National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for modeling software global

  1. A Global Software Inspection Process for Distributed Software Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    delivering high-quality software to global users at lower costs. The main expected benefits from distributed towards quality assurance and management. Keywords: Global Software Development, Distributed Software Development, Software Inspection, Tool, Software quality Categories: D.2.2, D.2.4 1 Introduction Due

  2. Global expansion strategies for software firms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoden, Michihiko

    2014-01-01

    The business competition in the software industry is increasingly becoming a global competition. In this era with a fast-paced innovative environment, strategy plays an important role for managers in software companies in ...

  3. Direct Painting Software for Tracing on 3D Brain Surfaces with Global Conformal Parameterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    Direct Painting Software for Tracing on 3D Brain Surfaces with Global Conformal Parameterization-resolution models proves difficult, and often requires expensive visualization or animation software. We therefore developed a convenient software toolkit that enables users to draw curves and label surface subregions

  4. Software Quality Model Requirements for Software Quality Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suryn, Witold

    Software Quality Model Requirements for Software Quality Engineering Marc-Alexis Côté M. Ing (marc Quality Engineering, Software Quality Models, ISO/IEC 9126. Abstract Software Quality Engineering is an emerging discipline that is concerned with improving the approach to software quality. It is important

  5. Methodology Modelling: Combining Software Processes with Software Products \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jun

    of software processes in improving the quality of software products has been widely recognised for some time processes and software products is a major factor in improving soft­ ware quality. 2. Fine­grained, nonMethodology Modelling: Combining Software Processes with Software Products \\Lambda Jun Han and Jim

  6. Thoughts From the 2012 Whitney Software Symposium | GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Big Data, Modeling and Simulation, High Performance Computing and the Industrial Internet as key technological enablers of GE's Software initiatives. We enjoyed speakers from...

  7. Cost Model and Cost Estimating Software

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter discusses a formalized methodology is basically a cost model, which forms the basis for estimating software.

  8. PASTE 2004 Page 1 June 2004 ""Model CheckingModel Checking"" Software withSoftware with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajamani, Sriram K.

    PASTE 2004 Page 1 June 2004 ""Model CheckingModel Checking"" Software withSoftware with Patrice;PASTE 2004 Page 2 June 2004 ""Model CheckingModel Checking"" · Model Checking = systematic state deadlock Each component is modeled by a FSM. #12;PASTE 2004 Page 3 June 2004 Model Checking of Software

  9. Call-For-Papers Special Issue on Software Modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Hong

    Model-based software testing · Applications of software modelling and meta-modelling in various stages.g., model-based software testing, modelling software configuration and deployment, etc. o In maintenanceCall-For-Papers Special Issue on Software Modelling In the International Journal of Software

  10. Modeling and Improving an Industrial Software Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Picco, Gian Pietro

    possible levels of maturity for a software process. At the first level, software production activities continuous improvement. It is the basis of the Japanese approach to industrial production and is applied1 Modeling and Improving an Industrial Software Process Sergio Bandinelli, Alfonso Fuggetta, Member

  11. Comparison of Competing Software Reliability Models: Bayesian Model Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Sanjib

    is in software development and testing. The goal of software reliability research is to quantify the performanceComparison of Competing Software Reliability Models: Bayesian Model Selection Sanjib Basu and Nader@math.niu.edu and nader@math.niu.edu Abstract Software reliability models are used to describe the evolution

  12. Selected Papers from FOSS4G 2013: OSGeo's Global Conference for Open Source Geospatial Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köbben, Barend

    Selected Papers from FOSS4G 2013: OSGeo's Global Conference for Open Source Geospatial Software 1 the rise of free and open source software in this area, flanked by open standards and the open data the submissions to the Academic Track of FOSS4G 2013, the global conference for Open Source Geospatial Software

  13. ECE 587 Hardware/Software Co-Design Lecture 09 Software Processor Modeling I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jia

    ECE 587 ­ Hardware/Software Co-Design Lecture 09 Software Processor Modeling I Professor Jia Wang ­ Hardware/Software Co-Design Spring 2015 1/22 #12;Reading Assignment This lecture: 3.4 Next lecture: 3.4 ECE 587 ­ Hardware/Software Co-Design Spring 2015 2/22 #12;Outline Software Processor Modeling Application

  14. Towards Integrated Variant Management in Global Software Engineering: An Experience Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    management based on experiences. Keywords--software product line, integrated feature modeling, traceability by electric/electronic components and corresponding software. Thereby, software product lines (SPL be extended by partly automated variant configuration mechanisms to handle restrictions and dependencies

  15. Integrated Mathematical Modeling Software Series of Vehicle Propulsion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mathematical Modeling Software Series of Vehicle Propulsion System: (1) Tractive Effort (T sub ew) of Vehicle Road WheelTrack Sprocket Integrated Mathematical Modeling Software...

  16. Software Dependability Evaluation Based on Markov Usage Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutjahr, Walter

    for computing optimal state transition probabilities for software tests, based on a Markov usage model; this distribution may also be used in the more general context of structural statistical testing of software, software usage models, software testing. 1 Introduction 1.1 Markov Software Usage Models In the last years

  17. Exploring Architectural Design Decision Management Paradigms for Global Software Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Dewayne E.

    on many fundamental architectural drift and erosion problems [20] in the software life cycle to localized software projects, software architecting and architectural knowledge are important to support of large complex systems, architecture plays an even more critical role in the structure of the project [13

  18. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan Requirements Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan Requirements...

  19. Software Discovery at San Ramon | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and asset life cycle optimization to fuel consumption management and plant automation. Software Development Tools and Methodologies These tools provide best practices for...

