Sample records for modeling software global

  1. Comparing Local and Global Software Effort Estimation Models Reflections on a Systematic Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    protocols. Keywords: D.2.9.b Cost estimation, project effort prediction, systematic review, empirical of practice in the form of benchmarking, assessment of current activities, estimation of future tasksComparing Local and Global Software Effort Estimation Models ­ Reflections on a Systematic Review

  2. Global expansion strategies for software firms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoden, Michihiko

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The business competition in the software industry is increasingly becoming a global competition. In this era with a fast-paced innovative environment, strategy plays an important role for managers in software companies in ...

  3. Managing Software Development for Global Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    too much refrigeration. #12;Cold chain description · Storage of vaccines from national level to pointManaging Software Development for Global Health Richard Anderson #12;Outline · PATH · The Cold and was in serious trouble · Applying software industry best practices is leading to a positive outcome 3/10/2010 CSE

  4. SOFTWARE EVOLUTION AND THE STAGED MODEL OF THE SOFTWARE LIFECYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 SOFTWARE EVOLUTION AND THE STAGED MODEL OF THE SOFTWARE LIFECYCLE K. H. Bennett Research............................................................................................................11 1.5 Iterative software development ...............................................................................................................19 1.10 The stages of the software lifecycle

  5. Software Quality Model Requirements for Software Quality Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suryn, Witold

    Quality Engineering needs a quality model that is usable throughout the software lifecycle, systematic, disciplined, quantifiable approach to the development and maintenance of quality of softwareSoftware Quality Model Requirements for Software Quality Engineering Marc-Alexis Côté M. Ing (marc

  6. From Local to Global Coordination: Lessons from Software Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grinter, Rebecca Elizabeth

    From Local to Global Coordination: Lessons from Software Reuse Rebecca E. Grinter Xerox PARC 3333 Coyote Hill Road Palo Alto, CA 94304 USA grinter@parc.xerox.com http://www.parc by making it possible to share code. However, software reuse in practice has proved much harder. This paper

  7. Software Modeling and Verification Professors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahám, Erika

    Software Modeling and Verification Staff · Professors Prof. Dr. Ir. Joost-Pieter Katoen Prof. em) Mark Timmer (Uni Twente, NL) Dr. Olga Tveretina (Karlsruhe University, D) Ralf Wimmer (Universität

  8. Managing Software Development for Global Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    refrigeration. Cold chain description · Storage of vaccines from national level to point of delivery · Manage · The Cold Chain · National Vaccine Forecasting · CCEM 1.0: In house development · CCEM 2.1: Out sourcing and was in serious trouble · Applying software industry best practices is leading to a positive outcome 3

  9. Optimization Online - Optimization Software and Modeling Systems ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Software and Modeling Systems Submissions - 2009. March 2009. Modeling Languages and Systems A Structure-Conveying Modelling Language ...

  10. Global Software Development at Siemens: Experience from Nine Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbsleb, James D.

    Global Software Development at Siemens: Experience from Nine Projects James D. Herbsleb Carnegie@cs.cmu.edu Daniel J. Paulish, Matthew Bass Siemens Corporate Research 755 College Road East Princeton, NJ, USA 08540 +1 609 734 6500 daniel.paulish,Matthew.Bass@siemens.com ABSTRACT We report on the experiences

  11. Global ice sheet modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Institute for Quaternary Studies

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

  12. Cost Model and Cost Estimating Software

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter discusses a formalized methodology is basically a cost model, which forms the basis for estimating software.

  13. Software reliability models for critical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pham, H.; Pham, M.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the first phase of the ongoing EG G Idaho, Inc. Software Reliability Research Program. The program is studying the existing software reliability models and proposes a state-of-the-art software reliability model that is relevant to the nuclear reactor control environment. This report consists of three parts: (1) summaries of the literature review of existing software reliability and fault tolerant software reliability models and their related issues, (2) proposed technique for software reliability enhancement, and (3) general discussion and future research. The development of this proposed state-of-the-art software reliability model will be performed in the second place. 407 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Software reliability models for critical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pham, H.; Pham, M.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the first phase of the ongoing EG&G Idaho, Inc. Software Reliability Research Program. The program is studying the existing software reliability models and proposes a state-of-the-art software reliability model that is relevant to the nuclear reactor control environment. This report consists of three parts: (1) summaries of the literature review of existing software reliability and fault tolerant software reliability models and their related issues, (2) proposed technique for software reliability enhancement, and (3) general discussion and future research. The development of this proposed state-of-the-art software reliability model will be performed in the second place. 407 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Selected Papers from FOSS4G 2013: OSGeo's Global Conference for Open Source Geospatial Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köbben, Barend

    Selected Papers from FOSS4G 2013: OSGeo's Global Conference for Open Source Geospatial Software 1 Introduction Over the past decades, geospatial information technology has reached a significant level the submissions to the Academic Track of FOSS4G 2013, the global conference for Open Source Geospatial Software

  16. Radiobiological modelling with MarCell software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasan, J.S.; Jones, T.D.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jones introduced a bone marrow radiation cell kinetics model with great potential for application in the fields of health physics, radiation research, and medicine. However, until recently, only the model developers have been able to apply it because of the complex array of biological and physical assignments needed for evaluation of a particular radiation exposure protocol. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the use of MarCell (MARrow CELL Kinetics) software for MS-DOS, a user-friendly computer implementation of that mathematical model that allows almost anyone with an elementary knowledge of radiation physics and/or medical procedures to apply the model. A hands-on demonstration of the software will be given by guiding the user through evaluation of a medical total body irradiation protocol and a nuclear fallout scenario. A brief overview of the software is given in the Appendix.

  17. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan Requirements Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan Requirements...

  18. Model Checking for Software Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Fourier Grenoble-I, Université

    -Dulay-Eisenbach-Kramer-95] ­ -calculus + FSP ­ LTSA (LTL properties) #12;6EWSA 2004 (May 21-22, St Andrews, Scotland) Model

  19. The China-in-Global Energy Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, T.

    The China-in-Global Energy Model (C-GEM) is a global Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model that captures the interaction of production, consumption and trade among multiple global regions and sectors – including five ...

  20. Parallel Seismic Ray Tracing in a Global Earth Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genaud, Stéphane

    1 Parallel Seismic Ray Tracing in a Global Earth Model Marc Grunberg * , Stéphane Genaud of the Earth interior, and seismic tomogra- phy is a means to improve knowledge in this #28;eld. In order present in this paper the de- sign of a software program implement- ing a fast seismic ray

  1. Inside a secret software lab: an ethnographic study of a global software package producer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimm, Christine Franziska

    2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an ethnographic study of the creation of a particular type of standard enterprise software package: Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems, which support wide-ranging organisational functions within large ...

  2. On Model Based Synthesis of Embedded Control Software Vadim Alimguzhin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tronci, Enrico

    Model Based Design approaches for control software. Given the formal model of a plant as a Discrete Time addresses model based synthesis of control software by trading system level non-functional requirementsOn Model Based Synthesis of Embedded Control Software Vadim Alimguzhin Federico Mari Igor Melatti

  3. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team) : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Anthropogenic climate change studies: scenario experiments (96) : : : : : : : : : 7 2 following its creation, the ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' team had to make its proofs in order

  4. Functional Testing Protocols for Commercial Building Efficiency Baseline Modeling Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jump, David; Price, Phillip N.; Granderson, Jessica; Sohn, Michael

    2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes procedures for testing and validating proprietary baseline energy modeling software accuracy in predicting energy use over the period of interest, such as a month or a year. The procedures are designed according to the methodology used for public domain baselining software in another LBNL report that was (like the present report) prepared for Pacific Gas and Electric Company: ?Commercial Building Energy Baseline Modeling Software: Performance Metrics and Method Testing with Open Source Models and Implications for Proprietary Software Testing Protocols? (referred to here as the ?Model Analysis Report?). The test procedure focuses on the quality of the software?s predictions rather than on the specific algorithms used to predict energy use. In this way the software vendor is not required to divulge or share proprietary information about how their software works, while enabling stakeholders to assess its performance.

  5. Sandia Energy - Global Climate Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-Voltage SiliconEnergyFailureGlobal Climate Models Home

  6. Examination of Contemporary Electromagnetic Software Capable of Modeling Problems of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakovlev, Vadim

    Heating Vadim V. Yakovlev Department of Mathematical Sciences, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester the database of the modern electromagnetic (EM) software suitable for the modeling of microwave heating. Software Database The database of the EM software available in the market and applicable to the majority

  7. An Empirical Study of Global Software Development: Distance and Speed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grinter, Rebecca Elizabeth

    Mockus Thomas A. Finholt Rebecca E. Grinter Bell Labs School of Information Xerox PARC Lucent +1 734 764 6131 +1 650 812 4818 {jherbsleb, audris}@lucent.com finholt@umich.edu grinter@parc survey data and data from the source code change management system to model the extent of delay

  8. Cost Model and Cost Estimating Software - DOE Directives, Delegations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is basically a cost model, which forms the basis for estimating software. g4301-1chp22.pdf -- PDF Document, 190 KB Writer: John Makepeace Subjects: Administration...

  9. Model-based Quality Assurance of Automotive Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurjens, Jan

    CASE tool by ETAS · Used in automotive industry · Event-driven operational model #12;Jan Jürjens et alModel-based Quality Assurance of Automotive Software Jan Jürjens1 , Daniel Reiss2 , David (Germany) #12;Jan Jürjens et al.: Model-based Quality Assurance of Automotive Software 2 The Problem (Meta

  10. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change of the tropical climate : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Short­term variability studies : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 8 2.3 Climate drift sensitivity studies

  11. Seamlessly Integrating Software & Hardware Modelling for Large-Scale Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yuxiao

    Engineering, with the math- ematical modelling approach, Modelica, to address the software/hardware integration problem. The environment and hardware components are modelled in Modelica and integrated software-hardware codesign, large-scale sys- tems, Behavior Engineering, Modelica. 1. Introduction

  12. Green Software Services: From Requirements to Business Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dustdar, Schahram

    Green Software Services: From Requirements to Business Models Schahram Dustdar, Fei Li, Hong years, green software research is gaining momentum because of the acute need for sustainable develop- ment. Most past research has been focused on the definitions, metrics and technical solutions for green

  13. Model-Based Quality Assurance of Automotive Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurjens, Jan

    Model-Based Quality Assurance of Automotive Software Jan Jürjens1 , Daniel Reiß2 , and David, Germany Abstract. Software in embedded (e.g. automotive) systems requires a high level of reliability to the automotive sector, characterized by strict safety requirements to com- ponents of a motor vehicle (see [5, 16

  14. Model Checking for Software Architectures Radu Mateescu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Fourier Grenoble-I, Université

    ] are essential engineering artifacts used in the de- sign process of complex software systems. They specify alge- bras, the most prominent ones being Wright [2] and Darwin [17]. Wright is based upon Csp, thus (configuration and coordination) and Fsp (a dialect of Csp) to describe the behaviour of individual components

  15. Software Platform Evaluation - Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. J. Jacobson; D. E. Shropshire; W. B. West

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Software Platform Evaluation (SPE) is to document the top-level evaluation of potential software platforms on which to construct a simulation model that satisfies the requirements for a Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION) of the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC). See the Software Requirements Specification for Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) Model (INEEL/EXT-05-02643, Rev. 0) for a discussion of the objective and scope of the VISION model. VISION is intended to serve as a broad systems analysis and study tool applicable to work conducted as part of the AFCI (including costs estimates) and Generation IV reactor development studies. This document will serve as a guide for selecting the most appropriate software platform for VISION. This is a “living document” that will be modified over the course of the execution of this work.

  16. Short Communication CORAL: QSPR model of water solubility based on local and global SMILES attributes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gini, Giuseppina

    Short Communication CORAL: QSPR model of water solubility based on local and global SMILES 17910, Jackson, MS 39217, USA h i g h l i g h t s " The CORAL software for the building up of QSPR/QSAR models is suggested. " The SMILES is used as the representation of the molecular structure. " The CORAL

  17. Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models Berkeley Lab Researcher Says Climate Science is Entering New...

  18. Murphy Tools: Utilizing Extracted GUI Models for Industrial Software Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Memon, Atif M.

    --graphical user interface; GUI test automation; model extraction; reverse engineering; industrial test environment is a technique for using models as a basis for automated test generation. The industrial adoption of MBTMurphy Tools: Utilizing Extracted GUI Models for Industrial Software Testing Pekka Aho VTT

  19. Software Requirements Specification Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. E. Shropshire; W. H. West

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Software Requirements Specification (SRS) is to define the top-level requirements for a Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION) of the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC). This simulation model is intended to serve a broad systems analysis and study tool applicable to work conducted as part of the AFCI (including costs estimates) and Generation IV reactor development studies.

  20. A Simulation Model for the Waterfall Software Development Life Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bassil, Youssef

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Software development life cycle or SDLC for short is a methodology for designing, building, and maintaining information and industrial systems. So far, there exist many SDLC models, one of which is the Waterfall model which comprises five phases to be completed sequentially in order to develop a software solution. However, SDLC of software systems has always encountered problems and limitations that resulted in significant budget overruns, late or suspended deliveries, and dissatisfied clients. The major reason for these deficiencies is that project directors are not wisely assigning the required number of workers and resources on the various activities of the SDLC. Consequently, some SDLC phases with insufficient resources may be delayed; while, others with excess resources may be idled, leading to a bottleneck between the arrival and delivery of projects and to a failure in delivering an operational product on time and within budget. This paper proposes a simulation model for the Waterfall development proce...

  1. Computer modeling of the global warming effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, W.M. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The state of knowledge of global warming will be presented and two aspects examined: observational evidence and a review of the state of computer modeling of climate change due to anthropogenic increases in greenhouse gases. Observational evidence, indeed, shows global warming, but it is difficult to prove that the changes are unequivocally due to the greenhouse-gas effect. Although observational measurements of global warming are subject to ``correction,`` researchers are showing consistent patterns in their interpretation of the data. Since the 1960s, climate scientists have been making their computer models of the climate system more realistic. Models started as atmospheric models and, through the addition of oceans, surface hydrology, and sea-ice components, they then became climate-system models. Because of computer limitations and the limited understanding of the degree of interaction of the various components, present models require substantial simplification. Nevertheless, in their present state of development climate models can reproduce most of the observed large-scale features of the real system, such as wind, temperature, precipitation, ocean current, and sea-ice distribution. The use of supercomputers to advance the spatial resolution and realism of earth-system models will also be discussed.

  2. Software Quality Modeling Experiences at an Oil Company Constanza Lampasona &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basili, Victor R.

    Software Quality Modeling Experiences at an Oil Company Constanza Lampasona & Jens Heidrich by Ecopetrol, a Colombian oil and gas company. The general approach taken is illustrated and excerpts from is to become one of the 30 most important companies in the oil and gas domain by 2020. IT plays an important

  3. Page 1 September 2014EMC'2014 Software Model Checking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Edmund M.

    Page 1 September 2014EMC'2014 Dynamic Software Model Checking Patrice Godefroid Microsoft Research #12;Page 2 September 2014EMC'2014 Ed Clarke: A man, An idea... · LASER'2011 summer school (Elba island, Italy) #12;Page 3 September 2014EMC'2014 Ed Clarke: A man, An idea... · LASER'2011 summer school (Elba

  4. 0 + 0 = 1 : the appliance model of selling software bundled with hardware

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hein, Bettina

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The business model of selling software bundled with hardware is called the appliance model. As hardware becomes less and less expensive and open source software is being offered for free, the traditional business model of ...

  5. Model-driven Automated Software FMEA Neal Snooke, PhD, Aberystwyth University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snooke, Neal

    Model-driven Automated Software FMEA Neal Snooke, PhD, Aberystwyth University Chris Price PhD, Aberystwyth University Key Words: Failure modes and effects analysis; software FMEA; model-driven software development SUMMARY & CONCLUSIONS This paper describes how software FMEA can be automated both for low

  6. Landau gauge condensates from global color model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao Zhang; Wei-qin Zhao

    2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the dimension-2 gluon pair condensate $g^2$ and the dimension-4 mixed quark-gluon condensate $$ in Landau gauge within the framework of global color model. The result for the dynamical gluon mass is within the range given by other independent determinations. The obtained mixed Landau gauge condensate $$ is clearly dependent on the definitions of the condensates. We show that the consistent result may be obtained when the same definitions are used.

  7. Software

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    improving the KIVA internal combustion engine modeling tool to help automotive engines be more fuel efficient. A free version of KIVA can be downloaded through FCI's...

  8. Chapter 3: Software Architecture Modelling: Bridging Two Worlds Using Ergonomics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nigay, Laurence

    Chapter 3: Software Architecture Modelling: Bridging Two Worlds Using Ergonomics and Software, · for verifying ergonomic and software properties, · for modifying and maintaining them in a productive way present a PAC-Amodeus software design solution of a WWW browser and its assessment in terms of ergonomic

  9. Parameterization of Urban Characteristics for Global Climate Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Trisha L.

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    of varying scales and effects of climate change on urban populations, urbanization must be included in global climate models (GCMs). To properly capture the spatial variability in urban areas, GCMs require global databases of urban extent and characteristics...

  10. Case-Based Reasoning vs Parametric Models for Software Quality Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menzies, Tim

    staff hours), and time (elapsed calendar months). In the first way, we construct a parametric model from historical cases. Aim: To assess case-based reasoning vs parametric modeling for quality Descriptors D.2.9 [Software Engineering]: Management--Software quality assurance; D.2.9 [Software Engineering

  11. R i l P tf li M d lRegional Portfolio Model Software Redevelopment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R i l P tf li M d lRegional Portfolio Model Software Redevelopment Request for Proposals #12;II. Services Desired by the CouncilII. Services Desired by the Council Software redevelopment of the Council's Regional Software redevelopment of the Council s Regional Portfolio Model (RPM) Redeveloped

  12. Research Article Automating Risk Analysis of Software Design Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Barton P.

    is the introduction of security activities in the software development lifecycle. This paper describes an approach being introduced into the software development lifecycle to reduce the number of software defects amount of security threats. One of the responses from software developers to these threats

  13. TriBITS lifecycle model. Version 1.0, a lean/agile software lifecycle model for research-based computational science and engineering and applied mathematical software.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willenbring, James M.; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Heroux, Michael Allen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Software lifecycles are becoming an increasingly important issue for computational science and engineering (CSE) software. The process by which a piece of CSE software begins life as a set of research requirements and then matures into a trusted high-quality capability is both commonplace and extremely challenging. Although an implicit lifecycle is obviously being used in any effort, the challenges of this process - respecting the competing needs of research vs. production - cannot be overstated. Here we describe a proposal for a well-defined software lifecycle process based on modern Lean/Agile software engineering principles. What we propose is appropriate for many CSE software projects that are initially heavily focused on research but also are expected to eventually produce usable high-quality capabilities. The model is related to TriBITS, a build, integration and testing system, which serves as a strong foundation for this lifecycle model, and aspects of this lifecycle model are ingrained in the TriBITS system. Here, we advocate three to four phases or maturity levels that address the appropriate handling of many issues associated with the transition from research to production software. The goals of this lifecycle model are to better communicate maturity levels with customers and to help to identify and promote Software Engineering (SE) practices that will help to improve productivity and produce better software. An important collection of software in this domain is Trilinos, which is used as the motivation and the initial target for this lifecycle model. However, many other related and similar CSE (and non-CSE) software projects can also make good use of this lifecycle model, especially those that use the TriBITS system. Indeed this lifecycle process, if followed, will enable large-scale sustainable integration of many complex CSE software efforts across several institutions.

  14. Global analysis of the intranuclear cascade model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, E.; Fraenkel, Z.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of the predictions of the intranuclear cascade model of Yariv-Fraenkel is made by means of global variables (flow angle and transverse momentum distributions). Signatures for the flow effect in the reaction are studied and the distributions of the shape of the events are determined, using the sphericity and coplanarity as shape parameters. The dependence of the results on two parameters of the model is investigated: the rearrangement of the particles in the Fermi sea after each particle-particle collision and the nuclear potential. The influence of the evaporation particles on the flow angle is checked. A comparison with the experimental results of the plastic ball/plastic wall group is made, using a simulation filter in order to take the experimental acceptance of the detector into account. The dependence of the flow angle on the mass of the colliding ions and on the bombarding energy is also studied. We find that the model predicts finite flow angles of the emitted particles. Slow rearrangement and a central potential cause larger flow angles. However, in all cases we find that the most probable calculated flow angle is smaller than the experimental one.

  15. Using Economics as Basis for Modelling and Evaluating Software Quality Stefan Wagner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using Economics as Basis for Modelling and Evaluating Software Quality Stefan Wagner Institut f@in.tum.de Abstract The economics and cost of software quality have been discussed in software engineering for decades, economics should be the basis of any quality analysis. However, this implies several issues that have

  16. Performance Model for the Pool Size Behavior in Apache HTTP Server Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Tien Van

    1 Performance Model for the Pool Size Behavior in Apache HTTP Server Software Tien Van Do, Ram Chakka, Thang Le Nhat, Udo Krieger Abstract The operation of the Web server's software architecture a way for a Web server software to organize (process or threading based) itself into more simultaneously

  17. On the Interaction between Business Models and Software Architecture in Electronic Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Hans

    1 On the Interaction between Business Models and Software Architecture in Electronic Commerce Jaap a business model for electronic commerce it is necessary to develop an architecture of the software system that will support this model. Such an architecture shows at an early stage to what extent the business model can

  18. Distributed lyapunov functions in analysis of graph models of software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roozbehani, Mardavij

    In previous works, the authors introduced a framework for software analysis, which is based on optimization of Lyapunov invariants. These invariants prove critical software properties such as absence of overflow and ...

  19. Survey of Companies in Machine Health Monitoring and Maintenance Company Capability Software Application Modeling Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Samuel H.

    software · Paper · Food · Steel · Petrochemical industries NO MODELING AssetPoint www.tabware.com · Data acquisition and open systems storage · Enterprise Asset Management Tabware (CMMS application) · Petrochemical

  20. Software Architecture for Object-Oriented Simulation Modeling and Simulation Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the realm of (i) model building & simulation execution in conjunction with (ii) software architectureSoftware Architecture for Object-Oriented Simulation Modeling and Simulation Environments: Case been a steady migration towards object-oriented modeling and simulation environments. There exist many

  1. Integrated decision support model for global sourcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mroczkowski, Victor A. (Victor Adam)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last decade, the U.S. aircraft industry has experienced increasing levels of international integration as companies seek to access global talent and resources, cut production costs, spread financial risk, and ...

  2. Global manufacturing model and case studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kijtawesataporn, Komsun

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Second, an operational layer discusses, the general idea of what policy a company needs to develop and how a company globally manages its operations and supply chain, resources, and markets. The third layer, societal, shows the importance and the impacts...

  3. Accuracy of Contemporary Parametric Software Estimation Models: A Comparative Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomkins, Andrew

    with delays and being costly and error- prone. Inaccurate estimation of project resources is considered as one the costs, schedule and the resources for IT projects. Software estimation is the process of predicting the effort, duration and cost required to develop a software system [2]. Estimators often rely on one or more

  4. Addressing Domain Evolution Challenges in Model-Driven Software Product-line Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Douglas C.

    Software Engineering Department Siemens Corporate Research Princeton, NJ 08540, USA lenz.gunther@siemens study that shows how a layered architecture and model-to-model transformation tool support can re- duce Transformation 1. Introduction Software product-line architectures (PLAs) [20] are a promising technology

  5. Large Scale Simulation of Tor: Modelling a Global Passive Adversary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blott, Stephen

    . Implementing global passive adversary attacks on currently deployed low latency anonymous networks designs have been developed which attempt to apply mixes to low latency traffic. The most widelyLarge Scale Simulation of Tor: Modelling a Global Passive Adversary Gavin O' Gorman and Stephen

  6. MODELING THE GLOBAL PEAKS AND COOLING SY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . In this study, the morphological analysis depicted to clarify different district areas from G.I.S. data heat island and global warming effects building simulation is outlined. INTRODUCTION Urban structures city scale and local scale. The main influence microclimate is the heat island caused by trapping

  7. GLOBAL COMPREHENSIVE MODELS IN POLITICS AND POLICYMAKING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    . In this editorial, I reflect on the role of comprehensive models, such as IAMs and earth system models (ESMs

  8. A simplified software architecture for self-updating Building Information Models (BIM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Pierre (Pierre Henri)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Information Modeling (BIM) is an emerging software technology that is revolutionizing the architecture, engineering, and construction (A/E/C) industry. BIM technology employs "object-based 3D models-containing the ...

  9. RICCI Sophie Global Change and Climate Modeling Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RICCI Sophie Global Change and Climate Modeling Team CERFACS - Toulouse, FRANCE Technical Report TR covariance matrix#17;. This hypothesis stems from the T S water mass properties conservation over long term

  10. Global Electricity Technology Substitution Model with Induced Technological Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    of E3MG. As opposed to traditional energy models based on cost optimisation procedures, it focuses, and it is difficult to model the energy sector without including its interactions with global economic activity. E3MGGlobal Electricity Technology Substitution Model with Induced Technological Change Jean

  11. A SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE FOR DEVELOPMENTAL MODELING IN PLANTS: THE COMPUTABLE PLANT PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mjolsness, Eric

    dynamic objects and relationships; a C++ code generator to translate SBML into highly efficient simulationA SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE FOR DEVELOPMENTAL MODELING IN PLANTS: THE COMPUTABLE PLANT PROJECT Victoria present the software architecture of the Computable Plant Project, a multidisciplinary computationally

  12. Global Transportation Roadmap Model | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAddInformationEnergyEnergy JumpGlobal

  13. MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) Version 2: Model Description and Baseline Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolov, Andrei P.

    The MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) is designed for analyzing the global environmental changes that may result from anthropogenic causes, quantifying the uncertainties associated with the projected changes, and ...

  14. Global quantum discord and quantum phase transition in XY model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Si-Yuan Liu; Yu-Ran Zhang; Wen-Li Yang; Heng Fan

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the relationship between the behavior of global quantum correlations and quantum phase transitions in XY model. We find that the two kinds of phase transitions in the studied model can be characterized by the features of global quantum discord (GQD) and the corresponding quantum correlations. We demonstrate that the maximum of the sum of all the nearest neighbor bipartite GQDs is effective and accurate for signaling the Ising quantum phase transition, in contrast, the sudden change of GQD is very suitable for characterizing another phase transition in the XY model. This may shed lights on the study of properties of quantum correlations in different quantum phases.

  15. Global Biofuels Modeling and Land Use

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biofuels Modeling and Land Use DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Strategic Analysis & Cross-cutting Sustainability March 25 2015 Gbadebo Oladosu...

  16. NREL Software Models Performance of Wind Plants (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This NREL Highlight is being developed for the 2015 February Alliance S&T Meeting, and describes NREL's Simulator for Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) software in collaboration with Norway-based Statoil, to optimize layouts and controls of wind plants arrays.

  17. Software Dependability Evaluation Based on Markov Usage Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutjahr, Walter

    characterizes the (estimated) distribution of possible uses of a given program or software system in its) reliability. As input, pre--information on failure probabili­ ties and losses in case of failure related be improved by the construction of a distribution with a common lower bound on state transition probabilities

  18. A BAYESIAN MODEL COMMITTEE APPROACH TO FORECASTING GLOBAL SOLAR RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 A BAYESIAN MODEL COMMITTEE APPROACH TO FORECASTING GLOBAL SOLAR RADIATION in the realm of solar radiation forecasting. In this work, two forecasting models: Autoregressive Moving. The very first results show an improvement brought by this approach. 1. INTRODUCTION Solar radiation

  19. A PHYSICS-BASED SOFTWARE FRAMEWORK FOR SUN-EARTH CONNECTION MODELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stout, Quentin F.

    . The SWMF is a structured collection of software building blocks to develop components for Sun-Earth system modeling, to couple them, and to assemble them into applications. A component is created from the user

  20. Second Level Cluster Dependencies: A Comparison of Modeling Software and Missing Data Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larsen, Ross Allen Andrew

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    SECOND LEVEL CLUSTER DEPENDENCIES: A COMPARISON OF MODELING SOFTWARE AND MISSING DATA TECHNIQUES A Dissertation by ROSS ALLEN ANDREW LARSEN Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2010 Major Subject: Educational Psychology SECOND LEVEL CLUSTER DEPENDENCIES: A COMPARISON OF MODELING SOFTWARE AND MISSING DATA TECHNIQUES A Dissertation by ROSS ALLEN ANDREW LARSEN Submitted...

  1. Global manufacturing model and case studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kijtawesataporn, Komsun

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of cross-border environments such as cultures, economics and politics. As illustrations of the model, two case studies are composed. First, SmartDrill Company shows the cross-cultural and economic influences on the company plan to establish a green...

  2. Automated Environment Generation for Software Model Checking Oksana Tkachuk, Matthew B. Dwyer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasareanu, Corina

    Automated Environment Generation for Software Model Checking Oksana Tkachuk, Matthew B. Dwyer programs or about program components, an abstract model of the environment can be essential in enabling environment behavior with sound abstractions of environment implemen­ tations to form a model

  3. Global Biogeochemistry Models and Global Carbon Cycle Research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covey, C; Caldeira, K; Guilderson, T; Cameron-Smith, P; Govindasamy, B; Swanston, C; Wickett, M; Mirin, A; Bader, D

    2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The climate modeling community has long envisioned an evolution from physical climate models to ''earth system'' models that include the effects of biology and chemistry, particularly those processes related to the global carbon cycle. The widely reproduced Box 3, Figure 1 from the 2001 IPCC Scientific Assessment schematically describes that evolution. The community generally accepts the premise that understanding and predicting global and regional climate change requires the inclusion of carbon cycle processes in models to fully simulate the feedbacks between the climate system and the carbon cycle. Moreover, models will ultimately be employed to predict atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases as a function of anthropogenic and natural processes, such as industrial emissions, terrestrial carbon fixation, sequestration, land use patterns, etc. Nevertheless, the development of coupled climate-carbon models with demonstrable quantitative skill will require a significant amount of effort and time to understand and validate their behavior at both the process level and as integrated systems. It is important to consider objectively whether the currently proposed strategies to develop and validate earth system models are optimal, or even sufficient, and whether alternative strategies should be pursued. Carbon-climate models are going to be complex, with the carbon cycle strongly interacting with many other components. Off-line process validation will be insufficient. As was found in coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs, feedbacks between model components can amplify small errors and uncertainties in one process to produce large biases in the simulated climate. The persistent tropical western Pacific Ocean ''double ITCZ'' and upper troposphere ''cold pole'' problems are examples. Finding and fixing similar types of problems in coupled carbon-climate models especially will be difficult, given the lack of observations required for diagnosis and validation of biogeochemical processes.

  4. Bounded Model Checking of Multi-threaded Software using SMT solvers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordeiro, Lucas

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transition from single-core to multi-core processors has made multi-threaded software an important subject in computer aided verification. Here, we describe and evaluate an extension of the ESBMC model checker to support the verification of multi-threaded software with shared variables and locks using bounded model checking (BMC) based on Satisfiability Modulo Theories (SMT). We describe three approaches to model check multi-threaded software and our modelling of the synchronization primitives of the Pthread library. In the lazy approach, we generate all possible interleavings and call the BMC procedure on each of them individually, until we either find a bug, or have systematically explored all interleavings. In the schedule recording approach, we encode all possible interleavings into one single formula and then exploit the high speed of the SMT solvers. In the underapproximation-widening approach, we reduce the state space by abstracting the number of state variables and interleavings from the proofs o...

  5. Novel application of the CORAL software to model cytotoxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles to bacteria Escherichia coli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gini, Giuseppina

    Novel application of the CORAL software to model cytotoxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles 39217, USA h i g h l i g h t s " The CORAL software for the building up of QSPR/QSAR models is suggested. " The CORAL model for cytotoxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles is demonstrated. " The model is a mathematical

  6. Commercial Building Energy Baseline Modeling Software: Performance Metrics and Method Testing with Open Source Models and Implications for Proprietary Software Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Phillip N.; Granderson, Jessica; Sohn, Michael; Addy, Nathan; Jump, David

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overarching goal of this work is to advance the capabilities of technology evaluators in evaluating the building-level baseline modeling capabilities of Energy Management and Information System (EMIS) software. Through their customer engagement platforms and products, EMIS software products have the potential to produce whole-building energy savings through multiple strategies: building system operation improvements, equipment efficiency upgrades and replacements, and inducement of behavioral change among the occupants and operations personnel. Some offerings may also automate the quantification of whole-building energy savings, relative to a baseline period, using empirical models that relate energy consumption to key influencing parameters, such as ambient weather conditions and building operation schedule. These automated baseline models can be used to streamline the whole-building measurement and verification (M&V) process, and therefore are of critical importance in the context of multi-measure whole-building focused utility efficiency programs. This report documents the findings of a study that was conducted to begin answering critical questions regarding quantification of savings at the whole-building level, and the use of automated and commercial software tools. To evaluate the modeling capabilities of EMIS software particular to the use case of whole-building savings estimation, four research questions were addressed: 1. What is a general methodology that can be used to evaluate baseline model performance, both in terms of a) overall robustness, and b) relative to other models? 2. How can that general methodology be applied to evaluate proprietary models that are embedded in commercial EMIS tools? How might one handle practical issues associated with data security, intellectual property, appropriate testing ‘blinds’, and large data sets? 3. How can buildings be pre-screened to identify those that are the most model-predictable, and therefore those whose savings can be calculated with least error? 4. What is the state of public domain models, that is, how well do they perform, and what are the associated implications for whole-building measurement and verification (M&V)? Additional project objectives that were addressed as part of this study include: (1) clarification of the use cases and conditions for baseline modeling performance metrics, benchmarks and evaluation criteria, (2) providing guidance for determining customer suitability for baseline modeling, (3) describing the portfolio level effects of baseline model estimation errors, (4) informing PG&E’s development of EMIS technology product specifications, and (5) providing the analytical foundation for future studies about baseline modeling and saving effects of EMIS technologies. A final objective of this project was to demonstrate the application of the methodology, performance metrics, and test protocols with participating EMIS product vendors.

