling water.

  11. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 177: Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 177, Mud Pits and Cellars, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 177 consists of the 12 following Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 8, 9, 19, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site: (1) 08-23-01, Mud Pit and Cellar; (2) 09-09-41, Unknown No.3 Mud Pit/Disposal Area; (3) 09-09-45, U-9bz PS No.1A Mud Pit (1) and Cellar; (4) 09-23-05, Mud Pit and Cellar; (5) 09-23-08, Mud Pit and Cellar; (6) 09-23-09, U-9itsx20 PS No.1A Cellar; (7) 10-23-02, Mud Pit and Cellar; (8) 10-23-03, Mud Pit and Cellar; (9) 19-23-01, Mud Pit and Cellar; (10) 19-23-02, Cellar and Waste Storage Area; (11) 19-23-03, Cellar with Casing; and (12) 20-23-07, Cellar. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 177 using the SAFER process. The data quality objective process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure options: (1) investigation and confirmation that no contamination exists above the preliminary action levels (PALs), leading to a no further action declaration, or (2) characterization of the nature and extent of contamination, leading to closure in place with use restrictions. The expected closure options were selected based on available information including contaminants of potential concern, future land use, and assumed risks. A decision flow process was developed to outline the collection of data necessary to achieve closure. There are two decisions that need to be answered for closure. Decision I is to determine whether contaminants of potential concern are present in concentrations exceeding the PALs. If contaminants of potential concern are found to be present above PALs, Decision II will be to determine the extent of contamination and generate the information necessary to close the site in place and implement the appropriate administrative controls (i.e., use restrictions). The following text summarizes the types of activities that will support the closure of CAU 177: (1) Perform site preparation activities (e.g., boundary setup, utility clearances, vegetation removal, movement/removal of fencing and debris). (2) Remove non-hazardous debris at various CASs, as required. (3) Collect environmental samples of residual drilling mud and soil using probabilistic (mud pits) and judgmental (cellars) sampling to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) (i.e., nature of contamination) if these data do not already exist. Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil if COCs exist) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. (4) Establish no further action as the corrective action if no contaminants are detected above final action levels. (5) If COCs are present at a CAS, establish the corrective action and implement appropriate use restrictions. (6) Confirm the preferred closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment. (7) Document all closure activities for CAU 177 in a Closure Report.

  12. U.S. Plutonium "Pit" Production: Additional Facilities, Production

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 | NUMBER643 DOE NNSAOak

  13. Closure of the Brewer Gold Mine by pit backfilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis-Russ, A.; Lupo, J.F. [Titan Environmental Corp., Englewood, CO (United States); Bronson, J.M. [Titan Environmental Corp., Tempe, AZ (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Brewer Gold Mine, located in north-central South Carolina, is implementing an innovative reclamation plan that includes backfilling the main Brewer open pit with mine waste. The primary goals of the closure are to reduce acid rock drainage and minimize or eliminate long-term operation and maintenance requirements by restoring the site property to approximate pre-mining topography. The plan calls for consolidation of approximately 200 acres of waste into approximately 20 hectares (50 acres). Much of the material to be backfilled into the pit, including spent heap leach material and waste rock, has acid-generating potential. Therefore, the backfill design integrated geochemical properties of the backfill materials with expected post-closure conditions. A prime consideration was the final position of the water table. Since mining at the site started in the early 1800`s, no records exist of the original groundwater levels. Therefore, the design incorporates a large anoxic limestone drain to control the final groundwater level. Additional amendments are to be placed in targeted areas of the backfill to maximize their utilization. A low-permeability cap system that includes a GEOSYNTHETIC clay liner has been designed to limit infiltration into the backfill.

  14. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

  15. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

  16. Prospects for CHIPS (R&D of Water Cherenkov Detectors in Mine Pits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karol Lang

    2015-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    CHIPS is an R&D program focused on designing and constructing a cost-effective large water Cherenkov detector (WCD) to study neutrino oscillations using accelerator beams. Traditional WCD's with a low energy threshold have been built in special large underground caverns. Civil construction of such facilities is costly and the excavation phase significantly delays the detector installation although, in the end, it offers a well-shielded apparatus with versatile physics program. Using concepts developed for the LBNE WCD (arXiv:1204.2295), we propose to submerge a detector in a deep water reservoir, which avoids the excavation and exploits the directionality of an accelerator neutrino beam for optimizing the detector. Following the LOI (arXiv:1307.5918), we have submerged a small test detector in a mine pit in Minnesota, 7 mrad off the NuMI axis. By adopting some technical ideas and solutions from IceCube and KM3NeT experiments, we are now focusing on designing a large (10 - 20 kt) isolated water container to house photodetectors with underwater readout and triggering. Here, we describe in more detail the CHIPS concept, its physics motivation and potential, and we briefly present the ongoing R&D activities

  17. Close Out Report for the Ash Pit Operable Unit I Area of Concern 2F

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I to the early 1950's. The Ash Pits were also used for disposal of coal ash from various buildingsFinal Close Out Report for the Ash Pit Operable Unit I Area of Concern 2F February 5, 2004..................................................................................................2 Figure 1 - Ash Level Verification Borings

  18. The Turkey Transcription Factor Pit-1/GHF-1 Can Activate the Turkey Prolactin and Growth Hormone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramachandran, Ramesh

    in regulating the prolactin (Prl) and growth hormone (GH) genes in mammals. In this study, the role that Pit-1 Pit-1 activated the turkey Prl, turkey GH, and rat Prl promoters 3.8-, 3.7-, and 12.5-fold reduction in the activation of the turkey Prl, turkey GH, and rat Prl promoters, respectively. Unex

  19. Cleanup Verification Package for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. W. Clark and H. M Sulloway

    2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit. This waste site received coal ash from the 100-F Area coal-fired steam plant. Leakage of process effluent from the 116-F-14 , 107-F Retention Basins flowed south into the ash pit, contaminating the northern portion.

  20. Cleanup Verification Package for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. W. Clark and H. M. Sulloway

    2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit. This waste site received coal ash from the 100-F Area coal-fired steam plant. Leakage of process effluent from the 116-F-14 , 107-F Retention Basins flowed south into the ash pit, contaminating the northern portion.

  1. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for the Nevada Test Site's Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit (Corrective Action Unit 342) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 342 is comprised of Corrective Action Site 23-56-01. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for Corrective Action Unit 342. The scope of this document consists of the following: Develop corrective action objectives; Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; Develop corrective action alternatives; Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of corrective action alternatives in relation to corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for the Corrective Action Unit.

  2. High Rate Laser Pitting Technique for Solar Cell Texturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hans J. Herfurth; Henrikki Pantsar

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    High rate laser pitting technique for solar cell texturing Efficiency of crystalline silicon solar cells can be improved by creating a texture on the surface to increase optical absorption. Different techniques have been developed for texturing, with the current state-of-the-art (SOA) being wet chemical etching. The process has poor optical performance, produces surfaces that are difficult to passivate or contact and is relatively expensive due to the use of hazardous chemicals. This project shall develop an alternative process for texturing mc-Si using laser micromachining. It will have the following features compared to the current SOA texturing process: -Superior optical surfaces for reduced front-surface reflection and enhanced optical absorption in thin mc-Si substrates -Improved surface passivation -More easily integrated into advanced back-contact cell concepts -Reduced use of hazardous chemicals and waste treatment -Similar or lower cost The process is based on laser pitting. The objective is to develop and demonstrate a high rate laser pitting process which will exceed the rate of former laser texturing processes by a factor of ten. The laser and scanning technologies will be demonstrated on a laboratory scale, but will use inherently technologies that can easily be scaled to production rates. The drastic increase in process velocity is required for the process to be implemented as an in-line process in PV manufacturing. The project includes laser process development, development of advanced optical systems for beam manipulation and cell reflectivity and efficiency testing. An improvement of over 0.5% absolute in efficiency is anticipated after laser-based texturing. The surface textures will be characterized optically, and solar cells will be fabricated with the new laser texturing to ensure that the new process is compatible with high-efficiency cell processing. The result will be demonstration of a prototype process that is suitable for scale-up to a production tool and process. The developed technique will have an reducing impact on product pricing. As efficiency has a substantial impact on the economics of solar cell production due to the high material cost content; in essence, improved efficiency through cost-effective texturing reduces the material cost component since the product is priced in terms of $/W. The project is a collaboration between Fraunhofer USA, Inc. and a c-Si PV manufacturer.

  3. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 126-B-3, 184-B Coal Pit Dumping Area, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-028

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The 126-B-3 waste site is the former coal storage pit for the 184-B Powerhouse. During demolition operations in the 1970s, the site was used for disposal of demolition debris from 100-B/C Area facilities. The site has been remediated by removing debris and contaminated soils. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  4. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 128-B-2, 100-B Burn Pit #2 Waste Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-038

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Carlson

    2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The 128-B-2 waste site was a burn pit historically used for the disposal of combustible and noncombustible wastes, including paint and solvents, office waste, concrete debris, and metallic debris. This site has been remediated by removing approximately 5,627 bank cubic meters of debris, ash, and contaminated soil to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  5. Remedial Action Work Plan Amchitka Island Mud Pit Closures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV

    2001-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This remedial action work plan presents the project organization and construction procedures developed for the performance of the remedial actions at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE's) sites on Amchitka Island, Alaska. During the late1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (the predecessor agency to DOE) used Amchitka Island as a site for underground nuclear tests. A total of nine sites on the Island were considered for nuclear testing; however, tests were only conducted at three sites (i.e., Long Shot in 1965, Milrow in 1969, and Cannikin in 1971). In addition to these three sites, large diameter emplacement holes were drilled in two other locations (Sites D and F) and an exploratory hole was in a third location (Site E). It was estimated that approximately 195 acres were disturbed by drilling or preparation for drilling in conjunction with these activities. The disturbed areas include access roads, spoil-disposal areas, mud pits which have impacted the environment, and an underground storage tank at the hot mix plant which was used to support asphalt-paving operations on the island. The remedial action objective for Amchitka Island is to eliminate human and ecological exposure to contaminants by capping drilling mud pits, removing the tank contents, and closing the tank in place. The remedial actions will meet State of Alaska regulations, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge management goals, address stakeholder concerns, and address the cultural beliefs and practices of the native people. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office will conduct work on Amchitka Island under the authority of the Comprehensive Emergency Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Field activities are scheduled to take place May through September 2001. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent Closure Report.

  6. Measuring energy savings for modernization projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, J.D. [Cowan Quality Buildings, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Schiller, S. [Schiller Associates, Oakland, CA (United States)]|[Schiller Associates, Boulder, OH (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy savings are often used to help finance a facility`s modernization program. The process of determining these savings has come under the microscope as facility owners often pay energy service companies based on savings measurements. Unfortunately, financiers and facility owners usually do not appreciate that determination of savings is an Art, subject to discretion. To them, savings are determined by accountants subtracting one year`s costs from another year`s costs. For those wishing to properly quantify avoided cost, engineering judgments must be added to this simplistic subtraction process. How do you measure something you don`t have? This is the challenge in measuring energy savings. The absence of energy use cannot be measured. However, energy savings can be determined indirectly, using measurements of the presence of energy use, engineering judgment and analysis. This article summarizes the state of the art in savings measurement, particularly as it may be applied by an energy service company (ESCO) in an energy performance contract.

  7. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for Department of Energy facilities, which includes nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards mitigation, and the System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1A. DOE O 420.1B Chg 1 issued 4-19-10.

  8. Misfit dislocation gettering by substrate pit-patterning in SiGe films on Si(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grydlik, Martyna; Groiss, Heiko; Brehm, Moritz; Schaeffler, Friedrich [Institute of Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenbergerstrasse 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Boioli, Francesca; Montalenti, Francesco; Miglio, Leo [L-NESS and Department of Material Science, University of Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Gatti, Riccardo; Devincre, Benoit [LEM, CNRS/ONERA, Chatillon Cedex (France)

    2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that suitable pit-patterning of a Si(001) substrate can strongly influence the nucleation and the propagation of dislocations during epitaxial deposition of Si-rich Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} alloys, preferentially gettering misfit segments along pit rows. In particular, for a 250 nm layer deposited by molecular beam epitaxy at x{sub Ge} = 15%, extended film regions appear free of dislocations, by atomic force microscopy, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy sampling. This result is quite general, as explained by dislocation dynamics simulations, which reveal the key role of the inhomogeneous distribution in stress produced by the pit-patterning.

  9. Fabrication of mitigation pits for improving laser damage resistance in dielectric mirrors by femtosecond laser machining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfe, Justin E.; Qiu, S. Roger; Stolz, Christopher J.

    2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Femtosecond laser machining is used to create mitigation pits to stabilize nanosecond laser-induced damage in multilayer dielectric mirror coatings on BK7 substrates. In this paper, we characterize features and the artifacts associated with mitigation pits and further investigate the impact of pulse energy and pulse duration on pit quality and damage resistance. Our results show that these mitigation features can double the fluence-handling capability of large-aperture optical multilayer mirror coatings and further demonstrate that femtosecond laser macromachining is a promising means for fabricating mitigation geometry in multilayer coatings to increase mirror performance under high-power laser irradiation.

  10. 2014 Modern Power Grid Video

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A video from NETL that describes the details of a modern power grid and how it can help our nation save on energy costs.

  11. 2014 Modern Power Grid Video

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A video from NETL that describes the details of a modern power grid and how it can help our nation save on energy costs.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: grid modernization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    grid modernization Renewables, Other Energy Issues To Be Focus of Enhanced Sandia-SINTEF Collaboration On May 28, 2014, in Biofuels, CRF, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy,...

  13. EARTHSAWtm IN-SITU CONTAINMENT OF PITS AND TRENCHES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest E. Carter, P.E.

    2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    EarthSaw{trademark} is a proposed technology for construction of uniform high quality barriers under and around pits and trenches containing buried radioactive waste without excavating or disturbing the waste. The method works by digging a deep vertical trench around the perimeter of a site, filling that trench with high specific gravity grout sealant, and then cutting a horizontal bottom pathway at the base of the trench with a simple cable saw mechanism. The severed block of earth becomes buoyant in the grout and floats on a thick layer of grout, which then cures into an impermeable barrier. The ''Interim Report on task 1 and 2'' which is incorporated into this report as appendix A, provided theoretical derivations, field validation of formulas, a detailed quantitative engineering description of the technique, engineering drawings of the hardware, and a computer model of how the process would perform in a wide variety of soil conditions common to DOE waste burial sites. The accomplishments of task 1 and 2 are also summarized herein Task 3 work product provides a comprehensive field test plan in Appendix B and a health and safety plan in Appendix C and proposal for a field-scale demonstration of the EarthSaw barrier technology. The final report on the subcontracted stress analysis is provided in Appendix D. A copy of the unified computer model is provided as individual non-functional images of each sheet of the spreadsheet and separately as a Microsoft Excel 2000 file.

  14. Pitting Corrosion in CVD SiC at 300?C in Deoxygenated High-Purity Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henager, Charles H.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Pitman, Stan G.; Senor, David J.; Geelhood, Ken J.; Painter, Chad L.

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    SiC is a candidate for nuclear applications at elevated temperatures but has not been fully studied under typical light-water reactor operating conditions, such as moderate temperatures and high pressures. Coupons of high-purity chemical vapor deposited SiC were exposed to deoxygenated, pressurized water at 573K and 100 Bar for up to 4000 hours. Ceramographic examination of the exposed SiC surfaces revealed both embryonic and large, d > 300 m, pits on the surface. The pits were characterized using scanning electron microscopy for structure and chemistry analysis. Pit densities were also determined by standard counting methods. The chemical analysis revealed that the pits are associated with the formation of silica and subsequent loss of Si, which is expected due to several suggested reactions between SiC and water.

  15. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 335, Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 335 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs). The CAU is located in the Well 3 Yard in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site. Historical records indicate that the Drain Pit (CAS 06-23-03) received effluent from truck-washing; the Drums/Oil Waste/Spill (CAS 06-20-01) consisted of four 55-gallon drums containing material removed from the Cased Hole; and the Cased Hole (CAS 06-20-02) was used for disposal of used motor oil, wastewater, and debris. These drums were transported to the Area 5 Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site in July 1991; therefore, they are no longer on site and further investigation or remediation efforts are not required. Consequently, CAS 06-20-01 will be closed with no further action and details of this decision will be described in the Closure Report for this CAU. Any spills that may have been associated with this CAS will be investigated and addressed under CAS 06-20-02. Field investigation efforts will be focused on the two remaining CASs. The scope of the investigation will center around identifying any contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) and, if present, determining the vertical and lateral extent of contamination. The COPCs for the Drain Pit include: total volatile/ semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (gasoline-and diesel-range organics), ethylene glycol monobutyl ether, polychlorinated biphenyls, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and radionuclides. The COPCs for the Cased Hole include: total volatile/ semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel-range organics only), and total Resource Conservation an d Recovery Act metals. Both biased surface and subsurface soil sampling will be conducted, augmented by visual inspection, video surveys, and electromagnetic surveys. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  16. Evaluation of open pit incineration for the disposal of hydrocarbon wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Stuart Ray

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Department) December 1981 ABSTRACT Evaluation of Open Pit Incine. ration For the Disposal of Hydrocarbon i&astes. (December 1981) Stuart Ray Bell, B. S. , Texas ASH University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Thomas R. Lalk The disposal... of hydrocarbon wastes using an open pit air curtain destructor (ACD) type incinerator was investigated. A prototype experi- mental incinerator was designed and constructed, and experiments were performed with it to determine the relationships among various...

  17. Determination of useful performance parameters for the ALR8(SI) plutonium pit container system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Mark Alan

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DETERMINATION OF USEFUL PERFORMANCE PARAMETERS FOR THE ALRS(SI) PLUTONIUM PIT CONTAINER SYSTEM A Thesis by MARK ALAN PIERCE Submitted to the Office of Cnaduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2000 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene DETERMINATION OF USEFUL PERFORMANCE PARAMETERS FOR THE ALRS(SI) PLUTONIUM PIT CONTAINER SYSTEM A Thesis by MARK ALAN PIERCE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies...

  18. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish facility safety requirements for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE O 420.1. Canceled by DOE O 420.1B.

