Sample records for modeling-computer simulations numerical

  1. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Wisian & Blackwell, 2004) Exploration...

  2. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Stillwater Area (Wisian & Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Stillwater Area (Wisian & Blackwell, 2004) Exploration Activity...

  3. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Wilt & Haar, 1986)...

  4. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell, 2004) Exploration Activity...

  5. Modeling-Computer Simulations At White Mountains Area (Goff ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At White Mountains Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) Exploration Activity...

  6. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. W....

  7. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

  8. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding...

  9. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration...

  10. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Battaglia, Et Al., 2003)...

  11. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity...

  12. Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Reiter, 1987) Exploration...

  13. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region...

  14. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date - 2003 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Several fluid-flow models presented regarding the Long Valley Caldera....

  15. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity...

  16. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

  17. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Tempel, Et Al., 2011) Exploration...

  18. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

  19. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date 1987 - 1995 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A modification of the...

  20. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date 1995 - 2000 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown...

  1. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. W. Pritchett...

  2. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Rudman & Epp, 1983) Exploration...

  3. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration...

  4. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details...

  5. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Wilt & Haar, 1986)...

  6. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Wannamaker, Et Al., 2006) Exploration...

  7. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleModeling-ComputerSimulationsAtFishLakeValleyArea(Deymonaz,EtAl.,2008)&oldid387627...

  8. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nevada Test And Training Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  9. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date 1987 - 1995 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A modification of the Aki-Lamer method was used to model the amplitude data....

  10. Modeling-Computer Simulations At U.S. West Region (Williams ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations At U.S. West Region (Williams & Deangelo, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer...

  11. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF c 2011 Institute for Scientific NUMERICAL ANALYSIS AND MODELING Computing and Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Raimund

    -dimensional model of sedimentation of suspensions of small solid particles dispersed in a viscous fluid. This model accepted spatially one-dimensional sedimentation model [35] gives rise to one scalar, nonlinear hyperbolicINTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF c 2011 Institute for Scientific NUMERICAL ANALYSIS AND MODELING Computing

  12. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF c 2012 Institute for Scientific NUMERICAL ANALYSIS AND MODELING Computing and Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Raimund

    -dimensional model of sedimentation of suspensions of small solid particles dispersed in a viscous fluid. This model accepted spatially one-dimensional sedimentation model [35] gives rise to one scalar, nonlinear hyperbolicINTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF c 2012 Institute for Scientific NUMERICAL ANALYSIS AND MODELING Computing

  13. Modeling-Computer Simulations (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis of Energy DemandModeling-Computer

  14. Modeling-Computer Simulations (Ozkocak, 1985) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis of EnergySimulations Activity Date

  15. Modeling-Computer Simulations (Ranalli & Rybach, 2005) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis of EnergySimulations Activity

  16. Modeling-Computer Simulations (Walker, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis of EnergySimulations

  17. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis of EnergySimulations2010) |

  18. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis of EnergySimulations2010)

  19. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Blackwell,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis of EnergySimulations2010)EtEt Al.,

  20. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Wannamaker,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis of EnergySimulations2010)EtEtEt Al.,

  1. Numerical simulation of hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warner, Joseph Barnes

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ared that the results of such treatments were not always adequately described by the two-dimensional models. With recent advances in hydraulic fracturing and computing technology, attempts have been made to formulate more realistic fracture models. These three...NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF HYDRAULIC FRACTURING A Thesis by JOSEPH BARNES WARNER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Maj or Subj ect...

  2. Simulating Reionization in Numerical Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaron Sokasian; Tom Abel; Lars E. Hernquist

    2001-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The incorporation of radiative transfer effects into cosmological hydrodynamical simulations is essential for understanding how the intergalactic medium (IGM) makes the transition from a neutral medium to one that is almost fully ionized. Here, we present an approximate numerical method designed to study in a statistical sense how a cosmological density field is ionized by a set of discrete point sources. A diffuse background radiation field is also computed self-consistently in our procedure. The method requires relatively few time steps and can be employed with simulations having high resolution. We describe the details of the algorithm and provide a description of how the method can be applied to the output from a pre-existing cosmological simulation to study the systematic reionization of a particular ionic species. As a first application, we compute the reionization of He II by quasars in the redshift range 3 to 6.

  3. Numerical Simulations of Thermobaric Explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E; Khasainov, B

    2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A Model of the energy evolution in thermobaric explosions is presented. It is based on the two-phase formulation: conservation laws for the gas and particle phases along with inter-phase interaction terms. It incorporates a Combustion Model based on the mass conservation laws for fuel, air and products; source/sink terms are treated in the fast-chemistry limit appropriate for such gas dynamic fields. The Model takes into account both the afterburning of the detonation products of the booster with air, and the combustion of the fuel (Al or TNT detonation products) with air. Numerical simulations were performed for 1.5-g thermobaric explosions in five different chambers (volumes ranging from 6.6 to 40 liters and length-to-diameter ratios from 1 to 12.5). Computed pressure waveforms were very similar to measured waveforms in all cases - thereby proving that the Model correctly predicts the energy evolution in such explosions. The computed global fuel consumption {mu}(t) behaved as an exponential life function. Its derivative {dot {mu}}(t) represents the global rate of fuel consumption. It depends on the rate of turbulent mixing which controls the rate of energy release in thermobaric explosions.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Cooling Gas Injection Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical Simulation of Cooling Gas Injection Using Adaptive Multiscale Techniques Wolfgang Dahmen: finite volume method, film cooling, cooling gas injection, multiscale techniques, grid adaptation AMS@igpm.rwth-aachen.de (Thomas Gotzen) #12;Numerical simulation of cooling gas injection using adaptive multiscale techniques

  5. The Numerical Simulation of Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Schmidt

    2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this contribution, I give an overview of the various approaches toward the numerical modelling of turbulence, particularly, in the interstellar medium. The discussion is placed in a physical context, i. e. computational problems are motivated from basic physical considerations. Presenting selected examples for solutions to these problems, I introduce the basic ideas of the most commonly used numerical methods.

  6. Numerical wind speed simulation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Athey, G.F.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A relatively simple stochastic model for simulating wind speed time series that can be used as an alternative to time series from representative locations is described in this report. The model incorporates systematic seasonal variation of the mean wind, its standard deviation, and the correlation speeds. It also incorporates systematic diurnal variation of the mean speed and standard deviation. To demonstrate the model capabilities, simulations were made using model parameters derived from data collected at the Hanford Meteorology Station, and results of analysis of simulated and actual data were compared.

  7. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF CHROMOSPHERIC MICROFLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, R. L.; Fang, C.; Chen, P. F., E-mail: fangc@nju.edu.c [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2010-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    With gravity, ionization, and radiation being considered, we perform 2.5 dimensional (2.5D) compressible resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of chromospheric magnetic reconnection using the CIP-MOCCT scheme. The temperature distribution of the quiet-Sun atmospheric model VALC and the helium abundance (10%) are adopted. Our 2.5D MHD simulation reproduces qualitatively the temperature enhancement observed in chromospheric microflares. The temperature enhancement DELTAT is demonstrated to be sensitive to the background magnetic field, whereas the total evolution time DELTAt is sensitive to the magnitude of the anomalous resistivity. Moreover, we found a scaling law, which is described as DELTAT/DELTAt {approx} n{sub H} {sup -1.5} B {sup 2.1}eta{sub 0} {sup 0.88}. Our results also indicate that the velocity of the upward jet is much greater than that of the downward jet, and the X-point may move up or down.

  8. Numerical simulations of quasar absorbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Theuns

    2005-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical state of the intergalactic medium can be probed in great detail with the intervening absorption systems seen in quasar spectra. The properties of the Hydrogen absorbers depend on many cosmological parameters, such as the matter-power spectrum, reionisation history, ionising background and the nature of the dark matter. The spectra also contain metal lines, which can be used to constrain the star formation history and the feedback processes acting in large and small galaxies. Simulations have been instrumental in investigating to what extent these parameters can be unambiguously constrained with current and future data. This paper is meant as an introduction to this subject, and reviews techniques and methods for simulating the intergalactic medium.

  9. Threedimensional numerical simulation for various geometries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbin, Raphaèle

    modelling and numerical simulation of natural gas­fed solid oxide cells (Solid Oxide Fuel Cell, SOFC) at a stationary regime. The principle of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) is based on the conversion of the chemical is taken into account in the present model. The SOFC systems seem to be of great interest for use

  10. Issues in Numerical Simulation of Fire Suppression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tieszen, S.R.; Lopez, A.R.

    1999-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines general physical and computational issues associated with performing numerical simulation of fire suppression. Fire suppression encompasses a broad range of chemistry and physics over a large range of time and length scales. The authors discuss the dominant physical/chemical processes important to fire suppression that must be captured by a fire suppression model to be of engineering usefulness. First-principles solutions are not possible due to computational limitations, even with the new generation of tera-flop computers. A basic strategy combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation techniques with sub-grid model approximations for processes that have length scales unresolvable by gridding is presented.

  11. NEW NUMERICAL TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE SIMULATION OF ARC WELDING PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    NEW NUMERICAL TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE SIMULATION OF ARC WELDING PROCESSES Michel Bellet 1 , Makhlouf Antipolis, France; soudage@transvalor.com Keywords: welding, finite elements, material deposit, adaptive for arc welding simulation and analysis. The new numerical technologies essentially consist first

  12. Numerical Simulation of Unsteady Three-Dimensional Sheet Cavitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twente, Universiteit

    Numerical Simulation of Unsteady Three-Dimensional Sheet Cavitation A.H. Koop #12;Numerical Simulation of Unsteady Three-Dimensional Sheet Cavitation A.H. Koop Thesis University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands #12;NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF UNSTEADY THREE-DIMENSIONAL SHEET CAVITATION PROEFSCHRIFT ter

  13. Numerical Simulations Unravel the Cosmic Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. -A. Faucher-Giguere; A. Lidz; L. Hernquist

    2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The universe is permeated by a network of filaments, sheets, and knots collectively forming a "cosmic web.'' The discovery of the cosmic web, especially through its signature of absorption of light from distant sources by neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium, exemplifies the interplay between theory and experiment that drives science, and is one of the great examples in which numerical simulations have played a key and decisive role. We recount the milestones in our understanding of cosmic structure, summarize its impact on astronomy, cosmology, and physics, and look ahead by outlining the challenges faced as we prepare to probe the cosmic web at new wavelengths.

  14. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis of EnergySimulations2010) | Open

  15. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis of EnergySimulations2010)Et Al.,

  16. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis of EnergySimulations2010)Et Al.,2010)

  17. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis of EnergySimulations2010)Et

  18. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Kennedy &

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis of EnergySimulations2010)EtEt

  19. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Wisian &

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis of EnergySimulations2010)EtEtEt

  20. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of turbulent combustion models that reflect some of the most important characteristics of turbulent reacting flows requires knowledge about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between the turbulence and the chemistry is so strong in certain regimes that is is very difficult to isolate the role played by one individual phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is an extremely useful tool to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interactions in certain well defined regimes. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting cases: the fast chemistry limit, where the turbulent fluctuations. In between these two limits, finite-rate chemical effects are important and the turbulence interacts strongly with the chemical processes. This regime is important because industrial burners operate in regimes in which, locally the flame undergoes extinction, or is at least in some nonequilibrium condition. Furthermore, these nonequilibrium conditions strongly influence the production of pollutants. To quantify the finite-rate chemistry effect, direct numerical simulations are performed to study the interaction between an initially laminar non-premixed flame and a three-dimensional field of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics of extinction and on transient effects on the fine scale mixing process. Differential molecular diffusion among species is also examined with this approach, both for nonreacting and reacting situations. To address the problem of large-scale mixing and to examine the effects of mean shear, efforts are underway to perform large eddy simulations of round three-dimensional jets.

  1. On the Numerical Simulation of Waterflooding of Heterogeneous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas Jr., Jim

    On the Numerical Simulation of Waterflooding of Heterogeneous Petroleum Reservoirs Jim Douglas, Jr displacement in petroleum reservoirs. A very detailed description of the numerical method is presented. Follow, 22290 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil #12; On the Numerical Simulation of Waterflooding of Heterogeneous

  2. Collisionless microinstabilities in stellarators. II. Numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Proll, J. H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Helander, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstraße 1, 17491 Greifswald, Germany and Max-Planck/Princeton Research Center for Plasma Physics, 17491 Greifswald (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstraße 1, 17491 Greifswald, Germany and Max-Planck/Princeton Research Center for Plasma Physics, 17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Microinstabilities exhibit a rich variety of behavior in stellarators due to the many degrees of freedom in the magnetic geometry. It has recently been found that certain stellarators (quasi-isodynamic ones with maximum-J geometry) are partly resilient to trapped-particle instabilities, because fast-bouncing particles tend to extract energy from these modes near marginal stability. In reality, stellarators are never perfectly quasi-isodynamic, and the question thus arises whether they still benefit from enhanced stability. Here, the stability properties of Wendelstein 7-X and a more quasi-isodynamic configuration, QIPC, are investigated numerically and compared with the National Compact Stellarator Experiment and the DIII-D tokamak. In gyrokinetic simulations, performed with the gyrokinetic code GENE in the electrostatic and collisionless approximation, ion-temperature-gradient modes, trapped-electron modes, and mixed-type instabilities are studied. Wendelstein 7-X and QIPC exhibit significantly reduced growth rates for all simulations that include kinetic electrons, and the latter are indeed found to be stabilizing in the energy budget. These results suggest that imperfectly optimized stellarators can retain most of the stabilizing properties predicted for perfect maximum-J configurations.

  3. Numerical simulation of micro-fluidic passive and active mixers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Saurabh

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations of mixing using passive and active techniques are performed. For passive mixing, numerical modeling of a micro-fluidic device, build by Holden and Cremer, was performed. The micro-fluidic device consists of a Y...

  4. Energy stable schemes and numerical simulations of two phase ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Energy stable schemes and numerical simulations of two phase complex fluids by the phase-field method Abstact: We present an energetic variational ...

  5. Direct numerical simulations of convective heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pointel, G.; Acharya, S.; Sharma, C. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with the development of a direct numerical simulation (DNS) code for solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation using higher order finite difference schemes. The time dependent Navier Stokes equation has been discretized using semi-implicit second order time splitting scheme, which requires the solution of pressure Poisson equation. For this purpose a Galerkin Fourier transform in the spanwise direction and a matrix diagonalization technique is used. The convection terms are formulated in non-conservative form on a collocated grid. A fifth order upwind biased scheme is used for this purpose. Diffusion terms are differenced using a sixth order central difference scheme. The algorithm is implemented on the MasPar MP-1, a Single Instruction Multiple Data computer where efficient data parallelization is used to get DNS results. The code has been used to get results for smooth channel flow at Re{sub {tau}} = 180. Results are now being obtained for the energy equation and for flow in a periodic ribbed channel.

  6. Numerical simulation of transpiration cooling through porous , T. Gotzen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    55, 52056 Aachen SUMMARY Transpiration cooling using ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials to facilitate such numerical simulations for a carbon/carbon material mounted in the side wall of a hot gasNumerical simulation of transpiration cooling through porous material W. Dahmen1 , T. Gotzen1 and S

  7. Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale Juan E. Santos Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale ­ p. #12;Introduction. I layering, fractures and craks at the mesoscale (on the order of centimeters) are common in the earth

  8. Numerical simulations of the intergalactic medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Theuns

    2002-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The intergalactic medium at redshifts 2--6 can be studied observationally through the absorption features it produces in the spectra of background quasars. Most of the UV-absorption lines arise in mildly overdense regions, which can be simulated reliably with current hydrodynamical simulations. Comparison of observed and simulated spectra allows one to put contraints on the model's parameters.

  9. Polarization transmission at RHIC, numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meot F.; Bai, M.; Liu, C.; Minty, M.; Ranjbar, V.

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Typical tracking simulations regarding the transmission of the polarization in the proton-proton collider RHIC are discussed. They participate in general studies aimed at understanding and improving polarization performances during polarized proton-proton runs.

  10. Numerical Simulation Study on Transpired Solar Air Collector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, C.; Guan, Z.; Zhao, X.; Wang, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The unglazed transpired solar air collector is now a well-recognized solar air heater for heating outside air directly. In this article, researchers introduced numerical simulation tools into the solar air collector research area, analyzed...

  11. Wavelet methods For the numerical simulation of incompressible fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starck, Jean-Luc

    Wavelet methods For the numerical simulation of incompressible fluids Erwan Deriaz Erwan Numerik, Seminar February 16th 2006 0-0 #12; Wavelets for the Navier-Stokes equations homogeneous or non homogeneous) With a wavelet discretization: £ ¦ ¨ 2 ©$# £ % ¦ ¨ 2 © & '' ( 1

  12. Direct Numerical Simulation of the Flow in a Pebble Bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Paul

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    bed reactors: dust generation and scaling, proceedings of ICAPP 2012, Chicago, June 24–28, 2012 [3] A. Shams, F. Roelofs, EMJ. Komen, E. Baglietto, 2013. “Quasi-direct numerical simulation of a pebble bed configuration. Part I: Flow (velocity...

  13. Numerical Simulation Study on Transpired Solar Air Collector 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, C.; Guan, Z.; Zhao, X.; Wang, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The unglazed transpired solar air collector is now a well-recognized solar air heater for heating outside air directly. In this article, researchers introduced numerical simulation tools into the solar air collector research area, analyzed...

  14. Numerical simulation of flow separation control by oscillatory fluid injection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resendiz Rosas, Celerino

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, numerical simulations of flow separation control are performed. The sep-aration control technique studied is called 'synthetic jet actuation'. The developed code employs a cell centered finite volume scheme which handles viscous...

  15. Numerical Simulation of a Natural Circulation Steam Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinmüller, Ewa B.

    Numerical Simulation of a Natural Circulation Steam Generator W. Linzer \\Lambda , K. Ponweiser circulation steam generator. We focus on a model with a simple geometry consisting of two vertical pipes properties of water and steam. We present a numerical algorithm based on an explicit upwind discretization

  16. Efficient Numerical Simulation for Long Range Wave Propagation 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solna, Knut

    Efficient Numerical Simulation for Long Range Wave Propagation 1 Kai Huang 2 George Papanicolaou 3 for simulating wave propagation over long dis- tances with both weak and strong scatterers. In domains with weak heterogeneities the wave field is decomposed into forward propagating and back scattered modes using two coupled

  17. On the Numerical Simulation of Waterflooding of Heterogeneous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furtado, Fred

    On the Numerical Simulation of Waterflooding of Heterogeneous Petroleum Reservoirs Jim Douglas, Jr Simulation of Waterflooding of Heterogeneous Petroleum Reservoirs · A two-stage operator-splitting allows consider as a model problem the two-phase immiscible displacement in petroleum reservoirs. A very detailed

  18. Numerical and laboratory simulations of auroral acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunell, H.; De Keyser, J. [1Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Avenue Circulaire 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium)] [1Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Avenue Circulaire 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Mann, I. [EISCAT Scientific Association, P.O. Box 812, SE-981 28 Kiruna, Sweden and Department of Physics, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå (Sweden)] [EISCAT Scientific Association, P.O. Box 812, SE-981 28 Kiruna, Sweden and Department of Physics, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå (Sweden)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of parallel electric fields is an essential ingredient of auroral physics, leading to the acceleration of particles that give rise to the auroral displays. An auroral flux tube is modelled using electrostatic Vlasov simulations, and the results are compared to simulations of a proposed laboratory device that is meant for studies of the plasma physical processes that occur on auroral field lines. The hot magnetospheric plasma is represented by a gas discharge plasma source in the laboratory device, and the cold plasma mimicking the ionospheric plasma is generated by a Q-machine source. In both systems, double layers form with plasma density gradients concentrated on their high potential sides. The systems differ regarding the properties of ion acoustic waves that are heavily damped in the magnetosphere, where the ion population is hot, but weakly damped in the laboratory, where the discharge ions are cold. Ion waves are excited by the ion beam that is created by acceleration in the double layer in both systems. The efficiency of this beam-plasma interaction depends on the acceleration voltage. For voltages where the interaction is less efficient, the laboratory experiment is more space-like.

  19. AI-Based Simulation: An Alternative to Numerical Simulation and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    : Numerical Modeling, Simulation, Artificial Intelligence, Data Min- ing, Reservoir Modeling, Reservoir data for brown fields. The run-time of AI-Based reservoir models that provide complete field responses Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to Numer- ical Reservoir Simulation (NRS) most of the computational modeling

  20. Numerical simulation of imbibition process in fractured cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Chunhuan

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the equations describing the imbibition of pure and carbonated water and the countercurrent flow of oil in porous rocks. Comparison between numerical solutions and experimental observations indicates that the models do simulate water imbibition and the COp.... ~~ +Blair 1964 presented a numerical solution for equations describing oil displacement by countercurrent water imbibition. Calculations were made for water imbibition into both linear and radial systems. Blair studied the effects on imbibition rates as a...

  1. Numerical simulation of water flow around a rigid fishing net

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roger Lewandowski; Géraldine Pichot

    2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is devoted to the simulation of the flow around and inside a rigid axisymmetric net. We describe first how experimental data have been obtained. We show in detail the modelization. The model is based on a Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes turbulence model penalized by a term based on the Brinkman law. At the out-boundary of the computational box, we have used a "ghost" boundary condition. We show that the corresponding variational problem has a solution. Then the numerical scheme is given and the paper finishes with numerical simulations compared with the experimental data.

  2. Numerical simulations of welds of thick steel pieces of interest for the thermonuclear fusion ITER machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmignani, B

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations of welds of thick steel pieces of interest for the thermonuclear fusion ITER machine

  3. Numerical Simulation for eHealth: Grid-enabled Medical Simulation Services Siegfried Benknera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Middleton, Stuart E.

    advanced bio-medical simulation applications. Often, however, such applications have a very limited methodology advances. The European GEMSS Project [7] is concerned with the creation of medical Grid service1 Numerical Simulation for eHealth: Grid-enabled Medical Simulation Services Siegfried Benknera

  4. Numerical simulation of cooling gas injection using adaptive multiscale techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical simulation of cooling gas injection using adaptive multiscale techniques Wolfgang Dahmen is investigated. Keywords: Finite Volume Method, Film cooling, Cooling gas injection, Multiscale techniques, Grid Mathematik, RWTH Aachen, Templergraben 55, 52056 Aachen Abstract The interaction of a jet of cooling gas

  5. Numerical Simulation of Wave Loads on Static Offshore Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Wave Loads on Static Offshore Structures ­ p. #12;VOF Free Surface Flow Model Modelling of Free Surface-cell resolution of prescribed wave forms in relaxation zones · Support for dynamic mesh with 6-DOF solver meshNumerical Simulation of Wave Loads on Static Offshore Structures Hrvoje Jasak, Inno Gatin, Vuko

  6. Numerical simulation of the truss spar 'Horn Mountain' using COUPLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theckum Purath, Basil

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    using an integrated marine monitoring system attached to the truss spar. In this study, dynamic analysis of the truss spar interacting with its mooring and riser system was performed using a time-domain numerical code, known as Â?COUPLEÂ?. The simulated...

  7. Numerical simulation of turbulent jet primary breakup in Diesel engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helluy, Philippe

    Numerical simulation of turbulent jet primary breakup in Diesel engines Peng Zeng1 Marcus Herrmann" IRMA Strasbourg, 23.Jan.2008 #12;Introduction DNS of Primary Breakup in Diesel Injection Phase Transition Modeling Turbulence Modeling Summary Outline 1 Introduction 2 DNS of Primary Breakup in Diesel

  8. Numerical Simulation of the Wave Bottom Boundary Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slinn, Donald

    boundary layer. Oscillatory boundary layers are examined using a high-resolution time-dependent threeNumerical Simulation of the Wave Bottom Boundary Layer Over a Smooth Surface. Part 1: Three for turbulent boundary layers that occur over a smooth bottom. Results indicate that turbulence levels

  9. Particle acceleration in solar flares: observations versus numerical simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Particle acceleration in solar flares: observations versus numerical simulations A O Benz, P C processes such as isotropization and magnetic trapping are made. Keywords: Particle acceleration, hard X. As the electric field of reconnection with possible parallel component capable of particle acceleration is limited

  10. Direct Numerical Simulations and Modeling of Jets in Crossflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahesh, Krishnan

    Direct Numerical Simulations and Modeling of Jets in Crossflow A THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE FACULTY. i #12;To my parents and my grandparents, and to Ramnath ii #12;Abstract Jets in crossflow are used to study the different aspects of round jets in a crossflow. The first problem studies

  11. Control of Jets in Crossflow using Direct Numerical Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahesh, Krishnan

    Control of Jets in Crossflow using Direct Numerical Simulations A THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE FACULTY in crossflow by axial pulsing. Our main idea is that pulsing generates vortex rings; the effect of pulsing on jets in crossflow can therefore be explained by studying the behavior of vortex rings in crossflow

  12. Numerical Simulation of Titanium Production in the Plasma Quench Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical Simulation of Titanium Production in the Plasma Quench Reactor Ray A. Beny and Randall A the nucleation of condensates in the steady-state supersonic nozzle flow generated in a plasma quench reactor reactions. The device has been termed the Plasma Quench Reactor or PQR. The PQR has demonstrated the ability

  13. Refined numerical models for multidimensional Type Ia supernova simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinecke, M; Niemeyer, J C

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following up on earlier work on this topic (Reinecke et al. 1999, A&A 347, pp. 724 and 739), we present an improved set of numerical models for simulations of white dwarfs exploding as Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Two-dimensional simulations were used to test the reliability and numerical robustness of these algorithms; the results indicate that integral quantities like the total energy release are insensitive to changes of the grid resolution (above a certain threshold), which was not the case for our former code. The models were further enhanced to allow fully three-dimensional simulations of SNe Ia. A direct comparison of a 2D and a 3D calculation with identical initial conditions shows that the explosion is considerably more energetic in three dimensions; this is most likely caused by the assumption of axisymmetry in 2D, which inhibits the growth of flame instabilities in the azimuthal direction and thereby decreases the flame surface.

  14. Refined numerical models for multidimensional Type Ia supernova simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Reinecke; W. Hillebrandt; J. C. Niemeyer

    2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Following up on earlier work on this topic (Reinecke et al. 1999, A&A 347, pp. 724 and 739), we present an improved set of numerical models for simulations of white dwarfs exploding as Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Two-dimensional simulations were used to test the reliability and numerical robustness of these algorithms; the results indicate that integral quantities like the total energy release are insensitive to changes of the grid resolution (above a certain threshold), which was not the case for our former code. The models were further enhanced to allow fully three-dimensional simulations of SNe Ia. A direct comparison of a 2D and a 3D calculation with identical initial conditions shows that the explosion is considerably more energetic in three dimensions; this is most likely caused by the assumption of axisymmetry in 2D, which inhibits the growth of flame instabilities in the azimuthal direction and thereby decreases the flame surface.

  15. A fast direct numerical simulation method for characterising hydraulic roughness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Daniel; MacDonald, Michael; Hutchins, Nicholas; Ooi, Andrew

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a fast direct numerical simulation (DNS) method that promises to directly characterise the hydraulic roughness of any given rough surface, from the hydraulically smooth to the fully rough regime. The method circumvents the unfavourable computational cost associated with simulating high-Reynolds-number flows by employing minimal-span channels (Jimenez & Moin 1991). Proof-of-concept simulations demonstrate that flows in minimal-span channels are sufficient for capturing the downward velocity shift, that is, the Hama roughness function, predicted by flows in full-span channels. We consider two sets of simulations, first with modelled roughness imposed by body forces, and second with explicit roughness described by roughness-conforming grids. Owing to the minimal cost, we are able to conduct DNSs with increasing roughness Reynolds numbers while maintaining a fixed blockage ratio, as is typical in full-scale applications. The present method promises a practical, fast and accurate tool for character...

  16. Transient productivity index for numerical well test simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanc, G.; Ding, D.Y.; Ene, A. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Pau (France)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most difficult aspect of numerical simulation of well tests is the treatment of the Bottom Hole Flowing (BHF) Pressure. In full field simulations, this pressure is derived from the Well-block Pressure (WBP) using a numerical productivity index which accounts for the grid size and permeability, and for the well completion. This productivity index is calculated assuming a pseudo-steady state flow regime in the vicinity of the well and is therefore constant during the well production period. Such a pseudo-steady state assumption is no longer valid for the early time of a well test simulation as long as the pressure perturbation has not reached several grid-blocks around the well. This paper offers two different solutions to this problem: (1) The first one is based on the derivation of a Numerical Transient Productivity Index (NTPI) to be applied to Cartesian grids; (2) The second one is based on the use of a Corrected Transmissibility and Accumulation Term (CTAT) in the flow equation. The representation of the pressure behavior given by both solutions is far more accurate than the conventional one as shown by several validation examples which are presented in the following pages.

  17. Stochastic algorithms for the analysis of numerical flame simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent progress in simulation methodologies and high-performance parallel computers have made it is possible to perform detailed simulations of multidimensional reacting flow phenomena using comprehensive kinetics mechanisms. As simulations become larger and more complex, it becomes increasingly difficult to extract useful information from the numerical solution, particularly regarding the interactions of the chemical reaction and diffusion processes. In this paper we present a new diagnostic tool for analysis of numerical simulations of reacting flow. Our approach is based on recasting an Eulerian flow solution in a Lagrangian frame. Unlike a conventional Lagrangian view point that follows the evolution of a volume of the fluid, we instead follow specific chemical elements, e.g., carbon, nitrogen, etc., as they move through the system . From this perspective an ''atom'' is part of some molecule of a species that is transported through the domain by advection and diffusion. Reactions cause the atom to shift from one chemical host species to another and the subsequent transport of the atom is given by the movement of the new species. We represent these processes using a stochastic particle formulation that treats advection deterministically and models diffusion and chemistry as stochastic processes. In this paper, we discuss the numerical issues in detail and demonstrate that an ensemble of stochastic trajectories can accurately capture key features of the continuum solution. The capabilities of this diagnostic are then demonstrated by applications to study the modulation of carbon chemistry during a vortex-flame interaction, and the role of cyano chemistry in rm NO{sub x} production for a steady diffusion flame.

  18. Diffusive mesh relaxation in ALE finite element numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dube, E.I.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory for a diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is developed for use in three-dimensional Arbitary Lagrange/Eulerian (ALE) finite element simulation techniques. This mesh relaxer is derived by a variational principle for an unstructured 3D grid using finite elements, and incorporates hourglass controls in the numerical implementation. The diffusive coefficients are based on the geometric properties of the existing mesh, and are chosen so as to allow for a smooth grid that retains the general shape of the original mesh. The diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is then applied to an ALE code system, and results from several test cases are discussed.

  19. Natural Ventilation in Buildings: Measurement in a Wind Tunnel and Numerical Simulation with Large Eddy Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    save energy consumed by the heating, ventilating, and air- conditioning systems in a building1 Natural Ventilation in Buildings: Measurement in a Wind Tunnel and Numerical Simulation@purdue.edu Abstract Natural ventilation in buildings can create a comfortable and healthy indoor environment, and can

  20. Numerical simulation of the impeller tip clearance effect on centrifugal compressor performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoenninger, Corbett Reed

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the numerical simulation of flow in centrifugal compressors. A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver was employed to simulate flow through two centrifugal compressors. The first compressor simulated was the NASA low speed...

  1. Numerical Relativity in Spherical Polar Coordinates: Off-center Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas W. Baumgarte; Pedro J. Montero; Ewald Müller

    2015-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We have recently presented a new approach for numerical relativity simulations in spherical polar coordinates, both for vacuum and for relativistic hydrodynamics. Our approach is based on a reference-metric formulation of the BSSN equations, a factoring of all tensor components, as well as a partially implicit Runge-Kutta method, and does not rely on a regularization of the equations, nor does it make any assumptions about the symmetry across the origin. In order to demonstrate this feature we present here several off-centered simulations, including simulations of single black holes and neutron stars whose center is placed away from the origin of the coordinate system, as well as the asymmetric head-on collision of two black holes. We also revisit our implementation of relativistic hydrodynamics and demonstrate that a reference-metric formulation of hydrodynamics together with a factoring of all tensor components avoids problems related to the coordinate singularities at the origin and on the axes. As a particularly demanding test we present results for a shock wave propagating through the origin of the spherical polar coordinate system.

  2. The Dynamics of Sinking Satellites Around Disk Galaxies: A Poor Man's Alternative to High-Resolution Numerical Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Taylor; Arif Babul

    2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a simple yet surprisingly accurate analytic scheme for tracking the dynamical evolution of substructure within larger dark halos. The scheme incorporates the effects of dynamical friction, tidal mass loss and tidal heating via physically motivated approximations. Using our scheme, we can predict the orbital evolution and mass-loss history of individual subhalos in detail. We are also able to determine the impact and importance of the different physical processes on the dynamical evolution of the subhalos. To test and calibrate this model, we compare it with a set of recent high-resolution numerical simulations of mergers between galaxies and small companions. We find that we can reproduce the orbits and mass-loss rates seen in all of these simulations with considerable accuracy, using a single set of values for the three free parameters in our model. Computationally, our scheme is more than 1000 times faster than the simplest of the high-resolution numerical simulations. This means that we can carry out detailed and statistically meaningful investigations into the characteristics of the subhalo population in different cosmologies, the stripping and disruption of the subhalos, and the interactions of the subhalos with other dynamical structures such as a thin disk. This last point is of particular interest given the ubiquity of minor mergers in hierarchical models. In this regard, our method's simplicity and speed makes it particularly attractive for incorporation into semi-analytic models of galaxy formation.

  3. Direct numerical simulation of pattern formation in subaqueous sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidanemariam, Aman G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of direct numerical simulation of incompressible fluid flow over a thick bed of mobile, spherically-shaped particles. The algorithm is based upon the immersed boundary technique for fluid-solid coupling and uses a soft-sphere model for the solid-solid contact. Two parameter points in the laminar flow regime are chosen, leading to the emergence of sediment patterns classified as `small dunes', while one case under turbulent flow conditions leads to `vortex dunes' with significant flow separation on the lee side. Wavelength, amplitude and propagation speed of the patterns extracted from the spanwise-averaged fluid-bed interface are found to be consistent with available experimental data. The particle transport rates are well represented by available empirical models for flow over a plane sediment bed in both the laminar and the turbulent regimes.