  7. Scalability of Control Planes for Software Defined Networks:Modeling and Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiang-Yang

    Scalability of Control Planes for Software Defined Networks:Modeling and Evaluation Jie Hu, Chuang on the modeling of the scalability of SDN control planes, and a scalability metric is also proposed which may network (SDN), designing a scalable SDN control plane becomes a critical problem. An effective approach

  8. Development of a new model to predict indoor daylighting : integration in CODYRUN software and validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Development of a new model to predict indoor daylighting : integration in CODYRUN software in the scientific literature for determining indoor daylighting values. They are classified in three categories. The originality of our paper relies on the coupling of several simplified models of indoor daylighting

  9. When security meets software engineering: A case of modelling secure information systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    When security meets software engineering: A case of modelling secure information systems Engineering: towards the Modeling of Secure Information Systems" paper presented at the 15th International. This is mainly because private information is stored in computer systems and without security, organisations (and

  10. Model Driven Configuration of Fault Tolerance Solutions for Component-Based Software System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - tural meta-model. Then, the impact of each component on the system reliability is automatically analyzedModel Driven Configuration of Fault Tolerance Solutions for Component-Based Software System Yihan Technologies (Ministry of Education) 2 School of Electronic Engineering & Computer Science, Peking University

  11. A Model of Success: The Carnegie Institute for Global Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Kirstin; Lehrer, David; Bean, Jonathan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carnegie Institute for Global Ecology Kirstin Weeks, DavidInstitute for Global Ecology, the answer is an unquali? edremarkable about the Global Ecology building is not only how

  12. Software Model Checking: The VeriSoft Approach Patrice Godefroid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajamani, Sriram K.

    of the concurrent system specified in a (essentially finite­state) modeling language. Many properties of a model purposes. 1 Examples of tools that follow the above paradigm are CAESAR [FGM + 92], COSPAN [HK90], CWB [CPS

  13. SMT-Based Bounded Model Checking for Embedded ANSI-C Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordeiro, Lucas; Marques-Silva, Joao

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Propositional bounded model checking has been applied successfully to verify embedded software but is limited by the increasing propositional formula size and the loss of structure during the translation. These limitations can be reduced by encoding word-level information in theories richer than propositional logic and using SMT solvers for the generated verification conditions. Here, we investigate the application of different SMT solvers to the verification of embedded software written in ANSI-C. We have extended the encodings from previous SMT-based bounded model checkers to provide more accurate support for finite variables, bit-vector operations, arrays, structures, unions and pointers. We have integrated the CVC3, Boolector, and Z3 solvers with the CBMC front-end and evaluated them using both standard software model checking benchmarks and typical embedded applications from telecommunications, control systems and medical devices. The experiments show that our approach can analyze larger problems and sub...

  14. MODELING WIND TURBINES IN THE GRIDLAB-D SOFTWARE ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, J.C.; Schneider, K.P.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the rapid expansion of wind power has resulted in a need to more accurately model the effects of wind penetration on the electricity infrastructure. GridLAB-D is a new simulation environment developed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by the Pacifi c Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in cooperation with academic and industrial partners. GridLAB-D was originally written and designed to help integrate end-use smart grid technologies, and it is currently being expanded to include a number of other technologies, including distributed energy resources (DER). The specifi c goal of this project is to create a preliminary wind turbine generator (WTG) model for integration into GridLAB-D. As wind power penetration increases, models are needed to accurately study the effects of increased penetration; this project is a beginning step at examining these effects within the GridLAB-D environment. Aerodynamic, mechanical and electrical power models were designed to simulate the process by which mechanical power is extracted by a wind turbine and converted into electrical energy. The process was modeled using historic atmospheric data, collected over a period of 30 years as the primary energy input. This input was then combined with preliminary models for synchronous and induction generators. Additionally, basic control methods were implemented, using either constant power factor or constant power modes. The model was then compiled into the GridLAB-D simulation environment, and the power outputs were compared against manufacturers’ data and then a variation of the IEEE 4 node test feeder was used to examine the model’s behavior. Results showed the designs were suffi cient for a prototype model and provided output power similar to the available manufacturers’ data. The prototype model is designed as a template for the creation of new modules, with turbine-specifi c parameters to be added by the user.

  15. Introduction to Software Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ? ) Concept of Operations (CONOPS) Software Requirements Requirements Engineering Processes System Models

  16. Climate Models from the Joint Global Change Research Institute

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Staff at the Joint Institute develop and use models to simulate the economic and physical impacts of global change policy options. The GCAM, for example, gives analysts insight into how regional and national economies might respond to climate change mitigation policies including carbon taxes, carbon trading, and accelerated deployment of energy technology. Three available models are Phoenix, GCAM, and EPIC. Phoenix is a global, dynamic recursive, computable general equilibrium model that is solved in five-year time steps from 2005 through 2100 and divides the world into twenty-four regions. Each region includes twenty-six industrial sectors. Particular attention is paid to energy production in Phoenix. There are nine electricity-generating technologies (coal, natural gas, oil, biomass, nuclear, hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal) and four additional energy commodities: crude oil, refined oil products, coal, and natural gas. Phoenix is designed to answer economic questions related to international climate and energy policy and international trade. Phoenix replaces the Second Generation Model (SGM) that was formerly used for general equilibrium analysis at JGCRI. GCAM is the Global Change Assessment Model, a partial equilibrium model of the world with 14 regions. GCAM operates in 5 year time steps from 1990 to 2095 and is designed to examine long-term changes in the coupled energy, agriculture/land-use, and climate system. GCAM includes a 151-region agriculture land-use module and a reduced form carbon cycle and climate module in addition to its incorporation of demographics, resources, energy production and consumption. The model has been used extensively in a number of assessment and modeling activities such as the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF), the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program, and the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and IPCC assessment reports. GCAM is now freely available as a community model. The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) Model is a process-based agricultural systems model composed of simulation components for weather, hydrology, nutrient cycling, pesticide fate, tillage, crop growth, soil erosion, crop and soil management and economics. Staff at PNNL have been involved in the development of this model by integrating new sub-models for soil carbon dynamics and nitrogen cycling.

  17. Creating a methodology and tool to capture and resolve conflicts in developing software requirements: Requirement Lifecycle Modeling Views manager (RLMV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Leeha Rae-Lyn

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    tool that will aid in tracing requirements throughout the software development lifecycle. The tool, named Requirement Lifecycle Modeling Views (RLMV), follows the architecture, as defined in The Unified Modeling Language Users Guide, for modeling...

  18. Software | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    applications, such as simulation and modeling, computation, internet usage, and more. Argonne has both commercially available software and open-source (free) software. Browse both...

  19. Modular Operational Test Plans for Inferences on Software Reliability Based on a Markov Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumdar, Mainak

    Modular Operational Test Plans for Inferences on Software Reliability Based on a Markov Model reliabilities. An operational test procedure is considered in which only the individual modules are tested and the system is considered acceptable if, and only if, no failures are observed. The minimum number of tests

  20. Hardware/Software Co-design for Energy-Efficient Seismic Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardware/Software Co-design for Energy-Efficient Seismic Modeling Jens Krueger , David Donofrio of conventional cluster technology has prompted investigation of architectural alternatives that offer higher computational efficiency. In this work, we compare the per- formance and energy efficiency of three

  1. The Journal on Software and Systems Modeling manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Journal on Software and Systems Modeling manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor-INRIA, Nantes, France 2 CITI/DI/FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal 3 TU Darmstadt, Germany 4 SAP. One of these problems is traceability management. In the European AMPLE project we are creating

  2. Star-Cap: Cluster Power Management Using Software-Only Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivoire, Suzanne

    Star-Cap: Cluster Power Management Using Software-Only Models John D. Davis johndavis-fidelity, real-time power manage- ment system for clusters. Star-Cap's cluster power management module uses, and approximately 40% of the total cost of ownership is related to energy [1]. Active server power management can

  3. SMT-Based Bounded Model Checking for Embedded ANSI-C Software Lucas Cordeiro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SMT-Based Bounded Model Checking for Embedded ANSI-C Software Lucas Cordeiro University word-level information in theories richer than propositional logic and using SMT solvers for the generated verification conditions. Here, we investigate the application of dif- ferent SMT solvers

  4. SMT-Based Bounded Model Checking for Embedded ANSI-C Software Lucas Cordeiro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SMT-Based Bounded Model Checking for Embedded ANSI-C Software Lucas Cordeiro University by encoding word-level information in theories richer than propositional logic and using SMT solvers for the gener- ated verification conditions. Here, we investigate the application of different SMT solvers

  5. Model Checking Large Software Specifications William Chan Richard J. Anderson Paul Beame Steve Burns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beame, Paul

    Model Checking Large Software Specifications William Chan Richard J. Anderson Paul Beame Steve methods for achieving acceptable performance, and giving a sum­ mary of the properties analyzed. Based.J. Anderson, P. Beame, F. Modugno, D. Notkin, and J.D. Reese are with the Department of Computer Science

  6. Global horizontal irradiance clear sky models : implementation and analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Reno, Matthew J.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clear sky models estimate the terrestrial solar radiation under a cloudless sky as a function of the solar elevation angle, site altitude, aerosol concentration, water vapor, and various atmospheric conditions. This report provides an overview of a number of global horizontal irradiance (GHI) clear sky models from very simple to complex. Validation of clear-sky models requires comparison of model results to measured irradiance during clear-sky periods. To facilitate validation, we present a new algorithm for automatically identifying clear-sky periods in a time series of GHI measurements. We evaluate the performance of selected clear-sky models using measured data from 30 different sites, totaling about 300 site-years of data. We analyze the variation of these errors across time and location. In terms of error averaged over all locations and times, we found that complex models that correctly account for all the atmospheric parameters are slightly more accurate than other models, but, primarily at low elevations, comparable accuracy can be obtained from some simpler models. However, simpler models often exhibit errors that vary with time of day and season, whereas the errors for complex models vary less over time.

  7. Software Engineering School COMSC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    management skills and performing key technical tasks in the software development lifecycle. The module and practices that are needed to develop software-intensive systems. Students will work on a software in the software lifecycle, and the pros and cons of different models of software construction to select

  8. Interactive software for model predictive control with simultaneous identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Echeverria Del Rio, Pablo

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Internal Model Control (IMC) by Garcia and Morari (Garcia and Morari, 1982); the other one was about the stability of constrained MPC by Rawlings and Muske (Rawlings and Muske, 1993). Among the research papers and thesis that have been written about MPC... making process (Garcia, Prett and Morari, 1989). In order to obtain the maximum benefit from a process, several performance objectives should be specified and attained in the design and actual implementation of the plant. However, this condition...

  9. Continuous Verification of Large Embedded Software using SMT-Based Bounded Model Checking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordeiro, Lucas; Marques-Silva, Joao

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complexity of software in embedded systems has increased significantly over the last years so that software verification now plays an important role in ensuring the overall product quality. In this context, SAT-based bounded model checking has been successfully applied to discover subtle errors, but for larger applications, it often suffers from the state space explosion problem. This paper describes a new approach called continuous verification to detect design errors as quickly as possible by looking at the Software Configuration Management (SCM) system and by combining dynamic and static verification to reduce the state space to be explored. We also give a set of encodings that provide accurate support for program verification and use different background theories in order to improve scalability and precision in a completely automatic way. A case study from the telecommunications domain shows that the proposed approach improves the error-detection capability and reduces the overall verification time by...

  10. AutoMoDe - Model-Based Development of Automotive Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziegenbein, Dirk; Freund, Ulrich; Bauer, Andreas; Romberg, Jan; Schatz, Bernhard

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes first results from the AutoMoDe (Automotive Model-Based Development) project. The overall goal of the project is to develop an integrated methodology for model-based development of automotive control software, based on problem-specific design notations with an explicit formal foundation. Based on the existing AutoFOCUS framework, a tool prototype is being developed in order to illustrate and validate the key elements of our approach.

  11. International Environmental Modelling and Software Society (iEMSs) 2010 International Congress on Environmental Modelling and Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ://www.iemss.org/iemss2010/index.php?n=Main.Proceedings Modelling and control of a hybrid renewable energy system to supply University, Tétouan, Morocco Abstract: Renewable energy sources are an "indigenous" environmental option. Hybrid plants can help in improving the economic and environmental sustainability of renewable energy

  12. International Environmental Modelling and Software Society (iEMSs) 2010 International Congress on Environmental Modelling and Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of the rain- fall/pollutant relationship at the catchment scale for intelligent environmental decision support for such relationship grows with the size of drainage networks in urban catchments or with the water pollu- tion models fail to describe correctly the dynamic changes of the system for different rainfall events (e

  13. MOGO: Model-Oriented Global Optimization of Petascale Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malony, Allen D.; Shende, Sameer S.

    2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The MOGO project was initiated under in 2008 under the DOE Program Announcement for Software Development Tools for Improved Ease-of-Use on Petascale systems (LAB 08-19). The MOGO team consisted of Oak Ridge National Lab, Argonne National Lab, and the University of Oregon. The overall goal of MOGO was to attack petascale performance analysis by developing a general framework where empirical performance data could be efficiently and accurately compared with performance expectations at various levels of abstraction. This information could then be used to automatically identify and remediate performance problems. MOGO was be based on performance models derived from application knowledge, performance experiments, and symbolic analysis. MOGO was able to make reasonable impact on existing DOE applications and systems. New tools and techniques were developed, which, in turn, were used on important DOE applications on DOE LCF systems to show significant performance improvements.

  14. Enhance accuracy in Software cost and schedule estimation by using "Uncertainty Analysis and Assessment" in the system modeling process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasantrao, Kardile Vilas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate software cost and schedule estimation are essential for software project success. Often it referred to as the "black art" because of its complexity and uncertainty, software estimation is not as difficult or puzzling as people think. In fact, generating accurate estimates is straightforward-once you understand the intensity of uncertainty and framework for the modeling process. The mystery to successful software estimation-distilling academic information and real-world experience into a practical guide for working software professionals. Instead of arcane treatises and rigid modeling techniques, this will guide highlights a proven set of procedures, understandable formulas, and heuristics that individuals and development teams can apply to their projects to help achieve estimation proficiency with choose appropriate development approaches In the early stage of software life cycle project manager are inefficient to estimate the effort, schedule, cost estimation and its development approach .This in tu...

  15. Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Huang, Yu (Joe) [White Box Technologies; Levinson, Ronnen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the United States Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs modern web technologies, usability design, and national average defaults as an interface to annual simulations of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim in order to provide estimated annual energy and cost savings. In addition to cool reflective roofs, RSC simulates multiple roof and attic configurations including different roof slopes, above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers, low-emittance roof surfaces, duct location, duct leakage rates, multiple substrate types, and insulation levels. A base case and energy-efficient alternative can be compared side-by-side to estimate monthly energy. RSC was benchmarked against field data from demonstration homes in Ft. Irwin, California; while cooling savings were similar, heating penalty varied significantly across different simulation engines. RSC results reduce cool roofing cost-effectiveness thus mitigating expected economic incentives for this countermeasure to the urban heat island effect. This paper consolidates comparison of RSC s projected energy savings to other simulation engines including DOE-2.1E, AtticSim, Micropas, and EnergyPlus, and presents preliminary analyses. RSC s algorithms for capturing radiant heat transfer and duct interaction in the attic assembly are considered major contributing factors to increased cooling savings and heating penalties. Comparison to previous simulation-based studies, analysis on the force multiplier of RSC cooling savings and heating penalties, the role of radiative heat exchange in an attic assembly, and changes made for increased accuracy of the duct model are included.

  16. A Vast Machine Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Vast Machine Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming Paul N. Edwards models, climate data, and the politics of global warming / Paul N. Edwards. p. cm. Includes. Climatology--History. 3. Meteorology--History. 4. Climatology--Technological innovation. 5. Global temperature

  17. A GLOBAL MAGNETIC TOPOLOGY MODEL FOR MAGNETIC CLOUDS. I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hidalgo, M. A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Alcala (Spain); Nieves-Chinchilla, T., E-mail: miguel.hidalgo@uah.es, E-mail: teresa.nieves-chinchil-1@nasa.gov [Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analytical approach to the global magnetic field topology of magnetic clouds (MCs) that considers them like close magnetic structures with torus geometry and with a non-uniform (variable maximum radius) cross section along them. Following our previous approach to the problem of MCs (Hidalgo 2003, 2011), we establish an intrinsic coordinate system for that topology, and then we analytically solve the Maxwell equations in terms of it. The purpose of the present work is to present this model, which will lead us to understand in a more realistic way the physical mechanisms inside MCs. The model has a non-force-free character and also takes into account the time evolution of the cross sections of the MCs in their movement through the interplanetary medium. In this first paper, we obtain the expressions for the components of the magnetic field and the plasma current density imposing a large mean radius of the torus, and imposing a circular cross section with a variable maximum radius. Eventually, we fit the model to data related to four well-known MCs measurements at 1 AU, (three of them with circular cross sections and without expansion, as it is deduced from the experimental data). We compare the results of this toroidal model with those obtained with our previous cylindrical circular cross section model, also with a non-force-free character.

  18. EWEC 2006 Wind Energy Conference and Exhibition Turbine Wake Model for Wind Resource Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EWEC 2006 Wind Energy Conference and Exhibition 1 Turbine Wake Model for Wind Resource Software Ole) AT: #12;EWEC 2006 Wind Energy Conference and Exhibition 2 21 2 0TT C U= (1) 0 0(1 )wU a U= - (2); 1.5 0.75 AR Aw0 U0 Uw0 T #12;EWEC 2006 Wind Energy Conference and Exhibition 3 ( )2 0 1 ( , ) 1

  19. Title: Early and global estimation of microvascular target organ damage in hypertension by use of innovative software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markatos, Evangelos P.

    Title: Early and global estimation of microvascular target organ damage in hypertension by use-mail: artriant@hotmail.com Disclosure: none Conflicts of interest: none Key Words: hypertension, target organ cardiovascular risk assessment and early #12;identification of hypertensive target organ damage is continuously

  20. California Wintertime Precipitation in Regional and Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, P M

    2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, wintertime precipitation from a variety of observational datasets, regional climate models (RCMs), and general circulation models (GCMs) is averaged over the state of California (CA) and compared. Several averaging methodologies are considered and all are found to give similar values when model grid spacing is less than 3{sup o}. This suggests that CA is a reasonable size for regional intercomparisons using modern GCMs. Results show that reanalysis-forced RCMs tend to significantly overpredict CA precipitation. This appears to be due mainly to overprediction of extreme events; RCM precipitation frequency is generally underpredicted. Overprediction is also reflected in wintertime precipitation variability, which tends to be too high for RCMs on both daily and interannual scales. Wintertime precipitation in most (but not all) GCMs is underestimated. This is in contrast to previous studies based on global blended gauge/satellite observations which are shown here to underestimate precipitation relative to higher-resolution gauge-only datasets. Several GCMs provide reasonable daily precipitation distributions, a trait which doesn't seem tied to model resolution. GCM daily and interannual variability is generally underpredicted.

  1. Global transportation cost modeling for long-range planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, R.B.; Michelhaugh, R.D.; Singley, P.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lester, P.B. [Dept. of Energy, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing to perform significant remediation activities of the sites for which it is responsible. To accomplish this, it is preparing a corporate global plan focused on activities over the next decade. Significant in these planned activities is the transportation of the waste arising from the remediation. The costs of this transportation are expected to be large. To support the initial assessment of the plan, a cost estimating model was developed, peer-reviewed against other available packaging and transportation cost data, and applied to a significant number of shipping campaigns of radioactive waste. This cost estimating model, known as the Ten-year Plan Transportation Cost Model (TEPTRAM), can be used to model radioactive material shipments between DOE sites or from DOE sites to non-DOE destinations. The model considers the costs for (a) recovering and processing of the wastes, (b)packaging the wastes for transport, and (c) the carriage of the waste. It also provides a rough order of magnitude estimate of labor costs associated with preparing and undertaking the shipments. At the user`s direction, the model can also consider the cost of DOE`s interactions with its external stakeholders (e.g., state and local governments and tribal entities) and the cost associated with tracking and communicating with the shipments. By considering all of these sources of costs, it provides a mechanism for assessing and comparing the costs of various waste processing and shipping campaign alternatives to help guide decision-making. Recent analyses of specific planned shipments of transuranic (TRU) waste which consider alternative packaging options are described. These analyses show that options are available for significantly reducing total costs while still satisfying regulatory requirements.

  2. The China-in-Global Energy Model Tianyu Qi, Niven Winchester, Da Zhang,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of production, consumption and trade among multiple global regions and sectors ­ including five energy to communicate research results and improve public understanding of global environment and energy challenges-intensive sectors ­ to analyze global energy demand, CO2 emissions, and economic activity. The C-GEM model supplies

  3. Intercomparison of the Cloud Water Phase among Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komurcu, Muge; Storelvmo, Trude; Tan, Ivy; Lohmann, U.; Yun, Yuxing; Penner, Joyce E.; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong; Takemura, T.

    2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed-phase clouds (clouds that consist of both cloud droplets and ice crystals) are frequently present in the Earth’s atmosphere and influence the Earth’s energy budget through their radiative properties, which are highly dependent on the cloud water phase. In this study, the phase partitioning of cloud water is compared among six global climate models (GCMs) and with Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization retrievals. It is found that the GCMs predict vastly different distributions of cloud phase for a given temperature, and none of them are capable of reproducing the spatial distribution or magnitude of the observed phase partitioning. While some GCMs produced liquid water paths comparable to satellite observations, they all failed to preserve sufficient liquid water at mixed-phase cloud temperatures. Our results suggest that validating GCMs using only the vertically integrated water contents could lead to amplified differences in cloud radiative feedback. The sensitivity of the simulated cloud phase in GCMs to the choice of heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization is also investigated. The response to a change in ice nucleation is quite different for each GCM, and the implementation of the same ice nucleation parameterization in all models does not reduce the spread in simulated phase among GCMs. The results suggest that processes subsequent to ice nucleation are at least as important in determining phase and should be the focus of future studies aimed at understanding and reducing differences among the models.

  4. Interactive Software Technology 1/24 Interactive Software Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wegner, Peter

    Interactive Software Technology 1/24 Interactive Software Technology Peter Wegner, Brown University Paradigms 2. Models of Interaction 3. Software Engineering, Artificial Intelligence, and Open Systems 4. Object­oriented Design: Sequential Interaction 5. Multiple Interface Models: Concurrent Interaction 6

  5. Hydrologic Nuclide Transport Models in Cyder, A Geologic Disposal Software Library - 13328

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huff, Kathryn D. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Component level and system level abstraction of detailed computational geologic repository models have resulted in four rapid computational models of hydrologic radionuclide transport at varying levels of detail. Those models are described, as is their implementation in Cyder, a software library of interchangeable radionuclide transport models appropriate for representing natural and engineered barrier components of generic geology repository concepts. A proof of principle demonstration was also conducted in which these models were used to represent the natural and engineered barrier components of a repository concept in a reducing, homogenous, generic geology. This base case demonstrates integration of the Cyder open source library with the Cyclus computational fuel cycle systems analysis platform to facilitate calculation of repository performance metrics with respect to fuel cycle choices. (authors)

  6. Application of the Software as a Service Model to the Control of Complex Building Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Donadee, Jonathan; Marnay, Chris; Mendes, Goncalo; Appen, Jan von; Megel, Oliver; Bhattacharya, Prajesh; DeForest, Nicholas; Lai, Judy

    2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to create broad access to its optimization software, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with the University of California at Davis (UC Davis) and OSISoft, has recently developed a Software as a Service (SaaS) Model for reducing energy costs, cutting peak power demand, and reducing carbon emissions for multipurpose buildings. UC Davis currently collects and stores energy usage data from buildings on its campus. Researchers at LBNL sought to demonstrate that a SaaS application architecture could be built on top of this data system to optimize the scheduling of electricity and heat delivery in the building. The SaaS interface, known as WebOpt, consists of two major parts: a) the investment& planning and b) the operations module, which builds on the investment& planning module. The operational scheduling and load shifting optimization models within the operations module use data from load prediction and electrical grid emissions models to create an optimal operating schedule for the next week, reducing peak electricity consumption while maintaining quality of energy services. LBNL's application also provides facility managers with suggested energy infrastructure investments for achieving their energy cost and emission goals based on historical data collected with OSISoft's system. This paper describes these models as well as the SaaS architecture employed by LBNL researchers to provide asset scheduling services to UC Davis. The peak demand, emissions, and cost implications of the asset operation schedule and investments suggested by this optimization model are analysed.

  7. Application of the Software as a Service Model to the Control of Complex Building Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Donadee, Jon; Marnay, Chris; Lai, Judy; Mendes, Goncalo; Appen, Jan von; M& #233; gel, Oliver; Bhattacharya, Prajesh; DeForest, Nicholas; Lai, Judy

    2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to create broad access to its optimization software, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with the University of California at Davis (UC Davis) and OSISoft, has recently developed a Software as a Service (SaaS) Model for reducing energy costs, cutting peak power demand, and reducing carbon emissions for multipurpose buildings. UC Davis currently collects and stores energy usage data from buildings on its campus. Researchers at LBNL sought to demonstrate that a SaaS application architecture could be built on top of this data system to optimize the scheduling of electricity and heat delivery in the building. The SaaS interface, known as WebOpt, consists of two major parts: a) the investment& planning and b) the operations module, which builds on the investment& planning module. The operational scheduling and load shifting optimization models within the operations module use data from load prediction and electrical grid emissions models to create an optimal operating schedule for the next week, reducing peak electricity consumption while maintaining quality of energy services. LBNL's application also provides facility managers with suggested energy infrastructure investments for achieving their energy cost and emission goals based on historical data collected with OSISoft's system. This paper describes these models as well as the SaaS architecture employed by LBNL researchers to provide asset scheduling services to UC Davis. The peak demand, emissions, and cost implications of the asset operation schedule and investments suggested by this optimization model are analyzed.

  8. An Aspect Oriented Model for Software Energy Efficiency in Decentralised Servers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaodong

    interests with the increasing impact of IT in energy consumption. Green-ness in software however, can Green software is a matter of concern with increasing energy bills and environmental impact, the green software research focus is mainly on energy efficiency [2]­[4]. Most green software techniques

  9. Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well? Reto Knutti1 global surface warming so well?, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L18704, doi:10.1029/ 2008GL034932. 1 models reproduce the observed surface warming better than one would expect given the uncertainties

  10. An examination of urban heat island characteristics in a global climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleson, Keith W.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Jackson, Trisha L.

    2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A parameterization for urban surfaces has been incorporated into the Community Land Model as part of the Community Climate System Model. The parameterization allows global simulation of the urban environment, in particular the temperature of cities...

  11. Arquitecturas Software Juan Jos Moreno Navarro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fredlund, Lars-Ã?ke

    Arquitecturas Software Juan José Moreno Navarro (Curso de Software basado en Componentes, junto a Lars-Ake Fredlund) Arquitecturas Software · Motivación: ­ Complejidad creciente de aplicaciones sus propiedades globales. Arquitecturas Software · Características: ­ Parte del diseño de software

  12. Model Comparison: A Key Challenge for Transformation Testing and Version Control in Model Driven Software Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey G.

    Model Comparison: A Key Challenge for Transformation Testing and Version Control in Model Driven practices associated with model transformation testing and version control of models. 1. Introduction target model). #12;· Version Control Tools do not Match the Structural Nature of Models An essential

  13. Global Ocean Circulation Modeling with an Isopycnic Coordinate Model. Final Report for May 1, 1998 - April 30, 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bleck, R.

    2004-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall aim of this project was to continue development of a global version of the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model (MICOM) with the intent of turning it into a full-fledged oceanic component of an earth system model.

  14. A constraint solver for software engineering : finding models and cores of large relational specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torlak, Emina, 1979-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relational logic is an attractive candidate for a software description language, because both the design and implementation of software often involve reasoning about relational structures: organizational hierarchies in the ...

  15. Global patterns of nitrogen limitation: confronting two global biogeochemical models with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Templer, Pamela

    representations of Earth System Models have included the carbon (C) cycle (Friedlingstein et al., 2006

  16. Dispersion model for elevated dense-gas-jet chemical releases (DOMS/DEGADIS) (for microcomputers). Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guinnup, D.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The computer program, Ooms/DEGADIS, found on these diskettes and described in the EPA report entitled, A Dispersion Model for Elevated Dense Gas Jet Chemical Releases - Volumes 1 and 2 (EPA 450/4-88-006a and b), is a VAX-operational program designed to simulate the dispersion of heavier-than-air gases which are emitted into the atmosphere with significant velocity through elevated ports. The program incorporates the sequential execution of two models. The first one (Ooms) calculates the trajectory and dispersion of the gas plume as it falls to the ground. The second (DEGADIS) calculates the downwind dispersion of the plume after it touches the ground. Users are referred to the Preface in the User's Guide for specific instructions for program implementation...Software Description: The program is written in FORTRAN with specific intent for compilation and execution on a Digital Equipment Corporation VAX computer. Implementation of the model on any other computer system may be attempted at the risk of the user. To facilitate dissemination of the model, it is being provided on two PC-compatible diskettes. The model should be uploaded via modem from a PC terminal to host VAX computer, and several files must then be renamed prior to compilation and execution.

  17. A simple model for evolution of proteins towards the global minimum of free energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unger, Ron

    in a simple model of protein folding. Results: Three possible evolutionary processes are explored. First can be achieved. The assumption that proteins fold to a conformation which is in the global minimum sequences that can find the global minimum [5]. In computer science terms this means that `protein folding

  18. Time series modeling and large scale global solar radiation forecasting from geostationary satellites data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Time series modeling and large scale global solar radiation forecasting from geostationary global solar radiation. In this paper, we use geostationary satellites data to generate 2-D time series of solar radiation for the next hour. The results presented in this paper relate to a particular territory

  19. SO2 emissions and lifetimes: Estimates from inverse modeling using in situ and global, spacebased

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Randall

    SO2 emissions and lifetimes: Estimates from inverse modeling using in situ and global, spacebased 18 March 2011. [1] Topdown constraints on global sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions are inferred through of GEOSChem for inversion of SO2 columns to emissions. The seasonal mean SO2 lifetime calculated with the GEOS

  20. 1997 SPECIAL ISSUE A Neural Global Workspace Model for Conscious Attention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Memphis, University of

    1997 SPECIAL ISSUE A Neural Global Workspace Model for Conscious Attention James Newman,1 Bernard J and 3 Department of Computer Science, Yonsei University (Received 9 July 1996; accepted 24 April 1997 neural network principles. 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd. Keywords--Attention, Binding, Consciousness, Global

  1. Inferring surface heat flux distributions guided by a global seismic model: particular application to Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Nikolai

    -flow measurements are rare or entirely absent. This will result in a smooth global heat-flow map that may proveInferring surface heat flux distributions guided by a global seismic model: particular application to Antarctica Nikolai M. Shapiro*, Michael H. Ritzwoller Department of Physics, Center for Imaging the Earth

  2. OASIS4: A Coupling Software for Next Generation Earth System Modelling Ren Redler (1), Sophie Valcke (2) and Hubert Ritzdorf (3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OASIS4: A Coupling Software for Next Generation Earth System Modelling René Redler (1), Sophie system modelling, Geosci. Model. Dev., 3, 87 ­ 104 Link ­ https://oasistrac.cerfacs.fr Financial support ­ R. Redler, S. Valcke and H. Ritzdorf, 2010: OASIS4 ­ a coupling software for next generation earth

  3. Globalization of biopharmaceutical manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pande, Rachna

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The biomanufacturing industry is changing due to increasing globalization. However, it is changing differently from other high tech industries like software/ semiconductor/ automobiles. In this study we use global ...

  4. Oceanic transports of heat and salt from a global model and data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Elise

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A state estimate produced by ECCO-GODAE from a global one-degree model and data spanning the years 1992-2005 is analyzed in terms of transports of volume, temperature, and freshwater. The estimate is assessed to be ...

  5. The oceanic and cratonic upper mantle: Clues from joint interpretation of global velocity and attenuation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asthenosphere Seismic attenuation Seismic velocity Anelasticity Partial melt Combined interpretation of seismicThe oceanic and cratonic upper mantle: Clues from joint interpretation of global velocity anelastic dispersion (Karato and Jung, 1998; Karato, 2003). A unique interpretation of seismological models

  6. Estimation of OTEC Global Resources with an Ocean General Circulation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) relies on the availability of temperature differencesEstimation of OTEC Global Resources with an Ocean General Circulation Model Krishnakumar Rajagopalan Postdoctoral Fellow Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering University of Hawai'i Abstract

  7. Testing Linear Diagnostics of Ensemble Performance on a Simplified Global Circulation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Ethan

    2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    is inherently flow dependent and that the ensemble predicts potential patterns of forecast errors more reliably than the magnitudes of the errors. A low-resolution global circulation model is implemented to calculate linear diagnostics in the vector space...

  8. Global vegetation model diversity and the risks of climate-driven ecosystem shifts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is modifying global biogeochemical cycles, and is expected to exert increasingly large effects in the future. How these changes will in turn affect and interact with the structure and function of particular ecosystems is unclear, however, both because of scientific uncertainties and the very diversity of global vegetation models in use. Writing in Environmental Research Letters, Warszawski et al. (1) aggregate results from a group of models, across a range of emissions scenarios and climate data, to investigate these risks. Although the models frequently disagree about which specific regions are at risk, they consistently predict a greater chance of ecosystem restructuring with more warming; this risk roughly doubles between 2 and 3 °C increases in global mean temperature. The innovative work of Warszawski et al. represents an important first step towards fully consistent multi-model, multi-scenario assessments of the future risks to global ecosystems.