  20. ESnet, Coalition Partners Announce Global Breakthrough for Software...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Software-Defined Networking Proving true SDN principles and deployment at Internet-scale, ONOS-based peering router and Vandervecken SDN controller stack successfully...

  1. Market Research Report - Global Open Source Software Market Size...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    And thanks to the support and assistance from Open Source Software industry chain related technical experts and marketing experts during Research Team survey and interviews. The...

  2. Modeling software artifact count attribute with s-curves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Norman K.

    2009-05-15

    The estimation of software project attributes, such as size, is important for software project resource planning and process control. However, research regarding software attribute modeling, such as size, effort, and cost, ...

  3. Software Maintainability Improvement: Integrating Standards and Models William C. Chu,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Yeh-Ching

    Software Maintainability Improvement: Integrating Standards and Models William C. Chu, Dpt Science and Engineering, Southeast University, China National Key Laboratory of Software Engineering, Wuhan University, China Abstract Software standards are highly recommended because they promise faster

  4. ECE 587 Hardware/Software Co-Design Lecture 10 Software Processor Modeling II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jia

    ECE 587 ­ Hardware/Software Co-Design Lecture 10 Software Processor Modeling II Professor Jia Wang ­ Hardware/Software Co-Design Spring 2015 1/20 #12;Reading Assignment This lecture: 3.4 Next lecture: 3.5 ECE 587 ­ Hardware/Software Co-Design Spring 2015 2/20 #12;Outline Overview Hardware Abstraction Layer

  5. Constructing Bayesiannetwork Models of Software Testing and Maintenance Uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziv, Hadar

    Constructing Bayesian­network Models of Software Testing and Maintenance Uncertainties To appear, Software requirements, Software test­ ing, Software maintenance 1 #12; 1 Introduction Development­to­market constraints. In real­life software projects, testing is often done after coding is complete, does

  6. Software Models for Mobile Wireless Evaggelia Pitoura

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitoura, Evaggelia

    with a given cost and level of technology ) mobile elements with less resources (e.g., memory, screen size' & $ % Software Models for Mobile Wireless Computing Evaggelia Pitoura Computer Science Department #12; ' & $ % Introduction Restrictions [25, 7, 10, 2]: Mobility ffl System configuration is no longer

  7. A software package for the graphical simulation of the Global Positioning System's satellite orbits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez-Lopez, Eugenio

    1981-01-01

    A SOFTWARE PACKAGE FOR THE GRAPHICAL SIMULATION OF THE GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM'S SATELLITE ORBITS A Thesis by EUGENIO MARTINEZ-LOPEZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1981 Ma)or Subject: Electrical Engineering Copyright by Eugenio Martinez-Lopez, 1979 A SOFTWARE PACKAGE FOR THE GRAPHICAL SIMULATION OF THE GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM&S SATELLITE ORBITS A Thesis by Eugenio...

  8. Bachelor's Project Statistical Models for Software Testing with Imperfect Debugging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Bucchianico, Alessandro

    Bachelor's Project Statistical Models for Software Testing with Imperfect Debugging A. Di models for software testing. During software testing, it is important to know when to stop testing (simplistic ways to solve Maximum Likelihood equations) are being used. In order to provide software test

  9. The China-in-Global Energy Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, T.

    The China-in-Global Energy Model (C-GEM) is a global Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model that captures the interaction of production, consumption and trade among multiple global regions and sectors – including five ...

  10. Process Models in Software Engineering Walt Scacchi, Institute for Software Research, University of California, Irvine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scacchi, Walt

    are developed. It begins with background and definitions of traditional software life cycle models that dominate 1961, Royce 1970). Overall, the apparent purpose of these early software life cycle models 1999). Royce (1970) originated the formulation of the software life cycle using the now familiar

  11. Inside a secret software lab: an ethnographic study of a global software package producer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimm, Christine Franziska

    2009-11-26

    This is an ethnographic study of the creation of a particular type of standard enterprise software package: Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems, which support wide-ranging organisational functions within large ...

  12. A Theoretical Foundation for Software Engineering: A Model Calculus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Dewayne E.

    A Theoretical Foundation for Software Engineering: A Model Calculus Dewayne E. Perry Advanced Research in Software Engineering (ARiSE) Electrical and Computer Engineering The University of Texas of software engineering and software engineering research. While empirical evaluation is important in both

  13. Institute for Software Technology Model-Based Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    t Institute for Software Technology Model-Based Testing Ausgewählte Kapitel Softwaretechnologie 2 2013/14 B.K. Aichernig Model-Based Testing 1 / 38 #12;t Institute for Software Technology Testing-Based Testing 2 / 38 #12;t Institute for Software Technology Testing vs. Model Checking vs. Proving One proves

  14. Software for facilitating the creation of parametric urban resource models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cockey, Sean M. (Sean Michael)

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes a new software tool to facilitate Parametric Urban Resource Modeling, a method for quantitatively studying and improving the distribution of resources in a city. The software is intended to help users ...

  15. Functional Testing Protocols for Commercial Building Efficiency Baseline Modeling Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jump, David; Price, Phillip N.; Granderson, Jessica; Sohn, Michael

    2013-09-06

    This document describes procedures for testing and validating proprietary baseline energy modeling software accuracy in predicting energy use over the period of interest, such as a month or a year. The procedures are designed according to the methodology used for public domain baselining software in another LBNL report that was (like the present report) prepared for Pacific Gas and Electric Company: ?Commercial Building Energy Baseline Modeling Software: Performance Metrics and Method Testing with Open Source Models and Implications for Proprietary Software Testing Protocols? (referred to here as the ?Model Analysis Report?). The test procedure focuses on the quality of the software?s predictions rather than on the specific algorithms used to predict energy use. In this way the software vendor is not required to divulge or share proprietary information about how their software works, while enabling stakeholders to assess its performance.