  19. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and the System Engineer Program.Chg 1 incorporates the use of DOE-STD-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process, mandatory for Hazard Category 1, 2 and 3 nuclear facilities. Cancels DOE O 420.1A.

  20. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE-STD-1104 contains the Department's method and criteria for reviewing and approving nuclear facility's documented safety analysis (DSA). This review and approval formally document the basis for DOE, concluding that a facility can be operated safely in a manner that adequately protects workers, the public, and the environment. Therefore, it is appropriate to formally require implementation of the review methodology and criteria contained in DOE-STD-1104.

  1. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Order is to establish facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. The Order has Change 1 dated 11-16-95, Change 2 dated 10-24-96, and the latest Change 3 dated 11-22-00 incorporated. The latest change satisfies a commitment made to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) in response to DNFSB recommendation 97-2, Criticality Safety.

  2. Study of Etching Pits in a Large-grain Single Cell Bulk Niobium Cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Xin [William and Mary College; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Wu, Andy T. [JLAB

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance of SRF cavities are limited by non-linear localized effects. The variation of local material characters between "hot" and "cold" spots is thus of intense interest. Such locations were identified in a BCP-etched large-grain single-cell cavity and removed for examination by high resolution electron microscopy (SEM), electron-back scattering diffraction microscopy (EBSD), optical microscopy, and 3D profilometry. Pits with clearly discernable crystal facets were observed in both "hotspot" and "coldspot" specimens. The pits were found in-grain, at bi-crystal boundaries, and on tri-crystal junctions. They are interpreted as etch pits induced by surface crystal defects (e.g. dislocations). All "coldspots" examined had qualitatively low density of etching pits or very shallow tri-crystal boundary junction. EBSD revealed crystal structure surrounding the pits via crystal phase orientation mapping, while 3D profilometry gave information on the depth and size of the pits. In addition, a survey of the samples by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) did not show any significant contamination of the samples surface.

  3. Analysis of potential groundwater contamination in the vicinity of the Weldon Spring Raffinate Pits site, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, S.Y.; Peterson, J.M.; Winters, M.C.B.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of the analysis of contaminant migration beneath the raffinate pits at the Weldon Spring Raffinate Pits site indicate that during a 10,000-year time period, the maximum concentrations in the water immediately beneath the pit bottoms would be about 4600 pCi/L of radium-226 (Pit 3) and about 12,000 pCi/L of uranium-238 (Pit 1); these concentrations would occur at the centers of the pit bottoms. Based on the assumptions used in this study, the radioactive contaminants in the pits would migrate no more than 2 m (7 ft) below the pit bottoms. Because 6 to 12 m (20 to 40 ft) of silty clays underlie the raffinate pits, the radioactive contaminants would take several tens of thousands of years to reach nearby groundwater supplies. Although the results of these analyses indicate that a high degree of confinement is provided by the four raffinate pits, it should be noted that the validity of such analyses rests on the quality of the parameter values utilized. Due to a lack of current site-specific data for some physical parameters, it has been necessary to use historical and regional data for these values. The values cited are at times inconsistent and contradictory, e.g., the wide range of values indicated for the permeability of clays underlying the pits. However, these were the only data available. The analysis reported herein indicates that within the limitations of the available data, use of the Raffinate Pits site for long-term management of radioactive materials such as those currently being stored in the four pits appears to be feasible. 24 references, 14 figures, 7 tables.

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory W76 Pit Tube Lifetime Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeln, Terri G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A metallurgical study was requested as part of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) W76-1 life-extension program (LEP) involving a lifetime analysis of type 304 stainless steel pit tubes subject to repeat bending loads during assembly and disassembly operations at BWXT/Pantex. This initial test phase was completed during the calendar years of 2004-2006 and the report not issued until additional recommended tests could be performed. These tests have not been funded to this date and therefore this report is considered final. Tubes were reportedly fabricated according to Rocky Flats specification P14548 - Seamless Type 304 VIM/VAR Stainless Steel Tubing. Tube diameter was specified as 0.125 inches and wall thickness as 0.028 inches. A heat treat condition is not specified and the hardness range specification can be characteristic of both 1/8 and 1/4 hard conditions. Properties of all tubes tested were within specification. Metallographic analysis could not conclusively determine a specified limit to number of bends allowable. A statistical analysis suggests a range of 5-7 bends with a 99.95% confidence limit. See the 'Statistical Analysis' section of this report. The initial phase of this study involved two separate sets of test specimens. The first group was part of an investigation originating in the ESA-GTS [now Gas Transfer Systems (W-7) Group]. After the bend cycle test parameters were chosen (all three required bends subjected to the same amount of bend cycles) and the tubes bent, the investigation was transferred to Terri Abeln (Metallurgical Science and Engineering) for analysis. Subsequently, another limited quantity of tubes became available for testing and were cycled with the same bending fixture, but with different test parameters determined by T. Abeln.

  5. Holocene versus modern catchment erosion rates at 300 MW Baspa II hydroelectric power plant (India, NW Himalaya)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bookhagen, Bodo

    Holocene versus modern catchment erosion rates at 300 MW Baspa II hydroelectric power plant (India private hydroelectric facility, located at the Baspa River which is an important left-hand tributary

  6. LANL Plutonium-Processing Facilities National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    55 (TA-55). TA-55 is the nation's most modern plu- tonium science and manufacturing facility, including world-class manufacturing capabilities for solving significant national security challenges and nondestructive analysis laboratories. Additionally, TA-55 can safely and securely ship, receive, handle

  7. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 356: Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Revision No. 0, August 2001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV)

    2001-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions necessary for the characterization and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 356, Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, as identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The CAU, located on the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 03-04-01, Area 3 Change House Septic System; CAS 03-09-01, Mud Pit Spill Over; CAS 03-09-03, Mud Pit; CAS 03-09-04, Mud Pit; CAS 03-09-05, Mud Pit; CAS 20-16-01, Landfill; CAS 20-22-21, Drums. Sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations are the basis for the development of the phased approach chosen to address the data collection activities prior to implementing the preferred closure alternative for each CAS. The Phase I investigation will determine through collection of environmental samples from targeted populations (i.e., mud/soil cuttings above textural discontinuity) if contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) are present in concentrations exceeding preliminary action levels (PALs) at each of the CASs. If COPCs are present above PALs, a Phase II investigation will be implemented to determine the extent of contamination to support the appropriate corrective action alternative to complete closure of the site. Groundwater impacts from potentially migrating contaminants are not expected due to the depths to groundwater and limiting hydrologic drivers of low precipitation and high evaporation rates. Future land-use scenarios limit future uses to industrial activities; therefore, future residential uses are not considered. Potential exposure routes to site workers from contaminants of concern in septage and soils include oral ingestion, inhalation, or dermal contact (absorption) through in-advertent disturbance of contaminated structures and/or soils. Diesel within drilling muds is expected to be the primary COPC based on process knowledge. Recirculation processes within the mud pits enhance volatilization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), thereby reducing the potential concentrations of any VOCs that may be present. A secondary source of contaminants from random truck dumping activities and leaking vehicle discharge may have released fuels, grease, motor oil, and hydraulic fluids into the mud pit effluent stream. Radionuclide contamination is not expected at these CASs based on historical information. The primary radioisotopes that could be expected, if present, are cesium-137, tritium, and strontium-90. The SAFER process ends with closure of the site based on the laboratory analytical results of the environmental samples. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 356 using the SAFER process. On completion of the field activities, a Closure Report will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for review and approval.

  8. Adsorbate-driven morphological changes on Cu(111) nano-pits

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mudiyanselage, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; BMCC-CUNY, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Science; Xu, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Hoffmann, F. M. [BMCC-CUNY, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Science; Hrbek, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Waluyo, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Boscoboinik, J. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Center for Functional Nanomaterials; Stacchiola, D. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adsorbate-driven morphological changes of pitted-Cu(111) surfaces have been investigated following the adsorption and desorption of CO and H. The morphology of the pitted-Cu(111) surfaces, prepared by Ar+ sputtering, exposed a few atomic layers deep nested hexagonal pits of diameters from 8 to 38 nm with steep step bundles. The roughness of pitted-Cu(111) surfaces can be healed by heating to 450-500 K in vacuum. Adsorption of CO on the pitted-Cu(111) surface leads to two infrared peaks at 2089-2090 and 2101-2105 cm-1 for CO adsorbed on under-coordinated sites in addition to the peak at 2071 cm-1 for CO adsorbed on atop sites of the close-packed Cu(111) surface. CO adsorbed on under-coordinated sites is thermally more stable than that of atop Cu(111) sites. Annealing of the CO-covered surface from 100 to 300 K leads to minor changes of the surface morphology. In contrast, annealing of a H covered surface to 300 K creates a smooth Cu(111) surface as deduced from infrared data of adsorbed CO and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) imaging. The observation of significant adsorbate-driven morphological changes with H is attributed to its stronger modification of the Cu(111) surface by the formation of a sub-surface hydride with a hexagonal structure, which relaxes into the healed Cu(111) surface upon hydrogen desorption. These morphological changes occur ~150 K below the temperature required for healing of the pitted-Cu(111) surface by annealing in vacuum. In contrast, the adsorption of CO, which only interacts with the top-most Cu layer and desorbs by 160 K, does not significantly change the morphology of the pitted-Cu(111) surface.

  9. Adsorbate-driven morphological changes on Cu(111) nano-pits

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mudiyanselage, K.; Xu, F.; Hoffmann, F. M.; Hrbek, J.; Waluyo, I.; Boscoboinik, J. A.; Stacchiola, D. J.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adsorbate-driven morphological changes of pitted-Cu(111) surfaces have been investigated following the adsorption and desorption of CO and H. The morphology of the pitted-Cu(111) surfaces, prepared by Ar+ sputtering, exposed a few atomic layers deep nested hexagonal pits of diameters from 8 to 38 nm with steep step bundles. The roughness of pitted-Cu(111) surfaces can be healed by heating to 450-500 K in vacuum. Adsorption of CO on the pitted-Cu(111) surface leads to two infrared peaks at 2089-2090 and 2101-2105 cm-1 for CO adsorbed on under-coordinated sites in addition to the peak at 2071 cm-1 for CO adsorbed on atop sitesmoreof the close-packed Cu(111) surface. CO adsorbed on under-coordinated sites is thermally more stable than that of atop Cu(111) sites. Annealing of the CO-covered surface from 100 to 300 K leads to minor changes of the surface morphology. In contrast, annealing of a H covered surface to 300 K creates a smooth Cu(111) surface as deduced from infrared data of adsorbed CO and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) imaging. The observation of significant adsorbate-driven morphological changes with H is attributed to its stronger modification of the Cu(111) surface by the formation of a sub-surface hydride with a hexagonal structure, which relaxes into the healed Cu(111) surface upon hydrogen desorption. These morphological changes occur ~150 K below the temperature required for healing of the pitted-Cu(111) surface by annealing in vacuum. In contrast, the adsorption of CO, which only interacts with the top-most Cu layer and desorbs by 160 K, does not significantly change the morphology of the pitted-Cu(111) surface.less

  10. MODERN AGRICULTURAL DIGITAL MANAGEMENT NETWORK INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODERN AGRICULTURAL DIGITAL MANAGEMENT NETWORK INFORMATION SYSTEM OF HEILONGJIANG RECLAMATION AREA@126.com Abstract: To meet the need of agriculture management modernization of Heilongjiang reclamation area, further boost large-scale integration level of modern agriculture production and boost management

  11. Heating System Modernization, Management of Peripheral Scope...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modernization, Management of Peripheral Scope Lessons Learned Report, NNSA, Dec 2010 Heating System Modernization, Management of Peripheral Scope Lessons Learned Report, NNSA,...

  12. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modern Grid Wisconsin Public Utility Institute and UW Energy Institute Joe Miller, Steve Pullins, Steve Bossart - Modern Grid Team April 29, 2008 1 Conducted by the National Energy...

  13. Superconducting RF Lab Facility Upgrades at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katonak, D.J.; Rusnak, B.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research and testing of multi-cell superconducting cavities demands extensive contamination control resources to achieve high-cavity fields. Facility upgrades at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) included the modernization of test equipment, expanding and modernizing cleanroom facilities, improving safety, and expanding the high-pressure rinse cleaning process equipment. Each upgrade was integrated into the facility to enable users to assemble prototype cryomodules. The scope of the upgrades, the new installed capability, and budget and schedule for certain aspects of the project are discussed in this paper.

  14. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. Cancels DOE 5480.7A, DOE 5480.24, DOE 5480.28 and Division 13 of DOE 6430.1A. Canceled by DOE O 420.1A.

  15. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for DOE and NNSA for nuclear safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1B, DOE G 420.1-2 and DOE G 420.1-3.

  16. Acceptance test report for the AN valve pit leak detection and low point drain assembly mock up test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EWER, K.L.

    1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes The Performance Mock-up Test Procedure for the Valve Pit Leak Detection and Low Point Drain Assembly Performance Mock-Up Test Procedure.

  17. Federal Energy Resources Modernization Coordinating Committee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, G.B.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the broad range of activities that are focused on meeting the President's Executive Order on Federal Energy Management promulgated to meet energy savings goals and encourage more efficient management of all federal energy resources. These activities are reported semiannually under the auspices of the Federal Energy Resource Modernization (FERM) Coordinating Committee, and as such include activities undertaken from April 1, 1992, through September 30, 1992. The activities reported are classified into four major categories: (1) technology-base support, which includes development of processes, software, metering and monitoring equipment and strategies, and other tools for federal energy managers to better understand and characterize their energy resources; (2) federal energy systems testing and monitoring; (3) federal energy systems revitalization projects at federal installations in cooperation with the utilities serving the sites; and (4) energy supply, distribution and end-use conservation assessment for federal agencies and/or facilities. Lighting systems and air conditioning projects at federal facilities, especially military bases are updated.

  18. Surplus weapons plutonium: Technologies for pit disassembly/conversion and MOX fuel fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toevs, J.W.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will provide a description of the technologies involved in the disposition of plutonium from surplus nuclear weapon components (pits), based on pit disassembly and conversion and on fabrication of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for disposition through irradiation in nuclear reactors. The MOX/Reactor option is the baseline disposition plan for both the US and russian for plutonium from pits and other clean plutonium metal and oxide. In the US, impure plutonium in various forms will be converted to oxide and immobilized in glass or ceramic, surrounded by vitrified high level waste to provide a radiation barrier. A similar fate is expected for impure material in Russia as well. The immobilization technologies will not be discussed. Following technical descriptions, a discussion of options for monitoring the plutonium during these processes will be provided.

  19. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, Burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, July 2002, Rev. No. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NNSA /NV

    2002-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 140 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 140 consists of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 05-08-01, Detonation Pits; 05-08-02, Debris Pits; 05-17-01, Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site (Buried); 05-19-01, Waste Disposal Site; 05-23-01, Gravel Gertie; 05-35-01, Burn Pit; 05-99-04, Burn Pit; 22-99-04, Radioactive Waste Dump; 23-17-01, Hazardous Waste Storage Area. All nine of these CASs are located within Areas 5, 22, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nevada, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. This CAU is being investigated because disposed waste may be present without appropriate controls (i.e., use restrictions, adequate cover) and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present or migrating at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The NTS has been used for various research and development projects including nuclear weapons testing. The CASs in CAU 140 were used for testing, material storage, waste storage, and waste disposal. A two-phase approach has been selected to collect information and generate data to satisfy needed resolution criteria and resolve the decision statements. Phase I will determine if contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) are present in concentrations exceeding preliminary action levels. This data will be evaluated at all CASs. Phase II will determine the extent of the contaminant(s) of concern (COCs). This data will only be evaluated for CASs with a COC identified during Phase I. Based on process knowledge, the COPCs for CAU 140 include volatile organics, semivolatile organics, petroleum hydrocarbons, explosive residues, herbicides, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and radionuclides. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  20. Pressure Capacity Reduction of X52 Pipeline Steel Damaged by a Semi-Elliptical Pitting Corrosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Kazerouni Sangi; Y. Gholipour

    AbstractSteel made pipelines with different diameters are used for transmitting oil and gas which in many cases are buried in soil under the sea bed or immersed in sea water. External corrosion of pipes is an important form of deterioration due to the aggressive environment of sea water. Corrosion normally results in pits. Hence, using the finite element method, namely ABAQUS software, this paper estimates the amount of pressure capacity reduction of a pipecontaining a semi-elliptical pitting corrosion and the rate of corrosion during the pipeline life of 25 years.

  1. Selenium Bioaccumulation in Stocked Fish as an Indicator of Fishery Potential in Pit Lakes on Reclaimed Coal Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hontela, Alice

    on Reclaimed Coal Mines in Alberta, Canada L. L. Miller J. B. Rasmussen V. P. Palace G. Sterling A to selenium (Se) and other metals and metalloids in pit lakes formed by open pit coal mining in Tertiary (thermal coal) and in Cretaceous (metallurgical coal) bedrock. Juvenile hatchery rainbow trout

  2. Site Selection for Surplus Plutonium Disposition Facilities at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L.D.

    2000-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A site selection study was conducted to evaluate locations for the proposed Surplus Plutonium Disposition Facilities. Facilities to be located include the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility, the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF), and the Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) facility. Objectives of the study include: (1) Confirm that the Department of Energy (DOE) selected locations for the MOX and PDCF were suitable based on selected siting criteria, (2) Recommend a site in the vicinity of F Area that is suitable for the PIP, and (3) Identify alternative suitable sites for one or more of these facilities in the event that further geotechnical characterization or other considerations result in disqualification of a currently proposed site.

