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Sample records for modeling wildlife densities

  1. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data The Wind Program hosted a...

  2. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A: Workshop Agenda July 2013 Appendix A: Workshop Agenda Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication Dates: July...

  3. Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs among land-use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rissman, Adena

    Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs and services, including timber production, carbon sequestration and storage, scenic amenities, and wildlife habitat. International efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon sequestration

  4. Density Functional Theory Models for Radiation Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Density Functional Theory Models for Radiation Damage S.L. Dudarev EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association and informative as the most advanced experimental techniques developed for the observation of radiation damage investigation and assessment of radiation damage effects, offering new insight into the origin of temperature

  5. Density waves in the Calogero model - revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardek, V. Feinberg, J. Meljanac, S.

    2010-03-15

    The Calogero model bears, in the continuum limit, collective excitations in the form of density waves and solitary modulations of the density of particles. This sector of the spectrum of the model was investigated, mostly within the framework of collective-field theory, by several authors, over the past 15 years or so. In this work we shall concentrate on periodic solutions of the collective BPS-equation (also known as 'finite amplitude density waves'), as well as on periodic solutions of the full static variational equations which vanish periodically (also known as 'large amplitude density waves'). While these solutions are not new, we feel that our analysis and presentation add to the existing literature, as we explain in the text. In addition, we show that these solutions also occur in a certain two-family generalization of the Calogero model, at special points in parameter space. A compendium of useful identities associated with Hilbert transforms, including our own proofs of these identities, appears in Appendix A. In Appendix B we also elucidate in the present paper some fine points having to do with manipulating Hilbert-transforms, which appear ubiquitously in the collective field formalism. Finally, in order to make this paper self-contained, we briefly summarize in Appendix C basic facts about the collective field formulation of the Calogero model.

  6. Utilizing spatial technologies to understand and model wildlife species distributions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugherty, Brad Ellis

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to utilize Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Remote Sensing, and the Global Positioning System (GPS) to develop and test an environmental model. The model was designed to predict, based ...

  7. neutron density. The neutron density (nn) of the source was modeled by solving the simul-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Stuart

    neutron density. The neutron density (nn) of the source was modeled by solving the simul- taneousT is the thermal neutron velocity, l is the decay constant, Ns is the s-process abun- dance, bsÀ is the maxwellian-averaged neutron capture cross-section, and t0 is the average neutron exposure (21). The branching decay of 186Re

  8. Model comparison for the density structure across solar coronal waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arregui, I; Ramos, A Asensio

    2015-01-01

    The spatial variation of physical quantities, such as the mass density, across solar atmospheric waveguides governs the timescales and spatial scales for wave damping and energy dissipation. The direct measurement of the spatial distribution of density, however, is difficult and indirect seismology inversion methods have been suggested as an alternative. We applied Bayesian inference, model comparison, and model-averaging techniques to the inference of the cross-field density structuring in solar magnetic waveguides using information on periods and damping times for resonantly damped magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) transverse kink oscillations. Three commonly employed alternative profiles were used to model the variation of the mass density across the waveguide boundary. Parameter inference enabled us to obtain information on physical quantities such as the Alfv\\'en travel time, the density contrast, and the transverse inhomogeneity length scale. The inference results from alternative density models were compared a...

  9. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Renewable Energy Programs Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Scott Johnston U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Brian Kinlan NCCOS-CMA-Biogeography Branch National Oceanographic...

  10. Conformal Higgs model: predicted dark energy density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. K. Nesbet

    2014-11-03

    Postulated universal Weyl conformal scaling symmetry provides an alternative to the $\\Lambda$CDM paradigm for cosmology. Recent applications to galactic rotation velocities, Hubble expansion, and a model of dark galactic halos explain qualitative phenomena and fit observed data without invoking dark matter. Significant revision of theory relevant to galactic collisions and clusters is implied, but not yet tested. Dark energy is found to be a consequence of conformal symmetry for the Higgs scalar field of electroweak physics. The present paper tests this implication. The conformal Higgs model acquires a gravitational effect described by a modified Friedmann cosmic evolution equation, shown to fit cosmological data going back to the cosmic microwave background epoch. The tachyonic mass parameter of the Higgs model becomes dark energy in the Friedmann equation. A dynamical model of this parameter, analogous to the Higgs mechanism for gauge boson mass, is derived and tested here. An approximate calculation yields a result consistent with the empirical magnitude inferred from Hubble expansion.

  11. Wildlife Diseases 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-03-13

    with rodents and rodent- infested areas, by controlling rodent populations, and by proper sanitation. For additional information contact the nearest office of Texas Cooperative Extension?Wildlife Services.. TCE?Wildlife Services P.O. Box 100410 ? San Antonio...

  12. Nuclear Level Density: Shell Model vs Mean Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen'kov, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of the nuclear level density is necessary for understanding various reactions including those in the stellar environment. Usually the combinatorics of Fermi-gas plus pairing is used for finding the level density. Recently a practical algorithm avoiding diagonalization of huge matrices was developed for calculating the density of many-body nuclear energy levels with certain quantum numbers for a full shell-model Hamiltonian. The underlying physics is that of quantum chaos and intrinsic thermalization in a closed system of interacting particles. We briefly explain this algorithm and, when possible, demonstrate the agreement of the results with those derived from exact diagonalization. The resulting level density is much smoother than that coming from the conventional mean-field combinatorics. We study the role of various components of residual interactions in the process of thermalization, stressing the influence of incoherent collision-like processes. The shell-model results for the traditionally...

  13. Integrated modelling and Bayesian inference applied to population and disease dynamics in wildlife: M.Bovis in badgers in Woodchester Park 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zijerveld, Leonardus Jacobus Johannes

    2013-06-29

    Understanding demographic and disease processes in wildlife populations tends to be hampered by incomplete observations which can include significant errors. Models provide useful insights into the potential impacts of ...

  14. Rapid model building of ?-sheets in electron-density maps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    A method for rapid model building of ?-sheets at moderate resolution is presented. A method for rapidly building ?-sheets into electron-density maps is presented. ?-Strands are identified as tubes of high density adjacent to and nearly parallel to other tubes of density. The alignment and direction of each strand are identified from the pattern of high density corresponding to carbonyl and C{sup ?} atoms along the strand averaged over all repeats present in the strand. The ?-strands obtained are then assembled into a single atomic model of the ?-sheet regions. The method was tested on a set of 42 experimental electron-density maps at resolutions ranging from 1.5 to 3.8 Å. The ?-sheet regions were nearly completely built in all but two cases, the exceptions being one structure at 2.5 Å resolution in which a third of the residues in ?-sheets were built and a structure at 3.8 Å in which under 10% were built. The overall average r.m.s.d. of main-chain atoms in the residues built using this method compared with refined models of the structures was 1.5 Å.

  15. Validating the BHR RANS model for variable density turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Israel, Daniel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gore, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stalsberg - Zarling, Krista L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The BHR RANS model is a turbulence model for multi-fluid flows in which density variation plays a strong role in the turbulence processes. In this paper they demonstrate the usefulness of BHR over a wide range of flows which include the effects of shear, buoyancy, and shocks. The results are in good agreement with experimental and DNS data across the entire set of validation cases, with no need to retune model coefficients between cases. The model has potential application to a number of aerospace related flow problems.

  16. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saracino-Brown, Jocelyn; Smith, Courtney; Gilman, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. The workshop was planned by Federal agency, academic, and private partners to promote collaboration between ongoing offshore ecological survey efforts, and to promote the collaborative development of complementary predictive models and compatible databases. The meeting primarily focused on efforts to establish and predict marine mammal, seabird, and sea turtle abundance, density, and distributions extending from the shoreline to the edge of the Exclusive Economic Zone between Nantucket Sound, Massachusetts and Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.

  17. Modelling charge transfer reactions with the frozen density embedding formalism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavanello, Michele [Gorlaeus Laboratories, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Neugebauer, Johannes [Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2011-12-21

    The frozen density embedding (FDE) subsystem formulation of density-functional theory is a useful tool for studying charge transfer reactions. In this work charge-localized, diabatic states are generated directly with FDE and used to calculate electronic couplings of hole transfer reactions in two {pi}-stacked nucleobase dimers of B-DNA: 5{sup '}-GG-3{sup '} and 5{sup '}-GT-3{sup '}. The calculations rely on two assumptions: the two-state model, and a small differential overlap between donor and acceptor subsystem densities. The resulting electronic couplings agree well with benchmark values for those exchange-correlation functionals that contain a high percentage of exact exchange. Instead, when semilocal GGA functionals are used the electronic couplings are grossly overestimated.

  18. Rapid model building of ?-helices in electron-density maps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    A method for rapid model building of ?-helices at moderate resolution is presented. A method for the identification of ?-helices in electron-density maps at low resolution followed by interpretation at moderate to high resolution is presented. Rapid identification is achieved at low resolution, where ?-helices appear as tubes of density. The positioning and direction of the ?-helices is obtained at moderate to high resolution, where the positions of side chains can be seen. The method was tested on a set of 42 experimental electron-density maps at resolutions ranging from 1.5 to 3.8 Å. An average of 63% of the ?-helical residues in these proteins were built and an average of 76% of the residues built matched helical residues in the refined models of the proteins. The overall average r.m.s.d. between main-chain atoms in the modeled ?-helices and the nearest atom with the same name in the refined models of the proteins was 1.3 Å.

  19. Nuclear Level Density: Shell Model vs Mean Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roman Sen'kov; Vladimir Zelevinsky

    2015-08-15

    The knowledge of the nuclear level density is necessary for understanding various reactions including those in the stellar environment. Usually the combinatorics of Fermi-gas plus pairing is used for finding the level density. Recently a practical algorithm avoiding diagonalization of huge matrices was developed for calculating the density of many-body nuclear energy levels with certain quantum numbers for a full shell-model Hamiltonian. The underlying physics is that of quantum chaos and intrinsic thermalization in a closed system of interacting particles. We briefly explain this algorithm and, when possible, demonstrate the agreement of the results with those derived from exact diagonalization. The resulting level density is much smoother than that coming from the conventional mean-field combinatorics. We study the role of various components of residual interactions in the process of thermalization, stressing the influence of incoherent collision-like processes. The shell-model results for the traditionally used parameters are also compared with standard phenomenological approaches.

  20. Ab Initio Derivation of Model Energy Density Functionals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobaczewski, J

    2015-01-01

    I propose a simple and manageable method that allows for deriving coupling constants of model energy density functionals (EDFs) directly from ab initio calculations performed for finite fermion systems. A proof-of-principle application allows for linking properties of finite nuclei, determined by using the nuclear nonlocal Gogny functional, to the coupling constants of the quasilocal Skyrme functional. The method does not rely on properties of infinite fermion systems but on the ab initio calculations in finite systems. It also allows for quantifying merits of different model EDFs in describing the ab initio results.

  1. Ab Initio Derivation of Model Energy Density Functionals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Dobaczewski

    2015-07-07

    I propose a simple and manageable method that allows for deriving coupling constants of model energy density functionals (EDFs) directly from ab initio calculations performed for finite fermion systems. A proof-of-principle application allows for linking properties of finite nuclei, determined by using the nuclear nonlocal Gogny functional, to the coupling constants of the quasilocal Skyrme functional. The method does not rely on properties of infinite fermion systems but on the ab initio calculations in finite systems. It also allows for quantifying merits of different model EDFs in describing the ab initio results.

  2. THE ENERGY DENSITY IN THE PLANAR ISING MODEL CLMENT HONGLER AND STANISLAV SMIRNOV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongler, Clément

    THE ENERGY DENSITY IN THE PLANAR ISING MODEL CLÃ?MENT HONGLER AND STANISLAV SMIRNOV Abstract. We boundary conditions. We relate the energy density of the model to a discrete fermionic spinor and compute. Introduction 1 1.1. The model 1 1.2. The energy density 2 1.3. Graph notation 3 1.4. The energy density 5 1

  3. Improved crystallographic models through iterated local density-guided model deformation and reciprocal-space refinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Read, Randy J. [University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); Adams, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Brunger, Axel T. [Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305-5432 (United States); Afonine, Pavel V.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hung, Li-Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    A density-based procedure is described for improving a homology model that is locally accurate but differs globally. The model is deformed to match the map and refined, yielding an improved starting point for density modification and further model-building. An approach is presented for addressing the challenge of model rebuilding after molecular replacement in cases where the placed template is very different from the structure to be determined. The approach takes advantage of the observation that a template and target structure may have local structures that can be superimposed much more closely than can their complete structures. A density-guided procedure for deformation of a properly placed template is introduced. A shift in the coordinates of each residue in the structure is calculated based on optimizing the match of model density within a 6 Å radius of the center of that residue with a prime-and-switch electron-density map. The shifts are smoothed and applied to the atoms in each residue, leading to local deformation of the template that improves the match of map and model. The model is then refined to improve the geometry and the fit of model to the structure-factor data. A new map is then calculated and the process is repeated until convergence. The procedure can extend the routine applicability of automated molecular replacement, model building and refinement to search models with over 2 Å r.m.s.d. representing 65–100% of the structure.

  4. Mass dependence of the vacuum energy density in the massive Schwinger model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taekoon Lee

    2007-03-09

    The vacuum energy density of the massive Schwinger model is shown to be not power expandable in the fermion mass.

  5. Wildlife Services 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-05-23

    in large numbers may damage property and cause human health problems. ? Protecting crops, timber, rangeland and other natural resources from the damage caused by gophers, prairie dogs, feral hogs, raccoons, rabbits, coyotes, grackles, beavers and other... wildlife. When building dams, beavers may cause flooding of timber and pastureland and the loss of trees and field crops. Feral hogs damage field crops, pastures and riparian habitat by their feeding, trampling and rooting activities. ? Protecting livestock...

  6. Spin densities from subsystem density-functional theory: Assessment and application to a photosynthetic reaction center complex model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solovyeva, Alisa [Gorlaeus Laboratories, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Technical University Braunschweig, Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Hans-Sommer-Str. 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Pavanello, Michele [Gorlaeus Laboratories, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Neugebauer, Johannes [Technical University Braunschweig, Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Hans-Sommer-Str. 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2012-05-21

    Subsystem density-functional theory (DFT) is a powerful and efficient alternative to Kohn-Sham DFT for large systems composed of several weakly interacting subunits. Here, we provide a systematic investigation of the spin-density distributions obtained in subsystem DFT calculations for radicals in explicit environments. This includes a small radical in a solvent shell, a {pi}-stacked guanine-thymine radical cation, and a benchmark application to a model for the special pair radical cation, which is a dimer of bacteriochlorophyll pigments, from the photosynthetic reaction center of purple bacteria. We investigate the differences in the spin densities resulting from subsystem DFT and Kohn-Sham DFT calculations. In these comparisons, we focus on the problem of overdelocalization of spin densities due to the self-interaction error in DFT. It is demonstrated that subsystem DFT can reduce this problem, while it still allows to describe spin-polarization effects crossing the boundaries of the subsystems. In practical calculations of spin densities for radicals in a given environment, it may thus be a pragmatic alternative to Kohn-Sham DFT calculations. In our calculation on the special pair radical cation, we show that the coordinating histidine residues reduce the spin-density asymmetry between the two halves of this system, while inclusion of a larger binding pocket model increases this asymmetry. The unidirectional energy transfer in photosynthetic reaction centers is related to the asymmetry introduced by the protein environment.

  7. Harvesting Rainwater for Wildlife 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cathey, James; Persyn, Russell A.; Porter, Dana; Dozier, Monty; Mecke, Michael; Kniffen, Billy

    2008-08-11

    Landowners can attract wildlife to their properties by installing rainwater catchment devices. This publication explains wildlife water sources, management considerations, rainfall catchment areas and wildlife tax valuation. It also illustrates...

  8. Modeling of free electronic state density in hydrogenic plasmas based on nearest neighbor approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishikawa, Takeshi

    2014-07-15

    Most conventional atomic models in a plasma do not treat the effect of the plasma on the free-electron state density. Using a nearest neighbor approximation, the state densities in hydrogenic plasmas for both bound and free electrons were evaluated and the effect of the plasma on the atomic model (especially for the state density of the free electron) was studied. The model evaluates the electron-state densities using the potential distribution formed by the superposition of the Coulomb potentials of two ions. The potential from one ion perturbs the electronic state density on the other. Using this new model, one can evaluate the free-state density without making any ad-hoc assumptions. The resulting contours of the average ionization degree, given as a function of the plasma temperature and density, are shifted slightly to lower temperatures because of the effect of the increasing free-state density.

  9. Fish and Wildlife Administrator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Fish & Wildlife Program, which implements and provides policy and planning support for actions to meet BPAs fish and wildlife mitigation responsibilities under...

  10. Wildlife Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricNCubicthe FOIA? TheWildlife Studies Studying Our

  11. Supplementary data for "Relativistic density functional theory modeling of plutonium and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titov, Anatoly

    Supplementary data for "Relativistic density functional theory modeling of plutonium and americium equilibrium geometries of plutonium and americium oxide molecules (standard .xyz files separated by empty

  12. Radial pulsations of neutron stars: computing alternative polytropic models regarding density and adiabatic index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vassilis Geroyannis; Georgios Kleftogiannis

    2014-06-14

    We revisit the problem of radial pulsations of neutron stars by computing four general-relativistic polytropic models, in which "density" and "adiabatic index" are involved with their discrete meanings: (i) "rest-mass density" or (ii) "mass-energy density" regarding the density, and (i) "constant" or (ii) "variable" regarding the adiabatic index. Considering the resulting four discrete combinations, we construct corresponding models and compute for each model the frequencies of the lowest three radial modes. Comparisons with previous results are made. The deviations of respective frequencies of the resolved models seem to exhibit a systematic behavior, an issue discussed here in detail.

  13. ON THE CONTINUITY OF THE MAGNETIZATION AND THE ENERGY DENSITY FOR POTTS MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ON THE CONTINUITY OF THE MAGNETIZATION AND THE ENERGY DENSITY FOR POTTS MODELS ON TWO of discontinuity of the magnetization and the energy density is at the onset of the magnetic ordering transition (i paper [BC] coauthored by one of us, the continuity of the energy density in the Potts (and generalized

  14. ON THE CONTINUITY OF THE MAGNETIZATION AND THE ENERGY DENSITY FOR POTTS MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotecký, Roman

    ON THE CONTINUITY OF THE MAGNETIZATION AND THE ENERGY DENSITY FOR POTTS MODELS ON TWO and the energy density is at the onset of the magnetic ordering transition (i.e., at the threshold for bond, the continuity of the energy density in the Potts (and generalized Ashkin-Teller) ferromagnets on Z2

  15. ON THE CONTINUITY OF THE MAGNETIZATION AND THE ENERGY DENSITY FOR POTTS MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    ON THE CONTINUITY OF THE MAGNETIZATION AND THE ENERGY DENSITY FOR POTTS MODELS ON TWO of discontinuity of the magnetization and the energy density is at the onset of the magnetic ordering transition (i] coauthored by one of us, the continuity of the energy density in the Potts (and generalized Ashkin

  16. Wavelet Based Density Estimators for Modeling Multidimensional Data Sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    the distribution of this random variable. We exhibit an estimator for the wavelet coeÃ?cients of this density and ionospheric data. After three levels of o#11;-line pre-processing, observations of temperature, water vapor agreement nr. F30602-99-1-0524, and unrestricted cash/equipment gifts from NCR, IBM, Intel and SUN. #12; 1

  17. Constraining snowmelt in a temperature-index model using simulated snow densities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Constraining snowmelt in a temperature-index model using simulated snow densities Kathryn J. Georgakakos, Editor-in-Chief Keywords: Snow density Snow modelling Melt factor Degree-day factor Warm maritime snowpack dynamics Snow depth s u m m a r y Current snowmelt parameterisation schemes are largely untested

  18. Ground state energy of the low density Hubbard model. An upper bound.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

    Ground state energy of the low density Hubbard model. An upper bound. Alessandro Giuliani an upper bound on the ground state energy of the three-dimensional (3D) repulsive Hubbard model on the cubic lattice agreeing in the low density limit with the known asymptotic expression of the ground state

  19. On Discriminative Joint Density Modeling Jarkko Salojarvi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    missing values, since the model is #12;assumed to generate also the covariates x. The models are often- criminative cost function, the conditional likelihood. We use the frame- work to derive generative models for generalized linear models, including logistic regression, linear discriminant analysis, and discriminative mix

  20. A restoration model of distorted electron density in wave-cutoff probe measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jun, Hyun-Su Lee, Yun-Seong

    2014-02-15

    This study investigates the problem of electron density distortion and how the density can be restored in a wave-cutoff probe. Despite recent plasma diagnostics research using a wave-cutoff probe, the problem of electron density distortion caused by plasma conditions has not been resolved. Experimental results indicate that electron density measured using the wave-cutoff method is highly susceptible to variations in the probe tip gap. This electron density distortion is caused by the bulk plasma disturbance between probe tips, and it must be removed for calculating the absolute electron density. To do this, a detailed analytic model was developed using the power balance equation near probe tips. This model demonstrates the characteristics of plasma distortion in wave-cutoff probe measurement and successfully restored the absolute value of electron density with varying probe tip gaps.

  1. Low density expansion and isospin dependence of nuclear energy functional: comparison between relativistic and Skyrme models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Providencia; D. P. Menezes; L. Brito; Ph. Chomaz

    2007-04-26

    In the present work we take the non relativistic limit of relativistic models and compare the obtained functionals with the usual Skyrme parametrization. Relativistic models with both constant couplings and with density dependent couplings are considered. While some models present very good results already at the lowest order in the density, models with non-linear terms only reproduce the energy functional if higher order terms are taken into account in the expansion.

  2. Simulation of High Density Pedestrian Flow: Microscopic Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dridi, Mohamed H

    2015-01-01

    In recent years modelling crowd and evacuation dynamics has become very important, with increasing huge numbers of people gathering around the world for many reasons and events. The fact that our global population grows dramatically every year and the current public transport systems are able to transport large amounts of people, heightens the risk of crowd panic or crush. Pedestrian models are based on macroscopic or microscopic behaviour. In this paper, we are interested in developing models that can be used for evacuation control strategies. This model will be based on microscopic pedestrian simulation models, and its evolution and design requires a lot of information and data. The people stream will be simulated, based on mathematical models derived from empirical data about pedestrian flows. This model is developed from image data bases, so called empirical data, taken from a video camera or data obtained using human detectors. We consider the individuals as autonomous particles interacting through socia...

  3. A HISTOGRAM DENSITY MODELING APPROACH TO MUSIC EMOTION RECOGNITION Ju-Chiang Wang1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hsin-Min

    A HISTOGRAM DENSITY MODELING APPROACH TO MUSIC EMOTION RECOGNITION Ju-Chiang Wang1,2 , Hsin with developing pre- dictive models that comprehend the affective content of musi- cal signals. Recently histogram den- sity modeling approach that models the emotion distribution by a 2-D histogram over

  4. Correction to kinetic energy density using exactly solvable model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexey Sergeev; Raka Jovanovic; Sabre Kais; Fahhad H Alharbi

    2015-06-03

    An accurate non-gradient-expansion based correction to Thomas--Fermi is developed using solvable model. The used model is a system of $N$ non-interacting electrons moving independently in the Coulomb field of the nuclear charge. The presented correction is applicable for atoms and should be extendable beyond that. The method exploits the fact that the difference between the Thomas--Fermi approximation and the non-interacting kinetic energy is comparable to the difference between the same values inside the proposed solvable model. The numerical experiments show that by adding this correction factor, the precision of Thomas--Fermi approximation is enhanced by an order of magnitude.

  5. HumanWildlife Interactions 6(2):261272, Fall 2012 A model to predict the likelihood of cliff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for construction and maintenance divisions of many departments of transportation. In planning future projects of cliff swallow nesting on a particular highway structure. We used logistic regression on data collected, highway structure, human­wildlife conflicts, logistic regression, nest, occupancy, Petrochelidon

  6. Schistosomiasis models with density dependence and age of ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-04-08

    Hopefully, a simple model can be thoroughly analyzed and .... time t, and r?s? denote the rate at which infected snails of infection age s release cercariae. Then

  7. Cooperative Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005 Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program Annual Report #12; 2005Annual Report Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program www.coopunits.org #12;2 #12;2 Front cover photos

  8. Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

  9. Wildlife Inventory, Craig Mountain, Idaho.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassirer, E. Frances

    1995-06-01

    Wildlife distribution/abundance were studied at this location during 1993 and 1994 to establish the baseline as part of the wildlife mitigation agreement for construction of Dworshak reservoir. Inventory efforts were designed to (1) document distribution/abundance of 4 target species: pileated woodpecker, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, and river otter, (2) determine distribution/abundance of rare animals, and (3) determine presence and relative abundance of all other species except deer and elk. 201 wildlife species were observed during the survey period; most were residents or used the area seasonally for breeding or wintering. New distribution or breeding records were established for at least 6 species. Pileated woodpeckers were found at 35% of 134 survey points in upland forests; estimated densities were 0-0.08 birds/ha, averaging 0.02 birds/ha. Yellow warblers were found in riparian areas and shrubby draws below 3500 ft elev., and were most abundant in white alder plant communities (ave. est. densities 0.2-2. 1 birds/ha). Black-capped chickadees were found in riparian and mixed tall shrub vegetation at all elevations (ave. est. densities 0-0.7 birds/ha). River otters and suitable otter denning and foraging habitat were observed along the Snake and Salmon rivers. 15 special status animals (threatened, endangered, sensitive, state species of special concern) were observed at Craig Mt: 3 amphibians, 1 reptile, 8 birds, 3 mammals. Another 5 special status species potentially occur (not documented). Ecosystem-based wildlife management issues are identified. A monitoring plant is presented for assessing effects of mitigation activities.

  10. Low-Resolution Density Maps from Atomic Models: How Stepping ``Back'' Can Be a Step ``Forward''

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Timothy S.

    Low-Resolution Density Maps from Atomic Models: How Stepping ``Back'' Can Be a Step ``Forward a tremendous impact on our discovery and understand- ing of basic life processes. Such structural informa- tion

  11. Quantum Hydrodynamic Model of Density Functional Zhenning Cai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Tiao

    models are globally hyperbolic thus locally wellposed. The contribution of the Kohn-Sham potential of application in many fields such as combustion, chemistry, and nuclear physics. As the exact N-body dynamics and molecules. It is centered around a variational principle that states that the ground-state energy of a many

  12. A Comparison of Bayesian and Conditional Density Models in Probabilistic Ozone Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, William

    A Comparison of Bayesian and Conditional Density Models in Probabilistic Ozone Forecasting Song Cai to provide predictive distributions of daily maximum surface level ozone concentrations. Five forecast models forecasts for extreme events, namely poor air quality events defined as having ozone concentration 82 ppb

  13. Galaxy density profiles and shapes -- I. simulation pipeline for lensing by realistic galaxy models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van de Ven, Glenn; Keeton, Charles R

    2008-01-01

    Studies of strong gravitational lensing in current and upcoming wide and deep photometric surveys, and of stellar kinematics from (integral-field) spectroscopy at increasing redshifts, promise to provide valuable constraints on galaxy density profiles and shapes, but only if we understand selection and modelling biases that affect both methods. To investigate the many different biases in a consistent way, we develop a flexible but efficient pipeline to simulate lensing by realistic galaxy models. We construct a variety of galaxy models with separate stellar and dark matter components that have a range of density profiles and shapes representative of early-type, central (non-satellite) galaxies. We use Fourier methods to calculate the lensing properties of galaxies with arbitrary surface density distributions, and Monte Carlo methods to compute lensing statistics such as point-source lensing cross-sections. Incorporating a variety of magnification bias modes lets us examine different survey strategies. We rigo...

  14. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs III. From uniform-density to clumpy regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marin, F; Gaskell, C M

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that part of, if not all, scattering regions of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are clumpy. Hence. in this paper, we run radiative transfer models in the optical/UV for a variety of AGN reprocessing regions with different distributions of clumpy scattering media. We use the latest version of the Monte Carlo code STOKES presented in the first two papers of this series to model AGN reprocessing regions of increasing morphological complexity. We replace previously uniform-density media with up to thousands of constant-density clumps. We couple a continuum source to fragmented equatorial scattering regions, polar outflows, and toroidal, obscuring dust regions and investigate a wide range of geometries. We also consider different levels of fragmentation in each scattering region to evaluate importance of fragmentation for the net polarization of the AGN. We find that, in comparison with uniform-density models, equatorial distributions of gas and dust clouds result in grayer spectr...

  15. Nuclear Level Density of ${}^{161}$Dy in the Shell Model Monte Carlo Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cem Özen; Yoram Alhassid; Hitoshi Nakada

    2012-06-27

    We extend the shell-model Monte Carlo applications to the rare-earth region to include the odd-even nucleus ${}^{161}$Dy. The projection on an odd number of particles leads to a sign problem at low temperatures making it impractical to extract the ground-state energy in direct calculations. We use level counting data at low energies and neutron resonance data to extract the shell model ground-state energy to good precision. We then calculate the level density of ${}^{161}$Dy and find it in very good agreement with the level density extracted from experimental data.

  16. Shear viscosity to entropy density ratio in the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. X. Li; D. Q. Fang; Y. G. Ma; C. L. Zhou

    2011-08-11

    The ratio of shear viscosity ($\\eta$) to entropy density ($s$) for an equilibrated system is investigated in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions below 100$A$ MeV within the framework of the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) model . After the collision system almost reaches a local equilibration, the temperature, pressure and energy density are obtained from the phase space information and {$\\eta/s$} is calculated using the Green-Kubo formulas. The results show that {$\\eta$}/$s$ decreases with incident energy and tend towards a smaller value around 0.5, which is not so drastically different from the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider results in the present model.

  17. Collapse models with non-white noises II: particle-density coupled noises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen L. Adler; Angelo Bassi

    2008-08-22

    We continue the analysis of models of spontaneous wave function collapse with stochastic dynamics driven by non-white Gaussian noise. We specialize to a model in which a classical "noise" field, with specified autocorrelator, is coupled to a local nonrelativistic particle density. We derive general results in this model for the rates of density matrix diagonalization and of state vector reduction, and show that (in the absence of decoherence) both processes are governed by essentially the same rate parameters. As an alternative route to our reduction results, we also derive the Fokker-Planck equations that correspond to the initial stochastic Schr\\"odinger equation. For specific models of the noise autocorrelator, including ones motivated by the structure of thermal Green's functions, we discuss the qualitative and qantitative dependence on model parameters, with particular emphasis on possible cosmological sources of the noise field.

  18. Iterative model building, structure refinement and density modification with the PHENIX AutoBuild wizard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Zwart, Peter H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hung, Li-Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Read, Randy J. [Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); Adams, Paul D., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The highly automated PHENIX AutoBuild wizard is described. The procedure can be applied equally well to phases derived from isomorphous/anomalous and molecular-replacement methods. The PHENIX AutoBuild wizard is a highly automated tool for iterative model building, structure refinement and density modification using RESOLVE model building, RESOLVE statistical density modification and phenix.refine structure refinement. Recent advances in the AutoBuild wizard and phenix.refine include automated detection and application of NCS from models as they are built, extensive model-completion algorithms and automated solvent-molecule picking. Model-completion algorithms in the AutoBuild wizard include loop building, crossovers between chains in different models of a structure and side-chain optimization. The AutoBuild wizard has been applied to a set of 48 structures at resolutions ranging from 1.1 to 3.2 Å, resulting in a mean R factor of 0.24 and a mean free R factor of 0.29. The R factor of the final model is dependent on the quality of the starting electron density and is relatively independent of resolution.

  19. Iterative model-building, structure refinement, and density modification with the PHENIX AutoBuild Wizard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY, England; Terwilliger, Thomas; Terwilliger, T.C.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf Wilhelm; Afonine, P.V.; Moriarty, N.W.; Zwart, P.H.; Hung, L.-W.; Read, R.J.; Adams, P.D.

    2007-04-29

    The PHENIX AutoBuild Wizard is a highly automated tool for iterative model-building, structure refinement and density modification using RESOLVE or TEXTAL model-building, RESOLVE statistical density modification, and phenix.refine structure refinement. Recent advances in the AutoBuild Wizard and phenix.refine include automated detection and application of NCS from models as they are built, extensive model completion algorithms, and automated solvent molecule picking. Model completion algorithms in the AutoBuild Wizard include loop-building, crossovers between chains in different models of a structure, and side-chain optimization. The AutoBuild Wizard has been applied to a set of 48 structures at resolutions ranging from 1.1 {angstrom} to 3.2 {angstrom}, resulting in a mean R-factor of 0.24 and a mean free R factor of 0.29. The R-factor of the final model is dependent on the quality of the starting electron density, and relatively independent of resolution.

  20. A Habitat-based Wind-Wildlife Collision Model with Application to the Upper Great Plains Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forcey, Greg, M.