  16. Modeling Space Shuttle Software Failures at Varying Criticality Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Joseph

    of a software failure data set for an industrial software development project. They propose models based criticality levels. A family of models based on transforms of cumulative time and cumulative failures the exponential, logarithmic, and power models. It also includes models based on transforms of the time per

  17. Using Dependency Models to Manage Complex Software Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Daniel

    .9 [Management]: Life cycle. D.2.11 [Software Architectures]: Information Hiding. General Terms DesignUsing Dependency Models to Manage Complex Software Architecture Neeraj Sangal, Ev Jordan Lattix of Technology {vineet,dnj}@csail.mit.edu ABSTRACT An approach to managing the architecture of large software

  18. Machine learning method for software quality model building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matwin, Stan

    Machine learning method for software quality model building Maurício Amaral de Almeida1 and Stan Ontario, K1N 6N5 Canada {malmeida,stan}@csi.uottawa.ca Abstract Software quality prediction can be cast to software quality prediction. As it often happens in real-life applications, significant part of the project

  19. Software Quality Modeling Experiences at an Oil Company Constanza Lampasona &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basili, Victor R.

    Software Quality Modeling Experiences at an Oil Company Constanza Lampasona & Jens Heidrich No 7-43 Bogotá, Colombia alexis.ocampo@ecopetrol.com.co ABSTRACT The concept of "software quality by refining the "quality" of software development products and processes into sub-concepts down to the level

  20. WEBCASRE: A WEBBASED TOOL FOR SOFTWARE RELIABILITY MODELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyu, Michael R.

    of overall system reliability. This trend makes the estimation of software reliability more and more critical to most large­scale projects in their reliability engineering aspects. Traditionally, software reliabilityWEB­CASRE: A WEB­BASED TOOL FOR SOFTWARE RELIABILITY MODELING Michael R. Lyu \\Lambda JË?urgen Sch

  1. A Model of Noisy Software Engineering Data* (Status Report)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

    A Model of Noisy Software Engineering Data* (Status Report) Roseanne Tesoriero and Marvin Zelkowitz. Software development data is highly variable, which of- ten result,s in underlying trends being hidden the character- istic curve. This process is used on sample data from the NASA/GSFC Software Engineering

  2. software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    software · contact ... software. TREECODE3D_YUKAWA. TREECODE3D_YUKAWA is a Fortran90 subroutine for approximating the screened Coulomb ...

  3. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team : 1995/1996 Scientific Report February 1997 CERFACS ACTIVITY REPORT 1 #12; Contents 1 Climate Modelling) : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Anthropogenic climate change studies: scenario experiments (96) : : : : : : : : : 7 2

  4. Research Article Automating Risk Analysis of Software Design Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Barton P.

    Research Article Automating Risk Analysis of Software Design Models Maxime Frydman,1 Guifré Ruiz,2 to reduce the need for costly human expertise to perform risk analysis in software, which is common of these secure development methodologies share one essential risk analysis activity, called threat modeling [4

  5. On Model Based Synthesis of Embedded Control Software Vadim Alimguzhin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tronci, Enrico

    Systems are indeed Software Based Control Sys- tems (SBCSs), that is control systems whose controller Model Based Design approaches for control software. Given the formal model of a plant as a Discrete Time Linear Hybrid System and the implementation specifications (that is, number of bits in the Analog-to-Digital

  6. MODDO -A TAILORED DOCUMENTATION SYSTEM FOR MODEL-DRIVEN SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baader, Franz

    Software Documentation, Model-Driven Software Development 1. INTRODUCTION Delivering high-quality softwareMODDO - A TAILORED DOCUMENTATION SYSTEM FOR MODEL-DRIVEN SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT Matthias Heinrich SAP.knechtel@sap.com ABSTRACT In the last decade Model-Driven Software Development (MDSD) has become an established software

  7. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change of the tropical climate : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Short­term variability studies : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 8 2.3 Climate drift sensitivity studies

  8. Automating Threat Modeling through the Software Development Life-Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Barton P.

    in the development life-cycle reduces its cost dramati- cally. Companies doing software development know this realityAutomating Threat Modeling through the Software Development Life-Cycle Guifr´e Ruiz1 , Elisa process through the development life-cycle. It does not require developers to have any security training

  9. Green Software Services: From Requirements to Business Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dustdar, Schahram

    Green Software Services: From Requirements to Business Models Schahram Dustdar, Fei Li, Hong years, green software research is gaining momentum because of the acute need for sustainable develop- ment. Most past research has been focused on the definitions, metrics and technical solutions for green

  10. software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    software. TREECODE3D_YUKAWA. TREECODE3D_YUKAWA is a Fortran90 subroutine for approximating the screened Coulomb (Yukawa) electrostatic ...

  11. Modeling and engineering software systems using Petri networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visée, Michaël

    2007-01-01

    A model of software applications for business process management based on colored Petri Networks is proposed and the corresponding application development process is exposed. A language is proposed to specify the enabling ...