  3. Mobile Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxide Capture inFacility AMF Information Science

  4. Facility Representatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd ofEvaluations in Covered Facilities | Department of Energy

  5. Facility Representatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd ofEvaluations in Covered Facilities | Department of Energy063-2011

  6. Facility Status

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-lFederalFYRANDOM DRUG TESTING The requirementFacility

  7. RENFORCEMENT ET CONTROLE DE PAREMENTS DANS UNE MINE A CffiL OUVERT DE CHARBON REINFORCEMENT AND CONTROL OF FOOTWALL SLOPES IN AN OPEN PIT COAL MINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    AND CONTROL OF FOOTWALL SLOPES IN AN OPEN PIT COAL MINE VERSTRKUNG UND KONTROLLE VON STOSSER IM KOHLETAGEBAU to exploit the stephanian coal.TheNorth West area ofthis open pit is composed of an overthrust fold. The coal

  8. Pit distribution in the equatorial region of Titan Kimberly A. Adams n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurdy, Donna M.

    distribution and size to characterize these features and understand their formation. Chi-square analysis. However, analysis of the densest cluster of pits, a group of 50, shows a more random distribution. Fractal analysis and comparison with a same-sized random set find only a hint of linearity. A Poisson distribution

  9. Slope design and implementation in open pit mines; geological and geomechanical Jean-Alain FLEURISSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 GHGT-9 Slope design and implementation in open pit mines; geological and geomechanical approach all natural geological and geomechanical features and the geological structures as well and geomechanical data; 2) determination of the potential mechanisms of deformation and failure, and their numerical

  10. Comparison study of solid/liquid separation techniques for oilfield pit closures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wojtanowicz, A.K.; Field, S.D.; Osterman, M.C.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vacuum filtration, belt-press filtration, screw-press filtration, and centrifuging techniques were evaluated in full-scale experiments for use in oilfield waste volume reduction. Centrifuging and belt-press filtration proved applicable to oilfield pit cleanups. Also, an effective chemical conditioning (coagulation and flocculation) was found for deliquoring seven types of oilfield waste slurries before separation.

  11. Modeling and Feedback Control for Air Flow Regulation in Deep Pits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Modeling and Feedback Control for Air Flow Regulation in Deep Pits Emmanuel WITRANT and Nicolas pressure regulation. Simulation results illustrate the efficiency of the modeling and control algorithms. 1 presented, with a real-time engineering model of the complete mine ven- tilation system. A novel control

  12. Cleanup Verification Package for the 100-F-20, Pacific Northwest Laboratory Parallel Pits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Appel

    2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 100-F-20, Pacific Northwest Laboratory Parallel Pits waste site. This waste site consisted of two earthen trenches thought to have received both radioactive and nonradioactive material related to the 100-F Experimental Animal Farm.

  13. Pitting corrosion control using regenerative biolms on aluminium 2024 in articial seawater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Thomas K.

    Pitting corrosion control using regenerative bio®lms on aluminium 2024 in arti®cial seawater D, CT 06269-3222, USA b Corrosion and Environment Eects Laboratory (CEEL), Department of Materials polyglutamate or polyaspartate, an additional small increase in corrosion inhibition occurred. Corrosion control

  14. PITTING CORROSION ON MAGNESIUM ALLOYS : A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF FIELD DATA USING EXTREME VALUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maume-Deschamps, Véronique

    PITTING CORROSION ON MAGNESIUM ALLOYS : A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF FIELD DATA USING EXTREME VALUE corrosion of the magnesium alloys AZ91D and AM60B combined with different coatings on steel bolts was investigated in field corrosion tests carried out by Volvo Car Corporation. Light metals like magnesium

  15. SCFA lead lab technical assistance review of the Pit 7 Complex source containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, D.; Janeday, D.; Woodward, D.; Imrich, J.; Evans, J.; Morris, M.; Reimus, P.; Hazen, T.

    2001-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    On January 29-30, 2001 a technical assistance team (TAT) met with the Pit 7 project team at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to review technologies being evaluated for remediation in the Site 300 Pit 7 Complex and the process for selecting these technologies. Specifically, the project team presented the TAT with a core need to identify technically and economically practicable technologies and methods to stabilize, contain, or control the tritium and uranium in the source areas at the Pits 3 and 5 landfill area to prevent further releases of these contaminants to groundwater and the migration of tritiated and uranium-contaminated groundwater. The approaches and needs for the systems surrounding the landfills were also presented and discussed. With encouragement from the project team, the TAT expanded its focus to include additional site characterization, a water balance model, and computational models. The TAT was comprised of leading technical and regulatory experts from around the country and was assembled by SCFA's Lead Lab in response to a technical assistance request from John Ziagos, Project Manager for the Pit 7 Area (Technical Assistance Request: LLNL No.1). A list of the TAT members is included below and contact information the TAT members and site participants is in Appendix B. To familiarize the TAT assistance team with Pit 7 Complex issues, the project team gave a presentation outlining the site geology, contaminant hydrogeology, land-use issues, stakeholder concerns, regulatory requirements, groundwater flow and transport modeling efforts, pit source characterization efforts, and remedial options. Time for clarification and questions between the TAT and the site team was integrated into the presentation schedule. On the morning of the second day, the TAT reconvened with the site team and John Evans of the TAT presented information about a helium soil gas survey method that could potentially be used to locate and characterize tritium hot spots in Pits 3 and 5. Following the presentation, the TAT gathered independently to identify issues that are critical to remedy selection and to list questions or information gaps that the site is trying to resolve.

  16. Remedial investigation report, site 2-Pesticide Pit Burial Area, Stewart Air National Guard Base, Newburgh, New York. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Site 2-Pesticide Pit Burial Area was investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. A removal action was conducted in 1988, when pesticide containers and contaminated soil were excavated from the pit. The pit covered an area of approximately 1000 square feet and was approximately 12 feet deep. The report recommends no further action based on study results.

  17. Remedial investigation report, site 2-Pesticide Pit Burial Area, Stewart Air National Guard Base, Newburgh, New York. Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Site 2-Pesticide Pit Burial Area was investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. A removal action was conducted in 1988, when pesticide containers and contaminated soil were excavated from the pit. The pit covered an area of approximately 1000 square feet and was approximately 12 feet deep. The report recommends no further action based on study results.

  18. MODERN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, InaprilU . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f

  19. Electrokinetic demonstration at the unlined chromic acid pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindgren, E.R.; Hankins, M.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mattson, E.D. [Salt-Unsat, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Duda, P.M. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy-metal contaminated soils are a common problem at Department of Energy (DOE)-operated sites and privately owned facilities throughout the nation. One emerging technology which can remove heavy metals from soil in situ is electrokinetics. To conduct electrokinetic (EK) remediation, electrodes are implanted into the ground, and a direct current is imposed between the electrodes. Metal ions dissolved in the soil pore water migrate towards an electrode where they can be removed. The electrokinetic program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been focusing on electrokinetic remediation for unsaturated soils. A patent was awarded for an electrokinetic electrode system designed at SNL for applications to unsaturated soils. Current research described in this report details an electrokinetic remediation field demonstration of a chromium plume that resides in unsaturated soil beneath the SNL Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL). This report describes the processes, site investigation, operation and monitoring equipment, testing procedures, and extraction results of the electrokinetic demonstration. This demonstration successfully removed chromium contamination in the form of chromium(VI) from unsaturated soil at the field scale. After 2700 hours of operation, 600 grams of Cr(VI) was extracted from the soil beneath the SNL CWL in a series of thirteen tests. The contaminant was removed from soil which has moisture contents ranging from 2 to 12 weight percent. This demonstration was the first EK field trial to successfully remove contaminant ions from and soil at the field scale. Although the new patented electrode system was successful in removing an anionic contaminant (i.e., chromate) from unsaturated sandy soil, the electrode system was a prototype and has not been specifically engineered for commercialization. A redesign of the electrode system as indicated by the results of this research is suggested for future EK field trials.

  20. The Modern Energy Savings Route

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, M.

    THE MODERN ENERGY SAVINGS ROUTE MATT SMITH President L.S. Enterprises 9801 West Bahia Vista Fort Myers, ABSTRACT In most operations, cooling towers are not purposely overlooked by Plant Personnel. However, the lack of knowledge about... their importance prevents energy managers from making intelligent, informed decisions. This paper will compare the various types of cooling towers in use. Their operational and energy usage considerations will be discussed with old and new techniques explained...

  1. Assistant Secretary Hoffman Discusses Grid Modernization with...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Assistant Secretary Hoffman Discusses Grid Modernization with the New York Times and E&E TV Assistant Secretary Hoffman Discusses Grid Modernization with the New York Times and E&E...

  2. TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS are the build-ing blocks of modern society. Efficient and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storici, Francesca

    TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS are the build- ing blocks of modern society. Efficient and safe movement. How- ever, transportation systems by their very nature also affect the environment through operations, construction, and maintenance of transportation facilities, and through the travel behaviors they encourage

  3. Think inside the box : an analysis of converting commercial property into self storage facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKinley, Sean Jeffrey

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The modern self storage facility is a multi-tenant operating business that reflects the needs of residential and commercial customers. The industry has evolved from a transition asset to a property type that adheres to ...

  4. Summary of environmental investigation of a closed reserve pit located within the pleasant bayou geopressured/geothermal lease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1991-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This investigation consisted of collecting 24 soil samples, 12 from a depth of 5 inches and 12 from 6 feet, and analyzing each one for 9 heavy metals, plus Hexavalent Chromium, 5 anions, and 4 cations. These tests were conducted to establish the composition of the soil from within the pit (samples, test no.1 thru 10) and from two sites outside the pit area (control no.1 and 2). The results would determine whether the pit closure continued to satisfy federal, state and/or local regulations, or whether additional analytical work was called for to establish if follow-up remediation was required.

  5. Modern Physics for Engineers Instructor: Randy Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Randy

    Syllabus Modern Physics for Engineers 15030276 Instructor: Randy Johnson 417 Geology/Physics Site: http://www.physics.uc.edu/~johnson/Modern.Physics/Index.html Textbooks: Serway, Moses, and Moyer, Modern Physics Auxiliary texts (available on reserve in library): Wheeler and Taylor, SpaceTime Physics

  6. Modern Physics Laboratory Dr. James E. Parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Modern Physics Laboratory Dr. James E. Parks Director of Undergraduate Laboratories Physics 461 students. It provides hands-on experience with experiments in modern physics that are challenging courses, reference material and by asking questions. #12;C:\\Users\\JEParks\\Documents\\Modern Physics Lab

  7. Modern Physics Laboratory Dr. James E. Parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Modern Physics Laboratory Dr. James E. Parks Director of Undergraduate Laboratories Physics 461 students. It provides hands-on experience with experiments in modern physics that are challenging are in two categories. The first category, Category I, consists of the modern physics experiments

  8. PY313: Modern Physics Spring 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    PY313: Modern Physics Spring 2012 Instructor and Class Information Instructor: Prof. Peter A. Zink: Physics 313 will examine the development of modern physics leading up to and including quantum mechanics for producing well-organized and clearly written engineering reports. Required Textbooks Modern Physics

  9. Migration of 1970s Minicomputer Controls to Modern Toolkit Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juras, R.C.; Meigs, M.J.; Sinclair, J.A.; Tatum, B.A.

    1999-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Controls for accelerators and associated systems at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been migrated from 197Os-vintage minicomputers to a modern system based on Vista and EPICS toolkit software. Stability and capabilities of EPICS software have motivated increasing use of EPICS for accelerator controls. In addition, very inexpensive subsystems based on EPICS and the EPICS portable CA server running on Linux PCs have been implemented to control an ion source test facility and to control a building-access badge reader system. A new object-oriented, extensible display manager has been developed for EPICS to facilitate the transition to EPICS and will be used in place of MEDM. EPICS device support has been developed for CAMAC serial highway controls.

  10. Characterization of seven United States coal regions. The development of optimal terrace pit coal mining systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wimer, R.L.; Adams, M.A.; Jurich, D.M.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report characterizes seven United State coal regions in the Northern Great Plains, Rocky Mountain, Interior, and Gulf Coast coal provinces. Descriptions include those of the Fort Union, Powder River, Green River, Four Corners, Lower Missouri, Illinois Basin, and Texas Gulf coal resource regions. The resource characterizations describe geologic, geographic, hydrologic, environmental and climatological conditions of each region, coal ranks and qualities, extent of reserves, reclamation requirements, and current mining activities. The report was compiled as a basis for the development of hypothetical coal mining situations for comparison of conventional and terrace pit surface mining methods, under contract to the Department of Energy, Contract No. DE-AC01-79ET10023, entitled The Development of Optimal Terrace Pit Coal Mining Systems.

  11. Title I conceptual design for Pit 6 landfill closure at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonnell, B.A.; Obenauf, K.S. [Golder Associates, Inc., Alameda, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this design project is to evaluate and prepare design and construction documents for a closure cover cap for the Pit 6 Landfill located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300. This submittal constitutes the Title I Design (Conceptual Design) for the closure cover of the Pit 6 Landfill. A Title I Design is generally 30 percent of the design effort. Title H Design takes the design to 100 percent complete. Comments and edits to this Title I Design will be addressed in the Title II design submittal. Contents of this report are as follows: project background; design issues and engineering approach; design drawings; calculation packages; construction specifications outline; and construction quality assurance plan outline.

  12. Project W-314 Specific Test and Evaluation Plan 241-AN-A Valve Pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAMMERS, J.S.

    1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made to the 241-AN-A Valve Pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system's performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP).

  13. Time Contortions in Modern Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. F. Kracklauer

    2002-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    As a basis for epistemological study of ``time,'' we analyze three suspect phenomena introduced by modern physics: non-locality, asymmetric aging and advanced interaction. It is shown that all three arise in connection with what has to be taken as arbitrary ideosyncrasies in formulation. It is shown that minor changes result in internally consistent variations of both Quantum Mechanics and Special Relativity devoid of these phenomena. The reinterpretation of some experiments though to confirm the existence of non-locality and asymmetric aging is briefly considered and a possible test is proposed.

  14. Construction quality assurance for Pit 6 landfill closure, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Golder Construction Services, Inc. (GCS), under contract to the Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), provided the construction quality assurance (CQA) observation and testing during the construction of the Site 300, Pit 6 landfill closure cover. The cap construction was performed as a CERCLA non-time-critical removal action from June 2 to August 29, 1997. the project site is located 18 miles east of Livermore on Tesla Road and approximately 10 miles southwest of Tracy on Corral Hollow Road in San Joaquin County, California. This report certifies that the LLNL, Site 300, Pit 6, Landfill Closure was constructed in accordance with the construction specifications and design drawings. This report documents construction activities and CQA monitoring and testing for construction of the Pit 6 Landfill Closure. Golder Associates, Inc. of Oakland, California was the design engineering firm responsible for preparation of the drawings and specifications. CQA services were provided by GCS, of Roseville, California, under supervision of a California registered civil Engineer.

  15. from Isotope Production Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium 2:32 Isotope cancer treatment...

  16. Fuel Fabrication Facility

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility November 2005 May 2007 June 2008 May 2012...

  17. Closure Report for the 92-Acre Area and Corrective Action Unit 111: Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of the 92-Acre Area, which includes Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111, 'Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits.' This CR provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that the closure objectives were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996 [as amended March 2010]). Closure activities began in January 2011 and were completed in January 2012. Closure activities were conducted according to Revision 1 of the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) for the 92-Acre Area and CAU 111 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2010). The following closure activities were performed: (1) Construct an engineered evapotranspiration cover over the boreholes, trenches, and pits in the 92-Acre Area; (2) Install use restriction (UR) warning signs, concrete monuments, and subsidence survey monuments; and (3) Establish vegetation on the covers. UR documentation is included as Appendix C of this report. The post-closure plan is presented in detail in Revision 1 of the CADD/CAP for the 92-Acre Area and CAU 111, and the requirements are summarized in Section 5.2 of this document. When the next request for modification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit NEV HW0101 is submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), the requirements for post-closure monitoring of the 92-Acre Area will be included. NNSA/NSO requests the following: (1) A Notice of Completion from NDEP to NNSA/NSO for closure of CAU 111; and (2) The transfer of CAU 111 from Appendix III to Appendix IV, Closed Corrective Action Units, of the FFACO.

  18. Guide to research facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

  19. Comparative Performance of Acoustic-tagged and PIT-tagged Juvenile Salmonids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hockersmith, Eric E.; Brown, Richard S.; Liedtke, Theresa L.

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous research tools and technologies are currently being used to evaluate fish passage and survival to determine the impacts of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) on endangered and threatened juvenile salmonids, including PIT tags, balloon tags, hydroacoustic evaluations, radio telemetry, and acoustic telemetry. Each has advantages and disadvantages, but options are restricted in some situations because of limited capabilities of a specific technology, lack of detection capability downstream, or availability of adequate numbers of fish. However, there remains concern about the comparative effects of the tag or the tagging procedure on fish performance. The recently developed Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic transmitter is the smallest active acoustic tag currently available. The goal of this study was to determine whether fish tagged with the JSATS acoustic-telemetry tag can provide unbiased estimates of passage behavior and survival within the performance life of the tag. We conducted both field and laboratory studies to assess tag effects. For the field evaluation we released a total of 996 acoustic-tagged fish in conjunction with 21,026 PIT-tagged fish into the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam on 6 and 13 May. Travel times between release and downstream dams were not significantly different for the majority of the reaches between acoustic-tagged and PIT-tagged fish. In addition to the field evaluation, a series of laboratory experiments were conducted to determine if growth and survival of juvenile Chinook salmon surgically implanted with acoustic transmitters is different than untagged or PIT tagged juvenile Chinook salmon. Only yearling fish with integrated and non-integrated transmitters experienced mortalities, and these were low (<4.5%). Mortality among sub-yearling control and PIT-tag treatments ranged up to 7.7% while integrated and non-integrated treatments had slightly higher rates (up to 8.3% and 7.9% respectively). No acoustic transmitters were shed by yearling fish during the course of the 90 day study. Up to 7.8% of subyearling fish expelled transmitters. Tags were expelled from 5 to 63 days post-surgery. The average time to expulsion was 27 days; few fish expelled transmitters within 14 days of implantation or less. Histological results suggest that inflammation associated with implantation of an acoustic transmitter can produce fibrous tissue which can invade and possibly damage internal organs soon after implantation. Reactions severe enough to damage organs however, were limited to only ~20% of subyearling Chinook salmon, all of which were under 101mm and 12g at tagging. The infiltration of the fibrous tissue into organs was observed most often in fish held for 21 days and appeared to decrease in subsequent holding times.