  4. MHD Remote Numerical Simulations: Evolution of Coronal Mass Ejections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Hernandez-Cervantes; A. Santillan; A. R. Gonzalez-Ponce

    2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are solar eruptions into interplanetary space of as much as a few billion tons of plasma, with embedded magnetic fields from the Sun's corona. These perturbations play a very important role in solar--terrestrial relations, in particular in the spaceweather. In this work we present some preliminary results of the software development at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico to perform Remote MHD Numerical Simulations. This is done to study the evolution of the CMEs in the interplanetary medium through a Web-based interface and the results are store into a database. The new astrophysical computational tool is called the Mexican Virtual Solar Observatory (MVSO) and is aimed to create theoretical models that may be helpful in the interpretation of observational solar data.

  5. Electromagnetic Pulse Propagation over Nonuniform Earth Surface: Numerical Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei V. Popov; Vladimir V. Kopeikin

    2007-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We simulate EM pulse propagation along the nonuniform earth surface using so called time-domain parabolic equation. To solve it by finite differences, we introduce a time-domain analog of the impedance boundary condition and a nonlocal BC of transparency reducing open computational domain to a strip of finite width. Numerical examples demonstrate influence of soil conductivity on the wide-band pulse waveform. For a high-frequency modulated EM pulse, we develop an asymptotic approach based on the ray structure of the monochromatic wave field at carrier frequency. This radically diminishes the computation costs and allows for pulsed wave field calculation in vast domains measured by tens of thousands wavelengths.

  6. Numerical simulation is vital to analyse complex chemi-cal or physical processes. The Institute for Numerical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griebel, Michael

    , says: "The power supplies and the cooling systems could not cope with the constant heavy loads of data computer networks supplied by specialist organisations have performed the institute's numerical simulation

  7. Numerical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627 Federal RegisterImplementation andNumerical simulations

  8. Numerical simulation of linear fiction welding (LFW) processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fratini, L.; La Spisa, D. [University of Palermo-Dept. of Industrial engineering (Italy)

    2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid state welding processes are becoming increasingly important due to a large number of advantages related to joining ''unweldable'' materials and in particular light weight alloys. Linear friction welding (LFW) has been used successfully to bond non-axisymmetric components of a range of materials including titanium alloys, steels, aluminum alloys, nickel, copper, and also dissimilar material combinations. The technique is useful in the research of quality of the joints and in reducing costs of components and parts of the aeronautic and automotive industries.LFW involves parts to be welded through the relative reciprocating motion of two components under an axial force. In such process the heat source is given by the frictional forces work decaying into heat determining a local softening of the material and proper bonding conditions due to both the temperature increase and the local pressure of the two edges to be welded. This paper is a comparative test between the numerical model in two dimensions, i.e. in plane strain conditions, and in three dimensions of a LFW process of AISI1045 steel specimens. It must be observed that the 3D model assures a faithful simulation of the actual threedimensional material flow, even if the two-dimensional simulation computational times are very short, a few hours instead of several ones as the 3D model. The obtained results were compared with experimental values found out in the scientific literature.

  9. A Flux-Limited Numerical Method for the MHD Equations to Simulate Propulsive Plasma Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choueiri, Edgar

    to be effective tools in plasma propulsion research, a higher order accu- rate solver that captures MHD shocks approach, numerical simulations are valuable tools in plasma thruster research. More- over, simulations can Simula- tions The importance of numerical simulation in advancing plasma thruster research was realized

  10. Energy and enstrophy transfer in numerical simulations of two-dimensional' turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallis, Geoff

    Energy and enstrophy transfer in numerical simulations of two-dimensional' turbulence Mathew E a significant fraction of the flow field,w and energy spectra from these simulations have slopes significantly October 1992; accepted 25 March 1993) Numerical simulations of statistically steady two-dimensional (2-D

  11. DIPOLE COLLAPSE AND DYNAMO WAVES IN GLOBAL DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrinner, Martin; Dormy, Emmanuel [MAG (ENS/IPGP), LRA, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 Rue Lhomond, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Petitdemange, Ludovic, E-mail: martin@schrinner.eu [Previously at Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany. (Germany)

    2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic fields of low-mass stars and planets are thought to originate from self-excited dynamo action in their convective interiors. Observations reveal a variety of field topologies ranging from large-scale, axial dipoles to more structured magnetic fields. In this article, we investigate more than 70 three-dimensional, self-consistent dynamo models in the Boussinesq approximation obtained by direct numerical simulations. The control parameters, the aspect ratio, and the mechanical boundary conditions have been varied to build up this sample of models. Both strongly dipolar and multipolar models have been obtained. We show that these dynamo regimes in general can be distinguished by the ratio of a typical convective length scale to the Rossby radius. Models with a predominantly dipolar magnetic field were obtained, if the convective length scale is at least an order of magnitude larger than the Rossby radius. Moreover, we highlight the role of the strong shear associated with the geostrophic zonal flow for models with stress-free boundary conditions. In this case the above transition disappears and is replaced by a region of bistability for which dipolar and multipolar dynamos coexist. We interpret our results in terms of dynamo eigenmodes using the so-called test-field method. We can thus show that models in the dipolar regime are characterized by an isolated 'single mode'. Competing overtones become significant as the boundary to multipolar dynamos is approached. We discuss how these findings relate to previous models and to observations.

  12. Numerical simulations of super-luminous supernovae of type IIn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D John

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present numerical simulations that include 1-D Eulerian multi-group radiation-hydrodynamics, 1-D non-LTE radiative transfer, and 2-D polarised radiative transfer for super-luminous interacting supernovae (SNe). Our reference model is a ~10Msun inner shell with 10^51erg ramming into a ~3Msun cold outer shell (the circumstellar-medium, or CSM) that extends from 10^15cm to 2x10^16cm and moves at 100km/s. We discuss the light curve evolution, which cannot be captured adequately with a grey approach. In these interactions, the shock-crossing time through the optically-thick CSM is much longer than the photon diffusion time. Radiation is thus continuously leaking from the shock through the CSM, in disagreement with the shell-shocked model that is often invoked. Our spectra redden with time, with a peak distribution in the near-UV during the first month gradually shifting to the optical range over the following year. Initially Balmer lines exhibit a narrow line core and the broad line wings that are characteristi...

  13. Numerical simulations of compressively driven interstellar turbulence: I. Isothermal gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Wolfram; Hupp, Markus; Kern, Sebastian; Niemeyer, Jens C

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed numerical simulations of supersonic isothermal turbulence driven by mostly compressive large-scale forcing, using both a static grid and adaptive mesh refinement with an effective resolution N=768^3. After a transient phase dominated by shocks, turbulence evolves into a steady state with an RMS Mach number about 2.5, in which cloud-like structures of over-dense gas are surrounded by highly rarefied gas. The index of the turbulence energy spectrum function beta = 2.0 in the shock-dominated phase. As the flow approaches statistical equilibrium, the spectrum flattens, with beta = 1.9. For the scaling exponent of the root mean square velocity fluctuation, we obtain gamma = 0.43 from the velocity structure functions of second order. These results are well within the range of observed scaling properties for the velocity dispersion in molecular clouds. Calculating structure functions of order p=1,...,5, we find for all scaling exponents significant deviations from the Kolmogorov-Burgers model proposed b...

  14. Analysis of Cold Air Distribution System in an Office Building by the Numerical Simulation Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian, Y.; Li, D.; Xu, H.; Ma, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulation is carried out in this paper to calculate indoor air patterns, which include angles of inlet direction and induced ratios in a typical official room. According to the simulation results, the indoor air distribution and indoor...

  15. Numerical simulations for nodal domains and spectral minimal partitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vial, Grégory

    unpublished results of [HHO2] with efficient numerical computations. This is the main goal of this paper

  16. DIAGNOSIS OF INSULATED BUILDING WALLS USING PASSIVE INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY AND NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    DIAGNOSIS OF INSULATED BUILDING WALLS USING PASSIVE INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY AND NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS This work presents the thermal monitoring of a multi-layered wall of a restored building (PANISSE platform parameters. Then they are compared with thermocouple measurements and numerical simulations. KEYWORDS

  17. Comparison of Numerical Techniques Used for Simulating Variable-Density Flow and Transport Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Comparison of Numerical Techniques Used for Simulating Variable-Density Flow and Transport code by simulating two new variable-density-flow and transport experimental data sets. The experiments transport of a sinking groundwater plume and a rising groundwater plume. The numerical techniques used

  18. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF POOL BOILING FOR STEADY STATE AND TRANSIENT HEATING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    1 NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF POOL BOILING FOR STEADY STATE AND TRANSIENT HEATING Ying He, Masahiro role in nucleate and transition boiling heat transfer at high heat flux. Many experiments have been in the numerical simulation of boiling heat transfer. In this study, based on the macrolayer evaporation model

  19. OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING TECHNIQUES AND FAC METHOD IN NUMERICAL RESERVOIR SIMULATION \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING TECHNIQUES AND FAC METHOD IN NUMERICAL RESERVOIR SIMULATION \\Lambda in numerical simulation of flow through hydrocarbon reservoirs within limitations in computing time and memory. These consist of solution of the conservation equations whichs govern the motion of fluid through the reservoir

  20. Experimental characterization and numerical simulations of a syntactic-foam/glass-bre composite sandwich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corigliano, Alberto

    Experimental characterization and numerical simulations of a syntactic-foam/glass-®bre composite core. Such core consists of a syntactic foam made by hollow glass microspheres embedded in an epoxy. Keywords: A. Glass ®bre; Composite sandwich; Syntactic foam; Mechanical tests; Numerical simulations (FE) 1

  1. Numerical simulation of three-dimensional electrical flow through geomaterials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akhtar, Anwar Saeed

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    95 99 V ELECTRICAL FLOW AROUND AN ELECTRICAL CONE PENETROMETER 104 5. 1 INTRODUCTION 5. 2 ANALYTICAL SOLUTION FOR ELECTRICAL FLOW AROUND AN ELECTRICAL CONE PENETROMETER 5. 3 NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION 5. 4 COMPARISON OF ANALYTICAL AND NUMERICAL... RESULTS 5. 5 CONCLUSION AND APPLICATION 5. 5. 1 Utilization of Numerical Results 104 106 110 113 115 116 VI EXPERIMENTAL EQUIPMENT DESIGN 121 6. 1 INTRODUCTION 6. 2 ELECTRICAL POWER SOURCE 6. 3 ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY CONE PENETROMETER 6. 4...

  2. Numerical Simulations of Gamma-Ray Burst Explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazzati, Davide; López-Cámara, Diego

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts are a complex, non-linear system that evolves very rapidly through stages of vastly different conditions. They evolve from scales of few hundred kilometers where they are very dense and hot to cold and tenuous on scales of parsecs. As such, our understanding of such a phenomenon can truly increase by combining theoretical and numerical studies adopting different numerical techniques to face different problems and deal with diverse conditions. In this review, we will describe the tremendous advancement in our comprehension of the bursts phenomenology through numerical modeling. Though we will discuss studies mainly based on jet dynamics across the progenitor star and the interstellar medium, we will also touch upon other problems such as the jet launching, its acceleration, and the radiation mechanisms. Finally, we will describe how combining numerical results with observations from Swift and other instruments resulted in true understanding of the bursts phenomenon and the challenges still lyi...

  3. Numerical simulation of flow separation control by oscillatory fluid injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resendiz Rosas, Celerino

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    and Lomax. The application of synthetic jet actuators is based in their ability to energize the boundary layer, thereby providing signifcant increase in the lift coefficient. This has been corroborated experimentally and it is corroborated numerically...

  4. Numerical simulations of self-focusing of ultrafast laser pulses Gadi Fibich*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiao-Ping

    Numerical simulations of self-focusing of ultrafast laser pulses Gadi Fibich* School November 2002; published 7 May 2003 Simulation of nonlinear propagation of intense ultrafast laser pulses, space-time focusing, and self-steepening. Our simulations show that, after the asymmetric temporal pulse

  5. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF ROTATING SUNSPOTS G. J. J. Botha1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rucklidge, Alastair

    , at a depth of 0 to 5 Mm there exist subsurface horizontal vortical flows, while there are also suggestions's convection zone. The solution forms a central flux tube in the cylindrical numerical domain, with convection, vortical flow. As a result, the azimuthal velocity and mag- netic field have their maximum values close

  6. Simulation of the secondary settling process with reliable numerical methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Raimund

    are placed in alphabetical order Abstract A consistent model for the settling-compression-dispersion process The sedimentation process in the secondary settling tank (SST) is still a challenge in modelling the full Sedimentation, clarifier, conservation law, partial differential equation, numerical flux INTRODUCTION

  7. Numerical Simulation of Enhanced Mixing in Scramjet Combustor Using Ramp, Tabs and Suction Collar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Seung-Jae

    2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations of the scramjet combustor by using the commercial CFD code Fluent with the coupled implicit method with second-order accurate discretization have been obtained for the reacting flows with the parallel fuel injection (ramp...

  8. Numerical simulations of ion transport membrane oxy-fuel reactors for CO? capture applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Jongsup

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations were performed to investigate the key features of oxygen permeation and hydrocarbon conversion in ion transport membrane (ITM) reactors. ITM reactors have been suggested as a novel technology to enable ...

  9. Course MA59800: Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Course MA59800: Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale matrix properties, fine layering, frac- tures and craks at the mesoscale (on the order of centimeters

  10. Course: Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Course: Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale Professor variations in the fluid and solid matrix properties, fine layering, frac- tures and craks at the mesoscale

  11. A comparative analysis of numerical simulation and analytical modeling of horizontal well cyclic steam injection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravago Bastardo, Delmira Cristina

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this research is to compare the performance of cyclic steam injection using horizontal wells based on the analytical model developed by Gunadi against that based on numerical simulation. For comparison, ...

  12. Groundwater flow with energy transport and waterice phase change: Numerical simulations, benchmarks, and application to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Jeffrey M.

    saturated, coupled porewater-energy transport, with freezing and melting porewater, and includes propor transport; Freezing; Cold regions; Benchmark; Modelling 1. Introduction The freezing and thawingGroundwater flow with energy transport and water­ice phase change: Numerical simulations

  13. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Numerical Simulation of a Gas Turbine Combustor Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subrata

    1 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Numerical Simulation of a Gas Turbine of combustion by using nanosecond pulsed plasma actuators for a gas turbine combustor. Moreau [2] and Corke et

  14. Numerical simulation of comminution in granular materials with an application to fault gouge evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang, Richard Anthony

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF COMMINUTION IN GRANULAR MATERIALS WITH AN APPLICATION TO FAULT GOUGE EVOLUTION A Thesis by RICHARD ANTHONY LANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2002 Major Subject: Geophysics NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF COMMINUTION IN GRANULAR MATERIALS WITH AN APPLICATION TO FAULT GOUGE EVOLUTION A Thesis by RICHARD ANTHONY LANG Submitted...

  15. Numerical Investigation of a Transverse Jet in a Supersonic Crossflow using Large Eddy Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Numerical Investigation of a Transverse Jet in a Supersonic Crossflow using Large Eddy Simulation injected fuel jets in hot supersonic crossflows. This paper describes the numerical algorithm being used into a supersonic crossflow computed on a coarse mesh. These results are discussed and similarity

  16. Effects of Shear Rate on Propagation of Blood Clotting Determined Using Microfluidics and Numerical Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    Effects of Shear Rate on Propagation of Blood Clotting Determined Using Microfluidics and Numerical-ismagilov@uchicago.edu Abstract: This paper describes microfluidic experiments with human blood plasma and numerical simulations removed. In addition, these results demonstrate the utility of simplified mechanisms and microfluidics

  17. Separation phenomena in the tritium source and numerical simulations of turbo-molecular pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharipov, Felix

    Separation phenomena in the tritium source and numerical simulations of turbo-molecular pumps Felix In the previous works [1, 2], the results of numerical calculations of tritium flow from the buffer vessel up to the first vacuum system were reported. Two values of the tritium source temperature were considered, i.e. 27

  18. Numerical Simulation of the Hydrodynamical Combustion to Strange Quark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian Niebergal; Rachid Ouyed; Prashanth Jaikumar

    2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from a numerical solution to the burning of neutron matter inside a cold neutron star into stable (u,d,s) quark matter. Our method solves hydrodynamical flow equations in 1D with neutrino emission from weak equilibrating reactions, and strange quark diffusion across the burning front. We also include entropy change due to heat released in forming the stable quark phase. Our numerical results suggest burning front laminar speeds of 0.002-0.04 times the speed of light, much faster than previous estimates derived using only a reactive-diffusive description. Analytic solutions to hydrodynamical jump conditions with a temperature dependent equation of state agree very well with our numerical findings for fluid velocities. The most important effect of neutrino cooling is that the conversion front stalls at lower density (below approximately 2 times saturation density). In a 2-dimensional setting, such rapid speeds and neutrino cooling may allow for a flame wrinkle instability to develop, possibly leading to detonation.

  19. Numerical simulation of copper ablation by ultrashort laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, PengJi; Li, YuHong

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a modified self-consistent one-dimensional hydrodynamic lagrangian fluid code, laser ablation of solid copper by ultrashort laser pulses in vacuum was simulated to study fundamental mechanisms and to provide a guide for drilling periodic microholes or microgratings on the metal surface. The simulated laser ablation threshold is a approximate constancy in femtosecond regime and increases as the square root of pulse duration in picosecond regime. The ablation depth as a function of pulse duration shows four different regimes and a minimum for a pulse duration of ~ 12ps for various laser fluences. The influence of laser-induced plasma shielding on ablation depth is also studied.

  20. Numerical simulation of tropical cumulus congestus during TOGA COARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechem, David B.

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    and active phases of the intraseasonal oscillation (ISO), with a unique signature consistent with cloudy-air detrainment near the 0°C isotherm. Congestus clouds in the simulation contribute 34% of the total precipitation during a 10 day transition period from...

  1. A numerical simulation of slantwise convection: its structure and evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overpeck, Scott Allen

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    convection), and could be a possible explanation for frontal rainbands. This study uses the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) as a diagnostic tool to simulate a slantwise convective case from the Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment (GALE, Dirks et al...

  2. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF LONG TERM UNSATURATED FLOW AND ACID MINE DRAINAGE AT WASTE ROCK PILES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF LONG TERM UNSATURATED FLOW AND ACID MINE DRAINAGE AT WASTE ROCK PILES Omar representative) waste rock piles and using observed climatic recharge data. The simulations were used to help are applied each year at the top of the piles, the water content profiles become periodic after a few years

  3. A Numerical Model for the Dynamic Simulation of a Recirculation Single-Effect Absorption Chiller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Numerical Model for the Dynamic Simulation of a Recirculation Single- Effect Absorption Chiller A dynamic model for the simulation of a new single-effect water/lithium bromide absorption chiller is developed. The chiller is driven by two distinct heat sources, includes a custom integrated falling film

  4. DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF COMPRESSIBLE TRANSITION: AN OVERVIEW M.Y. Hussaini and G. Erlebacher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erlebacher, Gordon

    DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF COMPRESSIBLE TRANSITION: AN OVERVIEW M.Y. Hussaini and G. Erlebacher in the field of compressible transition. As a result, new computational tools have made their appearance. Recently however, research at Langley has begun to focus on the simulation of compressible transition

  5. A Model and Numerical Framework for the Simulation of Solid-Solid Phase Transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee, Sanjay

    A Model and Numerical Framework for the Simulation of Solid-Solid Phase Transformations Garrett J computational realization for the simulation of solid-solid phase transformations of the type observed in shape physical experiments and is indicative of the power of the proposed modelling methodology. In particular

  6. Acceleration of heavy and light particles in turbulence: comparison between experiments and direct numerical simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Volk; E. Calzavarini; G. Verhille; D. Lohse; N. Mordant; J. -F. Pinton; F. Toschi

    2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare experimental data and numerical simulations for the dynamics of inertial particles with finite density in turbulence. In the experiment, bubbles and solid particles are optically tracked in a turbulent flow of water using an Extended Laser Doppler Velocimetry technique. The probability density functions (PDF) of particle accelerations and their auto-correlation in time are computed. Numerical results are obtained from a direct numerical simulation in which a suspension of passive pointwise particles is tracked, with the same finite density and the same response time as in the experiment. We observe a good agreement for both the variance of acceleration and the autocorrelation timescale of the dynamics; small discrepancies on the shape of the acceleration PDF are observed. We discuss the effects induced by the finite size of the particles, not taken into account in the present numerical simulations.

  7. Numerical simulation of laminar reacting flows with complex chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day, Marcus S.; Bell, John B.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an adaptive algorithm for low Mach number reacting flows with complex chemistry. Our approach uses a form of the low Mach number equations that discretely conserves both mass and energy. The discretization methodology is based on a robust projection formulation that accommodates large density contrasts. The algorithm uses an operator-split treatment of stiff reaction terms and includes effects of differential diffusion. The basic computational approach is embedded in an adaptive projection framework that uses structured hierarchical grids with subcycling in time that preserves the discrete conservation properties of the underlying single-grid algorithm. We present numerical examples illustrating the performance of the method on both premixed and non-premixed flames.

  8. Numerical Simulations of Leakage from Underground LPG Storage Caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Hajime; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To secure a stable supply of petroleum gas, underground storage caverns for liquified petroleum gas (LPG) are commonly used in many countries worldwide. Storing LPG in underground caverns requires that the surrounding rock mass remain saturated with groundwater and that the water pressure be higher than the liquid pressure inside the cavern. In previous studies, gas containment criteria for underground gas storage based on hydraulic gradient and pressure have been discussed, but these studies do not consider the physicochemical characteristics and behavior of LPG such as vaporization and dissolution in groundwater. Therefore, while these studies are very useful for designing storage caverns, they do not provide better understanding of the either the environmental effects of gas contamination or the behavior of vaporized LPG. In this study, we have performed three-phase fluid flow simulations of gas leakage from underground LPG storage caverns, using the multiphase multicomponent nonisothermal simulator TMVOC (Pruess and Battistelli, 2002), which is capable of solving the three-phase nonisothermal flow of water, gas, and a multicomponent mixture of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in multidimensional heterogeneous porous media. A two-dimensional cross-sectional model resembling an actual underground LPG facility in Japan was developed, and gas leakage phenomena were simulated for three different permeability models: (1) a homogeneous model, (2) a single-fault model, and (3) a heterogeneous model. In addition, the behavior of stored LPG was studied for the special case of a water curtain suddenly losing its function because of operational problems, or because of long-term effects such as clogging of boreholes. The results of the study indicate the following: (1) The water curtain system is a very powerful means for preventing gas leakage from underground storage facilities. By operating with appropriate pressure and layout, gas containment can be ensured. (2) However , in highly heterogeneous media such as fractured rock and fault zones, local flow paths within which the gas containment criterion is not satisfied could be formed. To eliminate such zones, treatments such as pre/post grouting or an additional installment of water-curtain boreholes are essential. (3) Along highly conductive features such as faults, even partially saturated zones possess certain effects that can retard or prevent gas leakage, while a fully unsaturated fault connected to the storage cavern can quickly cause a gas blowout. This possibility strongly suggests that ensuring water saturation of the rock surrounding the cavern is a very important requirement. (4) Even if an accident should suddenly impair the water curtain, the gas plume does not quickly penetrate the ground surface. In these simulations, the plume takes several months to reach the ground surface.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Bubble Formation in Co-Flowing Mercury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL; Wendel, Mark W [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL; Riemer, Bernie [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we present computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of helium bubble formation and detachment at a submerged needle in stagnant and co-flowing mercury. Since mercury is opaque, visualization of internal gas bubbles was done with proton radiography (pRad) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE2). The acoustic waves emitted at the time of detachment and during subsequent oscillations of the bubble were recorded with a microphone. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) model was used to simulate the unsteady two-phase flow of gas injection in mercury. The VOF model is validated by comparing detailed bubble sizes and shapes at various stages of the bubble growth and detachment, with the experimental measurements at different gas flow rates and mercury velocities. The experimental and computational results show a two-stage bubble formation. The first stage involves growing bubble around the needle, and the second follows as the buoyancy overcomes wall adhesion. The comparison of predicted and measured bubble sizes and shapes at various stages of the bubble growth and detachment is in good agreement.

  10. On numerical turbulence generation for test-particle simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tautz, R. C. [Zentrum fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Dosch, A. [Center for Space Plasmas and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, Alabama 35805 (United States)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A modified method is presented to generate artificial magnetic turbulence that is used for test-particle simulations. Such turbulent fields are obtained from the superposition of a set of wave modes with random polarizations and random directions of propagation. First, it is shown that the new method simultaneously fulfils requirements of isotropy, equal mean amplitude and variance for all field components, and vanishing divergence. Second, the number of wave modes required for a stochastic particle behavior is investigated by using a Lyapunov approach. For the special case of slab turbulence, it is shown that already for 16 wave modes the particle behavior agrees with that shown for considerably larger numbers of wave modes.

  11. Numerical simulations of X-rays Free Electron Lasers (XFEL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Antonelli; Agissilaos Athanassoulis; Zhongyi Huang; Peter A. Markowich

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation which arises as an effective single particle model in X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL). This equation appears as a first-principles model for the beam-matter interactions that would take place in an XFEL molecular imaging experiment in \\cite{frat1}. Since XFEL is more powerful by several orders of magnitude than more conventional lasers, the systematic investigation of many of the standard assumptions and approximations has attracted increased attention. In this model the electrons move under a rapidly oscillating electromagnetic field, and the convergence of the problem to an effective time-averaged one is examined. We use an operator splitting pseudo-spectral method to investigate numerically the behaviour of the model versus its time-averaged version in complex situations, namely the energy subcritical/mass supercritical case, and in the presence of a periodic lattice. We find the time averaged model to be an effective approximation, even close to blowup, for fast enough oscillations of the external field. This work extends previous analytical results for simpler cases \\cite{xfel1}.

  12. Numerical simulation of scour process around bridge piers in cohesive soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Gengsheng

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of streambed materials is also necessary. Consequently, progresses are very limitted in this area. Numerical computation of bridge pier scour in noncohesive soils can only be found in Olsen and Melaaen (1993) and Olsen (1996), and no reference exists... in numerical simulations of scour process. Furthermore, all the references are confined to noncohesive soils. Olsen and Melaaen (1993) calculated the shape of a scour hole around a cylinder mounted in a noncohesive streambed. They used a three...

  13. Massively-Parallel Direct Numerical Simulation of Gas Turbine Endwall Film-Cooling Conjugate Heat Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meador, Charles Michael

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    MASSIVELY-PARALLEL DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF GAS TURBINE ENDWALL FILM-COOLING CONJUGATE HEAT TRANSFER A Thesis by CHARLES MICHAEL MEADOR Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2010 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering MASSIVELY-PARALLEL DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF GAS TURBINE ENDWALL FILM-COOLING CONJUGATE HEAT TRANSFER A Thesis by CHARLES MICHAEL MEADOR Submitted to the O ce of Graduate...

  14. The ignition process in type Ia supernovae: numerical simulations of core temperature perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Iapichino; M. Brüggen; W. Hillebrandt; J. C. Niemeyer

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The onset of the thermonuclear runaway in a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf, leading to the explosion as a type Ia supernova, is studied with hydrodynamical simulations. We investigate the evolution of temperature fluctuations (``bubbles'') in the WD's convective core by means of 2D numerical simulations. We show how the occurrence of the thermonuclear runaway depends on various bubble parameters. The relevance of the progenitor's composition for the ignition process is also discussed.

  15. The ignition process in type Ia supernovae: numerical simulations of core temperature perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iapichino, L; Hillebrandt, W; Niemeyer, J C

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The onset of the thermonuclear runaway in a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf, leading to the explosion as a type Ia supernova, is studied with hydrodynamical simulations. We investigate the evolution of temperature fluctuations (``bubbles'') in the WD's convective core by means of 2D numerical simulations. We show how the occurrence of the thermonuclear runaway depends on various bubble parameters. The relevance of the progenitor's composition for the ignition process is also discussed.

  16. MULTIDIMENSIONAL NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF THE REACTING FLOW IN A PULSE COMBUSTOR \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MULTIDIMENSIONAL NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF THE REACTING FLOW IN A PULSE COMBUSTOR \\Lambda Daniel L to study the behavior of pulse combustors. Our approach is based on the use of higher­order Godunov meth of pulse combustor is based on a Helmholtz resonator -- a burning cycle drives a resonant pressure wave

  17. Stochastic numerical simulations of long term unsaturated flow in waste rock piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    Stochastic numerical simulations of long term unsaturated flow in waste rock piles O. Fala Genivar water flow in waste rock piles using selected realizations of stochastically distributed hydraulic term hydrogeological behaviour of waste rock piles, to help select the construction sequence

  18. Numerical methods for the simulation of a corrosion model in a nuclear waste deep repository $

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Numerical methods for the simulation of a corrosion model in a nuclear waste deep repository $ C of the French nuclear waste management agency ANDRA, investigations are conducted to optimize and finalize by the Nuclear Waste Management Agency ANDRA Corresponding author. Phone: +49 30 20372 560, Fax: +49 30 2044975

  19. Numerical simulations of gas-particle flows with combustion Julien NUSSBAUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Numerical simulations of gas-particle flows with combustion Julien NUSSBAUM French-german Research. At the initial time, the mixture of gas-powder grains is contained in the combustion chamber, limited gas species. The pressure increases in the combustion chamber, while the front flame propagates

  20. Maneuverability of ships in ice: numerical simulation and comparison with field measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    Maneuverability of ships in ice: numerical simulation and comparison with field measurements Biao Su Department of Marine Technology, NTNU May 28, 2013 #12;Motivation Local ice load Global ice load Ship's performance · Ice-hull interaction · Local ice load · Global ice load · Ship's performance #12

  1. Numerical simulation of ice-induced loads on ships and comparison with field measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    Numerical simulation of ice-induced loads on ships and comparison with field measurements Biao Su Department of Marine Technology, NTNU May 28, 2013 #12;Motivation Local ice load Global ice load Ship's performance · Ice-hull interaction · Local ice load · Global ice load · Ship's performance #12;Outline

  2. Numerical simulation and sensitivity study of a severe hailstorm in northeast Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, Romu

    Numerical simulation and sensitivity study of a severe hailstorm in northeast Spain E. García Atmósfera, Instituto de Medio Ambiente, Universidad de León, 24071 León, Spain b Grup de Meteorologia, Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Palma de Mallorca, Spain Accepted 8 August 2005

  3. Numerical Simulation of Mesoscale Circulations in a Region of Contrasting Soil Types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Sethu

    Numerical Simulation of Mesoscale Circulations in a Region of Contrasting Soil Types SETHU RAMAN,1 AARON SIMS,1,2 ROBB ELLIS,1 and RYAN BOYLES 1 Abstract--Mesoscale processes that form due to changes on mesoscale processes are examined. Climatological analyses indicate increased convective precipitation

  4. APPENDIX B -GRAPHICS Most computer simulation work produces lots of numerical data. The analysis of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boal, David

    APPENDIX B - GRAPHICS Most computer simulation work produces lots of numerical data. The analysis. In this section, we describe some elements of computer graphics that are appropriate to the Apple PowerPCs of the Computational Physics Lab. Further editions of these notes will include Windows versions of the graphics. Our

  5. Thesis topic: "Characterisation of wake tracking procedures by means of numerical simulation" (Bachelor or master )

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    and finally methods of aeroelastic simulation of wind turbines in wake. Scope The proposed work aims.jose.trujillo@uni-oldenburg.de Fig. Near wake path of an offshore wind turbine estimatied by means of wake tracking #12; of fluid dynamics and wind turbine aerodynamics - Numerical analysis - Programming skills in a scripting

  6. Numerical Simulation of Phase Transformations in Shape Memory Alloy Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melnik, Roderick

    Numerical Simulation of Phase Transformations in Shape Memory Alloy Thin Films Debiprosad Roy- tions of phase transformation dynamics in shape memory alloy thin films are reported in this paper transformation path from austenite to martensites and recovers the original shape. This is known as shape memory

  7. Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclone*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated is eventually dissipated due to surface friction. Since the energy production rate is a linear function while frictional dissipation rate balances the energy production rate near the radius of maximum wind (RMW

  8. Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    0 Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated is eventually dissipated due to surface friction. Since the energy production rate is a linear function while frictional dissipation rate balances the energy production rate near the radius of maximum wind (RMW

  9. Numerical Simulations of the Wave Bottom Boundary Layer over Sand Ripples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slinn, Donald

    locations. Under conditions of oscillatory potential flow external to the boundary layer causedNumerical Simulations of the Wave Bottom Boundary Layer over Sand Ripples by Thomas Pierro A Thesis boundary layer are believed to play a major role in the re-suspension and transport of sediment, as well

  10. Numerically exact computer simulations of light scattering by densely packed, random particulate media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Review Numerically exact computer simulations of light scattering by densely packed, random Astronomical Observatory of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 27 Zabolotny Street, 03680 Kyiv- albedo Solar System objects are caused by CB. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Contents 1. Introduction

  11. Numerical simulation of a lattice polymer model at its integrable point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bedini; A. L. Owczarek; T. Prellberg

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit an integrable lattice model of polymer collapse using numerical simulations. This model was first studied by Bl\\"ote and Nienhuis in J. Phys. A. {\\bf 22}, 1415 (1989) and it describes polymers with some attraction, providing thus a model for the polymer collapse transition. At a particular set of Boltzmann weights the model is integrable and the exponents $\

  12. Numerical simulation of a thermoacoustic couple A. I. Abd El-Rahmana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Numerical simulation of a thermoacoustic couple A. I. Abd El-Rahmana and E. Abdel-filled half-wavelength thermoacoustic refrigerator. The finite volume method is used, and the solid and air in thermoacoustic refrigerators, characterizing and optimizing their performance, and building models

  13. Liquid phase oxidation kinetics of oil sands bitumen: Models for in situ combustion numerical simulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adegbesan, K.O.; Donnelly, J.K.; Moore, R.G.; Bennion, D.W.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiresponse kinetic models are established for the low-temperature oxidation (LTO) reaction of Athabasca oil sands bitumen. The models provide adequate description of the overall rate of oxygen consumption and of the reactions of the liquid phase bitumen components. The LTO models are suitable for use in the in situ combustion numerical simulators of oil sands.