  12. Discovering Models of Software Processes from EventBased Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Alexander L.

    in process discovery is to use those data to describe the process in a form suitable for formal­modelDiscovering Models of Software Processes from Event­Based Data Jonathan E. Cook and Alexander L process methods and tools presuppose the existence of a formal model of a process. Unfortunately

  13. Modular Operational Test Plans for Inferences on Software Reliability Based on a Markov Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumdar, Mainak

    Modular Operational Test Plans for Inferences on Software Reliability Based on a Markov Model. Keywords: Software reliability; Modular Operational Tests; Sample Size Determination; Mathematical Programming #12;Modular Operational Test Plans for Inferences on Software Reliability Based on a Markov Model

  14. A model of global net ecosystem production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, C.S.; Matson, P.A. (NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)); Field, C.B.; Randerson, J. (Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA (United States)); Vitousek, P.M.; Mooney, H.A. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States))

    1993-06-01

    We present an ecosystem modeling approach to resolve global climate and edaphic controls on seasonal NEP patterns. Global remote sensing, climate and land surface data sets are used as inputs to drive a terrestrial carbon cycle model at 1[degrees]lat/lon resolution. monthly net primary productivity (NPP) is calculated using surface radiation and NDVI to determine photosynthesis, which is subsequently adjusted by temperature, water and nitrogen stress factors. Total nitrogen availability is coupled to net mineralization rates from litter soil carbon pools. Soil respiration and NPP balance one another globally at around 60 Gt C yr[sup [minus]1]. The seasonal amplitude of global NEP is 1.2 Gt C. Although substantial month-to-month variation is observed for tropical forest areas, seasonal amplitude is driven globally by boreal and temperate forest ecosystems between 650 and 30[degrees] N latitude.

  15. Functional Testing Protocols for Commercial Building Efficiency Baseline Modeling Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jump, David

    2014-01-01

    for   Proprietary  Software  Testing  Protocols”  (vendors   value   software   testing   as   a   means   to  and  requirements  for  testing  software  vendor  energy  

  16. Hardware/Software Co-design of Global Cloud System Resolving Michael F. Wehner 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliker, Leonid

    with rapid com- putational and observational advances allowing long-term sim- ulation of the climate system-high resolution climate model specifications at relatively affordable cost and power considerations. A strawman with sources of solar and infrared radiation (Solomon et al. 2007). Current global climate models used

  17. Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models Berkeley Lab Researcher Says Climate Science is Entering New...

  18. Automated Analysis of Software Designs with Graphic Quality Models Department of Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Hong

    Automated Analysis of Software Designs with Graphic Quality Models QIAN ZHANG Department@brookes.ac.uk Abstract: Software quality models play a significant role in software quality assurance. Based on our previous work on graphic modelling of software quality, this paper extends the quality modelling language

  19. New generation of software? Modeling of energy demands for residential ventilation with HTML interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forowicz, T

    1997-01-01

    New generation of software? Modeling of energy demands for residential ventilation with HTML interface

  20. Constructing Bayesian-network Models of Software Testing and Maintenance Uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziv, Hadar

    Constructing Bayesian-network Models of Software Testing and Maintenance Uncertainties-lived software, requirements are analyzed and speci ed, designs and code modules are developed, test- ing, Software testing, Software maintenance 1 #12;1 Introduction Development of complex software is fraught

  1. Adaptive Software Testing in the Context of an Improved Controlled Markov Chain Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Sukhamay

    Adaptive Software Testing in the Context of an Improved Controlled Markov Chain Model Hai Hu, Chang@buaa.edu.cn Abstract Adaptive software testing is the counterpart of adaptive control in software testing. It means that software testing strategy should be adjusted on- line by using the testing data collected during software

  2. Software

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|Sensitive Species3performedValley | Departmentmaterials |Software

  3. Efficient Power Modeling and Software Thermal Sensing for Runtime Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efficient Power Modeling and Software Thermal Sensing for Runtime Temperature Monitoring WEI WU of cooling and packaging considerably. It is therefore imper- ative to be able to monitor the temperature temperature monitoring. ACM Trans. Des. Autom. Electron. Syst. 12, 3, Article 25 (August 2007), 29 pages. DOI

  4. Lensview: Software for modelling resolved gravitational lens images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randall B. Wayth; Rachel L. Webster

    2006-09-19

    We have developed a new software tool, Lensview, for modelling resolved gravitational lens images. Based on the LensMEM algorithm, the software finds the best fitting lens mass model and source brightness distribution using a maximum entropy constraint. The method can be used with any point spread function or lens model. We review the algorithm and introduce some significant improvements. We also investigate and discuss issues associated with the statistical uncertainties of models and model parameters and the issues of source plane size and source pixel size. We test the software on simulated optical and radio data to evaluate how well lens models can be recovered and with what accuracy. For optical data, lens model parameters can typically be recovered with better than 1% accuracy and the degeneracy between mass ellipticity and power law is reduced. For radio data, we find that systematic errors associated with using processed radio maps, rather than the visibilities, are of similar magnitude to the random errors. Hence analysing radio data in image space is still useful and meaningful. The software is applied to the optical arc HST J15433+5352 and the radio ring MG1549+3047 using a simple elliptical isothermal lens model. For HST J15433+5352, the Einstein radius is 0.525" +/- 0.015 which probably includes a substantial convergence contribution from a neighbouring galaxy. For MG1549+3047, the model has Einstein radius 1.105" +/- 0.005 and core radius 0.16" 0.03. The total mass enclosed in the critical radius is 7.06 x 10^{10} Solar masses for our best model.

  5. 0 + 0 = 1 : the appliance model of selling software bundled with hardware

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hein, Bettina

    2007-01-01

    The business model of selling software bundled with hardware is called the appliance model. As hardware becomes less and less expensive and open source software is being offered for free, the traditional business model of ...