  20. Facilities Condition and Hazards Assessment for Materials and Fuel Complex Facilities MFC-799, 799A, and 770C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mecham; Don Konoyer

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Materials & Fuel Complex (MFC) facilities 799 Sodium Processing Facility (a single building consisting of two areas: the Sodium Process Area (SPA) and the Carbonate Process Area (CPA), 799A Caustic Storage Area, and 770C Nuclear Calibration Laboratory have been declared excess to future Department of Energy mission requirements. Transfer of these facilities from Nuclear Energy to Environmental Management, and an associated schedule for doing so, have been agreed upon by the two offices. The prerequisites for this transfer to occur are the removal of nonexcess materials and chemical inventory, deinventory of the calibration source in MFC-770C, and the rerouting and/or isolation of utility and service systems. This report provides a description of the current physical condition and any hazards (material, chemical, nuclear or occupational) that may be associated with past operations of these facilities. This information will document conditions at time of transfer of the facilities from Nuclear Energy to Environmental Management and serve as the basis for disposition planning. The process used in obtaining this information included document searches, interviews and facility walk-downs. A copy of the facility walk-down checklist is included in this report as Appendix A. MFC-799/799A/770C are all structurally sound and associated hazardous or potentially hazardous conditions are well defined and well understood. All installed equipment items (tanks, filters, etc.) used to process hazardous materials remain in place and appear to have maintained their integrity. There is no evidence of leakage and all openings are properly sealed or closed off and connections are sound. The pits appear clean with no evidence of cracking or deterioration that could lead to migration of contamination. Based upon the available information/documentation reviewed and the overall conditions observed during the facilities walk-down, it is concluded that these facilities may be disposed of at minimal risk to human health, safety or the environment.

  1. Future Fixed Target Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

  2. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability MODERN GRID S T R A T E G Y AMI Demand Response Distribution Management Systems Advanced OMS Distribution Automation...

  3. Comparative economics: evolution and the modern economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermeij, Geerat J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparison of primate economies. Journal of Bioeconomics,1999). Complexity and the economy. Science, 284, 107109.evolution and the modern economy Ghabrial, A. S. , &

  4. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Some Technical Challenges Symposium on Modeling & Control of Alternative Energy Systems Joe Miller - Modern Grid Team Lead April 2, 2009 1 Conducted by the National Energy...

  5. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is an essential component of the modern grid: IC creates a dynamic, interactive "mega-infrastructure" for real-time information and power exchange IC allows the various...

  6. Another Map, another History, another Modernity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, Iain Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Buck-Morss, Susan. Hegel, Haiti, and Universal History.Modernity Disavowed. Haiti and the Cultures of Slavery inbetween Hegel and Haiti, between European idealist

  7. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the April 2000, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 23-56-01, Former Mercury Fire Training Pit. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

  8. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revison 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the June 2003, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: CAS 06-20-02, 20-inch Cased Hole CAS 06-23-03, Drain Pit These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

  9. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 356: Mud Pits and Disposal Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the November 2002, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 356: Mud Pits and Disposal Sites as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: CAS 03-04-01, Area 3 Change House Septic System CAS 03-09-04, Mud Pit These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

  10. RADIOACTIVE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK PITTING PREDICTIONS: AN INVESTIGATION INTO CRITICAL SOLUTION CONCENTRATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, E.

    2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests was performed on samples of ASTM A537 carbon steel in support of a probability-based approach to evaluate the effect of chloride and sulfate on corrosion the steel?s susceptibility to pitting corrosion. Testing solutions were chosen to systemically evaluate the influence of the secondary aggressive species, chloride, and sulfate, in the nitrate based, high-level wastes. The results suggest that evaluating the combined effect of all aggressive species, nitrate, chloride, and sulfate, provides a consistent response for determining corrosion susceptibility. The results of this work emphasize the importance for not only nitrate concentration limits, but also chloride and sulfate concentration limits.

  11. Feasibility Study for the K-Area Bingham Pump Outage Pit (643-1G)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The K-Area Bingham Pump Outage Pit (KBPOP) is one of four BPOP areas at Savannah River Site (SRS), collectively referred to as the BPOP waste unit group. This Feasibility Study (FS) of Remedial Alternatives serves as the lead FS for the BPOP waste unit group. This section identifies the purpose and scope of the FS and presents site background information summarized from the Final Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment (RI/BRA) WSRC-RP- 95-1555, Rev. 1.2 (WSRC 1997).

  12. PIT 9: From "Black Eye" to Part of DOE Cleanup Success

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics OneOutreach Efforts Excitement PIT 9: From

  13. Enterprise Modernization for Power Systems Quick Start Guide Enterprise Modernization Sandbox for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enterprise Modernization for Power Systems Quick Start Guide Enterprise Modernization Sandbox for Power Systems Quick Start Guide August, 2010 2010 IBM Corporation Page 1 of 45 #12;Enterprise Modernization for Power Systems Quick Start Guide Purpose of the Quick Start Guide

  14. Corrective action plan for corrective action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nacht, S.

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mercury Fire Training Pit is a former fire training area located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Mercury Fire Training Pit was used from approximately 1965 to the early 1990s to train fire-fighting personnel at the NTS, and encompasses an area approximately 107 meters (m) (350 feet [ft]) by 137 m (450 ft). The Mercury Fire Training Pit formerly included a bermed burn pit with four small burn tanks, four large above ground storage tanks an overturned bus, a telephone pole storage area, and areas for burning sheds, pallets, and cables. Closure activities will include excavation of the impacted soil in the aboveground storage tank and burn pit areas to a depth of 1.5 m (5 ft), and excavation of the impacted surface soil downgradient of the former ASTs and burnpit areas to a depth of 0.3 m (1 ft). Excavated soil will be disposed in the Area 6 Hydrocarbon Landfill at the NTS.

  15. In situ vitrification demonstration at Pit 1, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 1: Results of treatability study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spalding, B.P.; Naney, M.T.; Cline, S.R.; Bogle, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Tixier, J.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A treatability study was initiated in October 1993 to apply in situ vitrification (ISV) to at least two segments of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) seepage Pit 1 by the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. This treatability study was later extended to include all of Pit 1 and was performed to support a possible Interim Record of Decision or removal action for closure of one or more of the seepage pits and trenches beginning as early as FY 1997. This treatability study was carried out to establish the field-scale technical performance of ISV for (1) attaining the required depth, nominally 15 ft, to incorporate source contamination within and beneath the pits; (2) demonstrating field capability for the overlap of melt settings which will be necessary to achieve fused, melted segments of the source contamination; (3) demonstrating off-gas handling technology for accommodating and minimizing the volatilization of {sup 137}Cs; (4) demonstrating adequate site characterization techniques to predict ISV melting kinetics, processing temperatures, and product durability; and (5) promoting public acceptance of ISV technology by demonstrating its safety, implementability, site impacts, and air emissions and by coordinating the treatability study within the regulatory closure process. In April 1996 an expulsion of an estimated 10% of the 196 Mg (216 tons) melt body occurred resulting in significant damage to ISV equipment and, ultimately, led to an indefinite suspension of further ISV operations at Pit 1. This report summarizes the technical accomplishments and status of the project in fulfilling these objectives through September 1997.

  16. Managing Risk in the Modern World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenton, Norman

    Managing Risk in the Modern World Applications of Bayesian Networks A Knowledge Transfer Report By Norman Fenton and Martin Neil #12;13 MANAGING RISK IN THE MODERN WORLD Applications of Bayesian Networks of Agena, a company that specialises in risk management for critical systems. Norman is an Affiliated

  17. CRAD, Facility Safety- Nuclear Facility Safety Basis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used for assessment of a contractor's Nuclear Facility Safety Basis.

  18. Texas Facilities Commission's Facility Management Strategic Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez, J. A.

    , Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 Facility Strategic Plan ?High Performance Building Approach ? Envelope ? Load Reduction ? (Re)Design ? Advanced Tactics ?Building Automation ? Sub-metering ? Controls ?Commissioning ? Assessment ? Continuous ?Facility... International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 Commissioning Assessment ?30 buildings ?CC Opportunities ?O&M Improvements ?Energy/Capital Improvement Opportunities ?Quick Payback Implementation ?Levering DM...

  19. Modern hot water district heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karnitz, M.A.; Barnes, M.H.; Kadrmas, C.; Nyman, H.O.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The history of district heating in Europe is drastically different from that in the United States. The development of district heating in northern and eastern Europe started in the early 1950s. Hot water rather than steam was used as the transport medium and the systems have proven to be more economical. Recently, the northern European concept has been introduced into two US cities - St. Paul and Willmar, Minnesota. The hot water project in St. Paul started construction and operation in the summer and fall of 1983, respectively. The entire first phase of the St. Paul project will take two summers to construct and will connect approximately 80 buildings for a total of 150 MW(t). The system spans the entire St. Paul business district and includes privately owned offices and retail buildings, city and county government buildings, hospitals, the state Capitol complex, and several industrial customers. The City of Willmar, Minnesota, replaced an old steam system with a modern hot water system in the summer of 1982. The first phase of the hot water system was constructed in the central business district. The system serves a peak thermal load of about 10 MW(t) and includes about 12,000 ft of network. The Willmar system completed the second stage of development in the fall of 1983. These two new systems demonstrate the benefits of the low-temperature hot water district heating technology. The systems are economical to build, have high reliability, and have low maintenance and operating cost.

  20. Pathway to a lower cost high repetition rate ignition facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obenschain, S.P.; Colombant, D.G.; Schmitt, A.J.; Sethian, J.D.; McGeoch, M. W. [Plasma Physics Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Plex LLC, Brookline, Massachusetts 02446-5478 (United States)

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach to a high-repetition ignition facility based on direct drive with the krypton-fluoride laser is presented. The objective is development of a 'Fusion Test Facility' that has sufficient fusion power to be useful as a development test bed for power plant materials and components. Calculations with modern pellet designs indicate that laser energies well below a megajoule may be sufficient. A smaller driver would result in an overall smaller, less complex and lower cost facility. While this facility might appear to have most direct utility to inertial fusion energy, the high flux of neutrons would also be able to address important issues concerning materials and components for other approaches to fusion energy. The physics and technological basis for the Fusion Test Facility are presented along with a discussion of its applications.

  1. Economic targeting in modern warfare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambeth, B.S.; Lewis, K.N.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear weapons and strategies for their use play a variety of roles in the defense and foreign policies of the United States and Soviet Union. Accordingly, both nations buy forces and prepare war plans for many purposes. Although it is perhaps the least likely contingency for which either country prepares, the scenario in which both sides launch more or less all-out attacks against their opponent's economic or urban-industrial target system often dominates public consideration of strategic policy issues. These kinds of strikes, generically termed countervalue attacks, are usually assumed to throw many thousands of nuclear weapons against cities and isolated facilities in order to destroy the adversary nation as an organized, functioning, and economically viable entity.

  2. Technology Transitions Facilities Database

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The types of R&D facilities at the DOE Laboratories available to the public typically fall into three broad classes depending on the mode of access: Designated User Facilities, Shared R&D...

  3. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Snake River stock) yearling fall chinook salmon that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1998. The three fall chinook acclimation facilities are operated by the Nez Perce Tribe and located at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids on the Snake River and at Big Canyon Creek on the Clearwater River. Yearlings at the Big Canyon facility consisted of two size classes that are referred to in this report as 9.5 fish per pound (fpp) and 30 fpp. The Big Canyon 9.5 fpp were comparable to the yearlings at Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. A total of 9,942 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Pittsburg Landing. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.19. Of the 9,942 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 6,836 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary). A total of 4,926 9.5 fpp and 2,532 30 fpp yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Big Canyon. PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 156.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.13. PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 113.1 mm and mean condition factor of 1.18. Of the 4,926 PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released, a total of 3,042 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. Of the 2,532 PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released, a total of 1,130 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 1,253 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Captain John Rapids. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 147.5 mm and mean condition factor of 1.09. Of the 1,253 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 719 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 2,420 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.0 mm and mean condition factor of 1.10. Of the 2,420 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 979 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Monumental and McNary). Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged fish released from Pittsburg Landing were 10.5 days to Lower Granite Dam, 21.7 days to McNary Dam and 29.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 16.4 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 18.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 25 at Lower Granite Dam, May 6 at McNary Dam and May 14 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 20 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 13.3 days to Lower Granite Dam, 26.0 days to McNary Dam and 30.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 13.0 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 15.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.3 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 27 at Lower Granite Dam, May 11 at McNary Dam and May 15 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 9 at Lower Granite Dam, May 24 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 20.8 days to Lower Granite Dam, 37.6 days to McNary Dam and 43.5 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 8.3 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 10.6 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 12.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 23 at McNary Dam and May 28 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 22 at Lower Granite Dam, May 31 at McNary Dam and June 5 at Bonneville Dam. Median arrival dates, based on all detections, of PIT tagge

  4. The New Generation of Uranium In Situ Recovery Facilities: Design Improvements Should Reduce Radiological Impacts Relative to First Generation Uranium Solution Mining Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.H. [CHP, SHB INC., Centennial, Colorado (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium In Situ Leaching / In Situ Recovery (ISL / ISR - also referred to as 'solution mining'), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and are expected to make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since the mid 1970's. However, current designs are expected to result in less radiological wastes and emissions relative to these 'first' generation plants (which were designed, constructed and operated through the 1980's). These early designs typically used alkaline leach chemistries in situ including use of ammonium carbonate which resulted in groundwater restoration challenges, open to air recovery vessels and high temperature calcining systems for final product drying vs the 'zero emissions' vacuum dryers as typically used today. Improved containment, automation and instrumentation control and use of vacuum dryers in the design of current generation plants are expected to reduce production of secondary waste byproduct material, reduce Radon emissions and reduce potential for employee exposure to uranium concentrate aerosols at the back end of the milling process. In Situ Recovery in the U.S. typically involves the circulation of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing (gaseous oxygen e.g) and complexing agents (carbon dioxide, e.g) into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant ( mill). Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or calcining and packaging operations depending on facility specifics. This paper presents an overview of the ISR process and the health physics monitoring programs developed at a number of commercial scale ISL / ISR Uranium recovery and production facilities as a result of the radiological character of these processes. Although many radiological aspects of the process are similar to that of conventional mills, conventional-type tailings as such are not generated. However, liquid and solid byproduct materials may be generated and impounded. The quantity and radiological character of these by products are related to facility specifics. Some special monitoring considerations are presented which are required due to the manner in which radon gas is evolved in the process and the unique aspects of controlling solution flow patterns underground. The radiological character of these processes are described using empirical data collected from many operating facilities. Additionally, the major aspects of the health physics and radiation protection programs that were developed at these first generation facilities are discussed and contrasted to circumstances of the current generation and state of the art of uranium ISR technologies and facilities. In summary: This paper has presented an overview of in situ Uranium recovery processes and associated major radiological aspects and monitoring considerations. Admittedly, the purpose was to present an overview of those special health physics considerations dictated by the in situ Uranium recovery technology, to point out similarities and differences to conventional mill programs and to contrast these alkaline leach facilities to modern day ISR designs. As evidenced by the large number of ISR projects currently under development in the U.S. and worldwide, non conventional Uranium recovery techniques

  5. Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corletti, Michael M. (New Kensington, PA); Lau, Louis K. (Monroeville, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville Boro, PA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps.

  6. Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corletti, M.M.; Lau, L.K.; Schulz, T.L.

    1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps. 1 figures.

  7. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, Burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision No. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 140: Waste Dumps, Burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Areas 5, 22, and 23 of the NTS, CAU 140 consists of nine corrective action sites (CASs). Investigation activities were performed from November 13 through December 11, 2002, with additional sampling to delineate the extent of contaminants of concern (COCs) conducted on February 4 and March 18 and 19, 2003. Results obtained from the investigation activities and sampling indicated that only 3 of the 9 CASs at CAU 140 had COCs identified. Following a review of existing data, future land use, and current operations at the NTS, the following preferred alternatives were developed for consideration: (1) No Further Action - six CASs (05-08-02, 05-17-01, 05-19-01, 05-35-01, 05-99-04, and 22-99-04); (2) Clean Closure - one CAS (05-08-01), and (3) Closure-in-Place - two CASs (05-23-01 and 23-17-01). These alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. Additionally, the alternatives meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated media at CAU 140.

  8. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 357: Mud Pits and Waste Dump, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krauss, Mark J

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 357: Mud Pits and Waste Dump, Nevada Test Site, Nevada as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications To Remove Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order dated September 2013. The Use Restriction Removal document was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection on October 16, 2013. The approval of the UR Removal document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the UR Removal document, this addendum consists of: This page that refers the reader to the UR Removal document for additional information The cover, title, and signature pages of the UR Removal document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the UR Removal document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 04-26-03, Lead Bricks. This UR was established as part of FFACO corrective actions and was based on the presence of lead contamination at concentrations greater than the action level established at the time of the initial investigation.

  9. Case Study - Minnesota Power - Accelerating Grid Modernization...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Power (MP) serves approximately 144,000 customers and manages almost 9,000 miles of power lines and over 160 substations. Grid modernization is a top corporate priority and...

  10. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity Initiative GridWise Alliance GridWise Architecture Council European SmartGrid Technology Platform 19 MODERN GRID S T R A T E G Y Questions? Office of Electricity...

  11. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    decision making by agents vs. operator Moving to a more de-centralized model Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability MODERN GRID S T R A T E G Y 8 Culture Change A...

  12. Modern Languages and Literatures Undergraduate programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, David

    As a truly international, interconnected unit, the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures of- fers, Germany, Russia, Spain, or Mexico. If there is a program offered by another accredited univer- sity

  13. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PSC Missouri - Utility Meeting Joe Miller, Steve Pullins - Modern Grid Team January 9, 2008 1 Conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory Funded by the U.S. Department...

  14. Small Power Production Facilities (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the purpose of these regulations, a small power production facility is defined as a facility that:...

  15. Modern Normativity and the Politics of Deregulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trey, George A.

    MODERN NORMATIVITY AND THE POLITICS OF DEREGULATION GEORGE A. TREY Loyola University of Chicago Jucrgcn Habermas has recently made considerable strides in his understanding of the operations of late-capitalism and the types of political... will suggest several reasons why a de-regulated form of politics is in order given his account of the late modern condition. 1 will also briefly highlight the main features of this model. * Habermas utilizes a theory of social evolution that demarcates...