  14. LIDAR OBSERVATIONS AND COMPARISON WITH NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF A LAKE MICHIGAN LAND BREEZE FRONT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    of the Lake-Induced Convection Experiments (Lake-ICE), on December 21, 1997 the University of Wisconsin VolumeLIDAR OBSERVATIONS AND COMPARISON WITH NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF A LAKE MICHIGAN LAND BREEZE FRONT G circulation over Lake Michigan. Backscatter returns revealed a steady offshore flow extending 1.5 to 4 km

  15. Direct numerical simulation of an iron rain in the magma ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    investigate the conversion of gravitational energy into viscous heating and the thermal equilibration betweenDirect numerical simulation of an iron rain in the magma ocean H. Ichikawa,1,2 S. Labrosse,1 and K of metal in a magma ocean. The model, using a fully Lagrangian approach called the moving particle semi

  16. Optimization and Numerical Simulation of the Cycling Process and Magnetic Shielding of a Miniature Adiabatic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timbie, Peter

    , which is crucial to minimize stray magnetic fields that could interfere with other refrigerator stagesOptimization and Numerical Simulation of the Cycling Process and Magnetic Shielding of a Miniature Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator Benjamin M. Cain May 18, 2004 A Senior Honors Thesis Project Under

  17. Numeric Simulation of Heat Transfer and Electrokinetic Flow in an Electroosmosis-Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    Numeric Simulation of Heat Transfer and Electrokinetic Flow in an Electroosmosis-Based Continuous is dedicated to under- standing the fluid flow and heat transfer mechanisms occurring in continuous flow PCR are discussed in detail. The importance of each heat transfer mechanism for different situations is also

  18. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent heat transfer in annuli: effect of heat flux ratio.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Direct numerical simulation of turbulent heat transfer in annuli: effect of heat flux ratio. M-la-Vall´ee cedex 2, France (Dated: October 23, 2008) Abstract Fully developed turbulent flow and heat transfer square (rms) of temperature fluctuations, turbulent heat fluxes, heat transfer, ...). To validate

  19. Steam generators two phase flows numerical simulation with liquid and gas momentum equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . The secondary flow is another loop that links the steam generator and the turbines. Inside the exchangerSteam generators two phase flows numerical simulation with liquid and gas momentum equations M Abstract This work takes place in steam generators flow studies and we consider here steady state three

  20. Ducted Turbine Blade Optimization Using Numerical Simulation Michael Shives and Curran Crawford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Ducted Turbine Blade Optimization Using Numerical Simulation Michael Shives and Curran Crawford analysis and optimization of ducted turbines. The model is similar to standard blade element momentum. This eliminates many assumptions used in applying the typical blade element momentum (BEM) theory to a turbine

  1. Numerical Simulation of a Single-Wafer Isothermal Plasma Etching Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economou, Demetre J.

    Numerical Simulation of a Single-Wafer Isothermal Plasma Etching Reactor Sang-Kyu Parkand Demetre J-plate single- wafer isothermal reactor was conducted. The oxygen plasma etching of polymer under high pressure with emphasis on chemical etching. Etching rate and uniformity were examined as a function of reactor geometry

  2. EulerianEulerian two-phase numerical simulation of nanofluid laminar forced convection in a microchannel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harting, Jens

    Eulerian­Eulerian two-phase numerical simulation of nanofluid laminar forced convection August 2010 Accepted 5 August 2010 Keywords: Nanofluid Microchannel Two-phase Laminar Heat transfer a b s t r a c t In this paper, laminar forced convection heat transfer of a copper­water nanofluid inside

  3. NUMERICAL METHODS FOR THE SIMULATION OF CONTINUOUS SEDIMENTATION IN IDEAL CLARIFIER-THICKENER UNITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a model of continuous sedimentation of ideal suspensions of small solid particles dispersed in a viscous of Kynch's and related sedimentation models are provided by Bustos et al. (1999) and Burger and WendlandNUMERICAL METHODS FOR THE SIMULATION OF CONTINUOUS SEDIMENTATION IN IDEAL CLARIFIER-THICKENER UNITS

  4. Numerical methods for the simulation of salt migration in regional groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    Numerical methods for the simulation of salt migration in regional groundwater flow E.S. van Baaren #12;Contents 1 Introduction 1 2 Model description 3 2.1 Basic Assumptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 3.2 Finite Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.2.1 Grid

  5. Numerical dissipation and the bottleneck effect in simulations of compressible isotropic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, W; Niemeyer, J C

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy spectrum functions computed from data of various three-dimensional simulations of forced isotropic turbulence are investigated. The piece-wise parabolic method (PPM) was used to treat flows with Mach number of the order unity. The dissipation is of purely numerical origin. For the dimensionless mean rate of dissipation, we find values in agreement with results from other, mostly incompressible turbulence simulations. The so-called bottleneck phenomenon is also present in the turbulence energy spectra. Although the bottleneck reduces the range of nearly inertial scales considerably, we were able to estimate the value of the Kolmogorov constant. In the statistically stationary regime, $C\\approx 1.7$ for strictly subsonic turbulence, but also in the presence of shocklets in moderately transonic flows. As compressive components become more significant, however, the value of $C$ appears to decrease. Moreover, we discuss length scales related to numerical dissipation, in particular, an effective numerical le...

  6. Numerical simulations of multi-shell plasma twisters in the solar atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murawski, K; Musielak, Z E; Dwivedi, B N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform numerical simulations of impulsively generated Alfv\\'en waves in an isolated photospheric flux tube, and explore the propagation of these waves along such magnetic structure that extends from the photosphere, where these waves are triggered, to the solar corona, and analyze resulting magnetic shells. Our model of the solar atmosphere is constructed by adopting the temperature distribution based on the semi-empirical model and specifying the curved magnetic field lines that constitute the magnetic flux tube which is rooted in the solar photosphere. The evolution of the solar atmosphere is described by 3D, ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations that are numerically solved by the FLASH code. Our numerical simulations reveal, based on the physical properties of the multi-shell magnetic twisters and the amount of energy and momentum associated with them, that these multi-shell magnetic twisters may be responsible for the observed heating of the lower solar corona and for the formation of solar wind. Moreov...

  7. Development of Spatio-Temporal Wavelet Post Processing Techniques for Application to Thermal Hydraulic Experiments and Numerical Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salpeter, Nathaniel

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    -intrusive particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) techniques. The second experiment is of a simulated double ended guillotine break in the prismatic block gas cooled reactor. Numerical simulations of jet flow mixing in the lower plenum of a prismatic block high...

  8. Numerical dissipation and the bottleneck effect in simulations of compressible isotropic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Schmidt; W. Hillebrandt; J. C. Niemeyer

    2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The piece-wise parabolic method (PPM) is applied to simulations of forced isotropic turbulence with Mach numbers $\\sim 0.1... 1$. The equation of state is dominated by the Fermi pressure of an electron-degenerate fluid. The dissipation in these simulations is of purely numerical origin. For the dimensionless mean rate of dissipation, we find values in agreement with known results from mostly incompressible turbulence simulations. The calculation of a Smagorinsky length corresponding to the rate of numerical dissipation supports the notion of the PPM supplying an implicit subgrid scale model. In the turbulence energy spectra of various flow realisations, we find the so-called bottleneck phenomenon, i.e., a flattening of the spectrum function near the wavenumber of maximal dissipation. The shape of the bottleneck peak in the compensated spectrum functions is comparable to what is found in turbulence simulations with hyperviscosity. Although the bottleneck effect reduces the range of nearly inertial length scales considerably, we are able to estimate the value of the Kolmogorov constant. For steady turbulence with a balance between energy injection and dissipation, it appears that $C\\approx 1.7$. However, a smaller value is found in the case of transonic turbulence with a large fraction of compressive components in the driving force. Moreover, we discuss length scales related to the dissipation, in particular, an effective numerical length scale $\\Delta_{\\mathrm{eff}}$, which can be regarded as the characteristic smoothing length of the implicit filter associated with the PPM.

  9. Modeling-Computer Simulations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983)(Roberts,(Laney,| Jump

  10. Development of a Numerical Simulator for Analyzing the Geomechanical Performance of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rutqvist, J.; Moridis, G.J.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we describe the development and application of a numerical simulator that analyzes the geomechanical performance of hydrate-bearing sediments, which may become an important future energy supply. The simulator is developed by coupling a robust numerical simulator of coupled fluid flow, hydrate thermodynamics, and phase behavior in geologic media (TOUGH+HYDRATE) with an established geomechanical code (FLAC3D). We demonstrate the current simulator capabilities and applicability for two examples of geomechanical responses of hydrate bearing sediments during production-induced hydrate dissociation. In these applications, the coupled geomechanical behavior within hydrate-bearing seducements are considered through a Mohr-Coulomb constitutive model, corrected for changes in pore-filling hydrate and ice content, based on laboratory data. The results demonstrate how depressurization-based gas production from oceanic hydrate deposits may lead to severe geomechanical problems unless care is taken in designing the production scheme. We conclude that the coupled simulator can be used to design production strategies for optimizing production, while avoiding damaging geomechanical problems.

  11. Modelling and Numerical Simulation of Gas Migration in a Nuclear Waste Repository

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourgeat, Alain; Smai, Farid

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a compositional compressible two-phase, liquid and gas, flow model for numerical simulations of hydrogen migration in deep geological radioactive waste repository. This model includes capillary effects and the gas diffusivity. The choice of the main variables in this model, Total or Dissolved Hydrogen Mass Concentration and Liquid Pressure, leads to a unique and consistent formulation of the gas phase appearance and disappearance. After introducing this model, we show computational evidences of its adequacy to simulate gas phase appearance and disappearance in different situations typical of underground radioactive waste repository.

  12. Direct Numerical Simulations of the Kraichnan Model: Scaling Exponents and Fusion Rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrienne L. Fairhall; Barak Galanti; Victor S. L'vov; Itamar Procaccia

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from direct numerical simulations of the Kraichnan model for passive scalar advection by a rapidly-varying random scaling velocity field for intermediate values of the velocity scaling exponent. These results are compared with the scaling exponents predicted for this model by Kraichnan. Further, we test the recently proposed fusion rules which govern the scaling properties of multi-point correlations, and present results on the linearity of the conditional statistics of the Laplacian operator on the scalar field.

  13. Numerical simulations of stripping effects in high-intensity hydrogen ion linacs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carneiro, J.-P.; /Fermilab; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P.N.; /Argonne

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations of H{sup -} stripping losses from blackbody radiation, electromagnetic fields, and residual gas have been implemented into the beam dynamics code TRACK. Estimates of the stripping losses along two high-intensity H{sup -} linacs are presented: the Spallation Neutron Source linac currently being operated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and an 8 GeV superconducting linac currently being designed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory.

  14. Numerical Simulation for eHealth: Gridenabled Medical Simulation Services Siegfried Benkner a , Gerhard Engelbrecht a , Werner Backfrieder b , Guntram Berti c , Jochen Fingberg c ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Middleton, Stuart E.

    advanced bio­medical simulation applications. Often, however, such applications have a very limited methodology advances. The European GEMSS Project [7] is concerned with the creation of medical Grid service1 Numerical Simulation for eHealth: Grid­enabled Medical Simulation Services Siegfried Benkner

  15. Coupling a Mesoscale Numerical Weather Prediction Model with Large-Eddy Simulation for Realistic Wind Plant Aerodynamics Simulations (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draxl, C.; Churchfield, M.; Mirocha, J.; Lee, S.; Lundquist, J.; Michalakes, J.; Moriarty, P.; Purkayastha, A.; Sprague, M.; Vanderwende, B.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind plant aerodynamics are influenced by a combination of microscale and mesoscale phenomena. Incorporating mesoscale atmospheric forcing (e.g., diurnal cycles and frontal passages) into wind plant simulations can lead to a more accurate representation of microscale flows, aerodynamics, and wind turbine/plant performance. Our goal is to couple a numerical weather prediction model that can represent mesoscale flow [specifically the Weather Research and Forecasting model] with a microscale LES model (OpenFOAM) that can predict microscale turbulence and wake losses.

  16. Numerical simulation of swirling flow in complex hydroturbine draft tube using unsteady statistical turbulence models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paik, Joongcheol [University of Minnesota; Sotiropoulos, Fotis [University of Minnesota; Sale, Michael J [ORNL

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical method is developed for carrying out unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) simulations and detached-eddy simulations (DESs) in complex 3D geometries. The method is applied to simulate incompressible swirling flow in a typical hydroturbine draft tube, which consists of a strongly curved 90 degree elbow and two piers. The governing equations are solved with a second-order-accurate, finite-volume, dual-time-stepping artificial compressibility approach for a Reynolds number of 1.1 million on a mesh with 1.8 million nodes. The geometrical complexities of the draft tube are handled using domain decomposition with overset (chimera) grids. Numerical simulations show that unsteady statistical turbulence models can capture very complex 3D flow phenomena dominated by geometry-induced, large-scale instabilities and unsteady coherent structures such as the onset of vortex breakdown and the formation of the unsteady rope vortex downstream of the turbine runner. Both URANS and DES appear to yield the general shape and magnitude of mean velocity profiles in reasonable agreement with measurements. Significant discrepancies among the DES and URANS predictions of the turbulence statistics are also observed in the straight downstream diffuser.

  17. A localised subgrid scale model for fluid dynamical simulations in astrophysics I: Theory and numerical tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Schmidt; J. C. Niemeyer; W. Hillebrandt

    2006-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a one-equation subgrid scale model that evolves the turbulence energy corresponding to unresolved velocity fluctuations in large eddy simulations. The model is derived in the context of the Germano consistent decomposition of the hydrodynamical equations. The eddy-viscosity closure for the rate of energy transfer from resolved toward subgrid scales is localised by means of a dynamical procedure for the computation of the closure parameter. Therefore, the subgrid scale model applies to arbitrary flow geometry and evolution. For the treatment of microscopic viscous dissipation a semi-statistical approach is used, and the gradient-diffusion hypothesis is adopted for turbulent transport. A priori tests of the localised eddy-viscosity closure and the gradient-diffusion closure are made by analysing data from direct numerical simulations. As an a posteriori testing case, the large eddy simulation of thermonuclear combustion in forced isotropic turbulence is discussed. We intend the formulation of the subgrid scale model in this paper as a basis for more advanced applications in numerical simulations of complex astrophysical phenomena involving turbulence.

  18. A localised subgrid scale model for fluid dynamical simulations in astrophysics I: Theory and numerical tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, W; Niemeyer, J C

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a one-equation subgrid scale model that evolves the turbulence energy corresponding to unresolved velocity fluctuations in large eddy simulations. The model is derived in the context of the Germano consistent decomposition of the hydrodynamical equations. The eddy-viscosity closure for the rate of energy transfer from resolved toward subgrid scales is localised by means of a dynamical procedure for the computation of the closure parameter. Therefore, the subgrid scale model applies to arbitrary flow geometry and evolution. For the treatment of microscopic viscous dissipation a semi-statistical approach is used, and the gradient-diffusion hypothesis is adopted for turbulent transport. A priori tests of the localised eddy-viscosity closure and the gradient-diffusion closure are made by analysing data from direct numerical simulations. As an a posteriori testing case, the large eddy simulation of thermonuclear combustion in forced isotropic turbulence is discussed. We intend the formulation of the sub...

  19. Some effects of data base variations on numerical simulations of uranium migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carnahan, C.L.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations of migration of chemicals in the geosphere depend on knowledge of identities of chemical species and on values of chemical equilibrium constants supplied to the simulators. In this work, some effects of variability in assumed speciation and in equilibrium constants were examined, using migration of uranium as an example. Various simulations were done of uranium migration in systems with varying oxidation potential, pH, and mator component content. A simulation including formation of aqueous species UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/, UO/sub 2/CO/sub 3//sup 0/, UO/sub 2/(CO/sub 3/)/sub 2//sup 2 -/, UO/sub 2/(CO/sub 3/)/sub 3//sup 4 -/, (UO/sub 2/)/sub 2/CO/sub 3/(OH)/sub 3//sup -/, UO/sub 2//sup +/, U(OH)/sub 4//sup 0/, and U(OH)/sub 5//sup -/ is compared to simulation excluding formation of UO/sub 2//sup +/ and U(OH)/sub 5//sup -/. These simulations relied on older data bases, and they are compared to a further simulation using recently published data on formation of U(OH)/sub 4//sup 0/, (UO/sub 2/)/sub 2/CO/sub 3/(OH)/sub 3//sup -/, UO/sub 2/(CO/sub 3/)/sub 5//sup 5 -/, and U(CO/sub 3/)/sub 5//sup 6 -/. Significant differences in dissolved uranium concentrations are noted among the simulations. Differences are noted also in precipitation of two solids, USiO/sub 4/(c) (coffinite) and CaUO/sub 4/(c) (calcium uranate), although the solubility products of the solids were not varied in the simulations. 18 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVE ENERGY FROM NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF AN OBSERVED SUNSPOT UMBRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felipe, T.; Khomenko, E.; Collados, M., E-mail: tobias@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38205, C/Via Lactea, s/n, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We aim at reproducing the height dependence of sunspot wave signatures obtained from spectropolarimetric observations through three-dimensional MHD numerical simulations. A magnetostatic sunspot model based on the properties of the observed sunspot is constructed and perturbed at the photosphere, introducing the fluctuations measured with the Si I {lambda}10827 line. The results of the simulations are compared with the oscillations observed simultaneously at different heights from the He I {lambda}10830 line, the Ca II H core, and the Fe I blends in the wings of the Ca II H line. The simulations show a remarkable agreement with the observations. They reproduce the velocity maps and power spectra at the formation heights of the observed lines, as well as the phase and amplification spectra between several pairs of lines. We find that the stronger shocks at the chromosphere are accompanied with a delay between the observed signal and the simulated one at the corresponding height, indicating that shocks shift the formation height of the chromospheric lines to higher layers. Since the simulated wave propagation matches very well the properties of the observed one, we are able to use the numerical calculations to quantify the energy contribution of the magnetoacoustic waves to the chromospheric heating in sunspots. Our findings indicate that the energy supplied by these waves is too low to balance the chromospheric radiative losses. The energy contained at the formation height of the lowermost Si I {lambda}10827 line in the form of slow magnetoacoustic waves is already insufficient to heat the higher layers, and the acoustic energy which reaches the chromosphere is around 3-9 times lower than the required amount of energy. The contribution of the magnetic energy is even lower.

  1. Gaussian variational ansatz in the problem of anomalous sea waves: Comparison with direct numerical simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruban, V P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonlinear dynamics of an obliquely oriented wave packet at sea surface is studied both analytically and numerically for various initial parameters of the packet, in connection with the problem of oceanic rogue waves. In the framework of Gaussian variational ansatz applied to the corresponding (1+2D) hyperbolic nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation, a simplified Lagrangian system of differential equations is derived, which determines the evolution of coefficients of the real and imaginary quadratic forms appearing in the Gaussian. This model provides a semi-quantitative description for the process of nonlinear spatio-temporal focusing, which is one of the most probable mechanisms of rogue wave formation in random wave fields. The system is integrated in quadratures, which fact allows us to understand qualitative differences between the linear and nonlinear regimes of the focusing of wave packet. Comparison of the Gaussian model predictions with results of direct numerical simulation of fully nonlinear long-cres...

  2. Multidimensional Numerical Simulation of a Pulse Combustor \\Lambda Daniel L. Marcus, Richard B. Pember, John B. Bell, Vincent E. Beckner,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, John B.

    Multidimensional Numerical Simulation of a Pulse Combustor \\Lambda Daniel L. Marcus, Richard B combustors. Our approach is based on the use of higher­order Godunov methods combined with adaptive

  3. Numerical simulation of the thermal conditions in a sea bay water area used for water supply to nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokolov, A. S. [JSC 'B. E. Vedeneev All-Russia Research Institute of Hydraulic Engineering (VNIIG)' (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'B. E. Vedeneev All-Russia Research Institute of Hydraulic Engineering (VNIIG)' (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Consideration is given to the numerical simulation of the thermal conditions in sea water areas used for both water supply to and dissipation of low-grade heat from a nuclear power plant on the shore of a sea bay.

  4. Numerical simulation of two-phase flow in discrete fractures using Rayleigh-Ritz finite element method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaul, Sandeep P.

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Spontaneous imbibition plays a very important role in the displacement mechanism of non-wetting fluid in naturally fractured reservoirs. We developed a new 2D two-phase finite element numerical model, as available commercial simulators cannot...

  5. Physical Modeling of the Motions of a Container Ship Moored to a Dock with Comparison to Numerical Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi, Yuanzhe

    2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    model experimental results of solid dock are also compared with the numerical simulation. These comparisons indicate that the motion characteristics of the model container ship represent similar trends for both rotations and translations...

  6. THE REBOUND CONDITION OF DUST AGGREGATES REVEALED BY NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF THEIR COLLISIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wada, Koji [Planetary Exploration Research Center, Chiba Institute of Technology, 2-17-1 Tsudanuma, Narashino, Chiba 275-0016 (Japan); Tanaka, Hidekazu; Yamamoto, Tetsuo [Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan); Suyama, Toru [Nagano City Museum, Hachimanpara Historic Park, Oshimada, Nagano 381-2212 (Japan); Kimura, Hiroshi, E-mail: wada@perc.it-chiba.ac.jp [Center for Planetary Science (CPS), Chuo-ku Minatojima Minamimachi 7-1-48, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan)

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Collisional growth of dust aggregates is a plausible root of planetesimals forming in protoplanetary disks. However, a rebound of colliding dust aggregates prevents dust from growing into planetesimals. In fact, rebounding aggregates are observed in laboratory experiments but not in previous numerical simulations. Therefore, the condition of rebound between dust aggregates should be clarified to better understand the processes of dust growth and planetesimal formation. We have carried out numerical simulations of aggregate collisions for various types of aggregates and succeeded in reproducing a rebound of colliding aggregates under specific conditions. Our finding is that in the rebound process, the key factor of the aggregate structure is the coordination number, namely, the number of particles in contact with a particle. A rebound is governed by the energy dissipation along with restructuring of the aggregates and a large coordination number inhibits the restructuring at collisions. Results of our numerical simulation for various aggregates indicate that they stick to each other when the mean coordination number is less than 6, regardless of their materials and structures, as long as their collision velocity is less than the critical velocity for fragmentation. This criterion of the coordination number would correspond to a filling factor of {approx}0.3, which is somewhat larger than that reported in laboratory experiments. In protoplanetary disks, dust aggregates are expected to have low bulk densities (<0.1 g cm{sup -3}) during their growth, which would prevent dust aggregates from rebounding. This result supports the formation of planetesimals with direct dust growth in protoplanetary disks.

  7. Statistically Steady Turbulence in Soap Films: Direct Numerical Simulations with Ekman Friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad Perlekar; Rahul Pandit

    2008-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed direct numerical simulation (DNS) designed to investigate the combined effects of walls and Ekman friction on turbulence in forced soap films. We concentrate on the forward-cascade regime and show how to extract the isotropic parts of velocity and vorticity structure functions and thence the ratios of multiscaling exponents. We find that velocity structure functions display simple scaling whereas their vorticity counterparts show multiscaling; and the probability distribution function of the Weiss parameter $\\Lambda$, which distinguishes between regions with centers and saddles, is in quantitative agreement with experiments.

  8. Simulation of fluid displacement in porous media - improved methods to minimize numerical dispersion and grid orientation effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laprea-Bigott, Marcelo

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SIMULATION OF FLUID DISPLACEMENT IN POROUS MEDIA ? IMPROVED METHODS TO MINIMIZE NUMERICAL DISPERSION AND GRID ORIENTATION EFFECTS A Thesis by MARCELO LAPREA-BIGOTT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1976 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering SIMULATION OF FLUID DISPLACEMENT IN POROUS MEDIA - IMPROVED METHODS TO MINIMIZE NUMERICAL DISPERSION AND GRID ORIENTATION EFFECTS A...

  9. Using Numerical Simulations to Gain Insight into the Structure of Superbubbles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip T. Komljenovic; Shantanu Basu; Doug Johnstone

    1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent high resolution observations of Galactic superbubbles have motivated us to re-examine several classes of superbubble models. We compare three classes of hydrodynamic models (the Kompaneets approximation, the thin shell model, and numerical simulations) in order to understand the structure of superbubbles and to gain insight into observations. In particular, we apply models to the W4 superbubble, which has been observed in the Pilot project of the arcminute resolution Canadian Galactic Plane Survey (Normandeau et al. 1996). Magnetohydrodynamic simulations are also performed and point the way to a fuller understanding of the W4 superbubble. We suggest that the highly collimated bubble and apparent lack of a Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the superbubble shell can be explained by the presence of a magnetic field.

  10. Numerical simulation of the flow field and the lifting forces in the bristle tip region of a brush seal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phung, Anh Ngoc

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complicated fluid flow at the tip of a typical bristle within a brush seal is simulated. A numerical model is developed to compute the three-dimensional details in the bristle tip region. Experimental and numerical leakage data are correlated...

  11. Magneto-acoustic wave energy from numerical simulations of an observed sunspot umbra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felipe, T; Collados, M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We aim at reproducing the height dependence of sunspot wave signatures obtained from spectropolarimetric observations through 3D MHD numerical simulations. A magneto-static sunspot model based on the properties of the observed sunspot is constructed and perturbed at the photosphere introducing the fluctuations measured with the \\SiI\\ $\\lambda$ 10827 \\AA\\ line. The results of the simulations are compared with the oscillations observed simultaneously at different heights from the \\HeI\\ $\\lambda$ 10830 \\AA\\ line, the \\CaIIH\\ core and the \\FeI\\ blends in the wings of the \\CaIIH\\ line. The simulations show a remarkable agreement with the observations. They reproduce the velocity maps and power spectra at the formation heights of the observed lines, as well as the phase and amplification spectra between several pair of lines. We find that the stronger shocks at the chromosphere are accompanied with a delay between the observed signal and the simulated one at the corresponding height, indicating that shocks shift th...

  12. The Origin and Kinematics of Cold Gas in Galactic Winds: Insight from Numerical Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujita, Akimi; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; New, Kimberly C B; Weaver, Robert

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the origin of Na I absorbing gas in ultraluminous infrared galaxies motivated by the recent observations by Martin of extremely superthermal linewidths in this cool gas. We model the effects of repeated supernova explosions driving supershells in the central regions of molecular disks with M_d=10^{10} M_{\\odot}, using cylindrically symmetric gas dynamical simulations run with ZEUS-3D. The shocked swept-up shells quickly cool and fragment by Rayleigh-Taylor instability as they accelerate out of the dense, stratified disks. The numerical resolution of the cooling and compression at the shock fronts determines the peak shell density, and so the speed of Rayleigh-Taylor fragmentation. We identify cooled shells and shell fragments as Na I absorbing gas and study its kinematics along various sightlines across the grid. We find that simulations with a numerical resolution of \\le 0.2 pc produce multiple Rayleigh-Taylor fragmented shells in a given line of sight that appear to explain the observed kinematics....

  13. Numerical simulation of turbulent heat transfer in an annular fuel channel augmented by spacer ribs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takase, Kazuyuki; Akino, Norio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of High Temperature Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal-hydraulic characteristics of fuel channels with three dimensional trapezoidal spacer ribs for high temperature gas-cooled reactors were investigated under the same coolant conditions as the reactor operation, maximum fuel channel outlet temperature of 1,000 C and pressure of 4 MPa, and analytically by numerical simulations using the {kappa}-{var_epsilon} turbulence model. The turbulent heat transfer coefficients in the spacer ribbed fuel channel were 20 to 100% higher than those in a concentric smooth annulus for a region of Reynolds number exceeding 2,000. Furthermore, the predicted Nusselt number in the spacer ribbed fuel channel was in good agreement with the empirical correlation obtained from the present experimental data within an error of 10% with Reynolds number of more than 5000. On the other hand, the friction factors in the spacer ribbed fuel channel were higher than those in the smooth duct in the turbulent region, and also they could be predicted with sufficient accuracy. In addition, the present numerical simulation could clarify quantitatively the effects of the heat transfer augmentation due to the spacer ribs and the axial velocity increase due to a reduction in the annular channel cross-section.

  14. A phase screen model for simulating numerically the propagation of a laser beam in rain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lukin, I P; Rychkov, D S; Falits, A V [Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Lai, Kin S; Liu, Min R [DSO National Laboratories 20 (Singapore)

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The method based on the generalisation of the phase screen method for a continuous random medium is proposed for simulating numerically the propagation of laser radiation in a turbulent atmosphere with precipitation. In the phase screen model for a discrete component of a heterogeneous 'air-rain droplet' medium, the amplitude screen describing the scattering of an optical field by discrete particles of the medium is replaced by an equivalent phase screen with a spectrum of the correlation function of the effective dielectric constant fluctuations that is similar to the spectrum of a discrete scattering component - water droplets in air. The 'turbulent' phase screen is constructed on the basis of the Kolmogorov model, while the 'rain' screen model utiises the exponential distribution of the number of rain drops with respect to their radii as a function of the rain intensity. Theresults of the numerical simulation are compared with the known theoretical estimates for a large-scale discrete scattering medium. (propagation of laser radiation in matter)

  15. Time and length scales within a fire and implications for numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TIESZEN,SHELDON R.

    2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A partial non-dimensionalization of the Navier-Stokes equations is used to obtain order of magnitude estimates of the rate-controlling transport processes in the reacting portion of a fire plume as a function of length scale. Over continuum length scales, buoyant times scales vary as the square root of the length scale; advection time scales vary as the length scale, and diffusion time scales vary as the square of the length scale. Due to the variation with length scale, each process is dominant over a given range. The relationship of buoyancy and baroclinc vorticity generation is highlighted. For numerical simulation, first principles solution for fire problems is not possible with foreseeable computational hardware in the near future. Filtered transport equations with subgrid modeling will be required as two to three decades of length scale are captured by solution of discretized conservation equations. By whatever filtering process one employs, one must have humble expectations for the accuracy obtainable by numerical simulation for practical fire problems that contain important multi-physics/multi-length-scale coupling with up to 10 orders of magnitude in length scale.

  16. Forecasting Gas Production in Organic Shale with the Combined Numerical Simulation of Gas Diffusion in Kerogen, Langmuir Desorption from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    SPE 159250 Forecasting Gas Production in Organic Shale with the Combined Numerical Simulation algorithm to forecast gas production in organic shale that simultaneously takes into account gas diffusion-than-expected permeability in shale-gas formations, while Langmuir desorption maintains pore pressure. Simulations confirm

  17. A numerical model of aerosol scavenging. Part 2, Simulation of a large city fire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, M.M.; Molenkamp, C.R.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a three-dimensional numerical cloud/smoke-plume model, we have simulated the burning of a large, mid-latitude city following a nuclear exchange. The model includes 18 dynamic and microphysical equations that predict the fire-driven airflow, cloud processes, and smoke-cloud interactions. In the simulation, the intense heating from the burning city produces a firestorm with updraft velocities exceeding 60 m/s. Within 15 minutes of ignition, the smoke plume penetrates the tropopause. The updraft triggers a cumulonimbus cloud that produces significant quantities of ice, snow, and hail. These solid hydrometeors, as well as cloud droplets and rain, interact with the smoke particles from the fire. At the end of the one-hour simulation, over 20% of the smoke is in slowly falling snowflakes. If the snow reaches the ground before the flakes completely sublimate (or melt and then evaporate), then only approximately 50% of the smoke will survive the scavenging processes and remain in the atmosphere to affect the global climate.

  18. Numerical simulations in support of the in situ bioremediation demonstration at Savannah River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travis, B.J.; Rosenberg, N.D.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the performance of the in situ bioremediation technology demonstrated at the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration (SRID) site in 1992--1993. The goal of the technology demonstration was to stimulate naturally occurring methanotrophic bacteria at the SRID site with injection of methane, air and air-phase nutrients (nitrogen and phosphate) such that significant amounts of the chlorinated solvent present in the subsurface would be degraded. Our approach is based on site-specific numerical simulations using the TRAMP computer code. In this report, we discuss the interactions among the physical and biochemical processes involved in in situ bioremediation. We also investigate improvements to technology performance, make predictions regarding the performance of this technology over long periods of time and at different sites, and compare in situ bioremediation with other remediation technologies.

  19. TOUGH2: A general-purpose numerical simulator for multiphase fluid and heat flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, K.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TOUGH2 is a numerical simulation program for nonisothermal flows of multicomponent, multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. The chief applications for which TOUGH2 is designed are in geothermal reservoir engineering, nuclear waste disposal, and unsaturated zone hydrology. A successor to the TOUGH program, TOUGH2 offers added capabilities and user features, including the flexibility to handle different fluid mixtures, facilities for processing of geometric data (computational grids), and an internal version control system to ensure referenceability of code applications. This report includes a detailed description of governing equations, program architecture, and user features. Enhancements in data inputs relative to TOUGH are described, and a number of sample problems are given to illustrate code applications. 46 refs., 29 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. The Origin and Kinematics of Cold Gas in Galactic Winds: Insight from Numerical Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akimi Fujita; Crystal L. Martin; Mordecai-Mark Mac Low; Kimberly C. B. New; Robert Weaver

    2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the origin of Na I absorbing gas in ultraluminous infrared galaxies motivated by the recent observations by Martin of extremely superthermal linewidths in this cool gas. We model the effects of repeated supernova explosions driving supershells in the central regions of molecular disks with M_d=10^10 M_\\sun, using cylindrically symmetric gas dynamical simulations run with ZEUS-3D. The shocked swept-up shells quickly cool and fragment by Rayleigh-Taylor instability as they accelerate out of the dense, stratified disks. The numerical resolution of the cooling and compression at the shock fronts determines the peak shell density, and so the speed of Rayleigh-Taylor fragmentation. We identify cooled shells and shell fragments as Na I absorbing gas and study its kinematics. We find that simulations with a numerical resolution of \\le 0.2 pc produce multiple Rayleigh-Taylor fragmented shells in a given line of sight. We suggest that the observed wide Na I absorption lines, = 320 \\pm 120 km s^-1 are produced by these multiple fragmented shells traveling at different velocities. We also suggest that some shell fragments can be accelerated above the observed average terminal velocity of 750 km s^-1 by the same energy-driven wind with an instantaneous starburst of \\sim 10^9 M_\\sun. The bulk of mass is traveling with the observed average shell velocity 330 \\pm 100 km s^-1. Our results show that an energy-driven bubble causing Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities can explain the kinematics of cool gas seen in the Na I observations without invoking additional physics relying primarily on momentum conservation, such as entrainment of gas by Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, ram pressure driving of cold clouds by a hot wind, or radiation pressure acting on dust. (abridged)

  1. Numerical simulation of shock initiation of Ni/Al multilayered composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sraj, Ihab; Knio, Omar M., E-mail: omar.knio@duke.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University, 144 Hudson Hall, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Specht, Paul E.; Thadhani, Naresh N. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 771 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Weihs, Timothy P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The initiation of chemical reaction in cold-rolled Ni/Al multilayered composites by shock compression is investigated numerically. A simplified approach is adopted that exploits the disparity between the reaction and shock loading timescales. The impact of shock compression is modeled using CTH simulations that yield pressure, strain, and temperature distributions within the composites due to the shock propagation. The resulting temperature distribution is then used as initial condition to simulate the evolution of the subsequent shock-induced mixing and chemical reaction. To this end, a reduced reaction model is used that expresses the local atomic mixing and heat release rates in terms of an evolution equation for a dimensionless time scale reflecting the age of the mixed layer. The computations are used to assess the effect of bilayer thickness on the reaction, as well as the impact of shock velocity and orientation with respect to the layering. Computed results indicate that initiation and evolution of the reaction are substantially affected by both the shock velocity and the bilayer thickness. In particular, at low impact velocity, Ni/Al multilayered composites with thick bilayers react completely in 100?ms while at high impact velocity and thin bilayers, reaction time was less than 100??s. Quantitative trends for the dependence of the reaction time on the shock velocity are also determined, for different bilayer thickness and shock orientation.