  9. Global economic changes and income inequality: a test of four competing models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Theresa Marie

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GLOBAL ECONOMIC CHANGES AND INCOME INEQUALITY: A TEST OF FOUR COMPETING MODELS A Thesis by THERESA MARK MORRIS Submitted to the OIEce of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1996 Major Subject: Sociology GLOBAL ECONOMIC CHANGES AND INCOME INEQUALITY: A TEST OF FOUR COMPETING MODELS A Thesis by THERESA MARIE MORRIS Submitted to Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  10. A UNIFIED HARDWARE/SOFTWARE PRIORITY SCHEDULING MODEL FOR GENERAL PURPOSE SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preston, Keith Alan

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Migrating functionality from software to hardware has historically held the promise of enhancing performance through exploiting the inherent parallel nature of hardware. Many early exploratory efforts in repartitioning ...

  11. BETR Global - A geographically explicit global-scale multimedia contaminant fate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macleod, M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    balance model.  Environmental Science &  Technology, 43(4), direct sources.  Environmental Science & Technology, 43(making process.  Environmental Science & Policy, 13(3), 175?

  12. GLOBAL STABILITY IN CHEMOSTAT-TYPE COMPETITION MODELS WITH NUTRIENT RECYCLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruan, Shigui

    GLOBAL STABILITY IN CHEMOSTAT-TYPE COMPETITION MODELS WITH NUTRIENT RECYCLING SHIGUI RUAN AND XUE- type competition models with nutrient recycling. In the first model the recycling is instantaneous, whereas in the second, the recycling is delayed. They carried out the equilibrium analysis and obtained

  13. Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua New, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    , multiple substrate types, and insulation levels. A base case and energy-efficient alternative canComparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua New, Oak Ridge National Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors

  14. Software Modeling of S-Metrics Visualizer: Synergetic Interactive Metrics Visualization Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dascalu, Sergiu

    utilization, earned-value cost and schedule performance) to provide enhanced management insight in a timely and visualization tool for Windows. Throughout the software development process managers must be aware problems that occur throughout the project's evolution. Software metrics help managers to better monitor

  15. To Be Presented at the Advanced Simulation Technology Symposium (ASTC), Washington DC, April 2004. Building Simulation Modeling Environments Using Systems Theory and Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Building Simulation Modeling Environments Using Systems Theory and Software Architecture Principles Hessam the relationships between the realm of (i) model building and simulation execution in conjunction with (ii) softwareTo Be Presented at the Advanced Simulation Technology Symposium (ASTC), Washington DC, April 2004

  16. The Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) Software Development: Applications, Infrastructure, and Middleware/Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of and future plans for the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) hinge on software that PCMDI is either currently distributing or plans to distribute to the climate community in the near future. These software products include standard conventions, national and international federated infrastructures, and community analysis and visualization tools. This report also mentions other secondary software not necessarily led by or developed at PCMDI to provide a complete picture of the overarching applications, infrastructures, and middleware/networks. Much of the software described anticipates the use of future technologies envisioned over the span of next year to 10 years. These technologies, together with the software, will be the catalyst required to address extreme-scale data warehousing, scalability issues, and service-level requirements for a diverse set of well-known projects essential for predicting climate change. These tools, unlike the previous static analysis tools of the past, will support the co-existence of many users in a productive, shared virtual environment. This advanced technological world driven by extreme-scale computing and the data it generates will increase scientists’ productivity, exploit national and international relationships, and push research to new levels of understanding.

  17. SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Configuration...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Configuration Management Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Configuration Management...

  18. Modeling aviation's global emissions, uncertainty analysis, and applications to policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joosung Joseph, 1974-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) fuel burn results below 3000 ft. For emissions, the emissions indices were the most influential uncertainties for the variance in model outputs. By employing the model, this thesis examined three policy options for ...

  19. Flexible finite-element modeling of global geomagnetic depth sounding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribaudo, Joseph Thomas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Flexible Finite-Element Modeling ofOF THE DISSERTATION Flexible Finite-Element Modeling ofin Chapter 2. The method is flexible enough to allow for a

  20. Global tropospheric ozone modeling: Quantifying errors due to grid resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wild, Oliver; Prather, Michael J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and much higher 90th percentile abundances than modeled. Ourbox) and 10th/90th percentiles (horizontal lines). ‘‘

  1. "Big Picture" Process Modeling Tools |GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    downstream advantages as costs are reduced thanks to lower power requirements for distillation and even reduced liquid waste generation. In the second case, process modeling...

  2. The holonic enterprise: a model for Internet-enabled global manufacturing supply chain and workflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulieru, Mihaela

    The holonic enterprise: a model for Internet-enabled global manufacturing supply chain and workflow, which supports organizational information that, in turn, can mirror social organization. The Holonic with an overview of the three main concepts used to develop our HE model: holonic systems, MAS, and the Internet

  3. Global empirical wind model for the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. I. Prevailing wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Global empirical wind model for the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. I. Prevailing wind Y. I. An updated empirical climatic zonally aver- aged prevailing wind model for the upper mesosphere/ lower of monthly mean winds from meteor radar and MF radar measurements at more than 40 stations, well distributed

  4. Using beryllium-7 to assess cross-tropopause1 transport in global models2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongyu

    1 Using beryllium-7 to assess cross-tropopause1 transport in global models2 3 Hongyu Liu1 , David B, MA13 14 Short Title: Beryllium-7 and cross-tropopause transport15 Index Terms: 0368 Troposphere Initiative (GMI) modeling framework the29 utility of cosmogenic beryllium-7 (7 Be), a natural aerosol tracer

  5. ECONOMIC MODELING OF THE GLOBAL ADOPTION OF CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECONOMIC MODELING OF THE GLOBAL ADOPTION OF CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES J. R. Mc of carbon capture and sequestration technologies as applied to electric generating plants. The MIT Emissions, is used to model carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies based on a natural gas combined cycle

  6. Use of a lidar forward model for global comparisons of cloud fraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    555 Use of a lidar forward model for global comparisons of cloud fraction between the ICESat lidar in extinction-to-backscatter ratio and effective radius affect the forward modeled mean cloud fraction by no more than 10%. 1. Introduction Clouds play a major role in the Earth's radiation budget and predictions

  7. Global ASM-Modeling Capability : Bruce A. McCarl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    multiproduct US model with a lot of supply response but with aggregate representatives of trade with the rest do not model supply response and are single or just a couple of commodities. 3. A detailed of the world. In particular, heaving an excess demand curve from the rest of the world without detail on where

  8. LHD (2011 10 31 10:00-11:30) Software System SMILE++ for Modeling of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Weidong

    was started at the Laboratory of Computational Aerodynamics (ITAM, Novosibirsk,Russia) at the end of the 1990s++ parallel software system developed at ITAM. The SMILE++ is based on the OOP approach and is completely

  9. Increasing NOAA's computational capacity to improve global forecast modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamill, Tom

    Systems Division Stephen J. Lord Director, NWS NCEP Environmental Modeling Center 19 July 2010 (303) 4973060 tom.hamill@noaa.gov #12; 2 Executive Summary The accuracy of many

  10. Modeling Abrupt Change in Global Sea Level Arising from Ocean - Ice-Sheet Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David M Holland

    2011-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    It is proposed to develop, validate, and apply a coupled ocean ice-sheet model to simulate possible, abrupt future change in global sea level. This research is to be carried out collaboratively between an academic institute and a Department of Energy Laboratory (DOE), namely, the PI and a graduate student at New York University (NYU) and climate model researchers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The NYU contribution is mainly in the area of incorporating new physical processes into the model, while the LANL efforts are focused on improved numerics and overall model development. NYU and LANL will work together on applying the model to a variety of modeling scenarios of recent past and possible near-future abrupt change to the configuration of the periphery of the major ice sheets. The project's ultimate goal is to provide a robust, accurate prediction of future global sea level change, a feat that no fully-coupled climate model is currently capable of producing. This proposal seeks to advance that ultimate goal by developing, validating, and applying a regional model that can simulate the detailed processes involved in sea-level change due to oceanÃ?Â? ice-sheet interaction. Directly modeling ocean ice-sheet processes in a fully-coupled global climate model is not a feasible activity at present given the near-complete absence of development of any such causal mechanism in these models to date.

  11. Data Assimilation Tools for CO2 Reservoir Model Development – A Review of Key Data Types, Analyses, and Selected Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Sullivan, E. C.; Murray, Christopher J.; Last, George V.; Black, Gary D.

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has embarked on an initiative to develop world-class capabilities for performing experimental and computational analyses associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. The ultimate goal of this initiative is to provide science-based solutions for helping to mitigate the adverse effects of greenhouse gas emissions. This Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative currently has two primary focus areas—advanced experimental methods and computational analysis. The experimental methods focus area involves the development of new experimental capabilities, supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL) housed at PNNL, for quantifying mineral reaction kinetics with CO2 under high temperature and pressure (supercritical) conditions. The computational analysis focus area involves numerical simulation of coupled, multi-scale processes associated with CO2 sequestration in geologic media, and the development of software to facilitate building and parameterizing conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reservoirs that represent geologic repositories for injected CO2. This report describes work in support of the computational analysis focus area. The computational analysis focus area currently consists of several collaborative research projects. These are all geared towards the development and application of conceptual and numerical models for geologic sequestration of CO2. The software being developed for this focus area is referred to as the Geologic Sequestration Software Suite or GS3. A wiki-based software framework is being developed to support GS3. This report summarizes work performed in FY09 on one of the LDRD projects in the computational analysis focus area. The title of this project is Data Assimilation Tools for CO2 Reservoir Model Development. Some key objectives of this project in FY09 were to assess the current state-of-the-art in reservoir model development, the data types and analyses that need to be performed in order to develop and parameterize credible and robust reservoir simulation models, and to review existing software that is applicable to these analyses. This report describes this effort and highlights areas in which additional software development, wiki application extensions, or related GS3 infrastructure development may be warranted.

  12. Comparison of Strong Gravitational Lens Model Software II. HydraLens: Computer-Assisted Strong Gravitational Lens Model Generation and Translation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefor, Alsn T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of strong gravitational lens model software in the analysis of lens models is not necessarily consistent among the various software available, suggesting that the use of several models may enhance the understanding of the system being studied. Among the publicly available codes, the model input files are heterogeneous, making the creation of multiple models tedious. An enhanced method of creating model files and a method to easily create multiple models, may increase the number of comparison studies. HydraLens simplifies the creation of model files for four strong gravitational lens model software packages, including Lenstool, Gravlens/Lensmodel, glafic and PixeLens, using a custom designed GUI for each of the four codes that simplifies the entry of the model for each of these codes, obviating the need for user manuals to set the values of the many flags and in each data field. HydraLens is designed in a modular fashion, which simplifies the addition of other strong gravitational lens codes in th...

  13. Modeling the barotropic response of the global ocean to atmospheric wind and pressure forcing -comparisons with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling the barotropic response of the global ocean to atmospheric wind and pressure forcing] A global simulation of the ocean response to atmospheric wind and pressure forcing has been run during the barotropic response of the global ocean to atmospheric wind and pressure forcing - comparisons

  14. To appear in: Boden A, Mller C, Nett B. Conducting Business Ethnography in Global Software Development Projects of Small German Enterprises. Information and Software Technology. 2010; accepted for publication.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of offshored software development work in SMEs [3,4,5,6]. The first part of the project was an explorative into offshoring in German small to medium-sized enterprises. Method: The material for this paper is based on reflections and field notes from two methodologically different research projects: an explorative ethnographic

  15. Global sensitivity analysis of computer models with functional inputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -based sensitivity analysis techniques, based on the so-called Sobol's indices, when some input variables computer codes which need a preliminary metamodeling step before performing the sensitivity analysis. We). The "mean model" allows to estimate the sensi- tivity indices of each scalar input variables, while

  16. Long-Range Atmospheric Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: A Global 3-D Model Analysis Including Evaluation of Arctic Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Carey

    We use the global 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem to simulate long-range atmospheric transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). To evaluate the model’s ability to simulate PAHs with different volatilities, ...

  17. The AeroCom Evaluation and Intercomparison of Organic Aerosol in Global Models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tsigaridis, Kostas; NASA Goddard Inst. for Space Studies, New York, NY; Daskalakis, N.; Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, Patras; Inst. of Chemical Engineering; Kanakidou, M.; ; Adams, P. J.; Artaxo, Paulo; Bahadur, R.; et al

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper evaluates the current status of global modeling of the organic aerosol (OA) occurrence in the troposphere and analyzes the differences calculated between models as well as between models and observations. Thirty-one global chemistry/transport and general circulation models have participated in this intercomparison, in the framework of AeroCom phase II. The simulation of OA varies greatly between models in terms of the magnitude of primary emissions, secondary OA (SOA) formation, the number of OA species used (2 to 62), the complexity of OA parameterizations (gas-particle partitioning, chemical aging, multiphase chemistry, aerosol microphysics), and the OA physical, chemical and opticalmore »properties. The diversity of the global OA simulation results has increased since earlier AeroCom experiments, mainly due to the increasing complexity of the SOA parameterization in models, and the implementation of new, highly uncertain, OA sources. Diversity of over an order of magnitude exists in the modeled vertical distribution of OA that deserves a dedicated future study. Furthermore, although the OA/OC ratio depends on OA sources and atmospheric processing and is important for model evaluation against OA and OC observations, it is resolved only by few global models. The median global primary OA source strength is 56 Tg a-1 (range 34 - 144 Tg a-1) and the median secondary OA source strength (natural and anthropogenic) is 19 Tg a-1 (range 13-121 Tg a-1). Among the models that take into account the semi-volatile SOA nature, the median source is calculated to be 51 Tg a-1 (range 16-121 Tg a-1), much larger than the median value of the models that calculate SOA in a more simplistic way (19 Tg a-1; range 13-20 Tg a-1, with one model at 37 Tg a-1). The median atmospheric burden of OA is 1.4 Tg (24 models in the range of 0.6-2.0 Tg and 4 between 2.4-3.8 Tg) with a median OA lifetime of 5.4 days (range 3.8-9.6 days). In models that reported both OA and sulfate burdens, the median value of the OA/sulfate burden ratio of is calculated to be 0.77; 13 models calculate a ratio lower than 1, and 9 models higher than 1. For 26 models that reported OA deposition fluxes, the median wet removal is 70 Tg a-1 (range 28-209 Tg a-1), which is on average 85% of the total OA deposition.« less

  18. The AeroCom Evaluation and Intercomparison of Organic Aerosol in Global Models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tsigaridis, Kostas [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Center for Climate Systems Research; NASA Goddard Inst. for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States); Daskalakis, N. [Univ. of Crete, Heraklion (Greece). Environmental Chemical Processes Lab.; Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, Patras (Greece); Inst. of Chemical Engineering; Kanakidou, M. [Univ. of Crete, Heraklion (Greece). Environmental Chemical Processes Lab.; ; Adams, P. J. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Dept. of Engineering and Public Policy; Artaxo, Paulo [Univ. of Sao Paulo (Brazil). Dept of Applied Physics; Bahadur, R. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Inst. of Oceanography; Balkanski, Y. [Lab. des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bauer, S. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Center for Climate Systems Research; NASA Goddard Inst. for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States); Bellouin, N. [Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter (United Kingdom); Benedetti, Angela [ECMWF, Reading (United Kingdom); Bergman, T. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Kuopio (Finland); Berntsen, T. [Univ. of Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Geosciences; CICERO, Oslo (Norway); Beukes, J. P. [North-West Univ., Potchestroom (South Africa). Environmental Sciences and Management; Bian, Huisheng [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County, MD (United States). Joint Center for Environmental Technology; Carslaw, K. S. [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom). School of Earth and Environment; Chin, M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Curci, Gabriele [Univ. of L'Aquila (Italy). Dept of Physics CETEMPS; Diehl, Thomas [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and Universities Space Research Association, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Easter, Richard C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ghan, Steven J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gong, S. [Meteorological Service of Canada, Toronto (Canada). Air Quality Research Branch; Hodzic, Alma [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Hoyle, Christopher R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Inst. for Forest Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) - Inst. for Snow and Avalanche Research (SLF), Davos (Switzerland); Iversen, T. [ECMWF, Reading (United Kingdom); Univ. of Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Geosciences; Norwegian Meteorological Inst., Oslo (Norway); Jathar, S. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Jimenez, J. L. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Kaiser, J. W. [ECMWF, Reading (United Kingdom); King's College London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geography; Max Planck Society, Mainz (Germany). Max Planck Inst. for Chemistry, Dept. of Atmospheric Chemistry; ; Kirkevag, A. [Norwegian Meteorological Inst., Oslo (Norway); Koch, Dorothy [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Center for Climate Systems Research; NASA Goddard Inst. for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States); Kokkola, H. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Kuopio (Finland); Lee, Y. H. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Lin, G. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Science; Liu, Xiaohong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Luo, Gan [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Albany, NY (United States); Ma, Xiaoyan [Environment Canada, Victoria, BC (Canada); Mann, G. W. [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom). National Centre for Atmospheric Science and School of Earth and Environment; Mihalopoulos, Nikos [Univ. of Crete, Heraklion (Greece). Environmental Chemical Processes Lab.; Morcrette, J. -J. [ECMWF, Reading (United Kingdom); Muller, J. F. [Belgian Inst. for Space Aeronomy, Brussels (Belgium); Myhre, G. [Center for International Climate and Environmental Research (CICERO), Oslo (Norway)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper evaluates the current status of global modeling of the organic aerosol (OA) occurrence in the troposphere and analyzes the differences calculated between models as well as between models and observations. Thirty-one global chemistry/transport and general circulation models have participated in this intercomparison, in the framework of AeroCom phase II. The simulation of OA varies greatly between models in terms of the magnitude of primary emissions, secondary OA (SOA) formation, the number of OA species used (2 to 62), the complexity of OA parameterizations (gas-particle partitioning, chemical aging, multiphase chemistry, aerosol microphysics), and the OA physical, chemical and optical properties. The diversity of the global OA simulation results has increased since earlier AeroCom experiments, mainly due to the increasing complexity of the SOA parameterization in models, and the implementation of new, highly uncertain, OA sources. Diversity of over an order of magnitude exists in the modeled vertical distribution of OA that deserves a dedicated future study. Furthermore, although the OA/OC ratio depends on OA sources and atmospheric processing and is important for model evaluation against OA and OC observations, it is resolved only by few global models. The median global primary OA source strength is 56 Tg a-1 (range 34 - 144 Tg a-1) and the median secondary OA source strength (natural and anthropogenic) is 19 Tg a-1 (range 13-121 Tg a-1). Among the models that take into account the semi-volatile SOA nature, the median source is calculated to be 51 Tg a-1 (range 16-121 Tg a-1), much larger than the median value of the models that calculate SOA in a more simplistic way (19 Tg a-1; range 13-20 Tg a-1, with one model at 37 Tg a-1). The median atmospheric burden of OA is 1.4 Tg (24 models in the range of 0.6-2.0 Tg and 4 between 2.4-3.8 Tg) with a median OA lifetime of 5.4 days (range 3.8-9.6 days). In models that reported both OA and sulfate burdens, the median value of the OA/sulfate burden ratio of is calculated to be 0.77; 13 models calculate a ratio lower than 1, and 9 models higher than 1. For 26 models that reported OA deposition fluxes, the median wet removal is 70 Tg a-1 (range 28-209 Tg a-1), which is on average 85% of the total OA deposition.

  19. A Global, Multi-Resolution Approach to Regional Ocean Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Qiang

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In this collaborative research project between Pennsylvania State University, Colorado State University and Florida State University, we mainly focused on developing multi-resolution algorithms which are suitable to regional ocean modeling. We developed hybrid implicit and explicit adaptive multirate time integration method to solve systems of time-dependent equations that present two signi#12;cantly di#11;erent scales. We studied the e#11;ects of spatial simplicial meshes on the stability and the conditioning of fully discrete approximations. We also studies adaptive #12;nite element method (AFEM) based upon the Centroidal Voronoi Tessellation (CVT) and superconvergent gradient recovery. Some of these techniques are now being used by geoscientists(such as those at LANL).

  20. Voronoi Tessellations and Their Application to Climate and Global Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, Lili [University of South Carolina; Ringler, Todd [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gunzburger, Max [Florida State University

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the use of Voronoi tessellations for grid generation, especially on the whole sphere or in regions on the sphere. Voronoi tessellations and the corresponding Delaunay tessellations in regions and surfaces on Euclidean space are defined and properties they possess that make them well-suited for grid generation purposes are discussed, as are algorithms for their construction. This is followed by a more detailed look at one very special type of Voronoi tessellation, the centroidal Voronoi tessellation (CVT). After defining them, discussing some of their properties, and presenting algorithms for their construction, we illustrate the use of CVTs for producing both quasi-uniform and variable resolution meshes in the plane and on the sphere. Finally, we briefly discuss the computational solution of model equations based on CVTs on the sphere.

  1. Global instability in a Sellers-type model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodai, Tamas; Lunkeit, Frank; Boschi, Robert

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ghil-Sellers energy balance model of Earth's climate, features -- for a considerable range of the solar intensity -- two stable climate states (a warm and a cold snowball Earth), where the bistability results from the celebrated ice-albedo feedback. The unstable solution is obtained and characterized in this paper. We find such unstable states by applying for the first time in a geophysical context the so-called edge tracking method that has been used for studying multiple coexisting states in shear flows. We examine robustness, efficiency, and accuracy properties of the edge tracking algorithm. We find that the procedure is the most efficient when taking a single bisection per cycle. Due to the strong diffusivity of the system trajectories of transient dynamics, initialized between the stable states with respect to the mean temperature, are confined to the heteroclininc trajectory, one which connects the fixed unstable and stable states, after relatively short transient times. This constraint dictates a ...

  2. Effect of dust models on global nuclear winter. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pontier, P.Q.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of optical-depth calculations were accomplished to assess the effects of various existing dust and soot models on the transmission of incident sunlight. A change in the standard deviation of the particle-size distribution from two to four, assuming constant total density, resulted in a decrease in the visible optical depth by a factor of ten. A technique using a method of direct integration was developed for the calculation of the effective optical depth of nuclear-induced dust and soot clouds. Contributions from directly transmitted photons, first scattered photons using anisotropic cross sections, and all subsequently scattered photons were used to calculate the amount of light transmitted through the cloud. Absorption effects were also included. The results of this study were comparable to the results of several recent nuclear winter studies.

  3. Bayesian Proteoform Modeling Improves Protein Quantification of Global Proteomic Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Datta, Susmita; Payne, Samuel H.; Kang, Jiyun; Bramer, Lisa M.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Metz, Thomas O.; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.; Tardiff, Mark F.; McDermott, Jason E.; Pounds, Joel G.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the capability of mass spectrometry-based proteomics has matured, tens of thousands of peptides can be measured simultaneously, which has the benefit of offering a systems view of protein expression. However, a major challenge is that with an increase in throughput, protein quantification estimation from the native measured peptides has become a computational task. A limitation to existing computationally-driven protein quantification methods is that most ignore protein variation, such as alternate splicing of the RNA transcript and post-translational modifications or other possible proteoforms, which will affect a significant fraction of the proteome. The consequence of this assumption is that statistical inference at the protein level, and consequently downstream analyses, such as network and pathway modeling, have only limited power for biomarker discovery. Here, we describe a Bayesian model (BP-Quant) that uses statistically derived peptides signatures to identify peptides that are outside the dominant pattern, or the existence of multiple over-expressed patterns to improve relative protein abundance estimates. It is a research-driven approach that utilizes the objectives of the experiment, defined in the context of a standard statistical hypothesis, to identify a set of peptides exhibiting similar statistical behavior relating to a protein. This approach infers that changes in relative protein abundance can be used as a surrogate for changes in function, without necessarily taking into account the effect of differential post-translational modifications, processing, or splicing in altering protein function. We verify the approach using a dilution study from mouse plasma samples and demonstrate that BP-Quant achieves similar accuracy as the current state-of-the-art methods at proteoform identification with significantly better specificity. BP-Quant is available as a MatLab ® and R packages at https://github.com/PNNL-Comp-Mass-Spec/BP-Quant.

  4. YEAR PROGRESS REPORT TITLE: Global Modeling of Tropospheric Aerosols and Their Contribution to Climate Variation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as CCN would cool the climate system by about ­1.16 W m-2 , while carbonaceous aerosols from fossil fuel combustion acting alone may cool the system by about ­0.52 W m-2 (see Table 1). However, because-1- GACP 2nd YEAR PROGRESS REPORT TITLE: Global Modeling of Tropospheric Aerosols

  5. Global Tracking of Uncertain Nonlinear Cascaded Systems with Adaptive Internal Model1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    robust output regulation problem by dynamic state feedback control for the case where the exosystem regulation with uncertain exosystem by dynamic state feedback control. We have succeeded in developingGlobal Tracking of Uncertain Nonlinear Cascaded Systems with Adaptive Internal Model1 Zhiyong Chen

  6. Modeling the Dynamics of Desakota Regions: Global - Local Nexus in the Taipei Metropolitan Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Bing-Sheng

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the 1970s, Asia has experienced rapid urbanization processes, which are distinct from U.S. society, and the direction of Asian urbanization is more strongly affected by economic globalization. The desakota model, proposed by McGee and Ginsburg...

  7. Conceptual understanding of climate change with a globally resolved energy balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dommenget, Dietmar

    Conceptual understanding of climate change with a globally resolved energy balance model Dietmar on the surface energy balance by very simple repre- sentations of solar and thermal radiation, the atmospheric and cold regions to warm more than other regions. Keywords Climate dynamics Á Climate change Á Climate

  8. IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering (to appear). Empirical Studies of a Prediction Model for Regression Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothermel, Gregg

    for Regression Test Selection Mary Jean Harrold 1 David Rosenblum 2 Gregg Rothermel 3 Elaine Weyuker 4 Abstract Regression testing is an important activity that can account for a large proportion of the cost of software maintenance. One approach to reducing the cost of regression testing is to employ a selective regression

  9. Commercial Software | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a variety of applications including simulation, modeling, computation, internet, flexible framework modeling, and more. Commercial software can be licensed directly from...

  10. ENERGY INVESTMENTS UNDER CLIMATE POLICY: A COMPARISON OF GLOBAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCollum, David; Nagai, Yu; Riahi, Keywan; Marangoni, Giacomo; Calvin, Katherine V.; Pietzcker, Robert; Van Vliet, Jasper; van der Zwaan, Bob

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The levels of investment needed to mobilize an energy system transformation and mitigate climate change are not known with certainty. This paper aims to inform the ongoing dialogue and in so doing to guide public policy and strategic corporate decision making. Within the framework of the LIMITS integrated assessment model comparison exercise, we analyze a multi-IAM ensemble of long-term energy and greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. Our study provides insight into several critical but uncertain areas related to the future investment environment, for example in terms of where capital expenditures may need to flow regionally, into which sectors they might be concentrated, and what policies could be helpful in spurring these financial resources. We find that stringent climate policies consistent with a 2°C climate change target would require a considerable upscaling of investments into low-carbon energy and energy efficiency, reaching approximately $45 trillion (range: $30–$75 trillion) cumulative between 2010 and 2050, or about $1.1 trillion annually. This represents an increase of some $30 trillion ($10–$55 trillion), or $0.8 trillion per year, beyond what investments might otherwise be in a reference scenario that assumes the continuation of present and planned emissions-reducing policies throughout the world. In other words, a substantial "clean-energy investment gap" of some $800 billion/yr exists — notably on the same order of magnitude as present-day subsidies for fossil energy and electricity worldwide ($523 billion). Unless the gap is filled rather quickly, the 2°C target could potentially become out of reach.

  11. Comparing Supply-Side Specifications in Models of Global Agriculture and the Food System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Sherman; van Meijl, Hans; Willenbockel, Dirk; Valin, Hugo; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Masui, Toshihiko; Sands, Ronald; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Havlik, Petr; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Tabeau, Andrzej; Kavallari, Aikaterini; Schmitz, Christoph; Dietrich, Jan P.; von Lampe, Martin

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper compares the theoretical specification of production and technical change across the partial equilibrium (PE) and computable general equilibrium (CGE) models of the global agricultural and food system included in the AgMIP model comparison study. The two modeling approaches have different theoretical underpinnings concerning the scope of economic activity they capture and how they represent technology and the behavior of supply and demand in markets. This paper focuses on their different specifications of technology and supply behavior, comparing their theoretical and empirical treatments. While the models differ widely in their specifications of technology, both within and between the PE and CGE classes of models, we find that the theoretical responsiveness of supply to changes in prices can be similar, depending on parameter choices that define the behavior of supply functions over the domain of applicability defined by the common scenarios used in the AgMIP comparisons. In particular, we compare the theoretical specification of supply in CGE models with neoclassical production functions and PE models that focus on land and crop yields in agriculture. In practice, however, comparability of results given parameter choices is an empirical question, and the models differ in their sensitivity to variations in specification. To illustrate the issues, sensitivity analysis is done with one global CGE model, MAGNET, to indicate how the results vary with different specification of technical change, and how they compare with the results from PE models.

  12. Daylighting Prediction Software: Comparative Analysis and Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estes, J. M. Jr.; Schreppler, S.; Newsom, T.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in selecting a software program are presented. “Radiance”, a reverse ray tracing method software package, was chosen for use in the simulations. An existing school was modeled with the Radiance software and predictions of daylighting contributions were compared...

  13. RELAP-7 SOFTWARE VERIFICATION AND VALIDATION PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Curtis L [Idaho National Laboratory; Choi, Yong-Joon [Idaho National Laboratory; Zou, Ling [Idaho National Laboratory

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This INL plan comprehensively describes the software for RELAP-7 and documents the software, interface, and software design requirements for the application. The plan also describes the testing-based software verification and validation (SV&V) process—a set of specially designed software models used to test RELAP-7.

  14. SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Design...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Design Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Design Checklist This checklist is intended to...

  15. Impact of emissions, chemistry, and climate on atmospheric carbon monoxide : 100-year predictions from a global chemistry-climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chien.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    The possible trends for atmospheric carbon monoxide in the next 100 yr have been illustrated using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate model driven by emissions predicted by a global economic development model. ...

  16. Impacts of increased bioenergy demand on global food markets: an AgMIP economic model intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lotze-Campen, Hermann; von Lampe, Martin; Kyle, G. Page; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Havlik, Petr; van Meijl, Hans; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Popp, Alexander; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Valin, Hugo; Willenbockel, Dirk; Wise, Marshall A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated Assessment studies have shown that meeting ambitious greenhouse gas mitigation targets will require substantial amounts of bioenergy as part of the future energy mix. In the course of the Agricultural Model Comparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP), five global agro-economic models were used to analyze a future scenario with global demand for ligno-cellulosic bioenergy rising to about 100 ExaJoule in 2050. From this exercise a tentative conclusion can be drawn that ambitious climate change mitigation need not drive up global food prices much, if the extra land required for bioenergy production is accessible or if the feedstock, e.g. from forests, does not directly compete for agricultural land. Agricultural price effects across models by the year 2050 from high bioenergy demand in an RCP2.6-type scenario appear to be much smaller (+5% average across models) than from direct climate impacts on crop yields in an RCP8.5-type scenario (+25% average across models). However, potential future scarcities of water and nutrients, policy-induced restrictions on agricultural land expansion, as well as potential welfare losses have not been specifically looked at in this exercise.

  17. Is the Ozone Depletion Regime a Model for an Emerging Regime on Global Warming?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang, Winfried

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the for- mation of a global warming regime produces a highlydepletion and the global warming regimes was recognized byan Emerging Regime on Global Warming? by Winfried Lang I.

  18. Assessing the Effects of Anthropogenic Aerosols on Pacific Storm Track Using a Multiscale Global Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J.; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan; Molina, Mario J.

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric aerosols impact weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track using a multi-scale global aerosol-climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and pre-industrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by - 2.5 and + 1.3 W m-2, respectively, by emission changes from pre-industrial to present day, and an increased cloud-top height indicates invigorated mid-latitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides for the first time a global perspective of the impacts of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multi-scale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on the global scale.

  19. The emerging market for Web-based enterprise software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Göldi, Andreas (Andreas Jakob)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Web-based enterprise software - sometimes referred to as "Software as a Service" (SaaS) or "on demand software" - is a major wave of innovation that introduces a new technical and economic model to enterprise software. The ...

  20. User's guide to DIANE Version 2. 1: A microcomputer software package for modeling battery performance in electric vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, W.W.; Walsh, W.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Energy Systems Div.); Symons, P.C. (Electrochemical Engineering Consultants, Inc., Morgan Hill, CA (USA))

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DIANE is an interactive microcomputer software package for the analysis of battery performance in electric vehicle (EV) applications. The principal objective of this software package is to enable the prediction of EV performance on the basis of laboratory test data for batteries. The model provides a second-by-second simulation of battery voltage and current for any specified velocity/time or power/time profile. The capability of the battery is modeled by an algorithm that relates the battery voltage to the withdrawn current, taking into account the effect of battery depth-of-discharge (DOD). Because of the lack of test data and other constraints, the current version of DIANE deals only with vehicles using fresh'' batteries with or without regenerative braking. Deterioration of battery capability due to aging can presently be simulated with user-input parameters accounting for an increase of effective internal resistance and/or a decrease of cell no-load voltage. DIANE 2.1 is written in FORTRAN language for use on IBM-compatible microcomputers. 7 refs.

  1. Assessing the Potential of Developing a Tool for Residential Facility Management Using Building Information Modeling Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madhani, Himanshu 1986-

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    for scheduled, proactive and (when necessary) reactive maintenance work. Globally, use of smart phones and various applications for home and office security has amplified. With increase in use of smart phones and applications by owners, such a tool would... that the building is a smart building which is synced with the system. Smart Buildings LLC (a US-based engineering and design firm) offers this definition: ?A smart building is the integration of building, technology, and energy systems. These systems may include...