  16. Secretary Chu to Discuss Importance of Electric Grid Modernization...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Discuss Importance of Electric Grid Modernization to U.S. Competitiveness at Gridwise Global Forum Secretary Chu to Discuss Importance of Electric Grid Modernization to U.S....

  17. Department of Energy Announces Steps to Help Modernize Natural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Announces Steps to Help Modernize Natural Gas Infrastructure Department of Energy Announces Steps to Help Modernize Natural Gas Infrastructure July 29, 2014 -...

  18. Factsheet: An Initiative to Help Modernize Natural Gas Transmission...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    An Initiative to Help Modernize Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure Factsheet: An Initiative to Help Modernize Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution...

  19. Emission Performance of Modern Diesel Engines Fueled with Biodiesel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Emission Performance of Modern Diesel Engines Fueled with Biodiesel Emission Performance of Modern Diesel Engines Fueled with Biodiesel This study presents full quantification of...

  20. Addendum 2 to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 358: Areas 18, 19, 20 Cellars/Mud Pits, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revison 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 358: Areas 18, 19, 20 Cellars/Mud Pits, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, January 2004 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 19-09-05, Mud Pit. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

  1. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations for the 600 Area facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document determines the need for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans for Westinghouse Hanford Company's 600 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. The Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations were prepared in accordance with A Guide For Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (WHC 1991). Five major Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 600 Area were evaluated: the Purge Water Storage Facility, 212-N, -P, and -R Facilities, the 616 Facility, and the 213-J K Storage Vaults. Of the five major facilities evaluated in the 600 Area, none will require preparation of a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan.

  2. Type B Investigation Report for 241-SY-101 Pump Start and 241-C-106 Pit Cleanout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewalt, J.R.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the direction of the Department of Energy (DOE) Manager, Richland Operations Office, a Type ``B`` investigation in accordance with the DOE Order 5484.1, Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Information Reporting Requirements, has been conducted. The scope of the investigation included two events: The ``Inadvertent Mixer Pump Operation at 241-SY-101`` (RL-WHC-TANK FARM-1993-069); ``Inadequate Work Control Results in Personnel Skin Contamination at 241-C-106, Pit B`` (RL-WHC-TANK FARM-1993-071) events. Additionally, at the request of the President of the WHC, a broader investigation into Waste Tank Farm ``safety practices`` and ``Conduct of Operations`` was also conducted. The review was focused on (1) WHC organizations performing operations, maintenance, and radiological safety tasks; and (2) KEH organizations performing major maintenance tasks.

  3. Removal Action Plan for the Accelerated Retrieval Project for a Described Area within Pit 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. M. Tyson

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Removal Action Plan documents the plan for implementation of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compenstion, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action to be performed by the Accelerated Retrieval Project. The focus of the action is the limited excavation and retrieval of selected waste streams from a designated portion of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Subsurface Disposal Area that are contaminated with volatile organic compounds, isotopes of uranium, or transuranic radionuclides. The selected retrieval area is approximately 0.2 ha (1/2 acre) and is located in the eastern portion of Pit 4. The proposed project is referred to as the Accelerated Retrieval Project. This Removal Action Plan details the major work elements, operations approach, and schedule, and summarizes the environmental, safety and health, and waste management considerations associated with the project.

  4. Role of surface finishing on pitting corrosion of a duplex stainless steel in seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salah-Rousset, N.B.; Chaouachi, M.A. [ENIT, Tunis (Tunisia). Lab. of Metallurgy and Materials; Chellouf, A. [STEG, Tunis (Tunisia)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Localized corrosion of duplex UNS S32550 stainless steel in seawater was investigated in the laboratory and in field trials for several surface finish conditions: polished, ground, and sandblasted. Electrochemical data obtained by polarization curves showed that the smoother, polished surface had better characteristics (higher pitting and protection potentials) than the ground or sandblasted surfaces. However, despite its high degree of roughness, the sandblasted surface was the most resistant in field conditions, exhibiting the lowest number of sites attacked. Internal compressive stresses created by sandblasting seem also to have an unsensitizing effect on sensitized zones that exist in cast steel (due to repairs of mold defects), reducing its susceptibility to microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Such stresses are not generated in polished or ground surfaces, and localized MIC attack can occur.

  5. Formation of etch pits during carbon doping of gallium arsenide with carbon tetrachloride by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Lian

    Formation of etch pits during carbon doping of gallium arsenide with carbon tetrachloride to examine the effects of carbon tetrachloride concentration and temperature on the morphology of carbon with increasing carbon tetrachloride concentration. Step bunching and pinning was observed at a IV/III ratio

  6. Abstract Pitting corrosion of aluminum 2024 in Luria Bertani medium was reduced by the secretion of anionic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Thomas K.

    Abstract Pitting corrosion of aluminum 2024 in Luria Bertani medium was reduced by the secretion Bacillus subtilis WB600/pBE92- Asp biofilm slightly reduced the corrosion rate of the pas- sive aluminum the corrosion rate by 90% (compared to the B. sub- tilis WB600/pBE92 biofilm which did not secrete polyas

  7. RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY STATION DEVELOPMENT FOR THE PIT DISASSEMBLY AND CONVERSION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalmaso, M.; Gibbs, K.; Gregory, D.

    2011-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed prototype equipment to demonstrate remote surveying of Inner and Outer DOE Standard 3013 containers for fixed and transferable contamination in accordance with DOE Standard 3013 and 10 CFR 835 Appendix B. When fully developed the equipment will be part of a larger suite of equipment used to package material in accordance with DOE Standard 3013 at the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Project slated for installation at the Savannah River Site. The prototype system consists of a small six-axis industrial robot with an end effector consisting of a force sensor, vacuum gripper and a three fingered pneumatic gripper. The work cell also contains two alpha survey instruments, swipes, swipe dispenser, and other ancillary equipment. An external controller interfaces with the robot controller, survey instruments and other ancillary equipment to control the overall process. SRNL is developing automated equipment for the Pit Disassembly and Conversion (PDC) Project that is slated for the Savannah River Site (SRS). The equipment being developed is automated packaging equipment for packaging plutonium bearing materials in accordance with DOE-STD-3013-2004. The subject of this paper is the development of a prototype Radiological Survey Station (RSS). Other automated equipment being developed for the PDC includes the Bagless transfer System, Outer Can Welder, Gantry Robot System (GRS) and Leak Test Station. The purpose of the RSS is to perform a frisk and swipe of the DOE Standard 3013 Container (either inner can or outer can) to check for fixed and transferable contamination. This is required to verify that the contamination levels are within the limits specified in DOE-STD-3013-2004 and 10 CFR 835, Appendix D. The surface contamination limit for the 3013 Outer Can (OC) is 500 dpm/100 cm2 (total) and 20 dpm/100 cm2 (transferable). This paper will concentrate on the RSS developments for the 3013 OC but the system for the 3013 Inner Can (IC) is nearly identical.

  8. Overview of the Performance of PIT-Tag Interrogation Systems for Adult Salmonids at Bonneville and McNary Dams, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Sandra L.; Prentice, Earl F.

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During winter 2001, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) installed a prototype orifice-based PIT-tag interrogation system into the Washington Shore Ladder at Bonneville Dam (BWSL). Detectors were installed into 12 weirs: 4 downstream (Weirs 334-337) and 8 upstream (Weirs 352-359) from the fish release point (i.e., the exit ladder for the Adult Fish Facility). NOAA Fisheries (National Marine Fisheries Service--NMFS) tagged and released salmonids during 2001 to determine tag-reading efficiencies for different salmonid populations. Data analyses focused on the upper eight weirs. The 2001 tagging results for spring chinook salmon indicated that having detectors in four consecutive weirs would have been sufficient to yield a reading efficiency of 95%. The BWSL orifice-based system performed well until the coho and fall chinook salmon migrations began. Coho and fall chinook salmon appeared to use the weir overflows, and thus avoid detection, at much higher rates than biologists expected. During 2001, technology advances led to the development of significantly larger antennas than had been available earlier, and thus it was possible to build antennas of approximately 2 x 6 ft. Consequently, it became feasible to design interrogation systems for ladder locations where all fish would have to go through the antennas and thus could not avoid detection by using the weir overflows (Fig. 1). Destron Technologies by Digital Angel designed a prototype interrogation system with two antennas that was installed into the counting-window area in the Oregon Ladder at McNary Dam, where its performance could then be directly compared to that of the orifice-based system in the same ladder. Although the orifice-based systems appeared less effective than the fisheries community wanted for fall chinook and coho salmon, the decision was made to proceed with installations planned for Bonneville and McNary Dams because valuable data would still be collected. During the winter of 2002, the Corps and BPA installed PIT-tag interrogation systems into the Bradford Island and Cascades Island Fish Ladders at Bonneville Dam and into the Washington and Oregon Ladders at McNary Dam. Like BWSL in 2001, these ladders had eight weirs (16 orifices) outfitted with fiberglass antennas. Douglas County Public Utility District also installed an orifice-based system into its ladders at Wells Dam, but they were able to use weirs with no overflow sections wherein all fish had to swim through the orifice antennas. Thus, 2002 was the first year that the fisheries community had PIT-tag detection of adult salmonids at Bonneville, McNary, Wells, and Lower Granite Dams (Fig. 2). This overview will provide information on how well the systems at Bonneville and McNary Dams performed.

  9. ARM Mobile Facilities

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Orr, Brad; Coulter, Rich

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This video provides an overview of the ARM Mobile Facilities, two portable climate laboratories that can deploy anywhere in the world for campaigns of at least six months.

  10. DOE Designated Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reactor** Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Joint Genome Institute - Production Genomics Facility (PGF)** (joint with LLNL, LANL, ORNL and PNNL) Advanced Light Source (ALS)...

  11. Accelerator Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Test Facility Vitaly Yakimenko October 6-7, 2010 ATF User meeting DOE HE, S. Vigdor, ALD - (Contact) T. Ludlam Chair, Physics Department V. Yakimenko Director ATF, Accelerator...

  12. ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LABORATORY PHYSICS DEPARTMENT Effective: 04012004 Page 1 of 2 Subject: Accelerator Test Facility - Linear Accelerator General Systems Guide Prepared by: Michael Zarcone...

  13. Carbon Fiber Technology Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Carbon Fiber Technology Facility is relevant in proving the scale- up of low-cost carbon fiber precursor materials and advanced manufacturing technologies * Significant...

  14. Science and Technology Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    IBRF Project Lessons Learned Report Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility Lessons Learned - Stage I Acquisition through Stage II Construction Completion August 2011 This...

  15. Programs & User Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Facility Climate, Ocean, and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Terrestrial Ecosystem and Climate Dynamics Fusion Energy Sciences Magnetic Fusion Experiments Plasma Surface...

  16. Facilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Some of the nation's most powerful and sophisticated facilities for energy research Argonne National Laboratory is home to some of the nation's most powerful and sophisticated...

  17. Existing Facilities Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The NYSERDA Existing Facilities program merges the former Peak Load Reduction and Enhanced Commercial and Industrial Performance programs. The new program offers a broad array of different...

  18. Facility Survey & Transfer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As DOE facilities become excess, many that are radioactively and/or chemically contaminated will become candidate for transfer to DOE-EM for deactivation and decommissioning.

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    InstituteSandia Photovoltaic Systems Symposium On April 15, 2014, in Concentrating Solar Power, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Facilities, Grid Integration, News,...

  20. "This is a very important book that bridges the gap between modern atomic physics and modern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nahar, Sultana Nurun

    "This is a very important book that bridges the gap between modern atomic physics and modern University Sultana N. Nahar, Ohio State University Bridging the gap between physics and astronomy, this is the first integrated graduate-level textbook on atomic astrophysics. It covers the basics of atomic physics

  1. Modern Physics and the Modern World Physics 427A David Thouless Winter 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thouless, David

    Modern Physics and the Modern World Physics 427A David Thouless Winter 2008 Introduction. 4. The neutron. This led to understanding of nuclear structure, to the discovery of nuclear fission, and to the prediction of neutron stars. 5. Nuclear resonance. This has provided an invaluable tool for the ex- ploration

  2. MINERAL FACILITIES MAPPING PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    MINERAL FACILITIES MAPPING PROJECT Yadira Soto-Viruet Supervisor: David Menzie, Yolanda Fong-Sam Minerals Information Team (MIT) USGS Summer Internship 2009 U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Minerals Information Team (MIT): Annually reports on the minerals facilities of more than 180 countries

  3. A Materials Facilities Initiative -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Materials Facilities Initiative - FMITS & MPEX D.L. Hillis and ORNL Team Fusion & Materials for Nuclear Systems Division July 10, 2014 #12;2 Materials Facilities Initiative JET ITER FNSF Fusion Reactor Challenges for materials: fluxes and fluence, temperatures 50 x divertor ion fluxes up to 100 x neutron

  4. Geophysical InversionFacility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    UBC Geophysical InversionFacility Modelling and Inversion of EMI data collected over magnetic soils of EMI data acquired at sites with magnetic soils · Geophysical Proveouts · Geonics EM63 Data · First model parameters: · Location · Orientation · Polarizabilities 4 #12;UBC Geophysical Inversion Facility

  5. Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Argonne Leadership Computing Facility 2010 ANNUAL REPORT S C I E N C E P O W E R E D B Y S U P E R C O M P U T I N G ANL-11/15 The Argonne Leadership Computing States Government nor any agency thereof, nor UChicago Argonne, LLC, nor any of their employees

  6. Emergency Facilities and Equipment

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume clarifies requirements of DOE O 151.1 to ensure that emergency facilities and equipment are considered as part of emergency management program and that activities conducted at these emergency facilities are fully integrated. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

  7. Nanotechnology User Facility for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A National Nanotechnology User Facility for Industry Academia Government #12;The National Institute of Commerce's nanotechnology user facility. The CNST enables innovation by providing rapid access to the tools new measurement and fabrication methods in response to national nanotechnology needs. www

  8. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. M. Obi

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Closure Report (CR) is to provide documentation of the completed corrective action and to provide data confirming the corrective action. The corrective action was performed following the approved Corrective Action Plan (CAP) (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE], 1999b) and consisted of closure-in-place with partial excavation, disposal, backfilling, administrative controls, and post-closure monitoring. Soil with petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations above the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) Action Level of 100 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) (Nevada Administrative Code, 1996) was removed to a depth of 1.5 meters (m) (5 feet [ft]). The excavations were backfilled with clean fill to restore the site and to prevent contact with deeper, closed-in-place soil that exceeded the NDEP Action Level. According to the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (DOE, 1998), the Mercury Fire Training Pit was used from approximately 1965 to the early 1990s to train fire-fighting and emergency response personnel at the NTS and encompasses an area approximately 85 by 115 m (280 by 380 ft). The location of the Mercury Fire Training Pit is shown in Figure 1 and a site plan is shown in Figure 2. The Mercury Fire Training Pit formerly included a bermed bum pit with four small bum tanks; four large above ground storage tanks (ASTS); an overturned bus, a telephone pole storage area; and several areas for burning sheds, pallets, and cables. During the active life of the Mercury Fire Training Pit, training events were conducted at least monthly and sometimes as often as weekly. Fuels burned during these events included off-specification or rust-contaminated gasoline, diesel, and aviation fuel (JP-4). Other items burned during these events included paint, tires, a pond liner, wood, paper, cloth, and copper cable. Approximately 570 liters (L) (150 gallons [gal]) of fuel were used for each training event resulting in an approximate total of 136,000 L (36,000 gal) of fuel used over the life of the Mercury Fire Training Pit. Unburned fuel was allowed to pool on the ground and was left to eventually volatilize or soak into the soil. In addition, fuels from the ASTS and fuels and fluids from the overturned bus leaked or spilled onto the ground. Approximately 19 L to 38 L (5 to 10 gal) of paint were also burned monthly until sometime in the 1970s.

  9. STAR Facility Tritium Accountancy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. J. Pawelko; J. P. Sharpe; B. J. Denny

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility has been established to provide a laboratory infrastructure for the fusion community to study tritium science associated with the development of safe fusion energy and other technologies. STAR is a radiological facility with an administrative total tritium inventory limit of 1.5g (14,429 Ci) [1]. Research studies with moderate tritium quantities and various radionuclides are performed in STAR. Successful operation of the STAR facility requires the ability to receive, inventory, store, dispense tritium to experiments, and to dispose of tritiated waste while accurately monitoring the tritium inventory in the facility. This paper describes tritium accountancy in the STAR facility. A primary accountancy instrument is the tritium Storage and Assay System (SAS): a system designed to receive, assay, store, and dispense tritium to experiments. Presented are the methods used to calibrate and operate the SAS. Accountancy processes utilizing the Tritium Cleanup System (TCS), and the Stack Tritium Monitoring System (STMS) are also discussed. Also presented are the equations used to quantify the amount of tritium being received into the facility, transferred to experiments, and removed from the facility. Finally, the STAR tritium accountability database is discussed.

  10. STAR facility tritium accountancy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawelko, R. J.; Sharpe, J. P.; Denny, B. J. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility has been established to provide a laboratory infrastructure for the fusion community to study tritium science associated with the development of safe fusion energy and other technologies. STAR is a radiological facility with an administrative total tritium inventory limit of 1.5 g (14,429 Ci) [1]. Research studies with moderate tritium quantities and various radionuclides are performed in STAR. Successful operation of the STAR facility requires the ability to receive, inventory, store, dispense tritium to experiments, and to dispose of tritiated waste while accurately monitoring the tritium inventory in the facility. This paper describes tritium accountancy in the STAR facility. A primary accountancy instrument is the tritium Storage and Assay System (SAS): a system designed to receive, assay, store, and dispense tritium to experiments. Presented are the methods used to calibrate and operate the SAS. Accountancy processes utilizing the Tritium Cleanup System (TCS), and the Stack Tritium Monitoring System (STMS) are also discussed. Also presented are the equations used to quantify the amount of tritium being received into the facility, transferred to experiments, and removed from the facility. Finally, the STAR tritium accountability database is discussed. (authors)

  11. DOE/NNSA Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NNSA Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor Award Date End Date OptionsAward Term Ultimate Potential Expiration Date Contract FY Competed Parent Companies LLC...