  2. GPU accelerated flow solver for direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salvadore, Francesco [CASPUR – via dei Tizii 6/b, 00185 Rome (Italy)] [CASPUR – via dei Tizii 6/b, 00185 Rome (Italy); Bernardini, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.bernardini@uniroma1.it [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Rome ‘La Sapienza’ – via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy)] [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Rome ‘La Sapienza’ – via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Botti, Michela [CASPUR – via dei Tizii 6/b, 00185 Rome (Italy)] [CASPUR – via dei Tizii 6/b, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical processing units (GPUs), characterized by significant computing performance, are nowadays very appealing for the solution of computationally demanding tasks in a wide variety of scientific applications. However, to run on GPUs, existing codes need to be ported and optimized, a procedure which is not yet standardized and may require non trivial efforts, even to high-performance computing specialists. In the present paper we accurately describe the porting to CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) of a finite-difference compressible Navier–Stokes solver, suitable for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent flows. Porting and validation processes are illustrated in detail, with emphasis on computational strategies and techniques that can be applied to overcome typical bottlenecks arising from the porting of common computational fluid dynamics solvers. We demonstrate that a careful optimization work is crucial to get the highest performance from GPU accelerators. The results show that the overall speedup of one NVIDIA Tesla S2070 GPU is approximately 22 compared with one AMD Opteron 2352 Barcelona chip and 11 compared with one Intel Xeon X5650 Westmere core. The potential of GPU devices in the simulation of unsteady three-dimensional turbulent flows is proved by performing a DNS of a spatially evolving compressible mixing layer.

  3. Numerical simulations of quiet Sun magnetism: On the contribution from a small-scale dynamo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rempel, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a series of radiative MHD simulations addressing the origin and distribution of mixed polarity magnetic field in the solar photosphere. To this end we consider numerical simulations that cover the uppermost 2-6 Mm of the solar convection zone and we explore scales ranging from 2 km to 25 Mm. We study how the strength and distribution of magnetic field in the photosphere and subsurface layers depend on resolution, domain size and boundary conditions. We find that 50% of the magnetic energy at the \\tau=1 level comes from field with the less than 500 G strength and that 50% of the energy resides on scales smaller than about 100 km. While probability distribution functions are essentially independent of resolution, properly describing the spectral energy distribution requires grid spacings of 8 km or smaller. The formation of flux concentrations in the photosphere exceeding 1 kG requires a mean vertical field strength greater than 30-40 G at \\tau=1. The filling factor of kG flux concentrations increase...

  4. A Review of Direct Numerical Simulations of Astrophysical Detonations and Their Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parete-Koon, Suzanne T [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Smith, Chris R [ORNL; Papatheodore, Thomas L [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of astrophysical detonations in degenerate matter have revealed that the nuclear burning is typically characterized by cellular structure caused by transverse instabilities in the detonation front. Type Ia supernova modelers often use one- dimensional DNS of detonations as inputs or constraints for their whole star simulations. While these one-dimensional studies are useful tools, the true nature of the detonation is multi-dimensional. The multi-dimensional structure of the burning influences the speed, stability, and the composition of the detonation and its burning products, and therefore, could have an impact on the spectra of Type Ia supernovae. Considerable effort has been expended modeling Type Ia supernovae at densities above 1 107 g cm 3 where the complexities of turbulent burning dominate the flame propagation. However, most full star models turn the nuclear burning schemes off when the density falls below 1 107 g cm 3 and distributed burning begins. The deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) is believed to occur at just these densities and consequently they are the densities important for studying the properties of the subsequent detonation. This work will review the status of DNS studies of detonations and their possible implications for Type Ia supernova models. It will cover the development of Detonation theory from the first simple Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) detonation models to the current models based on the time-dependent, compressible, reactive flow Euler equations of fluid dynamics.

  5. Numerical simulations of acoustically generated gravitational waves at a first order phase transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Rummukainen, Kari; Weir, David J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present details of numerical simulations of the gravitational radiation produced by a first order {thermal} phase transition in the early universe. We confirm that the dominant source of gravitational waves is sound waves generated by the expanding bubbles of the low-temperature phase. We demonstrate that the sound waves have a power spectrum with power-law form between the scales set by the average bubble separation (which sets the length scale of the fluid flow $L_\\text{f}$) and the bubble wall width. The sound waves generate gravitational waves whose power spectrum also has a power-law form, at a rate proportional to $L_\\text{f}$ and the square of the fluid kinetic energy density. We identify a dimensionless parameter $\\tilde\\Omega_\\text{GW}$ characterising the efficiency of this "acoustic" gravitational wave production whose value is $8\\pi\\tilde\\Omega_\\text{GW} \\simeq 0.8 \\pm 0.1$ across all our simulations. We compare the acoustic gravitational waves with the standard prediction from the envelope appr...

  6. Numerical simulations of acoustically generated gravitational waves at a first order phase transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark Hindmarsh; Stephan J. Huber; Kari Rummukainen; David J. Weir

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present details of numerical simulations of the gravitational radiation produced by a first order {thermal} phase transition in the early universe. We confirm that the dominant source of gravitational waves is sound waves generated by the expanding bubbles of the low-temperature phase. We demonstrate that the sound waves have a power spectrum with power-law form between the scales set by the average bubble separation (which sets the length scale of the fluid flow $L_\\text{f}$) and the bubble wall width. The sound waves generate gravitational waves whose power spectrum also has a power-law form, at a rate proportional to $L_\\text{f}$ and the square of the fluid kinetic energy density. We identify a dimensionless parameter $\\tilde\\Omega_\\text{GW}$ characterising the efficiency of this "acoustic" gravitational wave production whose value is $8\\pi\\tilde\\Omega_\\text{GW} \\simeq 0.8 \\pm 0.1$ across all our simulations. We compare the acoustic gravitational waves with the standard prediction from the envelope approximation. Not only is the power spectrum steeper (apart from an initial transient) but the gravitational wave energy density is generically two orders of magnitude or more larger.

  7. Numerical relativity simulations of thick accretion disks around tilted Kerr black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vassilios Mewes; José A. Font; Filippo Galeazzi; Pedro J. Montero; Nikolaos Stergioulas

    2015-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we present 3D numerical relativity simulations of thick accretion disks around {\\it tilted} Kerr black holes. We investigate the evolution of three different initial disk models with a range of initial black hole spin magnitudes and tilt angles. For all the disk-to-black hole mass ratios considered ($0.044-0.16$) we observe significant black hole precession and nutation during the evolution. This indicates that for such mass ratios, neglecting the self-gravity of the disks by evolving them in a fixed background black hole spacetime is not justified. We find that the two more massive models are unstable against the Papaloizou-Pringle (PP) instability and that those PP-unstable models remain unstable for all initial spins and tilt angles considered, showing that the development of the instability is a very robust feature of such PP-unstable disks. The tilt between the black hole spin and the disk is strongly modulated during the growth of the PP instability, causing a partial global realignment of black hole spin and disk angular momentum in the most massive model with constant specific angular momentum $l$. For the model with non-constant $l$-profile we observe a long-lived $m=1$ non-axisymmetric structure which shows strong oscillations of the tilt angle in the inner regions of the disk. We attribute this effect to the development of Kozai-Lidov oscillations. Our simulations also confirm earlier findings that the development of the PP instability causes the long-term emission of large amplitude gravitational waves, predominantly for the $l=m=2$ multipole mode. The imprint of the BH precession on the gravitational waves from tilted BH-torus systems remains an interesting open issue that would require significantly longer simulations than those presented in this work.

  8. TOUGH2: A general-purpose numerical simulator for multiphase nonisothermal flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulators for multiphase fluid and heat flows in permeable media have been under development at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for more than 10 yr. Real geofluids contain noncondensible gases and dissolved solids in addition to water, and the desire to model such `compositional` systems led to the development of a flexible multicomponent, multiphase simulation architecture known as MULKOM. The design of MULKOM was based on the recognition that the mass-and energy-balance equations for multiphase fluid and heat flows in multicomponent systems have the same mathematical form, regardless of the number and nature of fluid components and phases present. Application of MULKOM to different fluid mixtures, such as water and air, or water, oil, and gas, is possible by means of appropriate `equation-of-state` (EOS) modules, which provide all thermophysical and transport parameters of the fluid mixture and the permeable medium as a function of a suitable set of primary thermodynamic variables. Investigations of thermal and hydrologic effects from emplacement of heat-generating nuclear wastes into partially water-saturated formations prompted the development and release of a specialized version of MULKOM for nonisothermal flow of water and air, named TOUGH. TOUGH is an acronym for `transport of unsaturated groundwater and heat` and is also an allusion to the tuff formations at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The TOUGH2 code is intended to supersede TOUGH. It offers all the capabilities of TOUGH and includes a considerably more general subset of MULKOM modules with added capabilities. The paper briefly describes the simulation methodology and user features.

  9. Numerical and simulation study of terahertz radiation generation by laser pulses propagating in the extraordinary mode in magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jha, Pallavi; Kumar Verma, Nirmal [Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow-226007 (India)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-dimensional numerical model for studying terahertz radiation generation by intense laser pulses propagating, in the extraordinary mode, through magnetized plasma has been presented. The direction of the static external magnetic field is perpendicular to the polarization as well as propagation direction of the laser pulse. A transverse electromagnetic wave with frequency in the terahertz range is generated due to the presence of the magnetic field. Further, two-dimensional simulations using XOOPIC code show that the THz fields generated in plasma are transmitted into vacuum. The fields obtained via simulation study are found to be compatible with those obtained from the numerical model.

  10. Grid-Based Surrogate Reservoir Modeling (SRM) for Fast Track Analysis of Numerical Reservoir Simulation Models at the Grid block Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    with a large number of producers, second, to a CO2 sequestration project in Australia, and finally to a numerical simulation study of potential carbon storage site in the United States. The numerical reservoir

  11. Numerical simulation of VAWT stochastic aerodynamic loads produced by atmospheric turbauence: VAWT-SAL code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homicz, G.F.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Blade fatigue life is an important element in determining the economic viability of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). A principal source of blade fatigue is thought to be the stochastic (i.e., random) aerodynamic loads created by atmospheric turbulence. This report describes the theoretical background of the VAWT Stochastic Aerodynamic Loads (VAWT-SAL) computer code, whose purpose is to numerically simulate these random loads, given the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and assumed turbulence properties. A Double-Multiple-Stream Tube (DMST) analysis is employed to model the rotor's aerodynamic response. The analysis includes the effects of Reynolds number variations, different airfoil sections and chord lengths along the blade span, and an empirical model for dynamic stall effects. The mean ambient wind is assumed to have a shear profile which is described by either a power law or a logarithmic variation with height above ground. Superimposed on this is a full 3-D field of turbulence: i.e., in addition to random fluctuations in time, the turbulence is allowed to vary randomly in planes perpendicular to the mean wind. The influence of flow retardation on the convection of turbulence through the turbine is also modeled. Calculations are presented for the VAWT 34-m Test Bed currently in operation at Bushland, Texas. Predicted time histories of the loads, as well as their Fourier spectra, are presented and discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the differences between so-called steady-state'' (mean wind only) predictions, and those produced with turbulence present. Somewhat surprisingly, turbulence is found to be capable of either increasing or decreasing the average output power, depending on the turbine's tip-speed ratio. A heuristic explanation for such behavior is postulated, and a simple formula is derived for predicting the magnitude of this effect without the need for a full stochastic simulation. 41 refs., 32 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Numerical relativity simulations of neutron star merger remnants using conservative mesh refinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tim Dietrich; Sebastiano Bernuzzi; Maximiliano Ujevic; Bernd Bruegmann

    2015-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study equal and unequal-mass neutron star mergers by means of new numerical relativity simulations in which the general relativistic hydrodynamics solver employs an algorithm that guarantees mass conservation across the refinement levels of the computational mesh. We consider eight binary configurations with total mass $M=2.7\\,M_\\odot$, mass-ratios $q=1$ and $q=1.16$, and four different equation of states (EOSs), and one configuration with a stiff EOS, $M=2.5M_\\odot$ and $q=1.5$. We focus on the post-merger dynamics and study the merger remnant, dynamical ejecta and the postmerger gravitational wave spectrum. Although most of the merger remnants form a hypermassive neutron star collapsing to a black hole+disk system on dynamical timescales, stiff EOSs can eventually produce a stable massive neutron star. Ejecta are mostly emitted around the orbital plane; favored by large mass ratios and softer EOS. The postmerger wave spectrum is mainly characterized by non-axisymmetric oscillations of the remnant. The stiff EOS configuration consisting of a $1.5M_\\odot$ and a $1.0M_\\odot$ neutron star shows a rather peculiar dynamics. During merger the companion star is very deformed; about~$\\sim0.03M_\\odot$ of rest-mass becomes unbound from the tidal tail due torque; and the merger remnant forms stable neutron star surrounded by a massive accretion disk $\\sim0.3M_\\odot$. Similar configurations might be particularly interesting for electromagnetic counterparts. Comparing results obtained with and without the conservative mesh refinement algorithm, we find that post-merger simulations can be affected by systematic errors if mass conservation is not enforced in the mesh refinement strategy. However, mass conservation also depends on grid details and on the artificial atmosphere setup. [abridged

  13. THE EFFECTS OF NUMERICAL METHODS ON THE STATISTICAL COMPARISON BETWEEN EXPERIMENTS AND SIMULATIONS OF SHOCKED GAS CYLINDERS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rider, William; Kamm, J. R. (James R.); Tomkins, C. D. (Chris D.); Prestridge, K. P. (Katherine P.); Rightley, P. M. (Paul M.); Benjamin, R. F. (Robert F.); Zoldi, C. A. (Cindy A.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Validation of numerical simulations, Le., the quantitative comparison of calculated results with experimental data, is an essential practice in computational fluid dynamics. These comparisons are particularly difficult in the field of shock-accelerated fluid mixing, which can be dominated by irregular structures induced by flow instabilities. Such flows exhibit non-deterministic behavior, which eliminates my direct way to establish correspondence between experimental data and numerical simulation. We examine the detailed structures of mixing experiments and their simulation for Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) experiments of Prestridge et al., Tomkins et al., and Jacobs. Numerical simulations of these experiments will be performed with several different high-resolution shock capturing schemes, including a variety of finite volume Godunov methods. We compare the experimental data for cOnfigurations of one and two diffuse cylinders of SF6 in air with numerical results using several multiscale metrics: fractal analysis, continuous wavelet transforms, and generalized correlations; these measures complement traditional metrics such as PDFs, mix fractions, and integral mixing widths.

  14. Introduction Flattening the Earth Continuation procedure Flat Earth Numerical simulations Continuation from a flat to a round Earth model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Introduction Flattening the Earth Continuation procedure Flat Earth Numerical simulations Continuation from a flat to a round Earth model in the coplanar orbit transfer problem M. Cerf1, T. Haberkorn, SADCO 2011, March 2nd M. Cerf, T. Haberkorn, E. Tr´elat Continuation from a flat to a round Earth model

  15. Numerical simulation of borehole acoustic logging in the frequency and time domains with hp-adaptive finite elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    and for the improvement of acoustic logging techniques used by oil- and oil-service companies to detect and quantifyNumerical simulation of borehole acoustic logging in the frequency and time domains with hp Available online 8 January 2009 Keywords: Acoustic logging Borehole acoustics Wave propagation Linear

  16. 392 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES. VOL. 38. NO. 2. FEBRUARY 1991 Numerical Simulation of a Steady-State Electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Carl

    392 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES. VOL. 38. NO. 2. FEBRUARY 1991 Numerical Simulation of a Steady-State Electron Shock Wave in a Submicrometer Semiconductor Device Carl L. Gardner Abstract-state electron shock wave in a semicon- ductor device are presented, using the hydrodynamic model

  17. Numerical simulation of bubble and droplet deformation by a level set approach with surface tension in three dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sminchisescu, Cristian

    Numerical simulation of bubble and droplet deformation by a level set approach with surface tension-dimensional Navier­Stokes solver for incompressible two-phase flow problems with surface tension and apply is the impact of surface tension and its discretization on the overall convergence behavior and conservation

  18. Evaluation and Numerical Simulation of Tsunami for Coastal Nuclear Power Plants of India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Pavan K.; Singh, R.K.; Ghosh, A.K.; Kushwaha, H.S. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre-Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent tsunami generated on December 26, 2004 due to Sumatra earthquake of magnitude 9.3 resulted in inundation at the various coastal sites of India. The site selection and design of Indian nuclear power plants demand the evaluation of run up and the structural barriers for the coastal plants: Besides it is also desirable to evaluate the early warning system for tsunami-genic earthquakes. The tsunamis originate from submarine faults, underwater volcanic activities, sub-aerial landslides impinging on the sea and submarine landslides. In case of a submarine earthquake-induced tsunami the wave is generated in the fluid domain due to displacement of the seabed. There are three phases of tsunami: generation, propagation, and run-up. Reactor Safety Division (RSD) of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Trombay has initiated computational simulation for all the three phases of tsunami source generation, its propagation and finally run up evaluation for the protection of public life, property and various industrial infrastructures located on the coastal regions of India. These studies could be effectively utilized for design and implementation of early warning system for coastal region of the country apart from catering to the needs of Indian nuclear installations. This paper presents some results of tsunami waves based on different analytical/numerical approaches with shallow water wave theory. (authors)

  19. NUMERICAL FLOW AND TRANSPORT SIMULATIONS SUPPORTING THE SALTSTONE FACILITY PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, G.

    2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saltstone Disposal Facility Performance Assessment (PA) is being revised to incorporate requirements of Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA), and updated data and understanding of vault performance since the 1992 PA (Cook and Fowler 1992) and related Special Analyses. A hybrid approach was chosen for modeling contaminant transport from vaults and future disposal cells to exposure points. A higher resolution, largely deterministic, analysis is performed on a best-estimate Base Case scenario using the PORFLOW numerical analysis code. a few additional sensitivity cases are simulated to examine alternative scenarios and parameter settings. Stochastic analysis is performed on a simpler representation of the SDF system using the GoldSim code to estimate uncertainty and sensitivity about the Base Case. This report describes development of PORFLOW models supporting the SDF PA, and presents sample results to illustrate model behaviors and define impacts relative to key facility performance objectives. The SDF PA document, when issued, should be consulted for a comprehensive presentation of results.

  20. Numerical simulations of aggregate breakup in bounded and unbounded turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthaus U. Babler; Luca Biferale; Luca Brandt; Ulrike Feudel; Ksenia Guseva; Alessandra S. Lanotte; Cristian Marchioli; Francesco Picano; Gaetano Sardina; Alfredo Soldati; Federico Toschi

    2015-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Breakup of small aggregates in fully developed turbulence is studied by means of direct numerical simulations in a series of typical bounded and unbounded flow configurations, such as a turbulent channel flow, a developing boundary layer and homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The simplest criterion for breakup is adopted, whereas aggregate breakup occurs when the local hydrodynamic stress $\\sigma\\sim \\varepsilon^{1/2}$, with $\\varepsilon$ being the energy dissipation at the position of the aggregate, overcomes a given threshold $\\sigma_\\mathrm{cr}$, which is characteristic for a given type of aggregates. Results show that the breakup rate decreases with increasing threshold. For small thresholds, it develops a universal scaling among the different flows. For high thresholds, the breakup rates show strong differences between the different flow configurations, highlighting the importance of non-universal mean-flow properties. To further assess the effects of flow inhomogeneity and turbulent fluctuations, theresults are compared with those obtained in a smooth stochastic flow. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations and applicability of a set of independent proxies.

  1. Physical mechanism and numerical simulation of the inception of the lightning upward leader

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Qingmin [Beijing Key Lab of High Voltage and EMC, School of Electric and Electronic Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China) and State Key Lab of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Lu Xinchang; Shi Wei; Zhang Li; Zou Liang; Lou Jie [Shandong Provincial Key Lab of UHV Technology and Gas Discharge, School of Electrical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The upward leader is a key physical process of the leader progression model of lightning shielding. The inception mechanism and criterion of the upward leader need further understanding and clarification. Based on leader discharge theory, this paper proposes the critical electric field intensity of the stable upward leader (CEFISUL) and characterizes it by the valve electric field intensity on the conductor surface, E{sub L}, which is the basis of a new inception criterion for the upward leader. Through numerical simulation under various physical conditions, we verified that E{sub L} is mainly related to the conductor radius, and data fitting yields the mathematical expression of E{sub L}. We further establish a computational model for lightning shielding performance of the transmission lines based on the proposed CEFISUL criterion, which reproduces the shielding failure rate of typical UHV transmission lines. The model-based calculation results agree well with the statistical data from on-site operations, which show the effectiveness and validity of the CEFISUL criterion.

  2. 8th International Special Session on Current Trends in Numerical Simulation for Parallel Engineering Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trinitis, C; Bader, M; Schulz, M

    2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In today's world, the use of parallel programming and architectures is essential for simulating practical problems in engineering and related disciplines. Significant progress in CPU architecture (multi- and many-core CPUs, SMT, transactional memory, virtualization support, shared caches etc.) system scalability, and interconnect technology, continues to provide new opportunities, as well as new challenges for both system architects and software developers. These trends are paralleled by progress in algorithms, simulation techniques, and software integration from multiple disciplines. In its 8th year, ParSim continues to build a bridge between application disciplines and computer science and to help fostering closer cooperations between these fields. Since its successful introduction in 2002, ParSim has established itself as an integral part of the EuroPVM/MPI conference series. In contrast to traditional conferences, emphasis is put on the presentation of up-to-date results with a short turn-around time. We believe that this offers a unique opportunity to present new aspects in this dynamic field and discuss them with a wide, interdisciplinary audience. The EuroPVM/MPI conference series, as one of the prime events in parallel computation, serves as an ideal surrounding for ParSim. This combination enables participants to present and discuss their work within the scope of both the session and the host conference. This year, five papers from authors in five countries were submitted to Par-Sim, and we selected three of them. They cover a range of different application fields including mechanical engineering, material science, and structural engineering simulations. We are confident that this resulted in an attractive special session and that this will be an informal setting for lively discussions as well as for fostering new collaborations. Several people contributed to this event. Thanks go to Jack Dongarra, the EuroPVM/MPI general chair, and to Jan Westerholm, Juha Fagerholm and Jussi Heikonen, the PC chairs, for their encouragement and support to continue the ParSim series at EuroPVM/MPI 2009. We would also like to thank the numerous reviewers, who provided us with their reviews in such a short amount of time (in most cases in just a few days) and thereby helped us to maintain the tight schedule. Last, but certainly not least, we would like to thank all those who took the time to submit papers and hence made this event possible in the first place. We are confident that this session will fulfill its purpose to provide new insights from both the engineering and the computer science side and encourages interdisciplinary exchange of ideas and cooperations, and that this will continue ParSim's tradition at EuroPVM/MPI.

  3. Numerical Simulation and Analyses of the Loss of Feedwater Transient at the Unit 4 of Kola NPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevanovic, Vladimir D. [University of Belgrade, Kraljice Marije 16, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Yugoslavia); Stosic, Zoran V.; Kiera, Michael; Stoll, Uwe [Framatome ANP GmbH, P.O. Box 3220, 91050 Erlangen (Germany)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-dimensional numerical simulation of the loss-of-feed water transient at the horizontal steam generator of the Kola nuclear power plant is performed. Presented numerical results show transient change of integral steam generator parameters, such as steam generation rate, water mass inventory, outlet reactor coolant temperature, as well as detailed distribution of shell side thermal-hydraulic parameters: swell and collapsed levels, void fraction distributions, mass flux vectors, etc. Numerical results are compared with measurements at the Kola NPP. The agreement is satisfactory, while differences are close to or below the measurement uncertainties. Obtained numerical results are the first ones that give complete insight into the three-dimensional and transient horizontal steam generator thermal-hydraulics. Also, the presented results serve as benchmark tests for the assessment and further improvement of one-dimensional models of horizontal steam generator built with safety codes. (authors)

  4. 6th International Special Session on Current Trends in Numerical Simulation for Parallel Engineering Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulz, M; Trinitis, C

    2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In today's world, the use of parallel programming and architectures is essential for simulating practical problems in engineering and related disciplines. Remarkable progress in CPU architecture (multi- and many-core, SMT, transactional memory, virtualization support, etc.), system scalability, and interconnect technology continues to provide new opportunities, as well as new challenges for both system architects and software developers. These trends are paralleled by progress in parallel algorithms, simulation techniques, and software integration from multiple disciplines. In its 6th year ParSim continues to build a bridge between computer science and the application disciplines and to help with fostering cooperations between the different fields. In contrast to traditional conferences, emphasis is put on the presentation of up-to-date results with a shorter turn-around time. This offers the unique opportunity to present new aspects in this dynamic field and discuss them with a wide, interdisciplinary audience. The EuroPVM/MPI conference series, as one of the prime events in parallel computation, serves as an ideal surrounding for ParSim. This combination enables the participants to present and discuss their work within the scope of both the session and the host conference. This year, ten papers with authors in ten countries were submitted to ParSim, and after a quick turn-around, yet thorough review process we decided to accept three of them for publication and presentation during the ParSim session. These three papers show the use of simulation in a range of different application fields including earthquake and turbulence simulation. At the same time, they also address computer science aspects and discuss different parallelization strategies, programming models and environments, as well as scalability. We are confident that this provides an attractive program and that ParSim will yet again be an informal setting for lively discussions and for fostering new collaborations. Several people contributed to this event. Thanks go to Jack Dongarra, the EuroPVM/MPI general chair, and to Thomas Herault and Franck Cappello, the PC chairs, for their support to continue the ParSim series at EuroPVM/MPI 2007. We would also like to thank the numerous reviewers, who provided us with their reviews in such a short amount of time (in most cases in just a few days) and thereby helped us to maintain the tight schedule. Last, but certainly not least, we would like to thank all those who took the time to submit papers and hence made this event possible in the first place. We are confident that this session will fulfill its purpose to provide new insights from both the engineering and the computer science side and encourages interdisciplinary exchange of ideas and cooperations. We hope that this will continue ParSim's tradition at EuroPVM/MPI.

  5. Numerical relativity reaching into post-Newtonian territory: a compact-object binary simulation spanning 350 gravitational-wave cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Bela; Buonanno, Alessandra; Taracchini, Andrea; Pfeiffer, Harald P; Scheel, Mark A; Chu, Tony; Kidder, Lawrence E; Pan, Yi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first numerical-relativity simulation of a compact-object binary whose gravitational waveform is long enough to cover the entire frequency band of advanced gravitational-wave detectors, such as LIGO, Virgo and KAGRA, for mass ratio 7 and total mass as low as $45.5\\,M_\\odot$. We find that effective-one-body models, either uncalibrated or calibrated against substantially shorter numerical-relativity waveforms at smaller mass ratios, reproduce our new waveform remarkably well, with a negligible loss in detection rate due to modeling error. In contrast, post-Newtonian inspiral waveforms and existing calibrated phenomenological inspiral-merger-ringdown waveforms display greater disagreement with our new simulation. The disagreement varies substantially depending on the specific post-Newtonian approximant used.

  6. Numerical relativity reaching into post-Newtonian territory: a compact-object binary simulation spanning 350 gravitational-wave cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bela Szilagyi; Jonathan Blackman; Alessandra Buonanno; Andrea Taracchini; Harald P. Pfeiffer; Mark A. Scheel; Tony Chu; Lawrence E. Kidder; Yi Pan

    2015-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first numerical-relativity simulation of a compact-object binary whose gravitational waveform is long enough to cover the entire frequency band of advanced gravitational-wave detectors, such as LIGO, Virgo and KAGRA, for mass ratio 7 and total mass as low as $45.5\\,M_\\odot$. We find that effective-one-body models, either uncalibrated or calibrated against substantially shorter numerical-relativity waveforms at smaller mass ratios, reproduce our new waveform remarkably well, with a negligible loss in detection rate due to modeling error. In contrast, post-Newtonian inspiral waveforms and existing calibrated phenomenological inspiral-merger-ringdown waveforms display greater disagreement with our new simulation. The disagreement varies substantially depending on the specific post-Newtonian approximant used.

  7. Numerical Stability and Convergence Analysis of Geometric Constraint Enforcement in Dynamic Simulation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Min-Hyung

    Simulation Systems Hongjun Jeon1 Min-Hyung Choi2 Min Hong3 1 Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering and trajectories of dynamically simulated entities. Therefore, effective and efficient enforcement and proper describes the formulation and integration of geometric constraints in a dynamic simulation and provides

  8. Determination of soil properties for sandy soils and road base at Riverside Campus using laboratory testing and numerical simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saez Barrios, Deeyvid O.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    : Chair of Committee, Jean-Louis Briaud Committee Members, Charles Aubeny Julian Kang Head of Department, John Niedzwecki Major Subject: Civil Engineering iii ABSTRACT Determination of Soil Properties of Sandy... Soils and Road Base at Riverside Campus Using Laboratory Testing and Numerical Simulation. (May 2010) Deeyvid Oscar Saez Barrios, B.En., Technological University of Panama Chair of Advisory Committee: Jean-Louis Briaud This study evaluated...

  9. Three-dimensional numerical manifold method simulations for blocky rock analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shentu, Longfei

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After decades of development, people realize that there are wider and more various applications of numerical modeling and analysis. However, current feasible software tools cannot satisfy engineering and commercial goals. ...

  10. Direct numerical simulation of electroconvective instability and hysteretic current-voltage response of a permselective membrane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pham, Van Sang

    We present a systematic, multiscale, fully detailed numerical modeling for dynamics of fluid flow and ion transport covering Ohmic, limiting, and overlimiting current regimes in conductance of ion-selective membrane. By ...

  11. An analysis of superhydrophobic turbulent drag reduction mechanisms using direct numerical simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothstein, Jonathan

    An analysis of superhydrophobic turbulent drag reduction mechanisms using direct numerical October 2009; accepted 22 April 2010; published online 11 June 2010 Superhydrophobic surfaces combine the drag reducing performance of superhydrophobic surfaces in turbulent channel flow. Slip velocities, wall

  12. On the numerical simulation of the instationary free fall of a solid in a fluid.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from meteorology, sedimentology and aerospace engineering to biology. We present a new numerical method], sedimentology [1], aerospace engineering [21] and biology (e.g. models for animal flights [2]). Recently

  13. Design And Verification of Controllers for Coupled Bunch Instabilities Using Optimal Control Theory And Numerical Simulation: Predictions for PEP II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hindi, Haitham; Prabhakar, Shyam; Fox, John D.; Linscott, Ivan; Teytelman, Dmitri; /SLAC

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a technique for the design and verification of efficient bunch-by-bunch controllers for damping longitudinal multibunch instabilities. The controllers attempt to optimize the use of available feedback amplifier power - one of the most expensive components of a feedback system - and define the limits of the closed loop system performance. Our design technique alternates between analytic computation of single bunch optimal controllers and verification on a multibunch numerical simulator. The simulator uses PEP-II parameters and identifies unstable coupled bunch modes, their growth rates and their damping rates with feedback. The results from the simulator are shown to be in reasonable agreement with analytical calculations based on the single bunch model. The technique is then used to evaluate the performance of a variety of controllers proposed for PEP-II.

  14. NREL Developing a Numerical Simulation Tool to Study Hydrokinetic Energy Conversion Devices and Arrays (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New code will help accelerate design improvements by providing a high-fidelity simulation tool to study power performance, structural loading, and the interactions between devices in arrays.

  15. Direct numerical simulations of type Ia supernovae flames I: The landau-darrieus instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, J.B.; Day, M.S.; Rendleman, C.A.; Woosley, S.E.; Zingale, M.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations of Type Ia Supernovae Flames I: The Landau-Subject headings: supernovae: general — white dwarfs —could occur in Type Ia supernovae (Niemeyer & Woosley 1997),

  16. Direct numerical simulations of type Ia supernovae flames II: The rayleigh-taylor instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, J.B.; Day, M.S.; Rendleman, C.A.; Woosley, S.E.; Zingale, M.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Weaver, T. A. 1994, in Supernovae, Les Houches, Session LIV,Simulations of Type Ia Supernovae Flames II: The Rayleigh-Subject headings: supernovae: general — white dwarfs —

  17. An Efficient Numerical Scheme for Simulating Unidirectional Irregular Waves Based on a Hybrid Wave Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Dongxing 1984-

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    is adopted. For demonstration, a free-wave spectrum is input to COUPLE for simulating the 6 DOF motions of a floating 5-MW wind turbine installed on an OC3 moored Spar and tensions in the mooring lines. It is shown that the CPU time for the above simulation...

  18. COMPUTATIONAL SIMULATION OF SCRAMJET COMBUSTORS - A COMPARISON BETWEEN QUASI-ONE DIMENSIONAL AND 2-D NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tourani, Chandraprakash Chandra

    2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................................................................................ 35 2.1 Hypersonic Air-breathing Propulsion Testing ............................................................. 35 2.2 Nonintrusive Diagnostic Techniques for Scramjet Research & Development ............ 47 2.3 Fuel Injection, Ignition, Flame... of 174,700 cells for highlighting the regions which employ grid packing. ............... 87 Figure 47: Mach number Contours for 2-D Cold Flow Simulation ........................................... 89 Figure 48: Mach number comparison for “Fuel OFF” case...

  19. 3D-radiation hydro simulations of disk-planet interactions: I. Numerical algorithm and test cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Klahr; W. Kley

    2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the evolution of an embedded protoplanet in a circumstellar disk using the 3D-Radiation Hydro code TRAMP, and treat the thermodynamics of the gas properly in three dimensions. The primary interest of this work lies in the demonstration and testing of the numerical method. We show how far numerical parameters can influence the simulations of gap opening. We study a standard reference model under various numerical approximations. Then we compare the commonly used locally isothermal approximation to the radiation hydro simulation using an equation for the internal energy. Models with different treatments of the mass accretion process are compared. Often mass accumulates in the Roche lobe of the planet creating a hydrostatic atmosphere around the planet. The gravitational torques induced by the spiral pattern of the disk onto the planet are not strongly affected in the average magnitude, but the short time scale fluctuations are stronger in the radiation hydro models. An interesting result of this work lies in the analysis of the temperature structure around the planet. The most striking effect of treating the thermodynamics properly is the formation of a hot pressure--supported bubble around the planet with a pressure scale height of H/R ~ 0.5 rather than a thin Keplerian circumplanetary accretion disk. We also observe an outflow of gas above and below the planet during the gap opening phase.