    2012-08-28

    Most previous studies on collision impacts at wind facilities have taken place at the site-specific level and have only examined small-scale influences on mortality. In this study, we examine landscape-level influences using a hierarchical spatial model combined with existing datasets and life history knowledge for: Horned Lark, Red-eyed Vireo, Mallard, American Avocet, Golden Eagle, Whooping Crane, red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat. These species were modeled in the central United States within Bird Conservation Regions 11, 17, 18, and 19. For the bird species, we modeled bird abundance from existing datasets as a function of habitat variables known to be preferred by each species to develop a relative abundance prediction for each species. For bats, there are no existing abundance datasets so we identified preferred habitat in the landscape for each species and assumed that greater amounts of preferred habitat would equate to greater abundance of bats. The abundance predictions for bird and bats were modeled with additional exposure factors known to influence collisions such as visibility, wind, temperature, precipitation, topography, and behavior to form a final mapped output of predicted collision risk within the study region. We reviewed published mortality studies from wind farms in our study region and collected data on reported mortality of our focal species to compare to our modeled predictions. We performed a sensitivity analysis evaluating model performance of 6 different scenarios where habitat and exposure factors were weighted differently. We compared the model performance in each scenario by evaluating observed data vs. our model predictions using spearmans rank correlations. Horned Lark collision risk was predicted to be highest in the northwestern and west-central portions of the study region with lower risk predicted elsewhere. Red-eyed Vireo collision risk was predicted to be the highest in the eastern portions of the study region and in the forested areas of the western portion; the lowest risk was predicted in the treeless portions of the northwest portion of the study area. Mallard collision risk was predicted to be highest in the eastern central portion of the prairie potholes and in Iowa which has a high density of pothole wetlands; lower risk was predicted in the more arid portions of the study area. Predicted collision risk for American Avocet was similar to Mallard and was highest in the prairie pothole region and lower elsewhere. Golden Eagle collision risk was predicted to be highest in the mountainous areas of the western portion of the study area and lowest in the eastern portion of the prairie potholes. Whooping Crane predicted collision risk was highest within the migration corridor that the birds follow through in the central portion of the study region; predicted collision risk was much lower elsewhere. Red bat collision risk was highly driven by large tracts of forest and river corridors which made up most of the areas of higher collision risk. Silver-haired bat and hoary bat predicted collision risk were nearly identical and driven largely by forest and river corridors as well as locations with warmer temperatures, and lower average wind speeds. Horned Lark collisions were mostly influenced by abundance and predictions showed a moderate correlation between observed and predicted mortality (r = 0.55). Red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat predictions were much higher and shown a strong correlations with observed mortality with correlations of 0.85, 0.90, and 0.91 respectively. Red bat collisions were influenced primarily by habitat, while hoary bat and silver-haired bat collisions were influenced mainly by exposure variables. Stronger correlations between observed and predicted collision for bats than for Horned Larks can likely be attributed to stronger habitat associations and greater influences of weather on behavior for bats. Although the collision predictions cannot be compared among species, our model outputs provide a convenient and easy landscape-level tool to quick

  1. Pete Schmidt Wildlife Biologist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pete Schmidt Wildlife Biologist March 2009 #12;OverviewOverview Location Importance to Fish system Anadromous fish remain Abundant wildlife remain Others working to improve habitat Connectivity & anadromous fish Local support MBCC support #12;HabitatHabitat TypesTypes Seasonal, forested, & scrub shrub

  2. Electron-density comparisons between radar observations and 3-D ionospheric model calculations. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.W.

    1990-01-01

    A comparison of electron densities calculated from the Utah State University First-Principals Ionospheric Model with simultaneous observations taken at Sondrestrom, Millstone, and Arecibo incoherent-scatter radars was undertaken to better understanding the response of the ionosphere at these longitudinally similar yet latitudinally separated locations. The comparison included over 50 days distributed over 3 1/2 years roughly symmetrical about the last solar-minimum in 1986. The overall trend of the comparison was that to first-order the model reproduces electron densities responding to diurnal, seasonal, geomagnetic, and solar-cycle variations for all three radars. However, some model-observation discrepancies were found. These include, failure of the model to correctly produce an evening peak at Millstone, fall-spring equinox differences at Sondrestrom, tidal structure at Arecibo, and daytime NmF2 values at Arecibo.

  3. Modelling Bulk Density According to Structure Development: Toward an Indicator of Microstructure Development in Ferralsols.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modelling Bulk Density According to Structure Development: Toward an Indicator of Microstructure the microaggregates with a small contribution of large pores resulting from root development and macrofaunal activity.25 g cm-3 among the 108 samples studied. Visual assessment of BESI showed that soil material

  4. Relativistic density functional theory modeling of plutonium and americium higher oxide molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titov, Anatoly

    Relativistic density functional theory modeling of plutonium and americium higher oxide molecules of plutonium and americium higher oxide molecules Andréi Zaitsevskii,1,2,a) Nikolai S. Mosyagin,2,3 Anatoly V of plutonium and americium higher oxide molecules (actinide oxidation states VI through VIII) by two

  5. Temporal-spatial modeling of electron density enhancement due to successive lightning strokes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otago, University of

    (FDTD) model that describes the effect of lightning electromagnetic pulses (EMP) on the ionosphere. Each The electromagnetic pulse (EMP) from lightning has been shown to modify conductivity and electron density in the lower successive EMP pulse interacts with a modified background ionosphere due to the previous pulses, resulting

  6. Comparison of transition densities in the DDHMS model of pre-equilibrium emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brito, L.; Carlson, B. V.

    2014-11-11

    The DDHMS (double differential hybrid Monte Carlo simulation) model treats nucleon-induced pre-equilibrium reactions as a series of particle-particle and particle-hole interactions in the space of energy and angle. This work compares spectra obtained within the model using diferent approximations to the density of accessible states. The calculations are performed with the EMPIRE reaction model code, a modular system containing several nuclear reaction models that permits a fairly complete descritpion of the reaction, from elastic scattering and absorption through the pre-equilbrium stage to the final decay by statistical emission.

  7. Stochastic Estimation of Nuclear Level Density in the Nuclear Shell Model: An Application to Parity-Dependent Level Density in $^{58}$Ni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shimizu, Noritaka; Futamura, Yasunori; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Mizusaki, Takahiro; Otsuka, Takaharu

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a novel method to obtain level densities in large-scale shell-model calculations. Our method is a stochastic estimation of eigenvalue count based on a shifted Krylov-subspace method, which enables us to obtain level densities of huge Hamiltonian matrices. This framework leads to a successful description of both low-lying spectroscopy and the experimentally observed equilibration of $J^\\pi=2^+$ and $2^-$ states in $^{58}$Ni in a unified manner.

  8. Estimating exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01

    This report describes generalized models for the estimation of contaminant exposure experienced by wildlife on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The primary exposure pathway considered is oral ingestion, e.g. the consumption of contaminated food, water, or soil. Exposure through dermal absorption and inhalation are special cases and are not considered hereIN. Because wildlife mobile and generally consume diverse diets and because environmental contamination is not spatial homogeneous, factors to account for variation in diet, movement, and contaminant distribution have been incorporated into the models. To facilitate the use and application of the models, life history parameters necessary to estimate exposure are summarized for 15 common wildlife species. Finally, to display the application of the models, exposure estimates were calculated for four species using data from a source operable unit on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  9. The Inflection Point of the Speed-Density Relation and the Social Force Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kretz, Tobias; Schlaich, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    It has been argued that the speed-density digram of pedestrian movement has an inflection point. This inflection point was found empirically in investigations of closed-loop single-file pedestrian movement. The reduced complexity of single-file movement does not only allow a higher precision for the evaluation of empirical data, but it occasionally also allows analytical considerations for micosimulation models. In this way it will be shown that certain (common) variants of the Social Force Model (SFM) do not produce an inflection point in the speed-density diagram if infinitely many pedestrians contribute to the force computed for one pedestrian. We propose a modified Social Force Model that produces the inflection point.

  10. Scaling and Density of Lee-Yang Zeroes in the Four Dimensional Ising Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Kenna; C. B. Lang

    1993-11-20

    The scaling behaviour of the edge of the Lee--Yang zeroes in the four dimensional Ising model is analyzed. This model is believed to belong to the same universality class as the $\\phi^4_4$ model which plays a central role in relativistic quantum field theory. While in the thermodynamic limit the scaling of the Yang--Lee edge is not modified by multiplicative logarithmic corrections, such corrections are manifest in the corresponding finite--size formulae. The asymptotic form for the density of zeroes which recovers the scaling behaviour of the susceptibility and the specific heat in the thermodynamic limit is found to exhibit logarithmic corrections too. The density of zeroes for a finite--size system is examined both analytically and numerically.

  11. Modelling of the internal dynamics and density in a tens of joules plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marquez, Ariel; Gonzalez, Jose; Tarifeno-Saldivia, Ariel; Pavez, Cristian; Soto, Leopoldo; Clausse, Alejandro

    2012-01-15

    Using MHD theory, coupled differential equations were generated using a lumped parameter model to describe the internal behaviour of the pinch compression phase in plasma focus discharges. In order to provide these equations with appropriate initial conditions, the modelling of previous phases was included by describing the plasma sheath as planar shockwaves. The equations were solved numerically, and the results were contrasted against experimental measurements performed on the device PF-50J. The model is able to predict satisfactorily the timing and the radial electron density profile at the maximum compression.

  12. Lattice vibrations in the Frenkel-Kontorova model. I. Phonon dispersion, number density, and energy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meng, Qingping; Wu, Lijun; Welch, David O.; Zhu, Yimei

    2015-06-17

    We studied the lattice vibrations of two inter-penetrating atomic sublattices via the Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model of a linear chain of harmonically interacting atoms subjected to an on-site potential, using the technique of thermodynamic Green's functions based on quantum field-theoretical methods. General expressions were deduced for the phonon frequency-wave-vector dispersion relations, number density, and energy of the FK model system. In addition, as the application of the theory, we investigated in detail cases of linear chains with various periods of the on-site potential of the FK model. Some unusual but interesting features for different amplitudes of the on-site potential of themore »FK model are discussed. In the commensurate structure, the phonon spectrum always starts at a finite frequency, and the gaps of the spectrum are true ones with a zero density of modes. In the incommensurate structure, the phonon spectrum starts from zero frequency, but at a non-zero wave vector; there are some modes inside these gap regions, but their density is very low. In our approximation, the energy of a higher-order commensurate state of the one-dimensional system at a finite temperature may become indefinitely close to the energy of an incommensurate state. This finding implies that the higher-order incommensurate-commensurate transitions are continuous ones and that the phase transition may exhibit a “devil's staircase” behavior at a finite temperature.« less

  13. A Model For the Formation of High Density Clumps in Proto-Planetary Nebulae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick A. Young; J. L. Highberger; David Arnett; L. M. Ziurys

    2003-09-19

    The detection of NaCl at large radii in the Egg Nebula, CRL 2688, requires densities of 10^7 - 10^8 cm^-3 in a thick shell of r ~ a few X 10^17 cm. To explain these results, a mechanism is needed for producing high densities at a considerable distance from the central star. In two dimensional simulations of the interaction of the fast wind with an ambient medium, the material becomes thermally unstable. The resulting clumps can achieve the requisite conditions for NaCl excitation. We present 2D models with simple physics as proof-of-principle calculations to show that the clumping behavior is robust. Clumping is a natural outcome of cooling in the colliding wind model and comparable to that inferred from observations.

  14. Statistical Distribution of the Vacuum Energy Density in Racetrack Kähler Uplift Models in String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoske Sumitomo; S. -H. Henry Tye; Sam S. C. Wong

    2013-05-03

    We study a racetrack model in the presence of the leading alpha'-correction in flux compactification in Type IIB string theory, for the purpose of getting conceivable de-Sitter vacua in the large compactified volume approximation. Unlike the K\\"ahler Uplift model studied previously, the alpha'-correction is more controllable for the meta-stable de-Sitter vacua in the racetrack case since the constraint on the compactified volume size is very much relaxed. We find that the vacuum energy density \\Lambda for de-Sitter vacua approaches zero exponentially as the volume grows. We also analyze properties of the probability distribution of \\Lambda in this class of models. As in other cases studied earlier, the probability distribution again peaks sharply at \\Lambda=0. We also study the Racetrack K\\"ahler Uplift model in the Swiss-Cheese type model.

  15. Effects of density dependent sex allocation on the dynamics of a simultaneous hermaphroditic population: Modelling and analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bravo de la Parra, Rafael

    Effects of density dependent sex allocation on the dynamics of a simultaneous hermaphroditic Available online 22 December 2009 Keywords: Sex-allocation model Sex-structured population dynamics Density model describing the dynamics of a population where sex allocation remains flexible throughout adult

  16. Gamma-ray burst prompt emission light curves and power density spectra in the ICMART model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Bo [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang, Bing, E-mail: bozhang@physics.unlv.edu, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2014-02-20

    In this paper, we simulate the prompt emission light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) within the framework of the Internal-Collision-induced MAgnetic Reconnection and Turbulence (ICMART) model. This model applies to GRBs with a moderately high magnetization parameter ? in the emission region. We show that this model can produce highly variable light curves with both fast and slow components. The rapid variability is caused by many locally Doppler-boosted mini-emitters due to turbulent magnetic reconnection in a moderately high ? flow. The runaway growth and subsequent depletion of these mini-emitters as a function of time define a broad slow component for each ICMART event. A GRB light curve is usually composed of multiple ICMART events that are fundamentally driven by the erratic GRB central engine activity. Allowing variations of the model parameters, one is able to reproduce a variety of light curves and the power density spectra as observed.

  17. Thermodynamics and Structural Properties of the High Density Gaussian Core Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atsushi Ikeda; Kunimasa Miyazaki

    2011-07-20

    We numerically study thermodynamic and structural properties of the one-component Gaussian core model (GCM) at very high densities. The solid-fluid phase boundary is carefully determined. We find that the density dependence of both the freezing and melting temperatures obey the asymptotic relation, $\\log T_f$, $\\log T_m \\propto -\\rho^{2/3}$, where $\\rho$ is the number density, which is consistent with Stillinger's conjecture. Thermodynamic quantities such as the energy and pressure and the structural functions such as the static structure factor are also investigated in the fluid phase for a wide range of temperature above the phase boundary. We compare the numerical results with the prediction of the liquid theory with the random phase approximation (RPA). At high temperatures, the results are in almost perfect agreement with RPA for a wide range of density, as it has been already shown in the previous studies. In the low temperature regime close to the phase boundary line, although RPA fails to describe the structure factors and the radial distribution functions at the length scales of the interparticle distance, it successfully predicts their behaviors at shorter length scales. RPA also predicts thermodynamic quantities such as the energy, pressure, and the temperature at which the thermal expansion coefficient becomes negative, almost perfectly. Striking ability of RPA to predict thermodynamic quantities even at high densities and low temperatures is understood in terms of the decoupling of the length scales which dictate thermodynamic quantities from the interparticle distance which dominates the peak structures of the static structure factor due to the softness of the Gaussian core potential.

  18. Monte Carlo modeling of electron density in hypersonic rarefied gas flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Jin; Zhang, Yuhuai; Jiang, Jianzheng

    2014-12-09

    The electron density distribution around a vehicle employed in the RAM-C II flight test is calculated with the DSMC method. To resolve the mole fraction of electrons which is several orders lower than those of the primary species in the free stream, an algorithm named as trace species separation (TSS) is utilized. The TSS algorithm solves the primary and trace species separately, which is similar to the DSMC overlay techniques; however it generates new simulated molecules of trace species, such as ions and electrons in each cell, basing on the ionization and recombination rates directly, which differs from the DSMC overlay techniques based on probabilistic models. The electron density distributions computed by TSS agree well with the flight data measured in the RAM-C II test along a decent trajectory at three altitudes 81km, 76km, and 71km.

  19. Improving macromolecular atomic models at moderate resolution by automated iterative model building, statistical density modification and refinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2003-07-01

    A procedure for iterative model-building, statistical density modification and refinement at moderate resolution (up to about 2.8 Å) is described. An iterative process for improving the completeness and quality of atomic models automatically built at moderate resolution (up to about 2.8 Å) is described. The process consists of cycles of model building interspersed with cycles of refinement and combining phase information from the model with experimental phase information (if any) using statistical density modification. The process can lead to substantial improvements in both the accuracy and completeness of the model compared with a single cycle of model building. For eight test cases solved by MAD or SAD at resolutions ranging from 2.0 to 2.8 Å, the fraction of models built and assigned to sequence was 46–91% (mean of 65%) after the first cycle of building and refinement, and 78-95% (mean of 87%) after 20 cycles. In an additional test case, an incorrect model of gene 5 protein (PDB code 2gn5; r.m.s.d. of main-chain atoms from the more recent refined structure 1vqb at 1.56 Å) was rebuilt using only structure-factor amplitude information at varying resolutions from 2.0 to 3.0 Å. Rebuilding was effective at resolutions up to about 2.5 Å. The resulting models had 60-80% of the residues built and an r.m.s.d. of main-chain atoms from the refined structure of 0.20 to 0.62 Å. The algorithm is useful for building preliminary models of macromolecules suitable for an experienced crystallographer to extend, correct and fully refine.

  20. Interacting boson model from energy density functionals: {gamma}-softness and the related topics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nomura, K.

    2012-10-20

    A comprehensive way of deriving the Hamiltonian of the interacting boson model (IBM) is described. Based on the fact that the multi-nucleon induced surface deformation in finite nucleus is simulated by effective boson degrees of freedom, the potential energy surface calculated with self-consistent mean-field method employing a given energy density functional (EDF) is mapped onto the IBM analog, and thereby the excitation spectra and transition rates with good symmetry quantum numbers are calculated. Recent applications of the proposed approach are reported: (i) an alternative robust interpretation of the {gamma}-soft nuclei and (ii) shape coexistence in lead isotopes.

  1. Shape coexistence in Lead isotopes in the interacting boson model with Gogny energy density functional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Nomura; R. Rodriguez-Guzman; L. M. Robledo; N. Shimizu

    2012-08-23

    We investigate the emergence and evolution of shape coexistence in the neutron-deficient Lead isotopes within the interacting boson model (IBM) plus configuration mixing with microscopic input based on the Gogny energy density functional (EDF). The microscopic potential energy surface obtained from the constrained self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method employing the Gogny-D1M EDF is mapped onto the coherent-state expectation value of the configuration-mixing IBM Hamiltonian. In this way, the parameters of the IBM Hamiltonian are fixed for each of the three relevant configurations (spherical, prolate and oblate) associated to the mean field minima. Subsequent diagonalization of the Hamiltonian provides the excitation energy of the low-lying states and transition strengths among them. The model predictions for the $0^{+}$ level energies and evolving shape coexistence in the considered Lead chain are consistent both with experiment and with the indications of the Gogny-EDF energy surfaces.

  2. Monte Carlo study of Lefschetz thimble structure in one-dimensional Thirring model at finite density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujii, Hirotsugu; Kikukawa, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    We consider the one-dimensional massive Thirring model formulated on the lattice with staggered fermions and an auxiliary compact vector (link) field, which is exactly solvable and shows a phase transition with increasing the chemical potential of fermion number: the crossover at a finite temperature and the first order transition at zero temperature. We complexify its path-integration on Lefschetz thimbles and examine its phase transition by hybrid Monte Carlo simulations on the single dominant thimble. We observe a discrepancy between the numerical and exact results in the crossover region for small inverse coupling $\\beta$ and/or large lattice size $L$, while they are in good agreement at the lower and higher density regions. We also observe that the discrepancy persists in the continuum limit keeping the temperature finite and it becomes more significant toward the low-temperature limit. This numerical result is consistent with our analytical study of the model's thimble structure. And these results imply...

  3. Thermodynamics of baryonic matter with strangeness within non-relativistic energy density functional model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ad. R. Raduta; F. Gulminelli; M. Oertel

    2014-09-15

    We study the thermodynamical properties of compressed baryonic matter with strangeness within non-relativistic energy density functional models with a particular emphasis on possible phase transitions found earlier for a simple $n,p,e,\\Lambda$-mixture. The aim of the paper is twofold: I) examining the phase structure of the complete system, including the full baryonic octet and II) testing the sensitivity of the results to the model parameters. We find that, associated to the onset of the different hyperonic families, up to three separate strangeness-driven phase transitions may occur. Consequently, a large fraction of the baryonic density domain is covered by phase coexistence with potential relevance for (proto)-neutron star evolution. It is shown that the presence of a phase transition is compatible both with the observational constraint on the maximal neutron star mass, and with the present experimental information on hypernuclei. In particular we show that two solar mass neutron stars are compatible with important hyperon content. Still, the parameter space is too large to give a definitive conclusion of the possible occurrence of a strangeness driven phase transition, and further constraints from multiple-hyperon nuclei and/or hyperon diffusion data are needed.

  4. Modeling the ion density distribution in collisional cooling RF multipole ion guides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Udseth, Harold R.; Smith, Richard D.

    2003-01-01

    Collisional cooling radio frequency (RF) multipoles are widely used in mass spectrometry, as ion guides and two-dimensional (2D) ion traps. Understanding the behavior of ions in these devices is important in choosing a multipole configuration. We have developed a computer model based on ion trajectory calculations in the RF multipole electric field, taking into account ion-ion and ion-neutral interactions. The two-dimensional model for idealized infinite RF multipoles gives accurate description of the ion density distribution. We consider first a basic case of a single m/z ion cloud in the 2D RF quadrupole after equilibrium is reached. Approximate theoretical relationships for the ion cloud configuration in the 2D ion trap are tested based on simulations results. Next we proceed with a case of an ion cloud consisting of several different m/z ion species. The ion relaxation dynamics and the process of establishing the stratified ion density distribution are followed. Simulations reveal a different relaxation dynamics for the axial and radial ion kinetic energy components. The kinetic energy relaxation rate is dependent on ion population and bath gas pressure. The equilibrium distribution agrees well with the ion stratification theory, as demonstrated by simulations for RF quadrupole and octupole 2D ion traps.

  5. Quadrupole collective dynamics from energy density functionals: Collective Hamiltonian and the interacting boson model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nomura, K.; Vretenar, D.; Niksic, T.; Otsuka, T.; Shimizu, N.

    2011-07-15

    Microscopic energy density functionals have become a standard tool for nuclear structure calculations, providing an accurate global description of nuclear ground states and collective excitations. For spectroscopic applications, this framework has to be extended to account for collective correlations related to restoration of symmetries broken by the static mean field, and for fluctuations of collective variables. In this paper, we compare two approaches to five-dimensional quadrupole dynamics: the collective Hamiltonian for quadrupole vibrations and rotations and the interacting boson model (IBM). The two models are compared in a study of the evolution of nonaxial shapes in Pt isotopes. Starting from the binding energy surfaces of {sup 192,194,196}Pt, calculated with a microscopic energy density functional, we analyze the resulting low-energy collective spectra obtained from the collective Hamiltonian, and the corresponding IBM Hamiltonian. The calculated excitation spectra and transition probabilities for the ground-state bands and the {gamma}-vibration bands are compared to the corresponding sequences of experimental states.

  6. Quark number density at imaginary chemical potential and its extrapolation to large real chemical potential by the effective model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junichi Takahashi; Junpei Sugano; Masahiro Ishii; Hiroaki Kouno; Masanobu Yahiro

    2014-10-30

    We evaluate quark number densities at imaginary chemical potential by lattice QCD with clover-improved two-flavor Wilson fermion. The quark number densities are extrapolated to the small real chemical potential region by assuming some function forms. The extrapolated quark number densities are consistent with those calculated at real chemical potential with the Taylor expansion method for the reweighting factors. In order to study the large real chemical potential region, we use the two-phase model consisting of the quantum hadrodynamics model for the hadron phase and the entanglement-PNJL model for the quark phase. The quantum hadrodynamics model is constructed to reproduce nuclear saturation properties, while the entanglement-PNJL model reproduces well lattice QCD data for the order parameters such as the Polyakov loop, the thermodynamic quantities and the screening masses. Then, we calculate the mass-radius relation of neutron stars and explore the hadron-quark phase transition with the two-phase model.

  7. Wildlife management assistance report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, M.B.

    1992-05-01

    Thirty-four days were spent administering hunts on Crackerneck Wildlife Management Area with 1773 people participating. Biological data was collected on 76 deer, eight wild turkeys, 33 feral hogs, 58 ducks of two species, 75 gray squirrels, 4 raccoons, 9 bobwhites, and 484 fish of 9 species. Serving as a Coordinating Land User for the SRS Site Use Committee entailed evaluating 81 land use proposals with regard to effects on wildlife populations. The antlerless deer quota program continued in the district with 129 landowners in Aiken, Barnwell, and Orangeburg Counties being approved for antlerless harvest which required field investigations, acreage verification at tax offices, and personal correspondence. Bait sites for turkey trapping were maintained on the SRS for two months. Wildlife census work was conducted on wild turkey, bobwhite, mourning dove, furbearers, fox squirrels, and bald eagles on the SRS and in Aiken and Barnwell Counties. Three wetlands in Aiken County were evaluated for suitability with regard to wood duck boxes. Two wetland environmental review notices for the SRS were evaluated. Additional work on Wildlife Management Area land included reposting 50 miles of boundary in Aiken and Lexington County and removing signs form several tracts lost from the program. Future recommendations for the turkey and regulations brochures were submitted and WMA maps covering Aiken and Lexington Counties were updated.

  8. Elastic models of the glass transition applied to a liquid with density anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Pica Ciamarra; Peter Sollich

    2015-08-19

    Elastic models of the glass transition relate the relaxation dynamics and the elastic properties of structural glasses. They are based on the assumption that the relaxation dynamics occurs through activated events in the energy landscape whose energy scale is set by the elasticity of the material. Here we investigate whether such elastic models describe the relaxation dynamics of systems of particles interacting via a purely repulsive harmonic potential, focusing on a volume fraction and temperature range that is characterized by entropy--driven water--like density anomalies. We do find clear correlations between relaxation time and diffusivity on the one hand, and plateau shear modulus and Debye--Waller factor on the other, thus supporting the validity of elastic models of the glass transition. However, we also show that the plateau shear modulus is not related to the features of the underlying energy landscape of the system, at variance with recent results for power--law potentials. This challenges the common potential energy landscape interpretation of elastic models.

  9. Appendix C of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the third appendix to the report, the compendium of pre-workshop answers.

  10. Appendix E of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the fifth appendix to the report, the bibliography of references.

  11. Appendix A of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the first appendix to the report, the workshop agenda.

  12. Extension of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model predictions at high densities and temperatures using an implicit regularization scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farias, R. L. S. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20559-900 (Brazil); Dallabona, G. [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal de Lavras, Cx. Postal 37, 37200-000, Lavras, MG (Brazil); Krein, G. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Pamplona 145, Sao Paulo, SP 01405-900 (Brazil); Battistel, O. A. [CBPF, Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Urca Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-06-15

    Traditional cutoff regularization schemes of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model limit the applicability of the model to energy-momentum scales much below the value of the regularizing cutoff. In particular, the model cannot be used to study quark matter with Fermi momenta larger than the cutoff. In the present work, an extension of the model to high temperatures and densities recently proposed by Casalbuoni, Gatto, Nardulli, and Ruggieri is used in connection with an implicit regularization scheme. This is done by making use of scaling relations of the divergent one-loop integrals that relate these integrals at different energy-momentum scales. Fixing the pion decay constant at the chiral symmetry breaking scale in the vacuum, the scaling relations predict a running coupling constant that decreases as the regularization scale increases, implementing in a schematic way the property of asymptotic freedom of quantum chromodynamics. If the regularization scale is allowed to increase with density and temperature, the coupling will decrease with density and temperature, extending in this way the applicability of the model to high densities and temperatures. These results are obtained without specifying an explicit regularization. As an illustration of the formalism, numerical results are obtained for the finite density and finite temperature quark condensate and applied to the problem of color superconductivity at high quark densities and finite temperature.

  13. Magnetic Energy Storage and Current Density Distributions for Different Force-Free Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regnier, S

    2011-01-01

    [..] The change in the magnetic configuration due to the increase/decrease of electric current for different force-free models (potential, linear and nonlinear force-free fields) has never been studied in detail before. Here we focus especially on the evolution of the free magnetic energy, the location of the excess of energy, and the distribution of electric currents in the corona. For this purpose, we use an idealised active region characterised by four main polarities and a satellite polarity allowing us to specify a complex topology and sheared arcades to the coronal magnetic field but no twisted flux bundles. We investigate the changes in the geometry and connectivity of field lines, the magnetic energy and current density content as well as the evolution of null points. Increasing the photospheric current density in the magnetic configuration does not dramatically change the energy-storage processes within the active region even if the magnetic topology is slightly modified. We conclude that for reasona...

  14. Global SAXS Data Analysis for Multilamellar Vesicles: Evolution of the Scattering Density Profile (SDP) Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heftberger, Peter [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria] [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria; Kollmitzer, Benjamin [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria] [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL] [ORNL; Pan, Jianjun [ORNL] [ORNL; Rappolt, Michael [University of Leeds, UK] [University of Leeds, UK; Amenitsch, Heinz [Graz University of Technology] [Graz University of Technology; Kucerka, Norbert [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,; Katsaras, John [ORNL] [ORNL; Pabst, georg [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria] [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria

    2014-01-01

    The highly successful scattering density profile (SDP) model, used to jointly analyze small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering data from unilamellar vesicles, has been adapted for use with data from fully hydrated, liquid crystalline multilamellar vesicles (MLVs). Using a genetic algorithm, this new method is capable of providing high-resolution structural information, as well as determining bilayer elastic bending fluctuations from standalone X-ray data. Structural parameters such as bilayer thickness and area per lipid were determined for a series of saturated and unsaturated lipids, as well as binary mixtures with cholesterol. The results are in good agreement with previously reported SDP data, which used both neutron and X-ray data. The inclusion of deuterated and non-deuterated MLV neutron data in the analysis improved the lipid backbone information but did not improve, within experimental error, the structural data regarding bilayer thickness and area per lipid.

  15. Physical Origin of Density Dependent Force of the Skyrme Type within the Quark Meson Coupling Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierre Guichon; Hrayr Matevosyan; N. Sandulescu; Anthony Thomas

    2006-03-17

    A density dependent, effective nucleon-nucleon force of the Skyrme type is derived from the quark-meson coupling model--a self-consistent, relativistic quark level description of nuclear matter. This new formulation requires no assumption that the mean scalar field is small and hence constitutes a significant advance over earlier work. The similarity of the effective interaction to the widely used SkM* force encourages us to apply it to a wide range of nuclear problems, beginning with the binding energies and charge distributions of doubly magic nuclei. Finding impressive results in this conventional arena, we apply the same effective interaction, within the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach, to the properties of nuclei far from stability. The resulting two neutron drip lines and shell quenching are quite satisfactory. Finally, we apply the relativistic formulation to the properties of dense nuclear matter in anticipation of future application to the properties of neutron stars.

  16. Macroscale modeling and mesoscale observations of plasma density structures in the polar cap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, S. [Phillips Lab., Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (United States)] [Phillips Lab., Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (United States); Basu, S. [National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA (United States)] [National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA (United States); Sojka, J.J. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)] [and others] [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); and others

    1995-04-15

    The seasonal and UT variation of mesoscale structures (10 km - 100 m) in the central polar cap has been obtained from an analysis of 250-MHz intensity scintillation observations made at Thule, Greenland. It has been established earlier that mesoscale structures causing scintillations of satellite signals may develop at the edges of macroscale structures (several hundred km) such as discrete polar cap plasma density enhancements or patches through the gradient drift instability process. As such, the authors examined the seasonal and UT variation of polar cap patches simulated by using the USU Time Dependent Ionospheric Model (TDIM) under conditions of southward B{sub z}. A fairly remarkable similarity is found between the scintillation observations and the model predictions of patch occurrence. For instance, both the patch and scintillation occurrences are minimized during the winter solstice (northern hemisphere) between 0800-1200 UT while also having their largest seasonal intensity between 2000-2400 UT. Little UT dependence of patches and scintillations is seen at equinox with high intensity being observed throughout the day, while during local summer the intensity of macroscale patches and mesoscale irregularities are found to be a minimum at all UT. These results indicate that macroscale features in the polar cap are routinely associated with plasma instabilities giving rise to smaller scale structures and that the specific patch formation mechanism assumed in the simulation is consistent with the observations. This ability to bridge between macroscale modeling and mesoscale observations provides a natural framework for the modeling of mesoscale structures themselves. This mesoscale modeling, in turn, can be utilized in a variety of radar and communication systems applications in the polar region. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  17. L.R.S. Bianchi type II Stiff Fluid cosmological model with Decaying Vacuum Energy Density $?$ in general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassan Amirhashchi

    2010-11-26

    Locally rotationally symmetric (L.R.S.) Bianchi type II stiff fluid cosmological model is investigated. To get the deterministic model of the universe, we have assumed a condition $A=B^{m}$ between metric potentials $A,~B$ where $n$ is the constant. It is shown that the vacuum energy density $\\Lambda$ is positive and proportional to $\\frac{1}{t^{2}}$. The values of deceleration parameter $q$, matter-energy density $\\Omega_{m}$ and dark-energy density $\\Omega_{\\Lambda}$ are found to be in good agreement with the values obtain from 5-years WMAP observations. the predicted value of the jerk parameter agrees with the SNLS SNIa and X-ray galaxy cluster distance data but does not with the SNIa gold sample data. In general, the model represent accelerating, shearing and non-rotating universe.The physical and geometrical behavior of these models are also discussed.