  12. Test Facility Daniil Stolyarov, Accelerator Test Facility User...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Development of the Solid-State Laser System for the Accelerator Test Facility Daniil Stolyarov, Accelerator Test Facility User's Meeting April 3, 2009 Outline Motivation for...

  13. MODERN DEVELOPMENTS IN MULTIPHASE FLOW & HEAT TRANSFER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lahey, Richard T.

    MODERN DEVELOPMENTS IN MULTIPHASE FLOW & HEAT TRANSFER "ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS OF FRACTAL AND CHAOS THEORY" RICHARD T. LAHEY, JR. Center for Multiphase Research Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Troy and multiphase flow & heat transfer will be stressed. This paper will begin by reviewing some important concepts

  14. Physics 15030401 Special Topics in Modern Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Randy

    Physics 15030401 Special Topics in Modern Physics Probability and Statistics for Physics Randy Johnson Summer, '96 Text Bevington and Robinson, Data Reduction and Error Analysis for the Physical Physics. Eardie, Drijard, James, Roos, and Sadoulet, Statistical Methods in Experimental Physics. Roe

  15. Medieval and Early Modern Events in Durham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    's Library (1669) on the UNESCO World Heritage site of Palace Green following a major restoration project exhibition of the Lindisfarne Gospels, and celebrate the rich resources of the city's historic libraries ­ Cosin's Library, the Cathedral Library, and the Library of Ushaw College. · Early Modern Catholicism

  16. Sandia Energy - About the Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Facility About the FacilityTara Camacho-Lopez2015-05-11T19:38:37+00:00 Test-Bed Wind Turbines Allow Facility Flexibility While Providing Reliable Data in Many Regimes SWiFT...

  17. Facility effluent monitoring plan determinations for the 300 Area facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations were conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company 300 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. These determinations have been prepared in accordance with A Guide For Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. Sixteen Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 300 Area were evaluated: 303 (A, B, C, E, F, G, J and K), 303 M, 306 E, 308, 309, 313, 333, 334 A, and the 340 Waste Handling Facility. The 303, 306, 313, 333, and 334 facilities Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations were prepared by Columbia Energy and Environmental Services of Richland, Washington. The 340 Central Waste Complex determination was prepared by Bovay Northwest, Incorporated. The 308 and 309 facility determinations were prepared by Westinghouse Handford Company. Of the 16 facilities evaluated, 3 will require preparation of a Facility effluent Monitoring Plan: the 313 N Fuels Fabrication Support Building, 333 N Fuels fabrication Building, and the 340 Waste Handling Facility. 26 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. Record of Technical Change for Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

    2005-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Record of Technical Change for Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, Burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (DOE/NV--963-Rev 2, dated November 2004).

  19. Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The first subchapter of the statute concerning Nuclear Power Generating Facilities provides for direct citizen participation in the decision to construct any nuclear power generating facility in...

  20. Pollution Control Facilities (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the purpose of this legislation, pollution control facilities are defined as any facilities designed for the elimination, mitigation or prevention of air or water pollution, including all...

  1. LANL | Physics | Trident Laser Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discovery science at Trident Laser Facility Several important discoveries and first observations have been made at the Trident Laser Facility, a unique three-beam neodymium-glass...

  2. Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations describe the siting and permitting process for hazardous waste facilities and reference rules for construction, operation, closure, and post-closure of these facilities.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: SWIFT Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SWIFT Facility Characterizing Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility Inflow On April 1, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Wind Energy The Scaled...

  4. User Facilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Facilities Advanced Photon Source Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System Center for Nanoscale Materials Transportation Research and...

  5. Effects of Prudhoe Bay reserve pit fluids on water quality and macroinvertebrates of arctic tundra ponds in Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, R.L.; Snyder-Conn, E.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report summarizes results from the authors` 1983 field study. Although the report should be useful in assessing impacts from reserve pit fluids under Arctic conditions and in evaluating possible management strategies, it was neither intended as an exhaustive study, nor can the results be wholly extrapolated to present-day oil field practices. Since 1983, state regulations concerning reserve pit fluid discharges have become increasingly stringent. Also, some industry practices have changed. For example, chrome lignosulfonate drill muds have been partly replaced by non-chrome lignosulfonates, and diesel oil has been largely replaced with less toxic mineral oil in drilling operations. From 1985 to 1987, the Fish and Wildlife Service began additional studies on Prudhoe Bay reserve pit fluids to examine impacts to tundra pond water, sediment, and biota; to evaluate acute and chronic toxicity through bioassays; and to examine bio-uptake of metals and hygrocarbons by resident species--including invertebrates, sedges, fish, and birds. Reports on these investigations have not yet been prepared, but should also be consulted by the interested reader when they become available.

  6. Cornell University Facilities Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Sturt

    Description: The Large Animal Teaching Complex (LATC) will be a joint facility for the College of Veterinary or increase operating costs of the dairy barn; therefore, the College of Veterinary Medicine has agreed

  7. Photovoltaic Research Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R&D) at its national laboratory facilities located throughout the country. To encourage further innovation,...

  8. NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's electricity from renewable resources by 2010. The Guidebook outlines eligibility and legal requirementsCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ` NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK March 2007 CEC-300 Executive Director Heather Raitt Technical Director RENEWABLE ENERGY OFFICE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

  9. NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

  10. NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

  11. Liquidity facilities and signaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arregui, Nicols

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation studies the role of signaling concerns in discouraging access to liquidity facilities like the IMF contingent credit lines (CCL) and the Discount Window (DW). In Chapter 1, I analyze the introduction of ...

  12. Facilities Management Department Restructuring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullins, Dyche

    Zone 2 Mission Bay/East Side: Includes Mission Bay, Mission Center Bldg, Buchanan Dental, Hunters Point, 654 Minnesota, Oyster Point 2. Recommendation that UCSF align all Facility Services and O

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy, SWIFT, Wind Energy One of the primary roles of Sandia's Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility will be to conduct detailed experiments on turbine wakes...

  14. Geophysical Investigations of the Mound City Borrow Pits, Ross County, Ohio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Blair

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    that applies direct current or low-frequency alternating current at the ground surface through metal probes to measure the potential difference (in Ohms) between them (Burger, et. al., 2006). Distinct variations in these measurements provide information... 2 1848 Squire and Davis Map 8 Figure 3 Modern Map of the site 12 Figure 4 Sample GPR line 15 Figure 5 Total Intensity Map of the Geomagnetic Field 17 Figure 6 Sample Magnetic Line 18 Figure 7 Typical Resistivity...

  15. Strategies for Facilities Renewal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Good, R. L.

    psig * Plant or Service Air 90 psig * Starting Air for gas engines 220 psig * Instrument Air 80 psig * 02 - process * N2 high purity 4. Water production systems and distribution * Potable water (remote rural site) * Fire water (not treated) * Cooling... sewers 6. Fuel systems * Mixed fuel (both by-product and purchased methane) * Pipeline natural gas * Fuel oil 7. Maintenance and office facilities * Various maintenance/construction shops, stores, offices * Office facilities for technical...

  16. Survival of Seaward-Migrating PIT and Acoustic-Tagged Juvenile Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Columbia Rivers: An Evaluation of Length-Specific Tagging Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Oldenburg, Eric W.; Seaburg, Adam; Cook, Katrina V.; Skalski, John R.; Eppard, M. B.; Deters, Katherine A.

    2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies examining the survival of juvenile salmon as they emigrate to the ocean provide important information regarding the management of regulated river systems. Acoustic telemetry is a widely used tool for evaluating the behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids in the Columbia River basin. Thus, it is important to understand how the surgical tagging process and the presence of a transmitter affect survival so any biases can be accounted for or eliminated. This study evaluated the effects of fish length and tag type on the survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon during their seaward migrations through the Snake and Columbia rivers during 2006, 2007, and 2008. Fish were collected at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River (river kilometer 695) and implanted with either only a passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag (PIT fish) or both a PIT tag and an acoustic transmitter (AT fish). Survival was estimated from release at Lower Granite Dam to multiple downstream locations (dams) using the CormackJollySeber single release model, and analysis of variance was used to test for differences among length-classes and between tag types. No length-specific tag effect was detected between PIT and AT fish (i.e., length affected the survival of PIT fish in a manner similar to which it affected the survival of AT fish). Survival among the smallest length class (i.e., 8089 mm) of both PIT and AT subyearling Chinook salmon was markedly low (i.e., 4%). Fish length was positively correlated with the survival of both PIT and AT fish. Significant differences in survival were detected between tag types; the survival of PIT fish was generally greater than that of AT fish. However, confounding variables warrant caution in making strong inferences regarding this factor. Further, results suggest that tag effects may be due to the process of surgically implanting the transmitter rather than the presence of the transmitter.

  17. Zaporozhye aluminum smelter: Ukraine modernization and environmental protection project. Feasibility study report. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report shows the results of a feasibility study conducted for the modernization and environmental protection systems proposed for the Zaporozhye Aluminum Smelter. The study reviews the overall technological and environmental improvement programs for the final design details for potcell modifications. Also covered is a review of project implementation for the best possible construction technique to minimize production loss as well as strategic investment plans to secure project financing from financial institutions. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) Executive Summary; (2) Introduction; (3) Existing Facilities at ZALK and its Fixed Assets; (4) Plant Modernization Project; (5) Environmental Control and Fume Treatment System; (6) Market Study; (7) Plant Organization and Manning; (8) Project Implementation Strategy; (9) Economical and Financial Analysis.

  18. Modernism with style : history, culture and the origins of modern architecture in Berlin, 1780-1870

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedrick, Christian A. (Christian Andrew)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation traces the continual, but overlooked, impact of Islamic architecture on practicing architects in nineteenth-century Berlin. As such, it examines the origins of Modernism by considering design strategies ...

  19. Modern Art and Modern Movement: Images of Dance in American Art, c. 1900-1950

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, JoLee Gillespie

    2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    with an examination of Everett Shinn's, Louis Kronberg's, and Malvina Hoffman's depictions of European ballet dancers, such as Russian Anna Pavlova. Chapter two discusses images of Isadora Duncan, the mother of modern dance, created by Abraham Walkowitz, John Sloan...

  20. Mound facility physical characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonne, W.R.; Alexander, B.M.; Cage, M.R.; Hase, E.H.; Schmidt, M.J.; Schneider, J.E.; Slusher, W.; Todd, J.E.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a baseline physical characterization of Mound`s facilities as of September 1993. The baseline characterizations are to be used in the development of long-term future use strategy development for the Mound site. This document describes the current missions and alternative future use scenarios for each building. Current mission descriptions cover facility capabilities, physical resources required to support operations, current safety envelope and current status of facilities. Future use scenarios identify potential alternative future uses, facility modifications required for likely use, facility modifications of other uses, changes to safety envelope for the likely use, cleanup criteria for each future use scenario, and disposition of surplus equipment. This Introductory Chapter includes an Executive Summary that contains narrative on the Functional Unit Material Condition, Current Facility Status, Listing of Buildings, Space Plans, Summary of Maintenance Program and Repair Backlog, Environmental Restoration, and Decontamination and Decommissioning Programs. Under Section B, Site Description, is a brief listing of the Site PS Development, as well as Current Utility Sources. Section C contains Site Assumptions. A Maintenance Program Overview, as well as Current Deficiencies, is contained within the Maintenance Program Chapter.

  1. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY 71 The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility the irradiated cells. Both the microbeam and the track segment facilities continue to be utilized in various investigations of this phenomenon. The single- particle microbeam facility provides precise control of the number

  2. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY 1 The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility for Radiological Research (CRR). Using the mi- crobeam facility, 10% of the cells were irradiated through particle beam as well as the first fo- cused microbeam in the new microbeam facility. Another significant

  3. Facility Location with Hierarchical Facility Costs Zoya Svitkina #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tardos, ?va

    Facility Location with Hierarchical Facility Costs Zoya Svitkina # ?? Eva Tardos + Abstract We consider the facility location problem with hierarchi­ cal facility costs, and give a (4 installation costs. Shmoys, Swamy and Levi [13] gave an approxi­ mation algorithm for a two­level version

  4. Inventory extension at the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanbro, W.D.; Longmire, V.; Olinger, C.T.; Argo, P.E.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The planned renovation of the Nuclear Material Storage Facility (NMSF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory will be a significant addition to the plutonium storage capacity of the nuclear weapons complex. However, the utility of the facility may be impaired by an overly conservative approach to performing inventories of material in storage. This report examines options for taking advantage of provisions in Department of Energy orders to extend the time between inventories. These extensions are based on a combination of modern surveillance technology, facility design features, and revised operational procedures. The report also addresses the possibility that NMSF could be the site of some form of international inspection as part of the US arms control and nonproliferation policy.

  5. NREL: Energy Systems Integration Facility - Facility Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency Visit | NationalWebmaster ToStaffCapabilities TheFacility

  6. Radiation Effects Facility - Facilities - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery, andSmartRadiation Effects Facility

  7. New Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) to Help Modernize the Grid |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilverNephelineNeuralNew AdvancesNewNew

  8. DOE/EA-1510; Final Environmental Assessment for the Alternate Financed Facility Modernization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant6-2002DOE/EA-1313 Rev. 0

  9. The Euler Legacy to Modern Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Dattoli; M. Del Franco

    2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Particular families of special functions, conceived as purely mathematical devices between the end of XVIII and the beginning of XIX centuries, have played a crucial role in the development of many aspects of modern Physics. This is indeed the case of the Euler gamma function, which has been one of the key elements paving the way to string theories, furthermore the Euler-Riemann Zeta function has played a decisive role in the development of renormalization theories. The ideas of Euler and later those of Riemann, Ramanujan and of other, less popular, mathematicians have therefore provided the mathematical apparatus ideally suited to explore, and eventually solve, problems of fundamental importance in modern Physics. The mathematical foundations of the theory of renormalization trace back to the work on divergent series by Euler and by mathematicians of two centuries ago. Feynman, Dyson, Schwinger... rediscovered most of these mathematical "curiosities" and were able to develop a new and powerful way of looking at physical phenomena.

  10. FINAL REPORT - CENTER FOR GRID MODERNIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markiewicz, Daniel R

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the CGM was to develop high-priority grid modernization technologies in advanced sensors, communications, controls and smart systems to enable use of real-time or near real-time information for monitoring, analyzing and managing distribution and transmission grid conditions. The key strategic approach to carry out individual CGM research and development (R&D) projects was through partnerships, primarily with the GridApp Consortium utility members.

  11. UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD FAU Research Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Harriet L.Wilkes Honors College FAU Research Facility Expansion Satellite Utility Plant Chiller Lift

  12. 4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture, Spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Caroline

    This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine ...

  13. ancient history modern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Modern History at Oxford. It gives the regulations prescribing the content of the syllabus and the subjects for examination in the Final Honour School of Modern History in...

  14. Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelmann, Christian

    Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures Christian Engelmann, Hong Ong trend in modern high performance computing (HPC) system architectures employs "lean" compute nodes) continue to reside on compute nodes. Key words: High Performance Computing, Middleware, Lean Compute Node

  15. FACILITIES and EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTION The UCR Institute for Integrative Genome Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyubomirsky, Ilya

    1 FACILITIES and EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTION The UCR Institute for Integrative Genome Biology interdisciplinary, four-story Genomics Building in 2009 to accommodate over 200 faculty members, graduate students one roof who use modern genetic tools, genomics and bioinformatics to help address basic and applied

  16. EA-1866: Modernization Planning at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of proposed modernization planning at Argonne National Laboratory in DuPage County, Illinois.

  17. JAPAN IN SYDNEY Professor sadler & modernism 192030s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viglas, Anastasios

    #12;1 JAPAN IN SYDNEY Professor sadler & modernism 192030s CUraTed BY aJioKa ChiaKi and maria in conjunction with the exhibition Japan in Sydney: Professor Sadler & modernism, 1920-30s University art gallery: Japan in sydney: Professor sadler & modernism, 1920-30s by ajioka Chiaki and maria (Connie) Tornatore

  18. Department of Humanities Advanced Certificate in Modern Language

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Language and Area Study in French, German or Spanish must first complete the requirements: _____French (AFR) _____German (AGE) _____Spanish (ASP) I. Advanced Modern Language Seminar (3 credits required in Literature and Film ____ HU4291 Modern Language Seminar I Spanish: Language and Power ____ HU4292 Modern

  19. Yoshio Nishina and the birth of modern physics in Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    #12;1 Yoshio Nishina and the birth of modern physics in Japan Imre Pázsit in co in the development of modern physics in his home country. Nishina's scientific activity is very far-reaching, and besides the famous formula, he established accelerator based research and modern nuclear physics in Japan

  20. Symmetry and Relativity : From Classical Mechanics to Modern Particle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Symmetry and Relativity : From Classical Mechanics to Modern Particle Physics Z.J. Ajaltouni to modern particle physics will be given and some open questions will be raised. Keywords: Symmetry that symmetry represents a methodology followed by Modern Physics in order to build coherent and successful

  1. MODERN MIRACLE MEDICAL MACHINES: PHYSICS INSTRUCTION FOR FUTURE MEDICAL STUDENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zollman, Dean

    1 MODERN MIRACLE MEDICAL MACHINES: PHYSICS INSTRUCTION FOR FUTURE MEDICAL STUDENTS DEAN ZOLLMAN a complete change in the course is not likely. So we are trying to bring some modern physics in the context--not just at the end when modern physics is typically presented. #12;2 2 Physics Education Research

  2. Intermediate Modern Physics: PH 354 (UA) Spring Semester 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camata, Renato P.