  20. Time-resolved temperature measurement and numerical simulation of millisecond laser irradiated silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zewen; Zhang Hongchao; Shen Zhonghua; Ni Xiaowu [School of Science, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2013-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal process of 1064 nm millisecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiated silicon was time-resolved temperature measured by an infrared radiation pyrometer, temperature evolutions of the spot center for wide range of laser energy densities were presented. The waveforms of temperature evolution curves contained much information about phase change, melting, solidification and vaporization. An axisymmetric numerical model was established for millisecond laser heating silicon. The transient temperature fields were obtained by using the finite element method. The numerical results of temperature evolutions of the spot center are in good agreement with the experimental results. Furthermore, the axial temperature distributions of the numerical results give a better understanding of the waveforms in the experimental results. The melting threshold, vaporizing threshold, melting duration, and melting depth were better identified by analyzing two kinds of results.

  1. The NINJA-2 project: Detecting and characterizing gravitational waveforms modelled using numerical binary black hole simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :,; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr?czi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, N G; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Numerical INJection Analysis (NINJA) project is a collaborative effort between members of the numerical relativity and gravitational-wave astrophysics communities. The purpose of NINJA is to study the ability to detect gravitational waves emitted from merging binary black holes and recover their parameters with next-generation gravitational-wave observatories. We report here on the results of the second NINJA project, NINJA-2, which employs 60 complete binary black hole hybrid waveforms consisting of a numerical portion modelling the late inspiral, merger, and ringdown stitched to a post-Newtonian portion modelling the early inspiral. In a "blind injection challenge" similar to that conducted in recent LIGO and Virgo science runs, we added 7 hybrid waveforms to two months of data recolored to predictions of Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo sensitivity curves during their first observing runs. The resulting data was analyzed by gravitational-wave detection algorithms and 6 of the waveforms were recovered w...

  2. Heat transfer coefficients in two-dimensional Yukawa systems (numerical simulations)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khrustalyov, Yu. V., E-mail: yuri.khrustalyov@gmail.com; Vaulina, O. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    New data on heat transfer in two-dimensional Yukawa systems have been obtained. The results of a numerical study of the thermal conductivity for equilibrium systems with parameters close to the conditions of laboratory experiments in dusty plasma are presented. The Green-Kubo relations are used to calculate the heat transfer coefficients. The influence of dissipation (internal friction) on the heat transfer processes in nonideal systems is studied. New approximations are proposed for the thermal conductivity and diffusivity for nonideal dissipative systems. The results obtained are compared with the existing experimental and numerical data.

  3. An adaptive framework for high-order, mixed-element numerical simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caplan, Philip Claude Delhaye

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work builds upon an adaptive simulation framework to allow for mixed-element meshes in two dimensions. Contributions are focused in the area of mesh generation which employs the Lk norm to produce various mesh types. ...

  4. Numerical Simulation/Analysis and Computer Aided Engineering for Virtual Protyping of Heavy Ground Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abd. Rahim, Mohd. Razi

    2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This doctoral project dissertation deals with the investigation of simulation/analysis in the product development process of specialized heavy ground vehicle engineering which posts some of the most challenging engineering ...

  5. Assessment of the State-Of-The-Art of Numerical Simulation of Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reservoir features of importance in the operation of enhanced geothermal systems are described first (Section 2). The report then reviews existing reservoir simulators developed for application to HDR reservoirs (Section 3), hydrothermal systems (Section 4), and nuclear waste isolation (Section 5), highlighting capabilities relevant to the evaluation and assessment of EGS. The report focuses on simulators that include some representation of flow in fractures, only mentioning other simulators, such as general-purpose programs or groundwater models (Section 6). Following these detailed descriptions, the report summarizes and comments on the simulators (Section 7), and recommends a course of action for further development (Section 8). The references are included in Section 9. Appendix A contains contractual information, including a description of the original and revised scope of work for this study. Appendix B presents comments on the draft report from DOE reviewer(s) and the replies of the authors to those comments. [DJE-2005

  6. Numerical Simulation of Transient Fields F. Messerer, C. Trinitis*, W. Boeck, G. Schoffner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stamatakis, Alexandros

    and polarity reversal for HVDC systems are simulated as examples for the transient stresses. The application distribution of an HVDC system can be improved with a certain surface resistivity. With such a resistivity

  7. Numerical Simulation of the Flow of a Power Law Fluid in an Elbow Bend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanakamedala, Karthik

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical study of flow of power law fluid in an elbow bend has been carried out. The motivation behind this study is to analyze the velocity profiles, especially the pattern of the secondary flow of power law fluid in a bend as there are several...

  8. Numerical simulation of transient, incongruent vaporization induced by high power laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, C.H.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mathematical model and numerical calculations were developed to solve the heat and mass transfer problems specifically for uranum oxide subject to laser irradiation. It can easily be modified for other heat sources or/and other materials. In the uranium-oxygen system, oxygen is the preferentially vaporizing component, and as a result of the finite mobility of oxygen in the solid, an oxygen deficiency is set up near the surface. Because of the bivariant behavior of uranium oxide, the heat transfer problem and the oxygen diffusion problem are coupled and a numerical method of simultaneously solving the two boundary value problems is studied. The temperature dependence of the thermal properties and oxygen diffusivity, as well as the highly ablative effect on the surface, leads to considerable non-linearities in both the governing differential equations and the boundary conditions. Based on the earlier work done in this laboratory by Olstad and Olander on Iron and on Zirconium hydride, the generality of the problem is expanded and the efficiency of the numerical scheme is improved. The finite difference method, along with some advanced numerical techniques, is found to be an efficient way to solve this problem.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Tsunami Generation by the Potential Flank Collapse of the Cumbre Vieja Volcano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    ; La Palma ,Canary Islands, Spain). Subaerial slide scenarios are first defined based on recent slope Volcano (CVV) on La Palma island (Canary Islands, Spain; Fig. 1) has been the object of numerous studies of past large paleo-submarine landslides of O(100 km3 ) volume, around the canary islands, at least

  10. Loop Current Mixed Layer Energy Response to Hurricane Lili (2002). Part II: Idealized Numerical Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Loop Current Mixed Layer Energy Response to Hurricane Lili (2002). Part II: Idealized Numerical horizontal pressure gradient, wind energy transfer to the mixed layer can be more efficient in such a regime as compared to the case of an initially horizontally homogeneous ocean. However, nearly all energy is removed

  11. Numerical Simulation of Impact Rollers for Estimating the Influence Depth of Soil Compaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Kukjoo

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    will estimate more precisely the depth of influence for impact rollers. To do so, the general purpose finite element computer program LS-DYNA is used for numerical predictions. The finite element study is carried out with three-dimensional models. A simplified...

  12. Numerical Integration Numerical Summation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Henri

    Numerical Integration Numerical Summation Numerical Extrapolation Numerical Recipes for Multiprecision Computations #12;Numerical Integration Numerical Summation Numerical Extrapolation Multiprecision, integration, summation, extrapolation, evaluation of continued fractions, Euler products and sums, complete

  13. Numerical Simulation of Plasma Behavior in a Magnetic Nozzle of a Laser-plasma Driven Nuclear Electric Propulsion System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kajimura, Y. [Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere (RISH), Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), CREST 4-1-8 Hon-chou, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Matsuda, N.; Hayashida, K.; Maeno, A.; Nakashima, H. [Department of Advanced Energy Engineering Science, Interdisciplinary Graduate school of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Kasugakouen 6-1, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-580 (Japan)

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations of plasma behavior in a magnetic nozzle of a Laser-Plasma Driven Nuclear Electric Propulsion System are conducted. The propellant is heated and accelerated by the laser and expanded isotropically. The magnetic nozzle is a combination of solenoidal coils and used to collimate and guide the plasma to produce thrust. Simulation calculations by a three-dimensional hybrid code are conducted to examine the plasma behaviors in the nozzle and to estimate the thrust efficiency. We also estimate a fraction ({alpha}) of plasma particles leaking in the forward (spacecraft) direction. By a combination of a few coils, we could decrease {alpha} value without degrading the thrust efficiency. Finally, the shaped propellant is proposed to increase the thrust efficiency.

  14. Numerical simulations of output pulse extraction from a high-power microwave compressor with a plasma switch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shlapakovski, Anatoli; Beilin, Leonid; Bliokh, Yuri; Donskoy, Moshe; Krasik, Yakov E. [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Hadas, Yoav [Department of Applied Physics, Rafael, PO Box 2250, Haifa 31021 (Israel); Schamiloglu, Edl [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations of the process of electromagnetic energy release from a high-power microwave pulse compressor comprising a gas-filled cavity and interference switch were carried out. A microwave plasma discharge in a rectangular waveguide H-plane tee was modeled with the use of the fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell code MAGIC. The gas ionization, plasma evolution, and interaction with RF fields accumulated within the compressor were simulated using different approaches provided by the MAGIC code: particle-in-cell approach accounting for electron-neutral collisions, gas conductivity model based on the concept of mobility, and hybrid modeling. The dependences of the microwave output pulse peak power and waveform on parameters that can be controlled in experiments, such as an external ionization rate, RF field amplitude, and background gas pressure, were investigated.

  15. Numerical simulations of lab-scale brine-water mixing experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, Imane; Webb, Stephen Walter

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory-scale experiments simulating the injection of fresh water into brine in a Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) cavern were performed at Sandia National Laboratories for various conditions of injection rate and small and large injection tube diameters. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code FLUENT was used to simulate these experiments to evaluate the predictive capability of FLUENT for brine-water mixing in an SPR cavern. The data-model comparisons show that FLUENT simulations predict the mixing plume depth reasonably well. Predictions of the near-wall brine concentrations compare very well with the experimental data. The simulated time for the mixing plume to reach the vessel wall was underpredicted for the small injection tubes but reasonable for the large injection tubes. The difference in the time to reach the wall is probably due to the three-dimensional nature of the mixing plume as it spreads out at the air-brine or oil-brine interface. The depth of the mixing plume as it spreads out along the interface was within a factor of 2 of the experimental data. The FLUENT simulation results predict the plume mixing accurately, especially the water concentration when the mixing plume reaches the wall. This parameter value is the most significant feature of the mixing process because it will determine the amount of enhanced leaching at the oil-brine interface.

  16. Use of a speed equation for numerical simulation of hydraulic fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linkov, Alexander M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper treats the propagation of a hydraulically driven crack. We explicitly write the local speed equation, which facilitates using the theory of propagating interfaces. It is shown that when neglecting the lag between the liquid front and the crack tip, the lubrication PDE yields that a solution satisfies the speed equation identically. This implies that for zero or small lag, the boundary value problem appears ill-posed when solved numerically. We suggest e - regularization, which consists in employing the speed equation together with a prescribed BC on the front to obtain a new BC formulated at a small distance behind the front rather than on the front itself. It is shown that - regularization provides accurate and stable results with reasonable time expense. It is also shown that the speed equation gives a key to proper choice of unknown functions when solving a hydraulic fracture problem numerically.

  17. Particle velocity based universal algorithm for numerical simulation of hydraulic fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wrobel, Michal

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the paper, we propose a new effective mathematical formulation and resulting universal numerical algorithm capable of tackling various HF models in the framework of a unified approach. The presented numerical scheme is not limited to any particular elasticity model or crack propagation regime. Its basic assumptions are: i) proper choice of independent and dependent variables (with the direct utilization of a new one - the reduced particle velocity), ii) tracing the fracture front by use of the speed equation which can be integrated in a closed form and sets an explicit relation between the crack propagation speed and the coefficients in the asymptotic expansion of the crack opening, iii) proper regularization techniques, iv) improved temporal approximation, v) modular algorithm architecture. The application of the new dependent variable, the reduced particle velocity, instead of the usual fluid flow rate, facilitates the computation of the crack propagation speed from the local relation based on the speed ...

  18. Numerical simulation of flow and heat transfer of internal cooling passage in gas turbine blade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Guoguang

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    for Rectangular Duct (Ar = 4:1) with In-Line V-Shaped Ribs on Leading and Trailing Surfaces ..............................................................................................17 Fig. 3.2 (a) Numerical Grid, (b) Grid Refinement....10 Nusselt Number Ratio Contours on (a) Leading and (b) Trailing Surface for Lower Reynolds Number (Re = 10,000) Cases............................34 Fig. 3.11 Comparison between Calculated and Measured Nusselt Number Ratios...

  19. Numerical simulation: Toward the design of high-efficiency planar perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Feng; Zhu, Jun, E-mail: zhujzhu@gmail.com, E-mail: sydai@ipp.ac.cn; Wei, Junfeng; Li, Yi; Lv, Mei [Key Laboratory of Novel Thin Film Solar Cells, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yang, Shangfeng [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Zhang, Bing; Yao, Jianxi [State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Dai, Songyuan, E-mail: zhujzhu@gmail.com, E-mail: sydai@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Novel Thin Film Solar Cells, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Organo-metal halide perovskite solar cells based on planar architecture have been reported to achieve remarkably high power conversion efficiency (PCE, >16%), rendering them highly competitive to the conventional silicon based solar cells. A thorough understanding of the role of each component in solar cells and their effects as a whole is still required for further improvement in PCE. In this work, the planar heterojunction-based perovskite solar cells were simulated with the program AMPS (analysis of microelectronic and photonic structures)-1D. Simulation results revealed a great dependence of PCE on the thickness and defect density of the perovskite layer. Meanwhile, parameters including the work function of the back contact as well as the hole mobility and acceptor density in hole transport materials were identified to significantly influence the performance of the device. Strikingly, an efficiency over 20% was obtained under the moderate simulation conditions.

  20. Inverse Load Calculation of Wind Turbine Support Structures - A Numerical Verification Using the Comprehensive Simulation Code FAST: Preprint (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pahn, T.; Jonkman, J.; Rolges, R.; Robertson, A.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physically measuring the dynamic responses of wind turbine support structures enables the calculation of the applied loads using an inverse procedure. In this process, inverse means deriving the inputs/forces from the outputs/responses. This paper presents results of a numerical verification of such an inverse load calculation. For this verification, the comprehensive simulation code FAST is used. FAST accounts for the coupled dynamics of wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity and turbine controls. Simulations are run using a 5-MW onshore wind turbine model with a tubular tower. Both the applied loads due to the instantaneous wind field and the resulting system responses are known from the simulations. Using the system responses as inputs to the inverse calculation, the applied loads are calculated, which in this case are the rotor thrust forces. These forces are compared to the rotor thrust forces known from the FAST simulations. The results of these comparisons are presented to assess the accuracy of the inverse calculation. To study the influences of turbine controls, load cases in normal operation between cut-in and rated wind speed, near rated wind speed and between rated and cut-out wind speed are chosen. The presented study shows that the inverse load calculation is capable of computing very good estimates of the rotor thrust. The accuracy of the inverse calculation does not depend on the control activity of the wind turbine.

  1. Quantised State Simulation (QSS): Advances in the Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vassiliadis, Vassilios S.; Fiorelli, Fabio

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    in the computer aided design of huge scale dynamical systems (e.g. as in the simulation of combustion in a distributed way within an internal combustion engine in the automobile industry). With a proper integration within an optimisation framework, furthermore...

  2. Low level jet development during a numerically simulated return flow event

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igau, Richard Charles

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the obstacle. This simulation shows that the structure of the lower tropospheric air flow during a period of return flow is complex. When mid-level westerlies are weak, mesoscale processes govern the development of low level jets. As the westerly winds increase...

  3. Numerical simulation of flow distribution for pebble bed high temperature gas cooled reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yesilyurt, Gokhan

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ?....................................................................................26 V CFD MODELLING ...................................................................................28 V.1 Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) ..........................................28 V.2 The History.... Hassan The premise of the work presented here is to use a common analytical tool, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), along with different turbulence models. Eddy viscosity models as well as state-of-the-art Large Eddy Simulation (LES) were...

  4. VOL. 19 NO. 1 ACTA METEOROLOGICA SINICA 2005 Numerical Simulation of Wind and Temperature Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    in the atmosphere boundary layer over urban and its surrounding areas. Urban heat island (UHI) is a well- known that the wind field is affected by the topography and urban heat island. Yang et al. (2003) simulated the winter heat island of Beijing considering the daily changing anthropogenic heat. It is indicated

  5. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Study on Airflow Characteristics in the Plenum of Underfloor Air Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X.; Li, N.; Fang, F.; Zhao, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy-efficient and cost-effective space conditioning in offices and other commercial buildings usually use the underfloor space for the supply air static-pressure plenum. The airflow in a plenum of the underfloor air supply was simulated by a...

  6. The Importance of the Entropy Inequality on Numerical Simulations Using Reduced Methane-air Reaction Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Nathan

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    mechanisms is to reduce the computational time needed to simulate a problem. The focus of this work is on the validity of reduced methane-air combustion mechanisms, particularly pertaining to satisfying the entropy inequality. While much of this work involves...

  7. The NINJA-2 project: Detecting and characterizing gravitational waveforms modelled using numerical binary black hole simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; the NINJA-2 Collaboration; :; J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; A. Alemic; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. Amariutei; M. Andersen; R. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; M. Barbet; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; G. Bergmann; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; L. Bosi; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brückner; S. Buchman; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; R. Burman; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; C. Celerier; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. Collette; M. Colombini; L. Cominsky; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corpuz; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; S. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; A. Donath; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; S. Dossa; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; T. Edo; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endr?czi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Gräf; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; S. Hooper; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; Y. Ji; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; J. Karlen; M. Kasprzack; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; F. Kawazoe; F. Kéfélian; G. M. Keiser; D. Keitel; D. B. Kelley; W. Kells; A. Khalaidovski

    2014-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Numerical INJection Analysis (NINJA) project is a collaborative effort between members of the numerical relativity and gravitational-wave astrophysics communities. The purpose of NINJA is to study the ability to detect gravitational waves emitted from merging binary black holes and recover their parameters with next-generation gravitational-wave observatories. We report here on the results of the second NINJA project, NINJA-2, which employs 60 complete binary black hole hybrid waveforms consisting of a numerical portion modelling the late inspiral, merger, and ringdown stitched to a post-Newtonian portion modelling the early inspiral. In a "blind injection challenge" similar to that conducted in recent LIGO and Virgo science runs, we added 7 hybrid waveforms to two months of data recolored to predictions of Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo sensitivity curves during their first observing runs. The resulting data was analyzed by gravitational-wave detection algorithms and 6 of the waveforms were recovered with false alarm rates smaller than 1 in a thousand years. Parameter estimation algorithms were run on each of these waveforms to explore the ability to constrain the masses, component angular momenta and sky position of these waveforms. We also perform a large-scale monte-carlo study to assess the ability to recover each of the 60 hybrid waveforms with early Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo sensitivity curves. Our results predict that early Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo will have a volume-weighted average sensitive distance of 300Mpc (1Gpc) for $10M_{\\odot}+10M_{\\odot}$ ($50M_{\\odot}+50M_{\\odot}$) binary black hole coalescences. We demonstrate that neglecting the component angular momenta in the waveform models used in matched-filtering will result in a reduction in sensitivity for systems with large component angular momenta. [Abstract abridged for ArXiv, full version in PDF

  8. Note: Numerical simulation and experimental validation of accelerating voltage formation for a pulsed electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egorov, I., E-mail: egoris@tpu.ru [Institute of High Technology Physics, Tomsk Polytechnic University, 2a Lenin Avenue, Tomsk 634028 (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development of a computation model of a pulsed voltage generator for a repetitive electron accelerator. The model is based on a principle circuit of the generator, supplemented with the parasitics elements of the construction. Verification of the principle model was achieved by comparison of simulation with experimental results, where reasonable agreement was demonstrated for a wide range of generator load resistance.

  9. Final Report: A Model Management System for Numerical Simulations of Subsurface Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachmann, David

    2013-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE and several other Federal agencies have committed significant resources to support the development of a large number of mathematical models for studying subsurface science problems such as groundwater flow, fate of contaminants and carbon sequestration, to mention only a few. This project provides new tools to help decision makers and stakeholders in subsurface science related problems to select an appropriate set of simulation models for a given field application.

  10. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AN EUV CORONAL WAVE BASED ON THE 2009 FEBRUARY 13 CME EVENT OBSERVED BY STEREO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Ofer; Attrill, Gemma D. R.; Wills-Davey, Meredith J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Manchester, Ward B. [Center for Space Environment Modeling, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On 2009 February 13, a coronal wave-CME-dimming event was observed in quadrature by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. We analyze this event using a three-dimensional, global magnetohydrodynamic model for the solar corona. The numerical simulation is driven and constrained by the observations, and indicates where magnetic reconnection occurs between the expanding CME core and surrounding environment. We focus primarily on the lower corona, extending out to 3 R{sub sun}; this range allows simultaneous comparison with both EUVI and COR1 data. Our simulation produces a diffuse coronal bright front remarkably similar to that observed by STEREO/EUVI at 195 A. It is made up of two components, and is the result of a combination of both wave and non-wave mechanisms. The CME becomes large-scale quite low (< 200 Mm) in the corona. It is not, however, an inherently large-scale event; rather, the expansion is facilitated by magnetic reconnection between the expanding CME core and the surrounding magnetic environment. In support of this, we also find numerous secondary dimmings, many far from the initial CME source region. Relating such dimmings to reconnecting field lines within the simulation provides further evidence that CME expansion leads to the 'opening' of coronal field lines on a global scale. Throughout the CME expansion, the coronal wave maps directly to the CME footprint. Our results suggest that the ongoing debate over the 'true' nature of diffuse coronal waves may be mischaracterized. It appears that both wave and non-wave models are required to explain the observations and understand the complex nature of these events.

  11. Numerical simulations of expanding supershells in dwarf irregular galaxies. II. Formation of giant HI rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. I. Vorobyov; Shantanu Basu

    2004-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform numerical hydrodynamic modeling of various physical processes that can form an HI ring as is observed in Holmberg I. Three energetic mechanisms are considered: multiple supernova explosions (SNe), a hypernova explosion associated with a gamma ray burst (GRB), and the vertical impact of a high velocity cloud (HVC). The total released energy has an upper limit of 10^54 ergs. We find that multiple SNe are in general more effective in producing shells that break out of the disk than a hypernova explosion of the same total energy. As a consequence, multiple SNe form rings with a high ring-to-center contrast K 45 deg) the HI image is characterized by two kidney-shaped density enhancements and a mild central depression.

  12. Numerical simulations of the internal shock model in magnetized relativistic jets of blazars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rueda-Becerril, Jesus M; Aloy, Miguel A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The internal shocks scenario in relativistic jets is used to explain the variability of the blazar emission. Recent studies have shown that the magnetic field significantly alters the shell collision dynamics, producing a variety of spectral energy distributions and light-curves patterns. However, the role played by magnetization in such emission processes is still not entirely understood. In this work we numerically solve the magnetohydodynamic evolution of the magnetized shells collision, and determine the influence of the magnetization on the observed radiation. Our procedure consists in systematically varying the shell Lorentz factor, relative velocity, and viewing angle. The calculations needed to produce the whole broadband spectral energy distributions and light-curves are computationally expensive, and are achieved using a high-performance parallel code.

  13. Numerical simulation of material and energy flow in an e-beam melt furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westerberg, K.W.; McClelland, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Finlayson, B.A. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical analysis is made of the material and energy flow in an electron-beam furnace. Energy from an electron beam vaporizes metal confined in a water-cooled crucible. At the beam impact site a. recirculating liquid metal pool is surrounded by a shell of its own solid. A Galerkin finite element method is modified to solve for the flow and temperature fields along with interface locations. The deforming mesh is parameterized using spines that pivot and stretch as the interfaces move. Results are given for an aluminum vaporizer in which parametric variations are made in the e-beam power and liquid viscosity. The calculations reveal the importance of the coupling between the free boundaries and the flow and energy fields.

  14. Methane Hydrate Dissociation by Depressurization in a Mount Elbert Sandstone Sample: Experimental Observations and Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, T.; Moridis, G.J.

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A preserved sample of hydrate-bearing sandstone from the Mount Elbert Test Well was dissociated by depressurization while monitoring the internal temperature of the sample in two locations and the density changes at high spatial resolution using x-ray CT scanning. The sample contained two distinct regions having different porosity and grain size distributions. The hydrate dissociation occurred initially throughout the sample as a result of depressing the pressure below the stability pressure. This initial stage reduced the temperature to the equilibrium point, which was maintained above the ice point. After that, dissociation occurred from the outside in as a result of heat transfer from the controlled temperature bath surrounding the pressure vessel. Numerical modeling of the test using TOUGH+HYDRATE yielded a gas production curve that closely matches the experimentally measured curve.

  15. Chaos and simple determinism in reversed field pinch plasmas: Nonlinear analysis of numerical simulation and experimental data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, C.A.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation the possibility that chaos and simple determinism are governing the dynamics of reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas is investigated. To properly assess this possibility, data from both numerical simulations and experiment are analyzed. A large repertoire of nonlinear analysis techniques is used to identify low dimensional chaos in the data. These tools include phase portraits and Poincare sections, correlation dimension, the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents and short term predictability. In addition, nonlinear noise reduction techniques are applied to the experimental data in an attempt to extract any underlying deterministic dynamics. Two model systems are used to simulate the plasma dynamics. These are the DEBS code, which models global RFP dynamics, and the dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM) model, which models drift wave turbulence. Data from both simulations show strong indications of low dimensional chaos and simple determinism. Experimental date were obtained from the Madison Symmetric Torus RFP and consist of a wide array of both global and local diagnostic signals. None of the signals shows any indication of low dimensional chaos or low simple determinism. Moreover, most of the analysis tools indicate the experimental system is very high dimensional with properties similar to noise. Nonlinear noise reduction is unsuccessful at extracting an underlying deterministic system.

  16. Non-linear numerical simulations of magneto-acoustic wave propagation in small-scale flux tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Khomenko; M. Collados; T. Felipe

    2008-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of non-linear, 2D, numerical simulations of magneto-acoustic wave propagation in the photosphere and chromosphere of small-scale flux tubes with internal structure. Waves with realistic periods of three to five minutes are studied, after applying horizontal and vertical oscillatory perturbations to the equilibrium model. Spurious reflections of shock waves from the upper boundary are minimized thanks to a special boundary condition. This has allowed us to increase the duration of the simulations and to make it long enough to perform a statistical analysis of oscillations. The simulations show that deep horizontal motions of the flux tube generate a slow (magnetic) mode and a surface mode. These modes are efficiently transformed into a slow (acoustic) mode in the vA propagates vertically along the field lines, forms shocks and remains always within the flux tube. It might deposit effectively the energy of the driver into the chromosphere. When the driver oscillates with a high frequency, above the cut-off, non-linear wave propagation occurs with the same dominant driver period at all heights. At low frequencies, below the cut-off, the dominant period of oscillations changes with height from that of the driver in the photosphere to its first harmonic (half period) in the chromosphere. Depending on the period and on the type of the driver, different shock patterns are observed.

  17. On the equivalence of dynamically orthogonal and bi-orthogonal methods: Theory and numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Minseok [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Sapsis, Themistoklis P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Karniadakis, George Em, E-mail: george_karniadakis@brown.edu [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Karhunen–Lòeve (KL) decomposition provides a low-dimensional representation for random fields as it is optimal in the mean square sense. Although for many stochastic systems of practical interest, described by stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs), solutions possess this low-dimensional character, they also have a strongly time-dependent form and to this end a fixed-in-time basis may not describe the solution in an efficient way. Motivated by this limitation of standard KL expansion, Sapsis and Lermusiaux (2009) [26] developed the dynamically orthogonal (DO) field equations which allow for the simultaneous evolution of both the spatial basis where uncertainty ‘lives’ but also the stochastic characteristics of uncertainty. Recently, Cheng et al. (2013) [28] introduced an alternative approach, the bi-orthogonal (BO) method, which performs the exact same tasks, i.e. it evolves the spatial basis and the stochastic characteristics of uncertainty. In the current work we examine the relation of the two approaches and we prove theoretically and illustrate numerically their equivalence, in the sense that one method is an exact reformulation of the other. We show this by deriving a linear and invertible transformation matrix described by a matrix differential equation that connects the BO and the DO solutions. We also examine a pathology of the BO equations that occurs when two eigenvalues of the solution cross, resulting in an instantaneous, infinite-speed, internal rotation of the computed spatial basis. We demonstrate that despite the instantaneous duration of the singularity this has important implications on the numerical performance of the BO approach. On the other hand, it is observed that the BO is more stable in nonlinear problems involving a relatively large number of modes. Several examples, linear and nonlinear, are presented to illustrate the DO and BO methods as well as their equivalence.

  18. NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF U10MO MONOLITHIC MINIPLATES FOR RESEARCH AND TEST REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakan Ozaltun & Herman Shen

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents assessment of the mechanical behavior of U-10wt% Mo (U10Mo) alloy based monolithic fuel plates subject to irradiation. Monolithic, plate-type fuel is a new fuel form being developed for research and test reactors to achieve higher uranium densities within the reactor core to allow the use of low-enriched uranium fuel in high-performance reactors. Identification of the stress/strain characteristics is important for understanding the in-reactor performance of these plate-type fuels. For this work, three distinct cases were considered: (1) fabrication induced residual stresses (2) thermal cycling of fabricated plates; and finally (3) transient mechanical behavior under actual operating conditions. Because the temperatures approach the melting temperature of the cladding during the fabrication and thermal cycling, high temperature material properties were incorporated to improve the accuracy. Once residual stress fields due to fabrication process were identified, solution was used as initial state for the subsequent simulations. For thermal cycling simulation, elasto-plastic material model with thermal creep was constructed and residual stresses caused by the fabrication process were included. For in-service simulation, coupled fluid-thermal-structural interaction was considered. First, temperature field on the plates was calculated and this field was used to compute the thermal stresses. For time dependent mechanical behavior, thermal creep of cladding, volumetric swelling and fission induced creep of the fuel foil were considered. The analysis showed that the stresses evolve very rapidly in the reactor. While swelling of the foil increases the stress of the foil, irradiation induced creep causes stress relaxation.

  19. Numerical simulation of the operation of piston rings in a reciprocating engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saghir, H.; Arques, P. [Centrale School of Lyon, Ecully (France)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the authors present results concerning the tightness of a combustion chamber by rings placed on a piston. The authors have developed a program of simulation of the operation of rings on a piston in movement. This program takes into account: the unstationary reciprocating movement of the ring in the piston ring groove and flows of gases between the combustion chamber, volumes delimited by the set rings-piston-cylinder and the crankcase. These flows are executed in rear of the ring or directly by the clearance to the cup of the ring.

  20. Mathematical Models and Numerical Simulations of phase change in Lagrangian and Eulerian descriptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiros Fonseca, Luis Alonso

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . 139 xvi ahfhfhg Nomenclature ? Density c Specific Heat cp Specific Heat cs Specific Heat in Solid Phase cps Specific Heat in Solid Phase cl Specific Heat in Liquid Phase cpl Specific Heat in Liquid Phase k Thermal Conductivity ks Thermal Conductivity... the movement of the front during evo- lution. In most applications of interest, simulation of the formation of the transition region i.e. solid-liquid interface is essential as it may not be possible to know its location a priori. 6 These limitations have...

  1. Numerical simulation of bump-on-tail instability with source and sink

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berk, H.L.; Pekker, M. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies; Breizman, B.N. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies]|[Budker Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents results of the simulations of the bump-on-tail instability with a weak source and sink. This problem has been posed as a paradigm for the important problem in controlled fusion, that of the unstable excitation of Alfven waves in a tokamak by resonant energetic alpha particles. The source of alpha particles is the controlled fusion reaction produced by the background plasma and the sink is the collisional transport processes that slow down or scatter the energetic particles. The mathematical techniques that are needed to address this applied problem can be demonstrated in the much simpler bump-on-tail problem, which is explained in this paper.

  2. Numerical simulation of coastal flows when solar radiation is blocked by smoke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molenkamp, C. R.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Smoke from fires ignited in a large-scale nuclear exchange would greatly reduce the flux of solar radiation at the ground and lead to rapid cooling over continental regions. Because of its large heat capacity, the ocean would cool more slowly so that a thermal gradient would tend to develop at the continental coastlines. In order to investigate the hypothesis that these thermal gradients would lead to zones of persistent precipitation along the coastlines, a modified version of the Colorado State University Mesoscale Model has been used to simulate the evolution of atmospheric flows for both West and East coasts assuming a moderate westerly synoptic flow of 5 m s/sup /minus/1/. In both cases a layer of fog forms over the ground, effectively limiting the rate of cooling over land. This fog layer grows in height as the atmosphere aloft cools, forming a stratus cloud. Moisture from the ocean surface, mixed vertically into a radiatively cooled atmosphere, causes a cloud layer to form over the ocean as well. With both land and sea covered by clouds, there is no differential cooling, anomalous flow fields, or enhanced precipitation. These simulations also demonstrate the important role of moisture in moderating the initial rate of atmospheric cooling when solar radiation is blocked by smoke.

  3. Accelerating Dissipative Particle Dynamics Simulations on GPUs: Algorithms, Numerics and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Yu-Hang

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a scalable dissipative particle dynamics simulation code, fully implemented on the Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) using a hybrid CUDA/MPI programming model, which achieves 10-30 times speedup on a single GPU over 16 CPU cores and almost linear weak scaling across a thousand nodes. A unified framework is developed within which the efficient generation of the neighbor list and maintaining particle data locality are addressed. Our algorithm generates strictly ordered neighbor lists in parallel, while the construction is deterministic and makes no use of atomic operations or sorting. Such neighbor list leads to optimal data loading efficiency when combined with a two-level particle reordering scheme. A faster in situ generation scheme for Gaussian random numbers is proposed using precomputed binary signatures. We designed custom transcendental functions that are fast and accurate for evaluating the pairwise interaction. The correctness and accuracy of the code is verified through a set of test cases ...