  18. Functional renormalization group study of Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model at finite temperature and density in external magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ken-Ichi Aoki; Hidenari Uoi; Masatoshi Yamada

    2015-07-09

    We study the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model at finite temperature and finite density in an external magnetic field using the Functional Renormalization Group (FRG). The dependence of the position of UltraViolet Fixed Point (UVFP) of the four-fermi coupling constant on temperature, density and external magnetic field is investigated and we obtain the chiral phase structure. The UVFP at low temperature and finite chemical potential oscillates in small external magnetic field, which can be interpreted as the de-Haas--van-Alfen effect. We also find that the external magnetic field moves the chiral phase boundary towards the symmetric side at low temperature and high density region.

  19. Functional renormalization group study of Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model at finite temperature and density in external magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aoki, Ken-Ichi; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    We study the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model at finite temperature and finite density in an external magnetic field using the Functional Renormalization Group (FRG). The dependence of the position of UltraViolet Fixed Point (UVFP) of the four-fermi coupling constant on temperature, density and external magnetic field is investigated and we obtain the chiral phase structure. The UVFP at low temperature and finite chemical potential oscillates in small external magnetic field, which can be interpreted as the de-Haas--van-Alfen effect. We also find that the external magnetic field moves the chiral phase boundary towards the symmetric side at low temperature and high density region.

  20. Adjusting lidar-derived digital terrain models in coastal marshes based on estimated aboveground biomass density

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Medeiros, Stephen; Hagen, Scott; Weishampel, John; Angelo, James

    2015-03-25

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from airborne lidar are traditionally unreliable in coastal salt marshes due to the inability of the laser to penetrate the dense grasses and reach the underlying soil. To that end, we present a novel processing methodology that uses ASTER Band 2 (visible red), an interferometric SAR (IfSAR) digital surface model, and lidar-derived canopy height to classify biomass density using both a three-class scheme (high, medium and low) and a two-class scheme (high and low). Elevation adjustments associated with these classes using both median and quartile approaches were applied to adjust lidar-derived elevation values closer tomore »true bare earth elevation. The performance of the method was tested on 229 elevation points in the lower Apalachicola River Marsh. The two-class quartile-based adjusted DEM produced the best results, reducing the RMS error in elevation from 0.65 m to 0.40 m, a 38% improvement. The raw mean errors for the lidar DEM and the adjusted DEM were 0.61 ± 0.24 m and 0.32 ± 0.24 m, respectively, thereby reducing the high bias by approximately 49%.« less

  1. Macroscale modeling and mesoscale observations of plasma density structures in the polar cap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, S.; Basu, S.; Sojka, J.J.; Schunk, R.W.; MacKenzie, E.

    1995-04-15

    The seasonal and UT variation of mesoscale structures (10 km - 100 m) in the central polar cap has been obtained from an analysis of 250-MHz intensity scintillation observations made at Thule, Greenland. It has been established earlier that mesoscale structures causing scintillations of satellite signals may develop at the edges of macroscale structures (several hundred km) such as discrete polar cap plasma density enhancements or patches through the gradient drift instability process. As such, the authrs examined the seasonal and UT variation of polar cap patches simulated by using the USU Time Dependent Ionospheric Model (TDIM) under conditions of southward B(sub z). A fairly remarkable similarity is found between the scintillation observations and the model predictions of patch occurrence. For instance, both the patch and scintillation occurrences are minimized during the winter solstice (northern hemisphere) between 0800-1200 UT while also having their largest seasonal intensity between 2000-2400 UT. Little UT dependence of patches and scintillations is seen at equinox with high intensity being observed throughout the day, while during local summer the intensity of macroscale patches and mesoscale irregularities are found to be a minimum at all UT. These results indicate that macroscale features in the polar cap are routinely associated with plasma instabilities giving rise to smaller scale structures and that the specific patch formation mechanism assumed in the simulation is consistent with the observations.

  2. Liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter with density-dependent relativistic mean-field models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guang-Hua Zhang; Wei-Zhou Jiang

    2013-02-14

    The liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter is studied within density-dependent relativistic mean-field models where the density dependence is introduced according to the Brown-Rho scaling and constrained by available data at low densities and empirical properties of nuclear matter. The critical temperature of the liquid-gas phase transition is obtained to be 15.7 MeV in symmetric nuclear matter falling on the lower edge of the small experimental error bars. In hot asymmetric matter, the boundary of the phase-coexistence region is found to be sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy. The critical pressure and the area of phase-coexistence region increases clearly with the softening of the symmetry energy. The critical temperature of hot asymmetric matter separating the gas phase from the LG coexistence phase is found to be higher for the softer symmetry energy.

  3. Stochastic modeling for trajectories drift in the ocean: Application of Density Clustering Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shchekinova, E Y

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to address the effects of wind-induced drift on a floating sea objects using high--resolution ocean forecast data and atmospheric data. Two applications of stochastic Leeway model for prediction of trajectories drift in the Mediterranean sea are presented: long-term simulation of sea drifters in the western Adriatic sea (21.06.2009-23.06.2009) and numerical reconstruction of the Elba accident (21.06.2009-23.06.2009). Long-term simulations in the western Adriatic sea are performed using wind data from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) and currents from the Adriatic Forecasting System (AFS). An algorithm of spatial clustering is proposed to identify the most probable search areas with a high density of drifters. The results are compared for different simulation scenarios using different categories of drifters and forcing fields. The reconstruction of sea object drift near to the Elba Island is performed using surface currents from the Mediterranean Forecastin...

  4. Stochastic modeling for trajectories drift in the ocean: Application of Density Clustering Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Y. Shchekinova; Y. Kumkar

    2015-05-18

    The aim of this study is to address the effects of wind-induced drift on a floating sea objects using high--resolution ocean forecast data and atmospheric data. Two applications of stochastic Leeway model for prediction of trajectories drift in the Mediterranean sea are presented: long-term simulation of sea drifters in the western Adriatic sea (21.06.2009-23.06.2009) and numerical reconstruction of the Elba accident (21.06.2009-23.06.2009). Long-term simulations in the western Adriatic sea are performed using wind data from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) and currents from the Adriatic Forecasting System (AFS). An algorithm of spatial clustering is proposed to identify the most probable search areas with a high density of drifters. The results are compared for different simulation scenarios using different categories of drifters and forcing fields. The reconstruction of sea object drift near to the Elba Island is performed using surface currents from the Mediterranean Forecasting System (MFS) and atmospheric forcing fields from the ECMWF. The results showed that draft-limited to an upper surface drifters more closely reproduced target trajectory during the accident.

  5. Trends in Formic Acid Decomposition on Model Transition Metal Surfaces: A Density Functional Theory Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herron, Jeffrey A.; Scaranto, Jessica; Ferrin, Peter A.; Li, Sha; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2014-12-05

    We present a first-principles, self-consistent periodic density functional theory (PW91-GGA) study of formic acid (HCOOH) decomposition on model (111) and (100) facets of eight fcc metals (Au, Ag, Cu, Pt, Pd, Ni, Ir, and Rh) and (0001) facets of four hcp (Co, Os, Ru, and Re) metals. The calculated binding energies of key formic acid decomposition intermediates including formate (HCOO), carboxyl (COOH), carbon monoxide (CO), water (H2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), hydroxyl (OH), carbon (C), oxygen (O), and hydrogen (H; H2) are presented. Using these energetics, we develop thermochemical potential energy diagrams for both the carboxyl-mediated and the formate-mediated dehydrogenation mechanisms on each surface. We evaluate the relative stability of COOH, HCOO, and other isomeric intermediates (i.e., CO + OH, CO2 + H, CO + O + H) on these surfaces. These results provide insights into formic acid decomposition selectivity (dehydrogenation versus dehydration), and in conjunction with calculated vibrational frequency modes, the results can assist with the experimental search for the elusive carboxyl (COOH) surface intermediate. Results are compared against experimental reports in the literature.

  6. COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 2006 #12;Front cover photos: Top. #12;2006 ANNUAL REPORT iANNUAL REPORT 2006 COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM Above Harbor, Alaska, to study the navigational needs of small boats and commercial fishing vessels. Laboratory

  7. WILDLIFE MITIGATION RULE AND RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to wildlife by 13 Columbia Basin hydropower dams for which habitat loss statements have been submitted to be general consensus that 35 percent was well . within the losses that could be attributed to hydropower of the habitat losses allocated to hydropower. During the 10- year period, the Council will focus on wildlife

  8. Generalized parton distributions and transverse densities in a light-front quark-diquark model for the nucleons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandan Mondal; Dipankar Chakrabarti

    2015-06-17

    We present a study of the generalized parton distributions for the quarks in a proton in both momentum and position spaces using the light-front wave functions of a quark-diquark model for the nucleon predicted by the soft-wall model of AdS/QCD. The results are compared with the soft-wall AdS/QCD model of proton GPDs for zero skewness. We also calculate the GPDs for nonzero skewness. We observe that the GPDs have a diffraction pattern in longitudinal position space, as seen before in other models. Then we present a comparitive study of the nucleon charge and anomalous magnetization densities in the transverse plane. Flavor decompositions of the form factors and transverse densities are also discussed.

  9. Spin Contamination in Hartree-Fock and Density Functional Theory Wavefunctions in Modeling of Adsorption on Graphite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Thanh N.

    Spin Contamination in Hartree-Fock and Density Functional Theory Wavefunctions in Modeling: April 27, 2000 We have examined the effect of spin contamination in single determinant wave function) method, we found that UHF has a large spin contamination. Consequently, this yields large errors

  10. Density of vacuum energy for multidimensional model of Kazner with scalar field and cosmological birth of particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey Yakovlev

    2011-12-22

    In the work's considered density of vacuum energy and dynamic of scalar field in multidimensional theory with cosmological constant. Using method of N.N.Bogolubov coefficients, was gotten expression for influence of anisotropic metric to vacuum energy. Obtained the effective mass of massles scalar field, that depends on cosmological constant, and some general theoretical results concerning arising of particles in the model.

  11. Comparison of collisional radiative models for edge electron density reconstruction from Li I (2s-2p) emission profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoschus, H.; Hudson, B.; Munoz Burgos, J. M. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 (United States); Thomas, D. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Schweinzer, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Four collisional radiative models (CRMs) for reconstruction of the edge electron density profile from the measured Li I (2s-2p) emission profile of an accelerated lithium beam are compared using experimental data from DIII-D. It is shown for both L- and H-mode plasmas that edge density profiles reconstructed with the CRMs DDD2, ABSOLUT, [Sasaki et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 1699 (1993)] and a new model developed at DIII-D agree in a density scan from n{sub e}{sup ped}= (2.0-6.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} within 20%, 20%, <5%, and 40%, respectively, of the pedestal density measured with Thomson scattering. Profile shape and absolute density vary in a scan of the effective ion charge Z{sub eff}= 1-6 up to a factor of two but agree with Thomson data for Z{sub eff}= 1-2 within the error bars.

  12. HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2):205213, Fall 2007 Intrafield patterns of wildlife damage to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Conflicts 1(2):205­213, Fall 2007 Intrafield patterns of wildlife damage to corn at reducing wildlife damage to row crops rely on information concerning the spatial nature of wildlife damage at local and landscape scales. In this study we explored spatial patterns of wildlife damage within

  13. Finite element analysis of a current density -electric eld formulation of Bean's model for superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Styles, Vanessa

    for superconductivity C. M. Elliott, D. Kay #3; and V. Styles Centre for Mathematical Analysis and its Applications long cylindrical superconductor subject to a transverse magnetic #12;eld. We introduce a #12;nite-II superconductors formulated in terms of the current density and the electric #12;eld intensity. The physical

  14. Optimal investment with counterparty risk: a default-density model approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Pennec, Erwan

    during the financial crisis. Key words: Counterparty risk, contagious loss or gain, density of default the contagious jump and investigated firstly by Jarrow and Yu [10]. For the credit derivative CDS, Brigo to a contagious loss when the asset is positively correlated with the counterparty, while the rise represents

  15. Optimal investment with counterparty risk: a default-density modeling approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pham, Huyên

    during the financial crisis. Key words: Counterparty risk, contagious loss or gain, density of default the contagious jump and investigated firstly by Jarrow and Yu [10]. For the credit derivative CDS, Brigo to a contagious loss when the asset is positively correlated with the counterparty, while the rise represents

  16. Modeling target bulk heating resulting from ultra-intense short pulse laser irradiation of solid density targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antici, P. [Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma ‘‘La Sapienza,’’ Via Scarpa 14-16, 00161 Roma (Italy) [Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma ‘‘La Sapienza,’’ Via Scarpa 14-16, 00161 Roma (Italy); INRS-EMT, Varennes, Québec (Canada); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via E. Fermi, 40-00044 Frascati (Italy); LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Gremillet, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)] [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Grismayer, T. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear-Laboratório Associado, Instituto Superior Técnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)] [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear-Laboratório Associado, Instituto Superior Técnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Mora, P. [Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau (France)] [Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Audebert, P.; Man?ic, A.; Fuchs, J. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France)] [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Borghesi, M.; Cecchetti, C. A. [School of Mathematics and Physics, The Queen's University, Belfast (United Kingdom)] [School of Mathematics and Physics, The Queen's University, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-15

    Isochoric heating of solid-density matter up to a few tens of eV is of interest for investigating astrophysical or inertial fusion scenarios. Such ultra-fast heating can be achieved via the energy deposition of short-pulse laser generated electrons. Here, we report on experimental measurements of this process by means of time- and space-resolved optical interferometry. Our results are found in reasonable agreement with a simple numerical model of fast electron-induced heating.

  17. The scaling functions of the free energy density and its derivatives for the 3d O(4) model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engels, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    We derive direct representations of the scaling functions of the 3d O(4) model which are relevant for comparisons to other models, in particular QCD. This is done in terms of expansions in the scaling variable z= t/h^{1/Delta}. The expansions around z=0 and the corresponding asymptotic ones for z --> +- infinity overlap such that no interpolation is needed. The expansion coefficients are determined numerically from the data of a previous high statistics simulation of the O(4) model on a three-dimensional lattice of linear extension L=120. From the scaling function of the magnetization we calculate the leading asymptotic coefficients of the scaling function of the free energy density. As a result we obtain the universal amplitude ratio A^+/A^-=1.84(4) for the specific heat. Comparing the scaling function of the energy density to the data we find the non-singular part of the energy density epsilon_{ns}(T) with high precision and at the same time excellent scaling properties.

  18. Fracture Density Estimation Using Spectral Analysis of Reservoir Reflections: A Numerical Modeling Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Fred

    2003-01-01

    We use a 3-D finite difference numerical model to generate synthetic seismograms from a simple fractured reservoir

  19. DEGAS 2 Neutral Transport Modeling of High Density, Low Temperature Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the resulting fluid neutral momentum balance in a slab geometry is d dx ³ mnv 2 + nT ´ = # T n dT dx - m# cx nv.24, and the charge exchange frequency, # cx = 2.93# cx n(T/m) 1/2 . With a neutral source on one end of the slab (x density # # n(x)/n(L), d# dx = - 2 4 (1-# T ) T (L) dT (x) dx # + ##cx [T (L)/m] 1/2 T (x) T (L) - # 2 # 2

  20. MODELING THE ANOMALY OF SURFACE NUMBER DENSITIES OF GALAXIES ON THE GALACTIC EXTINCTION MAP DUE TO THEIR FIR EMISSION CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiwagi, Toshiya; Suto, Yasushi; Taruya, Atsushi; Yahata, Kazuhiro; Kayo, Issha; Nishimichi, Takahiro

    2015-02-01

    The most widely used Galactic extinction map is constructed assuming that the observed far-infrared (FIR) fluxes come entirely from Galactic dust. According to the earlier suggestion by Yahata et al., we consider how FIR emission of galaxies affects the SFD map. We first compute the surface number density of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 galaxies as a function of the r-band extinction, A {sub r,} {sub SFD}. We confirm that the surface densities of those galaxies positively correlate with A {sub r,} {sub SFD} for A {sub r,} {sub SFD} < 0.1, as first discovered by Yahata et al. for SDSS DR4 galaxies. Next we construct an analytical model to compute the surface density of galaxies, taking into account the contamination of their FIR emission. We adopt a log-normal probability distribution for the ratio of 100 ?m and r-band luminosities of each galaxy, y ? (?L){sub 100} {sub ?m}/(?L) {sub r}. Then we search for the mean and rms values of y that fit the observed anomaly, using the analytical model. The required values to reproduce the anomaly are roughly consistent with those measured from the stacking analysis of SDSS galaxies. Due to the limitation of our statistical modeling, we are not yet able to remove the FIR contamination of galaxies from the extinction map. Nevertheless, the agreement with the model prediction suggests that the FIR emission of galaxies is mainly responsible for the observed anomaly. Whereas the corresponding systematic error in the Galactic extinction map is 0.1-1 mmag, it is directly correlated with galaxy clustering and thus needs to be carefully examined in precision cosmology.

  1. FINAL PROJECT REPORT DOE Early Career Principal Investigator Program Project Title: Developing New Mathematical Models for Multiphase Flows Based on a Fundamental Probability Density Function Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shankar Subramaniam

    2009-04-01

    This final project report summarizes progress made towards the objectives described in the proposal entitled “Developing New Mathematical Models for Multiphase Flows Based on a Fundamental Probability Density Function Approach”. Substantial progress has been made in theory, modeling and numerical simulation of turbulent multiphase flows. The consistent mathematical framework based on probability density functions is described. New models are proposed for turbulent particle-laden flows and sprays.

  2. Human Dimensions of Wildlife Research Norman Dandy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human Dimensions of Wildlife Research Norman Dandy Social & Economic Research Group #12;Wildlife) · Human-dimensions of species management (HDSM) Research Projects #12;Collaborative Frameworks for Land of woodland landscapes ­ discussion groups, · Choice experiments, · Fellowships / Placements, · Newsletters

  3. Wildlife studies on the Hanford site: 1994 Highlights report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

    1995-04-01

    The purposes of the project are to monitor and report trends in wildlife populations; conduct surveys to identify, record, and map populations of threatened, endangered, and sensitive plant and animal species; and cooperate with Washington State and federal and private agencies to help ensure the protection afforded by law to native species and their habitats. Census data and results of surveys and special study topics are shared freely among cooperating agencies. Special studies are also conducted as needed to provide additional information that may be required to assess, protect, or manage wildlife resources at Hanford. This report describes highlights of wildlife studies on the Site in 1994. Redd counts of fall chinook salmon in the Hanford Reach suggest that harvest restrictions directed at protecting Snake River salmon may have helped Columbia River stocks as well. The 1994 count (5619) was nearly double that of 1993 and about 63% of the 1989 high of approximately 9000. A habitat map showing major vegetation and land use cover types for the Hanford Site was completed in 1993. During 1994, stochastic simulation was used to estimate shrub characteristics (height, density, and canopy cover) across the previously mapped Hanford landscape. The information provided will be available for use in determining habitat quality for sensitive wildlife species. Mapping Site locations of plant species of concern continued during 1994. Additional sensitive plant species data from surveys conducted by TNC were archived. The 10 nesting pairs of ferruginous hawks that used the Hanford Site in 1993 represented approximately 25% of the Washington State population.

  4. Fish & Wildlife Annual Project Summary, 1983.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1984-07-01

    BPA's Division of Fish and Wildlife was created in 1982 to develop, coordinate and manage BPA's fish and wildlife program. Division activities protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife resources impacted by hydroelectric development and operation in the Columbia River Basin. At present the Division spends 95% of its budget on restoration projects. In 1983, 83 projects addressed all aspects of the anadromous fish life cycle, non-migratory fish problems and the status of wildlife living near reservoirs.

  5. Seismic scattering attributes to estimate reservoir fracture density : a numerical modeling study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Frederick D. (Frederick Douglas), 1978-

    2003-01-01

    We use a 3-D finite difference numerical model to generate synthetic seismograms from a simple fractured reservoir containing evenly-spaced, discrete, vertical fracture zones. The fracture zones are represented using a ...

  6. Seismic Scattering Attributes to Estimate Reservoir Fracture Density: A Numerical Modeling Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Frederick Douglas

    We use a 3-D finite difference numerical model to generate synthetic seismograms from a simple fractured reservoir containing evenly-spaced, discrete, vertical fracture zones. The fracture zones are represented using a ...

  7. Measuring and Modeling Fault Density for Plume-Fault Encounter Probability Estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, P.D.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Nicot, J.-P.

    2011-05-15

    Emission of carbon dioxide from fossil-fueled power generation stations contributes to global climate change. Storage of this carbon dioxide within the pores of geologic strata (geologic carbon storage) is one approach to mitigating the climate change that would otherwise occur. The large storage volume needed for this mitigation requires injection into brine-filled pore space in reservoir strata overlain by cap rocks. One of the main concerns of storage in such rocks is leakage via faults. In the early stages of site selection, site-specific fault coverages are often not available. This necessitates a method for using available fault data to develop an estimate of the likelihood of injected carbon dioxide encountering and migrating up a fault, primarily due to buoyancy. Fault population statistics provide one of the main inputs to calculate the encounter probability. Previous fault population statistics work is shown to be applicable to areal fault density statistics. This result is applied to a case study in the southern portion of the San Joaquin Basin with the result that the probability of a carbon dioxide plume from a previously planned injection had a 3% chance of encountering a fully seal offsetting fault.

  8. PHYSICAL REVIEW C 77, 064308 (2008) Effective shell model Hamiltonians from density functional theory: Quadrupolar and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertsch George F.

    2008-01-01

    ), and the configuration-interaction shell-model (CISM) approach [2]. SCMF theories are often cast in terms of an energy. Such parametrizations are usually based on the zero-range Skyrme force [3] or on the Gogny interaction [4]. The CISM effective CISM interactions can sometimes be traced back to the bare nucleon-nucleon interaction

  9. Steady-State and Dynamic Modeling of Commercial Slurry High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE) Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Y. A.

    , solvent, and oligomeric species from the polymer. Sol- vent is separated from the oligomer and recycled, Polymers Plus and Aspen Dynamics. The discussion includes thermodynamic properties, phase equilibrium, reaction kinetics, polymer properties, and other modeling issues. We characterize a Ziegler- Natta catalyst

  10. An extended SMLD approach for presumed probability density function in flamelet combustion model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coclite, Alessandro; De Palma, Pietro; Cutrone, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an extension of the standard flamelet progress variable (FPV) approach for turbulent combustion, applying the statistically most likely distribution (SMLD) framework to the joint PDF of the mixture fraction, Z, and the progress variable, C. In this way one does not need to make any assumption about the statistical correlation between Z and C and about the behaviour of the mixture fraction, as required in previous FPV models. In fact, for state-of-the-art models, with the assumption of very-fast-chemistry,Z is widely accepted to behave as a passive scalar characterized by a $\\beta$-distribution function. Instead, the model proposed here, evaluates the most probable joint distribution of Z and C without any assumption on their behaviour and provides an effective tool to verify the adequateness of widely used hypotheses, such as their statistical independence. The model is validated versus three well-known test cases, namely, the Sandia flames. The results are compared with those obtained by ...

  11. Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the impacts of hydropower dams on fish and wildlife. It also helps direct more than $250 million each year habitats in tributaries that have been damaged by development. A broad range of entities propose projects issues, as well as an independent panel of economists to provide guidance on questions of cost

  12. Combinatorial nuclear level-density model (Journal Article) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnect Collider Tests of the Little Higgs Model

  13. Combinatorial nuclear level-density model (Journal Article) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnect Collider Tests of the Little Higgs ModelConnect Combinatorial

  14. A Radiative Transport Model for Heating Paints using High Density Plasma Arc Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S; Duty, Chad E; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Nichols, Mark; Blue, Craig A; Ott, Ronald D

    2009-01-01

    The energy distribution and ensuing temperature evolution within paint-like systems under the influence of infrared radiation was studied. Thermal radiation effects as well as those due to heat conduction were considered. A complete set of material properties was derived and discussed. Infrared measurements were conducted to obtain experimental data for the temperature in the paint film. The heat flux of the incident radiation from the plasma arc lamp was measured using a heat flux sensor with a very short response time. The comparison between the computed and experimental results for temperature show that the models that are based on spectral four-flux RTE and accurate optical properties yield accurate results for the black paint systems.

  15. Density functional investigation of intermolecular effects on {sup 13}C NMR chemical-shielding tensors modeled with molecular clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, Sean T.; Dybowski, Cecil; Iuliucci, Robbie J.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2014-10-28

    A quantum-chemical method for modeling solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance chemical-shift tensors by calculations on large symmetry-adapted clusters of molecules is demonstrated. Four hundred sixty five principal components of the {sup 13}C chemical-shielding tensors of 24 organic materials are analyzed. The comparison of calculations on isolated molecules with molecules in clusters demonstrates that intermolecular effects can be successfully modeled using a cluster that represents a local portion of the lattice structure, without the need to use periodic-boundary conditions (PBCs). The accuracy of calculations which model the solid state using a cluster rivals the accuracy of calculations which model the solid state using PBCs, provided the cluster preserves the symmetry properties of the crystalline space group. The size and symmetry conditions that the model cluster must satisfy to obtain significant agreement with experimental chemical-shift values are discussed. The symmetry constraints described in the paper provide a systematic approach for incorporating intermolecular effects into chemical-shielding calculations performed at a level of theory that is more advanced than the generalized gradient approximation. Specifically, NMR parameters are calculated using the hybrid exchange-correlation functional B3PW91, which is not available in periodic codes. Calculations on structures of four molecules refined with density plane waves yield chemical-shielding values that are essentially in agreement with calculations on clusters where only the hydrogen sites are optimized and are used to provide insight into the inherent sensitivity of chemical shielding to lattice structure, including the role of rovibrational effects.

  16. A National Assessment of the Intrastructure for Urban Wildlife Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Michaela Rene

    2014-08-01

    ecosystems. Universities and state wildlife agencies are the main driving forces for research and management, and it is crucial that these institutions provide support for managing wildlife in urban environments. Universities (n = 73) and state wildlife...

  17. QER- Comment of National Wildlife Foundation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mollie Simon Climate and Energy National Wildlife Federation - National Advocacy Center 901 E. Street, NW Suite 400 Washington, DC 20004 +1 202.797.6651

  18. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation...

  19. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural...

  20. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

  1. Adapting to Change 475 Wildlife-Vehicle Collisions Data Collection PREDICTIVE MODELS OF HERPETOFAUNA ROAD MORTALITY HOTSPOTS IN EXTENSIVE ROAD NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langen, Tom A.

    mortality risk and road-caused habitat fragmentation indicate that effective monitoring and mitigation- kill risk or critical corridors for habitat and population connectivity. While such models have already are expensive or labor-intensive, making them impractical to implement throughout a road network (see reviews

  2. Appendix D of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data. Workshop to Establish Coordination and Communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the fourth appendix to the report, the presentations from the workshop.

  3. Appendix B of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data. Workshop to Establish Coordination and Communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the second appendix to the report, the workshop participants.

  4. J/Psi suppression, percolation model and the critical energy density in AA collisions at SPS and RHIC energies with the account of centrality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Feofilov; O. Kochebina

    2009-07-09

    Experimental data on the onset of a so-called anomalous J/psi suppression in PbPb collisions at the SPS are considered in the framework of string percolation model. This onset is observed at a certain collision centrality, characterized by the number of nucleons-participants (Npart) related to the impact-parameter. Modified Bjorken formula calculations are performed for the local energy densities in AA collisions at different impact-parameters and with detailed account of the latest data available on the charged particles densities at midrapidity. Finally we compare variations of mean local energy and of string densities and match the occurrence of the critical percolation phenomenon with the critical energy density value, considering them at the same values of Npart. Similar analysis was performed for recent RHIC data and the results are discussed.

  5. Wildlife / dangerous Tree assessor's Course Workbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Wildlife / dangerous Tree assessor's Course Workbook Wildland fire safeTy Course Module Revised from the "Wildlife/Danger Tree Assessor's Course ­ Forest Harvesting and Silviculture." Jeff Mc contributions to this current course workbook. #12;Danger Tree Assessor's Course July 2010 ii Library

  6. Revised May 2008 Wildlife/Danger Tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Revised May 2008 Wildlife/Danger Tree Assessor's Course Workbook Forest Harvesting and Silviculture: Ministry of Forests and Range Ministry of Environment #12;#12;Wildlife/Danger Tree Assessor's Course Workbook: Forest Harvesting and Silviculture Module May 2008 iii DANGEROUS TREE ASSESSMENT IN BRITISH

  7. Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma E-1026 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University #12;Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma Authors from the Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management, Oklahoma State University

  8. Wildlife Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw,WhatUtilityRateNamingHelper JumpWild HorseWildlife

  9. Accurate neutralino relic density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Gondolo; Joakim Edsjo

    1998-04-30

    We enlarge our set of supersymmetric models and update accelerator constraints in our precise calculation of the relic density of the lightest neutralino, which includes relativistic Boltzmann averaging, subthreshold and resonant annihilations, and coannihilation processes among charginos and neutralinos.

  10. Structure of AgI-doped Ge-In-S glasses: Experiment, reverse Monte Carlo modelling, and density functional calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrissanthopoulos, A.; Jovari, P.; Kaban, I.; Gruner, S.; Kavetskyy, T.; Borc, J.; Wang, W.; Ren, J.; Chen, G.; Yannopoulos, S.N.

    2012-08-15

    We report an investigation of the structure and vibrational modes of Ge-In-S-AgI bulk glasses using X-ray diffraction, EXAFS spectroscopy, Reverse Monte-Carlo (RMC) modelling, Raman spectroscopy, and density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations. The combination of these techniques made it possible to elucidate the short- and medium-range structural order of these glasses. Data interpretation revealed that the AgI-free glass structure is composed of a network where GeS{sub 4/2} tetrahedra are linked with trigonal InS{sub 3/2} units; S{sub 3/2}Ge-GeS{sub 3/2} ethane-like species linked with InS{sub 4/2}{sup -} tetrahedra form sub-structures which are dispersed in the network structure. The addition of AgI into the Ge-In-S glassy matrix causes appreciable structural changes, enriching the Indium species with Iodine terminal atoms. The existence of trigonal species InS{sub 2/2}I and tetrahedral units InS{sub 3/2}I{sup -} and InS{sub 2/2}I{sub 2}{sup -} is compatible with the EXAFS and RMC analysis. Their vibrational properties (harmonic frequencies and Raman activities) calculated by DFT are in very good agreement with the experimental values determined by Raman spectroscopy. - Graphical abstract: Experiment (XRD, EXAFS, RMC, Raman scattering) and density functional calculations are employed to study the structure of AgI-doped Ge-In-S glasses. The role of mixed structural units as illustrated in the figure is elucidated. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doping Ge-In-S glasses with AgI causes significant changes in glass structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experiment and DFT are combined to elucidate short- and medium-range structural order. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Indium atoms form both (InS{sub 4/2}){sup -} tetrahedra and InS{sub 3/2} planar triangles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer (InS{sub 4/2}){sup -} tetrahedra bond to (S{sub 3/2}Ge-GeS{sub 3/2}){sup 2+} ethane-like units forming neutral sub-structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mixed chalcohalide species (InS{sub 3/2}I){sup -} offer vulnerable sites for the uptake of Ag{sup +}.

  11. PdnCO (n ) 1,2): Accurate Ab Initio Bond Energies, Geometries, and Dipole Moments and the Applicability of Density Functional Theory for Fuel Cell Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gherman, Benjamin F.

    and the Applicability of Density Functional Theory for Fuel Cell Modeling Nathan E. Schultz, Benjamin F. Gherman Form: August 18, 2006 Electrode poisoning by CO is a major concern in fuel cells. As interest. Introduction Several of the most successful fuel cell applications use a Pt anode as a catalyst

  12. A study of density of states and ground states in hydrophobic-hydrophilic protein folding models by equi-energy sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Wing Hung

    A study of density of states and ground states in hydrophobic-hydrophilic protein folding models June 2006 We propose an equi-energy EE sampling approach to study protein folding in the two a detailed study of the thermodynamics of HP protein folding, in particular, on the temperature dependence

  13. Some examples of different descriptions of energy-momentum density in the context of Bianchi IX cosmological model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Nourinezhad; S. Hamid Mehdipour

    2012-03-08

    Based on the Bianchi type IX metric, we calculate the energy and momentum density components of the gravitational field for the five different definitions of energy-momentum, namely, Tolman, Papapetrou, Landau-Lifshitz, M{\\o}ller and Weinberg. The energy densities of M{\\o}ller and Weinberg become zero for the spacetime under consideration. In the other prescriptions, i.e., Tolman, Papapetrou and Landau-Lifshitz complexes, we find different non-vanishing energy-momentum densities for the given spacetime, supporting the well-known argument in General Relativity that the different definitions may lead to different distributions even in the same spacetime background.