  6. Model-driven Automated Software FMEA Neal Snooke, PhD, Aberystwyth University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snooke, Neal

    Model-driven Automated Software FMEA Neal Snooke, PhD, Aberystwyth University Chris Price PhD, Aberystwyth University Key Words: Failure modes and effects analysis; software FMEA; model-driven software development SUMMARY & CONCLUSIONS This paper describes how software FMEA can be automated both for low

  7. HASARD: A Model-Based Method for Quality Analysis of Software Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Hong

    HASARD: A Model-Based Method for Quality Analysis of Software Architecture Hong Zhu Department for the analysis of software quality as entailed in software architectural designs. In this method, quality hazards architectural designs to predict their quality. 1.1 Motivation Software architecture is a structural model

  8. Macroeconometric Modelling with a Global Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pesaran, M. Hashem; Smith, Ron P.

    2006-03-14

    for the future evolution of the weights as well. 6 where Aj = 0 BBB@ A0zjW0 A1zjW1 ... ANzjWN 1 CCCA ; ax = 0 BBB@ a0z a1z ... aNz 1 CCCA ; "t = 0 BBB@ "0t "1t ... "Nt 1 CCCA : As before, the rational expectations solution of the global structural model, assuming...

  9. Chapter 3: Software Architecture Modelling: Bridging Two Worlds Using Ergonomics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nigay, Laurence

    Chapter 3: Software Architecture Modelling: Bridging Two Worlds Using Ergonomics and Software, · for verifying ergonomic and software properties, · for modifying and maintaining them in a productive way present a PAC-Amodeus software design solution of a WWW browser and its assessment in terms of ergonomic

  10. KnowledgeBased Software Assistant : A Knowledge Representation Model and its Implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boudjlida, Nacer

    of the software life­cycle. In this paper, we řrst propose concepts for software process model­ ing in order in the software life­cycle [?][?][?][?]. A řrst approach relies on an object base and a rule base. The obj in the ALF Project [?][?] (Advanced software engineering environment Logistics Framework) which aims

  11. Challenges in Using an Economic Cost Model for Software Engineering Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Hoek, André

    1 Challenges in Using an Economic Cost Model for Software Engineering Simulation Emily Oh André van dynamics underlying real-world software engineering processes. We are constructing a new approach to software engineering education that is based on the use of an educa- tional software engineering simulation

  12. Modeling and Analysis of Load and Time Dependent Software Rejuvenation Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Telek, Miklós

    divided into design, coding and test­ ing phase. Traditionally, software quality improve­ mentModeling and Analysis of Load and Time Dependent Software Rejuvenation Policies S. Garg 1 , A running client­server type software systems by many clients, such software ``ages'' with time

  13. Inferred Models for Dynamic and Sparse Hardware-Software Spaces Weidan Wu Benjamin C. Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Benjamin C.

    Inferred Models for Dynamic and Sparse Hardware-Software Spaces Weidan Wu Benjamin C. Lee Duke University {weidan.wu, benjamin.c.lee}@duke.edu Abstract Diverse software and heterogeneous hardware pose new hardware-software analysis. These strategies include (i) identifying shared software behavior; (ii

  14. Simulating an Automated Approach to Discovery and Modeling of Open Source Software Development Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scacchi, Walt

    of automated process discovery and modeling mechanisms that can be applied to Web-based software development projects. Keywords: Automated Process Discovery, Process Modeling and Simulation, Open Source SoftwareSimulating an Automated Approach to Discovery and Modeling of Open Source Software Development

  15. Analysis of Software Evolvability in Quality Models Hongyu Pei Breivold1, Ivica Crnkovic2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Steffen

    Analysis of Software Evolvability in Quality Models Hongyu Pei Breivold1, Ivica Crnkovic2 1ABB analyze several existing quality models for the purpose of evaluating how software evolvability is that although none of the existing quality models is dedicated to the analysis of software evolvability, we can

  16. An integrated life cycle quality model for general public market software products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suryn, Witold

    An integrated life cycle quality model for general public market software products Witold Suryn1 of the software product results from its ultimate quality seen by both acquirers and end users. An integrated life cycle quality model, further called complement model for software product quality combines high level

  17. Integrated Modeling of Process-and Data-Centric Software Systems with PHILharmonicFlows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    Integrated Modeling of Process- and Data-Centric Software Systems with PHILharmonicFlows Carolina--Process- and data-centric software systems require a tight integration of processes, functions, data, and users methodological guidance for modeling large process- and data-centric software systems based on PHILharmonic

  18. A Comparative Study of Software Model Checkers as Unit Testing Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Comparative Study of Software Model Checkers as Unit Testing Tools: An Industrial Case Study, and can be utilized as unit testing tools. However, since software model checkers are not fully mature yet and CBMC to testing the components of a storage platform software for flash memory. Through this project

  19. A Systematic and Comprehensive Tool for Software Reliability Modeling and Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyu, Michael R.

    reliability. This trend makes the estimation of software reliability more and more crit­ ical to most large­scale projects in their reliability engineering aspects. Traditionally, software reliability modeling is a setA Systematic and Comprehensive Tool for Software Reliability Modeling and Measurement Michael R

  20. Validation of Software for Bayesian Models Using Posterior Quantiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelman, Andrew

    developing the necessary software "from scratch," and such software is rarely tested to the same extent 2004). Standard approaches to software testing and debugging from the engineering and computer science what it claims to do. Here we outline a simulation-based method for testing the correctness of software

  1. TriBITS lifecycle model. Version 1.0, a lean/agile software lifecycle model for research-based computational science and engineering and applied mathematical software.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willenbring, James M.; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Heroux, Michael Allen