  4. Numerical simulation of the stochastic dynamics of inclusions in biomembranes in presence of surface tension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Rafii-Tabar; H. R. Sepangi

    2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The stochastic dynamics of inclusions in a randomly fluctuating biomembrane is simulated. These inclusions can represent the embedded proteins and the external particles arriving at a cell membrane. The energetics of the biomembrane is modelled via the Canham-Helfrich Hamiltonian. The contributions of both the bending elastic-curvature energy and the surface tension of the biomembrane are taken into account. The biomembrane is treated as a two-dimensional sheet whose height variations from a reference frame is treated as a stochastic Wiener process. The lateral diffusion parameter associated with this Wiener process coupled with the longitudinal diffusion parameter obtained from the standard Einsteinian diffusion theory completely determine the stochastic motion of the inclusions. It is shown that the presence of surface tension significantly affects the overall dynamics of the inclusions, particularly the rate of capture of the external inclusions, such as drug particles, at the site of the embedded inclusions, such as the embedded proteins.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Superfast Shock-Induced Chemical Reaction in Titanium - Silicon Mixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zelepugin, S. A. [Dept. for Structural Macrokinetics, Tomsk Scientific Centre, SD RAS, Tomsk, 634021 (Russian Federation); Nikulichev, V. B. [Kyrgyz-Russian Slavonic University, Bishkek, 720000 (Kyrgyzstan); Ivanova, O. V. [Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A phenomenological zeroth-order kinetic model for computations of shock-induced solid-state chemical reactions in porous mixtures is proposed. In the model a porous mixture is considered as a continuous medium whose thermomechanical properties are determined at each time step depending on mass fractions of the components. The kinetic relationships are characterized by a constant rate of chemical transformation under shock wave loading. The heat release due to chemical transformation is introduced in the energy equation. The effect of the dispersity of the mixture components on the reaction rate is taken into account by varying the constants that enter the kinetic model. The results of the numerical computations for porous Ti-Si mixture reflect the fact that the process can be divided into several stages (dynamic compaction, shock-wave propagation, reaction of synthesis). It is shown that an increase in the chemical-reaction rate can give rise to flow regimes in which the unloading wave almost stops.

  6. PROBABILISTIC SIMULATION OF SUBSURFACE FLUID FLOW: A STUDY USING A NUMERICAL SCHEME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buscheck, Timothy Eric

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been an increasing interest in probabilistic modeling of hydrogeologic systems. The classical approach to groundwater modeling has been deterministic in nature, where individual layers and formations are assumed to be uniformly homogeneous. Even in the case of complex heterogeneous systems, the heterogeneities describe the differences in parameter values between various layers, but not within any individual layer. In a deterministic model a single-number is assigned to each hydrogeologic parameter, given a particular scale of interest. However, physically there is no such entity as a truly uniform and homogeneous unit. Single-number representations or deterministic predictions are subject to uncertainties. The approach used in this work models such uncertainties with probabilistic parameters. The resulting statistical distributions of output variables are analyzed. A numerical algorithm, based on axiomatic principles of probability theory, performs arithmetic operations between probability distributions. Two subroutines are developed from the algorithm and incorporated into the computer program TERZAGI, which solves groundwater flow problems in saturated, multi-dimensional systems. The probabilistic computer program is given the name, PROGRES. The algorithm has been applied to study the following problems: one-dimensional flow through homogeneous media, steady-state and transient flow conditions, one-dimensional flow through heterogeneous media, steady-state and transient flow conditions, and two-dimensional steady-stte flow through heterogeneous media. The results are compared with those available in the literature.

  7. Two-dimensional numerical simulation of a Stirling engine heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibrahim, M.B. [Cleveland State Univ., OH (United States); Tew, R.C.; Dudenhoefer, J.E. [Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the first phase of an effort to develop multidimensional models of Stirling engine components; the ultimate goal is to model an entire engine working space. More specifically, this paper describes parallel plate and tubular heat exchanger models with emphasis on the central part of the channel (i.e., ignoring hydrodynamic and thermal end effects). The model assumes: Laminar, incompressible flow with constant thermophysical properties. In addition, a constant axial temperature gradient is imposed. The governing equations, describing the model, have been solved Crack-Nicloson finite-difference scheme. Model predictions have been compared with analytical solutions for oscillating/reversing flow and heat transfer in order to check numerical accuracy. The simplifying assumptions will later be relaxed to permit modeling of incompressible, laminar/turbulent flow that occurs in Stirling heat exchanger. Excellent agreement has been obtained for the model predictions with analytical solutions available for both flow in circular tubes and between parallel plates. Also the heat transfer computational results are in good agreement with the heat transfer analytical results for parallel plates.

  8. Excluded Volume Effects in Polymer Solutions: II. Comparison of Experimental Results with Numerical Simulation Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graessley, W.W.; Grest, G.S.; Hayward, R.C.

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of excluded volume on the coil size of dilute linear polymers was investigated by off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations. The radius of gyration R{sub g} was evaluated for a wide range of chain lengths at several temperatures and at the athermal condition. The theta temperature and the corresponding theta chain dimensions were established for the system, and the dependence of the size expansion factor, a{sub s} = R{sub g} /(R{sub g}){sub {theta}}, on chain length N and temperature T was examined. For long chains and at high temperatures, a{sub s} is a function of N/N{sub s}{sup 2} alone, where the length scale N{sub s}{sup 2} depends only on T. The form of this simulations-based master function compares favorably with {alpha}{sub s}(M/M{sub s}{sup 2}), an experimental master curve for linear polymers in good solvents, where M{sub s}{sup 2} depends only on polymer-solvent system. Comparisons when N{sub s}{sup 2}(T) and M{sub s}{sup 2}(system) are reduced to common units, numbers of Kuhn steps, strongly indicate that coil expansion in even the best of good solvents is small relative to that expected for truly athermal solutions. An explanation for this behavior is proposed, based on what would appear to be an inherent difference in the equation of state properties for polymeric and monomeric liquids.

  9. The Ohio River Valley CO2 Storage Project AEP Mountaineer Plant, West Virginia Numerical Simulation and Risk Assessment Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeraj Gupta

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of numerical simulations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection were conducted as part of a program to assess the potential for geologic sequestration in deep geologic reservoirs (the Rose Run and Copper Ridge formations), at the American Electric Power (AEP) Mountaineer Power Plant outside of New Haven, West Virginia. The simulations were executed using the H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2}-NaCl operational mode of the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator (White and Oostrom, 2006). The objective of the Rose Run formation modeling was to predict CO{sub 2} injection rates using data from the core analysis conducted on the samples. A systematic screening procedure was applied to the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} storage site utilizing the Features, Elements, and Processes (FEP) database for geological storage of CO{sub 2} (Savage et al., 2004). The objective of the screening was to identify potential risk categories for the long-term geological storage of CO{sub 2} at the Mountaineer Power Plant in New Haven, West Virginia. Over 130 FEPs in seven main classes were assessed for the project based on site characterization information gathered in a geological background study, testing in a deep well drilled on the site, and general site conditions. In evaluating the database, it was apparent that many of the items were not applicable to the Mountaineer site based its geologic framework and environmental setting. Nine FEPs were identified for further consideration for the site. These FEPs generally fell into categories related to variations in subsurface geology, well completion materials, and the behavior of CO{sub 2} in the subsurface. Results from the screening were used to provide guidance on injection system design, developing a monitoring program, performing reservoir simulations, and other risk assessment efforts. Initial work indicates that the significant FEPs may be accounted for by focusing the storage program on these potential issues. The screening method was also useful in identifying unnecessary items that were not significant given the site-specific geology and proposed scale of the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} Storage Project. Overall, the FEP database approach provides a comprehensive methodology for assessing potential risk for a practical CO{sub 2} storage application. An integrated numerical fate and transport model was developed to enable risk and consequence assessment at field scale. Results show that such an integrated modeling effort would be helpful in meeting the project objectives (such as site characterization, engineering, permitting, monitoring and closure) during different stages. A reservoir-scale numerical model was extended further to develop an integrated assessment framework which can address the risk and consequence assessment, monitoring network design and permitting guidance needs. The method was used to simulate sequestration of CO{sub 2} in moderate quantities at the Mountaineer Power Plant. Results indicate that at the relatively low injection volumes planned for pilot scale demonstration at this site, the risks involved are minor to negligible, owing to a thick, low permeability caprock and overburden zones. Such integrated modeling approaches coupled with risk and consequence assessment modeling are valuable to project implementation, permitting, monitoring as well as site closure.

  10. Numerical simulation of the plasma current quench following a disruptive energy loss

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strickler, D.J.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Holmes, J.A.; Miller, J.B.; Rothe, K.E.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The plasma electromagnetic interaction with poloidal field coils and nearby passive conductor loops during the current quench following a disruptive loss of plasma energy is simulated. By solving a differential/algebraic system consisting of a set of circuit equations (including the plasma circuit) coupled to a plasma energy balance equation and an equilibrium condition, the electromagnetic consequences of an abrupt thermal quench are observed. Limiters on the small and large major radium sides of the plasma are assumed to define the plasma cross section. The presence of good conductors near the plasma and a small initial distance (i.e., 5 to 10% of the plasma minor radius) between the plasma edge and an inboard limiter are shown to lead to long current decay times. For a plasma with an initial major radius R/sub o/ = 4.3 m, aspect ratio A = 3.6, and current I/sub P/ = 4.0 MA, introducing nearby passive conductors lengthens the current decay from milliseconds to hundreds of milliseconds.

  11. Numerical simulations of stick percolation: Application to the study of structured magnetorheologial elastomers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. L. Mietta; R. M. Negri; P. I. Tamborenea

    2014-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we explore how structural parameters of composites filled with one-dimensional, electrically conducting elements (such as sticks, needles, chains, or rods) affect the percolation properties of the system. To this end, we perform Monte Carlo simulations of asymmetric two-dimensional stick systems with anisotropic alignments. We compute the percolation probability functions in the direction of preferential orientation of the percolating objects and in the orthogonal direction, as functions of the experimental structural parameters. Among these, we considered the average length of the sticks, the standard deviation of the length distribution, and the standard deviation of the angular distribution. We developed a computer algorithm capable of reproducing and verifying known theoretical results for isotropic networks and which allows us to go beyond and study anisotropic systems of experimental interest. Our research shows that the total electrical anisotropy, considered as a direct consequence of the percolation anisotropy, depends mainly on the standard deviation of the angular distribution and on the average length of the sticks. A conclusion of practical interest is that we find that there is a wide and well-defined range of values for the mentioned parameters for which it is possible to obtain reliable anisotropic percolation under relatively accessible experimental conditions when considering composites formed by dispersions of sticks, oriented in elastomeric matrices.

  12. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    previous seismic experiments and earthquake-monitoring projects, and data donated from mining, geothermal, and petroleum companies. We also collected (May 2002 and August 2004) two...

  13. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

  14. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

  15. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

  16. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    vein structure associated with ore deposits. References David D. Blackwell, Richard P. Smith, Al Waibel, Maria C. Richards, Patrick Stepp (2009) Why Basin and Range Systems are...

  17. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    springs, and fumaroles. These samples were analyzed for noble gas abundances and their helium isotropic compositions. It was found that the geothermal fluids range from 0.70 to...

  18. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the Fenton Hill HDR Reservoir Donald W. Brown (1994) How to Achieve a Four-Fold Productivity Increase at Fenton Hill Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.org...

  19. Modeling-Computer Simulations (Gritto & Majer) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman WindMoana Geothermal AreaImpactsGritto

  20. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman WindMoana

  1. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman WindMoana(Tempel, Et Al., 2011) | Open

  2. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman WindMoana(Tempel, Et Al., 2011)Reiter,(Wilt

  3. Modeling-Computer Simulations (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis of Energy Demand

  4. Modeling-Computer Simulations (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis of Energy

  5. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983) | Open(Battaglia, Et

  6. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983) | Open(Battaglia,

  7. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983) |

  8. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983)(Roberts, Et Al.,

  9. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983)(Roberts, Et

  10. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983)(Roberts, EtGeothermal

  11. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Yellowstone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983)(Roberts,(Laney,|

  12. Finite-rate chemistry and transient effects in Direct Numerical Simulations of turbulent non-premixed flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahalingam, S. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Vervisch, L. [Institut de Mecanique des Fluides, Numeriques (France)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of turbulent non-premixed flames including finite-rate chemistry and heat release effects were performed. Two chemical reaction models were considered: (1) a single-step global reaction model in which the heat release and activation energy parameters are chosen to model methane-air combustion, and (2) a two-step reaction model to simulate radical production and consumption and to compare against the single-step model. The model problem consists of the interaction between an initially unstrained laminar diffusion flame and a three-dimensional field of homogeneous turbulence. Conditions ranging from fast chemistry to the pure mixing limit were studied by varying a global Damkoehler number. Results suggest that turbulence-induced mixing acting along the stoichiometric line leads to a strong modification of the inner structure of the turbulent flame compared with a laminar strained flame, resulting in intermediate species concentrations well above the laminar prediction. This result is consistent with experimental observations. Comparison of the response of the turbulent flame structure due to changes in the scalar dissipation rate with a steady strained laminar flame reveals that unsteady strain rates experienced by the turbulent flame may be responsible for the observed high concentrations of reaction intermediates.

  13. A numerical simulation study of gallium-phosphide/silicon heterojunction passivated emitter and rear solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Hannes [Department of Solar Energy, Institute Solid-State Physics, Leibniz University of Hannover, Appelstr. 2, 30167 Hannover (Germany); ARC Photovoltaics Centre of Excellence, University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Ohrdes, Tobias [Institute for Solar Energy Research Hamelin (ISFH), 31860 Emmerthal (Germany); Dastgheib-Shirazi, Amir [Div. Photovoltaics, Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz (Germany); Puthen-Veettil, Binesh; König, Dirk [ARC Photovoltaics Centre of Excellence, University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Altermatt, Pietro P. [Department of Solar Energy, Institute Solid-State Physics, Leibniz University of Hannover, Appelstr. 2, 30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of passivated emitter and rear (PERC) solar cells made of p-type Si wafers is often limited by recombination in the phosphorus-doped emitter. To overcome this limitation, a realistic PERC solar cell is simulated, whereby the conventional phosphorus-doped emitter is replaced by a thin, crystalline gallium phosphide (GaP) layer. The resulting GaP/Si PERC cell is compared to Si PERC cells, which have (i) a standard POCl{sub 3} diffused emitter, (ii) a solid-state diffused emitter, or (iii) a high efficiency ion-implanted emitter. The maximum efficiencies for these realistic PERC cells are between 20.5% and 21.2% for the phosphorus-doped emitters (i)–(iii), and up to 21.6% for the GaP emitter. The major advantage of this GaP hetero-emitter is a significantly reduced recombination loss, resulting in a higher V{sub oc}. This is so because the high valence band offset between GaP and Si acts as a nearly ideal minority carrier blocker. This effect is comparable to amorphous Si. However, the GaP layer can be contacted with metal fingers like crystalline Si, so no conductive oxide is necessary. Compared to the conventional PERC structure, the GaP/Si PERC cell requires a lower Si base doping density, which reduces the impact of the boron-oxygen complexes. Despite the lower base doping, fewer rear local contacts are necessary. This is so because the GaP emitter shows reduced recombination, leading to a higher minority electron density in the base and, in turn, to a higher base conductivity.

  14. An investigation of the effect of pore scale flow on average geochemical reaction rates using direct numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafa, S. Molins; Trebotich, D.; Steefel, C. I.; Shen, C.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scale-dependence of geochemical reaction rates hinders their use in continuum scale models intended for the interpretation and prediction of chemical fate and transport in subsurface environments such as those considered for geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Processes that take place at the pore scale, especially those involving mass transport limitations to reactive surfaces, may contribute to the discrepancy commonly observed between laboratory-determined and continuum-scale or field rates. Here, the dependence of mineral dissolution rates on the pore structure of the porous media is investigated by means of pore scale modeling of flow and multicomponent reactive transport. The pore scale model is comprised of high performance simulation tools and algorithms for incompressible flow and conservative transport combined with a general-purpose multicomponent geochemical reaction code. The model performs direct numerical simulation of reactive transport based on an operator-splitting approach to coupling transport and reactions. The approach is validated with a Poiseuille flow single-pore experiment and verified with an equivalent 1D continuum-scale model of a capillary tube packed with calcite spheres. Using the case of calcite dissolution as an example, the high resolution model is used to demonstrate that non-uniformity in the flow field at the pore scale has the effect of decreasing the overall reactivity of the system, even when systems with identical reactive surface area are considered. The effect becomes more pronounced as the heterogeneity of the reactive grain packing increases, particularly where the flow slows sufficiently such that the solution approaches equilibrium locally and the average rate becomes transport-limited.

  15. Numerical simulation studies of gas production scenarios from hydrate accumulations at the Mallik Site, McKenzie Delta, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, George J.; Collett, Timothy S.; Dallimore, Scott R.; Satoh, Tohru; Hancock, Stephen; Weatherill, Brian

    2002-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mallik site represents an onshore permafrost-associated gas hydrate accumulation in the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada. An 1150 m deep gas hydrate research well was drilled at the site in 1998. The objective of this study is the analysis of various gas production scenarios from several gas-hydrate-bearing zones at the Mallik site. The TOUGH2 general-purpose simulator with the EOSHYDR2 module were used for the analysis. EOSHYDR2 is designed to model the non-isothermal CH{sub 4} (methane) release, phase behavior and flow under conditions typical of methane-hydrate deposits by solving the coupled equations of mass and heat balance, and can describe any combination of gas hydrate dissociation mechanisms. Numerical simulations indicated that significant gas hydrate production at the Mallik site was possible by drawing down the pressure on a thin free-gas zone at the base of the hydrate stability field. Gas hydrate zones with underlying aquifers yielded significant gas production entirely from dissociated gas hydrate, but large amounts of produced water. Lithologically isolated gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs with no underlying free gas or water zones, and gas-hydrate saturations of at least 50% were also studied. In these cases, it was assumed that thermal stimulation by circulating hot water in the well was the method used to induce dissociation. Sensitivity studies indicated that the methane release from the hydrate accumulations increases with gas-hydrate saturation, the initial formation temperature, the temperature of the circulating water in the well, and the formation thermal conductivity. Methane production appears to be less sensitive to the rock and hydrate specific heat and permeability of the formation.

  16. Study of Particle Rotation Effect in Gas-Solid Flows using Direct Numerical Simulation with a Lattice Boltzmann Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwon, Kyung; Fan, Liang-Shih; Zhou, Qiang; Yang, Hui

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A new and efficient direct numerical method with second-order convergence accuracy was developed for fully resolved simulations of incompressible viscous flows laden with rigid particles. The method combines the state-of-the-art immersed boundary method (IBM), the multi-direct forcing method, and the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). First, the multi-direct forcing method is adopted in the improved IBM to better approximate the no-slip/no-penetration (ns/np) condition on the surface of particles. Second, a slight retraction of the Lagrangian grid from the surface towards the interior of particles with a fraction of the Eulerian grid spacing helps increase the convergence accuracy of the method. An over-relaxation technique in the procedure of multi-direct forcing method and the classical fourth order Runge-Kutta scheme in the coupled fluid-particle interaction were applied. The use of the classical fourth order Runge-Kutta scheme helps the overall IB-LBM achieve the second order accuracy and provides more accurate predictions of the translational and rotational motion of particles. The preexistent code with the first-order convergence rate is updated so that the updated new code can resolve the translational and rotational motion of particles with the second-order convergence rate. The updated code has been validated with several benchmark applications. The efficiency of IBM and thus the efficiency of IB-LBM were improved by reducing the number of the Lagragian markers on particles by using a new formula for the number of Lagrangian markers on particle surfaces. The immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method (IBLBM) has been shown to predict correctly the angular velocity of a particle. Prior to examining drag force exerted on a cluster of particles, the updated IB-LBM code along with the new formula for the number of Lagrangian markers has been further validated by solving several theoretical problems. Moreover, the unsteadiness of the drag force is examined when a fluid is accelerated from rest by a constant average pressure gradient toward a steady Stokes flow. The simulation results agree well with the theories for the short- and long-time behavior of the drag force. Flows through non-rotational and rotational spheres in simple cubic arrays and random arrays are simulated over the entire range of packing fractions, and both low and moderate particle Reynolds numbers to compare the simulated results with the literature results and develop a new drag force formula, a new lift force formula, and a new torque formula. Random arrays of solid particles in fluids are generated with Monte Carlo procedure and Zinchenko's method to avoid crystallization of solid particles over high solid volume fractions. A new drag force formula was developed with extensive simulated results to be closely applicable to real processes over the entire range of packing fractions and both low and moderate particle Reynolds numbers. The simulation results indicate that the drag force is barely affected by rotational Reynolds numbers. Drag force is basically unchanged as the angle of the rotating axis varies.

  17. Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 13901395 Numerical Simulation of Replacing Oil by Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovych, Roman

    ­1395 Numerical Simulation of Replacing Oil by Water in a Scale-Invariant Porous Medium Ekaterina P. KUROCHKINA with 2563 grid in spatial variables. 1 Introduction The interface of oil displaced by water is unstable a significant influence on the transport of water and oil. The permeability heterogenei- ty is often identified

  18. The effect of flame structure on soot formation and transport in turbulent nonpremixed flames using direct numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lignell, David O. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84098 (United States); Reacting Flow Research Department, Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Chen, Jacqueline H. [Reacting Flow Research Department, Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Smith, Philip J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84098 (United States); Lu, Tianfeng; Law, Chung K. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct numerical simulations of a two-dimensional, nonpremixed, sooting ethylene flame are performed to examine the effects of soot-flame interactions and transport in an unsteady configuration. A 15-step, 19-species (with 10 quasi-steady species) chemical mechanism was used for gas chemistry, with a two-moment, four-step, semiempirical soot model. Flame curvature is shown to result in flames that move, relative to the fluid, either toward or away from rich soot formation regions, resulting in soot being essentially convected into or away from the flame. This relative motion of flame and soot results in a wide spread of soot in the mixture fraction coordinate. In regions where the center of curvature of the flame is in the fuel stream, the flame motion is toward the fuel and soot is located near the flame at high temperature and hence has higher reaction rates and radiative heat fluxes. Soot-flame breakthrough is also observed in these regions. Fluid convection and flame displacement velocity relative to fluid convection are of similar magnitudes while thermophoretic diffusion is 5-10 times lower. These results emphasize the importance of both unsteady and multidimensional effects on soot formation and transport in turbulent flames. (author)

  19. Numerical simulations of the transport and diffusion during the 1991 Winter Validation Study along the Front Range in Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, J.D.; O'Steen, B.L.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An important aspect of the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program is the development and evaluation of numerical models that predict transport and diffusion of pollutants in complex terrain. Operational mesoscale modeling of the transport of pollutants in complex terrain will become increasingly practical as computational costs decrease and additional data from high-resolution remote sensing instrumentation networks become available during the 1990s. Four-dimensional data assimilation (4DDA) techniques are receiving a great deal of attention recently not only to improve the initial conditions of mesoscale forecast models, but to create high-quality four-dimensional mesoscale analysis fields that can be used as input to air-quality models. In this study, a four-dimensional data assimilation technique based on Newtonian relaxation is incorporated into the Colorado State University (CSU) Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) and evaluated using data taken from one experiment of the 1991 ASCOT field study along the front range of the Rockies in Colorado. The main objective of this study is to compare the observed surface concentrations with those predicted by a Lagrangian particle dispersion model and to demonstrate the effect of data assimilation on the simulated plume. In contrast to pervious studies in which the smallest horizontal grid spacing was 10 km (Stauffer and Seaman, 1991) and 8 km (Yamada and Hermi, 1991), data assimilation is applied in this study to domains with a horizontal grid spacing as small as 1 km.

  20. Numerical simulations of the transport and diffusion during the 1991 Winter Validation Study along the Front Range in Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, J.D.; O`Steen, B.L.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An important aspect of the US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program is the development and evaluation of numerical models that predict transport and diffusion of pollutants in complex terrain. Operational mesoscale modeling of the transport of pollutants in complex terrain will become increasingly practical as computational costs decrease and additional data from high-resolution remote sensing instrumentation networks become available during the 1990s. Four-dimensional data assimilation (4DDA) techniques are receiving a great deal of attention recently not only to improve the initial conditions of mesoscale forecast models, but to create high-quality four-dimensional mesoscale analysis fields that can be used as input to air-quality models. In this study, a four-dimensional data assimilation technique based on Newtonian relaxation is incorporated into the Colorado State University (CSU) Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) and evaluated using data taken from one experiment of the 1991 ASCOT field study along the front range of the Rockies in Colorado. The main objective of this study is to compare the observed surface concentrations with those predicted by a Lagrangian particle dispersion model and to demonstrate the effect of data assimilation on the simulated plume. In contrast to pervious studies in which the smallest horizontal grid spacing was 10 km (Stauffer and Seaman, 1991) and 8 km (Yamada and Hermi, 1991), data assimilation is applied in this study to domains with a horizontal grid spacing as small as 1 km.

  1. Analysis of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh/Taylor unstable flow using direct numerical simulation data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schilling, Oleg; Mueschke, Nicholas J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from a 1152X760X1280 direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a transitional Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer modeled after a small Atwood number water channel experiment is used to comprehensively investigate the structure of mean and turbulent transport and mixing. The simulation had physical parameters and initial conditions approximating those in the experiment. The budgets of the mean vertical momentum, heavy-fluid mass fraction, turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate, heavy-fluid mass fraction variance, and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance dissipation rate equations are constructed using Reynolds averaging applied to the DNS data. The relative importance of mean and turbulent production, turbulent dissipationmore »and destruction, and turbulent transport are investigated as a function of Reynolds number and across the mixing layer to provide insight into the flow dynamics not presently available from experiments. The analysis of the budgets supports the assumption for small Atwood number, Rayleigh/Taylor driven flows that the principal transport mechanisms are buoyancy production, turbulent production, turbulent dissipation, and turbulent diffusion (shear and mean field production are negligible). As the Reynolds number increases, the turbulent production in the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate equation becomes the dominant production term, while the buoyancy production plateaus. Distinctions between momentum and scalar transport are also noted, where the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate both grow in time and are peaked near the center plane of the mixing layer, while the heavy-fluid mass fraction variance and its dissipation rate initially grow and then begin to decrease as mixing progresses and reduces density fluctuations. All terms in the transport equations generally grow or decay, with no qualitative change in their profile, except for the pressure flux contribution to the total turbulent kinetic energy flux, which changes sign early in time (a countergradient effect). The production-to-dissipation ratios corresponding to the turbulent kinetic energy and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance are large and vary strongly at small evolution times, decrease with time, and nearly asymptote as the flow enters a self-similar regime. The late-time turbulent kinetic energy production-to-dissipation ratio is larger than observed in shear-driven turbulent flows. The order of magnitude estimates of the terms in the transport equations are shown to be consistent with the DNS at late-time, and also confirms both the dominant terms and their evolutionary behavior. These results are useful for identifying the dynamically important terms requiring closure, and assessing the accuracy of the predictions of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and large-eddy simulation models of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh-Taylor instability-generated flow.« less

  2. Analysis of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh/Taylor unstable flow using direct numerical simulation data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schilling, Oleg [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mueschke, Nicholas J. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from a 1152X760X1280 direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a transitional Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer modeled after a small Atwood number water channel experiment is used to comprehensively investigate the structure of mean and turbulent transport and mixing. The simulation had physical parameters and initial conditions approximating those in the experiment. The budgets of the mean vertical momentum, heavy-fluid mass fraction, turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate, heavy-fluid mass fraction variance, and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance dissipation rate equations are constructed using Reynolds averaging applied to the DNS data. The relative importance of mean and turbulent production, turbulent dissipation and destruction, and turbulent transport are investigated as a function of Reynolds number and across the mixing layer to provide insight into the flow dynamics not presently available from experiments. The analysis of the budgets supports the assumption for small Atwood number, Rayleigh/Taylor driven flows that the principal transport mechanisms are buoyancy production, turbulent production, turbulent dissipation, and turbulent diffusion (shear and mean field production are negligible). As the Reynolds number increases, the turbulent production in the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate equation becomes the dominant production term, while the buoyancy production plateaus. Distinctions between momentum and scalar transport are also noted, where the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate both grow in time and are peaked near the center plane of the mixing layer, while the heavy-fluid mass fraction variance and its dissipation rate initially grow and then begin to decrease as mixing progresses and reduces density fluctuations. All terms in the transport equations generally grow or decay, with no qualitative change in their profile, except for the pressure flux contribution to the total turbulent kinetic energy flux, which changes sign early in time (a countergradient effect). The production-to-dissipation ratios corresponding to the turbulent kinetic energy and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance are large and vary strongly at small evolution times, decrease with time, and nearly asymptote as the flow enters a self-similar regime. The late-time turbulent kinetic energy production-to-dissipation ratio is larger than observed in shear-driven turbulent flows. The order of magnitude estimates of the terms in the transport equations are shown to be consistent with the DNS at late-time, and also confirms both the dominant terms and their evolutionary behavior. These results are useful for identifying the dynamically important terms requiring closure, and assessing the accuracy of the predictions of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and large-eddy simulation models of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh-Taylor instability-generated flow.

  3. High-accuracy numerical simulation of black-hole binaries: Computation of the gravitational-wave energy flux and comparisons with post-Newtonian approximants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Boyle; Alessandra Buonanno; Lawrence E. Kidder; Abdul H. Mroué; Yi Pan; Harald P. Pfeiffer; Mark A. Scheel

    2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Expressions for the gravitational wave (GW) energy flux and center-of-mass energy of a compact binary are integral building blocks of post-Newtonian (PN) waveforms. In this paper, we compute the GW energy flux and GW frequency derivative from a highly accurate numerical simulation of an equal-mass, non-spinning black hole binary. We also estimate the (derivative of the) center-of-mass energy from the simulation by assuming energy balance. We compare these quantities with the predictions of various PN approximants (adiabatic Taylor and Pade models; non-adiabatic effective-one-body (EOB) models). We find that Pade summation of the energy flux does not accelerate the convergence of the flux series; nevertheless, the Pade flux is markedly closer to the numerical result for the whole range of the simulation (about 30 GW cycles). Taylor and Pade models overestimate the increase in flux and frequency derivative close to merger, whereas EOB models reproduce more faithfully the shape of and are closer to the numerical flux, frequency derivative and derivative of energy. We also compare the GW phase of the numerical simulation with Pade and EOB models. Matching numerical and untuned 3.5 PN order waveforms, we find that the phase difference accumulated until $M \\omega = 0.1$ is -0.12 radians for Pade approximants, and 0.50 (0.45) radians for an EOB approximant with Keplerian (non-Keplerian) flux. We fit free parameters within the EOB models to minimize the phase difference, and confirm degeneracies among these parameters. By tuning pseudo 4PN order coefficients in the radial potential or in the flux, or, if present, the location of the pole in the flux, we find that the accumulated phase difference can be reduced - if desired - to much less than the estimated numerical phase error (0.02 radians).

  4. NUMERICAL DETERMINATION AND TREATMENT OF CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT IN THE COUPLED BUILDING ENERGY AND CFD SIMULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    BUILDING ENERGY AND CFD SIMULATION Zhiqiang Zhai* Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural, IN 47907-2088, USA ABSTRACT The integration of building Energy Simulation (ES) and Computational Fluid, Energy Simulation, CFD, Coupling INTRODUCTION A building energy simulation (ES) program predicts building

  5. Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for estimates of the oil and gas flow rate from the Macondoteam and carried out oil and gas flow simulations using theoil-gas system. The flow of oil and gas was simulated using

  6. Towards Real Earth Models --Computational Geophysics on Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farquharson, Colin G.

    Towards Real Earth Models -- Computational Geophysics on Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes? Colin tetrahedral meshes. EM geophysics on unstructured tetrahedral meshes. Disadvantages, difficulties, challenges. Conclusions. #12;Outline: Geological models! Advantages of unstructured tetrahedral meshes. EM geophysics

  7. Long-term simulation of turbulence-induced loads using the SNLWIND-3D, FAST, YawDyn, and ADAMS numerical codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, N.D.; Wright, A.D.; Buhl, M.L. Jr.; Tangler, J.L.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Notable progress was made in simulating the dynamic response of operating wind turbines during the past several years. In concert with these activities, the ability to adequately simulate the characteristics of the turbulent inflow, which is directly or indirectly responsible for much of the observed response, has also improved significantly. Recent investigations have shown that without such inflow simulations, it is often difficult to predict fatigue-load distributions that agree with observations. In this paper we discuss the results of a numerical experiment in which we simulated representative diurnal variations in the inflow environments for two distinct locations within a multi-row wind farm: upwind of the first and downwind of the last row of turbines. With the SNLWIND-3D turbulence simulation code, we created a series of 144, 10-minute inflow records that are likely to occur individually within a 24-hour period at each location. An upwind, rigid-hub, three-bladed turbine was modeled with the Yaw Dynamics (YawDyn) and Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical Systems (ADAMS) simulation codes while a downwind, teetered-hub, two-bladed turbine was simulated with the Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures, and Turbulence (FAST) code and ADAMS. We found good to excellent agreement between the codes themselves in predicting the flapwise bending load spectra, and with limited test data.

  8. Investigation of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence and mixing using direct numerical simulation with experimentally-measured initial conditions. I. Comparison to experimental data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueschke, N; Schilling, O

    2008-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1152 x 760 x 1280 direct numerical simulation (DNS) using initial conditions, geometry, and physical parameters chosen to approximate those of a transitional, small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing experiment [Mueschke, Andrews and Schilling, J. Fluid Mech. 567, 27 (2006)] is presented. The density and velocity fluctuations measured just off of the splitter plate in this buoyantly unstable water channel experiment were parameterized to provide physically-realistic, anisotropic initial conditions for the DNS. The methodology for parameterizing the measured data and numerically implementing the resulting perturbation spectra in the simulation is discussed in detail. The DNS model of the experiment is then validated by comparing quantities from the simulation to experimental measurements. In particular, large-scale quantities (such as the bubble front penetration hb and the mixing layer growth parameter {alpha}{sub b}), higher-order statistics (such as velocity variances and the molecular mixing parameter {theta}), and vertical velocity and density variance spectra from the DNS are shown to be in favorable agreement with the experimental data. Differences between the quantities obtained from the DNS and from experimental measurements are related to limitations in the dynamic range of scales resolved in the simulation and other idealizations of the simulation model. This work demonstrates that a parameterization of experimentally-measured initial conditions can yield simulation data that quantitatively agrees well with experimentally-measured low- and higher-order statistics in a Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer. This study also provides resolution and initial conditions implementation requirements needed to simulate a physical Rayleigh-Taylor mixing experiment. In Part II [Mueschke and Schilling, Phys. Fluids (2008)], other quantities not measured in the experiment are obtained from the DNS and discussed, such as the integral- and Taylor-scale Reynolds numbers, Reynolds stress anisotropy and two-dimensional density and velocity variance spectra, hypothetical chemical product formation measures, other local and global mixing parameters, and the statistical composition of mixed fluid.