  14. Wildlife Rehabilitation Centers: Survey of Rehabilitators' Attitudes, Motivations, and Knowledge and Study of Animal Admittance to the South Plains Wildlife Rehabilitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    Wildlife Rehabilitation Centers: Survey of Rehabilitators' Attitudes, Motivations, and Knowledge and Study of Animal Admittance to the South Plains Wildlife Rehabilitation Center by E. Kathleen Wildlife Rehabilitation Center for allowing me access to the wildlife admittance records and providing

  15. Reviewing the human dimensions of wildlife management and recreation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to wildlife management? Who opposes wildlife management and why? Change in the human dimensions of wildlifeReviewing the human dimensions of wildlife management and recreation Mariella Marzano Norman Dandy Centre for Human & Ecological Sciences Forest Research #12;Human Dimensions of Species Management http

  16. WILDLIFE RESPONSE TO STAND STRUCTURE OF GREEN ASH WOODLANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WILDLIFE RESPONSE TO STAND STRUCTURE OF GREEN ASH WOODLANDS by Robert A. Hodorff A thesis submitted Sciences, South Dakota State University. 1985 #12;WILDLIFE RESPONSE TO STAND STRUCTURE OF GREEN ASH, Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences Date #12;WILDLIFE RESPONSE TO STAND STRUCTURE OF GREEN ASH

  17. wildlife

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 FederalRivers andMEDA Station3/%2A| National48/%2A en

  18. Assessment of lesser prairie-chicken lek density relative to landscape characteristics in Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennifer Timmer; Matthew Butler; Warren Ballard; Clint Boal; Heather Whitlaw

    2012-08-31

    My 2.5-yr Master'Â?s project accomplished the objectives of estimating lesser prairie-chicken (LPC) lek density and abundance in the Texas occupied range and modeling anthropogenic and landscape features associated with lek density by flying helicopter lek surveys for 2 field seasons and employing a line-transect distance sampling method. This project was important for several reasons. Firstly, wildlife managers and biologists have traditionally monitored LPC populations with road-based surveys that may result in biased estimates and do not provide access to privately-owned or remote property. From my aerial surveys and distance sampling, I was able to provide accurate density and abundance estimates, as well as new leks and I detected LPCs outside the occupied range. Secondly, recent research has indicated that energy development has the potential to impact LPCs through avoidance of tall structures, increased mortality from raptors perching on transmission lines, disturbance to nesting hens, and habitat loss/fragmentation. Given the potential wind energy development in the Texas Panhandle, spatial models of current anthropogenic and vegetative features (such as transmission lines, roads, and percent native grassland) influencing lek density were needed. This information provided wildlife managers and wind energy developers in Texas with guidelines for how change in landscape features could impact LPCs. Lastly, LPC populations have faced range-wide declines over the last century and they are currently listed as a candidate species under the Endangered Species Act. I was able to provide timely information on LPC populations in Texas that will be used during the listing process.

  19. WILDLIFE SECTION 11 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 11-1 Seotember 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a number of other activities associated with hydroelectric development have altered land and stream areas increases. Programs to protect, mitigate and enhance wildlife affected by hydroelectric development should

  20. Fish and Wildlife Toxicology Lecture Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    ; methods used to assess hazards contaminants pose to fish and wildlife; sublethal and indirect effects" Session 2: Laboratory Toxicity Tests/ "Anatomy of an Oil Spill" Session 3: Factors Governing Test Results

  1. Statistical density modification using local pattern matching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2007-01-23

    A computer implemented method modifies an experimental electron density map. A set of selected known experimental and model electron density maps is provided and standard templates of electron density are created from the selected experimental and model electron density maps by clustering and averaging values of electron density in a spherical region about each point in a grid that defines each selected known experimental and model electron density maps. Histograms are also created from the selected experimental and model electron density maps that relate the value of electron density at the center of each of the spherical regions to a correlation coefficient of a density surrounding each corresponding grid point in each one of the standard templates. The standard templates and the histograms are applied to grid points on the experimental electron density map to form new estimates of electron density at each grid point in the experimental electron density map.

  2. Operational/Secondary Losses and Wildlife Monitoring Issues Wildlife Advisory Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to costs and manpower, likely cannot be applied at the scale needed to fully mitigate operational impacts with dual benefits and strive to mesh both fish and wildlife resources in the development of these ecosystem for the development of ecosystem approaches to mitigation that benefit both fish and wildlife resources, while keeping

  3. 46 The Wildlife Professional, Winter 2012 The Wildlife Society A New Forest Fire Paradigm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeSante, David F.

    46 The Wildlife Professional, Winter 2012 © The Wildlife Society A New Forest Fire Paradigm paradigm--which holds that severe forest fires are always harmful--to a new one that embraces among forest types and regions, and fire severity differs with vegetation type, geographical location

  4. Scaling properties of critical bubble of homogeneous nucleation in stretched fluid of square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masao Iwamatsu

    2008-08-07

    The square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy is used to study homogeneous bubble nucleation in a stretched liquid to check the scaling rule for the work of formation of the critical bubble as a function of scaled undersaturation $\\Delta\\mu/\\Delta\\mu_{\\rm spin}$, the difference in chemical potential $\\Delta\\mu$ between the bulk undersaturated and saturated liquid divided by $\\Delta\\mu_{\\rm spin}$ between the liquid spinodal and saturated liquid. In contrast to our study, a similar density-functional study for a Lennard-Jones liquid by Shen and Debenedetti [J. Chem. Phys. {\\bf 114}, 4149 (2001)] found that not only the work of formation but other various quantities related to the critical bubble show the scaling rule, however, we found virtually no scaling relationships in our model near the coexistence. Although some quantities show almost perfect scaling relations near the spinodal, the work of formation divided by the value deduced from the classical nucleation theory shows no scaling in this model even though it correctly vanishes at the spinodal. Furthermore, the critical bubble does not show any anomaly near the spinodal as predicted many years ago. In particular, our model does not show diverging interfacial width at the spinodal, which is due to the fact that compressibility remains finite until the spinodal is reached in our parabolic models.

  5. Model-based simultaneous optimization of multiple design parameters for lithium-ion batteries for maximization of energy density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Model-based simultaneous optimization of multiple design parameters for lithium-ion batteries Keywords: Lithium-ion batteries Model-based design Optimization Physics based reformulated model a b s t r for porous electrodes that are commonly used in advanced batteries such as lithium-ion systems. The approach

  6. Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, Neil R; Evans, James W.; Parr, Patricia Dreyer

    2007-10-01

    This document outlines a plan for management of the wildlife resources on the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation. Management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; restoration of wildlife species; preservation, management, and enhancement of wildlife habitats; coordination of wildlife studies and characterization of areas; and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into several categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for attaining them. These objectives are management of (1) wildlife habitats to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety; (4) the Three Bend Scenic and Wildlife Management Refuge Area; (5) nuisance wildlife, including nonnative species, to achieve adequate population control for the maintenance of health and safety on the Reservation; (6) sensitive species (i.e., state or federally listed as endangered, threatened, of special concern, or in need of management) through preservation and protection of both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (7) wildlife disease. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through agreements between TWRA and DOE and between DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC.

  7. ITEP Webinar: Climate Change Impacts on Fish and Wildlife

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attend this Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) webinar and learn the climate change challenges for fish and wildlife and what can be done to help safeguard fish, wildlife, and plants and the communities and economies that depend on them.

  8. The Pennsylvania 4-H Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Project (WHEP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Pennsylvania 4-H Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Project (WHEP) Originally Written By: Edward L. Neilson, Jr. and Delwin E. Benson, Ph.D. Adapted From the 4-H Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Program National..........................................................................................................................3 A Real Life Project

  9. Management and Conservation Article Application of a Bioeconomic Production Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dugger, Bruce

    Management and Conservation Article Application of a Bioeconomic Production Model to Improve Wildlife Management BENJAMIN S. RASHFORD,1 Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, University Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331-3601, USA ABSTRACT Faced with limited budgets, wildlife managers need

  10. Riparian Buffers for Wildlife Benefits of Riparian Buffers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    , develop- ment, and recreation. Losing these buffers has negatively affected wildlife habitat and water the information you will need to create an effective riparian buffer for wildlife while pro- tecting water quality for wildlife; but they also improve water quality for humans. In general, the wider and more diversely planted

  11. Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development RELATIONSHIP OF THE POWER PLAN TO THE FISH AND WILDLIFE The Power Act requires that the Council's power plan and Bonneville's resource acquisition program and to accommodate system operations to benefit fish and wildlife. The central purpose of this chapter of the power

  12. Demand for Wildlife Hunting in the Southeastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 Demand for Wildlife Hunting in the Southeastern United States Presented by: Neelam C. Poudyal... Number of studies scrutinized demand for wildlife hunting (Ziemer et al. 1980; Miller and Hay,1981). Essential to understand what influences hunting demand. Projecting how the future of wildlife hunting

  13. Wind Energy Development & Wildlife Striving for Co-existence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    for Wind Farm Sitings #12;Ohio Map of Survey Effort #12;Wind Energy & Nebraska's Wildlife Map #12Wind Energy Development & Wildlife ­ Striving for Co-existence Caroline Jezierski Nebraska Wind Energy & Wildlife Project Coordinator ISU ­ October 26, 2012 #12;#12;Installed Wind Power Capacity http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/wind

  14. Semi-microscopic modeling of heavy-ion fusion reactions with multi-reference covariant density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Hagino; J. M. Yao

    2015-04-15

    We describe low-lying collective excitations of atomic nuclei with the multi-reference covariant density functional theory, and combine them with coupled-channels calculations for heavy-ion fusion reactions at energies around the Coulomb barrier. To this end, we use the calculated transition strengths among several collective states as inputs to the coupled-channels calculations. This approach provides a natural way to describe anharmonic multi-phonon excitations as well as a deviation of rotational excitations from a simple rigid rotor. We apply this method to subbarrier fusion reactions of $^{58}$Ni+$^{58}$Ni, $^{58}$Ni+$^{60}$Ni and $^{40}$Ca+$^{58}$Ni systems. We find that the effect of anharmonicity tends to smear the fusion barrier distributions, better reproducing the experimental data compared to the calculations in the harmonic oscillator limit.

  15. WILDLIFE SECTION 11 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 11-1 December 14, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a number of other activities associated with hydroelectric development have altered land and stream areas to protect, mitigate and enhance wildlife affected by hydroelectric development should consider the net

  16. Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 39(3), 2003, pp. 712717 Wildlife Disease Association 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gompper, Matthew E.

    37996, USA; 3 New York State Museum, CEC 3140, Albany, New York 12230, USA; 4 Wildlife Conservation is important for understanding coyote pop- ulation limitation and understanding po- tential risks that coyote

  17. About density functional theory interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirill Koshelev

    2015-05-28

    Two forms of relativistic density functional are derived from Dirac equation. Based on their structure analysis model of split electron is proposed. In this model electric charge and mass of electron behave like two point-like particles. It is shown that two electrons obeying this model cannot occupy the same quantum state. Empirical verification of the model is discussed.

  18. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mundinger, John

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  19. Neutron–proton effective mass splitting in neutron-rich matter at normal density from analyzing nucleon–nucleus scattering data within an isospin dependent optical model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Xiao -Hua; Guo, Wen -Jun; Li, Bao -An; Chen, Lie -Wen; Fattoyev, Farrukh J.; Newton, William G.

    2015-04-01

    The neutron–proton effective mass splitting in asymmetric nucleonic matter of isospin asymmetry ? and normal density is found to be m*n-p?(m*n – m*p)/m = (0.41 ± 0.15)? from analyzing globally 1088 sets of reaction and angular differential cross sections of proton elastic scattering on 130 targets with beam energies from 0.783 MeV to 200 MeV, and 1161 sets of data of neutron elastic scattering on 104 targets with beam energies from 0.05 MeV to 200 MeV within an isospin dependent non-relativistic optical potential model. It sets a useful reference for testing model predictions on the momentum dependence of the nucleonmore »isovector potential necessary for understanding novel structures and reactions of rare isotopes.« less

  20. Modelling of a self-sustained density wave oscillation and its neutronic response in a three-dimensional heterogeneous system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    t The main types of instabilities encountered in commercial Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) are global and in operating commercial Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) is the possible instabilities that can arise modelling a boiling channel exhibiting a DWO with the US NRC RELAP5 code, and by thereafter converting

  1. WFS 350 -WILDLIFE DAMAGE MANAGEMENT SPRING 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muller, Lisa

    . Omaha, Nebraska, USA. Available on-line at: www.ianr.unl.edu/wildlife/solutions/handbook the lecture material, field trips, and assigned readings. General Reports: You must locate one current (no.). The written report will be graded as follows: 1. Report format, article selection, etc. 20 pts. 2. Writing

  2. WILDLIFE HABITAT RELATIONS AND HABITAT FRAGMENTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in California's Hardwood Rangelands1 Barrett A. Garrison2 Frank W. Davis3 The nine papers in the following. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Garrison and Davis Brief Overview of the Session on Wildlife Habitat and described a coordinated regional planning effort to conserve remaining habitats. Garrison and Standiford

  3. Dynamic modelling of high biomass density cultivation and biohydrogen production in different scales of flat plate photobioreactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Dongda; Dechatiwongse, Pongsathorn; del Rio-Chanona, Ehecatl Antonio; Maitland, Geoffrey C.; Hellgardt, Klaus; Vassiliadis, Vassilios S.

    2015-06-04

    stream_source_info Zhang et al 2015 Biotechnology and Bioengineering.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 42360 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Zhang et al 2015 Biotechnology and Bioengineering.pdf.txt Content-Type text... effects in the induction of hydrogen production with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Part I. Model development and parameter identification. Biotechnology and Bioengineering, 102(1), 232–245. doi:10.1002/bit.22034 Giannelli, L., & Torzillo, G. (2012). Hydrogen...

  4. A study of the influence of isotopic substitution on the melting point and temperature of maximum density of water by means of path integral simulations of rigid models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBride, Carl; Noya, Eva G; Vega, Carlos; 10.1039/C2CP42393F

    2012-01-01

    The melting point of ice Ih, as well as the temperature of maximum density (TMD) in the liquid phase, has been computed using the path integral Monte Carlo method. Two new models are introduced; TIP4PQ_D2O and TIP4PQ_T2O which are specifically designed to study D2O and T2O respectively. We have also used these models to study the "competing quantum effects" proposal of Habershon, Markland and Manolopoulos; the TIP4PQ/2005, TIP4PQ/2005 (D2O) and TIP4PQ/2005 (T2O) models are able to study the isotopic substitution of hydrogen for deuterium or tritium whilst constraining the geometry, while the TIP4PQ_D2O and TIP4PQ_T2O models, where the O-H bond lengths are progressively shortened, permit the study of the influence of geometry (and thus dipole moment) on the isotopic effects. For TIP4PQ_D2O - TIP4PQ/2005 we found a melting point shift of 4.9 K (experimentally the value is 3.68K) and a TMD shift of 6K (experimentally 7.2K). For TIP4PQ_T2O - TIP4PQ/2005 we found a melting point shift of 5.2 K (experimentally the ...

  5. The relative variational model - A topological view of matter and its properties: UO{sub 2}{sup {+-}x} density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dias, M. S.; De Vasconcelos, V.; Mattos, J. R. L.; Lameiras, F. S. [Center for Development of the Nuclear Technology - CDTN, National Commission for the Nuclear Energy - CNEN, PO Box: 941, 30.161-970, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Jordao, E. [Chemistry Engineering Dept., Campinas State Univ., FEQ/UNICAMP, Av. Albert Einstein, 500, 13083-852, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Formal definitions of convergence, connected-ness and continuity were established to characterize and describe the crystalline solid and its properties as a unified notion in the topological space. The crystalline solid is a previously empty space that has been filled with atoms and phonons, i.e., the crystal is built with packages of matter and energy in a regular and orderly repetitive pattern along three orthogonal dimensions of the space. The spatial occupation of the atom in the crystal structure is determined by its mean vibrational volume. Thus, the changes of volume and the changes of internal energy are intrinsically linked. In fact, physical and material properties are the interdependent and bijective quantifications associated with variations of the internal energy. These properties are modeled by means of an intrinsic and invariable form function: the Relative Variational Model. In this paper, the lattice parameter and specific mass of UO{sub 2}{sup {+-}x} are depicted in dependence on the variations of the stoichiometry in the band of -0.016 {<=} x and <0.25 and temperature from 0 K up to melting point. (authors)

  6. Liquid drops on a surface: using density functional theory to calculate the binding potential and drop profiles and comparing with results from mesoscopic modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam P. Hughes; Uwe Thiele; Andrew J. Archer

    2015-01-28

    The contribution to the free energy for a film of liquid of thickness $h$ on a solid surface, due to the interactions between the solid-liquid and liquid-gas interfaces is given by the binding potential, $g(h)$. The precise form of $g(h)$ determines whether or not the liquid wets the surface. Note that differentiating $g(h)$ gives the Derjaguin or disjoining pressure. We develop a microscopic density functional theory (DFT) based method for calculating $g(h)$, allowing us to relate the form of $g(h)$ to the nature of the molecular interactions in the system. We present results based on using a simple lattice gas model, to demonstrate the procedure. In order to describe the static and dynamic behaviour of non-uniform liquid films and drops on surfaces, a mesoscopic free energy based on $g(h)$ is often used. We calculate such equilibrium film height profiles and also directly calculate using DFT the corresponding density profiles for liquid drops on surfaces. Comparing quantities such as the contact angle and also the shape of the drops, we find good agreement between the two methods. We also study in detail the effect on $g(h)$ of truncating the range of the dispersion forces, both those between the fluid molecules and those between the fluid and wall. We find that truncating can have a significant effect on $g(h)$ and the associated wetting behaviour of the fluid.

  7. Stability of critical bubble in stretched fluid of square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masao Iwamatsu; Yutaka Okabe

    2010-06-11

    The square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy, that was used previously to study the homogeneous bubble nucleation [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 104508 (2008)], is used to study the stability of the critical bubble nucleated within the bulk under-saturated stretched fluid. The stability of the bubble is studied by solving the Schr\\"odinger equation for the fluctuation. The negative eigenvalue corresponds to the unstable growing mode of the fluctuation. Our results show that there is only one negative eigenvalue whose eigenfunction represents the fluctuation that corresponds to the isotropically growing or shrinking nucleus. In particular, this negative eigenvalue survives up to the spinodal point. Therefore the critical bubble is not fractal or ramified near the spinodal.

  8. Probability density function treatment of turbulence/chemistry interactions during the ignition of a temperature-stratified mixture for application to HCCI engine modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; Chen, J.-Y.; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2008-12-15

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine technology promises to reduce NO{sub x} and soot emissions while achieving high thermal efficiency. Temperature and mixture stratification are regarded as effective means of controlling the start of combustion and reducing the abrupt pressure rise at high loads. Probability density function methods are currently being pursued as a viable approach to modeling the effects of turbulent mixing and mixture stratification on HCCI ignition. In this paper we present an assessment of the merits of three widely used mixing models in reproducing the moments of reactive scalars during the ignition of a lean hydrogen/air mixture ({phi}=0.1, p=41atm, and T=1070 K) under increasing temperature stratification and subject to decaying turbulence. The results from the solution of the evolution equation for a spatially homogeneous joint PDF of the reactive scalars are compared with available direct numerical simulation (DNS) data [E.R. Hawkes, R. Sankaran, P.P. Pebay, J.H. Chen, Combust. Flame 145 (1-2) (2006) 145-159]. The mixing models are found able to quantitatively reproduce the time history of the heat release rate, first and second moments of temperature, and hydroxyl radical mass fraction from the DNS results. Most importantly, the dependence of the heat release rate on the extent of the initial temperature stratification in the charge is also well captured. (author)

  9. Role of domestic dogs in diseases of significance to humans and wildlife health in central Chile 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acosta-Jamett, Gerardo

    2010-01-01

    The higher proximity among humans, domestic animals and wildlife favours disease spill-over both from wildlife to domestic animals and vice versa, which is a potential risk for the extinction of wildlife populations and ...

  10. California Department of Fish and Wildlife: Federal Energy Regulatory...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Department of Fish and Wildlife: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Hydroelectric Projects Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  11. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting March 29, 2013 Kristen Johnson...

  12. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review and Permitting Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California...

  13. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Permitting...

  14. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of...

  15. BPA celebrates protection of Lemhi River fish and wildlife habitat

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    celebrates-protection-of-Lemhi-River-fish-and-wildlife-habitat Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives...

  16. Nevada Department of Wildlife Energy Planning and Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Department of Wildlife Energy Planning and Conservation Fund Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Nevada Department of...

  17. The Wildlife Society (TWS) GIS Annual Remote Sensing Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dwyer, Chris

    1996-01-01

    Secretary/Treasurer, TWS GIS & Remote Sensing Working Group.The Wildlife Society (TWS) GIS Annual Remote Sensing Meetinghosted a special meeting of GIS and remote sensing interests

  18. Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Dan [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2008-11-03

    The Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is a 12,718 acre complex located in Douglas County, Washington. Four distinct management units make up the area: Bridgeport, Chester Butte, Dormaier and Sagebrush Flat. The four Units are located across a wide geographic area within Douglas County. The Units are situated roughly along a north/south line from Bridgeport in the north to the Douglas/Grant county line in the south, 60 miles away. The wildlife area was established to conserve and enhance shrubsteppe habitat for the benefit shrubsteppe obligate and dependent wildlife species. In particular, the Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is managed to promote the recovery of three state-listed species: Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (threatened), greater sage grouse (threatened) and the pygmy rabbit (endangered). The US Fish and Wildlife Service also list the pygmy rabbit as endangered. Wildlife area staff seeded 250 acres of old agricultural fields located on the Sagebrush Flat, Dormaier and Chester Butte units. This has been a three project to reestablish high quality shrubsteppe habitat on fields that had either been abandoned (Dormaier) or were dominated by non-native grasses. A mix of 17 native grasses and forbs, most of which were locally collected and grown, was used. First year maintenance included spot spraying Dalmatian toadflax on all sites and mowing annual weeds to reduce competition. Photo points were established and will be integral to long term monitoring and evaluation. Additional monitoring and evaluation will come from existing vegetation transects. This year weed control efforts included spot treatment of noxious weeds, particularly Dalmatian toadflax, in previously restored fields on the Bridgeport Unit (150 acres). Spot treatment also took place within fields scheduled for restoration (40 acres) and in areas where toadflax infestations are small and relatively easily contained. Where toadflax is so widespread that chemical treatment would be impractical, we use the bioagent Mecinus janthinus, available through Professor Gary Piper of Washington State University. This year we released 4,000 M. janthinus on the Bridgeport Unit at 6 separate locations. Since 2002 we have released approximately 14,400 of these insects, 80% of these on the Bridgeport Unit. Additional weed control activities included mowing and spot spraying more than 32 miles of roads, cutting and removal of annual weeds within fenced deer exclosures. We upgraded the solar powered irrigation system that supplies water to a stand of water birch trees planted in 2002. Wildlife area staff designed and built a new solar array and installed a higher capacity pump. The increased capacity will ensure that these trees receive adequate water through the hot summer months and allow us to create at least one additional stand. This project is an important part in our effort to expand the available winter habitat for sharp-tailed grouse on the Bridgeport Unit. Maintenance of fences, parking areas and roads continued during throughout the year. Two parking areas, at Chester Butte and Bridgeport, were graded and additional gravel added. Roads on the Bridgeport Unit were graded and repaired following spring runoff. Trespass and dumping issues have increased in recent years on the Bridgeport Unit. To address these problems we constructed four steel gates at access points on this unit. Each gate is tubular steel attached to 8-inch diameter steel posts, 10 feet long that are cemented into the ground. Two gates allow access to BPA substation facilities and power-line right-of ways so placement, construction and locking issues had to be coordinated with BPA's Real Estate staff in Spokane. Environmental Compliance Documentation issues were addressed again this year. This process has the potential to cause delays the completion of projects within the fiscal year. With this in mind and an eye toward the future, we requested that several projects planned for the coming years be surveyed this year. Beginning in August of 2007, area staff worked with BPA staff to identify work elements

  19. Fast transit portal dosimetry using density-scaled layer modeling of aSi-based electronic portal imaging device and Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Jae Won; Kim, Jong Oh; Yeo, Inhwan Jason; Cho, Young-Bin; Kim, Sun Mo; DiBiase, Steven

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Fast and accurate transit portal dosimetry was investigated by developing a density-scaled layer model of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and applying it to a clinical environment. Methods: The model was developed for fast Monte Carlo dose calculation. The model was validated through comparison with measurements of dose on EPID using first open beams of varying field sizes under a 20-cm-thick flat phantom. After this basic validation, the model was further tested by applying it to transit dosimetry and dose reconstruction that employed our predetermined dose-response-based algorithm developed earlier. The application employed clinical intensity-modulated beams irradiated on a Rando phantom. The clinical beams were obtained through planning on pelvic regions of the Rando phantom simulating prostate and large pelvis intensity modulated radiation therapy. To enhance agreement between calculations and measurements of dose near penumbral regions, convolution conversion of acquired EPID images was alternatively used. In addition, thickness-dependent image-to-dose calibration factors were generated through measurements of image and calculations of dose in EPID through flat phantoms of various thicknesses. The factors were used to convert acquired images in EPID into dose. Results: For open beam measurements, the model showed agreement with measurements in dose difference better than 2% across open fields. For tests with a Rando phantom, the transit dosimetry measurements were compared with forwardly calculated doses in EPID showing gamma pass rates between 90.8% and 98.8% given 4.5 mm distance-to-agreement (DTA) and 3% dose difference (DD) for all individual beams tried in this study. The reconstructed dose in the phantom was compared with forwardly calculated doses showing pass rates between 93.3% and 100% in isocentric perpendicular planes to the beam direction given 3 mm DTA and 3% DD for all beams. On isocentric axial planes, the pass rates varied between 95.8% and 99.9% for all individual beams and they were 98.2% and 99.9% for the composite beams of the small and large pelvis cases, respectively. Three-dimensional gamma pass rates were 99.0% and 96.4% for the small and large pelvis cases, respectively. Conclusions: The layer model of EPID built for Monte Carlo calculations offered fast (less than 1 min) and accurate calculation for transit dosimety and dose reconstruction.

  20. EIS(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-20) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOEEIS-0246SA-20) Allyn Meuleman, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Camas Prairie Acquisition, Anderson Ranch...

  1. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's net-zero energy visitor's center at the Assabet River National Wildlife.

  2. Phenomenological Relativistic Energy Density Functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lalazissis, G. A.; Kartzikos, S.; Niksic, T.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.; Ring, P.

    2009-08-26

    The framework of relativistic nuclear energy density functionals is applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena, not only in spherical and deformed nuclei along the valley of beta-stability, but also in exotic systems with extreme isospin values and close to the particle drip-lines. Dynamical aspects of exotic nuclear structure is explored using the fully consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov model. Recent applications of energy density functionals with explicit density dependence of the meson-nucleon couplings are presented.

  3. Rainwater Wildlife Area Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2004-01-01

    The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland cover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2}2 plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

  4. 2011Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report AnnuAl RePoRt to the noRthWest Gove | Northwest Power & Conservation Council Document 2012-11 | September 2012 #12;FIsh & WIlDlIFe Costs ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthWESt GOvERNORS costs 08

  5. APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and wildlife affected by the development, operation, and management of [hydropower] facilities while assuring that have significant capital and/or operating costs that would be borne, at least in part, by the power that the Council would develop the fish and wildlife program immediately after passage of the Act.5 In contrast

  6. Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    PotentialWind Energy Resource Potential New U.S. Generating CapacityNew U.S. Generating Capacity Wind energy1 Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife Carrie Lowe, M.S. Candidate UniversityOutline · Introduction · Wind energy in the U.S. I t ildlif· Impacts on wildlife · Guidelines · Future directions

  7. Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD)(Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    The Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD), developed and maintained by the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is comprised of over 1,000 citations pertaining to the effects of land-based wind, offshore wind, marine and hydrokinetic, power lines, and communication and television towers on wildlife.

  8. Wildlife and Wind Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland:MeadowWikiSysop's blog HomeWildlife and Wind Energy

  9. Fish and Wildlife Service | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport Jump to: navigation,FirstGeoTherm GmbH JumpFishWildlife

  10. World Wildlife Fund | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan) Jump to: navigation, searchWorld FuelWildlife Fund Jump

  11. Scattering Density Profile Model of POPG Bilayers as Determined by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Small-Angle Neutron and X-ray Scattering Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia); Holland, B [University of Guelph; Gray, C.G [University of Guelph; Tomberli, B [Brandon University; Katsaras, John [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    We combine molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and experiment, both small-angle neutron (SANS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), to determine the precise structure of bilayers composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG), a lipid commonly encountered in bacterial membranes. Experiment and simulation are used to develop a one-dimensional scattering density profile (SDP) model suitable for the analysis of experimental data. The joint refinement of such data (i.e., SANS and SAXS) results in the area per lipid that is then used in the fixed-area simulations. In the final step, the direct comparison of simulated-to-experimental data gives rise to the detailed structure of POPG bilayers. From these studies we conclude that POPG s molecular area is 66.0 +/- 1.3 ^2, its overall bilayer thickness is 36.7 +/- 0.7 , and its hydrocarbon region thickness is 27.9 ( 0.6 , assuming a simulated value of 1203 ^3 for the total lipid volume.

  12. Critical cavity in the stretched fluid studied using square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masao Iwamatsu

    2009-04-04

    The generic square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy is used to study the stability of a cavity introduced into the stretched liquid. The various properties of the critical cavity, which is the largest stable cavity within the liquid, are compared with those of the critical bubble of the homogeneous bubble nucleation. It is found that the size of the critical cavity is always smaller than that of the critical bubble, while the work of formation of the former is always higher than the latter in accordance with the conjectures made by Punnathanam and Corti [J. Chem. Phys. {\\bf 119}, 10224 (2003)] deduced from the Lennard-Jones fluids. Therefore their conjectures about the critical cavity size and the work of formation would be more general and valid even for other types of liquid such as metallic liquid or amorphous. However, the scaling relations they found for the critical cavity in the Lennard-Jones fluid are marginally satisfied only near the spinodal.

  13. Low density expansion for Lyapunov exponents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hermann Schulz-Baldes

    2006-07-12

    In some quasi-one-dimensional weakly disordered media, impurities are large and rare rather than small and dense. For an Anderson model with a low density of strong impurities, a perturbation theory in the impurity density is developed for the Lyapunov exponent and the density of states. The Lyapunov exponent grows linearly with the density. Anomalies of the Kappus-Wegner type appear for all rational quasi-momenta even in lowest order perturbation theory.

  14. Electron trap density distribution of Si-rich silicon nitride extracted using the modified negative charge decay model of silicon-oxide-nitride-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jong Duk

    Electron trap density distribution of Si-rich silicon nitride extracted using the modified negative at elevated temperatures 150 °C , which can be used for extracting the electron trap density distribution tunneling, Eox t is the internal electric field induced by the trapped charges in the silicon nitride layer

  15. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for the Noxon Rapids and Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Projects, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissell, Gael

    1985-04-01

    Mitigation projects for wildlife species impacted by the Noxon Rapids and Cabinet Gorge hydroelectric projects are recommended. First priority projects encompass the development of long-term wildlife management plans for WWP lands adjacent to the two reservoirs. General objectives for all WWP lands include alternatives designed to protect or enhance existing wildlife habitat. It is also suggested that WWP evaluate the current status of beaver and river otter populations occupying the reservoirs and implement indicated management. Second priority projects include the protection/enhancement of wildlife habitat on state owned or privately owned lands. Long-term wildlife management agreements would be developed with Montana School Trust lands and may involve reimbursement of revenues lost to the state. Third priority projects include the enhancement of big game winter ranges located on Kootenai National Forest lands. 1 ref., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  16. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

  17. Laboratory Density Functionals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Giraud

    2007-07-26

    We compare several definitions of the density of a self-bound system, such as a nucleus, in relation with its center-of-mass zero-point motion. A trivial deconvolution relates the internal density to the density defined in the laboratory frame. This result is useful for the practical definition of density functionals.

  18. Appendix A -1 Appendix A: The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix A - 1 Appendix A: The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program The 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program is the fifth revision of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program since the NPCC principles. The 2000 NPCC Fish and Wildlife Program marks a significant departure from past versions, which

  19. iJanuary 2001 Department of Fish and Wildlife Washington State Elk Herd Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    iJanuary 2001 Department of Fish and Wildlife Washington State Elk Herd Plan BLUE MOUNTAINS ELK 98501-1091 Prepared by Pat E. Fowler, District Wildlife Biologist January 2001 Director, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Date #12;iiJanuary 2001 Department of Fish and Wildlife TABLE OF CONTENTS

  20. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Hungry Horse Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissell, Gael

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Hungry Horse hydroelectric project. In this report, mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. Mitigation objectives for each species (group) were established based on the loss estimates but tailored to the recommended projects. 13 refs., 3 figs., 19 tabs.