    Intermediate Modern Physics: PH 354 (UA) Spring Semester 2009 Time and location: Tuesdays, (205) 348-3799 (Other times by appointment) Modern Physics for Scientists and Engineers Thornton & Rex: http://modern.physics.virginia.edu/Book/errata3.html Other Books and Resources Suggested: Quantum

  3. The fate of presentism in modern physics Christian Wuthrich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wthrich, Christian

    The fate of presentism in modern physics Christian Wuthrich Forthcoming in Roberto Ciunti, Kristie of assessing the compatibility of presentism with various theories of modern physics, including both spacetime for representational purposes without imbuing them with physical existence. The vantage point of modern spacetime

  4. Closure Strategy for a Waste Disposal Facility with Multiple Waste Types and Regulatory Drivers at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Desotell; D. Wieland; V. Yucel; G. Shott; J. Wrapp

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is planning to close the 92-Acre Area of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is about 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Closure planning for this facility must take into account the regulatory requirements for a diversity of waste streams, disposal and storage configurations, disposal history, and site conditions. This paper provides a brief background of the Area 5 RWMS, identifies key closure issues, and presents the closure strategy. Disposals have been made in 25 shallow excavated pits and trenches and 13 Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes at the 92-Acre Area since 1961. The pits and trenches have been used to dispose unclassified low-level waste (LLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and asbestiform waste, and to store classified low-level and low-level mixed materials. The GCD boreholes are intermediate-depth disposal units about 10 feet (ft) in diameter and 120 ft deep. Classified and unclassified high-specific activity LLW, transuranic (TRU), and mixed TRU are disposed in the GCD boreholes. TRU waste was also disposed inadvertently in trench T-04C. Except for three disposal units that are active, all pits and trenches are operationally covered with 8-ft thick alluvium. The 92-Acre Area also includes a Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU) operating under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Interim Status, and an asbestiform waste unit operating under a state of Nevada Solid Waste Disposal Site Permit. A single final closure cover is envisioned over the 92-Acre Area. The cover is the evapotranspirative-type cover that has been successfully employed at the NTS. Closure, post-closure care, and monitoring must meet the requirements of the following regulations: U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, Title 40 CFR Part 265, Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) 444.743, RCRA requirements as incorporated into NAC 444.8632, and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). A grouping of waste disposal units according to waste type, location, and similarity in regulatory requirements identified six closure units: LLW Unit, Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111 under FFACO, Asbestiform LLW Unit, Pit 3 MWDU, TRU GCD Borehole Unit, and TRU Trench Unit. The closure schedule of all units is tied to the closure schedule of the Pit 3 MWDU under RCRA.

  5. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News]SPARTICUSJune31, 2005 [Facility

  6. Facilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment6 FY 2007FY 2014Facilities Facilities

  7. Facility Disposition Projects

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment6 FY 2007FY 2014Facilities Facilities

  8. Facility Data Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget » FY 2014Facilities FusionFacility Data Policy

  9. 57EXTERNAL CONTROLS ON MODERN CLASTIC TURBIDITE SYSTEMS: THREE CASE STUDIES EXTERNAL CONTROLS ON MODERN CLASTIC TURBIDITE SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    57EXTERNAL CONTROLS ON MODERN CLASTIC TURBIDITE SYSTEMS: THREE CASE STUDIES EXTERNAL CONTROLS of controlling factors that combine to influence the development of modern turbidite systems, and how these vary ON MODERN CLASTIC TURBIDITE SYSTEMS: THREE CASE STUDIES C. HANS NELSON AND CARLOTA ESCUTIA Instituto Andaluz

  10. May 28, 2007 Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures 1/20 Middleware in Modern High Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelmann, Christian

    May 28, 2007 Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures 1/20 Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures Christian Engelmann1,2, Hong Ong1, Stephen L 28, 2007 Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures 2/20 Talk Outline

  11. Viability of Modern Automated Rapid Transit Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    characterized by: Lack of distribution system from transit stations & stops and from parking facilities: 1.8 Reliability: 99.7% vehicle availability; 99.2% system availability (U.S. transit: 97.5%) #12 Not necessarily "personal," but close #12;What ART Looks Like #12;Characteristics of ART Systems Separate

  12. FACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    to the repair of hydraulic turbine runners and large pump impellers. Reclamation operates and maintains a wideFACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES VOLUME 2-5 TURBINE REPAIR Internet Version variety of reaction and impulse turbines as well as axial flow, mixed flow, radial flow pumps and pump

  13. Facilities Management Field Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Facilities Management Field Services FieldStationsAnnualReport2006 #12;Cover Photo by Dr Mark Jermy coast #12; Introduction A very wet Steve Weaver emerges from the river. Ah, field work! The Government broadband, at least there is now an alternative to the telephone line. Electrical power spikes (and outages

  14. Graph algorithms experimentation facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonom, Donald George

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DRAWADJMAT 2 ~e ~l 2. ~f ~2 2 ~t ~& [g H 2 O? Z Mwd a P d ed d Aid~a sae R 2-BE& T C dbms Fig. 2. External Algorithm Handler The facility is menu driven and implemented as a client to XAGE. Our implementation follows very closely the functionality...

  15. NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for and receive production incentives, referred to as supplemental energy payments (SEPs), from the New RenewableCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK APRIL 2006 CEC-300 Director Heather Raitt Technical Director Renewable Energy Program Drake Johnson Office Manager Renewable

  16. Risk assessment of drain valve failure in the K-West basin south loadout pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MORGAN, R.G.

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The drain valve located in the bottom of the K-West Basin South Loadout Pit (SLOP) could provide an additional leak path from the K Basins if the drain valve were damaged during construction, installation, or operation of the cask loading system. For the K-West Basin SLOP the immersion pail support structure (IPSS) has already been installed, but the immersion pail has not been installed in the IPSS. The objective of this analysis is to evaluate the risk of damaging the drain valve during the remaining installation activities or operation of the cask loading system. Valve damage, as used in this analysis, does not necessarily imply large amounts of the water will be released quickly from the basin, rather valve damage implies that the valve's integrity has been compromised. The analysis process is a risk-based uncertainty analysis where best engineering judgement is used to represent each variable in the analysis. The uncertainty associated with each variable is represented by a probability distribution. The uncertainty is propagated through the analysis by Monte Carlo convolution techniques. The corresponding results are developed as a probability distribution and the risk is expressed in terms of the corresponding complementary cumulative distribution function (''risk curve''). The total risk is the area under the ''risk curve''. The risk of potentially dropping a cask into or on the IPSS and damaging the drain valve is approximately 1 x 10{sup -4} to 2 x 10{sup -5} per year. The risk of objects falling behind the IPSS and damaging the valve is 3 x 10{sup -2} to 6 x 10{sup -3} per year. Both risks are expressed as drain value failure frequencies. The risk of objects falling behind the IPSS and damaging the valve can be significantly reduced by an impact limiter and/or installing a gating or plate over the area bounded by the back of the IPSS and the wall of the SLOP. With either of these actions there is a 90 percent confidence that the frequency of drain valve failure would be less than 1 x 10{sup -6} per year.

  17. Modern testing meets wide range of objectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlig-Economides, C.A.; Hegeman, P. (Schlumberger Oilfield Services, Houston, TX (United States)); Clark, G. (Schlumberger Oilfield Services, Aberdeen (United Kingdom))

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing sequences in two very different wells illustrate the wide range of objectives that are met with modern testing procedures. The first example is a drill stem test in an exploration well. The second test is in an established producing well. The exploration well test incorporated tubing-conveyed perforating, fluid sampling, production logging, and matrix stimulation to evaluate and properly treat near-well bore damage, as well as to investigate reservoir volume and characterize boundaries. The test on the established producer evaluated whether a workover could remedy lower than expected productivity. Production logging was combined with stationary transient measurements.

  18. Modern Quantum Technologies of Information Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korchenko, Oleksandr; Gnatyuk, Sergiy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the paper systematization and classification of modern quantum technologies of the information security against cyber-terrorist attack are carried out. The characteristic of the basic directions of quantum cryptography from the viewpoint of used quantum technologies is given. The qualitative analysis of advantages and disadvantages of concrete quantum protocols is made. The current status of a problem of practical quantum cryptography using in telecommunication networks is considered. In particular, the short review of existing commercial systems of quantum key distribution is given.

  19. Modern topics in theoretical nuclear physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. K. Jennings; A. Schwenk

    2006-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past five years there have been profound advances in nuclear physics based on effective field theory and the renormalization group. In this brief, we summarize these advances and discuss how they impact our understanding of nuclear systems and experiments that seek to unravel their unknowns. We discuss future opportunities and focus on modern topics in low-energy nuclear physics, with special attention to the strong connections to many-body atomic and condensed matter physics, as well as to astrophysics. This makes it an exciting era for nuclear physics.

  20. Natural Gas Modernization Clearinghouse | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMake Your NextHowNQA-1.pdfLab DayModernization Clearinghouse

  1. IT Modernization Strategy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment of Energy IRS Issues New TaxModernization

  2. Modernizing Public Transport Webinar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker,Modernizing Public Transport

  3. Particle Size (Sieving) and Enthalpy (Acid Calorimetry) Analysis of Single-Pull K East Basin Floor and Pit Sludges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bredt, Paul R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Delegard, Calvin H. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Schmidt, Andrew J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Silvers, Kurt L. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Thornton, Brenda M. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Gano, Sue (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses particle size and calorimetry analyses performed on single-pull sludge samples collected from the Hanford K East Basin floor and pits. This study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of the baseline sludge management plan, which calls for the sludge to be packaged, shipped and stored at T Plant in the Hanford 200 West Area until final processing as a future date. These analyses were needed to better understand the K Basin sludge inventory and chemical reactivity.

  4. Nano Research Facility Lab Safety Manual Nano Research Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    1 Nano Research Facility Lab Safety Manual Nano Research Facility: Weining Wang Office: Brauer---chemical, biological, or radiological. Notify the lab manager, Dr. Yujie Xiong at 5-4530. Eye Contact: Promptly flush

  5. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the treatability study of in situ vitrification of Seepage Pit 1 in Waste Area Grouping 7 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) establishes the quality assurance procedures and requirements to be implemented for the control of quality-related activities for Phase 3 of the Treatability Study (TS) of In Situ Vitrification (ISV) of Seepage Pit 1, ORNL Waste Area Grouping 7. This QAPjP supplements the Quality Assurance Plan for Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program by providing information specific to the ISV-TS. Phase 3 of the TS involves the actual ISV melt operations and posttest monitoring of Pit 1 and vicinity. Previously, Phase 1 activities were completed, which involved determining the boundaries of Pit 1, using driven rods and pipes and mapping the distribution of radioactivity using logging tools within the pipes. Phase 2 involved sampling the contents, both liquid and solids, in and around seepage Pit 1 to determine their chemical and radionuclide composition and the spatial distribution of these attributes. A separate QAPjP was developed for each phase of the project. A readiness review of the Phase 3 activities presented QAPjP will be conducted prior to initiating field activities, and an Operational Acceptance, Test (OAT) will also be conducted with no contamination involved. After, the OAT is complete, the ISV process will be restarted, and the melt will be allowed to increase with depth and incorporate the radionuclide contamination at the bottom of Pit 1. Upon completion of melt 1, the equipment will be shut down and mobilized to an adjacent location at which melt 2 will commence.

  6. Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indiana Department of Environmental Management requires permits before the construction or expansion of biomass anaerobic digestion or gasification facilities.

  7. The Caterpillar Coal Gasification Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welsh, J.; Coffeen, W. G., III

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a review of one of America's premier coal gasification installations. The caterpillar coal gasification facility located in York, Pennsylvania is an award winning facility. The plant was recognized as the 'pace setter plant of the year...

  8. Facilities Automation and Energy Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jen, D. P.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computerized facilities automation and energy management systems can be used to maintain high levels of facilities operations efficiencies. The monitoring capabilities provides the current equipment and process status, and the analysis...

  9. Biomass Feedstock National User Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1BIntegration of Supply Chains I: Breaking Down Barriers Biomass Feedstock National User Facility Kevin L. Kenney, Director, Biomass Feedstock National User Facility, Idaho National Laboratory

  10. Reed Reactor Facility Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frantz, Stephen G.

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the report of the operations, experiments, modifications, and other aspects of the Reed Reactor Facility for the year.

  11. Economies of Valuation and Desire: How New Deal Photography Made the Amish Modern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Elizabeth Louise

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern By Elizabeth Louise Bennett A dissertation submittedModern by Elizabeth Louise Bennett Doctor of Philosophy in

  12. CFTF | Carbon Fiber Technology Facility | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BTRIC CNMS CSMB CFTF Working with CFTF HFIR MDF NTRC OLCF SNS Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Home | User Facilities | CFTF CFTF | Carbon Fiber Technology Facility SHARE Oak...

  13. CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May 29, 2009 CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May 29, 2009 May 29, 2009 Nuclear Facility...

  14. Microsoft Word - CBU-PIT-2004-00010_R1.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your HomeOverviewCleanupShippingFacility Work

  15. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    175 THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY #12;176 #12;177 THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH the microbeam and the track-segment facilities have been utilized in various investigations. Table 1 lists-segment facility. Samples are treated with graded doses of radical scavengers to observe changes in the cluster

  16. Surficial geology and performance assessment for a Radioactive Waste Management Facility at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, K.E. [Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies, Co., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Gustafson, D.L.; Huckins-Gang, H.E.; Miller, J.J.; Rawlinson, S.E. [Raytheon Services Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Nevada Test Site, one potentially disruptive scenario being evaluated for the Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) Facility Performance Assessment is deep post-closure erosion that would expose buried radioactive waste to the accessible environment. The GCD Facility located at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) lies at the juncture of three alluvial fan systems. Geomorphic surface mapping in northern Frenchman Flat indicates that reaches of these fans where the RWMS is now located have been constructional since at least the middle Quaternary. Mapping indicates a regular sequence of prograding fans with entrenchment of the older fan surfaces near the mountain fronts and construction of progressively younger inset fans farther from the mountain fronts. At the facility, the oldest fan surfaces are of late Pleistocene and Holocene age. More recent geomorphic activity has been limited to erosion and deposition along small channels. Trench and pit wall mapping found maximum incision in the vicinity of the RWMS to be less than 1.5 m. Based on collected data, natural geomorphic processes are unlikely to result in erosion to a depth of more than approximately 2 m at the facility within the 10,000-year regulatory period.

  17. The Emergence of the Modern Universe: Tracing the Cosmic Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Shull; B. D. Savage; J. A. Morse; S. G. Neff; J. T. Clarke; T. Heckman; A. L. Kinney; E. B. Jenkins; A. K. Dupree; S. A. Baum; H. Hasan

    1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the report of the Ultraviolet-Optical Working Group (UVOWG) commissioned by NASA to study the scientific rationale for new missions in ultraviolet/optical space astronomy approximately ten years from now, when the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is de-orbited. The UVOWG focused on a scientific theme, The Emergence of the Modern Universe, the period from redshifts z = 3 to 0, occupying over 80% of cosmic time and beginning after the first galaxies, quasars, and stars emerged into their present form. We considered high-throughput UV spectroscopy (10-50x throughput of HST/COS) and wide-field optical imaging (at least 10 arcmin square). The exciting science to be addressed in the post-HST era includes studies of dark matter and baryons, the origin and evolution of the elements, and the major construction phase of galaxies and quasars. Key unanswered questions include: Where is the rest of the unseen universe? What is the interplay of the dark and luminous universe? How did the IGM collapse to form the galaxies and clusters? When were galaxies, clusters, and stellar populations assembled into their current form? What is the history of star formation and chemical evolution? Are massive black holes a natural part of most galaxies? A large-aperture UV/O telescope in space (ST-2010) will provide a major facility in the 21st century for solving these scientific problems. The UVOWG recommends that the first mission be a 4m aperture, SIRTF-class mission that focuses on UV spectroscopy and wide-field imaging. In the coming decade, NASA should investigate the feasibility of an 8m telescope, by 2010, with deployable optics similar to NGST. No high-throughput UV/Optical mission will be possible without significant NASA investments in technology, including UV detectors, gratings, mirrors, and imagers.

  18. Final Technical Report - Modernization of the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe Taddeucci, P E

    2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Project (BCH) was purchased by the City of Boulder, CO (the city) in 2001. Project facilities were originally constructed in 1910 and upgraded in the 1930s and 1940s. By 2009, the two 10 MW turbine/generators had reached or were nearing the end of their useful lives. One generator had grounded out and was beyond repair, reducing plant capacity to 10 MW. The remaining 10 MW unit was expected to fail at any time. When the BCH power plant was originally constructed, a sizeable water supply was available for the sole purpose of hydroelectric power generation. Between 1950 and 2001, that water supply had gradually been converted to municipal water supply by the city. By 2001, the water available for hydroelectric power generation at BCH could not support even one 10 MW unit. Boulder lacked the financial resources to modernize the facilities, and Boulder anticipated that when the single, operational historical unit failed, the project would cease operation. In 2009, the City of Boulder applied for and received a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant for $1.18 million toward a total estimated project cost of $5.155 million to modernize BCH. The federal funding allowed Boulder to move forward with plant modifications that would ensure BCH would continue operation. Federal funding was made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009. Boulder determined that a single 5 MW turbine/generator would be the most appropriate capacity, given the reduced water supply to the plant. Average annual BCH generation with the old 10 MW unit had been about 8,500 MW-hr, whereas annual generation with a new, efficient turbine could average 11,000 to 12,000 MW-hr. The incremental change in annual generation represents a 30% increase in generation over pre-project conditions. The old turbine/generator was a single nozzle Pelton turbine with a 5-to-1 flow turndown and a maximum turbine/generator efficiency of 82%. The new unit is a double nozzle Pelton turbine with a 10-to-1 flow turndown and a maximum turbine/generator efficiency of 88%. This alone represents a 6% increase in overall efficiency. The old turbine operated at low efficiencies due to age and non-optimal sizing of the turbine for the water flow available to the unit. It was shut down whenever water flow dropped to less than 4-5 cfs, and at that flow, efficiency was 55 to 60%. The new turbine will operate in the range of 70 to 88% efficiency through a large portion of the existing flow range and would only have to be shut down at flow rates less than 3.7 cfs. Efficiency is expected to increase by 15-30%, depending on flow. In addition to the installation of new equipment, other goals for the project included: ?¢???¢ Increasing safety at Boulder Canyon Hydro ?¢???¢ Increasing protection of the Boulder Creek environment ?¢???¢ Modernizing and integrating control equipment into Boulder?¢????s municipal water supply system, and ?¢???¢ Preserving significant historical engineering information prior to power plant modernization. From January 1, 2010 through December 31, 2012, combined consultant and contractor personnel hours paid for by both the city and the federal government have totaled approximately 40,000. This equates roughly to seven people working full time on the project from January 2010 through December 2012. This project also involved considerable material expense (steel pipe, a variety of valves, electrical equipment, and the various components of the turbine and generator), which were not accounted for in terms of hours spent on the project. However, the material expense related to this project did help to create or preserve manufacturing/industrial jobs throughout the United States. As required by ARRA, the various components of the hydroelectric project were manufactured or substantially transformed in the U.S. BCH is eligible for nomination to

  19. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 553: Areas 19, 20 Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehlecke, Robert F.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 553: Areas 19, 20 Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. It has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. A SAFER may be performed when the following criteria are met: (1) Conceptual corrective actions are clearly identified (although some degree of investigation may be necessary to select a specific corrective action before completion of the Corrective Action Investigation [CAI]); (2) Uncertainty of the nature, extent, and corrective action must be limited to an acceptable level of risk; (3) The SAFER Plan includes decision points and criteria for making data quality objective (DQO) decisions. The purpose of the investigation will be to document and verify the adequacy of existing information; to affirm the decision for clean closure, closure in place, or no further action; and to provide sufficient data to implement the corrective action. The actual corrective action selected will be based on characterization activities implemented under this SAFER Plan. This SAFER Plan identifies decision points developed in cooperation with the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection (NDEP), where the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) will reach consensus with the NDEP before beginning the next phase of work. Corrective Action Unit 553 is located in Areas 19 and 20 of the NTS, approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 553 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: 19-99-01, Mud Spill; 19-99-11, Mud Spill; 20-09-09, Mud Spill; and 20-99-03, Mud Spill. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites (i.e., the expected nature and extent of contaminants of potential concern [COPCs]) to recommend closure of CAU 553 using the SAFER process (FFACO, 1996).