  9. Final spin and radiated energy in numerical simulations of binary black holes with equal masses and equal, aligned or anti-aligned spins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel A. Hemberger; Geoffrey Lovelace; Thomas J. Loredo; Lawrence E. Kidder; Mark A. Scheel; Béla Szilágyi; Nicholas W. Taylor; Saul A. Teukolsky

    2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of merging black holes (including the emitted gravitational waves and the properties of the remnant) can currently be computed only by numerical simulations. This paper introduces ten numerical relativity simulations of binary black holes with equal masses and equal spins aligned or anti-aligned with the orbital angular momentum. The initial spin magnitudes have $|\\chi_i| \\lesssim 0.95$ and are more concentrated in the aligned direction because of the greater astrophysical interest of this case. We combine this data with five previously reported simulations of the same configuration, but with different spin magnitudes, including the highest spin simulated to date, $\\chi_i \\approx 0.97$. This data set is sufficiently accurate to enable us to offer improved analytic fitting formulae for the final spin and for the energy radiated by gravitational waves as a function of initial spin. The improved fitting formulae can help to improve our understanding of the properties of binary black hole merger remnants and can be used to enhance future approximate waveforms for gravitational wave searches, such as Effective-One-Body waveforms.

  10. Numerical simulation of single-phase and multiphase non-Darcy flow in porous and fractured reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    flow simulations in fractured reservoirs, Report LBL-15227,behavior of naturally fractured reservoirs, Soc. Pet. Eng.Flow in Porous and Fractured Reservoirs Yu-Shu Wu Earth

  11. Dynamic analysis of the parallel-plate EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) simulator using a wire-mesh approximation and the numerical electromagnetics code. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gedney, S.D.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electromagnetic pulse (EMP) produced by a high-altitude nuclear blast presents a severe threat to electronic systems due to its extreme characteristics. To test the vulnerability of large systems, such as airplanes, missiles, or satellites, they must be subjected to a simulated EMP environment. One type of simulator that has been used to approximate the EMP environment is the Large Parallel-Plate Bounded-Wave Simulator. It is a guided-wave simulator which has properties of a transmission line and supports a single TEM model at sufficiently low frequencies. This type of simulator consists of finite-width parallel-plate waveguides, which are excited by a wave launcher and terminated by a wave receptor. This study addresses the field distribution within a finite-width parallel-plate waveguide that is matched to a conical tapered waveguide at either end. Characteristics of a parallel-plate bounded-wave EMP simulator were developed using scattering theory, thin-wire mesh approximation of the conducting surfaces, and the Numerical Electronics Code (NEC). Background is provided for readers to use the NEC as a tool in solving thin-wire scattering problems.

  12. Numerical simulations of epitaxial growth process in MOVPE reactor as a tool for design of modern semiconductors for high power electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skibinski, Jakub; Wejrzanowski, Tomasz [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Woloska 141, 02507 Warsaw (Poland); Caban, Piotr [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01919 Warsaw (Poland); Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof J. [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering Woloska, 141, 02507 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present study numerical simulations of epitaxial growth of gallium nitride in Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy reactor AIX-200/4RF-S is addressed. Epitaxial growth means crystal growth that progresses while inheriting the laminar structure and the orientation of substrate crystals. One of the technological problems is to obtain homogeneous growth rate over the main deposit area. Since there are many agents influencing reaction on crystal area such as temperature, pressure, gas flow or reactor geometry, it is difficult to design optimal process. According to the fact that it's impossible to determine experimentally the exact distribution of heat and mass transfer inside the reactor during crystal growth, modeling is the only solution to understand the process precisely. Numerical simulations allow to understand the epitaxial process by calculation of heat and mass transfer distribution during growth of gallium nitride. Including chemical reactions in numerical model allows to calculate the growth rate of the substrate and estimate the optimal process conditions for obtaining the most homogeneous product.

  13. Numerical simulations of neutron star mergers as the central engines of short-period gamma-ray bursts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archibald, Richard Andrew

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of fully three dimensional, post-Newtonian hydrodynamical simulations of the dynamical evolution of mergers between compact stellar remnants (neutron stars and black holes). Although the code is ...

  14. Development and verification of a numerical simulator to calculate the bottom hole flowing pressures in multiphase systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasool, Syed Ahmed

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vast amount of research has been conducted on the subject of pressure drop in muldphase flow systems. The simulator developed for this research incorporates the Beggs and Brill model for pressure drop prediction with an equation of state...

  15. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of heat transfer in an annular fuel channel with periodic spacer ribs under a fully developed turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takase, Kazuyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal-hydraulic characteristics in a spacer-ribbed annular fuel channel for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors were analyzed numerically by three-dimensional computations under a fully developed turbulent flow. The two-equation {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model was applied in the present turbulent analysis, and the turbulence model constants for eddy viscosity and the turbulent Prandtl number were improved from the previous standard values to increase the accuracy of numerical simulations. Consequently, heat transfer coefficients and friction factors in the spacer-ribbed fuel channel were predicted with sufficient accuracy in the range of Reynolds number >3,000. It was clarified quantitatively that the main mechanism for heat transfer augmentation in the spacer-ribbed fuel channel was a combined effect of the turbulence promoter effect by the spacer rib and the velocity acceleration effect by a reduction in the channel cross section.

  16. 19th. AIAA-CEAS Aeroacoutics Conference, May 28th 2013, Berlin Dynamic Modeling and Numerical Simulation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xun

    19th. AIAA-CEAS Aeroacoutics Conference, May 28th 2013, Berlin Dynamic Modeling and Numerical was presented in this paper. By this control-oriented model, transient dynamic process of multi-physics coupling problem in a progressive wave tube could be approximately studied. The proposed model is verified

  17. A controlled distributed parameter model for a fluid-flexible structure system: numerical simulations and experiment validations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baudouin, Lucie

    A controlled distributed parameter model for a fluid-flexible structure system: numerical consider the problem of active reduction of vibrations in a fluid-flexible structure system and the sloshing of the fuel inside the wing's tank. The control is performed using piezoelectric patches

  18. Numerical Simulations of Violent Free Surface by a Coupled Level-Set and Volume-of-Fluid Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yucheng

    2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................................ 57 4.6 3D Dam Breaking Flow ................................................................................ 59 4.7 3D Dam Breaking Flow with Cylindrical Pillar ............................................ 62 CHAPTER V SLOSHING FLOW... IN PARTIALLY FILLED LNG TANK ....... 65 5.1 Introduction ................................................................................................... 65 5.2 Experimental and Numerical Setups...

  19. Numerical Simulation of Sediment Particles Released at the Edge of the Viscous Sublayer in Steady and Oscillating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scotti, Alberto

    fluctuations due to the oscillatory free stream are usually confined within a thin oscillating boundary layer3 and Oscillating Turbulent Boundary Layers Yeon S. Changa) and Alberto Scottib) Department of Marine Sciences In this report we studied numerically the movement of suspended sediments in a turbulent boundary layer over

  20. Testing the accuracy of the Hydro-PM approximation in numerical simulations of the Lyman-alpha forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo Viel; Martin G. Haehnelt; Volker Springel

    2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We implement the hydro-PM (HPM) technique (Gnedin & Hui 1998) in the hydrodynamical simulation code GADGET-II and quantify the differences between this approximate method and full hydrodynamical simulations of the Lyman-alpha forest in a concordance LCDM model. At redshifts z=3 and z=4, the differences between the gas and dark matter (DM) distributions, as measured by the one-point distribution of density fluctuations, the density power spectrum and the flux power spectrum, systematically decrease with increasing resolution of the HPM simulqation. However, reducing these differences to less than a few percent requires a significantly larger number of grid-cells than particles, with a correspondingly larger demand for memory. Significant differences in the flux decrement distribution remain even for very high resolution hydro-PM simulations, particularly at low redshift. At z=2, the differences between the flux power spectra obtained from HPM simulations and full hydrodynamical simulations are generally large and of the order of 20-30 %, and do not decrease with increasing resolution of the HPM simulation. This is due to the presence of large amounts of shock-heated gas, a situation which is not adequately modelled by the HPM approximation. We confirm the results of Gnedin & Hui (1998) that the statistical properties of the flux distribution are discrepant by > 5-20 % when compared to full hydrodynamical simulations. The discrepancies in the flux power spectrum are strongly scale- and redshift-dependent and extend to large scales. Considerable caution is needed in attempts to use calibrated HPM simulations for quantitative predictions of the flux power spectrum and other statistical properties of the Lyman-alpha forest.

  1. Numerical simulations of rubber networks at moderate to high tensile strains using a purely enthalpic force extension curve for individual chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, David Edward [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of numerical simulations of random, three-dimensional, periodic, tetrafunctional networks in response to a volume-preserving tensile strain. For the intranode force, we use a polynomial fit to a purely enthalpic ab initio force extension curve for extended polyisoprene. The simulation includes a relaxation procedure to minimize the node forces and enforces chain rupture when the extension of a network chain reaches the ab initio rupture strain. For the reasonable assumption that the distribution of network chain lengths is Gaussian, we find that the calculated snap-back velocity, temperature increase due to chain ruptures and predicted tensile stress versus strain curve are consistent with experimental data in the moderate to high extension regime. Our results show that a perfect tetrafunctional polyisoprene network is extremely robust, capable of supporting tensile stresses at least a factor of 10 greater than what is observed experimentally.

  2. Numerical simulation of the non-isothermal developing flow of a nonlinear viscoelastic fluid in a rectangular channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikoleris, Teo

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid in a Rectangular Channel (December 1988) Teo Nikoleris, B. S. , Reed College Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. R. Darby An orthogonal collocation finite element program was used to numerically model the hydrodynamicslly and thermally... in negligible increase of Nw~ ~?. Also, the approach of Chang and Finlayson [6], [7] who applied orthogonal collocation finite elements in conjunction with bicubic Hermitian polynomials to approximate various viscoelastic flow problems, also met with little...

  3. Numerical simulation of the electromagnetic fields excited by loop antennas in plasma in the whistler frequency range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koldanov, V. A.; Korobkov, S. V.; Gushchin, M. E.; Kostrov, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Applied Physics (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The electromagnetic fields excited by circular loop antennas in a magnetized plasma in the whistler frequency range are simulated by the finite-difference time-domain method. The spatial structure of quasi-monochromatic fields excited in the near- and far-field zones by an antenna with a harmonic current, as well as the dynamics of the electromagnetic field excited by an antenna with a current in the form of a single video pulse, is studied. Simulations performed for a uniform plasma and uniform ambient magnetic field agree well with the results of theoretical analysis and model laboratory experiments performed on large-scale plasma devices.

  4. J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 136 (2006) 157166 A LagrangianEulerian approach for the numerical simulation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinch, John

    CB3 0WA, UK b University of Cambridge, BP Institute & Engineering Department, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0EZ, UK Received 17 January 2006; received in revised form 11 April 2006; accepted 11 April of view. Rasmussen and Hassager [1,2] simulate creeping flows of viscoelastic fluids described

  5. APPLICATION OF THE REDUCTION OF SCALE RANGE IN A LORENTZ BOOSTED FRAME TO THE NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF PARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    -principles (e.g., Particle-In-Cell), for particle acceler- ation devices or problems such as: particle beams OF PARTICLE J.-L. Vay , W. M. Fawley, C. G. R. Geddes, E. Cormier-Michel, LBNL, Berkeley, CA, USA D. P. Grote to perform computer simulations in a boosted frame for a certain class of systems: particle beams inter

  6. 43rd AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, Jan 1013, Reno, Nevada Direct numerical simulation of turbulent jets in crossflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahesh, Krishnan

    simulation of turbulent jets in crossflow Suman Muppidi and Krishnan Mahesh University of Minnesota crossflow. The velocity ratio of the jet to that of the crossflow is 5.7 and the Reynolds number based agreement. I. Introduction A jet in crossflow is defined as the flow field where a jet of fluid enters

  7. Numerical simulation of the fluid flow and heat transfer processes during scavenging in a two-stroke engine under steady-state conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castro Gouveia, M. de; Reis Parise, J.A. dos; Nieckele, A.O. (Pontificia Univ. Catolica, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical simulation of the scavenging process in a two-stroke flat-piston model engine has been developed. Air enters the cylinder circumferentially, inducting a three-dimensional turbulent swirling flow. The problem was modeled as a steady-state axisymmetric flow through a cylinder with uniform wall temperature. The steady-state regime was simulated by assuming the piston head fixed at the bottom dead center. The calculation was performed employing the {kappa}-{epsilon} model of turbulence. A comparison of the results obtained for the flow field with available experimental data showed very good agreement, and a comparison with an available numerical solution revealed superior results. The effects of the Reynolds number, inlet port angles, and engine geometry on the flow and in-cylinder heat transfer characteristics were investigated. The Nusselt number substantially increases with larger Reynolds numbers and a smaller bore-to-stroke ratio. It is shown that the positioning of the exhaust value(s) is the main parameter to control the scavenging process.

  8. Numerically Simulating the Hydrodynamic and Water Quality Environment for Migrating Salmon in the Lower Snake River, 2002-2003 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, C.; Richmond, M.; Coleman, A. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer temperatures in the Lower Snake River can be altered by releasing cold waters that originate from deep depths within Dworshak Reservoir. These cold releases are used to lower temperatures in the Clearwater and Lower Snake Rivers and to improve hydrodynamic and water quality conditions for migrating aquatic species. This project monitored the complex three-dimensional hydrodynamic and thermal conditions at the Clearwater and Snake River confluence and the processes that led to stratification of Lower Granite Reservoir (LGR) during the late spring, summer, and fall of 2002. Hydrodynamic, water quality, and meteorological conditions around the reservoir were monitored at frequent intervals, and this effort is continuing in 2003. Monitoring of the reservoir is a multi-year endeavor, and this report spans only the first year of data collection. In addition to monitoring the LGR environment, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic and water quality model has been applied. This model uses field data as boundary conditions and has been applied to the entire 2002 field season. Numerous data collection sites were within the model domain and serve as both calibration and validation locations for the numerical model. Errors between observed and simulated data varied in magnitude from location to location and from one time to another. Generally, errors were small and within expected ranges, although, as additional 2003 field data becomes available, model parameters may be improved to minimize differences between observed and simulated values. A two-dimensional, laterally-averaged hydrodynamic and water quality model was applied to the three reservoirs downstream of LGR (the pools behind Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and Ice Harbor Dams). A two-dimensional model is appropriate for these reservoirs because observed lateral thermal variations during summer and fall 2002 were almost negligible; however, vertical thermal variations were quite large (see USACE 2003). The numerical model was applied to each reservoir independently to simulate the time period between May 1 and October 1, 2002. Differences between observed and simulated data were small, although improvements to model coefficients may be performed as additional thermal data, collected in the reservoirs during 2003, becomes available.

  9. Investigation of HCCI Combustion of Diethyl Ether and Ethanol Mixtures Using Carbon 14 Tracing and Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mack, J H; Dibble, R W; Buchholz, B A; Flowers, D L

    2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the rapid combustion typically experienced in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), components in fuel mixtures do not ignite in unison or burn equally. In our experiments and modeling of blends of diethyl ether (DEE) and ethanol (EtOH), the DEE led combustion and proceeded further toward completion, as indicated by {sup 14}C isotope tracing. A numerical model of HCCI combustion of DEE and EtOH mixtures supports the isotopic findings. Although both approaches lacked information on incompletely combusted intermediates plentiful in HCCI emissions, the numerical model and {sup 14}C tracing data agreed within the limitations of the single zone model. Despite the fact that DEE is more reactive than EtOH in HCCI engines, they are sufficiently similar that we did not observe a large elongation of energy release or significant reduction in inlet temperature required for light-off, both desired effects for the combustion event. This finding suggests that, in general, HCCI combustion of fuel blends may have preferential combustion of some of the blend components.

  10. Modeling pure methane hydrate dissociation using a numerical simulator from a novel combination of X-ray computed tomography and macroscopic data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, A.; Moridis, G.J.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Sloan, Jr., E.D.

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The numerical simulator TOUGH+HYDRATE (T+H) was used to predict the transient pure methane hydrate (no sediment) dissociation data. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to visualize the methane hydrate formation and dissociation processes. A methane hydrate sample was formed from granular ice in a cylindrical vessel, and slow depressurization combined with thermal stimulation was applied to dissociate the hydrate sample. CT images showed that the water produced from the hydrate dissociation accumulated at the bottom of the vessel and increased the hydrate dissociation rate there. CT images were obtained during hydrate dissociation to confirm the radial dissociation of the hydrate sample. This radial dissociation process has implications for dissociation of hydrates in pipelines, suggesting lower dissociation times than for longitudinal dissociation. These observations were also confirmed by the numerical simulator predictions, which were in good agreement with the measured thermal data during hydrate dissociation. System pressure and sample temperature measured at the sample center followed the CH{sub 4} hydrate L{sub w}+H+V equilibrium line during hydrate dissociation. The predicted cumulative methane gas production was within 5% of the measured data. Thus, this study validated our simulation approach and assumptions, which include stationary pure methane hydrate-skeleton, equilibrium hydrate-dissociation and heat- and mass-transfer in predicting hydrate dissociation in the absence of sediments. It should be noted that the application of T+H for the pure methane hydrate system (no sediment) is outside the general applicability limits of T+H.

  11. Numerical simulation of operation modes in atmospheric pressure uniform barrier discharge excited by a saw-tooth voltage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Xuechen; Niu Dongying; Yin Zengqian [College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Fang Tongzhen; Wang Long [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The characteristics of dielectric barrier discharge excited by a saw-tooth voltage are simulated in atmospheric pressure helium based on a one-dimensional fluid model. A stepped discharge is obtained per half voltage cycle with gas gap width less than 2 mm by the simulation, which is different to the pulsed discharge excited by a sinusoidal voltage. For the stepped discharge, the plateau duration increases with increasing the voltage amplitude and decreasing the gas gap. Therefore, uniform discharge with high temporal duty ratio can be realized with small gap through increasing the voltage amplitude. The maximal densities of both electron and ion appear near the anode and the electric field is almost uniformly distributed along the gap, which indicates that the stepped discharge belongs to a Townsend mode. In contrast to the stepped discharge with small gas gap, a pulsed discharge can be obtained with large gas gap. Through analyzing the spatial density distributions of electron and ion and the electric field, the pulsed discharge is in a glow mode. The voltage-current (V-I) characteristics are analyzed for the above mentioned discharges under different gas gaps, from which the different discharge modes are verified.

  12. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF c 2008 Institute for Scientific NUMERICAL ANALYSIS AND MODELING Computing and Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Sourabh V.

    in rivers, fluidized beds, coal-based oxy-fuel combustion cham- bers, biomass gasifiers, among others is first validated for flow over a fixed sphere at various Reynolds numbers and flow generated by a freely

  13. Developments in Petroleum Science, 6 FUNDAMENTALS OF NUMERICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Developments in Petroleum Science, 6 FUNDAMENTALS OF NUMERICAL RESERVOIR SIMULATION DONALD WCongressCatalogingin PublicationData Peaceman, Donald W Fundamentals of numerical reservoir simulation. (develrpents in petroleum

  14. Numerical simulations used for a validity check on the laser induced photo-detachment diagnostic method in electronegative plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oudini, N. [Laboratoire des plasmas de décharges, Centre de Développement des Technologies Avancées, Cité du 20 Aout BP 17 Baba Hassen, 16081 Algiers (Algeria); Taccogna, F. [Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi, CNR, via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy); Bendib, A. [Laboratoire d'Electronique Quantique, Faculté de Physique, USTHB, El Alia BP 32, Bab Ezzouar 16111, Algiers (Algeria); Aanesland, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas (CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Univ Paris-Sud), École Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser photo-detachment is used as a method to measure or determine the negative ion density and temperature in electronegative plasmas. In essence, the method consists of producing an electropositive channel (negative ion free region) via pulsed laser photo-detachment within an electronegative plasma bulk. Electrostatic probes placed in this channel measure the change in the electron density. A second pulse might be used to track the negative ion recovery. From this, the negative ion density and temperature can be determined. We study the formation and relaxation of the electropositive channel via a two-dimensional Particle-In-Cell/Mote Carlo collision model. The simulation is mainly carried out in a Hydrogen plasma with an electronegativity of ??=?1, with a parametric study for ? up to 20. The temporal and spatial evolution of the plasma potential and the electron densities shows the formation of a double layer (DL) confining the photo-detached electrons within the electropositive channel. This DL evolves into two fronts that move in the opposite directions inside and outside of the laser spot region. As a consequence, within the laser spot region, the background and photo-detached electron energy distribution function relaxes/thermalizes via collisionless effects such as Fermi acceleration and Landau damping. Moreover, the simulations show that collisional effects and the DL electric field strength might play a non-negligible role in the negative ion recovery within the laser spot region, leading to a two-temperature negative ion distribution. The latter result might have important effects in the determination of the negative ion density and temperature from laser photo detachment diagnostic.

  15. Regionalization of subsurface stormflow parameters of hydrologic models: Up-scaling from physically based numerical simulations at hillslope scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Melkamu; Ye, Sheng; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Fiori, Aldo; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface stormflow is an important component of the rainfall-runoff response, especially in steep forested regions. However; its contribution is poorly represented in current generation of land surface hydrological models (LSMs) and catchment-scale rainfall-runoff models. The lack of physical basis of common parameterizations precludes a priori estimation (i.e. without calibration), which is a major drawback for prediction in ungauged basins, or for use in global models. This paper is aimed at deriving physically based parameterizations of the storage-discharge relationship relating to subsurface flow. These parameterizations are derived through a two-step up-scaling procedure: firstly, through simulations with a physically based (Darcian) subsurface flow model for idealized three dimensional rectangular hillslopes, accounting for within-hillslope random heterogeneity of soil hydraulic properties, and secondly, through subsequent up-scaling to the catchment scale by accounting for between-hillslope and within-catchment heterogeneity of topographic features (e.g., slope). These theoretical simulation results produced parameterizations of the storage-discharge relationship in terms of soil hydraulic properties, topographic slope and their heterogeneities, which were consistent with results of previous studies. Yet, regionalization of the resulting storage-discharge relations across 50 actual catchments in eastern United States, and a comparison of the regionalized results with equivalent empirical results obtained on the basis of analysis of observed streamflow recession curves, revealed a systematic inconsistency. It was found that the difference between the theoretical and empirically derived results could be explained, to first order, by climate in the form of climatic aridity index. This suggests a possible codependence of climate, soils, vegetation and topographic properties, and suggests that subsurface flow parameterization needed for ungauged locations must account for both the physics of flow in heterogeneous landscapes, and the co-dependence of soil and topographic properties with climate, including possibly the mediating role of vegetation.

  16. Three-Dimensional Characteristics of Post-CHF Behaviour Within a Rod Bundle for Loss-of-Flow Simulation: Experimental and Three-Fluid Porous Media Numerical Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stosic, Zoran V. [Framatome ANP GmbH, PO Box 3220, Erlangen, 91050 (Germany); Stevanovic, Vladimir D. [University of Belgrade, Kraljice Marije 16, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Yugoslavia); Tadashi Iguchi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura 319-1195 (Japan)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The investigation of three-dimensional transient propagations of dry-out fronts within a nuclear fuel rod bundle is performed, based on experimental and numerical simulations. The spreading of Critical Heat Flux (CHF) fronts across a bundle, caused by sudden decrease of coolant mass flow rate followed by delayed gradual decrease of power generation is predicted, and the locus of dry patches is shown. Simultaneous occurrence of CHF and re-wet multi-fronts in here-analysed flow transient has not been detected so obvious as in power transient, previously analysed. Due to a possible building of a vapour zone, the CHF front spatial propagation has to be carefully analysed in transient conditions. (authors)

  17. Numerical simulations of a loop quantum cosmos: robustness of the quantum bounce and the validity of effective dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Diener; Brajesh Gupt; Parampreet Singh

    2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A key result of isotropic loop quantum cosmology is the existence of a quantum bounce which occurs when the energy density of the matter field approaches a universal maximum close to the Planck density. Though the bounce has been exhibited in various matter models, due to severe computational challenges some important questions have so far remained unaddressed. These include the demonstration of the bounce for widely spread states, its detailed properties for the states when matter field probes regions close to the Planck volume and the reliability of the continuum effective spacetime description in general. In this manuscript we rigorously answer these questions using the Chimera numerical scheme for the isotropic spatially flat model sourced with a massless scalar field. We show that as expected from an exactly solvable model, the quantum bounce is a generic feature of states even with a very wide spread, and for those which bounce much closer to the Planck volume. We perform a detailed analysis of the departures from the effective description and find some expected, and some surprising results. At a coarse level of description, the effective dynamics can be regarded as a good approximation to the underlying quantum dynamics unless the states correspond to small scalar field momenta, in which case they bounce closer to the Planck volume, or are very widely spread. Quantifying the amount of discrepancy between the quantum and the effective dynamics, we find that the departure between them depends in a subtle and non-monotonic way on the field momentum and different fluctuations. Interestingly, the departures are generically found to be such that the effective dynamics overestimates the spacetime curvature, and underestimates the volume at the bounce.

  18. Development of a Two-fluid Drag Law for Clustered Particles using Direct Numerical Simulation and Validation through Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gokaltun, Seckin; Munroe, Norman; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents a new drag model, based on the cohesive inter-particle forces, implemented in the MFIX code. This new drag model combines an existing standard model in MFIX with a particle-based drag model based on a switching principle. Switches between the models in the computational domain occur where strong particle-to-particle cohesion potential is detected. Three versions of the new model were obtained by using one standard drag model in each version. Later, performance of each version was compared against available experimental data for a fluidized bed, published in the literature and used extensively by other researchers for validation purposes. In our analysis of the results, we first observed that standard models used in this research were incapable of producing closely matching results. Then, we showed for a simple case that a threshold is needed to be set on the solid volume fraction. This modification was applied to avoid non-physical results for the clustering predictions, when governing equation of the solid granular temperate was solved. Later, we used our hybrid technique and observed the capability of our approach in improving the numerical results significantly; however, improvement of the results depended on the threshold of the cohesive index, which was used in the switching procedure. Our results showed that small values of the threshold for the cohesive index could result in significant reduction of the computational error for all the versions of the proposed drag model. In addition, we redesigned an existing circulating fluidized bed (CFB) test facility in order to create validation cases for clustering regime of Geldart A type particles.

  19. Constraints on the Self-Interaction Cross-Section of Dark Matter from Numerical Simulations of the Merging Galaxy Cluster 1E 0657-5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott W. Randall; Maxim Markevitch; Douglas Clowe; Anthony H. Gonzalez; Marusa Bradac

    2007-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    (Abridged) We compare recent results from X-ray, strong lensing, weak lensing, and optical observations with numerical simulations of the merging galaxy cluster 1E0657-56. X-ray observations reveal a bullet-like subcluster with a prominent bow shock, while lensing results show that the positions of the total mass peaks are consistent with the centroids of the collisionless galaxies (and inconsistent with the X-ray brightness peaks). Previous studies, based on older observational datasets, have placed upper limits on the self-interaction cross-section of dark matter per unit mass, sigma/m, using simplified analytic techniques. In this work, we take advantage of new, higher-quality observational datasets by running N-body simulations of 1E0657-56 that include the effects of self-interacting dark matter, and comparing the results with observations. Furthermore, the recent data allow for a new independent method of constraining sigma/m, based on the non-observation of an offset between the bullet subcluster mass peak and galaxy centroid. This new method places an upper limit (68% confidence) of sigma/m cold dark matter model and observations.

  20. Numerical simulations of depressurization-induced gas production from gas hydrate reservoirs at the Walker Ridge 312 site, northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myshakin, Evgeniy M.; Gaddipati, Manohar; Rose, Kelly; Anderson, Brian J.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2009, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Gas Hydrates Joint-Industry-Project (JIP) Leg II drilling program confirmed that gas hydrate occurs at high saturations within reservoir-quality sands in the GOM. A comprehensive logging-while-drilling dataset was collected from seven wells at three sites, including two wells at the Walker Ridge 313 site. By constraining the saturations and thicknesses of hydrate-bearing sands using logging-while-drilling data, two-dimensional (2D), cylindrical, r-z and three-dimensional (3D) reservoir models were simulated. The gas hydrate occurrences inferred from seismic analysis are used to delineate the areal extent of the 3D reservoir models. Numerical simulations of gas production from the Walker Ridge reservoirs were conducted using the depressurization method at a constant bottomhole pressure. Results of these simulations indicate that these hydrate deposits are readily produced, owing to high intrinsic reservoir-quality and their proximity to the base of hydrate stability. The elevated in situ reservoir temperatures contribute to high (5–40 MMscf/day) predicted production rates. The production rates obtained from the 2D and 3D models are in close agreement. To evaluate the effect of spatial dimensions, the 2D reservoir domains were simulated at two outer radii. The results showed increased potential for formation of secondary hydrate and appearance of lag time for production rates as reservoir size increases. Similar phenomena were observed in the 3D reservoir models. The results also suggest that interbedded gas hydrate accumulations might be preferable targets for gas production in comparison with massive deposits. Hydrate in such accumulations can be readily dissociated due to heat supply from surrounding hydrate-free zones. Special cases were considered to evaluate the effect of overburden and underburden permeability on production. The obtained data show that production can be significantly degraded in comparison with a case using impermeable boundaries. The main reason for the reduced productivity is water influx from the surrounding strata; a secondary cause is gas escape into the overburden. The results dictate that in order to reliably estimate production potential, permeability of the surroundings has to be included in a model.

  1. Numerical Simulation of PulseTube Refrigerators: 1D model I.A. Lyulina 1 , R.M.M. Mattheij 1 , A.S. Tijsseling 1 , A.T.A.M. de Waele 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    Numerical Simulation of Pulse­Tube Refrigerators: 1D model I.A. Lyulina 1 , R.M.M. Mattheij 1 , A of a pulse­tube refrigerator. Conservation equations describing compressible gas flow in the tube are solved, calculate the average enthalpy flow and estimate the refrigeration power. Keywords: pulse­tube refrigerator

  2. Uncertainty and error in computational simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Diegert, K.V.; Alvin, K.F.; Rutherford, B.M.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper addresses the question: ``What are the general classes of uncertainty and error sources in complex, computational simulations?`` This is the first step of a two step process to develop a general methodology for quantitatively estimating the global modeling and simulation uncertainty in computational modeling and simulation. The second step is to develop a general mathematical procedure for representing, combining and propagating all of the individual sources through the simulation. The authors develop a comprehensive view of the general phases of modeling and simulation. The phases proposed are: conceptual modeling of the physical system, mathematical modeling of the system, discretization of the mathematical model, computer programming of the discrete model, numerical solution of the model, and interpretation of the results. This new view is built upon combining phases recognized in the disciplines of operations research and numerical solution methods for partial differential equations. The characteristics and activities of each of these phases is discussed in general, but examples are given for the fields of computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer. They argue that a clear distinction should be made between uncertainty and error that can arise in each of these phases. The present definitions for uncertainty and error are inadequate and. therefore, they propose comprehensive definitions for these terms. Specific classes of uncertainty and error sources are then defined that can occur in each phase of modeling and simulation. The numerical sources of error considered apply regardless of whether the discretization procedure is based on finite elements, finite volumes, or finite differences. To better explain the broad types of sources of uncertainty and error, and the utility of their categorization, they discuss a coupled-physics example simulation.

  3. Numerical simulation in oil recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, M.F.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major research emphasis in this book is on the modeling of fractures, heterogeneities, viscous fingering, and diffusion-dispersion effects in the flow in porous media. This volume contains seventeen papers on the latest developments. Its diverse presentation brings together the various disciplines of applied mathematics, chemical engineering, physics and hydrology.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Transpiration Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University, Templergraben 55, 52056 Aachen SUMMARY Transpiration cooling using ceramic matrix composite (CMC

  5. Building ventilation: A pressure airflow model computer generation and elements of validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, H; Adelard, L; Mara, T A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The calculation of airflows is of great importance for detailed building thermal simulation computer codes, these airflows most frequently constituting an important thermal coupling between the building and the outside on one hand, and the different thermal zones on the other. The driving effects of air movement, which are the wind and the thermal buoyancy, are briefly outlined and we look closely at their coupling in the case of buildings, by exploring the difficulties associated with large openings. Some numerical problems tied to the resolving of the non-linear system established are also covered. Part of a detailled simulation software (CODYRUN), the numerical implementation of this airflow model is explained, insisting on data organization and processing allowing the calculation of the airflows. Comparisons are then made between the model results and in one hand analytical expressions and in another and experimental measurements in case of a collective dwelling.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Flow Field Inside a Squeeze Film Damper and the Study of the Effect of Cavitation on the Pressure Distribution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khandare, Milind Nandkumar

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Squeeze Film Dampers (SFDs) are employed in high-speed Turbomachinery, particularly aircraft jet engines, to provide external damping. Despite numerous successful applications, it is widely acknowledged that the theoretical ...

  7. An Integrated Experimental and Numerical Study: Developing a...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and natural geothermal systems. The simulator can also be used to evaluate long-term CO2 sequestration potentials. State Minnesota Objectives Modify a numerical simulator (TOUGH2)...

  8. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman WindMoana Geothermal

  9. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Coso Geothermal Area (2000) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman WindMoana GeothermalInformation 0

  10. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman WindMoana GeothermalInformation 0Open

  11. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman WindMoana GeothermalInformation

  12. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Geysers Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman WindMoana GeothermalInformationEnergy

  13. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman WindMoana(Tempel, Et Al., 2011) |

  14. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman WindMoana(Tempel, Et Al., 2011) |Energy

  15. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman WindMoana(Tempel, Et Al., 2011)

  16. Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson &

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman WindMoana(Tempel, Et Al., 2011)Reiter,

  17. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Brown &

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis of

  18. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff &

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983) | Open Energy

  19. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983) | Open Energy2008) |

  20. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983) | Open Energy2008)

  1. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Rudman

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983) | Open

  2. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nevada Test And Training Range Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983) |(Sabin, Et Al.,

  3. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983) |(Sabin, Et Al.,Al.,

  4. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blackwell,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983) |(Sabin, Et

  5. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983) |(Sabin, Et2004) |

  6. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983) |(Sabin, Et2004)

  7. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell, Et

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983) |(Sabin, Et2004)Al.,

  8. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983) |(Sabin,

  9. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983) |(Sabin,| Open Energy

  10. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Obsidian Cliff Area (Hulen, Et Al., 2003)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983) |(Sabin,| Open

  11. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983) |(Sabin,| OpenEnergy

  12. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Stillwater Area (Wisian & Blackwell, 2004)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983) |(Sabin,| OpenEnergy|

  13. Modeling-Computer Simulations At The Needles Area (Bell & Ramelli, 2009) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983) |(Sabin,|

  14. Modeling-Computer Simulations At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983) |(Sabin,|Energy

  15. Modeling-Computer Simulations At U.S. West Region (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983) |(Sabin,|EnergyOpen

  16. Modeling-Computer Simulations At U.S. West Region (Williams & Deangelo,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983)

  17. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983)(Roberts,

  18. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983)(Roberts,(Laney, 2005)

  19. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983)(Roberts,(Laney,

  20. Modeling-Computer Simulations At White Mountains Area (Goff & Decker, 1983)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983)(Roberts,(Laney,| Open

  1. Numerical Simulation of the Flow Field in 3D Eccentric Annular and 2D Centered Labyrinth Seals for Comparison with Experimental LDA Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijaykumar, Anand

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The flow field in an annular seal is simulated for synchronous circular whirl orbits with 60Hz whirl frequency and a clearance/radius ratio of 0.0154 using the Fluent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code. Fluent's Moving ...