  2. Sensitivity of photolysis frequencies and key tropospheric oxidants in a global model to cloud vertical distributions and optical properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongyu

    in the tropical upper troposphere. We find that the radiative impact of clouds on global photolysis frequencies(O1 D), J(NO2)) due to the radiative effects of clouds in June are about 0.0% (0.4%, 0.9%), 0.8% (1Sensitivity of photolysis frequencies and key tropospheric oxidants in a global model to cloud

  3. Predicting spin of compact objects from their QPOs: A global QPO model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banibrata Mukhopadhyay

    2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We establish a unified model to explain Quasi-Periodic-Oscillation (QPO) observed from black hole and neutron star systems globally. This is based on the accreting systems thought to be damped harmonic oscillators with higher order nonlinearity. The model explains multiple properties parallelly independent of the nature of the compact object. It describes QPOs successfully for several compact sources. Based on it, we predict the spin frequency of the neutron star Sco X-1 and the specific angular momentum of black holes GRO J1655-40, GRS 1915+105.

  4. Model Development Development of a system emulating the global carbon cycle in Earth system models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Tachiiri; J. C. Hargreaves; J. D. Annan; A. Oka; A. Abe-ouchi; M. Kawamiya

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    developed a loosely coupled model (LCM) which can represent the outputs of a GCMbased Earth system model

  5. FRAMES-2.0 Software System: Linking to the Groundwater Modeling System (GMS) RT3D and MT3DMS Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, Gene; Castleton, Karl J.; Pelton, Mitch A.

    2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Linkages to the Groundwater Modeling System have been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to enable the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to more realistically assess the risk to the public of radioactive contaminants at NRC-licensed sites. Common software tools presently in use are limited in that they cannot assess contaminant migration through complex natural environments. The purpose of this initiative is to provide NRC with a licensing safety-analysis tool with sufficient power, flexibility, and utility that it can serve as the primary software platform for analyzing the hazards associated with licensing actions at those “complex” sites at which the traditional tools are inappropriate. As a tool designed to realistically approximate prospective doses to the public, this initiative addresses NRC’s safety-performance goal by confirming that licensing actions do not result in undue risk to the public.

  6. New generation of software? Modeling of energy demands for residential ventilation with HTML interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forowicz, T.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents an interactive on-line package for calculation of energy and cost demands for residential infiltration and ventilation, with input and output data entry through a web browser. This is a unique tool. It represents a new kind of approach to developing software employing user (client) and server (package provider) computers. The main program, servicing {open_quotes}intelligent{close_quotes} CGI (Common Gateway Interface) calls, resides on the server and dynamically handles the whole package performance and the procedure of calculations. The {open_quotes}computing engine{close_quotes} consists of two parts: RESVENT - the previously existing program for ventilation calculations and ECONOMICS - for heating and cooling system energy and cost calculations. The user interface is designed in such a way, that it allows simultaneous access by many users from all over the world.

  7. The Global Nuclear Futures Model: A Dynamic Simulation Tool for Energy Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, N.E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0748 (United States)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Global Nuclear Futures Model (GNFM) is a dynamic simulation tool that provides an integrated framework to model key aspects of nuclear energy, nuclear materials storage and disposition, global nuclear materials management, and nuclear proliferation risk. It links nuclear energy and other energy shares dynamically to greenhouse gas emissions and twelve other measures of environmental impact. It presents historical data from 1990 to 2000 and extrapolates energy demand through the year 2050. More specifically, it contains separate modules for energy, the nuclear fuel cycle front end, the nuclear fuel cycle back end, defense nuclear materials, environmental impacts, and measures of the potential for nuclear proliferation. It is globally integrated but also breaks out five regions of the world so that environmental impacts and nuclear proliferation concerns can be evaluated on a regional basis. The five regions are the United States of America (USA), The Peoples Republic of China (China), the former Soviet Union (FSU), the OECD nations excluding the USA, and the rest of the world (ROW). (author)

  8. Evaluation of the Suitability of Polarimetric Scattering and Emissivity Models with Scene Generation Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gartley, Michael G.

    Evaluation of the Suitability of Polarimetric Scattering and Emissivity Models with Scene models and hardware based infrared scene projectors commonly utilize analytical forms of polarized bi, polarimetric imaging sensors and payloads can benefit greatly from polarization capable synthetic image

  9. Managed Evolution of a Model Driven Development Approach to Software-based Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieman, James M.

    Driven Architecture (MDA) initiative from the Object Management Group (OMG) is a well-known example of model-based development as framed by the Model Driven Architecture (MDA) [MDA2001]. The MDA advocates

  10. Environmental Modelling & Software 15 (2000) 681692 www.elsevier.com/locate/envsoft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -scale air pollution modelling using adaptive unstructured meshes A.S. Tomlin a,* , S. Ghorai a , G. Hart of Computer Studies, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK Abstract High resolution models of air pollution but less so in meteorological and air pollution models. However, it is well known that grid resolution has

  11. Matilda: A Distributed UML Virtual Machine for Model-Driven Software Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Jun

    is designed as a pipeline (or sequence) of plugins. Different plugins implement different functionalities in Matilda, such as importing UML models, validating UML models and construct- ing a JAST. The pipeline, called Matilda, which allows developers to design their applications as UML models and directly execute

  12. Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locatelli, R.

    A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model ...

  13. The U.S. Research University as a Global Model: Some Fundamental Problems to Consider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, Robert A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The political economy of globalization in the Americas. PaloThe political economy of globalization in the Americas (pp.The political economy of globalization in the Americas (pp.

  14. The HBI in a quasi-global model of the intracluster medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latter, Henrik N

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate how convective instabilities influence heat conduction in the intracluster medium (ICM) of cool-core galaxy clusters. The ICM is a high-beta, weakly collisional plasma in which the transport of momentum and heat is aligned with the magnetic field. The anisotropy of heat conduction, in particular, gives rise to instabilities that can access energy stored in a temperature gradient of either sign. We focus on the heat-flux buoyancy-driven instability (HBI), which feeds on the outwardly increasing temperature profile of cluster cool cores. Our aim is to elucidate how the global structure of a cluster impacts on the growth and morphology of the linear HBI modes when in the presence of Braginskii viscosity, and ultimately on the ability of the HBI to thermally insulate cores. We employ an idealised quasi-global model, the plane-parallel atmosphere, which captures the essential physics -- e.g. the global radial profile of the cluster -- while letting the problem remain analytically tract...

  15. Evaluating Clouds, Aerosols, and their Interactions in Three Global Climate Models using COSP and Satellite Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ban-Weiss, George; Jin, Ling; Bauer, S.; Bennartz, Ralph; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai; Ming, Yi; Guo, Huan; Jiang, Jonathan

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurately representing aerosol-cloud interactions in global climate models is challenging. As parameterizations evolve, it is important to evaluate their performance with appropriate use of observations. In this work we compare aerosols, clouds, and their interactions in three climate models (AM3, CAM5, ModelE) to MODIS satellite observations. Modeled cloud properties were diagnosed using the CFMIP Observations Simulator Package (COSP). Cloud droplet number concentrations (N) were derived using the same algorithm for both satellite-simulated model values and observations. We find that aerosol optical depth tau simulated by models is similar to observations. For N, AM3 and CAM5 capture the observed spatial pattern of higher values in near-coast versus remote ocean regions, though modeled values in general are higher than observed. In contrast, ModelE simulates lower N in most near-coast versus remote regions. Aerosol- cloud interactions were computed as the sensitivity of N to tau for marine liquid clouds off the coasts of South Africa and Eastern Asia where aerosol pollution varies in time. AM3 and CAM5 are in most cases more sensitive than observations, while the sensitivity for ModelE is statistically insignificant. This widely used sensitivity could be subject to misinterpretation due to the confounding influence of meteorology on both aerosols and clouds. A simple framework for assessing the N – tau sensitivity at constant meteorology illustrates that observed sensitivity can change from positive to statistically insignificant when including the confounding influence of relative humidity. Satellite simulated values of N were compared to standard model output and found to be higher with a bias of 83 cm-3.

  16. Evolution of Meteorological Base Models for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.S

    ESL-PA-13-11-01 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Energy Procedia 00 (2013) 000–000 www.elsevier.com/locate/procedia 2013 ISES Solar World Congress Evaluation of Meteorological Base Models... for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas Kee Han Kima,b*, Juan-Carlos Baltazarb, and Jeff S. Haberla,b aDepartment of Architecture, Texas A&M University, 3137 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3137, U.S.A. bEnergy Systems Laboratory, Texas A...

  17. Collaborative Proposal: Transforming How Climate System Models are Used: A Global, Multi-Resolution Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estep, Donald

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the great interest in regional modeling for both weather and climate applications, regional modeling is not yet at the stage that it can be used routinely and effectively for climate modeling of the ocean. The overarching goal of this project is to transform how climate models are used by developing and implementing a robust, efficient, and accurate global approach to regional ocean modeling. To achieve this goal, we will use theoretical and computational means to resolve several basic modeling and algorithmic issues. The first task is to develop techniques for transitioning between parameterized and high-fidelity regional ocean models as the discretization grid transitions from coarse to fine regions. The second task is to develop estimates for the error in scientifically relevant quantities of interest that provide a systematic way to automatically determine where refinement is needed in order to obtain accurate simulations of dynamic and tracer transport in regional ocean models. The third task is to develop efficient, accurate, and robust time-stepping schemes for variable spatial resolution discretizations used in regional ocean models of dynamics and tracer transport. The fourth task is to develop frequency-dependent eddy viscosity finite element and discontinuous Galerkin methods and study their performance and effectiveness for simulation of dynamics and tracer transport in regional ocean models. These four projects share common difficulties and will be approach using a common computational and mathematical toolbox. This is a multidisciplinary project involving faculty and postdocs from Colorado State University, Florida State University, and Penn State University along with scientists from Los Alamos National Laboratory. The completion of the tasks listed within the discussion of the four sub-projects will go a long way towards meeting our goal of developing superior regional ocean models that will transform how climate system models are used.

  18. A Formal Approach for Modeling Software Agents Coordination Lily Chang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shatz, Sol M.

    Petri net approach to model the coordination of multi-agent systems. A higher level net (called host net) defines the movements and coordination mechanism of agents, while lower level nets (called agent nets that are tokens of the host net) model the behavior of individual agents. A dynamic channel concept

  19. Agriculture and Climate Change in Global Scenarios: Why Don't the Models Agree

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Gerald; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; Ahammad, Helal; Blanc, Elodie; Calvin, Katherine V.; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Kyle, G. Page; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; von Lampe, Martin; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; van Meijl, Hans; Mueller, C.; Reilly, J. M.; Robertson, Richard; Sands, Ronald; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Valin, Hugo; Willenbockel, Dirk

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agriculture is unique among economic sectors in the nature of impacts from climate change. The production activity that transforms inputs into agricultural outputs makes direct use of weather inputs. Previous studies of the impacts of climate change on agriculture have reported substantial differences in outcomes of key variables such as prices, production, and trade. These divergent outcomes arise from differences in model inputs and model specification. The goal of this paper is to review climate change results and underlying determinants from a model comparison exercise with 10 of the leading global economic models that include significant representation of agriculture. By providing common productivity drivers that include climate change effects, differences in model outcomes are reduced. All models show higher prices in 2050 because of negative productivity shocks from climate change. The magnitude of the price increases, and the adaptation responses, differ significantly across the various models. Substantial differences exist in the structural parameters affecting demand, area, and yield, and should be a topic for future research.

  20. The Thermodynamic Influence of Subgrid Orography in a Global Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Bian, Xindi; Hunt, Allen G.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessments of the impacts of climate change typically require information at scales of 10 km or less. Such a resolution will not be achieved by global climate models for many years. We have developed an alternative to explicit resolution that can meet the needs of climate change impact assessment now. We have applied to a global climate model a physically-based subgrid-scale treatment of the influence of orography on temperature, clouds, precipitation, and land surface hydrology. The treatment represents subgrid variations in surface elevation in terms of fractional area distributions of discrete elevation classes. For each class it calculates the height rise/descent of air parcels traveling through the grid cell, and applies the influence of the rise/descent to the temperature and humidity profiles of the elevation class. Cloud, radiative, and surface processes are calculated separately for each elevation class using the same physical parameterizations used by the model without the subgrid parameterization. The simulated climate fields for each elevation class can then be distributed in post-processing according to the spatial distribution of surface elevation within each grid cell. Parallel 10-year simulations with and without the subgrid treatment have been performed. The simulated temperature, precipitation and snow water are mapped to 2.5 minute (~5 km) resolution and compared with gridded analyses of station measurements. The simulation with the subgrid scheme produces a much more realistic distribution of snow water and significantly more realistic distributions of temperature and precipitation than the simulation without the subgrid scheme. Moreover, the grid cell means of most other fields are virtually unchanged by the subgrid scheme. This suggests that the tuning of the climate model without the subgrid scheme is also applicable to the model with the scheme.

  1. FRAMES-2.0 Software System: Providing Password Protection and Limited Access to Models and Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, Gene; Pelton, Mitch A.

    2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important concerns for regulatory agencies is the concept of reproducibility (i.e., reproducibility means credibility) of an assessment. One aspect of reproducibility deals with tampering of the assessment. In other words, when multiple groups are engaged in an assessment, it is important to lock down the problem that is to be solved and/or to restrict the models that are to be used to solve the problem. The objective of this effort is to provide the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with a means to limit user access to models and to provide a mechanism to constrain the conceptual site models (CSMs) when appropriate. The purpose is to provide the user (i.e., NRC) with the ability to “lock down” the CSM (i.e., picture containing linked icons), restrict access to certain models, or both.

  2. Open source software maturity model based on linear regression and Bayesian analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Dongmin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    based on Bayesian statistics. More importantly, an updating rule is established through Bayesian analysis to improve the joint distribution, and thus the objectivity of the coefficients in the linear multiple-regression model, according to new incoming...

  3. Building robust chemical reaction mechanisms : next generation of automatic model construction software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Jing, 1972-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building proper reaction mechanisms is crucial to model the system dynamic properties for many industrial processes with complex chemical reaction phenomena. Because of the complexity of a reaction mechanism, computer-aided ...

  4. Services and the Business Models of Product Firms: An Empirical Analysis of the Software Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suarez, Fernando F.

    Some product firms increasingly rely on service revenues as part of their business models. One possible explanation is that they turn to services to generate additional profits when their product industries mature and ...

  5. Integrating chemistry into 3D climate models: Detailed kinetics in the troposphere and stratosphere of a global climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kao, C.Y.J.; Elliott, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Earth and Environmental Sciences Div.; Turco, R.P.; Zhao, X. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The motivation for the project is to create the first complete, three-dimensional climate model that enfolds atmospheric photochemistry. The LANL chemical global climate model (GCM) not only distributes the trace greenhouse gases and modifies their concentrations within the detailed photochemical web, but also permits them to influence the radiation field and so force their own transport. Both atmospheric chemistry and fluid dynamics are nonlinear and zonally asymmetric phenomena. They can only be adequately modeled in three dimensions on the global grid. The kinetics-augmented GCM is the only program within the atmospheric community capable of investigating interaction involving chemistry and transport. The authors have conducted case studies of timely three-dimensional chemistry issues. Examples include ozone production from biomass burning plumes, kinetic feedbacks in zonally asymmetric transport phenomena with month- to year-long time scales, and volcano sulfate aerosols with respect to their potential effects on tropospheric ozone depletion.

  6. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  7. Global model of a gridded-ion thruster powered by a radiofrequency inductive coil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chabert, P.; Arancibia Monreal, J.; Bredin, J.; Popelier, L.; Aanesland, A. [LPP, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UPMC, Paris XI, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A global (volume-averaged) model of a gridded-ion thruster is proposed. The neutral propellant (xenon gas) is injected into the thruster chamber at a fixed rate and a plasma is generated by circulating a radiofrequency current in an inductive coil. The ions generated in this plasma are accelerated out of the thruster by a pair of DC biased grids. The neutralization downstream is not treated. Xenon atoms also flow out of the thruster across the grids. The model, based on particle and energy balance equations, solves for four global variables in the thruster chamber: the plasma density, the electron temperature, the neutral gas (atom) density, and the neutral gas temperature. The important quantities to evaluate the thruster efficiency and performances are calculated from these variables and from the voltage across the grids. It is found that the mass utilization efficiency rapidly decreases with the gas flow rate. However, the radiofrequency power transfer efficiency increases significantly with the injected gas flow rate. Therefore, there is a compromise to be found between these two quantities.

  8. Global well-posedness of strong solutions to a tropical climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jinkai

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we consider the Cauchy problem to the TROPIC CLIMATE MODEL derived by Frierson-Majda-Pauluis in [Comm. Math. Sci, Vol. 2 (2004)] which is a coupled system of the barotropic and the first baroclinic modes of the velocity and the typical midtropospheric temperature. The system considered in this paper has viscosities in the momentum equations, but no diffusivity in the temperature equation. We establish here the global well-posedness of strong solutions to this model. In proving the global existence of strong solutions, to overcome the difficulty caused by the absence of the diffusivity in the temperature equation, we introduce a new velocity $w$ (called the pseudo baroclinic velocity), which has more regularities than the original baroclinic mode of the velocity. An auxiliary function $\\phi$, which looks like the effective viscous flux for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, is also introduced to obtain the $L^\\infty$ bound of the temperature. Regarding the uniqueness, we use the idea of p...

  9. An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change: the MIT IGSM-CAM (version 1.0)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    This paper describes a computationally efficient framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model ...

  10. Global MHD simulations of stratified and turbulent protoplanetary discs. I. Model properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastien Fromang; Richard P. Nelson

    2006-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of global 3-D MHD simulations of stratified and turbulent protoplanetary disc models. The aim of this work is to develop thin disc models capable of sustaining turbulence for long run times, which can be used for on-going studies of planet formation in turbulent discs. The results are obtained using two codes written in spherical coordinates: GLOBAL and NIRVANA. Both are time--explicit and use finite differences along with the Constrained Transport algorithm to evolve the equations of MHD. In the presence of a weak toroidal magnetic field, a thin protoplanetary disc in hydrostatic equilibrium is destabilised by the magnetorotational instability (MRI). When the resolution is large enough (25 vertical grid cells per scale height), the entire disc settles into a turbulent quasi steady-state after about 300 orbits. Angular momentum is transported outward such that the standard alpha parameter is roughly 4-6*10^{-3}. We find that the initial toroidal flux is expelled from the disc midplane and that the disc behaves essentially as a quasi-zero net flux disc for the remainder of the simulation. As in previous studies, the disc develops a dual structure composed of an MRI--driven turbulent core around its midplane, and a magnetised corona stable to the MRI near its surface. By varying disc parameters and boundary conditions, we show that these basic properties of the models are robust. The high resolution disc models we present in this paper achieve a quasi--steady state and sustain turbulence for hundreds of orbits. As such, they are ideally suited to the study of outstanding problems in planet formation such as disc--planet interactions and dust dynamics.

  11. ICSE Workshop on Green and Sustainable Software Engineering, Zurich, Switzerland, 3rd June 2012 An Energy Consumption Model and Analysis Tool for Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Jean-Guy

    system-level optimisation. Keywords-green computing; Cloud computing; energy consumption; performanceIn 1st ICSE Workshop on Green and Sustainable Software Engineering, Zurich, Switzerland, 3rd June 2012 An Energy Consumption Model and Analysis Tool for Cloud Computing Environments FeiFei Chen, Jean

  12. 3rd International Conference on Countermeasures to Urban Heat Island Venice, October 13-15, 2014 Comparison of Software Models for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua Newa, William A. Millera, Yu (Joe- based tool to estimate cool-roof energy savings 2 2014-08-20: The Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) is undergoing revision and validation. Results from the current version of RSC (beta release 0.92) may

  13. Environmental Modelling & Software 15 (2000) 161167 www.elsevier.com/locate/envsoft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuncheva, Ludmila I.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of heavy metal loadings in Liverpool bay L.I. Kuncheva a,* , J. Wrench b , L.C. Jain c , A.S. Al of the loadings of 10 heavy metals in Liverpool bay. Each metal concentration is associated with a fuzzy set modelling; Liverpool bay; Heavy metal concentration; Index of spatial distribution 1. Introduction

  14. Automated Software Engineering Process Assessment: Supporting Diverse Models using an Ontology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    , ISO 9001). It also provides an in-the-loop automated process assessment capability that can help, ISO 9001), and suitable performance and scalability. The approach can reduce the effort required assessment while simultaneously supporting diverse process assessment reference models (CMMI, ISO/IEC 15504

  15. Accounting for Global Climate Model Projection Uncertainty in Modern Statistical Downscaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johannesson, G

    2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Future climate change has emerged as a national and a global security threat. To carry out the needed adaptation and mitigation steps, a quantification of the expected level of climate change is needed, both at the global and the regional scale; in the end, the impact of climate change is felt at the local/regional level. An important part of such climate change assessment is uncertainty quantification. Decision and policy makers are not only interested in 'best guesses' of expected climate change, but rather probabilistic quantification (e.g., Rougier, 2007). For example, consider the following question: What is the probability that the average summer temperature will increase by at least 4 C in region R if global CO{sub 2} emission increases by P% from current levels by time T? It is a simple question, but one that remains very difficult to answer. It is answering these kind of questions that is the focus of this effort. The uncertainty associated with future climate change can be attributed to three major factors: (1) Uncertainty about future emission of green house gasses (GHG). (2) Given a future GHG emission scenario, what is its impact on the global climate? (3) Given a particular evolution of the global climate, what does it mean for a particular location/region? In what follows, we assume a particular GHG emission scenario has been selected. Given the GHG emission scenario, the current batch of the state-of-the-art global climate models (GCMs) is used to simulate future climate under this scenario, yielding an ensemble of future climate projections (which reflect, to some degree our uncertainty of being able to simulate future climate give a particular GHG scenario). Due to the coarse-resolution nature of the GCM projections, they need to be spatially downscaled for regional impact assessments. To downscale a given GCM projection, two methods have emerged: dynamical downscaling and statistical (empirical) downscaling (SDS). Dynamic downscaling involves configuring and running a regional climate model (RCM) nested within a given GCM projection (i.e., the GCM provides bounder conditions for the RCM). On the other hand, statistical downscaling aims at establishing a statistical relationship between observed local/regional climate variables of interest and synoptic (GCM-scale) climate predictors. The resulting empirical relationship is then applied to future GCM projections. A comparison of the pros and cons of dynamical versus statistical downscaling is outside the scope of this effort, but has been extensively studied and the reader is referred to Wilby et al. (1998); Murphy (1999); Wood et al. (2004); Benestad et al. (2007); Fowler et al. (2007), and references within those. The scope of this effort is to study methodology, a statistical framework, to propagate and account for GCM uncertainty in regional statistical downscaling assessment. In particular, we will explore how to leverage an ensemble of GCM projections to quantify the impact of the GCM uncertainty in such an assessment. There are three main component to this effort: (1) gather the necessary climate-related data for a regional SDS study, including multiple GCM projections, (2) carry out SDS, and (3) assess the uncertainty. The first step is carried out using tools written in the Python programming language, while analysis tools were developed in the statistical programming language R; see Figure 1.

  16. Using CORE Model-Based Systems Engineering Software to Support Program Management in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Project: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, C.; Sandor, D.; Simpkins, P.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes how a model-based systems engineering software, CORE, is helping the U. S. Department of Energy's Office of Biomass Program assist with bringing biomass-derived biofuels to the market. This software tool provides information to guide informed decision-making as biomass-to-biofuels systems are advanced from concept to commercial adoption. It facilitates management and communication of program status by automatically generating custom reports, Gantt charts, and tables using the widely available programs of Microsoft Word, Project and Excel.

  17. A sensitivity study of the thermodynamic environment on GFDL model hurricane intensity: Implications for global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, W.; Tuleya, R.E.; Ginis, I.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the effect of thermodynamic environmental changes on hurricane intensity is extensively investigated with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory hurricane model for a suite of experiments with different initial upper-tropospheric temperature anomalies up to {+-}4 C and sea surface temperatures ranging from 26 to 31 C given the same relative humidity profile. The results indicate that stabilization in the environmental atmosphere and sea surface temperature (SST) increase cause opposing effects on hurricane intensity. The offsetting relationship between the effects of atmospheric stability increase (decrease) and SST increase (decrease) is monotonic and systematic in the parameter space. This implies that hurricane intensity increase due to a possible global warming associated with increased CO{sub 2} is considerably smaller than that expected from warming of the oceanic waters alone. The results also indicate that the intensity of stronger (weaker) hurricanes is more (less) sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes. The model-attained hurricane intensity is found to be well correlated with the maximum surface evaporation and the large-scale environmental convective available potential energy. The model-attained hurricane intensity if highly correlated with the energy available from wet-adiabatic ascent near the eyewall relative to a reference sounding in the undisturbed environment for all the experiments. Coupled hurricane-ocean experiments show that hurricane intensity becomes less sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes since the ocean coupling causes larger (smaller) intensity reduction for stronger (weaker) hurricanes. This implies less increase of hurricane intensity related to a possible global warming due to increased CO{sub 2}.

  18. INTERPRETING THE GLOBAL 21 cm SIGNAL FROM HIGH REDSHIFTS. I. MODEL-INDEPENDENT CONSTRAINTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirocha, Jordan; Harker, Geraint J. A.; Burns, Jack O., E-mail: jordan.mirocha@colorado.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Campus Box 389, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The sky-averaged (global) 21 cm signal is a powerful probe of the intergalactic medium (IGM) prior to the completion of reionization. However, so far it has been unclear whether it will provide more than crude estimates of when the universe's first stars and black holes formed, even in the best case scenario in which the signal is accurately extracted from the foregrounds. In contrast to previous work, which has focused on predicting the 21 cm signatures of the first luminous objects, we investigate an arbitrary realization of the signal and attempt to translate its features to the physical properties of the IGM. Within a simplified global framework, the 21 cm signal yields quantitative constraints on the Ly? background intensity, net heat deposition, ionized fraction, and their time derivatives without invoking models for the astrophysical sources themselves. The 21 cm absorption signal is most easily interpreted, setting strong limits on the heating rate density of the universe with a measurement of its redshift alone, independent of the ionization history or details of the Ly? background evolution. In a companion paper, we extend these results, focusing on the confidence with which one can infer source emissivities from IGM properties.

  19. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prusa, Joseph

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG�s advanced dynamics core with the �physics� of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer- reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  20. The Future of Food Demand: Understanding Differences in Global Economic Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valin, Hugo; Sands, Ronald; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; Nelson, Gerald; Ahammad, Helal; Blanc, Elodie; Bodirsky, Benjamin; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Kyle, G. Page; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Paltsev, S.; Rolinski, Susanne; Tabeau, Andrzej; van Meijl, Hans; von Lampe, Martin; Willenbockel, Dirk

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the capacity of agricultural systems to feed the world population under climate change requires a good prospective vision on the future development of food demand. This paper reviews modeling approaches from ten global economic models participating to the AgMIP project, in particular the demand function chosen and the set of parameters used. We compare food demand projections at the horizon 2050 for various regions and agricultural products under harmonized scenarios. Depending on models, we find for a business as usual scenario (SSP2) an increase in food demand of 59-98% by 2050, slightly higher than FAO projection (54%). The prospective for animal calories is particularly uncertain with a range of 61-144%, whereas FAO anticipates an increase by 76%. The projections reveal more sensitive to socio-economic assumptions than to climate change conditions or bioenergy development. When considering a higher population lower economic growth world (SSP3), consumption per capita drops by 9% for crops and 18% for livestock. Various assumptions on climate change in this exercise do not lead to world calorie losses greater than 6%. Divergences across models are however notable, due to differences in demand system, income elasticities specification, and response to price change in the baseline.

  1. Consideration of the electron energy distribution function shape in a Ar and N{sub 2} global model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Namjun; Oh, Soo-Ghee [Division of Energy Systems Research, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Gaboriau, Freddy [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062 Toulouse (France)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a method to compensate the effects of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) shape on plasma characteristics when using global models to describe Ar and N{sub 2} inductively coupled discharges. A non-Maxwellian global model is developed for the pressure range 1-1000 mTorr by using an user-friendly Boltzmann equation solver to calculate the EEDF. The calculated EEDFs are compared with the measurements performed with a single Langmuir probe in the same conditions. We also compare the calculated results by using the Boltzmann equation solver with the results by assuming a Maxwellian EEDF and point out the influence of both methods on the contribution of the multi-step process on ionization. Finally, to take into account the shape of the EEDF in global models, abacuses are presented as a function of the absorbed power density and the pressure for typical Ar and N{sub 2} planar ICP discharges.

  2. Scenario and parameter studies on global deposition of radioactivity using the computer model GLODEP2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro, C.S.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The GLODEP2 computer code was utilized to determine biological impact to humans on a global scale using up-to-date estimates of biological risk. These risk factors use varied biological damage models for assessing effects. All the doses reported are the unsheltered, unweathered, smooth terrain, external gamma dose. We assume the unperturbed atmosphere in determining injection and deposition. Effects due to ''nuclear winter'' may invalidate this assumption. The calculations also include scenarios that attempt to assess the impact of the changing nature of the nuclear stockpile. In particular, the shift from larger to smaller yield nuclear devices significantly changes the injection pattern into the atmosphere, and hence significantly affects the radiation doses that ensue. We have also looked at injections into the equatorial atmosphere. In total, we report here the results for 8 scenarios. 10 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs.

  3. Radiative effect of clouds on tropospheric chemistry in a global three-dimensional chemical transport model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongyu

    Radiative effect of clouds on tropospheric chemistry in a global three-dimensional chemical. (2006), Radiative effect of clouds on tropospheric chemistry in a global three-dimensional chemical frequencies are calculated using the Fast-J radiative transfer algorithm. The GEOS-3 global cloud optical

  4. Software Developers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Because SEED will provide a common, open-source data framework, software developers will be able to write applications that access the data in a consistent way (with proper permissions), or build functionalities onto the SEED platform in a replicable way.

  5. Global energy and water balance: Characteristics from finite-volume atmospheric model of the IAP/LASG (FAMIL1)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Linjiong; Bao, Qing; Liu, Yimin; Wu, Guoxiong; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Wang, Xiaocong; He, Bian; Yu, Haiyang; Li, Jiandong

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper documents version 1 of the Finite-volume Atmospheric Model of the IAP/LASG (FAMIL1), which has a flexible horizontal resolution up to a quarter of 1°. The model, currently running on the ‘‘Tianhe 1A’’ supercomputer, is the atmospheric component of the third-generation Flexible Global Ocean-Atmosphere-Land climate System model (FGOALS3) which will participate in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6). In addition to describing the dynamical core and physical parameterizations of FAMIL1, this paper describes the simulated characteristics of energy and water balances and compares them with observational/reanalysis data. The comparisons indicate that the model simulates well the seasonalmore »and geographical distributions of radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface, as well as the surface latent and sensible heat fluxes. A major weakness in the energy balance is identified in the regions where extensive and persistent marine stratocumulus is present. Analysis of the global water balance also indicates realistic seasonal and geographical distributions with the global annual mean of evaporation minus precipitation being approximately 10?? mm d?¹. We also examine the connections between the global energy and water balance and discuss the possible link between the two within the context of the findings from the reanalysis data. Finally, the model biases as well as possible solutions are discussed.« less

  6. Time series modeling and large scale global solar radiation forecasting from geostationary satellites data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voyant, Cyril; Muselli, Marc; Paoli, Christophe; Nivet, Marie Laure

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When a territory is poorly instrumented, geostationary satellites data can be useful to predict global solar radiation. In this paper, we use geostationary satellites data to generate 2-D time series of solar radiation for the next hour. The results presented in this paper relate to a particular territory, the Corsica Island, but as data used are available for the entire surface of the globe, our method can be easily exploited to another place. Indeed 2-D hourly time series are extracted from the HelioClim-3 surface solar irradiation database treated by the Heliosat-2 model. Each point of the map have been used as training data and inputs of artificial neural networks (ANN) and as inputs for two persistence models (scaled or not). Comparisons between these models and clear sky estimations were proceeded to evaluate the performances. We found a normalized root mean square error (nRMSE) close to 16.5% for the two best predictors (scaled persistence and ANN) equivalent to 35-45% related to ground measurements. F...

  7. CSP 587: Software Quality Management S. Kan, Software Quality engineering, Addison-Wesley.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    hours · Quality Appraisal Programs 5 hours SEI's Capability Maturity Model ISO 9000 Total 45 hours CSPCSP 587: Software Quality Management Texts S. Kan, Software Quality engineering, Addison-Wesley. Objectives Students will learn methods of software quality management. This will include exposure to software

  8. Software Quality Assurance Plan for GoldSim Models Supporting the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites Performance Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory J. Shott, Vefa Yucel

    2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) applies to the development and maintenance of GoldSim models supporting the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs). Two PA models have been approved by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as of November 2006 for the PA maintenance work undertaken by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). NNSA/NSO asked NSTec to assume the custodianship of the models for future development and maintenance. The models were initially developed by Neptune and Company (N&C).

  9. Dealing with software: the research data issues 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Neil Chue

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Software underpins much of the scientific research undertaken today. As well as the “traditional” use of software for modelling and simulation, it is used to manage and control instruments, and analyse and visualise data. This permeation of the use...

  10. Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (EGEMS): A New Generation of Energy Efficiency Policy Planning Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; McMahon, James E.

    2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents efforts to date and prospective goals towards development of a modelling and analysis framework which is comprehensive enough to address the global climate crisis, and detailed enough to provide policymakers with concrete targets and achievable outcomes. In terms of energy efficiency policy, this requires coverage of the entire world, with emphasis on countries and regions with large and/or rapidly growing energy-related emissions, and analysis at the 'technology' level-building end use, transport mode or industrial process. These elements have not been fully addressed by existing modelling efforts, which usually take either a top-down approach, or concentrate on a few fully industrialized countries where energy demand is well-understood. Inclusion of details such as appliance ownership rates, use patterns and efficiency levels throughout the world allows for a deeper understanding of the demand for energy today and, more importantly, over the coming decades. This is a necessary next step for energy analysts and policy makers in assessment of mitigation potentials. The modelling system developed at LBNL over the past 3 years takes advantage of experience in end use demand and in forecasting markets for energy-consuming equipment, in combination with known technology-based efficiency opportunities and policy types. A particular emphasis has been placed on modelling energy growth in developing countries. Experiences to date include analyses covering individual countries (China and India), end uses (refrigerators and air conditioners) and policy types (standards and labelling). Each of these studies required a particular effort in data collection and model refinement--they share, however, a consistent approach and framework which allows comparison, and forms the foundation of a comprehensive analysis system leading to a roadmap to address the greenhouse gas mitigation targetslikely to be set in the coming years.