  20. Cache Energy Optimization Techniques For Modern Processors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittal, Sparsh [ORNL] ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern multicore processors are employing large last-level caches, for example Intel's E7-8800 processor uses 24MB L3 cache. Further, with each CMOS technology generation, leakage energy has been dramatically increasing and hence, leakage energy is expected to become a major source of energy dissipation, especially in last-level caches (LLCs). The conventional schemes of cache energy saving either aim at saving dynamic energy or are based on properties specific to first-level caches, and thus these schemes have limited utility for last-level caches. Further, several other techniques require offline profiling or per-application tuning and hence are not suitable for product systems. In this book, we present novel cache leakage energy saving schemes for single-core and multicore systems; desktop, QoS, real-time and server systems. Also, we present cache energy saving techniques for caches designed with both conventional SRAM devices and emerging non-volatile devices such as STT-RAM (spin-torque transfer RAM). We present software-controlled, hardware-assisted techniques which use dynamic cache reconfiguration to configure the cache to the most energy efficient configuration while keeping the performance loss bounded. To profile and test a large number of potential configurations, we utilize low-overhead, micro-architecture components, which can be easily integrated into modern processor chips. We adopt a system-wide approach to save energy to ensure that cache reconfiguration does not increase energy consumption of other components of the processor. We have compared our techniques with state-of-the-art techniques and have found that our techniques outperform them in terms of energy efficiency and other relevant metrics. The techniques presented in this book have important applications in improving energy-efficiency of higher-end embedded, desktop, QoS, real-time, server processors and multitasking systems. This book is intended to be a valuable guide for both newcomers and veterans in the field of cache power management. It will help graduate students, CAD tool developers and designers in understanding the need of energy efficiency in modern computing systems. Further, it will be useful for researchers in gaining insights into algorithms and techniques for micro-architectural and system-level energy optimization using dynamic cache reconfiguration. We sincerely believe that the ``food for thought'' presented in this book will inspire the readers to develop even better ideas for designing ``green'' processors of tomorrow.

  1. Modern Grid Initiative Distribution Taxonomy Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Kevin P.; Chen, Yousu; Chassin, David P.; Pratt, Robert G.; Engel, David W.; Thompson, Sandra E.

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for the development of a toxonomy of prototypical electrical distribution feeders. Two of the primary goals of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Modern Grid Initiative (MGI) are 'to accelerate the modernization of our nation's electricity grid' and to 'support demonstrations of systems of key technologies that can serve as the foundation for an integrated, modern power grid'. A key component to the realization of these goals is the effective implementation of new, as well as existing, 'smart grid technologies'. Possibly the largest barrier that has been identified in the deployment of smart grid technologies is the inability to evaluate how their deployment will affect the electricity infrastructure, both locally and on a regional scale. The inability to evaluate the impacts of these technologies is primarily due to the lack of detailed electrical distribution feeder information. While detailed distribution feeder information does reside with the various distribution utilities, there is no central repository of information that can be openly accessed. The role of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in the MGI for FY08 was to collect distribution feeder models, in the SynerGEE{reg_sign} format, from electric utilities around the nation so that they could be analyzed to identify regional differences in feeder design and operation. Based on this analysis PNNL developed a taxonomy of 24 prototypical feeder models in the GridLAB-D simulations environment that contain the fundamental characteristics of non-urban core, radial distribution feeders from the various regions of the U.S. Weighting factors for these feeders are also presented so that they can be used to generate a representative sample for various regions within the United States. The final product presented in this report is a toolset that enables the evaluation of new smart grid technologies, with the ability to aggregate their effects to regional and national levels. The distribution feeder models presented in this report are based on actual utility models but do not contain any proprietary or system specific information. As a result, the models discussed in this report can be openly distributed to industry, academia, or any interested entity, in order to facilitate the ability to evaluate smart grid technologies.

  2. Simulation of Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine Impact with Cask and MCO During Insertion into the Transfer Pit (FDT-137)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BAZINET, G.D.

    2000-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The K-Basin Cask and Transportation System will be used for safely packaging and transporting approximately 2,100 metric tons of unprocessed, spent nuclear fuel from the 105 K East and K West Basins to the 200 E Area Canister Storage Building (CSB). Portions of the system will also be used for drying the spent fuel under cold vacuum conditions prior to placement in interim storage. The spent nuclear fuel is currently stored underwater in the two K-Basins. The K-Basins loadout pit is the area selected for loading spent nuclear fuel into the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) which in turn is located within the transportation cask. This Cask/MCO unit is secured.in the pit with a pail load out structure whose primary function is lo suspend and support the Cask/MCO unit at.the desired elevations and to protect the unit from the contaminated K-Basin water. The fuel elements will be placed in special baskets and stacked in the MCO that have been previously placed in the cask. The casks will be removed from the K Basin load out areas and taken to the cold vacuum drying station. Then the cask will be prepared for transportation to the CSB. The shipments will occur exclusively on the Hanford Site between K-Basins and the CSB. Travel will be by road with one cask per trailer. At the CSB receiving area the cask will be removed from the trailer. A gantry crane will then move the cask over to the transfer pit and load the cask into the transfer pit. From the transfer pit the MCO will be removed from the cask by the MCO Handling Machine (MHM). The MHM will move the MCO from the transfer pit to a canister storage tube in the CSB. MCOs will be piled two high in each canister Storage tube.

  3. Closure certification report for the Bear Creek burial grounds B area and walk-in pits at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 5, 1993, the revised RCRA Closure Plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds B Area and Walk-In Pits at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, DOE/OR/01-1100&D3 and Y/ER-53&D3, was approved by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The closure activities described in that closure plan have been performed. The purpose of this document is to summarize the closure activities for B Area and Walk-In Pits (WIPs), including placement of the Kerr Hollow Quarry debris at the WIPs.

  4. Influence of surface modifications on pitting corrosion behavior of nickel-base alloy 718. Part 1: Effect of machine hammer peening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of surface modifications induced by machine hammer peening on pitting corrosion behavior of nickel-base alloy 718 in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution is investigated. Severe work hardening and high compressive residual stress are generated with surface smoothing and microstructure evolution in terms of formation of nano-grains and nano-twins in the near surface region after machine hammer peening. Electrochemical tests results show that machine hammer peening has a beneficial influence on the corrosion resistance, indicated by a significant increase of the critical pitting potential (+134 mV) accompanied with lower corrosion current density and higher polarization resistance.

  5. Control and regulation of modern distribution system, ForskEL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    system, ForskEL (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Control and regulation of modern distribution system, ForskEL Country Denmark Coordinates...

  6. administration modernization act: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Information Sciences Websites Summary: Modern Extensible Languages Daniel Zingaro October 2007 SQRL Report 47 McMaster University 12;Abstract Extensible languages are...

  7. Forensic dentistry solves modern crimes, unravels mysteries of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dentistry solves modern crimes, unravels mysteries of Salem Witch Trials, ancient Egypt Take a peek into the world of forensic dentistry at Jefferson Lab's Oct. 30 Fall...

  8. Emission Performance of Modern Diesel Engines Fueled with Biodiesel

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Emission Performance of Modern Diesel Engines Fueled with Biodiesel Aaron Williams, Jonathan Burton, Xin He and Robert L. McCormick National Renewable Energy Laboratory October 5,...

  9. Impact of Biodiesel on Modern Diesel Engine Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Impact of Biodiesel on Modern Diesel Engine Emissions Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review - Fuels and Lubricants Technologies PI: Bob McCormick Presenter: Aaron Williams May...

  10. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1999. This was the fourth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 453,117 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities not only slightly exceeded the 450,000 fish quota, but a second release of 76,386 yearlings (hereafter called Surplus) were acclimated at the Big Canyon facility and released about two weeks after the primary releases. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 9,941 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 9,583 from Big Canyon, 2,511 Big Canyon Surplus and 2,494 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 983 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low and did not appear to increase after transport to the acclimation facilities. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery and relatively high at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the release groups ranged from 147.4 mm (146.7-148.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 163.7 mm (163.3-164.1 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.04 at Pittsburg Landing to 1.23 at Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 87.8% (82.1-93.4%) for Big Canyon Surplus to 94.1% (90.1-98.1%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 58.7% (49.3-68.1%) for Big Canyon Surplus to 71.3% (60.1-82.5%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 9.3 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 18.7 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 9.0 rkm/d for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 17.3 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 7-10 days to Lower Granite Dam and 21-23 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from the FCAP facilities, were all from April 23-25. The median arrival date for Big Canyon Surplus was May 4. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups were all from May 7-8. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam were May 17 for Big Canyon Surplus and April 26 for Lyons Ferry Hatchery.

  11. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2002. This was the seventh year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 479,358 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities exceeded the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,545 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,482 from Big Canyon and 2,487 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium to high with 43-62% of fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 146.7 mm (146.2-147.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.8 mm (163.5-166.1 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.14 at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 88.6% (86.0-91.1%) for Pittsburg Landing to 97.0% (92.4-101.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 54.3% (50.2-58.3%) for Big Canyon to 70.5% (65.4-75.5%) for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 8.1 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 14.1 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 10.9 rkm/d for Big Canyon to 15.9 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 9-12 days to Lower Granite Dam and 25-30 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from the FCAP facilities, ranged from April 20-28. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for the FCAP groups were all May 11. The objectives of this project are to quantify and evaluate pre-release fish health, condition and mark retention as well as post-release survival, migration timing, migration rates, travel times and movement patterns of fall Chinook salmon from supplementation releases at the FCAP facilities, then provide feedback to co-managers for project specific and basin wide management decision-making.

  12. Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the facilities. Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) More Documents & Publications Calibration Model...

  13. Materials Engineering Research Facility | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Engineering Research Facility Argonne's new Materials Engineering Research Facility (MERF) supports the laboratory's Advanced Battery Materials Synthesis and...

  14. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF)...

  15. SERAPH facility capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castle, J.; Su, W.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SERAPH (Solar Energy Research and Applications in Process Heat) facility addresses technical issues concerning solar thermal energy implementation in industry. Work will include computer predictive modeling (refinement and validation), system control and evaluation, and the accumulation of operation and maintenance experience. Procedures will be consistent (to the extent possible) with those of industry. SERAPH has four major components: the solar energy delivery system (SEDS); control and data acquisition (including sequencing and emergency supervision); energy distribution system (EDS); and areas allocated for storage development and load devices.

  16. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015 [Facility News] Flynn,

  17. ARM - Facility News Article

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  18. ARM - Facility News Article

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  19. ARM - Facility News Article

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  20. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  2. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Facilities

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  3. ARM - Facility News Article

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  4. ARM - Facility News Article

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  5. ARM - Facility News Article

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  6. ARM - Facility News Article

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  7. ARM - Facility News Article

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  8. ARM - Facility News Article

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  9. ARM - Facility News Article

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  10. ARM - Facility News Article

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  11. ARM - Facility News Article

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  12. ARM - Facility News Article

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  13. ARM - Facility News Article

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  14. ARM - Facility News Article

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  15. ARM - Facility News Article

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  16. ARM - Facility News Article

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  17. ARM - Facility News Article

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  18. ARM - Facility News Article

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  19. ARM - Facility News Article

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  20. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  2. ARM - Facility News Article

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  3. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  4. ARM - SGP Central Facility

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  5. ARM - SGP Extended Facility

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  6. ARM - SGP Intermediate Facility

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  7. ARM Climate Research Facility

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  8. ARM Climate Research Facility

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  9. ARM Climate Research Facility

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  10. ARM Climate Research Facility

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  11. ARM Climate Research Facility

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  12. ARM Climate Research Facility

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  13. ARM Climate Research Facility

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  14. ARM Climate Research Facility

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  15. WIPP - Public Reading Facilities

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  16. User Facilities | ORNL

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  17. NREL: Biomass Research - Facilities

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  18. ARM - Facility News Article

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  19. ARM - Facility News Article

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  20. ARM - Facility News Article

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  1. ARM - Facility News Article

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  2. ARM - Facility News Article

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  3. ARM - Facility News Article

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  4. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch 15, 2005 [FacilityNewMobile15,

  5. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch 15, 200515, 2004 [Facility

  6. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch 15, 200515, 2004 [FacilityNew

  7. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch 15,15, 2004 [Facility News]

  8. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch 15,15, 2004 [Facility

  9. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch 15,15, 2004 [FacilityAugust

  10. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility News] Data

  11. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility News] Data23,

  12. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility News]

  13. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility News]31, 2004

  14. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility News]31,

  15. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility

  16. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility30, 2004

  17. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility30, 2004New

  18. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility30,

  19. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility30,October 27,

  20. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility30,October

  1. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility30,OctoberNew

  2. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility30,OctoberNew,

  3. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 201122, 2011 [Facility News]

  4. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 201122, 2011 [Facility

  5. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 201122, 2011 [Facility22,

  6. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 201122, 2011 [Facility22,14,

  7. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1,October 16, 2007 [Facility

  8. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1,October 16,13, 2012 [Facility

  9. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1,OctoberAprilStaging Facility

  10. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [Facility News] Beat Schmid

  11. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [Facility News] Beat

  12. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [Facility News] Beat30, 2008

  13. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [Facility News] Beat30,

  14. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [Facility News]

  15. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [Facility News]June 28, 2013

  16. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [Facility News]June 28,

  17. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [Facility News]June 28,July

  18. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [Facility News]June

  19. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [Facility News]JuneDecember

  20. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [Facility

  1. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityApril 30, 2008

  2. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityApril 30, 200815,

  3. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityApril 30, 200815,31,

  4. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityApril 30,

  5. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityApril 30,Farewell to

  6. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityApril 30,Farewell

  7. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityApril 30,Farewell15,

  8. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityApril

  9. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityAprilApril 30, 2008

  10. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityAprilApril 30,

  11. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityAprilApril

  12. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityAprilAprilFebruary

  13. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007April 15, 2008 [Facility News]

  14. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007April 15, 2008 [Facility

  15. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007April 15, 2008 [FacilityJune

  16. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007April 15,23, 2007 [Facility

  17. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007April 15,23, 2007 [Facility21,

  18. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007April 15,23,, 2009 [Facility

  19. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007April 15,23,, 2009 [Facility5,

  20. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3,January 11, 2007 [Facility News]

  1. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3,January 11, 2007 [Facility

  2. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3,January 11, 2007 [Facility3, 2015

  3. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3,January 11, 2007 [Facility3,

  4. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3,January 11, 2007 [Facility3,3, 2015

  5. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3,January 11, 2007 [Facility3,3,

  6. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3,January 11, 2007 [Facility3,3,April

  7. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3,JanuarySeptember 30, 2009 [Facility

  8. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugustMultifilterAugust 31, 2008 [Facility

  9. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSA Site Manager Named;

  10. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSA Site Manager

  11. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSA Site ManagerFebruary

  12. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSA Site

  13. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSA SiteSeptember 15, 2008

  14. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSA SiteSeptember 15,

  15. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSA SiteSeptember 15,7,

  16. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSA SiteSeptember

  17. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSA SiteSeptemberDiffuse

  18. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSA

  19. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping It Up With

  20. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping It Up With15,

  1. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping It Up

  2. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping It Up15, 2006

  3. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping It Up15,

  4. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping It Up15,New

  5. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping It

  6. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping ItJanuary 15,

  7. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping ItJanuary

  8. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping

  9. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping31, 2006

  10. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping31,

  11. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping31,Preparations

  12. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New

  13. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfrared Sky Imager Takes a

  14. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfrared Sky Imager Takes

  15. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfrared Sky Imager

  16. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfrared Sky ImagerFebruary

  17. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfrared Sky

  18. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfrared SkyMay 31, 2006

  19. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfrared SkyMay 31,

  20. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfrared SkyMay 31,31, 2006

  1. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfrared SkyMay 31,31,

  2. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfrared SkyMay 31,31,March

  3. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfrared SkyMay

  4. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfrared SkyMayApril 30,

  5. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfrared SkyMayApril

  6. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfrared SkyMayAprilApril

  7. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfrared

  8. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfraredMarch 27, 2010

  9. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfraredMarch 27, 2010April

  10. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfraredMarch 27,

  11. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfraredMarch 27,April 15,

  12. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfraredMarch 27,April

  13. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfraredMarch

  14. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfraredMarch30, 2010

  15. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfraredMarch30, 201026,

  16. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfraredMarch30,

  17. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfraredMarch30,April 30,

  18. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfraredMarch30,April

  19. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfraredMarch30,AprilARM

  20. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News]