  2. Numerical Simulation of Flow Field Inside a Squeeze Film Damper and the Study of the Effect of Cavitation on the Pressure Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khandare, Milind Nandkumar

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of SFDs can be expensive and time consuming. The current work simulates the flow field inside the dynamically deforming annular gap of a SFD using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code Fluent and compares the results to the experimental...

  3. Numerical Simulation of the Flow Field in 3D Eccentric Annular and 2D Centered Labyrinth Seals for Comparison with Experimental LDA Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijaykumar, Anand

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The flow field in an annular seal is simulated for synchronous circular whirl orbits with 60Hz whirl frequency and a clearance/radius ratio of 0.0154 using the Fluent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code. Fluent's Moving Reference Frame model...

  4. Numerical simulation of the air flow field in a laboratory fume hood using the CFD-ACE(TM) computational fluid dynamics code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Sousa, Cedric Benedict

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    realized information on the hood entry losses and other design parameters that are of interest to the users, designers and owners of fume hoods. After the specification of the problem and generation of the mesh, the modeled hood was simulated using CFD...

  5. Numerical Simulation of a Premixed Turbulent V-Flame1 , M. S. Day, J. F. Grcar, M. J. Lijewski, M. Johnson, R. K. Cheng and I. G. Shepherd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, John B.

    diffusion. The chemical kinetics are modeled using the DRM- 19 methane mechanism, containing 21 chemical-stabilized premixed turbulent V-flame. The computations use an adaptive projection method based on a low Mach number formulation that incorpo- rates detailed chemical kinetics and transport. The simulations are performed

  6. Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative to volcanic-rock units is exemplified by the large difference in their estimated maximum hydraulic conductivity; 4,000 and 400 feet per day, respectively. Simulated minimum estimates of hydraulic conductivity are inexact and represent the lower detection limit of the method. Minimum thicknesses of lithologic intervals also were defined for comparing AnalyzeHOLE results to hydraulic properties in regional ground-water flow models.

  7. The matching of polymer solution fast filament stretching, relaxation and break up experimental results with 1D and 2D numerical viscoelastic simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vadillo, D.C.; Tembely, M.; Morrison, N.F.; Harlen, O.G.; Mackley, M.R.; Soucemarianadin, A.

    D. C. Vadillo*1, M. Tembely**2, N.F. Morrison3, O. G. Harlen3, M. R. Mackley1 10 and A. Soucemarianadin***2 11 12 1Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, 13 CB2 3RA, UK 14 2Laboratory for Geophysical... . Rasmussen, P-Y. Longin, and O. Hassager, “Growth of non-635 axisymmetric disturbances of the free surface in the filament stretching rheometer: 636 Experiments and simulation,” J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 180, 163–186 (2002). 637 Bazilevsky A. V., V. M...

  8. Numerical simulation of groundwater flow and contaminant transport at the K, L, and P areas of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) as part of the process for continuing operation of three reactors at the Savannah River Site (SRS). As required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the EIS must address the potential environmental consequences to human health and the environment of this major federal action.'' Some of the possible consequences are related to subsurface transport of radionuclides released to seepage basins during normal reactor operation. To assist in the evaluation of the potential subsurface environmental impacts of these releases, Camp Dresser McKee Inc. (CDM) was contracted in June of 1989 to develop a three-dimensional groundwater flow and contaminant transport model which will simulate the movement of radionuclides at each of the reactor areas after they enter the groundwater system through the seepage basins. This report describes the development, calibration, and simulation results of the groundwater flow and contaminant transport model developed for this task. 10 refs., 63 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. A Correction Scheme for Thermal Conductivity Measurement Using the Comparative Cut-bar Technique Based on a 3D Numerical Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas W. Marshall; Changhu Xing; Charles Folsom; Colby Jensen; Heng Ban

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As an important factor affecting the accuracy of the thermal conductivity measurement, systematic (bias) error in the guarded comparative axial heat flow (cut-bar) method was mostly neglected by previous researches. This bias is due primarily to the thermal conductivity mismatch between sample and meter bars (reference), which is common for a sample of unknown thermal conductivity. A correction scheme, based on a finite element simulation of the measurement system, was proposed to reduce the magnitude of the overall measurement uncertainty. This scheme was experimentally validated by applying corrections on four types of sample measurements in which the specimen thermal conductivity is much smaller, slightly smaller, equal and much larger than that of the meter bar. As an alternative to the optimum guarding technique proposed before, the correction scheme can be used to minimize uncertainty contribution from the measurement system with non-optimal guarding conditions. It is especially necessary for large thermal conductivity mismatches between sample and meter bars.

  10. Building ventilation : a pressure airflow model computer generation and elements of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Building ventilation : a pressure airflow model computer generation and elements of validation H when heating a residential building, approximately 30% of the energy loss is due to air renewal[1. Thus in tropical climates, natural ventilation affects essentially the inside comfort by favouring

  11. A Unified RANS-LES Model: Computational Development, Accuracy and Cost1 Harish Gopalana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinz, Stefan

    -Stokes (RANS) methods, applies modeling assumptions to all the scales of motion. The17 use of LES methodsA Unified RANS-LES Model: Computational Development, Accuracy and Cost1 Harish Gopalana , Stefan Heinzb, , Michael K. Stöllingera 2 aMechanical Engineering Department, University of Wyoming, 1000 E

  12. Thorotrast and in vivo thorium dioxide: numerical simulation of 30 years of alpha radiation absorption by the tissues near a large compact source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianconi, Andrea

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The epidemiology of the slightly radioactive contrast agent named Thorotrast presents a very long latency period between the injection and the development of the related pathologies. It is an example of the more general problem posed by a radioactive internal contaminant whose effects are not noteworthy in the short term but become dramatic in the long period. A point that is still to be explored is fluctuations (in space and time) in the localized absorption of radiation by the tissues. Methods: A Monte Carlo simulation code has been developed to study over a 30 year period the daily absorption of alpha radiation by micrometer sized portions of tissue placed at a distance of 0-100 micrometers from a model source, that approximates a compact thorium dioxide source in liver or spleen whose size is larger or equal to 20 micrometers. The biological depletion of the daughter nuclei of the thorium series is taken into account. The initial condition assumes chemically purified natural thorium. Results: ...

  13. Disruptive Innovation in Numerical Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waltz, Jacob I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose the research and development of a high-fidelity hydrodynamic algorithm for tetrahedral meshes that will lead to a disruptive innovation in the numerical modeling of Laboratory problems. Our proposed innovation has the potential to reduce turnaround time by orders of magnitude relative to Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) codes; reduce simulation setup costs by millions of dollars per year; and effectively leverage Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and future Exascale computing hardware. If successful, this work will lead to a dramatic leap forward in the Laboratory's quest for a predictive simulation capability.

  14. The Numerical Approximation of Solutions of ... - Purdue University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    numerical simulation of waterflooding of heterogeneous petroleum reservoirs. Computational Geosciences, 1 (1997). 155–190. J. Douglas, Jr., C.-S. Huang, and ...

  15. Numerical Simulation of Condensation in Transonic Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twente, Universiteit

    set of governing equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 2.3.8 Speed of sound equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 2.3.1 Gas-liquid mixtures of the liquid phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2.3.4 Alternative derivation of Hill's Method

  16. Numerical simulations in laser controlled fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Afanas'ev, Y.V.; Busurina, L.N.; Volosevich, P.P.; Galiguzova, I.I.; Gamalii, E.G.; Gus'kov, S.Y.; Danilova, G.V.; Krokhin, O.N.; Kurdyumov, S.P.; Levanov, E.I.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various theoretical models for the events which occur in laser targets are discussed. Difference methods are used to solve the corresponding problems. The results calculated by the LUCH program at the Institute of Applied Mathematics are compared with experiments carried out in the Kal'mar device (Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow) and in the USA (at the KMS Fusion laboratory) in the Argus and Shiva devices. The theoretical and experimental results are in satisfactory agreement over broad ranges of the laser power density. It is also shown that the results calculated by the code of the Institute of Applied Mathematics and by the code of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LASNEX) under identical physical assumptions are approximately the same.

  17. A numerical sensitivity analysis of streamline simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaban Habib, Fady Ruben

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    of the finite-difference flow equations. In order to find the position of the particle, its movement through a three- dimensional finite-difference cell must be considered. Let?s start with the rate of change in the particle?s x-component of velocity... were performed to determine the effects of various influential elements on the stability and results of the solution. Those experiments were applied to various models to identify the impact of factors such as mobility ratios, mapping of saturation...

  18. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF INCOMPRESSIBLE FLOWS IN ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PDEs by boundary layer or quasi-geostrophic approximations, as well as imposing ... are to be completed with admissible initial and boundary conditions. ... eral practice, especially for spectral approximations, to treat the nonlinear terms .... spectral-Galerkin method in [19] is as good, if not more efficient and accurate, as.

  19. A numerical sensitivity analysis of streamline simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaban Habib, Fady Ruben

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    .9.................................................................................................. 88 4.60 Homogeneous with qinj=50 Bbls/D varying SegIT value.............................. 89 4.61 Homogeneous line to line with qinj=50 Bbls/D using different ? t. ............... 90 4.62 Homogeneous line to block at same PVI using ? t=20... days........................... 92 4.63 Homogeneous line to block at same PVI using ? t=5 days............................. 93 4.64 PermX distribution for heterogeneous model in gravity cases....................... 94 4.65 Heterogeneous line...

  20. Numerical simulation of electrokinetically driven micro flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hahm, Jungyoon

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in a micro-channel is studied. External electric field, flow rate of pressure driven flow, and geometry in the micro-channel are manipulated to obtain the focusing point, which led to determination of the electrophoretic mobility and (relative...

  1. Numerical simulation of sandstone reservoir models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Stephen Joseph

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Case 3 - Alternatin h1 h and low ermeabilities Waterflood performance of the Case 3 reservoir is shown in Figures 19 and 20. The process 1s practically rate insensitive for both the high and low viscosity ratio cases because of the ex istence... The results of the water flood study indicate that lower rates result i n higher waterflood oil recoveries from heterogeneous reservoirs, particularly where high oil-water viscosity ratios exist. These results support the conclusions of Jordan et. al...

  2. Numerical Simulations ANSYS FLUENT 14.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    -cooled divertor with multi-pin array (HEMP) · FZK design1 used array of fins (vs. jet impingement) to cool surface

  3. Numerical Simulation of Free Standing Hybrid Risers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Tiancong

    2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................................... 11 2.2.2 Rotational Spring Boundary Condition ............................................... 12 2.2.3 Clamped Boundary Condition ............................................................. 14 2.2.4 Free Boundary Condition... difficulty. 14 2.2.3 Clamped Boundary Condition In the case of the connection between the vertical riser and upper riser assembly, a stress joint is applied. The stress joint is typically modeled as the clamped boundary condition. In other words...

  4. Numerical Analysis Department Robustness improvement of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    Numerical Analysis Department Robustness improvement of polyhedral mesh method for airbag of polyhedral mesh method for airbag deployment simulations MASTER OF SCIENCE THESIS For the degree of Master entitled ROBUSTNESS IMPROVEMENT OF POLYHEDRAL MESH METHOD FOR AIRBAG DEPLOYMENT SIMULATIONS by SANTIAGO

  5. Geometric Numerical Methods for Numerical Weather Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langdon, Stephen

    -Mesh (HPM) Method · Label space is discretised into N particles with coordinates on the momentum phase space and Sij = (1 - ^2xx)-1. Geometric Numerical Methods for Numerical Weather Prediction ­ p. 8/28 #12;HPM Equations of shallow water motions · The canonical HPM equations of 1D shallow water motion on TS1 are P

  6. Introduction to Focus Issue: Rhythms and Dynamic Transitions in Neurological Disease: Modeling, Computation, and Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaper, Tasso J., E-mail: tasso@bu.edu; Kramer, Mark A., E-mail: mak@bu.edu [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Rotstein, Horacio G., E-mail: horacio@njit.edu [Department of Mathematical Sciences, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Rhythmic neuronal oscillations across a broad range of frequencies, as well as spatiotemporal phenomena, such as waves and bumps, have been observed in various areas of the brain and proposed as critical to brain function. While there is a long and distinguished history of studying rhythms in nerve cells and neuronal networks in healthy organisms, the association and analysis of rhythms to diseases are more recent developments. Indeed, it is now thought that certain aspects of diseases of the nervous system, such as epilepsy, schizophrenia, Parkinson's, and sleep disorders, are associated with transitions or disruptions of neurological rhythms. This focus issue brings together articles presenting modeling, computational, analytical, and experimental perspectives about rhythms and dynamic transitions between them that are associated to various diseases.

  7. Numerical study of high heat ux pool boiling heat transfer Ying He a,*, Masahiro Shoji b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Numerical study of high heat ¯ux pool boiling heat transfer Ying He a,*, Masahiro Shoji b , Shigeo simulation model of boiling heat transfer is proposed based on a numerical macrolayer model [S. Maruyama, M. Shoji, S. Shimizu, A numerical simulation of transition boiling heat transfer, in: Proceedings

  8. High performance computing and numerical modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical methods play an ever more important role in astrophysics. This is especially true in theoretical works, but of course, even in purely observational projects, data analysis without massive use of computational methods has become unthinkable. The key utility of computer simulations comes from their ability to solve complex systems of equations that are either intractable with analytic techniques or only amenable to highly approximative treatments. Simulations are best viewed as a powerful complement to analytic reasoning, and as the method of choice to model systems that feature enormous physical complexity such as star formation in evolving galaxies, the topic of this 43rd Saas Fee Advanced Course. The organizers asked me to lecture about high performance computing and numerical modelling in this winter school, and to specifically cover the basics of numerically treating gravity and hydrodynamics in the context of galaxy evolution. This is still a vast field, and I necessarily had to select a subset ...

  9. LAB #8 Numerical Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Page 1. LAB #8. Numerical Methods. Goal: The purpose of this lab is to explain how computers numerically ... Also you will examine what .... (7) Now consider the differential equation ... 3-exp(2*y)+sqrt(t)/y; (Don't forget the “;” at the end.).

  10. An investigation of the numerical treatment of condensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasson, Joseph

    The simulation of complete condensation continues to challenge the numerical methods currently used for multi-phase flow modeling; especially at low pressures, the change of phase process from a two-phase mixture to liquid ...

  11. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Tidal Current Energy Extraction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Xiaojing

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical and experimental investigations of tidal current energy extraction have been conducted in this study. A laboratory-scale water flume was simulated using commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. ...

  12. Assessment of the MUSTA approach for numerical relativistic dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blakely, P. M.; Nikiforakis, N.; Henshaw, W. D.

    2015-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    waves 1. Introduction The numerical solution of the relativistic hydrodynamical equa- tions is of importance to the simulation of astrophysical phe- nomena such as gamma-ray bursts, supernova core-collapse, and relativistic wind accretion. Although...

  13. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF A FINITE ELEMENT SCHEME FOR THE APPROXIMATION OF HARMONIC MAPS INTO SURFACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartels, Soeren

    NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF A FINITE ELEMENT SCHEME FOR THE APPROXIMATION OF HARMONIC MAPS INTO SURFACES Geometric partial differential equations and their analysis as well as numerical simulation have recently

  14. Numerical Simulation of Liquid-Solid, Solid-Liquid Phase Change Using Finite Element Method in h,p,k Framework with Space-Time Variationally Consistent Integral Forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truex, Michael

    2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase cps Specific Heat in Solid Phase cl Specific Heat in Liquid Phase cpl Specific Heat in Liquid Phase k Thermal Conductivity ks Thermal Conductivity in Solid Phase kl Thermal Conductivity in Liquid Phase L Latent Heat of Fusion Lf Latent Heat... models and the computational infrastructure employed for obtaining numerical solutions of the associated IVPs. 1.1 Mathematical Models First, we consider the mathematical models that are currently used for phase change phenomena. These essentially fall...

  15. Numerical Analysis Gordon K. Smyth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Gordon K.

    Numerical Analysis Gordon K. Smyth May 1997 Numerical analysis is concerned with the accurate discipline of numer­ ical analysis is almost entirely a product of the period since 1950 during which biostatisticians can benefit from familiarity with numerical analysis. An understanding of the numerical methods

  16. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL AND ANALYTICAL METHODS IN GEOMECHANICS Int. J. Numer. Anal. Meth. Geomech., 2002; 26: 925944 (DOI: 10.1002/nag.223)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamann, Bernd

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL AND ANALYTICAL METHODS IN GEOMECHANICS Int. J. Numer. Anal geomechanics Boris Jeremi!cc1, *,y , Gerik Scheuermann2,3 , Jan Frey3 , Zhaohui Yang1 , Bernd Hamann2 , Kenneth is the visualization of stress tensors resulting from 3D numerical simulations in computational geomechanics

  17. RisR1448(EN) Numerical Study of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is the better understanding of the physics of the aeroelastic motion of wind turbine blades in order to improve of wind turbine blades in order to improve the numerical simulation of such dynamical systems. In previous works, both aerodynamic damping cal- culations and fully-coupled aeroelastic simulations of wind turbine

  18. Studied models Numerical scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helluy, Philippe

    : Sound speed: c0 = 1500m/s Pressure: p0 = 105Pa Density: 0 = 1000kg/m3 Vapor: 1 = 1.4 (1 = 0) Water: 2. Helluy, S. M¨uller H´el`ene Mathis Micro-Macro Modelling and Simulation of Liquid-Vapour Flows #12 approximations H´el`ene Mathis Micro-Macro Modelling and Simulation of Liquid-Vapour Flows #12;Studied models

  19. Numerical Integration Gordon K. Smyth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Gordon K.

    Numerical Integration Gordon K. Smyth in Encyclopedia of Biostatistics (ISBN 0471 975761) Edited by Peter Armitage and Theodore Colton John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, 1998 #12;Numerical Integration Numerical integration is the study of how the numerical value of an integral can be found. Also called

  20. Simulations Data Simulation Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    to request different simulations data. The flow chart above demonstrates the different steps and options@ornl.gov) Autotune Drupal 7 CMS Current building energy models (BEMs), using EnergyPlus or other simulations, are unreliable because they have to constantly be calibrated to match actual energy usage data. Currently

  1. Numerical modeling of multiphase plumes: a comparative study between two-fluid and mixed-fluid integral models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhaumik, Tirtharaj

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the physics of multiphase plumes and their simulation through numerical modeling has been an important area of research in recent times in the area of environmental fluid mechanics. The two renowned numerical modeling types...

  2. Task A, High Energy Physics Program experiment and theory: Task B, High Energy Physics Program numerical simulation of quantum field theories. Progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effort of the experimental group has been concentrated on the CERN ALEPH and FERMILAB D0 collider experiments and completion of two fixed target experiments. The BNL fixed target experiment 771 took the world`s largest sample of D(1285) and E/iota(1420) events, using pion, kaon and antiproton beams. Observing the following resonances: 0{sup {minus_plus}} [1280], 1{sup {plus}{plus}} [1280], 0{sup {minus_plus}} [1420], 0{sup {minus_plus}} [1470], 1{sup {plus_minus}} [1415]. The Fermilab fixed target experiment E711, dihadron production in pN interactions at 800 GeV, completed data reduction and analysis. The atomic weight dependence, when parameterized as {sigma}(A) = {sigma}{sub o}A{sup {alpha}}, yielded a value of {alpha} = 1.043 {plus_minus} 0.011 {plus_minus} .012. The cross section per nucleon and angular distributions was also measured as a function of two particle mass and agrees very well with QCD calculations. The D0 Fermilab Collider Experiment E740 began its first data taking run in April 1992. The CERN collider experiment ALEPH at LEP is presently taking more data. The Z mass and width, the couplings to the upper and lower components of the hadronic isospin doublet, forward-backward asymmetries of hadronic events, and measurements of the fragmentation process have been made. The effort of detector development for the SSC has substantially increased with particular emphasis on scintillators, both in fibers and plates. Work has continued on higher-order QCD calculations using the Monte Carlo technique developed previously. This year results for WW, ZZ, WZ, and {sub {gamma}{gamma}} production have been published. A method for incorporating parton showering in such calculations was developed and applied to W production. The multicanonical Monte Carlo algorithm has stood up to the promises anticipated; it was used in multicanonical simulations of first-order phase transitions and for spin glass systems.

  3. The effect of urban canopy parameterizations on mesoscale meteorological model simulations in the Paso del Norte area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M.J.; Williams, M.D.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since mesoscale numerical models do not have the spatial resolution to directly simulate the fluid dynamics and thermodynamics in and around urban structures, urban canopy parameterizations are sometimes used to approximate the drag, heating, and enhanced turbulent kinetic energy (tke) produced by the sub-grid scale urban elements. In this paper, we investigate the effect of the urban canopy parameterizations used in the HOTMAC mesoscale meteorological model by turning the parameterizations on and off. The model simulations were performed in the Paso del Norte region, which includes the cities of El Paso and Ciudad Juarez, the Franklin and Sierra Juarez mountains, and the Rio Grande. The metropolitan area is surrounded by relatively barren scrubland and is intersected by strips of vegetation along the Rio Grande. Results indicate that the urban canopy parameterizations do affect the mesoscale flow field, reducing the magnitude of wind speed and changing the magnitude of the sensible heat flux and tke in the metropolitan area. A nighttime heat island and a daytime cool island exist when urban canopy parameters are turned on, but associated recirculation flows are not readily apparent. Model-computed solar, net, and longwave radiation values look reasonable, agreeing for the most part with published measurements.

  4. 11. NUMERICAL TECHNIQUES 1 Numerical identification of effective multipole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    11. NUMERICAL TECHNIQUES 1 Numerical identification of effective multipole moments of polarizable of the induced multipole moments. A general multipole theory is available in the literature, however, only linear multipole model is usually exploited when determining numerically these effective moments. Since this axial

  5. Method for simulating discontinuous physical systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baty, Roy S. (Albuquerque, NM); Vaughn, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mathematical foundations of conventional numerical simulation of physical systems provide no consistent description of the behavior of such systems when subjected to discontinuous physical influences. As a result, the numerical simulation of such problems requires ad hoc encoding of specific experimental results in order to address the behavior of such discontinuous physical systems. In the present invention, these foundations are replaced by a new combination of generalized function theory and nonstandard analysis. The result is a class of new approaches to the numerical simulation of physical systems which allows the accurate and well-behaved simulation of discontinuous and other difficult physical systems, as well as simpler physical systems. Applications of this new class of numerical simulation techniques to process control, robotics, and apparatus design are outlined.

  6. MESOSCALE SIMULATIONS OF POWDER COMPACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomov, Ilya; Fujino, Don; Antoun, Tarabay; Liu, Benjamin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore CA 94551 (United States)

    2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of shock compaction of metal and ceramic powders have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating a well-characterized shock compaction experiment of a porous ductile metal. Simulation results using the Steinberg material model and handbook values for solid 2024 aluminum showed good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not as well studied as metals, so a simple material model for solid ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powders have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. The numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as that measured experimentally using VISAR. The numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line as observed in experiments. We found that for good quantitative agreement with experiments 3D simulations are essential.

  7. Numerical Integration Gordon K. Smyth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Gordon K.

    Numerical Integration Gordon K. Smyth May 1997 Numerical integration is the study of how the numerical value of an integral can be found. Also called quadrature, which refers to finding a square whose \\Lambda . Of central interest is the process of approximating a definite integral from values of the in

  8. Numerical Analysis Gordon K. Smyth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Gordon K.

    Numerical Analysis Gordon K. Smyth in Encyclopedia of Biostatistics (ISBN 0471 975761) Edited by Peter Armitage and Theodore Colton John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, 1998 #12;Numerical Analysis Numerical analysis is concerned with the accurate and efficient evalua- tion of mathematical expressions

  9. Dynamical Spacetimes from Numerical Hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan Adams; Nathan Benjamin; Arvin Moghaddam; Wojciech Musial

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We numerically construct dynamical asymptotically-AdS$_4$ metrics by evaluating the fluid/gravity metric on numerical solutions of dissipative hydrodynamics in (2+1) dimensions. The resulting numerical metrics satisfy Einstein's equations in (3+1) dimensions to high accuracy.

  10. Lattice Boltzmann Model for Numerical Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilseven, E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Bona-Masso formulation, Einstein equations are written as a set of flux conservative first order hyperbolic equations that resemble fluid dynamics equations. Based on this formulation, we construct a lattice Boltzmann model for Numerical Relativity. Our model is validated with well-established tests, showing good agreement with analytical solutions. Furthermore, we show that by increasing the relaxation time, we gain stability at the cost of losing accuracy, and by decreasing the lattice spacings while keeping a constant numerical diffusivity, the accuracy and stability of our simulations improves. Finally, in order to show the potential of our approach a linear scaling law for parallelisation with respect to number of CPU cores is demonstrated. Our model represents the first step in using lattice kinetic theory to solve gravitational problems.

  11. Simple intrinsic defects in GaAs : numerical supplement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Report presents numerical tables summarizing properties of intrinsic defects in gallium arsenide, GaAs, as computed by density functional theory. This Report serves as a numerical supplement to the results published in: P.A. Schultz and O.A. von Lilienfeld, 'Simple intrinsic defects in GaAs', Modelling Simul. Mater. Sci Eng., Vol. 17, 084007 (2009), and intended for use as reference tables for a defect physics package in device models. The numerical results for density functional theory calculations of properties of simple intrinsic defects in gallium arsenide are presented.

  12. Grid-independent Issue in Numerical Heat Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao Wei; Wang Jian; Liao Guangxuan

    2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Grid independent is associated with the accuracy or even rationality of numerical results. This paper takes two-dimensional steady heat transfer for example to reveal the effect of grid resolution on numerical results. The law of grid dependence is obtained and a simple mathematical formula is presented. The production acquired here can be used as the guidance in choosing grid density in numerical simulation and get exact grid independent value without using infinite fine grid. Through analyzing grid independent, we can find the minimum number of grid cells that is needed to get grid-independent results. Such strategy can save computational resource while ensure a rational computational result.

  13. Assessment of Molecular Modeling & Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2002-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews the development and applications of molecular and materials modeling in Europe and Japan in comparison to those in the United States. Topics covered include computational quantum chemistry, molecular simulations by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, mesoscale modeling of material domains, molecular-structure/macroscale property correlations like QSARs and QSPRs, and related information technologies like informatics and special-purpose molecular-modeling computers. The panel's findings include the following: The United States leads this field in many scientific areas. However, Canada has particular strengths in DFT methods and homogeneous catalysis; Europe in heterogeneous catalysis, mesoscale, and materials modeling; and Japan in materials modeling and special-purpose computing. Major government-industry initiatives are underway in Europe and Japan, notably in multi-scale materials modeling and in development of chemistry-capable ab-initio molecular dynamics codes.

  14. Numerical simulations of the stratified oceanic bottom boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, John R.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    approximation that the mean wave energy and the backgroundfound that only 6% of the wave energy was re?ected back fromfound that the internal wave energy spec- trum in the outer

  15. Numerical simulations of mine penetration in soft sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Zhigang

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by Fig. 2. 1(b): (cr, ? ai)/2 = c (2. 2) 45 45' a' 6s I I I I ds (a) (b) Fig. 2. 1. Failure of a frictioaless, weightless soil under a strip load (after Wu, 1976) The failure mechanism is shown above in Fig. 2. 1(a). Using plastic equilibrium...

  16. Threedimensional numerical simulation of the temperature, potential and concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbin, Raphaèle

    distributions of a unit cell for various geometries of SOFC's Rapha`ele Herbin, Jean­Michel Fiard Universit'e de, SOFC). The physics of fuel cell operation and the simplifying assumptions which are taken into account in the mathematical model are briefly presented in section 2. For a description of the principle of a SOFC, we refer

  17. Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic wave propagation is a common technique used in hydrocarbon exploration geophysics, mining and reservoir characterization and production.

  18. advanced numerical simulations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of chromospheric magnetic reconnection using the CIP-MOCCT scheme. The temperature distribution of the quiet-Sun atmospheric model VALC and the helium abundance (10%) are adopted....

  19. assessment numerical simulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of chromospheric magnetic reconnection using the CIP-MOCCT scheme. The temperature distribution of the quiet-Sun atmospheric model VALC and the helium abundance (10%) are adopted....

  20. advanced numerical simulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of chromospheric magnetic reconnection using the CIP-MOCCT scheme. The temperature distribution of the quiet-Sun atmospheric model VALC and the helium abundance (10%) are adopted....

  1. Physical formulation and numerical algorithm for simulating N ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Dong

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 5, 2014 ... Media 82 (2010) 463–483. .... [41] K.A. Smith, F.J. Solis, D.L. Chopp, A projection method for motion of triple juncations by level sets, Interfaces ...

  2. VERIFICATION OF A NUMERICAL SIMULATION TECHNIQUE FOR NATURAL CONVECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadgil, A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on advanced passive cooling techniques. Systems Analysis andand fabrica- tion techniques. Cooling Systems Research. This

  3. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF TWO-DIMENSIONAL MELTING AND RESOLIDIFICATION OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuwen

    POWDER LAYER IN SELECTIVE LASER SINTERING PROCESS Tiebing Chen and Yuwen Zhang Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Missouri--Columbia, Columbia, Missouri, USA Selective laser sintering technology in the rapid prototyping field. Direct selective laser sintering (SLS) of metal powders

  4. Numerical simulation of two-phase fluid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    diffusive wave (see also Carcione, 2007). Hence, fluid flow and pressure diffusion are phenomena described by the same differential equation. In hydrology and ...

  5. Numerical simulation of fracture mode transition in ductile plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Liang

    Fracture mode of ductile solids can vary depending on the history of stress state the material experienced. For example, ductile plates under remote in-plane loading are often found to rupture in mode I or mixed mode I/III. ...

  6. Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    characterization and production. Local variations in ..... in geological formations is a procedure ... geologic formation at depths typically >1000 m where pressure ...

  7. Course: Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    [6] S. C. Brenner and L. R. Scott, The Mathematical Theory of Finite Element ... media, Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, (198), 2009,.

  8. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent Taylor–Couette flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The hot-wire anemometry measurements by Smith &. Townsend (1982) and Townsend (1984) for a radius ratio 0.667 suggested that for. Taylor numbers below ...

  9. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF RESERVOIR COMPACTION IN LIQUID DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lippmann, M.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    13. modeling of liquid geothermal systems: Ph.D. thesis,of water dominated geothermal fields with large temper~of land subsidence in geothermal areas: Proc. 2nd Int. Symp.

  10. Numerical simulation of three-dimensional electrical flow through geomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akhtar, Anwar Saeed

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    components in different arrangements (Mitchell 1993; Shang et al. 1995). These are very simple models and have been verified by experiments that consider only one-dimensional flow of current. In actual practice, current flow is three-dimensional around... the source. Methods do not exist to analyze three-dimensional current flow through circuit elements other than resistors. Thus, there is a need to develop methods to overcome these shortcomings. Electrical cone penetrometers have been used to convey...

  11. Simulated Composite Baseball Bat Impacts Using Numerical and Experimental Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Lloyd V.

    is synthetic, and commonly used in batting cages. It is injection molded from an air filled rubber and designed yarn wound around a cork and rubber pill, and covered with leather. The second baseball type with a large deflection Hertzian type contact model [3]. For the case of the homogeneous synthetic ball

  12. Contemporary Mathematics A Numerical Simulation of Multicomponent Gas Flow in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ewing, Richard E.

    and gravitational e#11;ects. Traditionally, the standard Darcy equation provides this relation. In this paper, however, we replace this classical law with the Forchheimer equation to model non-Darcy ow [F, RM, HG]. The Forchheimer equation is believed to be more accurate than the classical Darcy's equation for gas ow with high

  13. Sensor and numerical simulator evaluation for porous medium desiccatio...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or humidity. However, a response to the changing conditions was recorded only when the drying front was very close to a sensor. Of the tested instruments, only the heat dissipation...

  14. Numerical Simulation of a Laboratory-Scale Turbulent Slot Flame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, John B.

    detailed chemical kinetics and a mixture model for differential species diffusion. Methane chemistry are performed using an adaptive time-dependent low Mach number combustion algorithm based on a second

  15. Numerical Simulations of Leakage from Underground LPG Storage Caverns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Hajime; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    model contains three propane storage caverns, 10 m wide and3.2.9. The loss of propane from storage is not significant,liquefied propane) was placed in the storage caverns, and

  16. Direct Numerical Simulation of Unsteady Decelerating Flows Yongmann M. Chung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Yongmann M.

    . In contrast, v' and w' do not decrease immediately and show a little delayed response after the pressu

  17. Numerical simulations of supercell interactions with thermal boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Michael Paul

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Storm motion. . d. Storm structure at time of peak surface vertical vorticity. . . . . . 5. ANALYSIS OF THE ORIGINS OF LOW-LEVEL ROTATION. . . . . . . . a. Background. . b. Circulation analyses. . c. Theories for delayed mesocyclogenesis. d. Low...-level mesocyclone strength. e. -3 K circulation, 6. CONCLUSIONS. . Page v V1 V111 13 13 14 22 34 40 42 49 49 52 61 70 73 80 REFERENCES VITA, . Page 89 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Surface mesoanalysis for 6 May 1975. . . . . Surface analysis...

  18. Treatment of physical and numerical diffusion in fluid dynamic simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huh, Kang Yul

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer code is developed to predict the behavior of the hydrogen gas in the containment aftet a loss-ofcoolant accident. The conservation equations for the four components, i.e., air, hydrogen, steam and water, are set ...

  19. Numerical Simulations of Compact Binaries Lawrence E. Kidder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    , Mark Scheel, Bela Szilagyi, Kip Thorne CITA: Harald Pfeiffer Motivation: Gravitational waves Properties gauge source functions key to get common horizon [Lindblom, Szilagyi; arXiv:0904.4873 (2009)] Change

  20. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF MONUMENTS BY THE CONTACT DYNAMICS METHOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    relation for unilateral conditions and Coulomb law as a dry friction law are adopted together constraints problems. It may be complicated so as to take into account dry friction. Remeshing is a costly constraints and large friction. The method is applied to monu- ments made of blocks. The relevance