  11. Global environmental effects of impact-generated aerosols: Results from a general circulation model: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covey, C.; Ghan, S.J.; Walton, J.J.; Weissman, P.R.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interception of sunlight by the high altitude worldwide dust cloud generated by impact of a large asteroid or comet would lead to substantial land surface cooling, according to our three-dimensional atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). This result is qualitatively similar to conclusions drawn from an earlier study that employed a one-dimensional atmospheric model, but in the GCM simulation the heat capacity of the oceans substantially mitigates land surface cooling, an effect that one-dimensional models cannot quantify. On the other hand, the low heat capacity of the GCM's land surface allows temperatures to drop more rapidly in the initial stage of cooling than in the one-dimensional model study. These two differences between three-dimensional and one-dimensional model simulations were noted previously in studies of ''nuclear winter; '' GCM-simulated climatic changes in the Alvarez-inspired scenario of ''asteroid/comet winter,'' however, are more severe than in ''nuclear winter'' because the assumed aerosol amount is large enough to intercept all sunlight falling on earth. Impacts of smaller objects -- which would occur much more frequently than the Cretaceous/Tertiary event deduced by Alvarez and coworkers -- could also lead to dramatic, though less severe, climatic changes, according to our GCM. Our conclusion is that it is difficult to imagine an asteroid or comet impact leading to anything approaching complete global freezing, but quite reasonable to assume that impacts at the Alvarez level, or even smaller, dramatically alter the climate in at least a ''patchy'' sense. 30 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. FTT:Power : A global model of the power sector with induced technological change and natural resource depletion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercure, J -F

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work introduces a model of Future Technology Transformations for the power sector (FTT:Power), a representation of global power systems based on market competition, induced technological change (ITC) and natural resource use and depletion. It is the first component of a family of sectoral bottom-up models of technology, designed for integration into the global macroeconometric model E3MG. ITC occurs as a result of technological learning produced by cumulative investment and leads to highly nonlinear, irreversible and path dependent technological transitions. The model uses a dynamic coupled set of logistic differential equations. As opposed to traditional bottom-up energy models based on systems optimisation, such differential equations offer an appropriate treatment of the times and structure of change involved in sectoral technology transformations, as well as a much reduced computational load. Resource use and depletion are represented by local cost-supply curves, which give rise to different regional...

  13. Intercomparison and Evaluation of Global Aerosol Microphysical Properties among AeroCom Models of a Range of Complexity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, G. W.; Carslaw, K. S.; Reddington, C. L.; Pringle, K. J.; Schulz, M.; Asmi, A.; Spracklen, D. V.; Ridley, D. A.; Woodhouse, M. T.; Lee, L. A.; Zhang, Kai; Ghan, Steven J.; Easter, Richard C.; Liu, Xiaohong; Stier, P.; Lee, Y. H.; Adams, P. J.; Tost, H.; Lelieveld, J.; Bauer, S.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; van Noije, T.; Strunk, A.; Vignati, E.; Bellouin, N.; Dalvi, M.; Johnson, C. E.; Bergman, T.; Kokkola, H.; Von Salzen, Knut; Yu, Fangqun; Luo, Gan; Petzold, A.; Heintzenberg, J.; Clarke, A. D.; Ogren, J. A.; Gras, J.; Baltensperger, Urs; Kaminski, U.; Jennings, S. G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Harrison, R. M.; Beddows, D. C.; Kulmala, M.; Viisanen, Y.; Ulevicius, V.; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Zdimal, V.; Fiebig, M.; Hansson, H. C.; Swietlicki, E.; Henzing, J. S.

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the next generation of global climate models will include aerosol schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. These models enable aerosol optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations to be determined by fundamental aerosol processes, which should lead to a more physically based simulation of aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcings. This study examines the global variation in particle size distribution simulated by twelve global aerosol microphysics models to quantify model diversity and to identify any common biases against observations. Evaluation against size distribution measurements from a new European network of aerosol supersites shows that the mean model agrees quite well with the observations at many sites on the annual mean, but there are some seasonal biases common to many sites. In particular, at many of these European sites, the accumulation mode number concentration is biased low during winter and Aitken mode concentrations tend to be overestimated in winter and underestimated in summer. At high northern latitudes, the models strongly underpredict Aitken and accumulation particle concentrations compared to the measurements, consistent with previous studies that have highlighted the poor performance of global aerosol models in the Arctic. In the marine boundary layer, the models capture the observed meridional variation in the size distribution, which is dominated by the Aitken mode at high latitudes, with an increasing concentration of accumulation particles with decreasing latitude. Considering vertical profiles, the models reproduce the observed peak in total particle concentrations in the upper troposphere due to new particle formation, although modelled peak concentrations tend to be biased high over Europe. Overall, the results suggest that most global aerosol microphysics models simulate the global variation of the particle size distribution with a good degree of skill, but some models are in poor agreement with the observations. Further work is required to better constrain size-resolved primary and secondary particle number sources, and an improved understanding of nucleation and growth (e.g. the role of nitrate and secondary organics) will improve the fidelity of simulated particle size distributions.

  14. Modeling of shippingModeling of shipping NONOxx emissions in globalemissions in global GeertGeert VinkenVinken11,, FolkertFolkert BoersmaBoersma22, and Daniel J. Jacob, and Daniel J. Jacob33

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    ) emissions 5-7% of global sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions 3-4% of global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions ShipModeling of shippingModeling of shipping NONOxx emissions in globalemissions in global CTMs 70% of the ship emissions occur within 400 km of land Only industrial sector not regulated under

  15. Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, Brett; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7). Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA), phytoplanktonproduced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and methane sulfonate (MS{sup -}) are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr{sup -1}, for the Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS{sup -} (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms) contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr{sup -1}, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ngm{sup -3}, with values up to 400 ngm{sup -3} over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that despite revealed discrepancies (often more than a factor of 2), both Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011) parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The largest increases (up to 20 %) in CCN (at a supersaturation (S) of 0.2 %) number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming marine organics are internally-mixed with sea-salt provides diverse results with increases and decreases in the concentration of CCN over different parts of the ocean. The sign of the CCN change due to the addition of marine organics to seasalt aerosol is determined by the relative significance of the increase in mean modal diameter due to addition of mass, and the decrease in particle hygroscopicity due to compositional changes in marine aerosol. Based on emerging evidence for increased CCN concentration over biologically active surface ocean areas/periods, our study suggests that treatment of sea spray in global climate models (GCMs) as an internal mixture of marine organic aerosols and sea-salt will likely lead to an underestimation in CCN number concentration.

  16. Global estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy

    using Advanced Very High Res- olution Radiometer Lai data, Climate Research Unit climate dataGlobal estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water-relative-humidity-based two-source (ARTS) E model that simulates the surface energy balance, soil water balance

  17. Enhancing the resolution of sea ice in long-term global ocean general circulation model (gcm) integrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Joong Tae

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Open water in sea ice, such as leads and polynyas, plays a crucial role in determining the formation of deep- and bottom-water, as well as their long-term global properties and circulation. Ocean general circulation models (GCMs) designed...

  18. The Role of Stratification-Dependent Mixing for the Stability of the Atlantic Overturning in a Global Climate Model*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzeion, Ben

    in a Global Climate Model* BEN MARZEION Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center, and Bjerknes Centre oceanic heat transport. Subsequently, and in opposition to results from previous studies, the overturning, as seen, for example, in temperature reconstructions from Greenland ice cores, are often ex- plained

  19. The new GFDL global atmosphere and land model AM2/LM2: Evaluation with prescribed SST simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bretherton, Chris

    _____________________________________________________________________________ 1 The members of the GFDL Global Atmospheric Model Development Team include Jeffrey L. Anderson+ , V@ , P. C. D. Milly# , Mary J. Nath+ , Jeffrey J. Ploshay+ , V. Ramaswamy+ , M. Daniel Schwarzkopf sensible and latent heat storage, groundwater storage, and stomatal resistance. The performance

  20. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutowski, William J.; Prusa, Joseph M.; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the "physics" of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited. 3a. EULAG Advances EULAG is a non-hydrostatic, parallel computational model for all-scale geophysical flows. EULAG's name derives from its two computational options: EULerian (flux form) or semi-LAGrangian (advective form). The model combines nonoscillatory forward-in-time (NFT) numerical algorithms with a robust elliptic Krylov solver. A signature feature of EULAG is that it is formulated in generalized time-dependent curvilinear coordinates. In particular, this enables grid adaptivity. In total, these features give EULAG novel advantages over many existing dynamical cores. For EULAG itself, numerical advances included refining boundary conditions and filters for optimizing model performance in polar regions. We also added flexibility to the model's underlying formulation, allowing it to work with the pseudo-compressible equation set of Durran in addition to EULAG's standard anelastic formulation. Work in collaboration with others also extended the demonstrated range of validity of soundproof models, showing that they are more broadly applicable than some had previously thought. Substantial testing of EULAG included application and extension of the Jablonowski-Williamson baroclinic wave test - an archetype of planetary weather - and further analysis of multi-scale interactions arising from collapse of temperature fronts in both the baroclinic wave test and simulations of the Held-Suarez idealized climate. These analyses revealed properties of atmospheric gravity waves not seen in previous work and further demonstrated the ability of EULAG to simulate realistic behavior over several orders of magnitude of length scales. Additional collaborative work enhanced capability for modeling atmospheric flows with adaptive moving meshes and demonstrated the ability of EULAG to move into petascale computing. 3b. CAM-EULAG Advances We have developed CAM-EULAG in collaboration with former project postdoc, now University of Cape Town Assistant Professor, Babatunde Abiodun. Initial study documented good model performance in aqua-planet simulations. In particular, we showed that the grid adaptivity (stretching) implemented in CAM-EULAG allows higher resolution in selected regions without causing anomalous behavior such as spurious wave reflection. We then used the stretched-grid version to analyze simulated extreme precipitation events in West Africa, comparing the precipitation and event environment with observed behavior. The model simulates fairly well the spatial scale and the interannual and intraseasonal variability of the extreme events, although its extreme precipitation intensity is weaker than observed. In addition, both observations and the simulations show possible forcing of extreme events by African easterly waves. 3c. Other Contributions Through our collaborations, we have made contributions to a wide range of outcomes. For research focused on terrestrial behavior, these have included (1) upwind schemes for gas dynamics, (2) a nonlinear perspective on the dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation, (3) numerical realism of thermal co

  1. Software design for panoramic astronomical pipeline processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lior Shamir; Robert J. Nemiroff; David O. Torrey; Wellesley E. Pereira

    2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the software requirement and design specifications for all-sky panoramic astronomical pipelines. The described software aims to meet the specific needs of super-wide angle optics, and includes cosmic-ray hit rejection, image compression, star recognition, sky opacity analysis, transient detection and a web server allowing access to real-time and archived data. The presented software is being regularly used for the pipeline processing of 11 all-sky cameras located in some of the world's premier observatories. We encourage all-sky camera operators to use our software and/or our hosting services and become part of the global Night Sky Live network.

  2. Modeling the Oil Transition: A Summary of the Proceedings of the DOE/EPA Workshop on the Economic and Environmental Implications of Global Energy Transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L [ORNL

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global energy system faces sweeping changes in the next few decades, with potentially critical implications for the global economy and the global environment. It is important that global institutions have the tools necessary to predict, analyze and plan for such massive change. This report summarizes the proceedings of an international workshop concerning methods of forecasting, analyzing, and planning for global energy transitions and their economic and environmental consequences. A specific case, it focused on the transition from conventional to unconventional oil and other energy sources likely to result from a peak in non-OPEC and/or global production of conventional oil. Leading energy models from around the world in government, academia and the private sector met, reviewed the state-of-the-art of global energy modeling and evaluated its ability to analyze and predict large-scale energy transitions.

  3. Improving Healthcare Using Software | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFP » Important Trinity /

  4. Crowdsourcing Software Announcement | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 Department of EnergyCross-SectorDepartment ofGE, MIT

  5. Crowdsourcing Software Award | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 Department of EnergyCross-SectorDepartment ofGE,

  6. Global Warming, endogenous risk and irreversibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony C.; Narain, Urvashi

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The economics of global warming, Institute for InternationalEconomic Models of Global Warming, Cambridge, Mass. MITstochastic losses from global warming, Risk Analysis 16(2):

  7. Sensitivity of Global Terrestrial Gross Primary Production to Hydrologic States Simulated by the Community Land Model Using Two Runoff Parameterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei, Huimin; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yang, Dawen; Shi, Xiaoying; Mao, Jiafu; Hayes, Daniel J.; Schwalm, C.; Wei, Yaxing; Liu, Shishi

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The terrestrial water and carbon cycles interact strongly at various spatio-temporal scales. To elucidate how hydrologic processes may influence carbon cycle processes, differences in terrestrial carbon cycle simulations induced by structural differences in two runoff generation schemes were investigated using the Community Land Model 4 (CLM4). Simulations were performed with runoff generation using the default TOPMODEL-based and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model approaches under the same experimental protocol. The comparisons showed that differences in the simulated gross primary production (GPP) are mainly attributed to differences in the simulated leaf area index (LAI) rather than soil moisture availability. More specifically, differences in runoff simulations can influence LAI through changes in soil moisture, soil temperature, and their seasonality that affect the onset of the growing season and the subsequent dynamic feedbacks between terrestrial water, energy, and carbon cycles. As a result of a relative difference of 36% in global mean total runoff between the two models and subsequent changes in soil moisture, soil temperature, and LAI, the simulated global mean GPP differs by 20.4%. However, the relative difference in the global mean net ecosystem exchange between the two models is small (2.1%) due to competing effects on total mean ecosystem respiration and other fluxes, although large regional differences can still be found. Our study highlights the significant interactions among the water, energy, and carbon cycles and the need for reducing uncertainty in the hydrologic parameterization of land surface models to better constrain carbon cycle modeling.

  8. Structure and Evolution of Giant Cells in Global Models of Solar Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark S. Miesch; Allan Sacha Brun; Marc L. Derosa; Juri Toomre

    2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The global scales of solar convection are studied through three-dimensional simulations of compressible convection carried out in spherical shells of rotating fluid which extend from the base of the convection zone to within 15 Mm of the photosphere. Such modelling at the highest spatial resolution to date allows study of distinctly turbulent convection, revealing that coherent downflow structures associated with giant cells continue to play a significant role in maintaining the strong differential rotation that is achieved. These giant cells at lower latitudes exhibit prograde propagation relative to the mean zonal flow, or differential rotation, that they establish, and retrograde propagation of more isotropic structures with vortical character at mid and high latitudes. The interstices of the downflow networks often possess strong and compact cyclonic flows. The evolving giant-cell downflow systems can be partly masked by the intense smaller scales of convection driven closer to the surface, yet they are likely to be detectable with the helioseismic probing that is now becoming available. Indeed, the meandering streams and varying cellular subsurface flows revealed by helioseismology must be sampling contributions from the giant cells, yet it is difficult to separate out these signals from those attributed to the faster horizontal flows of supergranulation. To aid in such detection, we use our simulations to describe how the properties of giant cells may be expected to vary with depth, how their patterns evolve in time, and analyze the statistical features of correlations within these complex flow fields.

  9. Global Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben D

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1996). Globalization in Question: International Economy andGlobalization; Justice; Poverty; Underground Economy; United

  10. Software Architecture and Software Configuration Bernhard Westfechtel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westfechtel, Bernhard

    the software life cycle. In addition, it supports system building (creation of derived objects from support for the management of evolving software objects throughout the whole life cycle. Several problems architectures play a central role in the development and maintenance of a software system. A software

  11. Development of an atmospheric aerosol model for studies of global budgets and effects of airborne particulate material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giorgi, F.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microphysics-removal atmospheric aerosol model (AAM) is developed for use in general circulation models (GCMs) to study global budgets and effects of particulate material. In this model the particle population is composed of a set of log-normal modes whose time evolution due to microphysical processes is described via prognostic equations for an appropriate number of moments of the particle-size distribution. Detailed parameterizations of particle coagulation, sedimentation, dry deposition, and wet removal are developed and implemented into the AAM. The AAM is incorporated into a GCM and is applied to two types of studies: (1) characteristics of the particle wet and dry removal processes, and (2) climatic impact of massive particulate injections following a global nuclear war, with emphasis on the sensitivity of the simulated effects to the inclusion of particle microphysics. Results are discussed.

  12. A globally convergent method for finding all steady-state solutions of distillation columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    A globally convergent method for finding all steady-state solutions of distillation columns Ali distillation column with 7 steady-states show the robustness of the method. No published software known to the steady-state model of distillation columns as it returns the original system as a single large block

  13. Using a total landed cost model to foster global logistics strategy in the electronics industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jearasatit, Apichart

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global operation strategies have been widely used in the last several decades as many companies and industries have taken advantage of lower production costs. However, in choosing a location, companies often only consider ...

  14. Climate change and agriculture : global and regional effects using an economic model of international trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John M.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Empirical estimates of the economic welfare implications of the impact of climate change on global agricultural production are made. Agricultural yield changes resulting from climate scenarios associated with a doubling ...

  15. A polar stratospheric cloud parameterization for the global modeling initiative three-dimensional model and its response to stratospheric aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Considine, D. B. [Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center and Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland, College Park (United States)] [Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center and Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland, College Park (United States); Douglass, A. R. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (United States)] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (United States); Connell, P. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States); Kinnison, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States); Rotman, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States)

    2000-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new parameterization of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) which was written for and incorporated into the three-dimensional (3-D) chemistry and transport model (CTM) developed for NASA's Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) by the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI). The parameterization was designed to respond to changes in NO{sub y} and H{sub 2}O produced by high-speed civilian transport (HSCT) emissions. The parameterization predicts surface area densities (SADs) of both Type 1 and Type 2 PSCs for use in heterogeneous chemistry calculations. Type 1 PSCs are assumed to have a supercooled ternary sulfate (STS) composition, and Type 2 PSCs are treated as water ice with a coexisting nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) phase. Sedimentation is treated by assuming that the PSC particles obey lognormal size distributions, resulting in a realistic mass flux of condensed phase H{sub 2}O and HNO{sub 3}. We examine a simulation of the Southern Hemisphere high-latitude lower stratosphere winter and spring seasons driven by temperature and wind fields from a modified version of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Middle Atmosphere Community Climate Model Version 2 (MACCM2). Predicted PSC SADs and median radii for both Type 1 and Type 2 PSCs are consistent with observations. Gas phase HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O concentrations in the high-latitude lower stratosphere qualitatively agree with Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) HNO{sub 3} and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) H{sub 2}O observations. The residual denitrification and dehydration of the model polar vortex after polar winter compares well with atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) observations taken during November 1994. When the NO{sub x} and H{sub 2}O emissions of a standard 500-aircraft HSCT fleet with a NO{sub x} emission index of 5 are added, NO{sub x} and H{sub 2}O concentrations in the Southern Hemisphere polar vortex before winter increase by up to 3%. This results in earlier onset of PSC formation, denitrification, and dehydration. Active Cl{sub y} increases and produces small ({approx}1%) decreases in lower stratospheric vortex O{sub 3} concentrations during the spring relative to the HSCT-free run. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union.

  16. NIMASTEP: a software to modelize, study and analyze the dynamics of various small objects orbiting specific bodies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Delsate; A. Compère

    2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    NIMASTEP is a dedicated numerical software developed by us, which allows one to integrate the osculating motion (using cartesian coordinates) in a Newtonian approach of an object considered as a point-mass orbiting a homogeneous central body that rotates with a constant rate around its axis of smallest inertia. The code can be applied to objects such as particles, artificial or natural satellites or space debris. The central body can be either any terrestrial planet of the solar system, any dwarf-planet, or even an asteroid. In addition, very many perturbations can be taken into account, such as the combined third-body attraction of the Sun, the Moon, or the planets, the direct solar radiation pressure (with the central body shadow), the non-homogeneous gravitational field caused by the non-sphericity of the central body, and even some thrust forces. The simulations were performed using different integration algorithms. Two additional tools were integrated in the software package; the indicator of chaos MEGNO and the frequency analysis NAFF. NIMASTEP is designed in a flexible modular style and allows one to (de)select very many options without compromising the performance. It also allows one to easily add other possibilities of use. The code has been validated through several tests such as comparisons with numerical integrations made with other softwares or with semi-analytical and analytical studies. The various possibilities of NIMASTEP are described and explained and some tests of astrophysical interest are presented. At present, the code is proprietary but it will be released for use by the community in the near future. Information for contacting its authors and (in the near future) for obtaining the software are available on the web site http://www.fundp.ac.be/en/research/projects/page_view/10278201/

  17. Understanding and Improving Software Productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scacchi, Walt

    Understanding and Improving Software Productivity Walt Scacchi Institute for Software Research;2 Introduction · What affects software productivity? ­ Software productivity has been one of the most studied aspects of software engineering ­ Goal: review sample of empirical studies of software productivity

  18. Simulated diurnal rainfall physics in a multi-scale global climate model with embedded explicit convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Michael Stephen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    their Community Earth System Model (Richard Neale, personaldevelopment of Earth system models capable of reproducing

  19. Global data set of biogenic VOC emissions calculated by the MEGAN model over the last 30 years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sindelarova, K.; Granier, Claire; Bouarar, I.; Guenther, Alex B.; Tilmes, S.; Stavrakou, T.; Muller, J. F.; Kuhn, U.; Stefani, P.; Knorr, W.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGANv2.1) together with the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) meteorological fields were used to create a global emission dataset of biogenic VOCs available on a monthly basis for the time period of 1980 - 2010. This dataset is called MEGAN-MACC. The model estimated mean annual total BVOC emission of 760 Tg(C) yr1 consisting of isoprene (70%), monoterpenes (11%), methanol (6%), acetone (3%), sesquiterpenes (2.5%) and other BVOC species each contributing less than 2 %. Several sensitivity model runs were performed to study the impact of different model input and model settings on isoprene estimates and resulted in differences of * 17% of the reference isoprene total. A greater impact was observed for sensitivity run applying parameterization of soil moisture deficit that led to a 50% reduction of isoprene emissions on a global scale, most significantly in specific regions of Africa, South America and Australia. MEGAN-MACC estimates are comparable to results of previous studies. More detailed comparison with other isoprene in ventories indicated significant spatial and temporal differences between the datasets especially for Australia, Southeast Asia and South America. MEGAN-MACC estimates of isoprene and*-pinene showed a reasonable agreement with surface flux measurements in the Amazon andthe model was able to capture the seasonal variation of emissions in this region.

  20. Designing supportability into software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirolkar, Prashant A., 1973-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Despite the identification of a "software crisis" in the 1960s, large software projects are full of defects even today [19]. These defects cause the software to behave unexpectedly. The cause generally is ...

  1. Designing security into software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Chang Tony

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When people talk about software security, they usually refer to security applications such as antivirus software, firewalls and intrusion detection systems. There is little emphasis on the security in the software itself. ...

  2. Global Positioning System receiver evaluation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, R.H.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Sandia project currently uses an outdated Magnavox 6400 Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver as the core of its navigation system. The goal of this study was to analyze the performance of the current GPS receiver compared to newer, less expensive models and to make recommendations on how to improve the performance of the overall navigation system. This paper discusses the test methodology used to experimentally analyze the performance of different GPS receivers, the test results, and recommendations on how an upgrade should proceed. Appendices contain detailed information regarding the raw data, test hardware, and test software.

  3. This Ph.D thesis encompasses a global numerical simulation of the needleeye float zone process, used to grow silicon single crystals. The numerical models includes coupled electro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and free surface models and a global heat transfer model, with moving boundaries. An axisymmetric fluid to determine flow field, after the phase boundaries have been determined, by the heat transfer model. A finite field, from which temperature gradients are determined. The heat transfer model is furthermore expanded

  4. Cloud Computing - Software as a Service (SaaS) - CRM Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassan, Sikander

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The software industry has a tremendously competitive environment at the global and regional levels and the companies usually follow the differentiation strategy. Most of the software companies are going through a change ...

  5. Theory and Software

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theory and Software Home People Science Highlights Publications Seminars & Meetings Opportunities Advisory Committee Theory and Software Group (X-ray Science Division) The Theory...

  6. Development of Multilingual Acoustic Models in the GlobalPhone Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultz, Tanja

    , namely Ara­ bic, Chinese (Mandarin and Wu), Croatian, English, French, German, Japanese, Korean] #words vocabulary Arabic 100 u.w. 20 u.w. u.w. Croatian (+30) 83 4019 14 106K 20K Japanese 121 9785 25 1. The GlobalPhone Database (u.w.=under way) For training and testing we use Croatian, Japanese

  7. Mind the gap: modeling local and global context in (road) networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    structural prior: roads form a connected network of thin segments, with slowly changing width and curvature-scale appearance information from a large neighborhood in the per-pixel classier. Globally, the network structure-pixel evidence, and then select pixels on an optimal subset of these paths by energy minimization in a CRF, where

  8. The Tropical Atmospheric El Nio Signal in Satellite Precipitation Data and a Global Climate Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) ABSTRACT Aspects of the tropical atmospheric response to El Niño related to the global energy and water and the Advanced Micro- wave Scanning Radiometer-E and simulations from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies are highly correlated, but anomalies in stratiform­convective rainfall partitioning in the two datasets

  9. Moisture Flux Convergence in Regional and Global Climate Models: Implications for Droughts in the Southwestern United States Under Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yanhong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Salathe, E.; Dominguez, Francina; Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The water cycle of the southwestern United States (SW) is dominated by winter storms that maintain a positive annual net precipitation. Analysis of the control and future climate from four pairs of regional and global climate models (RCMs and GCMs) shows that the RCMs simulate a higher fraction of transient eddy moisture fluxes because the hydrodynamic instabilities associated with flow over complex terrain are better resolved. Under global warming, this enables the RCMs to capture the response of transient eddies to increased atmospheric stability that allows more moisture to converge on the windward side of the mountains by blocking. As a result, RCMs simulate enhanced transient eddy moisture convergence in the SW compared to GCMs, although both robustly simulate drying due to enhanced moisture divergence by the divergent mean flow in a warmer climate. This enhanced convergence leads to reduced susceptibility to hydrological change in the RCMs compared to GCMs.

  10. Managing the software design documents with XML Junichi Suzuki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Jun

    Managing the software design documents with XML Junichi Suzuki Department of Computer Science, and addresses how we can manage the software design documents for the distributed software development. Introduction It is hard to share and manage the software design models and their documents within a distributed

  11. Land-use change trajectories up to 2050: insights from a global agro-economic model comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, Christoph; van Meijl, Hans; Kyle, G. Page; Nelson, Gerald C.; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Gurgel, Angelo; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Popp, Alexander; Sands, Ronald; Tabeau, Andrzej; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; von Lampe, Martin; Wise, Marshall A.; Blanc, Elodie; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Kavallari, Aikaterini; Valin, Hugo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in agricultural land use have important implications for environmental services. Previous studies of agricultural land-use futures have been published indicating large uncertainty due to different model assumptions and methodologies. In this article we present a first comprehensive comparison of global agro-economic models that have harmonized drivers of population, GDP, and biophysical yields. The comparison allows us to ask two research questions: (1) How much cropland will be used under different socioeconomic and climate change scenarios? (2) How can differences in model results be explained? The comparison includes four partial and six general equilibrium models that differ in how they model land supply and amount of potentially available land. We analyze results of two different socioeconomic scenarios and three climate scenarios (one with constant climate). Most models (7 out of 10) project an increase of cropland of 10–25% by 2050 compared to 2005 (under constant climate), but one model projects a decrease. Pasture land expands in some models, which increase the treat on natural vegetation further. Across all models most of the cropland expansion takes place in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. In general, the strongest differences in model results are related to differences in the costs of land expansion, the endogenous productivity responses, and the assumptions about potential cropland.

  12. Scientific Final Report: COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William J. Gutowski; Joseph M. Prusa, Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz

    2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the 'physics' of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  13. Development of an atmospheric aerosol model for studies of global budgets and effects of airborne particulate material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giorgi, F.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microphysics-removal Atmospheric Aerosol Model (AAM) is developed for use in General Circulation Models (GCM) to study global budgets and effects of particulate material. In this model the particle population is assumed to be composed of a set of log-normal modes whose time evolution due to microphysical processes is described via prognostic equations for an appropriate number of moments of the particle size distribution. This newly devised technique, by making use of a small number of prognostic equations for the aerosol variables and utilizing optimized numerical procedures, renders the model computationally efficient, hence particularly suitable for use in complex 3D GCMs. Detailed parameterizations of particle coagulation, sedimentation, dry deposition, and wet removal are incorporated into the AAM.

  14. Draft only. This version: July 2011 GPE-VN: A general equilibrium model for the study of globalization,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coxhead, Ian

    of economies with global markets, for growth, economic welfare, income distribution and the environment, but the implications of integration with the global economy for income distribution, poverty change of globalization, poverty and the environment in Vietnam1 Ian Coxhead, University

  15. Effective hybrid evolutionary computational algorithms for global optimization and applied to construct prion AGAAAAGA fibril models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evolutionary algorithms are parallel computing algorithms and simulated annealing algorithm is a sequential computing algorithm. This paper inserts simulated annealing into evolutionary computations and successful developed a hybrid Self-Adaptive Evolutionary Strategy $\\mu+\\lambda$ method and a hybrid Self-Adaptive Classical Evolutionary Programming method. Numerical results on more than 40 benchmark test problems of global optimization show that the hybrid methods presented in this paper are very effective. Lennard-Jones potential energy minimization is another benchmark for testing new global optimization algorithms. It is studied through the amyloid fibril constructions by this paper. To date, there is little molecular structural data available on the AGAAAAGA palindrome in the hydrophobic region (113-120) of prion proteins.This region belongs to the N-terminal unstructured region (1-123) of prion proteins, the structure of which has proved hard to determine using NMR spectroscopy or X-ray crystallography ...

  16. Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

    2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this DOE project the improvements to parameterization of marine primary organic matter (POM) emissions, hygroscopic properties of marine POM, marine isoprene derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) emissions, surfactant effects, new cloud droplet activation parameterization have been implemented into Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.0), with a seven mode aerosol module from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)���¢��������s Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). The effects of marine aerosols derived from sea spray and ocean emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on microphysical properties of clouds were explored by conducting 10 year CAM5.0-MAM7 model simulations at a grid resolution 1.9�������°��������2.5�������° with 30 vertical layers. Model-predicted relationship between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of CCN in remote marine atmosphere was compared to data from the A-Train satellites (MODIS, CALIPSO, AMSR-E). Model simulations show that on average, primary and secondary organic aerosol emissions from the ocean can yield up to 20% increase in Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% Supersaturation, and up to 5% increases in droplet number concentration of global maritime shallow clouds. Marine organics were treated as internally or externally mixed with sea salt. Changes associated with cloud properties reduced (absolute value) the model-predicted short wave cloud forcing from -1.35 Wm-2 to -0.25 Wm-2. By using different emission scenarios, and droplet activation parameterizations, this study suggests that addition of marine primary aerosols and biologically generated reactive gases makes an important difference in radiative forcing assessments. All baseline and sensitivity simulations for 2001 and 2050 using global-through-urban WRF/Chem (GU-WRF) were completed. The main objective of these simulations was to evaluate the capability of GU-WRF for an accurate representation of the global atmosphere by exploring the most accurate configuration of physics options in GWRF for global scale modeling in 2001 at a horizontal grid resolution of 1�������° x 1�������°. GU-WRF model output was evaluated using observational datasets from a variety of sources including surface based observations (NCDC and BSRN), model reanalysis (NCEP/ NCAR Reanalysis and CMAP), and remotely-sensed data (TRMM) to evaluate the ability of GU-WRF to simulate atmospheric variables at the surface as well as aloft. Explicit treatment of nanoparticles produced from new particle formation in GU-WRF/Chem-MADRID was achieved by expanding particle size sections from 8 to 12 to cover particles with the size range of 1.16 nm to 11.6 �������µm. Simulations with two different nucleation parameterizations were conducted for August 2002 over a global domain at a 4�������º by 5�������º horizontal resolution. The results are evaluated against field measurement data from the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Real Time Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as satellite and reanalysis data. We have also explored the relationship between ���¢��������clean marine���¢������� aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses

  17. Software distribution using xnetlib

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dongarra, J.J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (US). Dept. of Computer Science]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Rowan, T.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Wade, R.C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (US). Dept. of Computer Science

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Xnetlib is a new tool for software distribution. Whereas its predecessor netlib uses e-mail as the user interface to its large collection of public-domain mathematical software, xnetlib uses an X Window interface and socket-based communication. Xnetlib makes it easy to search through a large distributed collection of software and to retrieve requested software in seconds.

  18. SOFTWARE ENGINEERING COMPUTER SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bone, Gary

    SOFTWARE ENGINEERING COMPUTER SCIENCE ... What's the Difference? goeng1@mcmaster.ca www). Software Engineering covers the course content listed under Computer Science, with some additions. Software). Software Engineering students will graduate with a Bachelor of Engineering (B.Eng). Computer Science

  19. LONG-TERM GLOBAL WATER USE PROJECTIONS USING SIX SOCIOECONOMIC SCENARIOS IN AN INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT MODELING FRAMEWORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.; Moss, Richard H.; Kim, Son H.