  1. Nuclear Energy Density Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kortelainen; T. Lesinski; J. Moré; W. Nazarewicz; J. Sarich; N. Schunck; M. V. Stoitsov; S. Wild

    2010-05-27

    We carry out state-of-the-art optimization of a nuclear energy density of Skyrme type in the framework of the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) theory. The particle-hole and particle-particle channels are optimized simultaneously, and the experimental data set includes both spherical and deformed nuclei. The new model-based, derivative-free optimization algorithm used in this work has been found to be significantly better than standard optimization methods in terms of reliability, speed, accuracy, and precision. The resulting parameter set UNEDFpre results in good agreement with experimental masses, radii, and deformations and seems to be free of finite-size instabilities. An estimate of the reliability of the obtained parameterization is given, based on standard statistical methods. We discuss new physics insights offered by the advanced covariance analysis.

  2. Maximum-likelihood density modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Structural Biology Group, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2000-08-01

    A likelihood-based density modification approach is developed that can incorporate expected electron-density information from a wide variety of sources. A likelihood-based approach to density modification is developed that can be applied to a wide variety of cases where some information about the electron density at various points in the unit cell is available. The key to the approach consists of developing likelihood functions that represent the probability that a particular value of electron density is consistent with prior expectations for the electron density at that point in the unit cell. These likelihood functions are then combined with likelihood functions based on experimental observations and with others containing any prior knowledge about structure factors to form a combined likelihood function for each structure factor. A simple and general approach to maximizing the combined likelihood function is developed. It is found that this likelihood-based approach yields greater phase improvement in model and real test cases than either conventional solvent flattening and histogram matching or a recent reciprocal-space solvent-flattening procedure [Terwilliger (1999 ?), Acta Cryst. D55, 1863–1871].

  3. California high speed rail proposal: “High speed rail and wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkerson, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    Chapter Wildlife and High Speed Rail C ALIFORNIA H IGH SDan Leavitt, California High Speed Rail Authority) AbstractThe California High Speed Rail (HSR) Proposal is in the

  4. Tribal Wildlife Grant (FWS)- Grant Writing Strategy Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Prosper Sustainably is hosting a free webinar on July 23, 2014 at 1pm PST that reviews the FWS Tribal Wildlife Grant funding opportunity. During the webinar Josh Simmons, Prosper Sustainably’s...

  5. EA-1023: Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project, Eugene, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund habitat acquisition (of land or a conservation easement), wildlife...

  6. Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwell, L.L.

    1994-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

  7. Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Montana Kwa-Taq-Nuk Casino Resort 49708 US-93 Polson, MT 59860 The Native American Fish and Wildlife Society is hosting a two-day conference featuring tribal roundtables on...

  8. EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement...

  9. Nevada Department of Wildlife Application for Energy Projects...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Department of Wildlife Application for Energy Projects "Fund for the Recovery of Costs" Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  10. EA-0939: Blue Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to secure land and conduct wildlife habitat enhancement and long term...

  11. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-328

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-328 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing roost sites, each within rock crevices in outcrops near the base of the Surry Mountain Lake dam

  12. Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

    1992-10-01

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

  13. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Rainwater Wildlife Area, 1998-2001 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen

    2004-01-01

    The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland rover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2} plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and plant community resiliency in all cover types. Watershed conditions, including floodplain/riparian, and instream habitat quality should improve as well providing multiple benefits for terrestrial and aquatic resources. While such benefits are not necessarily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they are consistent with the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program.

  14. Statistical density modification using local pattern matching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2003-10-01

    Statistical density modification can make use of local patterns of density found in protein structures to improve crystallographic phases. A method for improving crystallographic phases is presented that is based on the preferential occurrence of certain local patterns of electron density in macromolecular electron-density maps. The method focuses on the relationship between the value of electron density at a point in the map and the pattern of density surrounding this point. Patterns of density that can be superimposed by rotation about the central point are considered equivalent. Standard templates are created from experimental or model electron-density maps by clustering and averaging local patterns of electron density. The clustering is based on correlation coefficients after rotation to maximize the correlation. Experimental or model maps are also used to create histograms relating the value of electron density at the central point to the correlation coefficient of the density surrounding this point with each member of the set of standard patterns. These histograms are then used to estimate the electron density at each point in a new experimental electron-density map using the pattern of electron density at points surrounding that point and the correlation coefficient of this density to each of the set of standard templates, again after rotation to maximize the correlation. The method is strengthened by excluding any information from the point in question from both the templates and the local pattern of density in the calculation. A function based on the origin of the Patterson function is used to remove information about the electron density at the point in question from nearby electron density. This allows an estimation of the electron density at each point in a map, using only information from other points in the process. The resulting estimates of electron density are shown to have errors that are nearly independent of the errors in the original map using model data and templates calculated at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Owing to this independence of errors, information from the new map can be combined in a simple fashion with information from the original map to create an improved map. An iterative phase-improvement process using this approach and other applications of the image-reconstruction method are described and applied to experimental data at resolutions ranging from 2.4 to 2.8 Å.

  15. Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-03-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Colville Confederated Tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The proposed action would allow the sponsors to secure property and conduct wildlife management activities within the boundaries of the Colville Indian Reservation. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. This area consists of several separated land parcels, of which 2,000 hectares (4,943 acres) have been purchased by BPA and an additional 4,640 hectares (11,466 acres) have been identified by the Colville Confederated Tribes for inclusion in the Project. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

  16. Segmenting participants on nonconsumptive wildlife-related recreation: a comparison of casual wildlife watchers and serious birders 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, James Stuart

    1998-01-01

    birders. For this study, casual wildlife watchers were represented by holders of Texas Conservation Passports and serious birders were represented by member of the American Birding Association. These two subgroups were surveyed using a mail...

  17. Experimental density and PC-SAFT modeling of Krytox (R) (perfluoropolyether) at pressures to 275 MPa and temperatures to 533 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bamgbade, B. A.; Wu, Y.; Burgess, W. A.

    2012-10-25

    Density data from 298 to 533 K and to 275 MPa are reported for Krytox® GPL 102, a poly(perfluoropropyl ether) (PFPE) with a CF3-branched fluoropropylether repeat group. The Tait equation fit to each density isotherm have mean absolute percent deviations (MAPD) between 0.11 and 0.30% with standard deviations (SD) not exceeding 0.20%. The perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) fit to the density data has an MAPD of 0.67% and an SD of 0.67%. Likewise the PC-SAFT fit to previously reported density data of Demnum®, a PFPE with an n-fluoropropylether repeat group, has an MAPD of 0.22% and a SD of 0.21% for Demnum® S-20 and an MAPD of 0.27% with a SD of 0.14% for Demnum® S-65. The trends exhibited by the PC-SAFT pure component parameters obtained from the fits of these three PFPEs are similar to those reported for linear and branched hydrocarbons with the same number of carbons.

  18. Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen

    2002-03-01

    This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

  19. FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS < PAGE 1 2013 Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS #12;PAGE 2 > 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIXTH AVENUE, SUITE

  20. Density functional theory for carbon dioxide crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Yiwen; Mi, Jianguo Zhong, Chongli

    2014-05-28

    We present a density functional approach to describe the solid?liquid phase transition, interfacial and crystal structure, and properties of polyatomic CO{sub 2}. Unlike previous phase field crystal model or density functional theory, which are derived from the second order direct correlation function, the present density functional approach is based on the fundamental measure theory for hard-sphere repulsion in solid. More importantly, the contributions of enthalpic interactions due to the dispersive attractions and of entropic interactions arising from the molecular architecture are integrated in the density functional model. Using the theoretical model, the predicted liquid and solid densities of CO{sub 2} at equilibrium triple point are in good agreement with the experimental values. Based on the structure of crystal-liquid interfaces in different planes, the corresponding interfacial tensions are predicted. Their respective accuracies need to be tested.

  1. Visualization of electronic density

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Grosso, Bastien; Cooper, Valentino R.; Pine, Polina; Hashibon, Adham; Yaish, Yuval; Adler, Joan

    2015-04-22

    An atom’s volume depends on its electronic density. Although this density can only be evaluated exactly for hydrogen-like atoms, there are many excellent numerical algorithms and packages to calculate it for other materials. 3D visualization of charge density is challenging, especially when several molecular/atomic levels are intertwined in space. We explore several approaches to 3D charge density visualization, including the extension of an anaglyphic stereo visualization application based on the AViz package to larger structures such as nanotubes. We will describe motivations and potential applications of these tools for answering interesting questions about nanotube properties.

  2. Updated Axion CDM energy density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji-Haeng Huh

    2008-10-08

    We update cosmological bound on axion model. The contribution from the anharmonic effect and the newly introduced initial overshoot correction are considered. We present an explicit formula for the axion relic density in terms of the QCD scale Lambda_{QCD}, the current quark masses m_q's and the Peccei-Quinn scale F_a, including firstly introduced 1.85 factor which is from the initial overshoot.

  3. Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  4. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soults, Scott

    2009-08-05

    The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) was actively involved in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in late 2007, but due to internal conflicts, the AFIWG members has fractionated into a smaller group. Implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. As of 2008, The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (Work Group) is a coalition comprised of wildlife managers from three tribal entities (Kalispel Tribe, Kootenai Tribe, Coeur d Alene Tribe) and the US Army Corps of Engineers. The Work Group directs where wildlife mitigation implementation occurs in the Kootenai, Pend Oreille and Coeur d Alene subbasins. The Work Group is unique in the Columbia Basin. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) wildlife managers in 1995, approved what was one of the first two project proposals to implement mitigation on a programmatic basis. The maintenance of this kind of approach through time has allowed the Work Group to implement an effective and responsive habitat protection program by reducing administrative costs associated with site-specific project proposals. The core mitigation entities maintain approximately 9,335 acres of wetland/riparian habitats in 2008.

  5. Bonneville Power Administration Wildlife Mitigation Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1996-08-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is responsible for mitigating the loss of wildlife habitat caused by the development of the Federal Columbia River Power System. BPA accomplishes this mitigation by funding projects consistent with those recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The projects are submitted to the Council from Indian Tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, and other Federal agencies. Future wildlife mitigation actions with potential environmental impacts are expected to include land acquisition and management, water rights acquisition and management, habitat restoration and enhancement, installation of watering devices, riparian fencing, and similar wildlife conservation actions. BPA needs to ensure that individual wildlife mitigation projects are planned and managed with appropriate consistency across projects, jurisdictions, and ecosystems, as well as across time. BPA proposes to standardize the planning and implementation of individual wildlife mitigation projects funded by BPA. Alternative 1 is the No Action alternative. Five standardizing alternatives are identified to represent the range of possible strategies, goals, and procedural requirements reasonably applicable to BPA-funded projects under a standardized approach to project planning and implementation. All action alternatives are based on a single project planning process designed to resolve site-specific issues in an ecosystem context and to adapt to changing conditions and information.

  6. Density of states of disordered systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Rossum, Mark; Nieuwenhuizen, Th.M; Hofstetter, E; Schreiber, M

    1994-05-15

    Density of states calculations for the tight-binding model with diagonal disorder are presented. An instanton approach is used to calculate the tails of the spectrum, including all prefactors. It is shown that a Hartree ...

  7. Using Wildlife Species Richness to Identify Land Protection Priorities in California's Hardwood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . 2 Wildlife Biologist, California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CDF), Sacramento; Senior Wildlife Biologist, Jones and Stokes Associates, Inc. Sacramento, California; Operations Research and GIS Specialist, CDF, Sacramento; and GIS Manager, Teale Data Center, Sacramento. Nancy D. Tosta2

  8. Privatization and regulatory oversight of commercial wildlife control activities in the United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Kieran J.

    2009-05-15

    Urbanization decreases the amount of natural habitat available to wildlife but some species are able to adapt to and even thrive in human-dominated landscapes. When humans and wildlife live in close proximity the number ...

  9. Nuisance Wildlife Education and Prevention Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, Neil R [ORNL

    2007-05-01

    This document outlines a plan for management of nuisance wildlife at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Nuisance wildlife management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; and law enforcement. This plan covers the following subjects: (1) roles and responsibilities of individuals, groups, and agencies; (2) the general protocol for reducing nuisance wildlife problems; and (3) species-specific methodologies for resolving nuisance wildlife management issues for mammals, birds, snakes, and insects. Achievement of the objectives of this plan will be a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA); U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)-Wildlife Services (WS); and ORNL through agreements between TWRA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC; and UT-Battelle, LLC; and USDA, APHIS-WS.

  10. Density-dependent covariant energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lalazissis, G. A.

    2012-10-20

    Relativistic nuclear energy density functionals are applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena at and away fromstability line. Isoscalar monopole, isovector dipole and isoscalar quadrupole giant resonances are calculated using fully self-consistent relativistic quasiparticle randomphase approximation, based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubovmodel. The impact of pairing correlations on the fission barriers in heavy and superheavy nuclei is examined. The role of pion in constructing desnity functionals is also investigated.

  11. Low density molded desiccant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lula, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    A formulation for low density syntactic foam desiccant, using a polyimide resin binder, glass microbubble filler, and molecular sieve desiccant powder has been developed. The formulation may be modified easily to meet specific part requirements such as density and desired moisture pickup. Some parts can be molded to size.

  12. The Quantum Energy Density: Improved E

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krogel, Jaron; Yu, Min; Kim, Jeongnim; Ceperley, David M.

    2013-01-01

    We establish a physically meaningful representation of a quantum energy density for use in Quantum Monte Carlo calculations. The energy density operator, dened in terms of Hamiltonian components and density operators, returns the correct Hamiltonian when integrated over a volume containing a cluster of particles. This property is demonstrated for a helium-neon \\gas," showing that atomic energies obtained from the energy density correspond to eigenvalues of isolated systems. The formation energies of defects or interfaces are typically calculated as total energy dierences. Using a model of delta-doped silicon (where dopant atoms form a thin plane) we show how interfacial energies can be calculated more eciently with the energy density, since the region of interest is small. We also demonstrate how the energy density correctly transitions to the bulk limit away from the interface where the correct energy is obtainable from a separate total energy calculation.

  13. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  14. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Assessing Habitat Quality of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  15. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note

  16. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-007

  17. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Relationships between Elevation and Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  18. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Silvicultural Treatments for Enhancing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  19. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  20. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

  1. JUVENILE SALMON MIGRATION SECTION 5 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 5-16 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JUVENILE SALMON MIGRATION SECTION 5 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 5-16 September 13, 1995 blank page #12;SECTION 5 JUVENILE SALMON MIGRATION September 13, 1995 5-16 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM temperature MIGRATION SECTION 5 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 5-17 September 13, 1995 program. If there are conflicting

  2. SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN PLANNING ECOREGION WILDLIFE ASSESSMENT 208 Appendix A: Assessment Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN PLANNING ECOREGION WILDLIFE ASSESSMENT 208 Appendix A: Assessment Tools #12;SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN PLANNING ECOREGION WILDLIFE ASSESSMENT A-1 Interactive and Washington during the Wildlife-Habitat Types in Oregon and Washington project. IBIS data is currently being

  3. EIS-0246: Wildlife Mitigation Program, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Washington, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BPA has decided to adopt the set of prescriptions (goals, strategies, and procedural requirements) identified in the final EIS as “Alternative 6, Balanced Action (BPA’s Preferred Alternative).” This decision will standardize the planning and implementation process, while achieving balance among all decision factors: (1) meeting the biological objectives of wildlife mitigation projects, (2) achievement of cost and administrative efficiency, (3) compliance with all applicable laws and regulations, and (4) protection and improvement of other environmental resources when such actions would support wildlife mitigation.

  4. Subsystem Density-Functional Theory as an Effective Tool for Modeling Ground and Excited States, their Dynamics, and Many-Body Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishtal, Alisa; Genova, Alessandro; Pavanello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Subsystem Density-Functional Theory (DFT) is an emerging technique for calculating the electronic structure of complex molecular and condensed phase systems. In this topical review, we focus on some recent advances in this field related to the computation of condensed phase systems, their excited states, and the evaluation of many-body interactions between the subsystems. As subsystem DFT is in principle an exact theory, any advance in this field can have a dual role. One is the possible applicability of a resulting method in practical calculations. The other is the possibility of shedding light on some quantum-mechanical phenomenon which is more easily treated by subdividing a supersystem into subsystems. An example of the latter is many-body interactions. In the discussion, we present some recent work from our research group as well as some new results, casting them in the current state-of-the-art in this review as comprehensively as possible.

  5. New Hampshire Coverts Project Volunteers Working for Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    New Hampshire Coverts Project Volunteers Working for Wildlife 2014 Annual Report Written by: Haley) 862-5327 October 31, 2014 The New Hampshire Coverts Project is sponsored by UNH Cooperative Extension and New Hampshire Fish & Game. The program also receives support from the New Hampshire Division

  6. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-323

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-323 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing Silver-haired bats do not remain in New Hampshire during the winter (see Izor 1979 for discussion to their summer habitat in New Hampshire (or, more gener- ally, to northern states; Cryan and Veilleux in press

  7. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-534

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-534 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing: Special Concern Global Rank: G5 State Rank: S3 Author: Carol R. Foss, New Hampshire Audubon Element 1 was listed as Threatened in New Hampshire between 1980 and 1986, was on the American Birds Blue List through

  8. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-184

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-184 Federal Listing: None State Listing 1989). Natu- ral vegetation commonly occurring in these New Hampshire sandy soils include white pine't occur in Vermont or Maine. New Hampshire's peripheral population of hognose snakes is state threatened

  9. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-553

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-553 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing: Not listed Global Rank: G4 State Rank: S2 Author: Carol R. Foss, New Hampshire Audubon Element 1: Distribution and Habitat 1.1 Habitat description Breeding habitat for the rusty blackbird in New Hampshire

  10. HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan B-209

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan B-209 Associated Species: spruce grouse: Carol R. Foss Affiliation: New Hampshire Audubon Element 1: Distribution and Habitat 1.1 Habitat on mineral soils. In northern New Hampshire, these range from well or moderately well drained upland forests

  11. HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanB-10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanB-10 Associated Species: Timber rattlesnake. Foss, Audubon Society of New Hampshire Element 1: Distribution and Habitat 1.1 Habitat description Appalachian oak pine forest systems are found mostly below 900 ft elevation in southern New Hampshire south

  12. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-218

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-218 Federal Listing: None State Listing: None Global Rank: G5 State Rank: S3 Authors: Kim A. Tuttle and M. N. Marchand, New Hampshire Fish and Game grass- lands, pine barrens, blueberry barrens, and grassy hilltops (Klemens 1993, New Hampshire Reptile

  13. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-221

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-221 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing found in similar shallow-water habitats in southernNewHampshire(JenkinsandBabbitt2003). The spotted, and a Species of Special concern in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Because their habitat overlaps

  14. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-580

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-580 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing: Not listed Global Rank: G5 State Rank: S3 Author: Jillian R. Kelly, New Hampshire Fish and Game Element 1). In the winter, spruce grouse feed entirely on short conifer needles (Nature- Serve 2005). New Hampshire natural

  15. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-64

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-64 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing, and Wisconsin (NatureServe 2004). New Hampshire and Maine represent the northernmost extent of the known to New Jersey are vulnerable to development. In New Hampshire, ringed boghaunter populations are limited

  16. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-276

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-276 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing Eastern red bats inhabit New Hampshire during the summer. Individuals migrate to southern states in the fall and return to New Hampshire and other northern states in the spring (Cryan and Veilleux in press

  17. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-523

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-523 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing included peer-re- viewed literature, Breeding Bird Survey Database, New Hampshire's Breeding Bird Atlas, and expert consultation. 1.8 Extent and Quality of Data The annual breeding bird survey, New Hampshire

  18. O&M strategic plan Fish and Wildlife Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Update on O&M strategic plan Fish and Wildlife Committee February 10, 2015 #12;Background Over, but will continue to help BPA meet its mitigation requirements. 2 #12;O&M Strategic planning Initial steps #C) Next steps in developing a Strategic Plan for Public Review Proposed Categories Screens

  19. Wildlife damage management professionals deal with very few

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , environmental degradation, or disease transmission, feral hogs play a substantial role. Earlier this year damage caused by feral hogs, a growing threat is transmission of diseases, primarily pseudorabies, Washington, DC 20250-3402, USA William H. Clay #12;138 Human­Wildlife C

  20. Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .F. Kalama Subbasin II.G. Lewis Subbasin II.H. Lower Columbia Tributaries II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind by recovery and subbasin planning. Appdx. D Economic Framework Potential costs and economic considerations;Lower Columbia Recovery Plan Steering Committee Mark Bagdovitz, US Fish and Wildlife Service John

  1. Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .F. Kalama Subbasin II.G. Lewis Subbasin II.H. Lower Columbia Tributaries II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind by recovery and subbasin planning Appdx. D Economic Framework Potential costs and economic considerations;Lower Columbia Recovery Plan Steering Committee Mark Bagdovitz, US Fish and Wildlife Service John

  2. Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind Subbasin II.K. Little White Salmon Subbasin II.L. Columbia Gorge Framework Potential costs and economic considerations for recovery and subbasin planning. Appdx. E Committee Mark Bagdovitz, US Fish and Wildlife Serv

  3. Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subbasin II.G. Lewis Subbasin II.H. Lower Columbia Tributaries II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind Subbasin by recovery and subbasin planning. Appdx. D Economic Framework Potential costs and economic considerations;Lower Columbia Recovery Plan Steering Committee Mark Bagdovitz, US Fish and Wildlife Service John

  4. 8 Connecticut Wildlife March/April 2012 "How suddenly they

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skelly, David Kiernan

    8 Connecticut Wildlife March/April 2012 "How suddenly they awake! Yesterday, as it were, asleep ­ Connecticut Science Center ; photos by Jonathan Richardson Filling occurs once leaves have fallen from in southern Connecticut to breed in March. Two images from the same vernal pond in central Connecticut

  5. ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURE AND WILDLIFE A Background Report on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instruments for the Conservation and Preservation of Wildlife Habitat in the Lower Fraser River Estuary), Brian Fairley (B.C. Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food), Kelly Fink (Canadian Forest Service, Fisheries and Food), and Bill Wareham (Ducks' Unlimited). The Forest Economics and Policy Analysis Research

  6. Numerical Solution of 3D Poisson-Nernst-Planck Equations Coupled with Classical Density Functional Theory for Modeling Ion and Electron Transport in a Confined Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Da; Zheng, Bin; Lin, Guang; Sushko, Maria L.

    2014-08-29

    We have developed efficient numerical algorithms for the solution of 3D steady-state Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations (PNP) with excess chemical potentials described by the classical density functional theory (cDFT). The coupled PNP equations are discretized by finite difference scheme and solved iteratively by Gummel method with relaxation. The Nernst-Planck equations are transformed into Laplace equations through the Slotboom transformation. Algebraic multigrid method is then applied to efficiently solve the Poisson equation and the transformed Nernst-Planck equations. A novel strategy for calculating excess chemical potentials through fast Fourier transforms is proposed which reduces computational complexity from O(N2) to O(NlogN) where N is the number of grid points. Integrals involving Dirac delta function are evaluated directly by coordinate transformation which yields more accurate result compared to applying numerical quadrature to an approximated delta function. Numerical results for ion and electron transport in solid electrolyte for Li ion batteries are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental data and the results from previous studies.

  7. HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2):129131, Fall 2007 This issue of Human-Wildlife Conflicts focuses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the management of feral hogs (Sus scrofa). As this exotic species has become more numerous apparent and alarming. How best to manage feral hogs has become one of the most vexing questions for wildlife agencies today, owing to society's mixed attitudes towards feral hogs (Rollins et al. 2007

  8. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):251260, Fall 2014 Wildlife strikes with U.S. military rotary-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    during deployments in the Middle East (e.g., Iraq), whereas, strikes to U.S. Air Force aircraft occurred, Iraq, military, rotary-wing aircraft, wildlife strikes During the last 2 decades, a great deal of armed conflict, and political upheaval has occurredintheMiddleEast(e.g.,Iraq)andsouth- central Asia (e

  9. Density shock waves in confined microswimmers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou

    2015-01-01

    Motile and driven particles confined in microfluidic channels exhibit interesting emergent behavior from propagating density bands to density shock waves. A deeper understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for these emergent structures is relevant to a number of physical and biomedical applications. Here, we study the formation of density shock waves in the context of an idealized model of microswimmers confined in a narrow channel and subject to a uniform external flow. Interestingly, these density shock waves exhibit a transition from `subsonic' with compression at the back to `supersonic' with compression at the front of the population as the intensity of the external flow increases. This behavior is the result of a non-trivial interplay between hydrodynamic interactions and geometric confinement, and is confirmed by a novel quasilinear wave model that properly captures the dependence of the shock formation on the external flow. These findings can be used to guide the development of novel mechan...

  10. Simulating Ru L3-Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Model Complexes and Electron Localization in Mixed-Valence Metal Dimers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiken, Benjamin E. Van; Valiev, Marat; Daifuku, Stephanie L.; Bannan, Caitlin; Strader, Matthew L.; Cho, Hana; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Govind, Niranjan; Khalil, Munira

    2013-04-26

    Ruthenium L3-edge X-ray absorption (XA) spectroscopy probes unoccupied 4d orbitals of the metal atom and is increasingly being used to investigate the local electronic structure in ground and excited electronic states of Ru complexes. The simultaneous development of computational tools for simulating Ru L3-edge spectra is crucial for interpreting the spectral features at a molecular level. This study demonstrates that time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is a viable and predictive tool for simulating ruthenium L3-edge XA spectroscopy. We systematically investigate the effects of exchange correlation functional and implicit and explicit solvent interactions on a series of RuII and RuIII complexes in their ground and electronic excited states. The TDDFT simulations reproduce all of the experimentally observed features in Ru L3-edge XA spectra within the experimental resolution (0.4 eV). Our simulations identify ligand-specific charge transfer features in complicated Ru L3-edge spectra of [Ru(CN)6]4- and RuII polypyridyl complexes illustrating the advantage of using TDDFT in complex systems. We conclude that the B3LYP functional most accurately predicts the transition energies of charge transfer features in these systems. We use our TDDFT approach to simulate experimental Ru L3-edge XA spectra of transition metal mixed-valence dimers of the form [(NC)5MII-CN-RuIII(NH3)5] (where M = Fe or Ru) dissolved in water. Our study determines the spectral signatures of electron delocalization in Ru L3-edge XA spectra. We find that the inclusion of explicit solvent molecules is necessary for reproducing the spectral features and the experimentally determined valencies in these mixed-valence complexes. This study validates the use of TDDFT for simulating Ru 2p excitations using popular quantum chemistry codes and providing a powerful interpretive tool for equilibrium and ultrafast Ru L3-edge XA spectroscopy.

  11. Identification of the true elastic modulus of high density polyethylene from tensile tests using an appropriate reduced model of the elastoviscoplastic behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blaise, A; Delobelle, Patrick; Meshaka, Yves; Cunat, C

    2012-01-01

    The rheological parameters of materials are determined in the industry according to international standards established generally on the basis of widespread techniques and robust methods of estimation. Concerning solid polymers and the determination of Young's modulus in tensile tests, ISO 527-1 or ASTM D638 standards rely on protocols with poor scientific content: the determination of the slope of conventionally defined straight lines fitted to stress-strain curves in a given range of elongations. This paper describes the approach allowing for a correct measurement of the instantaneous elastic modulus of polymers in a tensile test. It is based on the use of an appropriate reduced model to describe the behavior of the material. The model comes a thermodynamical framework and allows to reproduce the behavior of an HDPE Polymer until large strains, covering the elastoviscoplastic and hardening regimes. Well-established principles of parameter estimation in engineering science are used to found the identificatio...

  12. Identification of the true elastic modulus of high density polyethylene from tensile tests using an appropriate reduced model of the elastoviscoplastic behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Blaise; Stéphane André; Patrick Delobelle; Yves Meshaka; C. Cunat

    2012-06-19

    The rheological parameters of materials are determined in the industry according to international standards established generally on the basis of widespread techniques and robust methods of estimation. Concerning solid polymers and the determination of Young's modulus in tensile tests, ISO 527-1 or ASTM D638 standards rely on protocols with poor scientific content: the determination of the slope of conventionally defined straight lines fitted to stress-strain curves in a given range of elongations. This paper describes the approach allowing for a correct measurement of the instantaneous elastic modulus of polymers in a tensile test. It is based on the use of an appropriate reduced model to describe the behavior of the material. The model comes a thermodynamical framework and allows to reproduce the behavior of an HDPE Polymer until large strains, covering the elastoviscoplastic and hardening regimes. Well-established principles of parameter estimation in engineering science are used to found the identification procedure. It will be shown that three parameters only are necessary to model experimental tensile signals: the instantaneous ('Young's') modulus, the maximum relaxation time of a linear distribution (described with a universal shape) and a strain hardening modulus to describe the 'relaxed' state. The paper ends with an assessment of the methodology. Our results of instantaneous modulus measurements are compared with those obtained with other physical experiments operating at different temporal and length scales.

  13. Measuring single-cell density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grover, William H.

    We have used a microfluidic mass sensor to measure the density of single living cells. By weighing each cell in two fluids of different densities, our technique measures the single-cell mass, volume, and density of ...

  14. High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas General Plasma Science Developing founda/ons and advancing fundamental understanding #12;The High Energy Density developing innovative techniques to study the properties of instabilities in magnetized-high-energy-density

  15. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed wh provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation.

  16. Bond length and electric current oscillation of long linear carbon chains: Density functional theory, MpB model, and quantum spin transport studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oeiras, R. Y.; Silva, E. Z. da [Institute of Physics “Gleb Wataghin”, University of Campinas-Unicamp, 13083-859 Campinas, SP (Brazil)] [Institute of Physics “Gleb Wataghin”, University of Campinas-Unicamp, 13083-859 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2014-04-07

    Carbon linear atomic chains attached to graphene have experimentally been produced. Motivated by these results, we study the nature of the carbon bonds in these nanowires and how it affects their electrical properties. In the present study we investigate chains with different numbers of atoms and we observe that nanowires with odd number of atoms present a distinct behavior than the ones with even numbers. Using graphene nanoribbons as leads, we identify differences in the quantum transport of the chains with the consequence that even and odd numbered chains have low and high electrical conduction, respectively. We also noted a dependence of current with the wire size. We study this unexpected behavior using a combination of first principles calculations and simple models based on chemical bond theory. From our studies, the electrons of carbon nanowires present a quasi-free electron behavior and this explains qualitatively the high electrical conduction and the bond lengths with unexpected values for the case of odd nanowires. Our study also allows the understanding of the electric conduction dependence with the number of atoms and their parity in the chain. In the case of odd number chains a proposed ?-bond (MpB) model describes unsaturated carbons that introduce a mobile ?-bond that changes dramatically the structure and transport properties of these wires. Our results indicate that the nature of bonds plays the main role in the oscillation of quantum electrical conduction for chains with even and odd number of atoms and also that nanowires bonded to graphene nanoribbons behave as a quasi-free electron system, suggesting that this behavior is general and it could also remain if the chains are bonded to other materials.

  17. Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

    2001-09-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

  18. Statistical approach to nuclear level density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen'kov, R. A.; Horoi, M.; Zelevinsky, V. G.

    2014-10-15

    We discuss the level density in a finite many-body system with strong interaction between the constituents. Our primary object of applications is the atomic nucleus but the same techniques can be applied to other mesoscopic systems. We calculate and compare nuclear level densities for given quantum numbers obtained by different methods, such as nuclear shell model (the most successful microscopic approach), our main instrument - moments method (statistical approach), and Fermi-gas model; the calculation with the moments method can use any shell-model Hamiltonian excluding the spurious states of the center-of-mass motion. Our goal is to investigate statistical properties of nuclear level density, define its phenomenological parameters, and offer an affordable and reliable way of calculation.

  19. Gedanken densities and exact constraints in density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perdew, John P.; Department of Chemistry, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122 ; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Sun, Jianwei; Burke, Kieron

    2014-05-14

    Approximations to the exact density functional for the exchange-correlation energy of a many-electron ground state can be constructed by satisfying constraints that are universal, i.e., valid for all electron densities. Gedanken densities are designed for the purpose of this construction, but need not be realistic. The uniform electron gas is an old gedanken density. Here, we propose a spherical two-electron gedanken density in which the dimensionless density gradient can be an arbitrary positive constant wherever the density is non-zero. The Lieb-Oxford lower bound on the exchange energy can be satisfied within a generalized gradient approximation (GGA) by bounding its enhancement factor or simplest GGA exchange-energy density. This enhancement-factor bound is well known to be sufficient, but our gedanken density shows that it is also necessary. The conventional exact exchange-energy density satisfies no such local bound, but energy densities are not unique, and the simplest GGA exchange-energy density is not an approximation to it. We further derive a strongly and optimally tightened bound on the exchange enhancement factor of a two-electron density, which is satisfied by the local density approximation but is violated by all published GGA's or meta-GGA’s. Finally, some consequences of the non-uniform density-scaling behavior for the asymptotics of the exchange enhancement factor of a GGA or meta-GGA are given.