    2012-01-01

    Software lifecycles are becoming an increasingly important issue for computational science and engineering (CSE) software. The process by which a piece of CSE software begins life as a set of research requirements and then matures into a trusted high-quality capability is both commonplace and extremely challenging. Although an implicit lifecycle is obviously being used in any effort, the challenges of this process - respecting the competing needs of research vs. production - cannot be overstated. Here we describe a proposal for a well-defined software lifecycle process based on modern Lean/Agile software engineering principles. What we propose is appropriate for many CSE software projects that are initially heavily focused on research but also are expected to eventually produce usable high-quality capabilities. The model is related to TriBITS, a build, integration and testing system, which serves as a strong foundation for this lifecycle model, and aspects of this lifecycle model are ingrained in the TriBITS system. Here, we advocate three to four phases or maturity levels that address the appropriate handling of many issues associated with the transition from research to production software. The goals of this lifecycle model are to better communicate maturity levels with customers and to help to identify and promote Software Engineering (SE) practices that will help to improve productivity and produce better software. An important collection of software in this domain is Trilinos, which is used as the motivation and the initial target for this lifecycle model. However, many other related and similar CSE (and non-CSE) software projects can also make good use of this lifecycle model, especially those that use the TriBITS system. Indeed this lifecycle process, if followed, will enable large-scale sustainable integration of many complex CSE software efforts across several institutions.

  2. Web Application for Modeling Global Antineutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew Barna; Steve Dye

    2015-10-19

    Electron antineutrinos stream freely from rapidly decaying fission products within nuclear reactors and from long-lived radioactivity within Earth. Those with energy greater than 1.8 MeV are regularly observed by several kiloton-scale underground detectors. These observations estimate the amount of terrestrial radiogenic heating, monitor the operation of nuclear reactors, and measure the fundamental properties of neutrinos. The analysis of antineutrino observations at operating detectors or the planning of projects with new detectors requires information on the expected signal and background rates. We present a web application for modeling global antineutrino energy spectra and detection rates for any surface location. Antineutrino sources include all registered nuclear reactors as well as the crust and mantle of Earth. Visitors to the website may model the location and power of a hypothetical nuclear reactor, copy energy spectra, and analyze the significance of a selected signal relative to background.

  3. Web Application for Modeling Global Antineutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barna, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Electron antineutrinos stream freely from rapidly decaying fission products within nuclear reactors and from long-lived radioactivity within Earth. Those with energy greater than 1.8 MeV are regularly observed by several kiloton-scale underground detectors. These observations estimate the amount of terrestrial radiogenic heating, monitor the operation of nuclear reactors, and measure the fundamental properties of neutrinos. The analysis of antineutrino observations at operating detectors or the planning of projects with new detectors requires information on the expected signal and background rates. We present a web application for modeling global antineutrino energy spectra and detection rates for any surface location. Antineutrino sources include all registered nuclear reactors as well as the crust and mantle of Earth. Visitors to the website may model the location and power of a hypothetical nuclear reactor, copy energy spectra, and analyze the significance of a selected signal relative to background.

  4. Software enhancements to the IVSEM model of the CTBTO IMS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damico, Joseph P.

    2011-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) developed the Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model (IVSEM) to estimate the performance of the International Monitoring System (IMS) operated by the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). IVSEM was developed in several phases between 1995 and 2000. The model was developed in FORTRAN with an IDL-based user interface and was compiled for Windows and UNIX operating systems. Continuing interest in this analysis capability, coupled with numerous advances in desktop computer hardware and software since IVSEM was written, enabled significant improvements to IVSEM run-time performance and data analysis capabilities. These improvements were implemented externally without modifying the FORTRAN executables, which had been previously verified. This paper describes the parallelization approach developed to significantly reduce IVSEM run-times and the new test setup and analysis tools developed to facilitate better IVSEM operation.

  5. A united model for hardware/software codesign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dave, Nirav Hemant, 1982-

    2011-01-01

    Embedded systems are almost always built with parts implemented in both hardware and software. Market forces encourage such systems to be developed with dierent hardware-software decompositions to meet dierent points on ...

  6. Distributed lyapunov functions in analysis of graph models of software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roozbehani, Mardavij

    In previous works, the authors introduced a framework for software analysis, which is based on optimization of Lyapunov invariants. These invariants prove critical software properties such as absence of overflow and ...

  7. Javanco, a software framework for optical network modelling and optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergman, Keren

    methods, i.e. keeping them expressed in pseudo-code. In most cases, however, a software implementation

  8. On the Interaction between Business Models and Software Architecture in Electronic Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Hans

    1 On the Interaction between Business Models and Software Architecture in Electronic Commerce Jaap a business model for electronic commerce it is necessary to develop an architecture of the software system that will support this model. Such an architecture shows at an early stage to what extent the business model can

  9. Modeling and simulating software acquisition process architectures S. James Choi a,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scacchi, Walt

    acquisition includes the processes typically associated with the software engineering life cycle. However, during, and after their software engineering life cycle. The need to address processes for systemsModeling and simulating software acquisition process architectures S. James Choi a,1 , Walt Scacchi

  10. Design Models for Components in Distributed Object Software X. Xie and S. M. Shatz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shatz, Sol M.

    approach for component-based software engineering. This paper discusses an approach for blending Petri netDesign Models for Components in Distributed Object Software 1 X. Xie and S. M. Shatz University of Illinois at Chicago Abstract Component-based software development has many potential advantages, including

  11. From UML to HDL: a Model Driven Architectural Approach to Hardware-Software Co-Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Mitchell

    From UML to HDL: a Model Driven Architectural Approach to Hardware-Software Co-Design Frank P the problem of hardware/software co-design via an open source laboratory for studying hardware- based system descriptions that can be implemented in either hardware or software. Utilizing component

  12. Aeras: A next generation global atmosphere model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Spotz, William F.; Smith, Thomas M.; Demeshko, Irina P.; Fike, Jeffrey A.