    2014-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we assess future water demands for the agricultural (irrigation and livestock), energy (electricity generation, primary energy production and processing), industrial (manufacturing and mining), and municipal sectors, by incorporating water demands into a technologically-detailed global integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change – the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Base-year water demands—both gross withdrawals and net consumptive use—are assigned to specific modeled activities in a way that maximizes consistency between bottom-up estimates of water demand intensities of specific technologies and practices, and top-down regional and sectoral estimates of water use. The energy, industrial, and municipal sectors are represented in fourteen geopolitical regions, with the agricultural sector further disaggregated into as many as eighteen agro-ecological zones (AEZs) within each region. We assess future water demands representing six socioeconomic scenarios, with no constraints imposed by future water supplies. The scenarios observe increases in global water withdrawals from 3,578 km3 year-1 in 2005 to 5,987 – 8,374 km3 year-1 in 2050, and to 4,719 – 12,290 km3 year-1 in 2095. Comparing the projected total regional water withdrawals to the historical supply of renewable freshwater, the Middle East exhibits the highest levels of water scarcity throughout the century, followed by India; water scarcity increases over time in both of these regions. In contrast, water scarcity improves in some regions with large base-year electric sector withdrawals, such as the USA and Canada, due to capital stock turnover and the almost complete phase-out of once-through flow cooling systems. The scenarios indicate that: 1) water is likely a limiting factor in climate change mitigation policies, 2) many regions can be expected to increase reliance on non-renewable groundwater, water reuse, and desalinated water, but they also highlight an important role for development and deployment of water conservation technologies and practices.

  20. A global conformance quality model. A new strategic tool for minimizing defects caused by variation, error, and complexity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinckley, C.M.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of Japanese products in the marketplace points to the dominant role of quality in product competition. Our focus is motivated by the tremendous pressure to improve conformance quality by reducing defects to previously unimaginable limits in the range of 1 to 10 parts per million. Toward this end, we have developed a new model of conformance quality that addresses each of the three principle defect sources: (1) Variation, (2) Human Error, and (3) Complexity. Although the role of variation in conformance quality is well documented, errors occur so infrequently that their significance is not well known. We have shown that statistical methods are not useful in characterizing and controlling errors, the most common source of defects. Excessive complexity is also a root source of defects, since it increases errors and variation defects. A missing link in the defining a global model has been the lack of a sound correlation between complexity and defects. We have used Design for Assembly (DFA) methods to quantify assembly complexity and have shown that assembly times can be described in terms of the Pareto distribution in a clear exception to the Central Limit Theorem. Within individual companies we have found defects to be highly correlated with DFA measures of complexity in broad studies covering tens of millions of assembly operations. Applying the global concepts, we predicted that Motorola`s Six Sigma method would only reduce defects by roughly a factor of two rather than orders of magnitude, a prediction confirmed by Motorola`s data. We have also shown that the potential defects rates of product concepts can be compared in the earliest stages of development. The global Conformance Quality Model has demonstrated that the best strategy for improvement depends upon the quality control strengths and weaknesses.

  1. Global Climate Modeling of the Martian water cycle with improved microphysics and radiatively active water ice clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarro, Thomas; Forget, François; Spiga, Aymeric; Millour, Ehouarn; Montmessin, Franck

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative effects of water ice clouds have noteworthy consequences on the Martian atmosphere, its thermal structure and circulation. Accordingly, the inclusion of such effects in the LMD Mars Global Climate Model (GCM) greatly modifies the simulated Martian water cycle. The intent of this paper is to address the impact of radiatively active clouds on atmospheric water vapor and ice in the GCM and improve its representation. We propose a new enhanced modeling of the water cycle, consisting of detailed cloud microphysics with dynamic condensation nuclei and a better implementation of perennial surface water ice. This physical modeling is based on tunable parameters. This new version of the GCM is compared to the Thermal Emission Spectrometer observations of the water cycle. Satisfying results are reached for both vapor and cloud opacities. However, simulations yield a lack of water vapor in the tropics after Ls=180{\\deg} which is persistent in simulations compared to observations, as a consequence of aphelion c...

  2. Proc. of 10th International Conf. on Software Engineering and Knowledge Engineering, June 1998, San Francisco, California Formalizing and Integrating the Functional Model into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Betty H.C.

    , Michigan 48824 fwangyi,chengbg@cps.msu.edu Abstract The data flow diagram (DFD), originally introduced demonstrated its usefulness in the software engineering discipline, DFDs seem to be essential to software de

  3. Contributions to an Improved Oxygen and Thermal Transport Model and Development of Fatigue Analysis Software for Asphalt Pavements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Xin

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Page 3-1 Schematic heat transfer model of pavement .............................................. 49 3-2 Comparison of sinusoidal model calculation with measured air temperature profile... are unavailable, data can be predicted using models. Several models for this purpose had been presented in literature ( 10~13). One method ( 10) uses a heat transfer model with a surface periodic temperature boundary condition assuming that daily and annual...

  4. Predicting tropospheric ozone and hydroxyl radical in a global, three-dimensional, chemistry, transport, and deposition model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atherton, C.S.

    1995-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Two of the most important chemically reactive tropospheric gases are ozone (O{sub 3}) and the hydroxyl radical (OH). Although ozone in the stratosphere is a necessary protector against the sun`s radiation, tropospheric ozone is actually a pollutant which damages materials and vegetation, acts as a respiratory irritant, and is a greenhouse gas. One of the two main sources of ozone in the troposphere is photochemical production. The photochemistry is initiated when hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide (CO) react with nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} = NO + NO{sub 2}) in the presence of sunlight. Reaction with the hydroxyl radical, OH, is the main sink for many tropospheric gases. The hydroxyl radical is highly reactive and has a lifetime on the order of seconds. Its formation is initiated by the photolysis of tropospheric ozone. Tropospheric chemistry involves a complex, non-linear set of chemical reactions between atmospheric species that vary substantially in time and space. To model these and other species on a global scale requires the use of a global, three-dimensional chemistry, transport, and deposition (CTD) model. In this work, I developed two such three dimensional CTD models. The first model incorporated the chemistry necessary to model tropospheric ozone production from the reactions of nitrogen oxides with carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH{sub 4}). The second also included longer-lived alkane species and the biogenic hydrocarbon isoprene, which is emitted by growing plants and trees. The models` ability to predict a number of key variables (including the concentration of O{sub 3}, OH, and other species) were evaluated. Then, several scenarios were simulated to understand the change in the chemistry of the troposphere since preindustrial times and the role of anthropogenic NO{sub x} on present day conditions.

  5. Emulating maize yields from global gridded crop models using statistical estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanc, E.

    This study estimates statistical models emulating maize yield responses to changes in temperature and

  6. Investigation of global and regional BWR instabilities with a four heated-channel Reduced Order Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    transport) and a heat transfer model (describing heat transfer between the fuel and the coolant). All

  7. On the accumulation of solid bodies in global turbulent protoplanetary disc models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastien Fromang; Richard P. Nelson

    2005-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the migration of solid bodies in turbulent protoplanetary accretion discs by means of global MHD simulations. The bodies range in size from 5 centimetres up to 1 metre, and so include objects whose migration is expected to be the most rapid due to gas drag interaction with the disc. As they drift inward through the disc, some of them are trapped in regions where gas pressure maxima are created by long lived anticyclonic vortices. This accumulation is very efficient, locally increasing the dust--to--gas ratio by a factor > 100 in some cases. We discuss the possible implications of this result for theories of planet formation.

  8. Evolution of Meteorological Base Models for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas Kee Han Kima,b*, Juan-Carlos Baltazarb, and Jeff S. Haberla,b aDepartment of Architecture, Texas A&M University, 3137 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3137, U.S.A. bEnergy Systems Laboratory, Texas A... for measured solar radiation data and, as a result, rely on the values from typical meteorological years. Texas, in a similar fashion as other states in the US, does not have an active network for solar radiation data and has a variety of weather conditions...

  9. Continuous mutual improvement of macromolecular structure models in the PDB and of X-ray crystallographic software: the dual role of deposited experimental data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87507 (United States); Bricogne, Gerard, E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Global Phasing Ltd, Sheraton House, Castle Park, Cambridge CB3 0AX (United Kingdom); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87507 (United States)

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Macromolecular structures deposited in the PDB can and should be continually reinterpreted and improved on the basis of their accompanying experimental X-ray data, exploiting the steady progress in methods and software that the deposition of such data into the PDB on a massive scale has made possible. Accurate crystal structures of macromolecules are of high importance in the biological and biomedical fields. Models of crystal structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) are in general of very high quality as deposited. However, methods for obtaining the best model of a macromolecular structure from a given set of experimental X-ray data continue to progress at a rapid pace, making it possible to improve most PDB entries after their deposition by re-analyzing the original deposited data with more recent software. This possibility represents a very significant departure from the situation that prevailed when the PDB was created, when it was envisioned as a cumulative repository of static contents. A radical paradigm shift for the PDB is therefore proposed, away from the static archive model towards a much more dynamic body of continuously improving results in symbiosis with continuously improving methods and software. These simultaneous improvements in methods and final results are made possible by the current deposition of processed crystallographic data (structure-factor amplitudes) and will be supported further by the deposition of raw data (diffraction images). It is argued that it is both desirable and feasible to carry out small-scale and large-scale efforts to make this paradigm shift a reality. Small-scale efforts would focus on optimizing structures that are of interest to specific investigators. Large-scale efforts would undertake a systematic re-optimization of all of the structures in the PDB, or alternatively the redetermination of groups of structures that are either related to or focused on specific questions. All of the resulting structures should be made generally available, along with the precursor entries, with various views of the structures being made available depending on the types of questions that users are interested in answering.

  10. Globalization Nationalized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazlish, Bruce

    Globalism and globalization have been seen as competitors to other allegiances, namely regionalism and nationalism. A look at recent efforts at reconceptualizing global history in China, Korea and the U.S., however, suggests ...

  11. Energy Monitoring of Software project-team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefèvre, Laurent

    Energy Monitoring of Software Systems project-team Romain Rouvoy Aurélien Bourdon Adel Noureddine Lionel Seinturier firstname.lastname@inria.fr #12;ICT & Energy 2% of the global energy consumption in 2007 [1] [1] Gartner #12;ICT & Energy [1] 2008 ICT report, Ecology Ministry 13.5% of the electricity

  12. A scalable high-order discontinuous Galerkin method for global atmospheric modeling Hae-Won Choia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Ramachandran D.

    system model will require a highly scalable and accurate flux-form formulation of atmospheric dynamics supercomputers. 1. INTRODUCTION The future evolution of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) into an Earth

  13. Global oceanic rainfall estimation from AMSR-E data based on a radiative transfer model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Kyoung-Wook

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved physically-based rainfall algorithm was developed using AMSR-E data based on a radiative transfer model. In addition, error models were designed and embedded in the algorithm to assess retrieval errors ...

  14. BIOMETRICS55, 580-584 A Global Goodness-of-Fit Statistic for Cox Regression Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parzen, Michael

    of the models would be helpful. Schoenfeld (1980), Moreau, O'Quigley, and Mesbah (1985), and Moreau, O'Quigley

  15. Using Citizen Science Data to Model the Distributions of Common Songbirds of Turkey Under Different Global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Using Citizen Science Data to Model the Distributions of Common Songbirds of Turkey Under Different an ornithological citizen science initiative (www.kusbank.org) with maximum entropy modeling and eight bioclimatic (2013) Using Citizen Science Data to Model the Distributions of Common Songbirds of Turkey Under

  16. Global economics/energy/environmental (E{sup 3}) modeling of long-term nuclear energy futures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Davidson, J.W.; Bathke, C.G.; Arthur, E.D.; Wagner, R.L. Jr.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A global energy, economics, environment (E{sup 3}) model has been adopted and modified with a simplified, but comprehensive and multi-regional, nuclear energy module. Using this model, consistent nuclear energy scenarios are constructed. A spectrum of future is examined at two levels in a hierarchy of scenario attributes in which drivers are either external or internal to nuclear energy. Impacts of a range of nuclear fuel-cycle scenarios are reflected back to the higher-level scenario attributes. An emphasis is placed on nuclear materials inventories (in magnitude, location, and form) and their contribution to the long-term sustainability of nuclear energy and the future competitiveness of both conventional and advanced nuclear reactors.

  17. The Role Of Modeling Assumptions And Policy Instruments in Evaluating The Global Implications Of U.S. Biofuel Policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of current U.S. biofuel law the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) is to reduce dependence on imported oil, but the law also requires biofuels to meet carbon emission reduction thresholds relative to petroleum fuels. EISA created a renewable fuel standard with annual targets for U.S. biofuel use that climb gradually from 9 billion gallons per year in 2008 to 36 billion gallons (or about 136 billion liters) of biofuels per year by 2022. The most controversial aspects of the biofuel policy have centered on the global social and environmental implications of its potential land use effects. In particular, there is an ongoing debate about whether indirect land use change (ILUC) make biofuels a net source, rather sink, of carbon emissions. However, estimates of ILUC induced by biofuel production and use can only be inferred through modeling. This paper evaluates how model structure, underlying assumptions, and the representation of policy instruments influence the results of U.S. biofuel policy simulations. The analysis shows that differences in these factors can lead to divergent model estimates of land use and economic effects. Estimates of the net conversion of forests and grasslands induced by U.S. biofuel policy range from 0.09 ha/1000 gallons described in this paper to 0.73 ha/1000 gallons from early studies in the ILUC change debate. We note that several important factors governing LUC change remain to be examined. Challenges that must be addressed to improve global land use change modeling are highlighted.

  18. International Conference on Human-Centered Software Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noé, Reinhold

    models in HCSE Social and organizational aspects in the software development lifecycle Human-centric software development tools User profiles and mental models User requirements and design constraints UserHCSE 2014 5th International Conference on Human-Centered Software Engineering Paderborn, Germany

  19. Global behavior of a multi-group SIS epidemic model with age ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 10, 2004 ... Security Agency (NSA) and Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... into the model may provide additional and important information which may be ...

  20. Author's personal copy Two-way coupling of an ENSO model to the global climate model CLIMBER-3a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levermann, Anders

    it is possible to introduce ENSO variability to an Earth system Model of Intermediate Complexity (EMIC we are using here. In this study we couple the Earth system model of intermediate complexity (EMIC

  1. CliCrop: a Crop Water-Stress and Irrigation Demand Model for an Integrated Global Assessment Model Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fant, C.A.

    This paper describes the use of the CliCrop model in the context of climate change general assessment

  2. Institute for Software Technology Wissensverarbeitung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motivation Example correct behavior battery(c)(ab(c)voltage(c))battery(c)(ab(c)voltage(c)) bulb for Software Technology Motivation Example cont. t t tsystem structure battery(B). bulb(L1). bulb(L2). bulb(L3 the fact that a bulb does not lit if it is broken · solution: model faulty behavior battery

  3. A global model simulation for 3-D radiative transfer impact on surface hydrology over the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, W.-L.; Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Leung, L. R.; Hsu, H.-H.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate 3-D mountain effects on solar flux distributions and their impact on surface hydrology over the western United States, specifically the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada, using the global CCSM4 (Community Climate System Model version 4; Community Atmosphere Model/Community Land Model – CAM4/CLM4) with a 0.23° × 0.31° resolution for simulations over 6 years. In a 3-D radiative transfer parameterization, we have updated surface topography data from a resolution of 1 km to 90 m to improve parameterization accuracy. In addition, we have also modified the upward-flux deviation (3-D–PP (plane-parallel)) adjustment to ensure that the energy balance atmore »the surface is conserved in global climate simulations based on 3-D radiation parameterization. We show that deviations in the net surface fluxes are not only affected by 3-D mountains but also influenced by feedbacks of cloud and snow in association with the long-term simulations. Deviations in sensible heat and surface temperature generally follow the patterns of net surface solar flux. The monthly snow water equivalent (SWE) deviations show an increase in lower elevations due to reduced snowmelt, leading to a reduction in cumulative runoff. Over higher-elevation areas, negative SWE deviations are found because of increased solar radiation available at the surface. Simulated precipitation increases for lower elevations, while it decreases for higher elevations, with a minimum in April. Liquid runoff significantly decreases at higher elevations after April due to reduced SWE and precipitation.« less

  4. Predicting software defects in varying development lifecycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Doo-Hwan

    Predicting software defects in varying development lifecycles using Bayesian nets Information and Software Technology (2007) Norman Fenton, Martin Neil, William March, Peter HyeonJeong Kim KAIST SE LAB #12;Contents Introduction Overall approach Analyzing the lifecycle Modeling the defect prediction

  5. Foundations for Feature Engineering of Software Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Alexander L.

    the user and the developer perspectives leads to difficulties in producing successful software systems. Developers are focused on the solution domain, where the system's lifecycle artifacts are key. Presently the software lifecycle and across the problem and solution domains. We present a model of lifecycle artifacts

  6. THE SOFTWARE KNOWLEDGE BASE Bertrand Meyer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Bertrand

    knowledge base" keeps track of software components and their properties; these properties are described, implementation, testing, project management). The use of the binary relational model for describing the properties of software is hacked by a theoretical study of the relations and constraints which play

  7. Malthusian assumptions lead to Boserupian phenology in a global model of the transitions to agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemmen, Carsten

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the many transitions from foraging to agropastoralism it is debated whether innovation in technology or increase of population is the primary driver. The driver discussion traditionally separates Malthusian (technology driven) from Boserupian (population driven) theories. I present a numerical model of the transition to agriculture and discuss this model in the light of the population versus technology debate and in Boserup's analytical frame- work in development theory. Although my model is based on ecological-Neomalthusian- principles, the coevolutionary positive feedback relationship between technology and population results in apparent Boserupian behaviour: innovation is greatest when population pressure is highest. This outcome is not only visible in the theory-driven reduced model, but is also present in a corresponding "real world" simulator which was tested against archaeological data, and which thus demonstrates the relevance and validity of the coevolutionary model. The lesson to be learned is th...

  8. User' Software Manual

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MM-Group Home MMG Advisory Committees 4-ID-D Home Recent Publications Beamline Info Optics Instrumentation Software User Info FAQs 4-ID-D Beamline Software Manual Introduction...

  9. Sensitivity of Remote Aerosol Distributions to Representation of Cloud-Aerosol Interactions in a Global Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Minghuai; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Qian, Yun; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun; Vinoj, V.

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Many global aerosol and climate models, including the widely used Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), have large biases in predicting aerosols in remote regions such as upper troposphere and high latitudes. In this study, we conduct CAM5 sensitivity simulations to understand the role of key processes associated with aerosol transformation and wet removal affecting the vertical and horizontal long-range transport of aerosols to the remote regions. Improvements are made to processes that are currently not well represented in CAM5, which are guided by surface and aircraft measurements together with results from a multi-scale aerosol-climate model (PNNL-MMF) that explicitly represents convection and aerosol-cloud interactions at cloud-resolving scales. We pay particular attention to black carbon (BC) due to its importance in the Earth system and the availability of measurements. We introduce into CAM5 a new unified scheme for convective transport and aerosol wet removal with explicit aerosol activation above convective cloud base. This new implementation reduces the excessive BC aloft to better simulate observed BC profiles that show decreasing mixing ratios in the mid- to upper-troposphere. After implementing this new unified convective scheme, we examine wet removal of submicron aerosols that occurs primarily through cloud processes. The wet removal depends strongly on the sub-grid scale liquid cloud fraction and the rate of conversion of liquid water to precipitation. These processes lead to very strong wet removal of BC and other aerosols over mid- to high latitudes during winter months. With our improvements, the Arctic BC burden has a10-fold (5-fold) increase in the winter (summer) months, resulting in a much better simulation of the BC seasonal cycle as well. Arctic sulphate and other aerosol species also increase but to a lesser extent. An explicit treatment of BC aging with slower aging assumptions produces an additional 30-fold (5-fold) increase in the Arctic winter (summer) BC burden. This BC aging treatment, however, has minimal effect on other under-predicted species. Interestingly, our modifications to CAM5 that aim at improving prediction of high-latitude and upper tropospheric aerosols also produce much better AOD and AAOD over various other regions globally when compared to multi-year AERONET retrievals. The improved aerosol distributions have impacts on other aspects of CAM5, improving the simulation of global mean liquid water path and cloud forcing.

  10. A global model simulation for 3-D radiative transfer impact on surface hydrology over Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, W.-L.; Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Leung, L. R.; Hsu, H.-H.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate 3-D mountain effects on solar flux distributions and their impact on surface hydrology over the Western United States, specifically the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada using CCSM4 (CAM4/CLM4) global model with a 0.23° × 0.31° resolution for simulations over 6 years. In 3-D radiative transfer parameterization, we have updated surface topography data from a resolution of 1 km to 90 m to improve parameterization accuracy. In addition, we have also modified the upward-flux deviation [3-D ? PP (plane-parallel)] adjustment to ensure that energy balance at the surface is conserved in global climate simulations based on 3-D radiation parameterization.more »We show that deviations of the net surface fluxes are not only affected by 3-D mountains, but also influenced by feedbacks of cloud and snow in association with the long-term simulations. Deviations in sensible heat and surface temperature generally follow the patterns of net surface solar flux. The monthly snow water equivalent (SWE) deviations show an increase in lower elevations due to reduced snowmelt, leading to a reduction in cumulative runoff. Over higher elevation areas, negative SWE deviations are found because of increased solar radiation available at the surface. Simulated precipitation increases for lower elevations, while decreases for higher elevations with a minimum in April. Liquid runoff significantly decreases in higher elevations after April due to reduced SWE and precipitation.« less

  11. Comparative Testing of the ESL's Code-Compliant Simulation Model and the FSEC's EnergyGauge Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Liu, Z.; Kim, S.

    .................................................................................... 7 3. COMPARISONS OF THE ESL MODEL AND FSEC’S ENERGYGAUGE............... 9 3.1 With the duct leakage.................................................................................................... 9 3.2 Without the duct leakage... parameters. ......................................................................................... 7 Table 2. Simulation summary........................................................................................... 36 Error! No table of figures...

  12. Two Case Studies of Open Source Software Development: Apache and Mozilla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbsleb, James D.

    , Productivity, Pro- gramming teams, Software process models, Software Quality assurance, Time estimation; D.2 of Mozilla data. We conclude with thoughts about the prospects for high-performance commercial/open source.8 [Software Engineering]-- Process metrics, Product metrics; K.6.3 [Software Management]-- Software

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20, 2013, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Energy Efficiency, Facilities, Global Climate & Energy, Materials Science, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, Partnership, Research &...

  14. A Model of Global Learning: How Students Change Through International High-Impact Experiences 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redwine, Tobin Dean

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    is warranted. The purpose of this study was to develop a model to explain the viewpoints of student changes by students who participate in a study abroad experience. To meet that purpose, three objectives were utilized. First, a qualitative phenomenology...

  15. Automatic Calibration of a Building Energy Simulation Model Using a Global Optimization Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, S. U.; Claridge, D.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulation model used to analyze the energy performance of an existing building should be calibrated to measured consumption data from the building so the simulation output closely follows the measured time series energy consumption data and shows...

  16. Parameterization of urban sub-grid scale processes in global atmospheric chemistry models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calbó, Josep.; Pan, Wen Wei.; Webster, Mort David.; Prinn, Ronald G.; McRae, Gregory J.

    We have derived a parameterization consisting of a set of analytical expressions that approximate the predictions by the CIT Urban Airshed Model for the net export to the environment (i.e., effective emissions) of several ...

  17. Do Coupled Climate Models Correctly SImulate the Upward Branch of the Deept Ocean Global Conveyor?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarmiento, Jorge L; Downes, Stephanie; Bianchi, Daniele

    2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The large-scale meridional overturning circulation (MOC) connects the deep ocean, a major reservoir of carbon, to the other components of the climate system and must therefore be accurately represented in Earth System Models. Our project aims to address the specific question of the pathways and mechanisms controlling the upwelling branch of the MOC, a subject of significant disagreement between models and observational syntheses, and among general circulation models. Observations of these pathways are limited, particularly in regions of complex hydrography such as the Southern Ocean. As such, we rely on models to examine theories of the overturning circulation, both physically and biogeochemically. This grant focused on a particular aspect of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) where there is currently significant disagreement between models and observationally based analyses of the MOC, and amongst general circulation models. In particular, the research focused on addressing the following questions: 1. Where does the deep water that sinks in the polar regions rise to the surface? 2. What processes are responsible for this rise? 3. Do state-of-the-art coupled GCMs capture these processes? Our research had three key components: observational synthesis, model development and model analysis. In this final report we outline the key results from these areas of research for the 2007 to 2012 grant period. The research described here was carried out primarily by graduate student, Daniele Bianchi (now a Postdoc at McGill University, Canada), and Postdoc Stephanie Downes (now a Research Fellow at The Australian national University, Australia). Additional support was provided for programmers Jennifer Simeon as well as Rick Slater.

  18. Optimization and sensitivity of a global biogeochemistry ocean model using combined in situ DIC, alkalinity, and phosphate data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Eun Young; Primeau, Francois

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    anthropogenic CO 2 in the Pacific Ocean, Global Biogeochem.dissolution in the Pacific Ocean, Global Biogeochem. Cycles,PO 4 ] in the equatorial Pacific Ocean by approximately 70%.

  19. Lifecycle Model

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter describes the lifecycle model used for the Departmental software engineering methodology.

  20. A simple object-oriented and open source model for scientific and policy analyses of the global climate system–Hector v1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartin, Corinne A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Schwarber, Adria; Link, Robert P.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple climate models play an integral role in policy and scientific communities. They are used for climate mitigation scenarios within integrated assessment models, complex climate model emulation, and uncertainty analyses. Here we describe Hector, an open source, object-oriented, simple global climate carbon-cycle model. This model runs essentially instantaneously while still representing the most critical global scale earth system processes. Hector has three main carbon pools: an atmosphere, land, and ocean. The model’s terrestrial carbon cycle includes respiration and primary production, accommodating arbitrary geographic divisions into, e.g., ecological biomes or political units. Hector’s actively solves the inorganic carbon system in the surface ocean, directly calculating air-sea fluxes of carbon and ocean pH. Hector reproduces the global historical trends of atmospheric [CO2] and surface temperatures. The model simulates all four Representative Concentration Pathways with high correlations (R >0.7) with current observations, MAGICC (a well-known simple climate model), and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project version 5. Hector is freely available under an open source license, and its modular design will facilitate a broad range of research in various areas.

  1. A complete desktop phase-equilibria software package using object-oriented programming and the component object model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Jairo Medina

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using a number of programming languages. OOP and COM are used in this research to create a library that implements a thermodynamics model and a set of phase-equilibria algorithms based on an equation of state (EOS). Without a major trade...

  2. Automatic Calibration of a Building Energy Simulation Model Using a Global Optimization Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, S. U.; Claridge, D.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    buildings, Proceedings of the ACEEE 1992 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 1, 137-147. Kaplan, M.B., Jones, B., Jansen, J., 1990. DOE- 2.1C Model calibration with monitored end-use data, Proceedings of the ACEEE 1990 Summer Study on Energy....E. Professor Texas A&M University Energy Systems Laboratory College Station, TX ABSTRACT A simulation model used to analyze the energy performance of an existing building should be calibrated to measured consumption data from...

  3. Post-2020 climate agreements in the major economies assessed in the light of global models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tavoni, Massimo; Kriegler, Elmar; Riahi, Keywan; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Aboumahboub, Tino; Bowen, Alex; Calvin, Katherine V.; Campiglio, Emanuele; Kober, Tom; Jewell, Jessica; Luderer, Gunnar; Marangoni, Giacomo; McCollum, David; van Sluisveld, Mariesse; Zimmer, Anne; van der Zwaan, Bob

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated assessment models can help in quantifying the implications of international climate agreements and regional climate action. This paper reviews scenario results from model intercomparison projects to explore different possible outcomes of post-2020 climate negotiations, recently announced pledges and their relation to the 2°C target. We provide key information for all the major economies, such as the year of emission peaking, regional carbon budgets and emissions allowances. We highlight the distributional consequences of climate policies, and discuss the role of carbon markets for financing clean energy investments, and achieving efficiency and equity.

  4. Agile Development and Software Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feitelson, Dror

    Agile Development and Software Evolution Dror Feitelson Basic Seminar on Software Engineering Hebrew University 2011 #12;Software Lifecycle Req's Analysis Design Construction Testing Transfer Maintenance Textbook view: #12;Software Lifecycle Req's Analysis Design Construction Testing Transfer

  5. HAZARD ANALYSIS SOFTWARE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, S; Tinh Tran, T

    2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington Safety Management Solutions, LLC developed web-based software to improve the efficiency and consistency of hazard identification and analysis, control selection and classification, and to standardize analysis reporting at Savannah River Site. In the new nuclear age, information technology provides methods to improve the efficiency of the documented safety analysis development process which includes hazard analysis activities. This software provides a web interface that interacts with a relational database to support analysis, record data, and to ensure reporting consistency. A team of subject matter experts participated in a series of meetings to review the associated processes and procedures for requirements and standard practices. Through these meetings, a set of software requirements were developed and compiled into a requirements traceability matrix from which software could be developed. The software was tested to ensure compliance with the requirements. Training was provided to the hazard analysis leads. Hazard analysis teams using the software have verified its operability. The software has been classified as NQA-1, Level D, as it supports the analysis team but does not perform the analysis. The software can be transported to other sites with alternate risk schemes. The software is being used to support the development of 14 hazard analyses. User responses have been positive with a number of suggestions for improvement which are being incorporated as time permits. The software has enforced a uniform implementation of the site procedures. The software has significantly improved the efficiency and standardization of the hazard analysis process.

  6. The Coronal Global Evolutionary Model (CGEM): Using HMI Vector Magnetogram and Doppler Data to Model the Buildup of Free Magnetic Energy in the Solar Corona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, George H; Bercik, David J; Kazachenko, Maria D; Lynch, Benjamin J; Welsch, Brian T; Hoeksema, J Todd; Hayashi, Keiji; Liu, Yang; Norton, Aimee A; Dalda, Alberto Sainz; Sun, Xudong; DeRosa, Marc L; Cheung, Mark C M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most violent space weather events (eruptive solar flares and coronal mass ejections) are driven by the release of free magnetic energy stored in the solar corona. Energy can build up on timescales of hours to days, and then may be suddenly released in the form of a magnetic eruption, which then propagates through interplanetary space, possibly impacting the Earth's space environment. Can we use the observed evolution of the magnetic and velocity fields in the solar photosphere to model the evolution of the overlying solar coronal field, including the storage and release of magnetic energy in such eruptions? The objective of CGEM, the Coronal Global Evolutionary Model, funded by the NASA/NSF Space Weather Modeling program, is to develop and evaluate such a model for the evolution of the coronal magnetic field. The evolving coronal magnetic field can then be used as a starting point for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the corona, which can then be used to drive models of heliospheric evolution and predi...

  7. Global and multi-scale features of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling: From modeling to forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitnov, Mikhail I.

    with the AL index, which measures the magnetic field disturbances produced by the substorm current system, such as turbulence, bursty bulk flows [Angelopolous et. al., 1999], and fluctuations in the near-Earth current sheet to reconstruct behavior of the system independent of modeling assump- tions, long time series data of geomagnetic

  8. A Global Approach for Reduced-Order Models of Flapping Flexible Wings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Mingjun

    description of both fluid and solid is then suggested as the step towards final ROMs. I. Introduction In early drawn back to nature's flapping-wing design. Among many reasons, a simple one can be explained by using basically provide mixed information affected by many factors, major or minor. The reduced-order model (ROM

  9. Polar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotko, William

    to J. Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 24 May 2007 #12;empirical model. Following synopsis-latitude ionosphere and ther- mosphere is the primary sink for electromagnetic power generated by the solar wind., 2006). Including Joule heat, mechanical work on the neutral gas, and collisionless energization

  10. Polar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotko, William

    submitted to J. Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 10 June 2007 #12;model. The location and extent- mosphere is the primary sink for electromagnetic power generated by the solar wind energization of auroral- and cusp-region plasmas, this variable energy transfer accounts for upwards of 60

  11. The Transition-Zone Water Filter Model for Global Material Circulation: Where Do We Stand?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with a small melt fraction, highly incompatible elements including hydro- gen, helium and argon are sequestered the fraction of water is small. Models have been developed to understand the structure of a melt layer Hilst, et al., 1997]), then the whole mantle is depleted with only a small volume (~10%) of relatively

  12. CIRES /NGDC Professional Research Assistant Software Engineer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    of data and integrated models describing the geophysical and solar- terrestrial environments. CIRES has and the ability to conceptualize user requirements into customer-friendly and efficient software applications

  13. Harmonizing Systems and Software Cost Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gan

    2009-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to examine the gaps and overlaps between software and systems engineering cost models with intent to harmonize the estimates in engineering engineering estimation. In particular, we evaluate ...

  14. A Process-Agent Construction Method for Software Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Doo-Hwan

    Library (EL): · Comprise historical data such as Time (T), Human Resource (HR), Cost (C), Quality (Q), etcA Process-Agent Construction Method for Software Process Modeling in SoftPM Prosim 2006 Qing Wang;Introduction Software process is highly dependent on the capabilities of individual software engineers

  15. 15 Software Product Line Engineering with the UML: Deriving Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    15 Software Product Line Engineering with the UML: Deriving Products T. Ziadi and J.-M. Jézéquel Abstract Software product line engineering introduces two new dimensions into the traditional engineering of software-based systems: the variability modeling and the product derivation. The variability gathers

  16. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard A. Ferrare; David D. Turner

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project goals: (1) Use the routine surface and airborne measurements at the ARM SGP site, and the routine surface measurements at the NSA site, to continue our evaluations of model aerosol simulations; (2) Determine the degree to which the Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol scattering and extinction can be used to remotely characterize the aerosol humidification factor; (3) Use the high temporal resolution CARL data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; and (4) Use the high temporal resolution CARL and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds.