  20. Montana Building with Wildlife Guide | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec(Pritchett, 2004)Michigan:Montana Building with Wildlife

  1. Market-Based Wildlife Mitigation in Wyoming | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,InformationIllinois: Energy Resources JumpMarion,Market-Based Wildlife

  2. Wildlife Monitoring and Wind Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar: Demonstration of NREL's BioEnergyWildlife Monitoring and

  3. Redshift Evolution of Galaxy Cluster Densities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. Carlberg; S. L. Morris; H. K. C. Yee; E. Ellingson

    1997-01-20

    The number of rich galaxy clusters per unit volume is a strong function of Omega, the cosmological density parameter, and sigma_8, the linear extrapolation to z=0 of the density contrast in 8/h Mpc spheres. The CNOC cluster redshift survey provides a sample of clusters whose average mass profiles are accurately known, which enables a secure association between cluster numbers and the filtered density perturbation spectrum. We select from the CNOC cluster survey those EMSS clusters with bolometric L_x>=10^45 erg/s and a velocity dispersion exceeding 800 km/s in the redshift ranges 0.18-0.35 and 0.35-0.55. We compare the number density of these subsamples with similar samples at both high and low redshift. Using the Press-Schechter formalism and CDM style structure models, the density data are described with sigma_8=0.75+/-0.1 and Omega=0.4+/-0.2 (90% confidence). The cluster dynamical analysis gives Omega=0.2+/-0.1$ for which sigma_8=0.95+/-0.1 (90% confidence). The predicted cluster density evolution in an \\Omega=1 CDM model exceeds that observed by more than an order of magnitude.

  4. US Fish and Wildlife Service lands biomonitoring operations manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rope, R.C.; Breckenridge, R.P.

    1993-08-01

    This is Volume 1 of an operations manual designed to facilitate the development of biomonitoring strategies for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands. It is one component of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands Biomonitoring Operations Manual. The Volume contains the Introduction to the Manual, background information on monitoring, and procedures for developing a biomonitoring strategy for Service lands. The purpose of the Biomonitoring Operations Manual is to provide an approach to develop and implement biomonitoring activities to assess the status and trends of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service trust resources. It also provides field sampline methods and documentation protocols for contaminant monitoring activities. The strategy described in the Manual has been designed as a stand alone process to characterize the presence of contaminants on lands managed by the Service. This process can be sued to develop a monitoring program for any tract of real estate with potential threats from on- or off-site contaminants. Because the process was designed to address concerns for Service lands that span the United States from Alaska to the Tropical Islands, it has a generic format that can be used in al types of ecosystems, however, significant site specific informtion is required to complete the Workbook and make the process work successfully.

  5. Sharing Texas resources: interpretation handbook for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrick, Tommie L.

    1994-01-01

    Sharing Texas Resources: Interpretation Handbook for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Tommie L. Herrick Nay 1994 Record of Study SHARZNG TEXAS RESOURCES: INTERPRETATION HANDBOOK POR THE TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTMENT A... Department Natural Resources Development SHARING TEXAS RESOURCES: INTERPRETATION HANDBOOK FOR THE TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTNENT A Professional Paper by Tommie L. Herrick Approved as to style and content by: Dr. Edward H. Heath (Chairman...

  6. The potential for commercial use of wildlife in some North-Eastern Tuli Block farms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nchunga, Mushanana Lawrence

    1978-01-01

    THE POTENTIAL FOR COMMERCIAL USE OF WILDLIFE IN SOME NORTH ? EASTERN TULI BLOCK FARMS A Thesis by Mushanana Lawrence Nchunga Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE POTENTIAL FOR COMMERCIAL USE OF WILDLIFE IN SOME NORTH-EASTERN TULI BLOCK FARMS A Thesis Mushanana Lawrence Nchunga A proved as to style and content by: ) (Chairman...

  7. Neutral hydrogen density profiles derived from geocoronal N. stgaard,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mende, Stephen B.

    Neutral hydrogen density profiles derived from geocoronal imaging N. Østgaard,1 S. B. Mende,1 H. U an empirical model of the neutral hydrogen density distribution at high altitudes (>3.5 RE geocentric distance from interplanetary hydrogen are obtained from a model. Assuming that the exosphere at high altitudes

  8. Wildlife Mitigation and Restoration for Grand Coulee Dam: Blue Creek Project, Phase 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merker, Christopher

    1993-04-01

    This report is a recommendation from the Spokane Tribe to the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) for partial mitigation for the extensive wildlife and wildlife habitat losses on the Spokane Indian Reservation caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. NPPC`s interim wildlife goal over the next 7 years for the Columbia hydropower system, is to protect, mitigate and enhance approximately 35% basin wide of the lost habitat units. Grand Coulee Dam had the greatest habitat losses of any Dams of the Wildlife Rule.

  9. COLLISIONS BETWEEN LARGE WILDLIFE AND MOTOR VEHICLE IN MAINE: 1998 - 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van-Riper, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Source: As part of Maine Department of TransportationWILDLIFE AND MOTOR VEHICLE IN MAINE: 1998 - 2001 Robert Van-Environmental Office, Maine Department of Transportation,

  10. A GIS-based identification of potentially significant wildlife habitats associated with roads in Vermont

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin, John M.; Viani, Kevin; Hammond, Forrest; Slesar, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Capen. 1997. A report on the biophysical regions in Vermont.report prepared for the Vermont Ecomapping Roundtable.scientist with the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department and

  11. Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-03-01

    In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this document. Details and results of the HEP analysis are included in this report.

  12. High Energy Density Capacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    BEEST Project: Recapping is developing a capacitor that could rival the energy storage potential and price of today’s best EV batteries. When power is needed, the capacitor rapidly releases its stored energy, similar to lightning being discharged from a cloud. Capacitors are an ideal substitute for batteries if their energy storage capacity can be improved. Recapping is addressing storage capacity by experimenting with the material that separates the positive and negative electrodes of its capacitors. These separators could significantly improve the energy density of electrochemical devices.

  13. Enlisting the support of the Texas birding community into the wildlife management process, with comparisons to Texas waterfowl hunters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leifester, Jason Andrew

    1994-01-01

    23. 6 100. 0 11. 1 3. 3 6. 1 18. 9 19. 5 3. 7 5. 7 25. 8 100. 0 9. 1 9. 6 3. 2 7. 0 22. 5 25. 1 4. 8 3. 2 15. 5 100. 0 Mean length of time (in years) lived in Texas: birders = 35. 3, waterfowl hunters = 31. 9, non... linear models and Chi-square tests) showed that birders are highly committed to their pastime, spending more time in the field and much more money on their hobby than the waterfowl hunters. Birders tended to feel that the State concentrates wildlife...

  14. Ligand identification using electron-density mapcorrelations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Cohn,Judith D.

    2006-12-01

    A procedure for the identification of ligands bound incrystal structuresof macromolecules is described. Two characteristics ofthe density corresponding to a ligand are used in the identificationprocedure. One is the correlation of the ligand density with each of aset of test ligands after optimization of the fit of that ligand to thedensity. The other is the correlation of a fingerprint of the densitywith the fingerprint of model density for each possible ligand. Thefingerprints consist of an ordered list of correlations of each the testligands with the density. The two characteristics are scored using aZ-score approach in which the correlations are normalized to the mean andstandard deviation of correlations found for a variety of mismatchedligand-density pairs, so that the Z scores are related to the probabilityof observing a particular value of the correlation by chance. Theprocedure was tested with a set of 200 of the most commonly found ligandsin the Protein Data Bank, collectively representing 57 percent of allligands in the Protein Data Bank. Using a combination of these twocharacteristics of ligand density, ranked lists of ligand identificationswere made for representative (F-o-F-c) exp(i phi(c)) difference densityfrom entries in the Protein Data Bank. In 48 percent of the 200 cases,the correct ligand was at the top of the ranked list of ligands. Thisapproach may be useful in identification of unknown ligands in newmacromolecular structures as well as in the identification of whichligands in a mixture have bound to a macromolecule.

  15. Density constrained TDHF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. E. Oberacker; A. S. Umar

    2015-02-13

    In this manuscript we provide an outline of the numerical methods used in implementing the density constrained time-dependent Hartree-Fock (DC-TDHF) method and provide a few examples of its application to nuclear fusion. In this approach, dynamic microscopic calculations are carried out on a three-dimensional lattice and there are no adjustable parameters, the only input is the Skyrme effective NN interaction. After a review of the DC-TDHF theory and the numerical methods, we present results for heavy-ion potentials $V(R)$, coordinate-dependent mass parameters $M(R)$, and precompound excitation energies $E^{*}(R)$ for a variety of heavy-ion reactions. Using fusion barrier penetrabilities, we calculate total fusion cross sections $\\sigma(E_\\mathrm{c.m.})$ for reactions between both stable and neutron-rich nuclei. We also determine capture cross sections for hot fusion reactions leading to the formation of superheavy elements.

  16. Density constrained TDHF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oberacker, V E

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript we provide an outline of the numerical methods used in implementing the density constrained time-dependent Hartree-Fock (DC-TDHF) method and provide a few examples of its application to nuclear fusion. In this approach, dynamic microscopic calculations are carried out on a three-dimensional lattice and there are no adjustable parameters, the only input is the Skyrme effective NN interaction. After a review of the DC-TDHF theory and the numerical methods, we present results for heavy-ion potentials $V(R)$, coordinate-dependent mass parameters $M(R)$, and precompound excitation energies $E^{*}(R)$ for a variety of heavy-ion reactions. Using fusion barrier penetrabilities, we calculate total fusion cross sections $\\sigma(E_\\mathrm{c.m.})$ for reactions between both stable and neutron-rich nuclei. We also determine capture cross sections for hot fusion reactions leading to the formation of superheavy elements.

  17. Low density microcellular foams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LeMay, James D. (Castro Valley, CA)

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular foam which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 .mu.m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process.

  18. Low density microcellular foams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LeMay, James D. (Castro Valley, CA)

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular from which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 .mu.m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process.

  19. Low density microcellular foams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LeMay, J.D.

    1991-11-19

    Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular foam which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 [mu]m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process. 8 figures.

  20. Low density microcellular foams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aubert, J.H.; Clough, R.L.; Curro, J.G.; Quintana, C.A.; Russick, E.M.; Shaw, M.T.

    1985-10-02

    Low density, microporous polymer foams are provided by a process which comprises forming a solution of polymer and a suitable solvent followed by rapid cooling of the solution to form a phase-separated system and freeze the phase-separated system. The phase-separated system comprises a polymer phase and a solvent phase, each of which is substantially continuous within the other. The morphology of the polymer phase prior to and subsequent to freezing determine the morphology of the resultant foam. Both isotropic and anisotropic foams can be produced. If isotropic foams are produced, the polymer and solvent are tailored such that the solution spontaneously phase-separates prior to the point at which any component freezes. The morphology of the resultant polymer phase determines the morphology of the reusltant foam and the morphology of the polymer phase is retained by cooling the system at a rate sufficient to freeze one or both components of the system before a change in morphology can occur. Anisotropic foams are produced by forming a solution of polymer and solvent that will not phase separate prior to freezing of one or both components of the solution. In such a process, the solvent typically freezes before phase separation occurs. The morphology of the resultant frozen two-phase system determines the morphology of the resultant foam. The process involves subjecting the solution to essentially one-dimensional cooling. Foams having a density of less than 0.1 g/cc and a uniform cell size of less than 10 ..mu..m and a volume such that the foams have a length greater than 1 cm are provided.

  1. Low density microcellular foams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aubert, James H. (Albuquerque, NM); Clough, Roger L. (Albuquerque, NM); Curro, John G. (Placitas, NM); Quintana, Carlos A. (Albuquerque, NM); Russick, Edward M. (Albuquerque, NM); Shaw, Montgomery T. (Mansfield Center, CT)

    1987-01-01

    Low density, microporous polymer foams are provided by a process which comprises forming a solution of polymer and a suitable solvent followed by rapid cooling of the solution to form a phase-separated system and freeze the phase-separated system. The phase-separated system comprises a polymer phase and a solvent phase, each of which is substantially continuous within the other. The morphology of the polymer phase prior to and subsequent to freezing determine the morphology of the resultant foam. Both isotropic and anisotropic foams can be produced. If isotropic foams are produced, the polymer and solvent are tailored such that the solution spontaneously phase-separates prior to the point at which any component freezes. The morphology of the resultant polymer phase determines the morphology of the resultant foam and the morphology of the polymer phase is retained by cooling the system at a rate sufficient to freeze one or both components of the system before a change in morphology can occur. Anisotropic foams are produced by forming a solution of polymer and solvent that will not phase separate prior to freezing of one or both components of the solution. In such a process, the solvent typically freezes before phase separation occurs. The morphology of the resultant frozen two-phase system determines the morphology of the resultant foam. The process involves subjecting the solution to essentially one-dimensional cooling. Means for subjecting such a solvent to one-dimensional cooling are also provided. Foams having a density of less than 0.1 g/cc and a uniform cell size of less than 10 .mu.m and a volume such that the foams have a length greater than 1 cm are provided.

  2. The effects of fish density on wading bird use of sediment ponds on an East Texas coal mine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renfrow, Donna Hubbard

    1993-01-01

    THE EFFECTS OF FISH DENSITY ON WADING BIRD USE OF SEDIMENT PONDS ON AN EAST TEXAS COAL MINE A Thesis by DONNA HUBBARD RENFROW Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8cM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE EFFECTS OF FISH DENSITY ON WADING BIRD USE OF SEDIMENT PONDS ON AN EAST TEXAS COAL MINE A Thesis by DONNA HUBBARD RENFROW Submitted to Texas A&M University...

  3. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-03

    First they had a vision: welcome people into a building embracing environmental stewardship on land that is steeped in history. The designers of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service took this vision and designed a new energy-efficient and environmentally friendly visitor center for the Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge located in Sudbury, Massachusetts.

  4. Participatory wildlife surveys in communal lands: a case study from Simanjiro, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Participatory wildlife surveys in communal lands: a case study from Simanjiro, Tanzania Fortunata U and Sustainability, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JN, U.K.; 3 Tanzania National Parks, PO Box 3134, Arusha, Tanzania; 4 Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute, PO Box 661, Arusha, Tanzania; 5 Center for Collaborative

  5. AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT RELATIVE TO FOSSIL FUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT RELATIVE TO FOSSIL FUEL POWER. Jarvis All Rights Reserved #12;AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT in offshore wind energy. I would also like to thank my committee members, Dr. Jeremy Firestone

  6. HumanWildlife Conflicts 2(2):240247, Fall 2008 Mammalian hazards at small airports in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fence maintenance is vital for effective wildlife- strike management at small airports. Key words,000 hours of aircraft downtime each year and cost the civil aviation industry >$556 million annually (Cleary the inception of aviation 100 years ago (Sodhi 2002). Unfortunately, the probability of wildlife strikes

  7. INDEPENDENT SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD (ISAB) REVIEW OF THE 2009 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDEPENDENT SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD (ISAB) REVIEW OF THE 2009 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM Kate of ocean conditions on fish and wildlife populations." #12;Relationship between CRB and Ocean Ecosystems Columbia R Basin Ecosystem Ocean Ecosystem Anadromous fish Viability Abundance, productivity, spatial

  8. University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension Forestry, Wildlife and Water Resources Programs Newsletter HabitatsHabitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension · Forestry, Wildlife and Water Resources Programs are reaching out to these varied interests to form a coalition to secure the necessary funding appreciation of the natural world and how they might act to insure that wildlife remains a part of it

  9. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Oregon Facilities, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedrossian, Karen L.

    1984-08-01

    The report presents a review and documentation of existing information on wildlife resources at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities within Oregon. Effects of hydroelectric development and operation; existing agreements; and past, current and proposed wildlife mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. (ACR)

  10. New Dimensions of Visual Landscape Assessment Wildlands Management for Wildlife Viewing1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    preservation and other activities associated with traditional game management. Fortunately, much of the knowledge and techniques developed for game #12;management can be transferred to considerations of wildlifeNew Dimensions of Visual Landscape Assessment Wildlands Management for Wildlife Viewing1 Tamsie

  11. Configuration Interactions Constrained by Energy Density Functionals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Alex Brown; Angelo Signoracci; Morten Hjorth-Jensen

    2010-09-24

    A new method for constructing a Hamiltonian for configuration interaction calculations with constraints to energies of spherical configurations obtained with energy-density-functional (EDF) methods is presented. This results in a unified model that reproduced the EDF binding-energy in the limit of single-Slater determinants, but can also be used for obtaining energy spectra and correlation energies with renormalized nucleon-nucleon interactions. The three-body and/or density-dependent terms that are necessary for good nuclear saturation properties are contained in the EDF. Applications to binding energies and spectra of nuclei in the region above 208Pb are given.

  12. Hydrogeologic Assessment of the Pixley National WildlifeRefuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2007-10-01

    A hydrogeological assessment of Pixley National Wildlife Refuge was conducted using published reports from the USGS and private engineering consultants that pertained to land in close proximity to the Refuge and from monitoring conducted by refuge staff in collaboration with Reclamation. The compiled data clearly show that there are a large number of agricultural wells throughout the Basin and that water levels are responsive to rates of pumping - in some cases declining more than 100 ft in a matter of a few years. Aquifer properties support a groundwater conjunctive use solution to the provision of additional water supply to the Refuge. The report provides justification for this approach.

  13. National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI Ventures Ltd Jump to:Information Wildlife Refuge System Administration

  14. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ Automation JumpSetIdaho: EnergyNatural Resources Code JumpWildlife

  15. Colorado Parks and Wildlife Rules and Regulations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open EnergyColorado Parks and Wildlife Rules and Regulations

  16. High Energy Density Microwaves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, R.M. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States)

    1999-04-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the RF98 Workshop entitled `High Energy Density Microwaves` held in California in October, 1998. The topics discussed were predominantly accelerator{minus}related. The Workshop dealt, for the most part, with the generation and control of electron beams, the amplification of RF signals, the design of mode converters, and the effect of very high RF field gradients. This Workshop was designed to address the concerns of the microwave tube industry worldwide, the plasma physicists who deal with very high beam currents and gigawatts of RF power, and researchers in accelerator centers around the world. Papers were presented on multibeam klystrons, gyrotron development, plasmas in microwave tubes, RF breakdown, and alternatives to conventional linear coliders at 1 TeV and above. The Workshop was partially sponsored by the US Department of Energy. There were 46 papers presented at the conference,out of which 19 have been abstracted for the Energy,Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  17. Particle number density fluctuations and pressure effects on structure formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. R. Matravers; J. Triginer

    2001-09-21

    We provide a covariant and gauge-invariant approach to the question of how a first order pressure can be incorporated self-consistently in a cosmological scenario. The approximation is relevant, in the linear regime, to weakly self-interacting or warm dark matter models. We also derive number density fluctuations in which new modes appear because the number density fluctuations are no longer simply proportional to the density fluctuations.

  18. Simulation of salt migrations in density dependent groundwater flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    Simulation of salt migrations in density dependent groundwater flow E.S. van Baaren Master's Thesis for the salt migration in the groundwater underneath the polders near the coast. The problem description of this thesis is to investigate the possibilities of modelling salt migrations in density dependent groundwater

  19. HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):271281, Fall 2009 Survival and productivity of a low-density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    bear population in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado RogeR a. BaldWin1 , Department of Animal 30003 MSC 4901, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88003, USA Abstract: Historically, Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) has supported a small black bear (Ursus americanus) population of low productivity. Increased

  20. Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects : Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington . Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

    1996-08-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement (Agreement) pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This Agreement serves to establish a monetary budget funded by BPA for projects proposed by Washington Wildlife Coalition members and approved by BPA to protect, mitigate, and improve wildlife and/or wildlife habitat within the State of Washington that has been affected by the construction of Federal dams along the Columbia River. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and/or improving wildlife habitat within five different project areas. These project areas are located throughout Grant County and in parts of Okanogan, Douglas, Adams, Franklin, Kittias, Yakima, and Benton Counties. The multiple projects would involve varying combinations of five proposed site-specific activities (habitat improvement, operation and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, access and recreation management, and cultural resource management). All required Federal, State, and tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground-disturbing activities.

  1. Soil Density/Moisture Gauge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This scenario provides the planning instructions, guidance, and evaluation forms necessary to conduct an exercise involving a highway shipment of a soil moisture/density gauge (Class 7 -...

  2. Ion Density Deviations in Semipermeable Ionic Microcapsules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiyun Tang; Alan R. Denton

    2015-07-07

    By implementing the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann theory in a cell model, we theoretically investigate the influence of polyelectrolye gel permeability on ion densities and pH deviations inside the cavities of ionic microcapsules. Our calculations show that variations in permeability of a charged capsule shell cause a redistribution of ion densities within the capsule, which ultimately affects the pH deviation and Donnan potential induced by the electric field of the shell. We find that semipermeable capsules can induce larger pH deviations inside their cavities that can permeable capsules. Furthermore, with increasing capsule charge, the influence of permeability on pH deviations progressively increases. Our theory, while providing a self-consistent method for modeling the influence of permeability on fundamental properties of ionic microgels, makes predictions of practical significance for the design of microcapsules loaded with fluorescent dyes, which can serve as biosensors for diagnostic purposes.

  3. Density of States for HP Lattice Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Bachmann; Wolfhard Janke

    2007-10-22

    The density of states contains all informations on energetic quantities of a statistical system, such as the mean energy, free energy, entropy, and specific heat. As a specific application, we consider in this work a simple lattice model for heteropolymers that is widely used for studying statistical properties of proteins. For short chains, we have derived exact results from conformational enumeration, while for longer ones we developed a multicanonical Monte Carlo variant of the nPERM-based chain growth method in order to directly simulate the density of states. For simplification, only two types of monomers with respective hydrophobic (H) and polar (P) residues are regarded and only the next-neighbour interaction between hydrophobic monomers, being nonadjacent along the chain, is taken into account. This is known as the HP model for the folding of lattice proteins.

  4. Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2007-2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calkins, Brian

    2007-10-01

    This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 08 contract period October 1, 2007-September 30, 2008. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. Significant progress was realized in almost all major work types. Of particular note was progress made in tree plantings and pasture rehabilitation efforts. This year's tree planting effort included five sites detailed below and in terms of the number of plants was certainly the largest effort on the wildlife area to date in one season. The planting itself took a significant amount of time, which was anticipated. However, installation of mats and tubes took much longer than expected which impacted planned fence projects in particular. Survival of the plantings appears to be good. Improvement to the quality of waterfowl pasture habitats is evident on a number of sites due to replanting and weed control efforts. Continuing long-term weed control efforts will be key in improving this particular type of habitat. A prolonged cold, wet spring and a number of equipment breakdowns presented stumbling blocks that impacted schedules and ultimately progress on planned activities. The unusual spring weather delayed fieldwork on pasture planting projects as well as weed control and slowed the process of maintaining trees and shrubs. This time lag also caused the continued deferral of some of our fencing projects. The large brush hog mower had the driveline break twice and the smaller tractor had an engine failure that caused it to be down for over a month. We have modified our budget plan for next year to include a temporary employee that will work primarily on tree maintenance and fencing projects to make sure that we make progress in these areas and we will be investigating whether a heavier duty driveline can be obtained for the mower.

  5. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 527 DecAID: A Decaying Wood Advisory Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 527 DecAID: A Decaying Wood Advisory Model and decaying wood (dead and partially dead trees and down wood) necessary to maintain wildlife habitat in Washington and Oregon. Whereas the relationship of dead and decaying wood to wildlife habitat is a major

  6. Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1988.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Northwest Power Planning Council; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority

    1987-10-01

    The FY 1988 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1988. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the amended Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined it has authority and responsibility to implement. The FY 1988 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 95 ongoing projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. These continuing activities are summarized briefly by Program area: (1) mainstem passage; (2) artificial propagation; (3) natural propagation; (4) resident fish and wildlife; and (5) planning activities.

  7. The design of high power density annular fuel for LWRs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Yi, 1975-

    2004-01-01

    Fuel performance models have been developed to assess the performance of internally and externally cooled LWR annular fuel. Such fuel may be operated at 30-50% higher core power density than the current operating LWRs, and ...

  8. The role of seniority-zero states in nuclear level densities

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Åberg, S.; Carlsson, B. G.; Døssing, Th.; Möller, P.

    2015-06-01

    At low excitation energies seniority-zero states dominate the level density of K=0 bands in deformed even–even nuclei, while they play no role at higher excitation energies. We describe the level densities in a Fermi-gas model as well as in a combinatorial level-density model and compare to detailed experimental data for some rare-earth nuclei.

  9. The Quantum Energy Density: Improved Efficiency for Quantum Monte Carlo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krogel, Jaron T; Kim, Jeongnim; Ceperley, David M

    2013-01-01

    We establish a physically meaningful representation of a quantum energy density for use in Quantum Monte Carlo calculations. The energy density operator, defined in terms of Hamiltonian components and density operators, returns the correct Hamiltonian when integrated over a volume containing a cluster of particles. This property is demonstrated for a helium-neon "gas," showing that atomic energies obtained from the energy density correspond to eigenvalues of isolated systems. The formation energies of defects or interfaces are typically calculated as total energy differences. Using a model of delta-doped silicon (where dopant atoms form a thin plane) we show how interfacial energies can be calculated more efficiently with the energy density, since the region of interest is small. We also demonstrate how the energy density correctly transitions to the bulk limit away from the interface where the correct energy is obtainable from a separate total energy calculation.

  10. A NEW RECIPE FOR OBTAINING CENTRAL VOLUME DENSITIES OF PRESTELLAR CORES FROM SIZE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Yorke, Harold W. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2011-07-10

    We propose a simple analytical method for estimating the central volume density of prestellar molecular cloud cores from their column density profiles. Prestellar cores feature a flat central part of the column density and volume density profiles of the same size indicating the existence of a uniform-density inner region. The size of this region is set by the thermal pressure force which depends only on the central volume density and temperature of the core, and can provide a direct measurement of the central volume density. Thus, a simple length measurement can immediately yield a central density estimate independent of any dynamical model for the core and without the need for fitting. Using the radius at which the column density is 90% of the central value as an estimate of the size of the flat inner part of the column density profile yields an estimate of the central volume density within a factor of two for well-resolved cores.

  11. Transition Metal Defect Behavior and Si Density of States in the Processing Temperature Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Scott

    density of states as a function of temperature and generate a third density of states model based on 0 K deleterious effects on performance, yield and reliability. In silicon photovoltaics, we are concerned

  12. Analysis of Crude Oil Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    This report responds to a request from Senator Ted Stevens that the Energy Information Administration provide an assessment of federal oil and natural gas leasing in the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in Alaska.

  13. Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2010-06-01

    The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. The two map products described in this report are (1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and (2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

  14. INTRODUCTION SECTION 1 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 1-13 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -site measures and programs -- respond to the impacts on fish and wildlife caused by the region's hydroelectric and management of hydroelectric facilities located on the Columbia River and its tributaries, while assuring

  15. The Fish and Wildlife Service Manual, Part 340 FW 3: Rights-of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Fish and Wildlife Service Manual, Part 340 FW 3: Rights-of-Way and Road Closings Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory...

  16. SampleSize 1.1 Sample Size Calculations for Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Bonneville Power Administration Division of Fish and Wildlife P.O. Box 3621 Portland, OR 97208-3621 Project of design variables. This project is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration, US Department of Energy

  17. Assessing Attitudes Toward Wildlife Ownership in United StatesMexico Borderlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Park & Tourism Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA ANGELA G. MERTIG Department or access to it on game ranches) made some wildlife species a potentially valuable asset for landowners

  18. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

  19. Evaluation of a wildlife underpass on Vermont State Highway 289 in Essex, Vermont

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin, John M.; Garland, Larry

    2001-01-01

    Scharf, technicians for the Vermont Department of Fish andEVALUATION OF A WILDLIFE UNDERPASS ON VERMONT STATE HIGHWAY289 IN ESSEX, VERMONT John M. Austin and Larry Garland,

  20. The wired wilderness : electronic surveillance and environmental values in wildlife biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Etienne Samuel

    2006-01-01

    In the second half of the twentieth century, American wildlife biologists incorporated Cold War-era surveillance technologies into their practices in order to render wild animals and their habitats legible and manageable. ...

  1. A study of wind waves in the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway near the Arkansas National Wildlife Refuge 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hershberger, Darla Anne

    1993-01-01

    The Aransas National Wildlife Refuge has been experiencing extensive erosion along the bank of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. A project was initiated to study the wave conditions in the channel in order to evaluate the respective energies...

  2. HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):296297, Fall 2009 Richard A. Dolbeer: scientist, innovator,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and produced advances in how airport habitats should be managedtoreduceusebywildlife,inthedesign of turbine-powered engines and airframes to withstand bird strikes, and in how wildlife strike data are reported

  3. Energy trapping from Hagedorn densities of states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connor Behan; Klaus Larjo; Nima Lashkari; Brian Swingle; Mark Van Raamsdonk

    2013-04-26

    In this note, we construct simple stochastic toy models for holographic gauge theories in which distributions of energy on a collection of sites evolve by a master equation with some specified transition rates. We build in only energy conservation, locality, and the standard thermodynamic requirement that all states with a given energy are equally likely in equilibrium. In these models, we investigate the qualitative behavior of the dynamics of the energy distributions for different choices of the density of states for the individual sites. For typical field theory densities of states (\\log(\\rho(E)) ~ E^{\\alphaenergy spread out relatively quickly. For large N gauge theories with gravitational duals, the density of states for a finite volume of field theory degrees of freedom typically includes a Hagedorn regime (\\log(\\rho(E)) ~ E). We find that this gives rise to a trapping of energy in subsets of degrees of freedom for parametrically long time scales before the energy leaks away. We speculate that this Hagedorn trapping may be part of a holographic explanation for long-lived gravitational bound states (black holes) in gravitational theories.

  4. Low density carbonized composite foams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Fung-Ming (Pleasanton, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A carbonized composite foam having a density less than about 50 mg/cm.sup.3 and individual cell sizes no greater than about 1 .mu.m in diameter is described, and the process of making it.

  5. Neutralino relic density including coannihilations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Gondolo; Joakim Edsjo

    1997-11-25

    We give an overview of our precise calculation of the relic density of the lightest neutralino, in which we included relativistic Boltzmann averaging, subthreshold and resonant annihilations, and coannihilation processes with charginos and neutralinos.

  6. Low density metal hydride foams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maienschein, Jon L. (Oakland, CA); Barry, Patrick E. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a low density foam having a porosity of from 0 to 98% and a density less than about 0.67 gm/cc, prepared by heating a mixture of powered lithium hydride and beryllium hydride in an inert atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 455 to about 490 K for a period of time sufficient to cause foaming of said mixture, and cooling the foam thus produced. Also disclosed is the process of making the foam.

  7. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act are major federal statutes designed to protect plant and animal resources from adverse effects due to development projects. Both Acts require consultation with wildlife authorities prior to committing resources to certain types of projects. The purposes and requirements of the two statutes are summarized in the following subsections. Also presented is a list of contacts in the regional and field offices of the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

  8. Real-Time Water Quality Monitoring and Habitat Assessment in theSan Luis National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanlon, Jeremy S.; Burns, Josephine R.; Stromayer, Karl A.K.; Jordan, Brandon M.; Ennis, Mike J.; Woolington,Dennis W.

    2005-08-28

    The project report describes a two year experiment to control wetland drainage to the San Joaquin River of California from the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge using a decision support system for real-time water quality management. This system required the installation and operation of one inlet and three drainage flow and water quality monitoring stations which allowed a simple mass balance model to be developed of the seasonally managed wetlands in the study area. Remote sensing methods were developed to document long-term trends in wetland moist soil vegetation and soil salinity in response to management options such as delaying the initiation of seasonal wetland drainage. These environmental management tools provide wetland managers with some of the tools necessary to improve salinity conditions in the San Joaquin River and improve compliance with State mandated salinity objectives without inflicting long-term harm on the wild fowl habitat resource.

  9. Annual Review of BPA-Funded Fish and Wildlife Projects in Montana, November 28-29, 1984.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drais, Gregory

    1985-01-01

    Brief summaries of projects investigating the impacts of hydroelectric power projects in Montana on fish and wildlife values are presented. (ACR)

  10. Strategies for restoring ecological connectivity and establishing wildlife passage for the upgrade of Route 78 in Swanton, Vermont: an overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin, John M.; Ferguson, Mark; Gingras, Glenn; Bakos, Greg

    2003-01-01

    on Black bears in Vermont. Stratton Mountain Black BearStudy. Final Report. Vermont Agency of Natural Resources,biologist with the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department.

  11. Threatened and endangered fish and wildlife of the midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schafer, D.W.; Robeck, K.E.