    2015-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is developing a new global atmosphere model named Aeras that is performance portable and supports the quantification of uncertainties. These next-generation capabilities are enabled by building Aeras on top of Albany, a code base that supports the rapid development of scientific application codes while leveraging Sandia's foundational mathematics and computer science packages in Trilinos and Dakota. Embedded uncertainty quantification (UQ) is an original design capability of Albany, and performance portability is a recent upgrade. Other required features, such as shell-type elements, spectral elements, efficient explicit and semi-implicit time-stepping, transient sensitivity analysis, and concurrent ensembles, were not componentsmore »of Albany as the project began, and have been (or are being) added by the Aeras team. We present early UQ and performance portability results for the shallow water equations.« less

  13. Emulating maize yields from global gridded crop models using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emulating maize yields from global gridded crop models using statistical estimates Elodie Blanc and Benjamin Sultan Report No. 279 March 2015 #12;The MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global from two established MIT research centers: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center

  14. Simulating an Automated Approach to Discovery and Modeling of Open Source Software Development Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scacchi, Walt

    Process Discovery, Process Modeling and Simulation, Open Source Software Development 1. Introduction to that can more readily facilitate process discovery and modeling. In our approach, we identify the kindsSimulating an Automated Approach to Discovery and Modeling of Open Source Software Development

  15. Adaptive Global Testing for Functional Linear Models Carnegie Mellon University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei, Jing

    Adaptive Global Testing for Functional Linear Models Jing Lei Carnegie Mellon University August 5 BCS-0941518. Abstract This paper studies global testing of the slope function in functional linear when approxi- mating the functional regression model by a finite dimensional multivariate linear

  16. Modeling the Global Critical Path in Concurrent Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling the Global Critical Path in Concurrent Systems Girish Venkataramani Tiberiu Chelcea Mihai Molecular Electronics, under contract number CCR0205523. #12;Keywords: Performance modeling, critical path analysis, high-level synthesis #12;Abstract We show how the global critical path can be used as a practical

  17. TOWARDS AN ABILITY MODEL FOR SOFTWARE ENGINEERING APPRENTICESHIP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    .Saliou}@univ-brest.fr ABSTRACT Despite recent efforts to improve the effectiveness of software engineering education, most provides the software engineering by immersion paradigm as an alternative to other education systems. Shifting to the constructivism paradigm as far as possible, this education system is entirely based on a 7

  18. Murphy Tools: Utilizing Extracted GUI Models for Industrial Software Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Memon, Atif M.

    Technical Research Centre of Finland Oulu, Finland Matias Suarez F-Secure Ltd Helsinki, Finland Atif M. Memon University of Maryland College Park, MD, USA Teemu Kanstrén VTT, Oulu, Finland University of development and testing of commercial software products. F-Secure Ltd is a software company from Finland

  19. SMT-Based Bounded Model Checking for Embedded ANSI-C Software Lucas Cordeiro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SMT-Based Bounded Model Checking for Embedded ANSI-C Software Lucas Cordeiro University to the verification of embedded soft- ware written in ANSI-C. We have extended the encodings from previous SMT. Keywords-Bounded Model Checking; Satisfiability Modulo Theories; Embedded ANSI-C Software; I. INTRODUCTION

  20. Tool Support to Model-based Quality Analysis of Software Architecture Qian Zhang, Jian Wu Hong Zhu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Hong

    Tool Support to Model-based Quality Analysis of Software Architecture Qian Zhang, Jian Wu Hong Zhu@brookes.ac.uk ABSTRACT This paper presents an automated software tool SQUARE (Software QUality and ARchitecture model- ling Environment). It is designed and implemented to support the analysis of software quality from

  1. Integrated decision support model for global sourcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mroczkowski, Victor A. (Victor Adam)

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade, the U.S. aircraft industry has experienced increasing levels of international integration as companies seek to access global talent and resources, cut production costs, spread financial risk, and ...

  2. Global manufacturing model and case studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kijtawesataporn, Komsun

    2003-01-01

    . Second, an operational layer discusses, the general idea of what policy a company needs to develop and how a company globally manages its operations and supply chain, resources, and markets. The third layer, societal, shows the importance and the impacts...

  3. Global Futures: a multithreaded execution model for Global Arrays-based applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Vishnu, Abhinav

    2012-05-31

    We present Global Futures (GF), an execution model extension to Global Arrays, which is based on a PGAS-compatible Active Message-based paradigm. We describe the design and implementation of Global Futures and illustrate its use in a computational chemistry application benchmark (Hartree-Fock matrix construction using the Self-Consistent Field method). Our results show how we used GF to increase the scalability of the Hartree-Fock matrix build to up to 6,144 cores of an Infiniband cluster. We also show how GF's multithreaded execution has comparable performance to the traditional process-based SPMD model.