  17. A Cross-model Comparison of Global Long-term Technology Diffusion under a 2?C Climate Change Control Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Zwaan, Bob; Rosler, Hilke; Kober, Tom; Aboumahboub, Tino; Calvin, Katherine V.; Gernaat, David; Marangoni, Giacomo; McCollum, David

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the long-term global energy technology diffusion patterns required to reach a stringent climate change target with a maximum average atmospheric temperature increase of 2°C. If the anthropogenic temperature increase is to be limited to 2°C, total CO2 emissions have to be reduced massively, so as to reach substantial negative values during the second half of the century. Particularly power sector CO2 emissions should become negative from around 2050 onwards according to most models used for this analysis in order to compensate for GHG emissions in other sectors where abatement is more costly. The annual additional capacity deployment intensity (expressed in GW/yr) for solar and wind energy until 2030 needs to be around that recently observed for coal-based power plants, and will have to be several times higher in the period 2030–2050. Relatively high agreement exists across models in terms of the aggregated low-carbon energy system cost requirements on the supply side until 2050, which amount to about 50 trillion US$.

  18. Use of a Lidar Forward Model for Global Comparisons of Cloud Fraction between the ICESat Lidar and the ECMWF Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    to underestimate cloud cover in the extra-tropical oceans, the trade wind cumulus, the stratocumulus sheets off-to-backscatter ratio and effective radius affect the forward modeled mean cloud fraction by no more than 10%. 1. Introduction Clouds play a major role in the Earth's radiation bud- get and predictions of future climate

  19. Global SAXS Data Analysis for Multilamellar Vesicles: Evolution of the Scattering Density Profile (SDP) Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heftberger, Peter [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria] [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria; Kollmitzer, Benjamin [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria] [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL] [ORNL; Pan, Jianjun [ORNL] [ORNL; Rappolt, Michael [University of Leeds, UK] [University of Leeds, UK; Amenitsch, Heinz [Graz University of Technology] [Graz University of Technology; Kucerka, Norbert [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,; Katsaras, John [ORNL] [ORNL; Pabst, georg [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria] [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The highly successful scattering density profile (SDP) model, used to jointly analyze small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering data from unilamellar vesicles, has been adapted for use with data from fully hydrated, liquid crystalline multilamellar vesicles (MLVs). Using a genetic algorithm, this new method is capable of providing high-resolution structural information, as well as determining bilayer elastic bending fluctuations from standalone X-ray data. Structural parameters such as bilayer thickness and area per lipid were determined for a series of saturated and unsaturated lipids, as well as binary mixtures with cholesterol. The results are in good agreement with previously reported SDP data, which used both neutron and X-ray data. The inclusion of deuterated and non-deuterated MLV neutron data in the analysis improved the lipid backbone information but did not improve, within experimental error, the structural data regarding bilayer thickness and area per lipid.

  20. Cirrus clouds in a global climate model with a statistical cirrus cloud scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.

    2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A statistical cirrus cloud scheme that accounts for mesoscale temperature perturbations is implemented in a coupled aerosol and atmospheric circulation model to better represent both subgrid-scale supersaturation and cloud formation. This new scheme treats the effects of aerosol on cloud formation and ice freezing in an improved manner, and both homogeneous freezing and heterogeneous freezing are included. The scheme is able to better simulate the observed probability distribution of relative humidity compared to the scheme that was implemented in an older version of the model. Heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN) are shown to decrease the frequency of occurrence of supersaturation, and improve the comparison with observations at 192 hPa. Homogeneous freezing alone can not reproduce observed ice crystal number concentrations at low temperatures (<205 K), but the addition of heterogeneous IN improves the comparison somewhat. Increases in heterogeneous IN affect both high level cirrus clouds and low level liquid clouds. Increases in cirrus clouds lead to a more cloudy and moist lower troposphere with less precipitation, effects which we associate with the decreased convective activity. The change in the net cloud forcing is not very sensitive to the change in ice crystal concentrations, but the change in the net radiative flux at the top of the atmosphere is still large because of changes in water vapor. Changes in the magnitude of the assumed mesoscale temperature perturbations by 25% alter the ice crystal number concentrations and the net radiative fluxes by an amount that is comparable to that from a factor of 10 change in the heterogeneous IN number concentrations. Further improvements on the representation of mesoscale temperature perturbations, heterogeneous IN and the competition between homogeneous freezing and heterogeneous freezing are needed.

  1. The Resilience of the Indian Economy to Rising Oil Prices as a Validation Test for a Global Energy-Environment-Economy CGE Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    as on how short-term mechanisms ­ and policy action ­ can smooth the negative impacts of energy price shocks1 The Resilience of the Indian Economy to Rising Oil Prices as a Validation Test for a Global Energy-Environment-Economy CGE Model Céline Guivarcha, * , Stéphane Hallegattea,b , Renaud Crassousa

  2. UC Irvine's Earth System Science Department has opportunities for postdocs and grad. students interested in global-scale cryospheric modeling. Our projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    interested in global-scale cryospheric modeling. Our projects (http://www.ess.uci.edu/~zender#ans and http://www.ess among the groups of Professors Charlie Zender (Aerosols, Radiation, http://www.ess.uci.edu/~zender), Jay Famiglietti (Hydrology, http://www.ess.uci.edu/~famiglietti), and Jim Randerson (Fire, C, H2O, http://www.ess

  3. Software engineering practices for control system reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. K. Schaffner; K. S White

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will discuss software engineering practices used to improve Control System reliability. The authors begin with a brief discussion of the Software Engineering Institute's Capability Maturity Model (CMM) which is a framework for evaluating and improving key practices used to enhance software development and maintenance capabilities. The software engineering processes developed and used by the Controls Group at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab), using the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) for accelerator control, are described. Examples are given of how their procedures have been used to minimized control system downtime and improve reliability. While their examples are primarily drawn from their experience with EPICS, these practices are equally applicable to any control system. Specific issues addressed include resource allocation, developing reliable software lifecycle processes and risk management.

  4. Evalutation and network of ec-decision support systems in the field of hydrological dispension models and of aquatic radioecological research Assessment of environmental models anf software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monte, L; Hofman, Dimitry

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evalutation and network of ec-decision support systems in the field of hydrological dispension models and of aquatic radioecological research

  5. Downscaling Global Land Cover Projections from an Integrated Assessment Model for Use in Regional Analyses: Results and Evaluation for the US from 2005 to 2095

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Huang, Maoyi; Wolf, Julie; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Projections of land cover change generated from Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and other economic-based models can be applied for analyses of environmental impacts at subregional and landscape scales. For those IAM and economic models that project land use at the sub-continental or regional scale, these projections must be downscaled and spatially distributed prior to use in climate or ecosystem models. Downscaling efforts to date have been conducted at the national extent with relatively high spatial resolution (30m) and at the global extent with relatively coarse spatial resolution (0.5 degree).

  6. A 1:1000 scale model of the digital world: Global connectivity can lead to the extinction of local networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleineberg, Kaj-Kolja

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overwhelming success of online social networks, the key actors in the cosmos of the Web 2.0, has reshaped human interactions on a worldwide scale. To understand the fundamental mechanisms which determine the fate of online social networks at the system level, we recently introduced a general ecological theory of the digital world. In this paper, we discuss the impact of heterogeneity in the network intrinsic fitness and present how the general theory can be applied to understand the competition between an international network, like Facebook, and local services. To this end, we construct a 1:1000 scale model of the digital world enclosing the 80 countries with most Internet users. We find that above a certain threshold the level of global connectivity can lead to the extinction of local networks. In addition, we reveal the complex role the tendency of individuals to engage in more active networks plays for the probability of local networks to become extinct and provide insights into the conditions under w...

  7. asci software quality: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quality Model Requirements for Software Quality Engineering Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: is an emerging discipline that is concerned with...

  8. asc software quality: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quality Model Requirements for Software Quality Engineering Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: is an emerging discipline that is concerned with...

  9. Tax Deduction Qualified Software

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On this page you'll find information about the EnergyGauge Summit version 3.20 (incorporating DOE-2.1E (v120)) qualified computer software (buildings.energy.gov/qualified_software.html), which calculates energy and power cost savings that meet federal tax incentive requirements for commercial buildings.

  10. Tax Deduction Qualified Software

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On this page you'll find information about the EnergyGauge Summit version 3.22 (incorporating DOE-2.1E (v120)) qualified computer software (buildings.energy.gov/qualified_software.html), which calculates energy and power cost savings that meet federal tax incentive requirements for commercial buildings.

  11. Tax Deduction Qualified Software

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On this page you'll find information about the EnergyGauge Summit version 3.21 (incorporating DOE-2.1E (v120)) qualified computer software (buildings.energy.gov/qualified_software.html), which calculates energy and power cost savings that meet federal tax incentive requirements for commercial buildings.

  12. Engineering Careers: Software Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenster, Sam

    of others When you screw up, you can do it on a massive scale #12;Totally unlike other engineering electronic device #12;Software tools Software engineers build their own tools The OS on your laptop;Just like other engineering Established body of knowledge Established practices Build on the work

  13. Probabilistic Software Workshop Probabilistic Software Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such identification imply a recommendation or it imply that any of the materials, instruments or equipment identified products. · NIST Disclaimer: Certain commercial equipment, instruments, software programs, and materials the official position of the National Institute of Standards and Technology or the U.S. Department of Justice

  14. SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM System Maintenance Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM More...

  15. global integrated assessment model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phipps, Steven J.

    , including emissions trading schemes and adaptation meas- ures. · Using GIAM, an illustrative long run include emissions trading schemes, carbon taxes, research and develop- ment schemes to encourage energy

  16. Estimation of methane and carbon dioxide surface fluxes using a 3-D global atmospheric chemical transport model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yu-Han, 1973-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane (CH?) and carbon dioxide (CO?) are the two most radiatively important greenhouse gases attributable to human activity. Large uncertainties in their source and sink magnitudes currently exist. We estimate global ...

  17. A comparison of the gravity field over Central Europe from superconducting gravimeters, GRACE and global hydrological models, using EOF analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crossley, David; de Linage, Caroline; Hinderer, Jacques; Boy, Jean-Paul; Famiglietti, James

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    retrieve absolute storage. To compute the ground gravity,storage in four layers within the first 2 m of the ground (ground gravity arises from the local cell (within about 20 km), and the rest comes from global water storage (

  18. Trend analysis from 1970 to 2008 and model evaluation of EDGARv4 global gridded anthropogenic mercury emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muntean, Marilena

    The Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) provides a time-series of man-made emissions of greenhouse gases and short-lived atmospheric pollutants from 1970 to 2008. Mercury is included in EDGARv4.tox1, ...

  19. Software quality assurance handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two important reasons for Software Quality Assurance (SQA) at Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD): First, the benefits from SQA make good business sense. Second, the Department of Energy has requested SQA. This handbook is one of the first steps in a plant-wide implementation of Software Quality Assurance at KCD. The handbook has two main purposes. The first is to provide information that you will need to perform software quality assurance activities. The second is to provide a common thread to unify the approach to SQA at KCD. 2 figs.

  20. Multiphase flow calculation software

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

  1. Under consideration for publication in Formal Aspects of Computing Concurrent Software Verification with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouaknine, Joël

    , Oxford, UK Abstract. We present a framework for model checking concurrent software systems which powerful verification techniques, counterexample-guided abstraction refinement and compositional reasoning with hardware and communication proto- cols, model checking is increasingly used to verify software systems

  2. Unit 9: Software Economics To provide an empirical view of where the effort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finkelstein, Anthony

    amount by which cost driver can influence the software cost estimated by the model) black box #12 and rework costs Ð code and documentation costs Ð labour and capital costs Ð software costs by phase costs. An Important Issue ¥ Why is it important to understand and control software costs? Ð software

  3. Software Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    To define requirements and responsibilities for software quality assurance (SQA) within the Department of Energy (DOE). DOE N 251.40, dated 5/3/01, extends this directive until 12/31/01.

  4. Software Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE N 251.40, dated 5/3/01, extends this directive until 12/31/01. To define requirements and responsibilities for software quality assurance (SQA) within the Department of Energy (DOE). Does not cancel other directives.

  5. The Software Patent Debate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guadamuz, Andres

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper discusses the proposed European Directive on the Patentability of Computer-Implemented Inventions and the subsequent debate that followed. Do software patents - as argued by policymakers' - result in increased ...

  6. Software Talk [Compatibility Mode

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acquisitionanalysis software for Diffraction Beam Lines at SSRL spec SPECPLOT ICS WxDiff WebSpec First installation on BL 2-1 CSS spec Direct connection (SCSI) 3rd party user...

  7. Software Function Allocation Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neal, Michael Ralph

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Necessary) Rapid Prototypes (Optional) 3. 4. 1 SFAM Step 1 ? Preparation If the Computer System Map (CSM) has not been created for the current overall hardware system, it is completed before the software function allocation process begins.... The methodology begins when the preconditions above have been met and the CSM is completed. The first step is to consult the list of software function allocation parameters provided as part of the methodology. The list of parameters will at first be sufficient...

  8. Engineering secure software 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jetly, Prateek

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    breaches in the operating environment. Security breaches resulting from misuse or tnisconfiguration of the program should not be blamed on the software. T'his is a debatable position. A security breach that results from an unintentional enor... units with public key algorithms, private keys, and certificates. Any attempt to access or modify the data in these devices will render them unusable. The device contains software tools. These devices use the computer they reside on as a general...

  9. Managing a Software Ecosystem Using a Multiple Software Product Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Managing a Software Ecosystem Using a Multiple Software Product Line: a Case Study on Digital increases the number of software ecosystems: software platforms developed and maintained in a decentralized YourCast from a single system to a medium- scale ecosystem, we show how organizing it as a multiple

  10. Software Safety Tutorial Status Update 1 Software Safety Tutorial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Jeff

    Software Safety Tutorial Status Update 1 Software Safety Tutorial (Status Update) Jeff Tian, tian@engr.smu.edu CSE, SMU, Dallas, TX 75275 Topics · Project Overview · Software Safety Overview · Project Tasks competency for real-time software engineers. · Project team: Jeff Tian (SMU): Basics of SSE D.T. Huynh

  11. Conserving Software-based Artwork through Software Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchese, Francis

    analysis, system and software design, its development, operation, and maintenance [1]. Software engineering role in software development within the aerospace, high technology, and financial service industries products to continue to be used. Maintenance is the longest process in the software engineering lifecycle

  12. The Evolution Matrix: Recovering Software Evolution using Software Visualization Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nierstrasz, Oscar

    The Evolution Matrix: Recovering Software Evolution using Software Visualization Techniques Michele - ABSTRACT One of the major problems in software evolution is coping with the complexity which stems from and effective way to visualize the evolution of software systems which helps to recover the evolution of object

  13. An investigation of the sub-grid variability of trace gases and aerosols for global climate modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    One fundamental property and limitation of grid based models is their inability to identify spatial details smaller than the grid cell size. While decades of work have gone into developing sub-grid treatments for clouds and land surface processes in climate models, the quantitative understanding of sub-grid processes and variability for aerosols and their precursors is much poorer. In this study, WRF-Chem is used to simulate the trace gases and aerosols over central Mexico during the 2006 MILAGRO field campaign, with multiple spatial resolutions and emission/terrain scenarios. Our analysis focuses on quantifying the sub-grid variability (SGV) of trace gases and aerosols within a typical global climate model grid cell, i.e. 75x75 km2. Our results suggest that a simulation with 3-km horizontal grid spacing adequately reproduces the overall transport and mixing of trace gases and aerosols downwind of Mexico City, while 75-km horizontal grid spacing is insufficient to represent local emission and terrain-induced flows along the mountain ridge, subsequently affecting the transport and mixing of plumes from nearby sources. Therefore, the coarse model grid cell average may not correctly represent aerosol properties measured over polluted areas. Probability density functions (PDFs) for trace gases and aerosols show that secondary trace gases and aerosols, such as O3, sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate, are more likely to have a relatively uniform probability distribution (i.e. smaller SGV) over a narrow range of concentration values. Mostly inert and long-lived trace gases and aerosols, such as CO and BC, are more likely to have broad and skewed distributions (i.e. larger SGV) over polluted regions. Over remote areas, all trace gases and aerosols are more uniformly distributed compared to polluted areas. Both CO and O3 SGV vertical profiles are nearly constant within the PBL during daytime, indicating that trace gases are very efficiently transported and mixed vertically by turbulence. But, simulated horizontal variability indicates that trace gases and aerosols are not well mixed horizontally in the PBL. During nighttime the SGV for trace gases is maximum at the surface, and quickly decreases with height. Unlike the trace gases, the SGV of BC and secondary aerosols reaches a maximum at the PBL top during the day. The SGV decreases with distance away from the polluted urban area, has a more rapid decrease for long-lived trace gases and aerosols than for secondary ones, and is greater during daytime than nighttime. The SGV of trace gases and aerosols is generally larger than for meteorological quantities. Emissions can account for up to 50% of the SGV over urban areas such as Mexico City during daytime for less-reactive trace gases and aerosols, such as CO and BC. The impact of emission spatial variability on SGV decays with altitude in the PBL and is insignificant in the free troposphere. The emission variability affects SGV more significantly during daytime (rather than nighttime) and over urban (rather than rural or remote) areas. The terrain, through its impact on meteorological fields such as wind and the PBL structure, affects dispersion and transport of trace gases and aerosols and their SGV.

  14. Self-adaptive software needs quantitative verification at Radu Calinescu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    , performance and operating cost (e.g., energy consumption) of software. These techniques include model checkingSelf-adaptive software needs quantitative verification at runtime Radu Calinescu Department 1: The world and the machine. [19, 30]. In contrast, several mathematically-based modelling

  15. Self-adaptive software needs quantitative verification at Radu Calinescu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , performance and operating cost (e.g., energy consumption) of software. These techniques include model checkingSelf-adaptive software needs quantitative verification at runtime Radu Calinescu Department"#.&*#.+$ Figure 1: The world and the machine. [19, 30]. In contrast, several mathematically-based modelling

  16. Copyright 1997 by Rational Software Corporation Analysis and Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mylopoulos, John

    Page 1 Copyright © 1997 by Rational Software Corporation Analysis and Design with UML Page 2 Copyright © 1997 by Rational Software Corporation Agenda n Benefits of Visual Modeling n History of the UML n Visual Modeling with UML n The Rational Iterative Development Process #12;Page 3 Copyright © 1997

  17. A Stigmergy Collaboration Approach in the Open Source Software Developer Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Xiaohui [ORNL; Pullum, Laura L [ORNL; Treadwell, Jim N [ORNL; Potok, Thomas E [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The communication model of some self-organized online communities is significantly different from the traditional social network based community. It is problematic to use social network analysis to analyze the collaboration structure and emergent behaviors in these communities because these communities lack peer-to-peer connections. Stigmergy theory provides an explanation of the collaboration model of these communities. In this research, we present a stigmergy approach for building an agent-based simulation to simulate the collaboration model in the open source software (OSS) developer community. We used a group of actors who collaborate on OSS projects through forums as our frame of reference and investigated how the choices actors make in contributing their work on the projects determines the global status of the whole OSS project. In our simulation, the forum posts serve as the digital pheromone and the modified Pierre-Paul Grasse pheromone model is used for computing the developer agents behavior selection probability.

  18. Common Misconceptions about Software Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Hoek, André

    Common Misconceptions about Software Architecture by Philippe Kruchten Rational Fellow Rational Software Canada References to architecture are everywhere: in every article, in every ad. And we take definition of software architecture. Are we all understanding the same thing? We gladly accept that software

  19. Response of precipitation extremes to idealized global warming in an aqua-planet climate model: Towards robust projection across different horizontal resolutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, F.; Collins, W.D.; Wehner, M.F.; Williamson, D.L.; Olson, J.G.

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Current climate models produce quite heterogeneous projections for the responses of precipitation extremes to future climate change. To help understand the range of projections from multimodel ensembles, a series of idealized 'aquaplanet' Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) runs have been performed with the Community Atmosphere Model CAM3. These runs have been analysed to identify the effects of horizontal resolution on precipitation extreme projections under two simple global warming scenarios. We adopt the aquaplanet framework for our simulations to remove any sensitivity to the spatial resolution of external inputs and to focus on the roles of model physics and dynamics. Results show that a uniform increase of sea surface temperature (SST) and an increase of low-to-high latitude SST gradient both lead to increase of precipitation and precipitation extremes for most latitudes. The perturbed SSTs generally have stronger impacts on precipitation extremes than on mean precipitation. Horizontal model resolution strongly affects the global warming signals in the extreme precipitation in tropical and subtropical regions but not in high latitude regions. This study illustrates that the effects of horizontal resolution have to be taken into account to develop more robust projections of precipitation extremes.

  20. Elite Software | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest, Illinois:EdinburghEldoradoElectronVault JumpLabs,Elite Software

  1. Self-assembling software generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bouchard, Ann M. (Albuquerque, NM); Osbourn, Gordon C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique to generate an executable task includes inspecting a task specification data structure to determine what software entities are to be generated to create the executable task, inspecting the task specification data structure to determine how the software entities will be linked after generating the software entities, inspecting the task specification data structure to determine logic to be executed by the software entities, and generating the software entities to create the executable task.

  2. Reducing Software Failures: Addressing the Ethical Risks of the Software Development By Don Gotterbarn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Montfort University

    Reducing Software Failures: Addressing the Ethical Risks of the Software Development Lifecycle by software developers. This process also is incorporated into a software development life cycle. A tool to develop Software Development Impact Statements is also discussed. INTRODUCTION Software developers

  3. Constraining the Influence of Natural Variability to Improve Estimates of Global Aerosol Indirect Effects in a Nudged Version of the Community Atmosphere Model 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kooperman, G. J.; Pritchard, M. S.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Somerville, Richard C.; Russell, Lynn

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural modes of variability on many timescales influence aerosol particle distributions and cloud properties such that isolating statistically significant differences in cloud radiative forcing due to anthropogenic aerosol perturbations (indirect effects) typically requires integrating over long simulations. For state-of-the-art global climate models (GCM), especially those in which embedded cloud-resolving models replace conventional statistical parameterizations (i.e. multi-scale modeling framework, MMF), the required long integrations can be prohibitively expensive. Here an alternative approach is explored, which implements Newtonian relaxation (nudging) to constrain simulations with both pre-industrial and present-day aerosol emissions toward identical meteorological conditions, thus reducing differences in natural variability and dampening feedback responses in order to isolate radiative forcing. Ten-year GCM simulations with nudging provide a more stable estimate of the global-annual mean aerosol indirect radiative forcing than do conventional free-running simulations. The estimates have mean values and 95% confidence intervals of -1.54 ± 0.02 W/m2 and -1.63 ± 0.17 W/m2 for nudged and free-running simulations, respectively. Nudging also substantially increases the fraction of the world’s area in which a statistically significant aerosol indirect effect can be detected (68% and 25% of the Earth's surface for nudged and free-running simulations, respectively). One-year MMF simulations with and without nudging provide global-annual mean aerosol indirect radiative forcing estimates of -0.80 W/m2 and -0.56 W/m2, respectively. The one-year nudged results compare well with previous estimates from three-year free-running simulations (-0.77 W/m2), which showed the aerosol-cloud relationship to be in better agreement with observations and high-resolution models than in the results obtained with conventional parameterizations.

  4. Software Framework for Advanced Power Plant Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Widmann; Sorin Munteanu; Aseem Jain; Pankaj Gupta; Mark Moales; Erik Ferguson; Lewis Collins; David Sloan; Woodrow Fiveland; Yi-dong Lang; Larry Biegler; Michael Locke; Simon Lingard; Jay Yun

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work accomplished during the Phase II development effort of the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS). The objective of the project is to develop the tools to efficiently combine high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models with process modeling software. During the course of the project, a robust integration controller was developed that can be used in any CAPE-OPEN compliant process modeling environment. The controller mediates the exchange of information between the process modeling software and the CFD software. Several approaches to reducing the time disparity between CFD simulations and process modeling have been investigated and implemented. These include enabling the CFD models to be run on a remote cluster and enabling multiple CFD models to be run simultaneously. Furthermore, computationally fast reduced-order models (ROMs) have been developed that can be 'trained' using the results from CFD simulations and then used directly within flowsheets. Unit operation models (both CFD and ROMs) can be uploaded to a model database and shared between multiple users.

  5. Software Engineering Course Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damon, Craig A.

    of too many managers is to chase away good people. 1. These roles may be split between technical with a manager. Managers have three roles in software development1: · people management · productivity management personnel research, Kristiansand, Norway. #12;22 Management Managing people Good people management

  6. Software Carpentry: Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greg Wilson

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last 15 years, Software Carpentry has evolved from a week-long training course at the US national laboratories into a worldwide volunteer effort to raise standards in scientific computing. This article explains what we have learned along the way the challenges we now face, and our plans for the future.

  7. Software Carpentry: Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Greg

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last 15 years, Software Carpentry has evolved from a week-long training course at the US national laboratories into a worldwide volunteer effort to raise standards in scientific computing. This article explains what we have learned along the way the challenges we now face, and our plans for the future.

  8. IBM Software Cross Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and minimize cost with our experi- enced onshore and offshore teams. We can deliver the perfect technical of core functionality for Lotus and WebSphere Portal software. Our proof-of-concept solutions provide short, focused engagements to help you explore specific, client defined functionality. Business

  9. JSATS Decoder Software Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flory, Adam E.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) Decoder is a software application that converts a digitized acoustic signal (a waveform stored in the .bwm file format) into a list of potential JSATS Acoustic MicroTransmitter (AMT) tagcodes along with other data about the signal including time of arrival and signal to noise ratios (SNR). This software is capable of decoding single files, directories, and viewing raw acoustic waveforms. When coupled with the JSATS Detector, the Decoder is capable of decoding in ‘real-time’ and can also provide statistical information about acoustic beacons placed within receive range of hydrophones within a JSATS array. This document details the features and functionality of the software. The document begins with software installation instructions (section 2), followed in order by instructions for decoder setup (section 3), decoding process initiation (section 4), then monitoring of beacons (section 5) using real-time decoding features. The last section in the manual describes the beacon, beacon statistics, and the results file formats. This document does not consider the raw binary waveform file format.

  10. IBM Software Providesacomprehensivesolutionfor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , companies must make sure that they're delivering products that meet their customers' requirements while companies address the challenges of embedded software development and delivery-- from initial product products, services and best practices to help companies define and manage their product development

  11. DuoTracker: Tool Support for Software Defect Data Collection and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dascalu, Sergiu

    evaluate their process using either the Capability Maturity Model (CMM) [3] or the ISO 9001 standards [4 software processes. Keywords--software defects; software anomalies; defect classification; PSP; CMM; IS0-9001 is then compared against the quality models of CMM or IS0 9001. There are also improvement methods such as IDEAL [5

  12. 2.5D global-disk oscillation models of the Be shell star {\\zeta} Tauri I. Spectroscopic and polarimetric analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, C; Okazaki, A T; Rivinius, T; Baade, D; Stefl, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Context. Various Be stars exhibit intensity variations of the violet and red emission peaks in their HI lines observed in emission. This so-called $V/R$ phenomenon is usually explained by the precession of a one-armed spiral density perturbation in the circumstellar disk. That global-disk oscillation scenario was confirmed, both observationally and theoretically, in the previous series of two papers analyzing the Be shell star {\\zeta} Tauri. The vertically averaged (2D) global-disk oscillation model used at the time was able to reproduce the $V/R$ variations observed in H{\\alpha}, as well as the spatially resolved interferometric data from AMBER/VLTI. Unfortunately, that model failed to reproduce the $V/R$ phase of Br15 and the amplitude of the polarization variation, suggesting that the inner disk structure predicted by the model was incorrect. Aims. The first aim of the present paper is to quantify the temporal variations of the shell-line characteristics of {\\zeta} Tauri. The second aim is to better unders...

  13. Are global trade negotiations behind a fragmented world of "gated globalization"?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    Are global trade negotiations behind a fragmented world of "gated globalization"? James Lake In a very simple three country model where global trade negotiations precede a sequential Free Trade. Even though sequential FTA for- mation may lead to global free trade if governments have not previously

  14. IDENTIFYING MODE CONFUSION POTENTIAL IN SOFTWARE DESIGN Mario Rodriguez, Marc Zimmerman, Masafumi Katahira,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leveson, Nancy

    Software Engineering Research Lab (SERL) is to create and evaluate such a methodology for integrated design, and analysis techniques starting with a user model of the system and generating appropriate and safe software

  15. Global Scale Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asphaug, Erik; Jutzi, Martin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global scale impacts modify the physical or thermal state of a substantial fraction of a target asteroid. Specific effects include accretion, family formation, reshaping, mixing and layering, shock and frictional heating, fragmentation, material compaction, dilatation, stripping of mantle and crust, and seismic degradation. Deciphering the complicated record of global scale impacts, in asteroids and meteorites, will lead us to understand the original planet-forming process and its resultant populations, and their evolution in time as collisions became faster and fewer. We provide a brief overview of these ideas, and an introduction to models.

  16. Monitoring Software Reliability using Statistical Process control: An MMLE approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, R Satya; Kantam, R R L

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper consider an MMLE (Modified Maximum Likelihood Estimation) based scheme to estimate software reliability using exponential distribution. The MMLE is one of the generalized frameworks of software reliability models of Non Homogeneous Poisson Processes (NHPPs). The MMLE gives analytical estimators rather than an iterative approximation to estimate the parameters. In this paper we proposed SPC (Statistical Process Control) Charts mechanism to determine the software quality using inter failure times data. The Control charts can be used to measure whether the software process is statistically under control or not.

  17. Systems Engineering Introduction to Software Quality Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryson, Joanna J.

    for quality management ISO 9001:2000 is a generic model of the quality process; ISO 9001:2008 clarifies ISO 9001:2000 ISO 9001:2008 applicable to any organisation that designs, develops and maintains products (or services) ISO 9000-3 interprets 9001 for software dev. 12 Features of ISO 9001:2008 Organisational

  18. Knowware: the third star after Hardware and Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Ruqian

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book proposes to separate knowledge from software and to make it a commodity that is called knowware. The architecture, representation and function of Knowware are discussed. The principles of knowware engineering and its three life cycle models: furnace model, crystallization model and spiral model are proposed and analyzed. Techniques of software/knowware co-engineering are introduced. A software component whose knowledge is replaced by knowware is called mixware. An object and component oriented development schema of mixware is introduced. In particular, the tower model and ladder model for mixware development are proposed and discussed. Finally, knowledge service and knowware based Web service are introduced and compared with Web service. In summary, knowware, software and hardware should be considered as three equally important underpinnings of IT industry. Ruqian Lu is a professor of computer science of the Institute of Mathematics, Academy of Mathematics and System Sciences. He is a fellow of Chin...

  19. ESnet, Coalition Partners Announce Global Breakthrough for Software...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    https:www.es.net About ONOS and ON.Lab ONOS is a SDN networking operating system for Service Provider networks architected for high performance, scale and availability. ONOS'...

  20. Software and Global Health: Understanding the Vaccine Cold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    boxes of vials of vaccinations out into villages. That requires too much refrigeration. #12 refrigerators? · What types are they? · How old? · Are they working? · Are they big enough for the required requirement list Health facility list Demographic data Refrigerator invento

  1. Software and Global Health: Assessing Vaccine Cold Chains from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    ? · How many refrigerators? · What types are they? · How old? · Are they working? · Are they big enough for the required vaccines? · Where are they? 1/5/2012ChangeSeminar 8 Country A: 5306 facilities, 4946 refrigerators Country B: 827 facilities, 1426 refrigerators Country C: 2846 facilities, 3153 refrigerators Country D

  2. Market Research Report - Global Open Source Software Market Size...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to 2015: Radiant Insights, Inc Home > Groups > Future of Condition Monitoring for Wind Turbines Marketresearchri's picture Submitted by Marketresearchri(45) Member 30 June, 2015...

  3. Software Discovery at San Ramon | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYou are hereValue ofSocioeconomicTexas

  4. ESnet, Coalition Partners Announce Global Breakthrough for Software-Defined

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract ManagementDiscoveringESnet Update Winter 2008

  5. Thoughts From the 2012 Whitney Software Symposium | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis ofwas published

  6. Ideas for Security Assurance in Security Critical Software using Modelica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yuxiao

    Ideas for Security Assurance in Security Critical Software using Modelica David Broman, Peter critical software. Modelica is a modern, strongly typed, de- clarative, and object-oriented language assurance, by expanding the scope of Modelica into also becoming a declarative modeling language for other

  7. Inventory management with dynamic Bayesian network software systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barker, Jon

    Inventory management with dynamic Bayesian network software systems Mark Taylor1 and Charles Fox2 1.fox@sheffield.ac.uk Abstract. Inventory management at a single or multiple levels of a supply chain is usually performed-the-shelf graphical software systems. We show how such sys- tems may be deployed to model a simple inventory problem

  8. Machine Learning Approaches to Estimating Software Development Effort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Douglas H.

    of software development effort is critical in software engineering. Underestimates lead to time pressures development effort from historical data. Our experiments indicate that these techniques are competitive on which they are trained. This cautionary note applies to any model­ construction strategy that relies

  9. Competition on Software Verification University of Passau, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beyer, Dirk

    and Analysis of Systems (TACAS). 1 Introduction The area of verification, in particular model checking, has). Several new and powerful software-verification tools became available, but they have not been comparedCompetition on Software Verification (SV-COMP) Dirk Beyer University of Passau, Germany Abstract

  10. An approach to ensuring quality in environmental software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelston, G.M.; Lundgren, R.E.; McDonald, J.P.; Hoopes, B.L.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental software is often used to determine impacts to the public, workers, and the environment from environmental contamination. It is vital, therefore, that the modeling results, and the software that provides them, be scientifically defensible and capable of withstanding the most rigorous of technical reviews. The control and assurance of quality is a critical factor for the project team that develops environmental software at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This document describes the philosophy, process, and activities that ensure a quality product throughout the life cycle of requirements analysis, design, programming, modification, testing, and implementation of environmental software. Environmental software developed by the project team is designed using an object-oriented approach. This software offers increased benefits, such as ease of maintenance and retention of the development and testing legacy of individual components, over traditional hard wired software. These benefits allow the design and testing of the models and future additions to be faster and less costly. This software is developed using a modular framework concept that allows a variety of models to work within a single construct. This software has two parts: an overall system framework and a set of modules. Each module has up to three components: a user interface, a scientific model, and pre/post-processors. Each of these pieces has a different set of quality criteria associated with it. However, whatever form this software might take for a particular client, standard processes apply to protect the information from inappropriate use. The information contained within this document can be applied to most environmental software to analyze risk in multiple environmental media.