    1980-06-01

    This report contains information of federally-listed endangered and/or threatened fish and wildlife occurring in the midwestern states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The information was compiled as a support document for the Regional Issue Identification and Assessment (RIIA) project sponsored by the Regional Assessments Division of the Office of Technology Impacts within the Department of Energy. The information on midwestern endangered species distribution, habitats, and reasons for population decline included in this document are designed to help assess the potential for adverse impacts if energy activities are sited within the general range of an endangered species. It is hoped that this document will thereby enhance the reliability of one portion of energy-related assessments performed in the Midwest. This report considers only those species listed prior to October 1979 as endangered and/or threatened in the federal endangered species list published in the Federal Register and that have been known to occur in the region in the last 20 years.

  12. Jacek Dobaczewski Density functional theory and energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobaczewski, Jacek

    Jacek Dobaczewski Density functional theory and energy density functionals in nuclear physics Jacek UNEDFCollaboration,http://unedf.org/ Universal Nuclear Energy Density FunctionalUniversal Nuclear Energy Density in Poland per voivodship Energy density functional 245 647 Price voivodship functional 654 763 295 580

  13. Numerical Approximation of Vortex Density Evolution in a Superconductor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Styles, Vanessa

    Numerical Approximation of Vortex Density Evolution in a Superconductor. C.M. Elliott & V. Styles Abstract A #12;nite volume/element approximation of a mean #12;eld model of superconducting vortices in one approximations of a two-dimensional version of the mean #12;eld model of superconducting vortices considered

  14. Towards A Resolution Of The Vacuum Energy Density Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldershaw, R L

    2009-01-01

    The theoretical vacuum energy density estimated on the basis of the Standard Model of particle physics and very general quantum assumptions is 59 to 123 orders of magnitude larger than the measured vacuum energy density for the observable universe which is determined on the basis of the Standard Model of cosmology and empirical data. This enormous disparity between the expectations of two of our most widely accepted theoretical frameworks demands a credible and self-consistent explanation, and yet even after decades of sporadic effort a generally accepted resolution of this crisis has not surfaced. Very recently, however, a discrete self-similar cosmological paradigm based on the fundamental principle of discrete scale invariance has been found to offer a rationale for reducing the vacuum energy density disparity by at least 115 orders of magnitude, and possibly this new paradigm offers a means of eliminating the vacuum energy density crisis entirely.

  15. Towards A Resolution Of The Vacuum Energy Density Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. L. Oldershaw

    2010-10-21

    The theoretical vacuum energy density estimated on the basis of the Standard Model of particle physics and very general quantum assumptions is 59 to 123 orders of magnitude larger than the measured vacuum energy density for the observable universe which is determined on the basis of the Standard Model of cosmology and empirical data. This enormous disparity between the expectations of two of our most widely accepted theoretical frameworks demands a credible and self-consistent explanation, and yet even after decades of sporadic effort a generally accepted resolution of this crisis has not surfaced. Very recently, however, a discrete self-similar cosmological paradigm based on the fundamental principle of discrete scale invariance has been found to offer a rationale for reducing the vacuum energy density disparity by at least 115 orders of magnitude, and possibly this new paradigm offers a means of eliminating the vacuum energy density crisis entirely.

  16. Nuclear Energy Density Optimization: UNEDF2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kortelainen; J. McDonnell; W. Nazarewicz; E. Olsen; P. -G. Reinhard; J. Sarich; N. Schunck; S. M. Wild; D. Davesne; J. Erler; A. Pastore

    2014-10-30

    The parameters of the UNEDF2 nuclear energy density functional (EDF) model were obtained in an optimization to experimental data consisting of nuclear binding energies, proton radii, odd-even mass staggering data, fission-isomer excitation energies, and single particle energies. In addition to parameter optimization, sensitivity analysis was done to obtain parameter uncertainties and correlations. The resulting UNEDF2 is an all-around EDF. However, the sensitivity analysis also demonstrated that the limits of current Skyrme-like EDFs have been reached and that novel approaches are called for.

  17. Ligand identification using electron-density map correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Adams, Paul D.; Moriarty, Nigel W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, BLDG 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Cohn, Judith D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-01-01

    An automated ligand-fitting procedure is applied to (F{sub o} ? F{sub c})exp(i?{sub c}) difference density for 200 commonly found ligands from macromolecular structures in the Protein Data Bank to identify ligands from density maps. A procedure for the identification of ligands bound in crystal structures of macromolecules is described. Two characteristics of the density corresponding to a ligand are used in the identification procedure. One is the correlation of the ligand density with each of a set of test ligands after optimization of the fit of that ligand to the density. The other is the correlation of a fingerprint of the density with the fingerprint of model density for each possible ligand. The fingerprints consist of an ordered list of correlations of each the test ligands with the density. The two characteristics are scored using a Z-score approach in which the correlations are normalized to the mean and standard deviation of correlations found for a variety of mismatched ligand-density pairs, so that the Z scores are related to the probability of observing a particular value of the correlation by chance. The procedure was tested with a set of 200 of the most commonly found ligands in the Protein Data Bank, collectively representing 57% of all ligands in the Protein Data Bank. Using a combination of these two characteristics of ligand density, ranked lists of ligand identifications were made for representative (F{sub o} ? F{sub c})exp(i?{sub c}) difference density from entries in the Protein Data Bank. In 48% of the 200 cases, the correct ligand was at the top of the ranked list of ligands. This approach may be useful in identification of unknown ligands in new macromolecular structures as well as in the identification of which ligands in a mixture have bound to a macromolecule.

  18. Precision Cosmology and the Density of Baryons in the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kaplinghat; M. S. Turner

    2000-11-14

    Big-bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy measurements give independent, accurate measurements of the baryon density and can test the framework of the standard cosmology. Early CMB data are consistent with the longstanding conclusion from BBN that baryons constitute a small fraction of matter in the Universe, but may indicate a slightly higher value for the baryon density. We clarify precisely what the two methods determine, and point out that differing values for the baryon density can indicate either an inconsistency or physics beyond the standard models of cosmology and particle physics. We discuss other signatures of the new physics in CMB anisotropy.

  19. Energy Density Inhomogeneities with Polynomial $f(R)$ Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sharif; Z. Yousaf

    2014-08-15

    In this paper, we study the effects of polynomial $f(R)$ model on the stability of homogeneous energy density in self-gravitating spherical stellar object. For this purpose, we construct couple of evolution equations which relate the Weyl tensor with matter parameters. We explore different factors responsible for density inhomogeneities with non-dissipative dust, isotropic as well as anisotropic fluids and dissipative dust cloud. We find that shear, pressure, dissipative parameters and $f(R)$ terms affect the existence of inhomogeneous energy density.

  20. Symmetry energy at subnuclear densities deduced from nuclear masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuhiro Oyamatsu; Kei Iida

    2010-04-19

    We examine how nuclear masses are related to the density dependence of the symmetry energy. Using a macroscopic nuclear model we calculate nuclear masses in a way dependent on the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter. We find by comparison with empirical two-proton separation energies that a smaller symmetry energy at subnuclear densities, corresponding to a larger density symmetry coefficient L, is favored. This tendency, which is clearly seen for nuclei that are neutron-rich, nondeformed, and light, can be understood from the property of the surface symmetry energy in a compressible liquid-drop picture.

  1. Effect of density dependent symmetry energy on Elliptical flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suneel Kumar; Karan Singh Vinayak

    2011-08-30

    The effect of the density dependent symmetry energy on elliptical flow is studied using isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model(IQMD). We have used the reduced isospin-dependent cross-section with soft equation of state to study the sensitivity of elliptical flow towards symmetry energy. Aim of the present study is to pin down the Elliptical flow for the various forms of the density dependent symmetry energy.

  2. High-density fluid compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, D.C.

    1981-09-29

    Clear, high-density fluids suitable for use as well completion, packing, and perforation media comprise aqueous solutions of zinc bromide and calcium bromide having densities lying in the range of about 14.5 up to about 18.0 pounds per gallon and measured PH's lying in the range of about 3.5 up to about 6.0. Optionally, such fluids may also comprise calcium chloride and/or a soluble film-forming amine-based corrosion inhibitor. Such fluids under conditions of ordinary use exhibit low corrosion rates and have crystallization points lying well below the range of temperatures under which they are used.

  3. UNBC Continuing Studies -WILDLIFE DANGER TREE REGISTRATION FORM UNBC CONTINUING STUDIES 3333 University Way, Prince George, BC, V2N 4Z9 TEL: 250-960-5980 FAX: 250-960-5984 TOLL FREE: 1-866-843-8061

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    UNBC Continuing Studies - WILDLIFE DANGER TREE REGISTRATION FORM UNBC CONTINUING STUDIES 3333 form. Name Telephone Number Email Address COURSE INFORMATION - WILDLIFE DANGER TREE ASSESSOR

  4. Defect transition energies and the density of electronic states in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolk, Norman H.

    Defect transition energies and the density of electronic states in hydrogenated amorphous silicon G in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). These measurements suggest that the density of neutral defects is much of the corresponding transition energies are determined and agree with two models proposed to describe the density

  5. Reliability of Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis for Estimating Whole-Fish Energy Density and Percent Lipids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reliability of Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis for Estimating Whole-Fish Energy Density impedance analysis (BIA) as a nonlethal means of predicting energy density and percent lipids for three fish in fish energy density or percent lipids. Models that combined BIA measures with body mass for prediction

  6. Time Dependent Density Functional Theory An introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botti, Silvana

    Time Dependent Density Functional Theory An introduction Francesco Sottile LSI, Ecole Polytechnique (ETSF) Time Dependent Density Functional Theory Palaiseau, 7 February 2012 1 / 32 #12;Outline 1 Frontiers 4 Perspectives and Resources Francesco Sottile (ETSF) Time Dependent Density Functional Theory

  7. Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project : Annual Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Richard P.; Berger, Matthew T.; Rushing, Samuel; Peone, Cory

    2009-01-01

    The Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) was proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. At present, the Hellsgate Project protects and manages 57,418 acres (approximately 90 miles2) for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species; most are located on or near the Columbia River (Lake Rufus Woods and Lake Roosevelt) and surrounded by Tribal land. To date we have acquired about 34,597 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. In addition to the remaining 1,237 HUs left unmitigated, 600 HUs from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife that were traded to the Colville Tribes and 10 secure nesting islands are also yet to be mitigated. This annual report for 2008 describes the management activities of the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) during the past year.

  8. Longitudinal polarized parton densities updated

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leader, Elliot; Sidorov, Aleksander V.; Stamenov, Dimiter B. [Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Bogoliubov Theoretical Laboratory Joint Institute for Nuclear Research 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences Blvd. Tsarigradsko Chaussee 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria)

    2006-02-01

    We have reanalyzed the world data on inclusive polarized DIS, in both NLO and LO QCD, including the new HERMES and COMPASS data. The updated NLO polarized densities are given in both the MS and JET schemes. The impact of the new data on the results is discussed.

  9. Radiating Gravitational Collapse with an Initial Inhomogeneous Energy Density Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Pinheiro; R. Chan

    2014-06-01

    A new model is proposed to a collapsing star consisting of an initial inhomogeneous energy density and anisotropic pressure fluid with shear, radial heat flow and outgoing radiation. In previous papers one of us has always assumed an initial star with homogeneous energy density. The aim of this work is to generalize the previous models by introducing an initial inhomogeneous energy density and compare it to the initial homogeneous energy density collapse model. We will show the differences between these models in the evolution of all physical quantities that characterizes the gravitational collapse. The behavior of the energy density, pressure, mass, luminosity and the effective adiabatic index is analyzed. The pressure of the star, at the beginning of the collapse, is isotropic but due to the presence of the shear the pressure becomes more and more anisotropic. The black hole is never formed because the apparent horizon formation condition is never satisfied, in contrast of the previous model where a black hole is formed. An observer at infinity sees a radial point source radiating exponentially until reaches the time of maximum luminosity and suddenly the star turns off. In contrast of the former model where the luminosity also increases exponentially, reaching a maximum and after it decreases until the formation of the black hole. The effective adiabatic index is always positive without any discontinuity in contrast of the former model where there is a discontinuity around the time of maximum luminosity. The collapse is about three thousand times slower than in the case where the energy density is initially homogeneous.

  10. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project : 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kesling, Jason; Abel, Chad; Schwabe, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    In 1998, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) submitted a proposal to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for the acquisition of the Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project). The proposed mitigation site was for the Denny Jones Ranch and included Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL) leases and grazing allotments. The Project approval process and acquisition negotiations continued for several years until the BPT and BPA entered into a Memorandum of Agreement, which allowed for purchase of the Project in November 2000. The 31,781 acre Project is located seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon and is adjacent to the Malheur River (Figure 1). Six thousand three hundred eighty-five acres are deeded to BPT, 4,154 acres are leased from DSL, and 21,242 acres are leased from BLM (Figure 2). In total 11 grazing allotments are leased between the two agencies. Deeded land stretches for seven miles along the Malheur River. It is the largest private landholding on the river between Riverside and Harper, Oregon. Approximately 938 acres of senior water rights are included with the Ranch. The Project is comprised of meadow, wetland, riparian and shrub-steppe habitats. The BLM grazing allotment, located south of the ranch, is largely shrub-steppe habitat punctuated by springs and seeps. Hunter Creek, a perennial stream, flows through both private and BLM lands. Similarly, the DSL grazing allotment, which lies north of the Ranch, is predominantly shrub/juniper steppe habitat with springs and seeps dispersed throughout the upper end of draws (Figure 2).

  11. Competition between superconductivity and spin density wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian De Cao

    2012-08-25

    The Hubbard model has been investigated widely by many authors, while this work may be new in two aspects. One, we focus on the possible effects of the positions of the gaps associated with the pairing and the spin density wave. Two, we suggest that the models with different parameters are appropriate for different materials (or a material in different doped regions). This will lead to some new insights into the high temperature superconductors. It is shown that the SDW can appear at some temperature region when the on-site Coulomb interaction is larger, while the SC requires a decreased U at a lower temperature. This can qualitatively explain the relationship between superconducting and pseudogap states of Cu-based superconductors in underdoped and optimally doped regions. The superinsulator is also discussed.

  12. Pion Superfluidity and Meson Properties at Finite Isospin Density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lianyi He; Meng Jin; Pengfei Zhuang

    2009-09-27

    We investigate pion superfluidity and its effect on meson properties and equation of state at finite temperature and isospin and baryon densities in the frame of standard flavor SU(2) NJL model. In mean field approximation to quarks and random phase approximation to mesons, the critical isospin chemical potential for pion superfluidity is exactly the pion mass in the vacuum, and corresponding to the isospin symmetry spontaneous breaking, there is in the pion superfluidity phase a Goldstone mode which is the linear combination of the normal sigma and charged pion modes. We calculate numerically the gap equations for the chiral and pion condensates, the phase diagrams, the meson spectra, and the equation of state, and compare them with that obtained in other effective models. The competitions between pion superfluidity and color superconductivity at finite baryon density and between pion and kaon superfluidity at finite strangeness density in flavor SU(3) NJL model are briefly discussed.

  13. HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2):199204, Fall 2007 A landscape-level survey of feral hog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Conflicts 1(2):199­204, Fall 2007 A landscape-level survey of feral hog impacts of feral hog (Sus scrofa) on the natural resources of the Big Thicket National Preserve (BTNP), a unit years. Key words: Big Thicket National Preserve, exotic species, feral hog, human­wildlife conflicts

  14. GAL.BLAYDES-FIRESTONE.DOC 11/19/2008 2:01 PM WIND POWER, WILDLIFE, AND THE MIGRATORY BIRD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    GAL.BLAYDES-FIRESTONE.DOC 11/19/2008 2:01 PM [1167] WIND POWER, WILDLIFE, AND THE MIGRATORY BIRD by discussing the rapid domestic growth of wind power and the implications for turbine-related avian and bat Fish and Wildlife Service-- all in an effort to ensure that wind power, which provides a cost

  15. HumanWildlife Interactions 5(1):100105, Spring 2011 A rat-resistant artificial nest box for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the island of Kauai, Hawaii. The sole population of about 500 birds is currently restricted to remote, higher, Hawaii Field Station, P.O. Box 10880, Hilo, HI 96721, USA will.pitt@aphis.usda.gov LAURA C. DRISCOLL, USDA/APHIS/Wildlife Services' National Wildlife Research Center, Hawaii Field Station, P.O. Box 10880

  16. Patrick G. R. Jodice U.S. Geological Survey South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jodice, Patrick

    Patrick G. R. Jodice U.S. Geological Survey South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Clemson, South Carolina, 29634, USA Tel.: (Office) +1 864.656.6190, (Home) +1 864.653.3872 Email: pjodice-June 2004), U.S. Geological Survey, South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Clemson

  17. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):284290, Fall 2014 Oil and gas impacts on Wyoming's sage-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Interactions 8(2):284­290, Fall 2014 Oil and gas impacts on Wyoming's sage- grouse: Historical impacts from oil and gas development to greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) habitat been extrapolated to estimate future oil and gas impacts in the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service (2010

  18. Counting Critters: Developing new ways to estimate wildlife population size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Len

    tamarin is a critically endangered primate, endemic to the tropical forests of NW Colombia. It is hard populations. Biometrics 65: 572-583 Photo: Neil Hope Photo: Callan Duck pups adults Listening for Whales tp ,1,5.0 pup 1 2 3 4 5 6+ t,1 a a a a a density dependent pup survival a Photo: Diane Claridge Traditional

  19. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-39)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-02-02

    BPA funds the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, which is tasked with the acquisition and restoration of key habitats within the Pend Oreille Watershed. This mitigation program purchases private land to be owned and managed by program participants for the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. BPA is currently working with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians to acquire and manage three parcels that total approximately 890 acres of land within Pend Oreille County, Washington. The properties proposed for acquisition contain habitats or potential habitats that will provide BPA with credits for partial mitigation of wildlife habitat losses due to the construction of Albeni Falls Dam. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

  20. FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 12th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs < PAGE 1 2012 Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 12TH AnnuAL REPORT TO THE nORTHWEST GOvERnORS #12;PAGE 2 > 12th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIxTH AvEnuE, Su

  1. FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 13th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs < PAGE 1 Draft 2013 Columbia River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 13TH AnnuAL REPORT TO THE nORTHWEST GOvERnORS #12;PAGE 2 > 13th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIxTH Av

  2. Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment/Management Plan and Finding of No Significant Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington bottoms wetlands mitigation site. Acquired by BPA in 1991, wildlife habitat at Burlington bottoms would contribute toward the goal of mitigation for wildlife losses and inundation of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal dams in the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins. Target wildlife species identified for mitigation purposes are yellow warbler, great blue heron, black-capped chickadee, red-tailed hawk, valley quail, spotted sandpiper, wood duck, and beaver. The Draft Management Plan/Environmental Assessment (EA) describes alternatives for managing the Burlington Bottoms area, and evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the alternatives. Included in the Draft Management Plan/EA is an implementation schedule, and a monitoring and evaluation program, both of which are subject to further review pending determination of final ownership of the Burlington Bottoms property.

  3. Assessment of Technologies Used to Characterize Wildlife Populations in the Offshore Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duberstein, Corey A.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Larson, Kyle B.

    2011-12-09

    Wind energy development in the offshore environment can have both direct and indirect effects on wildlife, yet little is known about most species that use near-shore and offshore waters due in part to the difficulty involved in studying animals in remote, challenging environments. Traditional methods to characterize offshore wildlife populations include shipboard observations. Technological advances have provided researches with an array of technologies to gather information about fauna from afar. This report describes the use and application of radar, thermal and optical imagery, and acoustic detection technologies for monitoring birds, bats, and marine mammals in offshore environments.

  4. Woody Plants for Wildlife: Brush Sculpting in South Texas and the Edwards Plateau 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert K.; Ginnett, Tim F.; Taylor, Richard B.

    1999-10-01

    &M University System; Wildlife Biologist, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. L-5332 9-99 Loc. Food Co ver W ater S E Species T P Forage M ast Fruit Protection Nesting Roosting P Agarito, desert holly, Mahonia trifoliolata 44 b i o i o B F o B F o B F Allthorn... Sculpting in South Texas and the Edwards Plateau Robert K. Lyons, Tim F. Ginnett and Richard B. Taylor* O ur perspective is changing on the value of brush or woody plants. When Texas rangeland was used primarily for livestock, managing brush meant...

  5. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousins, Katherine

    2009-04-03

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration projects and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the project area.

  6. Density Functional Theory (DFT) Rob Parrish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    · References 2 #12;Wavefunction Approach 3 Hydrogen 421 Wavefunction at Density Isosurface. Really hard to find Easy to do this Why? Because of Hermitian Operators: Kinetic Energy Density: #12;Density Functional Approach 4 Hydrogen 421 Density (Why is it grayscale?) A bit less obvious Probably easier to find

  7. Density variations and anomalies in palladium compacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Back, D.; Jones, T.; Ransick, M.; Walburg, T.; Werkmeister, D.

    1992-05-14

    Low-density compacts of palladium powder have relative densities of about 30{plus minus}10% TD. The variations in density are of concern for operations such as chemical/hydrogen pump systems because heat, mass, and momentum transport properties can be affected. Variations in density result from the inherent nature and interacting forces of UASA compaction of powder in cylinders. In addition to these expected variations, discontinuous density anomalies, such as cracks or high density ridges, are also found. An anomaly of particular concern was found to resemble a steer's head.'' it is a symmetrical region of low density located at or near the center of a compact. Typically, this region is surrounded by a band of high density, compacted palladium that sometimes exceeds the density of the surrounding compact matrix by a factor of three. This report examines these density variations and anomalies both theoretically and empirically.

  8. Density variations and anomalies in palladium compacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Back, D.; Jones, T.; Ransick, M.; Walburg, T.; Werkmeister, D.

    1992-05-14

    Low-density compacts of palladium powder have relative densities of about 30{plus_minus}10% TD. The variations in density are of concern for operations such as chemical/hydrogen pump systems because heat, mass, and momentum transport properties can be affected. Variations in density result from the inherent nature and interacting forces of UASA compaction of powder in cylinders. In addition to these expected variations, discontinuous density anomalies, such as cracks or high density ridges, are also found. An anomaly of particular concern was found to resemble a ``steer`s head.`` it is a symmetrical region of low density located at or near the center of a compact. Typically, this region is surrounded by a band of high density, compacted palladium that sometimes exceeds the density of the surrounding compact matrix by a factor of three. This report examines these density variations and anomalies both theoretically and empirically.

  9. Why are Halo Density Profiles Stable at Formation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Gonzalez-Casado; A. Raig; E. Salvador-Sole

    1998-10-28

    We analyze the physical justification of the picture proposed by Salvador-Sole et al. in these proceedings for the time evolution of the universal density profile of dark-matter halos. According to this picture, halos have at formation a stable (i.e. independent of mass and time) dimensionless density profile, the characteristic length and density scales of the profile depending on the underlying cosmogony. Subsequent evolution is driven by mass accretion onto the outskirts of halos and can be characterized simply by the increment of halo radius with time and the corresponding decrease of the critical density of the universe. We find this picture to be a reasonable good description of the expected evolution of halos in hierarchical models of structure formation.

  10. Nuclear Energy Density Functionals: What do we really know?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulgac, Aurel; Jin, Shi

    2015-01-01

    We present the simplest nuclear energy density functional (NEDF) to date, determined by only 4 significant phenomenological parameters, yet capable of fitting measured nuclear masses with better accuracy than the Bethe-Weizs\\"acker mass formula, while also describing density structures (charge radii, neutron skins etc.) and time-dependent phenomena (induced fission, giant resonances, low energy nuclear collisions, etc.). The 4 significant parameters are necessary to describe bulk nuclear properties (binding energies and charge radii); an additional 2 to 3 parameters have little influence on the bulk nuclear properties, but allow independent control of the density dependence of the symmetry energy and isovector excitations, in particular the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule. This Hohenberg-Kohn-style of density functional theory successfully realizes Weizs\\"acker's ideas and provides a computationally tractable model for a variety of static nuclear properties and dynamics, from finite nuclei to neutron stars, where...

  11. A novel density of state method for complex action systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biagio Lucini; Kurt Langfeld

    2014-11-01

    Recently, a new and efficient algorithm (the LLR method) has been proposed for computing densities of states in statistical systems and gauge theories. In this talk, we explore whether this novel density of states method can be applied to numerical computations of observables in systems for which the action is complex. To this purpose, we introduce a generalised density of states, in terms of which integrals of oscillating observables can be determined semi-analytically, and we define a strategy to compute it with the LLR method. As a case study, we apply these ideas to the Z(3) spin model at finite density, finding a remarkable agreement of our results for the phase twist with those obtained with the worm algorithm for all explored chemical potentials, including values for which there are cancellations over sixteen orders of magnitude. These findings open new perspectives for dealing with the sign problem on physically more relevant systems.

  12. Phase-field crystal modeling and classical density functional theory of freezing K. R. Elder,1 Nikolas Provatas,2 Joel Berry,1,3 Peter Stefanovic,2 and Martin Grant3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Martin

    model solidification, phase segregation, grain growth, elastic and plastic deformations in anisotropic-field or continuum models have been used to simulate spinodal decomposition,1 order-disorder transition kinetics,2 with the development of free energies that capture the thermodynamics of pure materials4­6 and alloys.7,8 Sev- eral

  13. Probability distribution of the vacuum energy density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duplancic, Goran; Stefancic, Hrvoje; Glavan, Drazen

    2010-12-15

    As the vacuum state of a quantum field is not an eigenstate of the Hamiltonian density, the vacuum energy density can be represented as a random variable. We present an analytical calculation of the probability distribution of the vacuum energy density for real and complex massless scalar fields in Minkowski space. The obtained probability distributions are broad and the vacuum expectation value of the Hamiltonian density is not fully representative of the vacuum energy density.

  14. Density functional theory of freezing: Analysis of crystal density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laird, Brian Bostian; McCoy, John D.; Haymet, A. D. J.

    1987-09-01

    the natural variables are temperature, chemical potential, and volume. The pressures are set equal by varying the liquid density until the grand thermodynamic potential, flO = - pV /kT, of the solid phase equals that of the liquid phase. It should... with temperature T, volume V, and chemical potential J.L. The particles interact via a potential energy U(rl, ... ,rn ) and feel an external single particle potential ifJ (r). Defining a dimen­ sionless single particle effective potential by u (r) = pJ.L - pif...

  15. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment at Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project, Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noyes, J.H.

    1985-09-01

    A habitat based assessment was conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project on the Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, to determine losses or gains resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric related components of the project. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types of the project site were mapped based on aerial photographs from 1944, 1964, and 1979, respectively. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected area and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Fifteen wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the project. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the project. The Hills Creek Project extensively altered or affected 4662 acres of land and river in the Middle Fork Willamette River drainage. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 2694 acres of old-growth forest and 207 acres of riparian habitat. Impacts resulting from the Hills Creek Project included the loss of winter range for Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for black-tailed deer, black bear, cougar, river otter, beaver, ruffed grouse, spotted owl, and other nongame species. Bald eagle and osprey were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected area to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Hills Creek Project, losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the life of the project.

  16. The nuclear density of states and the role of the residual interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvin W. Johnson; Edgar Teran

    2005-12-02

    We discuss the role of mean-field and moment methods in microscopic models for calculating the nuclear density of states (also known as the nuclear level density). Working in a shell-model framework, we use moments of the nuclear many-body Hamiltonian to illustrate the importance of the residual interaction for accurate representations.

  17. arXiv:0907.0199v1[stat.AP]1Jul2009 High-Dimensional Density Estimation via SCA: An Example in the Modelling of Hurricane Tracks6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ann B..

    in the Modelling of Hurricane Tracks6 Susan M. Buchman, Ann B. Lee1 , Chad M. Schafer Department of Statistics variability of tropical cyclones in the North Atlantic; each datum in this case is an entire hurricane

  18. Rock Density | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewable Energy|Gas and Electric JumpDensity Jump to:

  19. Northwest Power and Conservation Council Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Power and Conservation Council Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Findings) of the Northwest Power Act, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council oversees the development, amendment by the development and operation of the hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries, known

  20. Northwest Power and Conservation Council Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Northwest Power and Conservation Council Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Findings) of the Northwest Power Act, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council oversees the development, amendment by the development and operation of the hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries, known

  1. HumanWildlife Interactions 4(2):257265, Fall 2010 Bullet fragmentation and lead deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Interactions 4(2):257­265, Fall 2010 Bullet fragmentation and lead deposition to North Dakota's program. Therefore, we analyzed fragmentation patterns and lead deposition in carcasses fragments and lead deposits throughout the entire abdominal cavity of carcasses. We also used 2 types

  2. 136 HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2) Berryman Institute addresses feral hog problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    136 Human­Wildlife Conflicts 1(2) Berryman Institute addresses feral hog problems BRUCE D. LEOPOLD that is growing in importance throughout the southeastern United States: feral hogs. Being in Mississippi, I am in crops to corn for biofuels will greatly enhance our feral hog populations. In Mississippi alone

  3. Wildlife management assistance report. Progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, M.B.

    1992-05-01

    Thirty-four days were spent administering hunts on Crackerneck Wildlife Management Area with 1773 people participating. Biological data was collected on 76 deer, eight wild turkeys, 33 feral hogs, 58 ducks of two species, 75 gray squirrels, 4 raccoons, 9 bobwhites, and 484 fish of 9 species. Serving as a Coordinating Land User for the SRS Site Use Committee entailed evaluating 81 land use proposals with regard to effects on wildlife populations. The antlerless deer quota program continued in the district with 129 landowners in Aiken, Barnwell, and Orangeburg Counties being approved for antlerless harvest which required field investigations, acreage verification at tax offices, and personal correspondence. Bait sites for turkey trapping were maintained on the SRS for two months. Wildlife census work was conducted on wild turkey, bobwhite, mourning dove, furbearers, fox squirrels, and bald eagles on the SRS and in Aiken and Barnwell Counties. Three wetlands in Aiken County were evaluated for suitability with regard to wood duck boxes. Two wetland environmental review notices for the SRS were evaluated. Additional work on Wildlife Management Area land included reposting 50 miles of boundary in Aiken and Lexington County and removing signs form several tracts lost from the program. Future recommendations for the turkey and regulations brochures were submitted and WMA maps covering Aiken and Lexington Counties were updated.

  4. Fish and Wildlife Management Questions and RM&E Strategies Key Management Questions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -hydro agency responsibilities. #12;2 Strategic Category: Hydro RM&E The following are the primary management1 Fish and Wildlife Management Questions and RM&E Strategies Key Management Questions 1. Are we implemented and accomplished as proposed? Strategic Category: Fish Population Status Monitoring The following

  5. FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995 Section 12 FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT Much of this program has focused on mitigating damage done for additional federal hydroelectric projects and to plan for new development in the basin. The Federal Energy

  6. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix M: Integrating Fish & Wildlife and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................. 16 SUMMARY OF KEY FINDINGS The Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system is a limited resource and reliable energy supply. This is so even though the hydroelectric operations specified for fish and wildlife peaking needs. On average, hydroelectric generation is reduced by about 1,200 average megawatts, relative

  7. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

    1984-11-01

    This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  8. Notes From the Chair 2 Revised Fish and Wildlife Program 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    adds to its cost, is a major question for the Council as it develops its Sixth Power Plan. On the fish and wildlife affected by hydropower dams. The power plan's goal is to ensure the region of an adequate, efficient, econom- ical, and reliable power system. In 2009, the Council will develop and complete its Sixth

  9. Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project wind power project site, we conducted an analysis of the suitability of habitat within the project would be located. Within the tidal marsh there were also tidal creeks and guts. The following list

  10. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):235244, Fall 2014 Examining patterns of animalvehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Interactions 8(2):235­244, Fall 2014 Examining patterns of animal­vehicle collisions, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing, People's Re- public of China, 100083 Abstract: Animal­vehicle collisions (AVCs) cause animal death, human injury, and vehicle damage. Uncovering the general patterns

  11. HumanWildlife Conflicts 2(2):194199, Fall 2008 How people should respond when

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by a black bear, mountain lion, or wolf, most respondents said to fight back. Opinion was divided over, carnivores, grizzly bear, human­wildlife conflicts, mountain lion, predator attacks, wolf Attacks by large). Black bears (Ursus americana), grizzly bears (Ursus arctos), mountain lions (Puma concolor), and gray

  12. Introduction Yellowstone National Park with its thermal features and abundant wildlife draws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Introduction Yellowstone National Park with its thermal features and abundant wildlife draws about pollution. Measurements of air quality at the West Entrance found CO concentrations comparable to highly by percentages Snowmobile Snowmobile Snowmobil e Snowcoach Snowcoach Pollutant average 2-stroke average 4-stroke

  13. REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR IN FISHERY BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF FISH, WILDLIFE, AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR IN FISHERY BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF FISH, WILDLIFE, AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY for minor= 26 - 28 Aquatic and Fishery Electives for Fishery Biology Minor (Additional course work may 301/307, MATH 141/155/160) BZ 332 Phycology (F) FW 402 Fish Culture (S; FW 300) BZ 471 Stream Biology

  14. SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS APPENDIX B FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM B-1 December 15, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS APPENDIX B FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM B-1 December 15, 1994 Appendix B SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS AND IMPACTS OF THE MAINSTEM PASSAGE ACTIONS This document summarizes regional hydropower costs and impacts of the mainstem passage actions in the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1994

  15. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) encourages anglers from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) encourages anglers from throughout to determine whether the fish was previously caught. Tarpon can be identified using DNA fingerprinting, or "fin survival rates, health, migration, and movement of individual fish within the fishery. By evaluating

  16. UNITED STATES DEPARTMEl\\1T OF THE I NTERI OR FI SH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNITED STATES DEPARTMEl\\1T OF THE I NTERI OR FI SH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Washington} D. C. } 20240. A simple penetrometer for the measurement of texture ch::mges in canned salmon. Gulf States shrimp cinnin on spoil age characteri stics. Equi pment Kote #8 - New hydraulically driven block speeds hauling crab -pot

  17. Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Site Specific Management Plan for the Hellsgate Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Matthew T.; Judd, Steven L.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains a detailed site-specific management plan for the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project. The report provides background information about the mitigation process, the review process, mitigation acquisitions, Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) and mitigation crediting, current habitat conditions, desired future habitat conditions, restoration/enhancements efforts and maps.