  11. Software Patent Litigation ABA Section of Litigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamos, Michael I.

    1 Software Patent Litigation ABA Section of Litigation Intellectual Property Litigation Committee............................................................ 2 II. Infringement issues specific to software patents Relating to Software Patents.........................................................15 POSSIBLE ISSUES

  12. Mining Test Cases To Improve Software Maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziftci, Celal

    also known as software development lifecycle) is a set ofin the Software Development Lifecycle In the lifecycle of apart of the software development lifecycle, has many

  13. Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research Supporting researchers in low- and middle-income countries to carry out health- related research within their own countries. Gl bal Health #12;3 | Global Health Research #12;Global Health Research | 4 We are a global charitable foundation dedicated

  14. Gammasphere software development. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piercey, R.B.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the activities of the nuclear physics group at Mississippi State University which were performed during 1993. Significant progress has been made in the focus areas: chairing the Gammasphere Software Working Group (SWG); assisting with the porting and enhancement of the ORNL UPAK histogramming software package; and developing standard formats for Gammasphere data products. In addition, they have established a new public ftp archive to distribute software and software development tools and information.

  15. Software Engineering Craig A. Damon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damon, Craig A.

    ) greenfield vs. brownfield project features #12;Software EngineeringCIS4150-1 20 many roles contribute to s

  16. Approved Module Information for CS2090, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Software Lifecycle and Design Module Code: CS2090

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo

    orally and in writing Indicative Module Content: Software lifecycle overview Software development modelsApproved Module Information for CS2090, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Software Lifecycle and Design of the software lifecycle with particular emphasis on software design and design realisation. By the end

  17. Software Verification and Validation Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olund, Thomas S.

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Software Verification and Validation procedure provides the action steps for the Tank Waste Information Network System (TWINS) testing process. The primary objective of the testing process is to provide assurance that the software functions as intended, and meets the requirements specified by the client. Verification and validation establish the primary basis for TWINS software product acceptance.

  18. Long range global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolle, K.C.; Pulkrabek, W.W.; Fiedler, R.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Platteville, WI (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores one of the causes of global warming that is often overlooked, the direct heating of the environment by engineering systems. Most research and studies of global warming concentrate on the modification that is occurring to atmospheric air as a result of pollution gases being added by various systems; i.e., refrigerants, nitrogen oxides, ozone, hydrocarbons, halon, and others. This modification affects the thermal radiation balance between earth, sun and space, resulting in a decrease of radiation outflow and a slow rise in the earth`s steady state temperature. For this reason the solution to the problem is perceived as one of cleaning up the processes and effluents that are discharged into the environment. In this paper arguments are presented that suggest, that there is a far more serious cause for global warming that will manifest itself in the next two or three centuries; direct heating from the exponential growth of energy usage by humankind. Because this is a minor contributor to the global warming problem at present, it is overlooked or ignored. Energy use from the combustion of fuels and from the output of nuclear reactions eventually is manifest as warming of the surroundings. Thus, as energy is used at an ever increasing rate the consequent global warming also increases at an ever increasing rate. Eventually this rate will become equal to a few percent of solar radiation. When this happens the earth`s temperature will have risen by several degrees with catastrophic results. The trends in world energy use are reviewed and some mathematical models are presented to suggest future scenarios. These models can be used to predict when the global warming problem will become undeniably apparent, when it will become critical, and when it will become catastrophic.

  19. Diagnosis of the Marine Low Cloud Simulation in the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) and the NCEP Global Forecast System (GFS)-Modular Ocean Model v4 (MOM4) coupled model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Heng; Mechoso, C. R.; Sun, Rui; Han, J.; Pan, H. L.; Park, S.; Hannay, Cecile; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Teixeira, J.

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a diagnostic analysis of the marine low cloud climatology simulated by two state-of-the-art coupled atmosphere-ocean models: the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) and the NCEP Global Forecasting System (GFS). In both models, the shallow convection and boundary layer turbulence parameterizations have been recently updated: both models now use a mass-flux scheme for the parameterization of shallow convection, and a turbulence parameterization capable of handling Stratocumulus (Sc)-topped Planetary Boundary Layers (PBLs). For shallow convection, both models employ a convective trigger function based on the concept of convective inhibition and both include explicit convective overshooting/penetrative entrainment formulation. For Sc-topped PBL, both models treat explicitly turbulence mixing and cloud-top entrainment driven by cloud-top radiative cooling. Our focus is on the climatological transition from Sc to shallow Cumulus (Cu)-topped PBL in the subtropical eastern oceans. We show that in the CESM the coastal Sc-topped PBLs in the subtropical Eastern Pacific are well-simulated but the climatological transition from Sc to shallow Cu is too abrupt and happens too close to the coast. By contrast, in the GFS coupled simulation the coastal Sc amount and PBL depth are severely underestimated while the transition from Sc to shallow Cu is ³delayed² and offshore Sc cover is too extensive in the subtropical Eastern Pacific. We discuss the possible connections between such differences in the simulations and differences in the parameterizations of shallow convection and boundary layer turbulence in the two models.

  20. Internal dosimetry software comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulmer, Judith Renee

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (ICRP) published in 1979 provided an improved approach for the assessment of internal dose. The ICRP recommendations were implemented in federal regulations promulgated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the Code of Federal Regulations (10... in the assessment of internal dose has led to the development of various computer software. In this study, several internal dosimetry codes were examined using a standard set of benchmark problems incorporating authentic exposure data. Personal computer...

  1. SGE: Software Presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nouanegue, H. F.; Daoud, A.; Lavigne, K.; Poulin, A.; Charette, A.; Lahala, S.; Sansregret, S.; Desbiens, G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? Technologie, Hydro-Qu?bec Why SGE software is needed? > Increase energy efficiency in Commercial and Institutional Buildings > Optimize HVAC systems operation (Power demand and energy consumption) > Simplify and assist building operators 4 Groupe... of historical data 10 Groupe ? Technologie, Hydro-Qu?bec > What are operation indicators? ? Value calculated from combination of measurements, set points or others operation indicators ? Comparables values with power units or no unit ? 30 fixed defined...

  2. Understanding Global Capitalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, William I.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sociology; globalization; political economy; development;economy fueled through 700 billion dollars injected into globalizationGlobalization Studies, also called CGS. I would economy and

  3. Global parameter optimization of Mather type plasma focus in the framework of the Gratton-Vargas two-dimensional snowplow model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auluck, S K H

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) is known to produce highly energetic ions, electrons and plasma environment which can be used for breeding of short-lived isotopes, plasma nanotechnology and other material processing applications. Commercial utilization of DPF in such areas would need a design tool which can be deployed in an automatic search for the best possible device configuration for a given application. The recently revisited [S K H Auluck, Physics of Plasmas 20, 112501 (2013)] Gratton-Vargas (GV) two-dimensional analytical snowplow model of plasma focus provides a numerical formula for dynamic inductance of a Mather type plasma focus fitted to thousands of automated computations, which enables construction of such design tool. This inductance formula is utilized in the present work to explore global optimization, based on first-principles optimality criteria, in a 4-dimensional parameter-subspace of the zero-resistance GV model. The optimization process is shown to reproduce the empirically observed constancy ...

  4. Global warming and global dioxide emission: An empirical study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linyan Sun [Xian Jiaotong Univ., Shaanxi (China); Wang, M. [Saint Mary`s Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the dynamic relationship between global surface temperature (global warming) and global carbon dioxide emission (CO{sub 2}) is modelled and analyzed by causality and spectral analysis in the time domain and frequency domain, respectively. Historical data of global CO{sub 2} emission and global surface temperature anomalies over 129 years from 1860-1988 are used in this study. The causal relationship between the two phenomena is first examined using the Sim and Granger causality test in the time domain after the data series are filtered by ARIMA models. The Granger causal relationship is further scrutinized and confirmed by cross-spectral and multichannel spectral analysis in the frequency domain. The evidence found from both analyses proves that there is a positive causal relationship between the two variables. The time domain analysis suggests that Granger causality exists between global surface temperature and global CO{sub 2} emission. Further, CO{sub 2} emission causes the change in temperature. The conclusions are further confirmed by the frequency domain analysis, which indicates that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission causes climate warming because a high coherence exists between the two variables. Furthermore, it is proved that climate changes happen after an increase in CO{sub 2} emission, which confirms that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission does cause global warming. 27 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Review of Quantitative Software Reliability Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, T.L.; Yue, M.; Martinez-Guridi, M.; Lehner, J.

    2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The current U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing process for digital systems rests on deterministic engineering criteria. In its 1995 probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) policy statement, the Commission encouraged the use of PRA technology in all regulatory matters to the extent supported by the state-of-the-art in PRA methods and data. Although many activities have been completed in the area of risk-informed regulation, the risk-informed analysis process for digital systems has not yet been satisfactorily developed. Since digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems are expected to play an increasingly important role in nuclear power plant (NPP) safety, the NRC established a digital system research plan that defines a coherent set of research programs to support its regulatory needs. One of the research programs included in the NRC's digital system research plan addresses risk assessment methods and data for digital systems. Digital I&C systems have some unique characteristics, such as using software, and may have different failure causes and/or modes than analog I&C systems; hence, their incorporation into NPP PRAs entails special challenges. The objective of the NRC's digital system risk research is to identify and develop methods, analytical tools, and regulatory guidance for (1) including models of digital systems into NPP PRAs, and (2) using information on the risks of digital systems to support the NRC's risk-informed licensing and oversight activities. For several years, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has worked on NRC projects to investigate methods and tools for the probabilistic modeling of digital systems, as documented mainly in NUREG/CR-6962 and NUREG/CR-6997. However, the scope of this research principally focused on hardware failures, with limited reviews of software failure experience and software reliability methods. NRC also sponsored research at the Ohio State University investigating the modeling of digital systems using dynamic PRA methods. These efforts, documented in NUREG/CR-6901, NUREG/CR-6942, and NUREG/CR-6985, included a functional representation of the system's software but did not explicitly address failure modes caused by software defects or by inadequate design requirements. An important identified research need is to establish a commonly accepted basis for incorporating the behavior of software into digital I&C system reliability models for use in PRAs. To address this need, BNL is exploring the inclusion of software failures into the reliability models of digital I&C systems, such that their contribution to the risk of the associated NPP can be assessed.

  6. Hipikat: A Project Memory for Software Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Hoek, André

    Hipikat: A Project Memory for Software Development Davor CCubranicc, Gail C. Murphy, Member, IEEE's usefulness in software modification tasks. One study evaluated the usefulness of Hipikat's recommendations Terms--Software development teams, project memory, software artifacts, recommender system, user studies

  7. Software is Discrete Mathematics University of Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, Rex L.

    , discrete mathematics, predicate logic, correctness proofs, formal methods, software engineering. 1Software is Discrete Mathematics Rex L Page University of Oklahoma School of Computer Science Descriptors D.2.4 [Software Engineering]: Software/Program Verification ­ correctness proofs, formal methods

  8. Benchmark experiments with global climate models applicable to extra-solar gas giant planets in the shallow atmosphere approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bending, V L; Kolb, U

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growing field of exoplanetary atmospheric modelling has seen little work on standardised benchmark tests for its models, limiting understanding of the dependence of results on specific models and conditions. With spatially resolved observations as yet difficult to obtain, such a test is invaluable. Although an intercomparison test for models of tidally locked gas giant planets has previously been suggested and carried out, the data provided were limited in terms of comparability. Here, the shallow PUMA model is subjected to such a test, and detailed statistics produced to facilitate comparison, with both time means and the associated standard deviations displayed, removing the time dependence and providing a measure of the variability. Model runs have been analysed to determine the variability between resolutions, and the effect of resolution on the energy spectra studied. Superrotation is a robust and reproducible feature at all resolutions.

  9. SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PROGRAM SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM Training Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM More Documents & Publications Quality Assurance Checklist...

  10. Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee : Guidelines for Requirements...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee : Guidelines for Requirements Management Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee : Guidelines for Requirements Management Requirements...

  11. Electronic Records Management Software Applications Design Criteria...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electronic Records Management Software Applications Design Criteria Standard Electronic Records Management Software Applications Design Criteria Standard This Standard is reissued...

  12. Global Warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heat Pump Basics31/2007 TeppeiProgramsGlobal1

  13. Academy for Global Engagement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Academy for Global Engagement 2013-2014 Global Fellows #12;Meredith Gore and Wildlife #12;Global Research Interests · risk percepHon and public support and Agricultural Engineering #12;Global Research Interests · catalyHc conversion of biomass

  14. global warming's six indias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    global warming's six indias: An Audience Segmentation Analysis #12;Global Warming's Six Indias 1............................................................................................................................................20 2. Global Warming Beliefs and Attitudes................................................................................ 21 Knowledge about global warming varies widely by group

  15. FLOWTRAN-TF software design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleman, S.E.; Flach, G.P.; Hamm, L.L.; Lee, S.Y.; Smith, F.G. III.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FLOWTRAN-TF was created to analyze an individual Mk22 fuel assembly during a large break Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario involving the Savannah River Site K-reactor after the initial few seconds of the transient. During the initial few seconds reactor cooling is limited by the static or Ledinegg flow instability phenomenon. The predecessor FLOWTRAN code was developed to analyze this portion of a LOCA. In the several seconds following the break, a significant fraction of the reactor coolant inventory leaks out the break, Emergency Cooling System (ECS) flow is initiated, and air enters the primary coolant circulation loops. Reactor fuel assemblies are cooled by a low flowrate air-water downflow. Existing commercial nuclear industry thermal-hydraulic codes were judged inadequate for detailed modeling of a Mk22 fuel assembly because the application involves a ribbed annular geometry, low pressure, downflow and an air-water mixture. FLOWTRAN-TF is a two-phase thermal-hydraulics code of similar technology to existing commercial codes such as RELAP and TRAC but customized for Savannah River Site applications. The main features and capabilities of FLOWTRAN-TF are detailed Mk22 fuel assembly ribbed annular geometry; conjugate heat transfer; detailed neutronic power distribution; three-dimensional heat conduction in Mk22 fuel and target tubes; two-dimensional coolant flow in channels (axial, azimuthal); single-phase and/or two-phase fluid (gas, liquid and/or gas-liquid); two-component (air, water); constitutive models applicable to low pressure air-water downflow in ribbed annular channels. The design of FLOWTRAN-TF is described in detail in this report which serves as the Software Design Report in accordance with Quality Assurance Procedure IV-4, Rev. 0 Software Design and Implementation'' in the 1Q34 manual.

  16. FLOWTRAN-TF software design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleman, S.E.; Flach, G.P.; Hamm, L.L.; Lee, S.Y.; Smith, F.G. III

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FLOWTRAN-TF was created to analyze an individual Mk22 fuel assembly during a large break Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario involving the Savannah River Site K-reactor after the initial few seconds of the transient. During the initial few seconds reactor cooling is limited by the static or Ledinegg flow instability phenomenon. The predecessor FLOWTRAN code was developed to analyze this portion of a LOCA. In the several seconds following the break, a significant fraction of the reactor coolant inventory leaks out the break, Emergency Cooling System (ECS) flow is initiated, and air enters the primary coolant circulation loops. Reactor fuel assemblies are cooled by a low flowrate air-water downflow. Existing commercial nuclear industry thermal-hydraulic codes were judged inadequate for detailed modeling of a Mk22 fuel assembly because the application involves a ribbed annular geometry, low pressure, downflow and an air-water mixture. FLOWTRAN-TF is a two-phase thermal-hydraulics code of similar technology to existing commercial codes such as RELAP and TRAC but customized for Savannah River Site applications. The main features and capabilities of FLOWTRAN-TF are detailed Mk22 fuel assembly ribbed annular geometry; conjugate heat transfer; detailed neutronic power distribution; three-dimensional heat conduction in Mk22 fuel and target tubes; two-dimensional coolant flow in channels (axial, azimuthal); single-phase and/or two-phase fluid (gas, liquid and/or gas-liquid); two-component (air, water); constitutive models applicable to low pressure air-water downflow in ribbed annular channels. The design of FLOWTRAN-TF is described in detail in this report which serves as the Software Design Report in accordance with Quality Assurance Procedure IV-4, Rev. 0 ``Software Design and Implementation`` in the 1Q34 manual.

  17. Categorical missing data imputation for software cost estimation by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Doo-Hwan

    the cost usually begins by building estimation model Apply estimation method to historical data setsCategorical missing data imputation for software cost estimation by multinomial logistic regression Organization type Banking, Construction, Gas, Defense, Engergy, ... bartype Business area type Accounting

  18. automated classification software: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    while it is easy to use and efficient. Tim Menzies 45 Model-driven Automated Software FMEA Neal Snooke, PhD, Aberystwyth University Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

  19. automated software packages: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    while it is easy to use and efficient. Tim Menzies 47 Model-driven Automated Software FMEA Neal Snooke, PhD, Aberystwyth University Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

  20. Job Opening at American Android Corp. Position: Software Engineer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Job Opening at American Android Corp. Position: Software Engineer Location: Princeton, New Jersey Job Description: American Android Corp. (www.americanandroid.com) develops humanoid robots modeling, and robot behavior development. Job Requirements: BS in computer science, robotics or related

  1. iEMSs 2008:International Congress on Environmental Modelling and Software Integrating Sciences and Information Technology for Environmental Assessment and Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Forrest M.

    to be based on results from integrated Earth System Models (ESMs), C-LAMP is helping to establish the metadata

  2. Sandia Energy - Software

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear PressLaboratorySoftware Home Climate & Earth Systems

  3. Software Talk [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYou are hereValueacquisition/analysis software

  4. NERSC Software Downloads

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1AllocationsNOVAPlayed Key Role in Workflow Software

  5. NERSC Software List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1AllocationsNOVAPlayed Key Role in Workflow Software

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates of Second Key Atmospheric Component On May 1, 2013, in Analysis, Capabilities, Climate, CRF, Energy, Facilities, Global Climate & Energy, Modeling & Analysis, News, News &...

  7. A Steady-State Picture of Solar Wind Acceleration and Charge State Composition Derived from a Global Wave-Driven MHD Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oran, Rona; van der Holst, Bart; Lepri, Susan T; Frazin, Alberto M Vásquez Federico A Nuevo Richard; Manchester, Ward B; Sokolov, Igor V; Gombosi, Tamas I

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The higher charge states found in slow ($<$400km s$^{-1}$) solar wind streams compared to fast streams have supported the hypothesis that the slow wind originates in closed coronal loops, and released intermittently through reconnection. Here we examine whether a highly ionized slow wind can also form along steady and open magnetic field lines. We model the steady-state solar atmosphere using AWSoM, a global magnetohydrodynamic model driven by Alfv{\\'e}n waves, and apply an ionization code to calculate the charge state evolution along modeled open field lines. This constitutes the first charge states calculation covering all latitudes in a realistic magnetic field. The ratios $O^{+7}/O^{+6}$ and $C^{+6}/C^{+5}$ are compared to in-situ Ulysses observations, and are found to be higher in the slow wind, as observed; however, they are under-predicted in both wind types. The modeled ion fractions of S, Si, and Fe are used to calculate line-of-sight intensities, which are compared to EIS observations above a cor...

  8. Unit Testing of Energy Consumption of Software Libraries Adel Noureddine1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Unit Testing of Energy Consumption of Software Libraries Adel Noureddine1,2 , Romain Rouvoy1. In this paper, we therefore introduce JalenUnit, a software framework that infers the energy consumption model, and comparing software libraries against their energy consumption. Categories and Subject Descriptors D.2

  9. Experience with Software Architectures and Configured Software Descriptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scacchi, Walt

    our experience in the specification, design, implementation and evolution of software engineering a commercial DBMS). However, experience with the explicit specification of the architctural design of large

  10. Past and Future Effects of Ozone on Net Primary Production and Carbon Sequestration Using a Global Biogeochemical Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felzer, Benjamin Seth.

    Exposure of plants to ozone inhibits photosynthesis and therefore reduces vegetation production and carbon sequestration. Simulations with the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) for the historical period (1860-1995) show ...

  11. Observed Characteristics of Clouds and Precipitating Systems Associated with the Tropical Circulation in Global Models and Reanalyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stachnik, Justin Paul

    2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents a series of work related to the representation of the Hadley circulation (HC) in atmospheric reanalyses and general circulation models (GCMs), with connections to the underlying tropical and subtropical cloud systems...

  12. Approved Module Information for CS4670, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Software Process and Management Module Code: CS4670

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo

    control, assurance and management systems; quality models and metrics; software management ? testing management: software cost estimation, software, COCOMO model Quality management: nature of quality; qualityApproved Module Information for CS4670, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Software Process and Management

  13. SHM Data Sets and Software

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sets and Software Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff Assistant Jutta Kayser (505)...

  14. Global and local cancer risks after the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident as seen from Chernobyl: A modeling study for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousseau, Timothy A.

    Chernobyl: A modeling study for radiocaesium (134 Cs & 137 Cs) Nikolaos Evangeliou a, , Yves Balkanski risks, prior to epidemiology, and compare them with those occurred after the Chernobyl accident the accident of Chernobyl. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Accidental releases

  15. Using Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget dataUsing Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget data to evaluate global models and radiative processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cloud cover r.p.allan@reading.ac.uk© University of Reading 20108 #12;Radiative bias: climate models estimate radiative effect of contrail cirrus:contrail cirrus: LW ~ 40 Wm-2 SW up to 80 Wm-2 rUsing Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget dataUsing Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget data

  16. Inconsistency Management in Software Engineering 1 INCONSISTENCY MANAGEMENT IN SOFTWARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spanoudakis, George

    ; do not guarantee some properties of the system, such as safety and reliability; and generateInconsistency Management in Software Engineering 1 INCONSISTENCY MANAGEMENT IN SOFTWARE ENGINEERING difficulties on system maintenance. On the positive side, inconsistencies can facilitate identification of some

  17. Energy Tracking Software Platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan Davis; Nathan Bird; Rebecca Birx; Hal Knowles

    2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Acceleration has created an interactive energy tracking and visualization platform that supports decreasing electric, water, and gas usage. Homeowners have access to tools that allow them to gauge their use and track progress toward a smaller energy footprint. Real estate agents have access to consumption data, allowing for sharing a comparison with potential home buyers. Home builders have the opportunity to compare their neighborhood's energy efficiency with competitors. Home energy raters have a tool for gauging the progress of their clients after efficiency changes. And, social groups are able to help encourage members to reduce their energy bills and help their environment. EnergyIT.com is the business umbrella for all energy tracking solutions and is designed to provide information about our energy tracking software and promote sales. CompareAndConserve.com (Gainesville-Green.com) helps homeowners conserve energy through education and competition. ToolsForTenants.com helps renters factor energy usage into their housing decisions.

  18. Software quality is a crucial issue in a society that vitally depends on software systems. Software quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deissenboeck, Florian

    ABSTRACT Software quality is a crucial issue in a society that vitally depends on software systems quality in development. If the top management of software dependent companies does not have effective software quality management. After giving a few examples for software quality in real life

  19. SAPHIRE 8 Software Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis L.Smith; Ted S. Wood

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is being conducted at the request of the DOE and the NRC. The INL has been requested by the NRC to improve and maintain the Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluation (SAPHIRE) tool set concurrent with the changing needs of the user community as well as staying current with new technologies. Successful completion will be upon NRC approved release of all software and accompanying documentation in a timely fashion. This project will enhance the SAPHIRE tool set for the user community (NRC, Nuclear Power Plant operations, Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) model developers) by providing improved Common Cause Failure (CCF), External Events, Level 2, and Significance Determination Process (SDP) analysis capabilities. The SAPHIRE development team at the Idaho National Laboratory is responsible for successful completion of this project. The project is under the supervision of Curtis L. Smith, PhD, Technical Lead for the SAPHIRE application. All current capabilities from SAPHIRE version 7 will be maintained in SAPHIRE 8. The following additional capabilities will be incorporated: • Incorporation of SPAR models for the SDP interface. • Improved quality assurance activities for PRA calculations of SAPHIRE Version 8. • Continue the current activities for code maintenance, documentation, and user support for the code.

  20. Persistence and global attractivity in the model $A_{n+1}=A_nF(A_{n-m})$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dang Vu Giang

    2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    First, we systemize ealier results the uniform persistence for discrete model $A_{n+1}=A_nF(A_{n-m})$ of population growth, where $F:(0,\\infty)\\to(0,\\infty)$ is continuous and strictly decreasing. Second, we investigation the effect of delay $m$ when $F$ is not monotone. We are mainly using $\\omega$-limit set of persistent solution, which is discussed in more general by P. Walters, 1982.

  1. ROSSBY WAVE INSTABILITY AT DEAD ZONE BOUNDARIES IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL RESISTIVE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICAL GLOBAL MODELS OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyra, Wladimir; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark, E-mail: wlyra@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been suggested that the transition between magnetorotationally active and dead zones in protoplanetary disks should be prone to the excitation of vortices via Rossby wave instability (RWI). However, the only numerical evidence for this has come from alpha disk models, where the magnetic field evolution is not followed, and the effect of turbulence is parameterized by Laplacian viscosity. We aim to establish the phenomenology of the flow in the transition in three-dimensional resistive-magnetohydrodynamical models. We model the transition by a sharp jump in resistivity, as expected in the inner dead zone boundary, using the PENCIL CODE to simulate the flow. We find that vortices are readily excited in the dead side of the transition. We measure the mass accretion rate finding similar levels of Reynolds stress at the dead and active zones, at the {alpha} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -2} level. The vortex sits in a pressure maximum and does not migrate, surviving until the end of the simulation. A pressure maximum in the active zone also triggers the RWI. The magnetized vortex that results should be disrupted by parasitical magneto-elliptic instabilities, yet it subsists in high resolution. This suggests that either the parasitic modes are still numerically damped or that the RWI supplies vorticity faster than they can destroy it. We conclude that the resistive transition between the active and dead zones in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, if sharp enough, can indeed excite vortices via RWI. Our results lend credence to previous works that relied on the alpha-disk approximation, and caution against the use of overly reduced azimuthal coverage on modeling this transition.

  2. Global Simulations of Ice nucleation and Ice Supersaturation with an Improved Cloud Scheme in the Community Atmosphere Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gettelman, A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Morrison, H.; Park, Sungsu; Conley, Andrew; Klein, Stephen A.; Boyle, James; Mitchell, David; Li, J-L F.

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A process-based treatment of ice supersaturation and ice-nucleation is implemented in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). The new scheme is designed to allow (1) supersaturation with respect to ice, (2) ice nucleation by aerosol particles and (3) ice cloud cover consistent with ice microphysics. The scheme is implemented with a 4-class 2 moment microphysics code and is used to evaluate ice cloud nucleation mechanisms and supersaturation in CAM. The new model is able to reproduce field observations of ice mass and mixed phase cloud occurrence better than previous versions of the model. Simulations indicate heterogeneous freezing and contact nucleation on dust are both potentially important over remote areas of the Arctic. Cloud forcing and hence climate is sensitive to different formulations of the ice microphysics. Arctic radiative fluxes are sensitive to the parameterization of ice clouds. These results indicate that ice clouds are potentially an important part of understanding cloud forcing and potential cloud feedbacks, particularly in the Arctic.

  3. NSTX Disruption Simulations of Detailed Divertor and Passive Plate Models by Vector Potential Transfer from OPERA Global Analysis Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. H. Titus, S. Avasaralla, A.Brooks, R. Hatcher

    2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) project is planning upgrades to the toroidal field, plasma current and pulse length. This involves the replacement of the center-stack, including the inner legs of the TF, OH, and inner PF coils. A second neutral beam will also be added. The increased performance of the upgrade requires qualification of the remaining components including the vessel, passive plates, and divertor for higher disruption loads. The hardware needing qualification is more complex than is typically accessible by large scale electromagnetic (EM) simulations of the plasma disruptions. The usual method is to include simplified representations of components in the large EM models and attempt to extract forces to apply to more detailed models. This paper describes a more efficient approach of combining comprehensive modeling of the plasma and tokamak conducting structures, using the 2D OPERA code, with much more detailed treatment of individual components using ANSYS electromagnetic (EM) and mechanical analysis. This capture local eddy currents and resulting loads in complex details, and allows efficient non-linear, and dynamic structural analyses.

  4. Wind Power Software

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more to globalWind Power Links These

  5. Tax Deduction Qualified Software: EnergyPlus version 7.0.0.036

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    exterior lighting controls." (ix) Daylighting (sidelighting, skylights, or tubular daylight devices). "The EnergyPlus software models sidelighting, skylights, and tubular...

  6. Tax Deduction Qualified Software: EnergyPlus version 5.0.0.031

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    exterior lighting controls." (ix) Daylighting (sidelighting, skylights, or tubular daylight devices). "The EnergyPlus software models sidelighting, skylights, and tubular...

  7. Tax Deduction Qualified Software: TRACE 700 version 6.3.0

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to control lighting." (ix) Daylighting (sidelighting, skylights, or tubular daylight devices). "The TRACE 700 software can model daylighting." (x) Improved fan system...

  8. Tax Deduction Qualified Software - EnergyPlus version 3.0.0.028

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    exterior lighting controls." (ix) Daylighting (sidelighting, skylights, or tubular daylight devices). "The EnergyPlus software models sidelighting, skylights, and tubular...

  9. Tax Deduction Qualified Software TRACE 700 version 6.3.0

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to control lighting." (ix) Daylighting (sidelighting, skylights, or tubular daylight devices). "The TRACE 700 software can model daylighting." (x) Improved fan system...

  10. Tax Deduction Qualified Software: EnergyPlus version 6.0.0.023

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    exterior lighting controls." (ix) Daylighting (sidelighting, skylights, or tubular daylight devices). "The EnergyPlus software models sidelighting, skylights, and tubular...

  11. Tax Deduction Qualified Software - EnergyPlus version 3.1.0.027

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    exterior lighting controls." (ix) Daylighting (sidelighting, skylights, or tubular daylight devices). "The EnergyPlus software models sidelighting, skylights, and tubular...

  12. IBM Software IBM Rational Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM Software Data Sheet March 2013 IBM Rational Team Concert Be lean. Be agile. Work together near real-time, contextual collaboration for distributed project teams Improve software quality objectives. Teams are trying to adopt agile practices, but are having difficulty because of several factors

  13. Software measurement 2009. 1. 14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Doo-Hwan

    Software measurement Tutorial 2009. 1. 14 Yeong-Seok Seo #12; KAIST SE LAB 2009 Contents Introduction Designing a software measurement process Measurement elements Measurement scales Measure for success Conclusion 2/28 #12; KAIST SE LAB 2009 Introduction(1/3) Definition of terminology Measurement[1

  14. CS487 -Software Engineering Last Updated -04/11/02 Course Manager Dr. Ilene Burnstein, Associate Professor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    , and software maintenance. Hands-on experience building a software system using the waterfall life cycle model. Students working in teams develop all life cycle deliverables: requirements document, specification/user needs. · Select an appropriate life cycle and process model for development of a software product

  15. The Software Engineering Master's Program 1. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Embedded Real-time Systems; ___SW4581 Software Reliability (3-1); ___SW4582 Weapons System Software SafetyThe Software Engineering Master's Program 1. Introduction The Software Engineering program at the U to learn all aspects of software development and the skills needed to efficiently and reliably plan

  16. Supervisory Control of Software Systems Vir V. Phoha, Senior Member, IEEE, Amit U. Nadgar,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phoha, Vir V.

    software systems based on the Supervisory Control Theory (SCT). Our method uses the SCT to model language theory, to model and control software systems without any structural modifications in the under a feedback control mechanism. Here, the DES to be controlled is modeled by the plant automaton G

  17. Agile Software Architecture: Why Your Project Needs It

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    2/12/2011 1 Agile Software Architecture: Why Your Project Needs It Business meets Implementation Chris Miyachi SDM Entering Class 2000 Presentation Outline · What is Software Architecture · Architecture within the Software Lifecycle · Software Architecture and Lean Software Development · Software

  18. FTT:Power : A global model of the power sector with induced technological change and natural resource depletion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercure, Jean-Francois

    2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    S Biomass+CCS BIGCC BIGCC+CCS Biogas Biogas+CCS S Hydro L Hydro Onshore Offshore Solar PV CSP Geothermal Wave Fuel Cells CHP 2010 2030 2050 2070 2090 0 10 20 30 40 50 Year El ec tri ci ty G en er at io n ( P W h ) 0 1 2 3 4 5 Year Ca pa cit y ( T W... ) Mitigation 2010 2030 2050 2070 2090 0 10 20 30 40 50 Year El ec tri ci ty G en er at io n ( P W h ) Nuclear Oil Coal Coal+CCS Gas Gas+CCS Biomass Biomass+CCS Hydro Wind Solar Geothermal Wave Figure 5: Model results for two sets of assumptions, a...

  19. Self-assembled software and method of overriding software execution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bouchard, Ann M.; Osbourn, Gordon C.

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer-implemented software self-assembled system and method for providing an external override and monitoring capability to dynamically self-assembling software containing machines that self-assemble execution sequences and data structures. The method provides an external override machine that can be introduced into a system of self-assembling machines while the machines are executing such that the functionality of the executing software can be changed or paused without stopping the code execution and modifying the existing code. Additionally, a monitoring machine can be introduced without stopping code execution that can monitor specified code execution functions by designated machines and communicate the status to an output device.

  20. International Workshop on Global Roadmap and Strategic Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amor, Robert

    International Workshop on Global Roadmap and Strategic Actions for ICT in Construction (August 22 Support Digital Models GlobalGlobal RoadmapRoadmap Workshop Report and Summary of Key Findings Edited by on Global Roadmap and Strategic Actions for ICT in Construction | 22-24 August, 2007 | Finland - 2