  18. COLLEGE OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT Bachelor of Science in Forestry and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    COLLEGE OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT Bachelor of Science in Forestry and Wildlife Major: Natural Resources Conservation Option: Natural Resources Science Education For Students Graduating Elective 3 13 15 SENIOR YEAR FOR CSES 4334 3444 Prin. of Agroforestry (fall) OR World Crops & Crop Systems

  19. HumanWildlife Interactions 4(1):130144, Spring 2010 Evaluation of damage by vertebrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    survey, distress call, grapes, human­wildlife conflicts, Meleagris gallopavo, vineyards, wild turkey range have resulted in conflict with human interests. Complaints include turkeys causing a nuisance in the Napa Valley and Sierra Foothills American Viticultural Areas of California. We conducted damage surveys

  20. HumanWildlife Interactions 7(2):182194, Fall 2013 Vitals rates and seasonal movements of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Interactions 7(2):182­194, Fall 2013 Vitals rates and seasonal movements of two the factors affecting the vital rates in these isolated populations. Livestock grazing by domestic cattle higher for both populations in 2005 than 2006. We attributed these annual differences in vital rates

  1. Negative energy densities in integrable quantum field theories at one-particle level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bostelmann, Henning

    2015-01-01

    We study the phenomenon of negative energy densities in quantum field theories with self-interaction. Specifically, we consider a class of integrable models (including the sinh-Gordon model) in which we investigate the expectation value of the energy density in one-particle states. In this situation, we classify the possible form of the stress-energy tensor from first principles. We show that one-particle states with negative energy density generically exist in non-free situations, and we establish lower bounds for the energy density (quantum energy inequalities). Demanding that these inequalities hold reduces the ambiguity in the stress-energy tensor, in some situations fixing it uniquely. Numerical results for the lowest spectral value of the energy density allow us to demonstrate how negative energy densities depend on the coupling constant and on other model parameters.

  2. Observation of Density Segregation inside Migrating Dunes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Groh; Ingo Rehberg; Christof A. Kruelle

    2011-09-18

    Spatiotemporal patterns in nature, such as ripples or dunes, formed by a fluid streaming over a sandy surface show complex behavior despite their simple forms. Below the surface, the granular structure of the sand particles is subject to self-organization processes, exhibiting such phenomena as reverse grading when larger particles are found on top of smaller ones. Here we report results of an experimental investigation with downscaled model dunes revealing that, if the particles differ not in size but in density, the heavier particles, surprisingly, accumulate in the central core close to the top of the dune. This finding contributes to the understanding of sedimentary structures found in nature and might be helpful to improve existing dating methods for desert dunes.

  3. Wildlife management plan, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Scrivner, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Under the Naval Petroleum Act of 1976, Congress directed the Secretary of the Navy and subsequently the Secretary of Energy, to produce petroleum products from Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) in Kern County, California, at the maximum efficient rate consistent with sound engineering practices. Because of the presence of two endangered species and the quality, quantity, and contiguous nature of habitat on NPR-1, the area is unique and management of its resources deserves special attention. The purpose of this wildlife management plan is to: (1) draw together specific information on NPR-1 wildlife resources; (2) suggest management goals that could be implemented, which if achieved, would result in diverse, healthy wildlife populations; and (3) reinitiate cooperative agreements between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other conservation organizations regarding the management of wildlife on NPR-1. NPR-1 supports an abundant and diverse vertebrate fauna. Twenty-five mammalian, 92 avian, eight reptilian, and two amphibian species have been observed on Elk Hills. Of these, three are endangered (San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica; giant kangaroo rat, Dipodomys ingens; blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Gambelia silus). Nine vertebrates, six invertebrates, and four plant species known to occur or suspected of occurring on Elk Hills are potential candidates for listing. A major objective of this management plan is to minimize the impact of petroleum development activities on the San Joaquin kit fox, giant kangaroo rat, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, and their essential habitats. This will mainly be achieved by monitoring the status of these species and their habitat and by restoring disturbed habitats. In general, management policies designed to benefit the above three species and other species of concern will also benefit other wildlife inhabiting NPR-1.

  4. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitats in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  5. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitat in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.; Miller, James, H.

    2004-07-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  6. Densities and energies of nuclei in dilute matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Papakonstantinou; J. Margueron; F. Gulminelli; Ad. R. Raduta

    2013-05-01

    We explore the ground-state properties of nuclear clusters embedded in a gas of nucleons with the help of Skyrme-Hartree-Fock microscopic calculations. Two alternative representations of clusters are introduced, namely coordinate-space and energy-space clusters. We parameterize their density profiles in spherical symmetry in terms of basic properties of the energy density functionals used and propose an analytical, Woods-Saxon density profile whose parameters depend, not only on the composition of the cluster, but also of the nucleon gas. We study the clusters' energies with the help of the local-density approximation, validated through our microscopic results. We find that the volume energies of coordinate-space clusters are determined by the saturation properties of matter, while the surface energies are strongly affected by the presence of the gas. We conclude that both the density profiles and the cluster energies are strongly affected by the gas and discuss implications for the nuclear EoS and related perspectives. Our study provides a simple, but microscopically motivated modeling of the energetics of clusterized matter at subsaturation densities, for direct use in consequential applications of astrophysical interest.

  7. Neutron skin uncertainties of Skyrme energy density functionals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kortelainen; J. Erler; W. Nazarewicz; N. Birge; Y. Gao; E. Olsen

    2013-07-16

    Background: Neutron-skin thickness is an excellent indicator of isovector properties of atomic nuclei. As such, it correlates strongly with observables in finite nuclei that depend on neutron-to-proton imbalance and the nuclear symmetry energy that characterizes the equation of state of neutron-rich matter. A rich worldwide experimental program involving studies with rare isotopes, parity violating electron scattering, and astronomical observations is devoted to pinning down the isovector sector of nuclear models. Purpose: We assess the theoretical systematic and statistical uncertainties of neutron-skin thickness and relate them to the equation of state of nuclear matter, and in particular to nuclear symmetry energy parameters. Methods: We use the nuclear superfluid Density Functional Theory with several Skyrme energy density functionals and density dependent pairing. To evaluate statistical errors and their budget, we employ the statistical covariance technique. Results: We find that the errors on neutron skin increase with neutron excess. Statistical errors due to uncertain coupling constants of the density functional are found to be larger than systematic errors, the latter not exceeding 0.06 fm in most neutron-rich nuclei across the nuclear landscape. The single major source of uncertainty is the poorly determined slope L of the symmetry energy that parametrizes its density dependence. Conclusions: To provide essential constraints on the symmetry energy of the nuclear energy density functional, next-generation measurements of neutron skins are required to deliver precision better than 0.06 fm.

  8. The latitudinal gradient of the NO peak density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fesen, C.G.; Rusch, D.W. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States)); Gerard, J.C. (Univ. de Liege (Belgium))

    1990-11-01

    The latitudinal gradients of the maximum nitric oxide densities near 110 km are presented for solstice and equinox periods from 1982 through 1985 as observed by the Solar Mesosphere Explorer satellite. The data indicate that the response of the maximum NO densities to the declining level of solar activity is latitudinally and seasonally dependent: the polar regions exhibit little sensitivity to solar activity, while the low latitude NO responds strongly. The data also reveal marked asymmetries in the latitudinal structure of the two hemispheres for each season. During June solstice periods, the latitudinal distribution is fairly flat, unlike December solstice periods which tend to show a definite minimum near 30{degree}N. Similarly, March data show very little latitudinal variation in the NO peak density between about {plus minus} 40{degree}, while the September data show marked gradients for the later years. The SME data further indicate that the nitric oxide densities vary considerably from day to day, even during very quiet geomagnetic periods, suggesting that the concept of an average distribution is of limited usefulness in understanding nitric oxide. A two-dimensional model is used to simualte the June solar cycle minimum data. The latitudinally averaged magnitudes of the observed NO peak densities are reproduced reasonably well by the model, but the shape of the latitudinal variation is not.

  9. DENSITY OF STATES CALCULATIONS FOR CARBON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Joan

    DENSITY OF STATES CALCULATIONS FOR CARBON ALLOTROPES AND MIXTURES EDUARDO WARSZAWSKI #12;#12;DENSITY OF STATES CALCULATIONS FOR CARBON ALLOTROPES AND MIXTURES Research Thesis Submitted in Partial;#12;Contents Abstract xiii 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Carbon allotropes

  10. Oxides having high energy densities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Kang, Kisuk

    2013-09-10

    Certain disclosed embodiments generally relate to oxide materials having relatively high energy and/or power densities. Various aspects of the embodiments are directed to oxide materials having a structure B.sub.i(M.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2, for example, a structure Li.sub.j(Ni.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2 such as Li(Ni.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5)O.sub.2. In this structure, Y represents one or more atoms, each independently selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metals, transition metals, Group 14 elements, Group 15, or Group 16 elements. In some embodiments, such an oxide material may have an O3 crystal structure, and/or a layered structure such that the oxide comprises a plurality of first, repeating atomic planes comprising Li, and a plurality of second, repeating atomic planes comprising Ni and/or Y.

  11. Low-Density Attack Revisited Tetsuya Izu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Low-Density Attack Revisited Tetsuya Izu Jun Kogure Takeshi Koshiba Takeshi Shimoyama Secure The low-density attack proposed by Lagarias and Odlyzko is a powerful algorithm against the subset sum, densities of the subset sum problems should be higher than 0.9408... in order to avoid the low

  12. Ultimate Energy Densities for Electromagnetic Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mankei Tsang

    2008-03-06

    The ultimate electric and magnetic energy densities that can be attained by bandlimited electromagnetic pulses in free space are calculated using an ab initio quantized treatment, and the quantum states of electromagnetic fields that achieve the ultimate energy densities are derived. The ultimate energy densities also provide an experimentally accessible metric for the degree of localization of polychromatic photons.

  13. Influence of density dependent symmetry energy on Elliptical flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karan Singh Vinayak; Suneel Kumar

    2011-09-18

    The effect of density dependent symmetry energy on elliptical flow is studied using isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model(IQMD). We have used the reduced isospin- dependent cross-section with hard(H) equation of state to study the sensitivity of elliptical flow towards symmetry energy in the energy range of 50 - 1000 MeV/nucleon. The elliptical flow becomes zero at a particular energy termed as transition energy. A systematic effort has been made to pin down the transition energy for the density dependent symmetry energy.

  14. Branch xylem density variations across the Amazon Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    increase wood density in Eucalyptus grandis seedlings? ,Changes in wood density of Eucalyptus camaldulensis due to

  15. Nonlinear models Nonlinear Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penny, Will

    Nonlinear models Will Penny Nonlinear Regression Nonlinear Regression Priors Energies Posterior Metropolis-Hasting Proposal density References Nonlinear models Will Penny Bayesian Inference Course, WTCN, UCL, March 2013 #12;Nonlinear models Will Penny Nonlinear Regression Nonlinear Regression Priors

  16. Aerodynamic Focusing Of High-Density Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz, D. E.; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2014-02-24

    High-density micron-sized particle aerosols might form the basis for a number of applications in which a material target with a particular shape might be quickly ionized to form a cylindrical or sheet shaped plasma. A simple experimental device was built in order to study the properties of high-density aerosol focusing for 1#22; m silica spheres. Preliminary results recover previous findings on aerodynamic focusing at low densities. At higher densities, it is demonstrated that the focusing properties change in a way which is consistent with a density dependent Stokes number.

  17. Energy density bounds for black strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinya Tomizawa

    2005-06-07

    The conserved charge called Y-ADM mass density associated with asymptotically translational Killing-Yano tensor gives us an appropriate physical meaning about the energy density of $p$ brane spacetimes or black strings. We investigated the positivity of energy density in black string spacetimes, using the spinorial technique introduced by Witten. Recently, the positivity of Y-ADM mass density in p brane spacetimes was discussed. In this paper, we will extend this discussion to the transversely asymptotically flat black string spacetimes containing an apparent horizon. We will give the sufficient conditions for the Y-ADM mass density to become positive in such spacetimes.

  18. COORDINATED IMPLEMENTATION, RESEARCH, MONITORING AND EVALUATION SECTION 3 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 3-2 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3-2 September 13, 1995 #12;SECTION 3 COORDINATED IMPLEMENTATION, RESEARCH, MONITORING AND EVALUATION September 13, 1995 3-2 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM address progress, problems and issues regarding program

  19. Is the 10-Year Wildlife Cycle Induced by a Lunar Cycle? Author(s): Herbert L. Archibald

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    work(s): Source: Wildlife Society Bulletin, Vol. 5, No. 3 (Autumn, 1977), pp. 126-129 Published by.22 represents the vernal equinox (21 March) in 1950. At this time, the moon's declination attained a maximum

  20. United states Department of the Interior, Oscar L. Chapman, Secret ary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United states Department of the Interior, Oscar L. Chapman, Secret ary Fish and Wildlife Service in the water by means of floats on the top line and held downward by weights on the bottom line to act

  1. VERMONT AGENCY OF TRANSPORTATION WILDLIFE CROSSING TEAM; BUILDING AN INTER-AGENCY PLANNING TOOL TO ADDRESS ECOLOGICAL CONNECTIVITY IN VERMONT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slesar, Chris; Morse, Susan C.; Austin, John M.

    2003-01-01

    He serves as chair of the Vermont Reptile and Amphibianis coordinator of the Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas.biologist with the Vermont Dept. of Fish and Wildlife. John

  2. Effects of system densities on distillation column performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fasesan, S.O.; Sanni, S.A.; Taiwo, E.A. [Obafemi Awolowo Univ., Ile-Ife (Nigeria). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1998-06-01

    Distillation experiments were carried out on three binary systems (ethanol-butanol, ethanol-propan-2-ol, and propan-2-ol-butanol) in a 0.1-m internal diameter glass column packed with 8 mm diameter Raschig rings. The experiments were performed under total reflux conditions and at atmospheric pressure. The data collected on column performance showed that performance declined with increasing average bulk liquid density. The results also lend credence to earlier reports on the behavior of column performance with respect to component concentration in the feed mixtures. The system densities of the three binary systems were measured at four different temperatures, 30, 40, 50, and 60 C. The data were compared with the predicted data of Yen-Woods and Multifluid models. The accuracy of the predictions of the Yen-Woods model was rather poor while that of the Multifluid model was very encouraging.

  3. Theoretical analysis of the worthiness of Henry and Elder problems as benchmarks of density-dependent groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    -dependent groundwater flow models M.J. Simpson a , T.P. Clement a,b,* a Centre for Water Research, Department the availability of benchmark problems for testing density-dependent groundwater models is limited, one should: Groundwater-modeling; Density-dependent flow; Unsaturated flow; Contaminant transport 1. Introduction

  4. Density waves in the shearing sheet III. Disc heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Fuchs

    2001-04-25

    The problem of dynamical heating of galactic discs by spiral density waves is discussed using the shearing sheet model. The secular evolution of the disc is described quantitatively by a diffusion equation for the distribution function of stars in the space spanned by integrals of motion of the stars, in particular the radial action integral and an integral related to the angular momentum. Specifically, disc heating by a succession of transient, `swing amplified' density waves is studied. It is shown that such density waves lead predominantly to diffusion of stars in radial action space. The stochastical changes of angular momenta of the stars and the corresponding stochastic changes of the guiding centre radii of the stellar orbits induced by this process are much smaller.

  5. Spiral density wave generation by vortices in Keplerian flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Bodo; G. Chagelishvili; G. Murante; A. Tevzadze; P. Rossi; A. Ferrari

    2005-03-22

    We perform a detailed analytical and numerical study of the dynamics of perturbations (vortex/aperiodic mode, Rossby and spiral-density waves) in 2D compressible disks with a Keplerian law of rotation. We draw attention to the process of spiral-density wave generation from vortices, discussing, in particular, the initial, most peculiar stages of wave emission. We show that the linear phenomenon of wave generation by vortices in smooth (without inflection points) shear flows found by using the so-called non-modal approach, is directly applicable to the present case. After an analytical non-modal description of the physics and characteristics of the spiral-density wave generation/propagation in the local shearing-sheet model, we follow the process of wave generation by small amplitude coherent circular vortex structures, by direct global numerical simulation, describing the main features of the generated waves.

  6. Improving experimental phases for strong reflections prior to density modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin [University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany); University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany); Hilgenfeld, Rolf, E-mail: hilgenfeld@biochem.uni-luebeck.de [University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany); Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zu Chong Zhi Road, Shanghai 201203, People’s Republic of (China); Terwilliger, Thomas C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Read, Randy J. [University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    A genetic algorithm has been developed to optimize the phases of the strongest reflections in SIR/SAD data. This is shown to facilitate density modification and model building in several test cases. Experimental phasing of diffraction data from macromolecular crystals involves deriving phase probability distributions. These distributions are often bimodal, making their weighted average, the centroid phase, improbable, so that electron-density maps computed using centroid phases are often non-interpretable. Density modification brings in information about the characteristics of electron density in protein crystals. In successful cases, this allows a choice between the modes in the phase probability distributions, and the maps can cross the borderline between non-interpretable and interpretable. Based on the suggestions by Vekhter [Vekhter (2005 ?), Acta Cryst. D61, 899–902], the impact of identifying optimized phases for a small number of strong reflections prior to the density-modification process was investigated while using the centroid phase as a starting point for the remaining reflections. A genetic algorithm was developed that optimizes the quality of such phases using the skewness of the density map as a target function. Phases optimized in this way are then used in density modification. In most of the tests, the resulting maps were of higher quality than maps generated from the original centroid phases. In one of the test cases, the new method sufficiently improved a marginal set of experimental SAD phases to enable successful map interpretation. A computer program, SISA, has been developed to apply this method for phase improvement in macromolecular crystallography.

  7. Oil, Water, and Wildlife: The Gulf of Mexico Disaster and Related Environmental Issues

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bickman, John W. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, United States

    2010-09-01

    The BP Macondo oil field spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the largest oil spill in U.S. history and has the potential to impact sea turtle and marine mammal populations, and others. This presentation will review the genotoxic effects of oil exposure in wildlife and discuss the potential for an oil spill to impact wildlife populations. Whereas some aspects of a spill are predictable, each spill is different because oils are highly variable, as are the environments in which they occur. The presentation will discuss what has been learned from previous spills, including the Exxon Valdez and the soviet oil legacy in Azerbaijan, and the potential dangers of offshore oil development in the Arctic. Related Purdue University research efforts in oil-spill related engineering and science also will be highlighted.

  8. Oil, Water, and Wildlife: The Gulf of Mexico Disaster and Related Environmental Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickman, John W.

    2010-08-04

    The BP Macondo oil field spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the largest oil spill in U.S. history and has the potential to impact sea turtle and marine mammal populations, and others. This presentation will review the genotoxic effects of oil exposure in wildlife and discuss the potential for an oil spill to impact wildlife populations. Whereas some aspects of a spill are predictable, each spill is different because oils are highly variable, as are the environments in which they occur. The presentation will discuss what has been learned from previous spills, including the Exxon Valdez and the soviet oil legacy in Azerbaijan, and the potential dangers of offshore oil development in the Arctic. Related Purdue University research efforts in oil-spill related engineering and science also will be highlighted.

  9. Air Quality Scoping Study for Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kavouras, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S.Department of Energy’s Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each site’s sampling program.

  10. Relativistic Mean-Field Theory and the High-Density Nuclear Equation of State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horst Mueller; Brian D. Serot

    1996-03-22

    The properties of high-density nuclear and neutron matter are studied using a relativistic mean-field approximation to the nuclear matter energy functional. Based on ideas of effective field theory, nonlinear interactions between the fields are introduced to parametrize the density dependence of the energy functional. Various types of nonlinearities involving scalar-isoscalar ($\\sigma$), vector-isoscalar ($\\omega$), and vector-isovector ($\\rho$) fields are studied. After calibrating the model parameters at equilibrium nuclear matter density, the model and parameter dependence of the resulting equation of state is examined in the neutron-rich and high-density regime. It is possible to build different models that reproduce the same observed properties at normal nuclear densities, but which yield maximum neutron star masses that differ by more than one solar mass. Implications for the existence of kaon condensates or quark cores in neutron stars are discussed.

  11. After the Conservation Reserve Program: Economic Decisions with Wildlife in Mind 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cearley, Kenneth A.; Amosson, Stephen H.; Warminski , Patrick; Jones, DeDe

    2009-04-07

    and includes drilling, casing, capping, gravel, packing, and slush pit digging. Windmill expenses include mill, tower, sucker rod, pipe removal and replacement, and cylinder pump. Storage facilities are not included in the estimate. In some areas 4 gallons... with conventional agricultural operations. Using partial budget analysis for planning will help de- termine if a landowner?s return on investment is greater than the proposed expenditures. Implementing a sound wildlife management plan that fits landowner...

  12. Resistance to Antibiotics of Clinical Relevance in the Fecal Microbiota of Mexican Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristóbal-Azkarate, Jurgi; Dunn, Jacob C.; Day, Jennifer M. W.; Amábile-Cuevas, Carlos F.

    2014-09-18

    further confirmed this by aligning the sequences with in-house control sequences using the MEGA5 software [34]. For further corroboration of felid species identification, we used a second molecular marker, a species- specific fragment polymorphism of a... role in determining ATBR in wildlife, as some species come in to more frequent contact with humans, human landscapes, or domestic animals than others [19–21]. However, very few studies have traced resistance genes found in antibiotic-free environments...

  13. Analysis of Oil and Gas Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2004-01-01

    This study analyzed the impact on future oil imports and expenditures of opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) to petroleum development. High, low, and mean ANWR oil resource case projections were compared to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 reference case. The study also examined whether potential synergies exist in opening ANWR to petroleum development and the construction of an Alaska gas pipeline from the North Slope to the lower 48 states.

  14. Growth Kinetics of Wildlife E. coli Isolates in Soil and Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallagher, Meghan

    2012-07-16

    water microcosm were spread plated onto MacConkey agar (Difco?) plate at different sampling times. The E. coli concentrations (CFU/mL) were recorded at each sampling time. The kinetic characteristics of E. coli strains in water at different... KINETICS OF WILDLIFE E. COLI ISOLATES IN SOIL AND WATER A Thesis by MEGHAN ANNE GALLAGHER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  15. Density Model Corrections Derived from Orbit Data to Characterize Upper Atmospheric Density Variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lechtenberg, Travis Francis

    2015-05-31

    ODTK Orbit Determination Tool Kit POE Precision Orbit Ephemerides PSO Precision Science Orbit RMS Root-Mean-Squared Value RSO Rapid Science Orbit SBUV Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet SEE Solar Extreme-ultraviolet Experiment SEM Solar Extreme...

  16. Fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-15

    The fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation surveys were completed October 3-7, 1994, at Norton Air Force Base (AFB), California. Two biologists from CDM Federal Programs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regional biologist and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) lead biologist conducted the surveys. A habitat assessment of three Installation Restoration Project (IRP) sites at Norton Air Force Base was also completed during the fall survey period. The IRP sites include: Landfill No. 2 (Site 2); the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP) area; and Former Fire Training Area No. 1 (Site 5). The assessments were designed to qualitatively characterize the sites of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and provide information for Remedial Design/Remedial Action activities. A Reference Area (Santa Ana River Wash) and the base urban areas were also characterized. The reference area assessment was performed to provide a baseline for comparison with the IRP site habitats. The fall 1994 survey is the second of up to four surveys that may be completed. In order to develop a complete understanding of all plant and animal species using the base, these surveys were planned to be conducted over four seasons. Species composition can vary widely during the course of a year in Southern California, and therefore, seasonal surveys will provide the most complete and reliable data to address changes in habitat structure and wildlife use of the site. Subsequent surveys will focus on seasonal wildlife observations and a spring vegetation survey.

  17. Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzner, R.E.; Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

  18. Management of wildlife causing damage at Argonne National Laboratory-East, DuPage County, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The DOE, after an independent review, has adopted an Environmental Assessment (EA) prepared by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) which evaluates use of an Integrated Wildlife Damage Management approach at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) in DuPage County, Illinois (April 1995). In 1994, the USDA issued a programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that covers nationwide animal damage control activities. The EA for Management of Wildlife Causing Damage at ANL-E tiers off this programmatic EIS. The USDA wrote the EA as a result of DOE`s request to USDA to prepare and implement a comprehensive Wildlife Management Damage Plan; the USDA has authority for animal damage control under the Animal Damage Control Act of 1931, as amended, and the Rural Development, Agriculture and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 1988. DOE has determined, based on the analysis in the EA, that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an EIS is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  19. Analytic Approach to the Cloud-in-cloud Problem for Non-Gaussian Density Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiki Taro Inoue; Masahiro Nagashima

    2002-03-28

    We revisit the cloud-in-cloud problem for non-Gaussian density fluctuations. We show that the extended Press-Schechter (EPS) formalism for non-Gaussian fluctuations has a flaw in describing mass functions regardless of type of filtering. As an example, we consider non-Gaussian models in which density fluctuations at a point obeys a \\chi^2 distribution with \

  20. Considering Air Density in Wind Power Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zénó Farkas

    2011-03-11

    In the wind power production calculations the air density is usually considered as constant in time. Using the CIPM-2007 equation for the density of moist air as a function of air temperature, air pressure and relative humidity, we show that it is worth taking the variation of the air density into account, because higher accuracy can be obtained in the calculation of the power production for little effort.

  1. Method of synthesizing a low density material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lorensen, L.E.; Monaco, S.B.

    1987-02-27

    A novel method of synthesizing a polymeric material of low density of the order of 50mg/cc or less. Such a low density material has applications in many areas including laser target fabrication. The method comprises preparing a polymer blend of two incompatible polymers as a major and a minor phase by mixing them and extruding the mixture, and then selectively extracting the major component, to yield a fine, low density structure.

  2. Considering Air Density in Wind Power Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farkas, Zénó

    2011-01-01

    In the wind power production calculations the air density is usually considered as constant in time. Using the CIPM-2007 equation for the density of moist air as a function of air temperature, air pressure and relative humidity, we show that it is worth taking the variation of the air density into account, because higher accuracy can be obtained in the calculation of the power production for little effort.

  3. 3-D capacitance density imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fasching, G.E.

    1988-03-18

    A three-dimensional capacitance density imaging of a gasified bed or the like in a containment vessel is achieved using a plurality of electrodes provided circumferentially about the bed in levels and along the bed in channels. The electrodes are individually and selectively excited electrically at each level to produce a plurality of current flux field patterns generated in the bed at each level. The current flux field patterns are suitably sensed and a density pattern of the bed at each level determined. By combining the determined density patterns at each level, a three-dimensional density image of the bed is achieved. 7 figs.

  4. Mini-review of Electron Density Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adler, Joan; Adler, Omri; Kreif, Meytal; Cohen, Or; Grosso, Bastien; Hashibon, Adham; Cooper, Valentino R

    2015-01-01

    We describe both educational and research oriented examples of electronic density visualization with AViz. Several detailed cases are presented and the procedures for their preparation are described.

  5. Chiral dynamics and peripheral transverse densities Granados...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    dynamics and peripheral transverse densities Granados, Carlos G. Uppsala University (Sweden); Weiss, Christian JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States) 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY...

  6. Uncertainty Quantification for Nuclear Density Functional Theory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Uncertainty Quantification for Nuclear Density Functional Theory and Information Content of New Measurements Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Uncertainty Quantification...

  7. Uncertainty Quantification for Nuclear Density Functional Theory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Uncertainty Quantification for Nuclear Density Functional Theory and Information Content of New Measurements Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly...

  8. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertulani, Carlos A.

    2014-09-10

    This grant had two components: Density functional theory and pairing and Nuclear reactions. This final report summarizes the activities for this SciDAC-2 project.

  9. Density waves in the shearing sheet I. Swing amplification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Fuchs

    2001-03-02

    The shearing sheet model of a galactic disk is studied anew. The theoretical description of its dynamics is based on three building blocks: Stellar orbits, which are described here in epicyclic approximation, the collisionless Boltzmann equation determining the distribution function of stars in phase space, and the Poisson equation in order to take account of the self-gravity of the disk. Using these tools I develop a new formalism to describe perturbations of the shearing sheet. Applying this to the unbounded shearing sheet model I demonstrate again how the disturbances of the disk evolve always into `swing amplified' density waves, i.e. spiral-arm like, shearing density enhancements, which grow and decay while the wave crests swing by from leading to trailing orientation. Several examples are given how such `swing amplification' events are incited in the shearing sheet.

  10. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Joe A.; Furnstahl, Dick; Horoi, Mihai; Lust, Rusty; Nazaewicc, Witek; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James

    2012-12-30

    During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold: ? First, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties; ? Second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data; ? Third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory.

  11. Transverse charge and magnetization densities in holographic QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarti, Dipankar

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of flavor structures of nucleons transverse charge and anomalous magnetization densities for both unpolarized and transversely polarized nucleons. We consider two different models for the electromagnetic form factors in holographic QCD. The flavor form factors are obtained by decomposing the Dirac and Pauli form factors for nucleons using the charge and isospin symmetry. The results are compared with two standard phenomenological parametrizations.

  12. Aerodynamic focusing of high-density aerosols D.E. Ruiz a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be modeled by a simple drag force within a prescribed background flowing gas. The particle-to-gas feedback to study the properties of high-density aerosol focusing for 1 m silica spheres. Preliminary results

  13. Empirical vertical structure of density anomaly in the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Current, Carole Louise

    1993-01-01

    Climatological vertical structure of density anomaly in the Gulf of Mexico is realistically characterized in a form useful for calibration and/or verification of numerical circulation models, employing a new method that ...

  14. DERIVATION AND OBSERVABILITY OF UPPER ATMOSPHERIC DENSITY VARIATIONS UTILIZING PRECISION ORBIT EPHEMERIDES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lechtenberg, Travis Francis

    2010-04-28

    Several models of atmospheric density exist in today's world, yet most possess significant errors when compared to data determined from actual satellite measurements. This research utilizes precision orbit ephemerides (POE) in an optimal orbit...

  15. The expansion of a collisionless plasma into a plasma of lower density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perego, M.; Gunzburger, M. D.; Howell, P. D.; Ockendon, J. R.; Allen, J. E.

    2013-05-15

    This paper considers the asymptotic and numerical solution of a simple model for the expansion of a collisionless plasma into a plasma of lower density. The dependence on the density ratio of qualitative and quantitative features of solutions of the well-known cold-ion model is explored. In the cold-ion limit, we find that a singularity develops in the ion density in finite time unless the density ratio is zero or close to unity. The classical cold-ion model may cease to be valid when such a singularity occurs and we then regularize the model by the finite ion-temperature Vlasov-Poisson system. Numerical evidence suggests the emergence of a multi-modal velocity distribution.

  16. Quantification of trap densities at dielectric/III–V semiconductor interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stemmer, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    III–V semiconductor interfaces Roman Engel-Herbert, a?model is used to determine interface trap densities ?D it ?2 / In 0.53 Ga 0.47 As interfaces with different D it and

  17. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    sea census techniques in connection with environmental impact assessments for offshore wind farms in the U.K.: A comparison of ship and aerial sampling methods for marine birds,...

  18. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cetaceans, seals, sea turtles, ocean sunfish and basking sharks. Other sharks and fish are recorded opportunistically. Data collection methods: Line-transect methods that...

  19. Modeling wildlife and other trade-offs with biofuel crop production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoms, DM; Davis, FW; Jenner, MW; Nogeire, TM; Kaffka, SR

    2012-01-01

    S, Dale BE (2005) Life cycle assessment of various croppingal. (2010) used life cycle assessment to derive greenhouseResearchers in life cycle assessment (LCA) have endeavored

  20. Participatory modeling of endangered wildlife systems: Simulating the sage-grouse and land use in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    use in Central Washington Allyson Beall, Len Zeoli School of Earth and Environmental Sciences because they depend on sagebrush for food, shelter and nesting. The sagebrush areas of Douglas County