  4. To appear in: Boden A, Mller C, Nett B. Conducting Business Ethnography in Global Software Development Projects of Small German Enterprises. Information and Software Technology. 2010; accepted for publication.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into offshoring in German small to medium-sized enterprises. Method: The material for this paper is based on offshoring. Building on our experiences from the field, we argue for actively conceptualizing struggles. Keywords: Global Software Engineering, Qualitative Research, Business Ethnography, Offshoring, Small

  5. Computational Approaches for Modelling Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication Using Multiphysics Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimack, Peter

    the Integral Approach (IA). The computational cost of performing this calculation is , for N points over developing highly specialised, bespoke software are highlighted. In order to calculate the complex nonlinear partial differential equation system representing the full problem. This includes

  6. ORIGINAL PAPER Modeling the impacts of global warming on predation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL PAPER Modeling the impacts of global warming on predation and biotic resistance in regulating or limiting exotic prey. We investigate how global warming potentially alters the strength damselfly Megalag- rion calliphya as predator and the invasive southern house mosquito Culex

  7. GLOBAL COMPREHENSIVE MODELS IN POLITICS AND POLICYMAKING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    . In this editorial, I reflect on the role of comprehensive models, such as IAMs and earth system models (ESMs

  8. Dependency models as a basis for analyzing software product platform modularity : a case study in strategic software design rationalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaMantia, Matthew J. (Matthew John)

    2006-01-01

    It is broadly accepted among software managers and architects that maintaining the integrity of software designs is important for the long-term health and viability of software product platforms. The use of modular, ...

  9. Industrial validation models 1 4/23/03 Experimental validation of new software technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

    Industrial validation models 1 4/23/03 Experimental validation of new software technology Marvin V When to apply a new technology in an organization is a critical decision for every software development organization. Earlier work defines a set of methods that the research community uses when a new technology

  10. SMT-Based Bounded Model Checking for Embedded ANSI-C Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 SMT-Based Bounded Model Checking for Embedded ANSI-C Software Lucas Cordeiro, Bernd Fischer software written in ANSI-C in order to improve scalability and precision in a completely automatic way. We was provided for ANSI-C [5] constructs such as bit-level operations, fixed- point arithmetic, pointers (i

  11. Parameterization of Urban Characteristics for Global Climate Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Trisha L.

    2011-10-31

    The data presented here are part of a global dataset developed specifically for use in climate models to simulate urban climates for specific regions of the globe. Article abstract: To help understand potential effects of urbanization on climates...

  12. A mixture model of global Internet capacity distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyunjin; Thorson, Stuart

    2015-05-13

    This article develops a preferential attachment-based mixture model of global Internet bandwidth and investigates it in the context of observed bandwidth distributions between 2002 and 2011. Our longitudinal analysis shows, among other things...

  13. Using Feature Modeling for Program Comprehension and Software Architecture Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riebisch, Matthias

    to the need for its architecture and design decisions to be recovered. Due to the long life cycle of software systems has been developed. Many of them have a long life cycle and contain a lot of company "know to be always up to date with the latest technologies and to evolve during their life cycle. Evolving often

  14. NREL Software Models Performance of Wind Plants (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    This NREL Highlight is being developed for the 2015 February Alliance S&T Meeting, and describes NREL's Simulator for Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) software in collaboration with Norway-based Statoil, to optimize layouts and controls of wind plants arrays.

  15. Parallel Assignments in Software Model Murray Stokely 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouaknine, Joël

    ] and used to measure the improvement in the verification of real software systems. This im- provement of passes over the same parts of the CFG, the cumulative savings obtained by this compression procedure can involve interacting with theorem provers, become more efficient. Moreover, in the context of concurrent C

  16. Multivariate Multi-Model Approach for Globally Multimodal Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Hao-hua

    Multivariate Multi-Model Approach for Globally Multimodal Problems Chung-Yao Chuang Institute this source of difficulty, we designed an EDA that builds and samples multiple probabilistic models at each adopt multivariate probabilis- tic models. Furthermore, we have also devised a mechanism

  17. A PHYSICS-BASED SOFTWARE FRAMEWORK FOR SUN-EARTH CONNECTION MODELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stout, Quentin F.

    . The SWMF is a structured collection of software building blocks to develop components for Sun-Earth system modeling, to couple them, and to assemble them into applications. A component is created from the user

  18. MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) Version 2: Model Description and Baseline Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolov, Andrei P.

    The MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) is designed for analyzing the global environmental changes that may result from anthropogenic causes, quantifying the uncertainties associated with the projected changes, and ...

  19. Failure Correlation in Software Reliability Models Katerina Goseva Popstojanova and Kishor Trivedi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goseva-Popstojanova, Katerina

    reliability modeling framework based on Markov renewal processes which nat- urally introduces dependence among for a more flexible and consistent model formulation and solution. The Markov renewal model pre- sentedFailure Correlation in Software Reliability Models Katerina Goseva ­ Popstojanova and Kishor

  20. SOFTWARE QUALITY ASSURANCE FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE CONSEQUENCE ASSESSMENT MODELS AT DOE'S SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, C

    2007-12-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Atmospheric Technologies Group develops, maintains, and operates computer-based software applications for use in emergency response consequence assessment at DOE's Savannah River Site. These applications range from straightforward, stand-alone Gaussian dispersion models run with simple meteorological input to complex computational software systems with supporting scripts that simulate highly dynamic atmospheric processes. A software quality assurance program has been developed to ensure appropriate lifecycle management of these software applications. This program was designed to meet fully the overall structure and intent of SRNL's institutional software QA programs, yet remain sufficiently practical to achieve the necessary level of control in a cost-effective manner. A general overview of this program is described.

  1. Commercial Building Energy Baseline Modeling Software: Performance Metrics and Method Testing with Open Source Models and Implications for Proprietary Software Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Phillip N

    2014-01-01

    for Proprietary Software Testing Philip N Price, Ph.D. ,for Proprietary Software Testing Final Report ET Projectfor the development of software testing protocols. These

  2. Thermal Decomposition of Natural Fibers: Global Kinetic Modeling with Nonisothermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with consideration of fiber as one pseudocomponent. Ma´lek method with activation energy values previously obtainedThermal Decomposition of Natural Fibers: Global Kinetic Modeling with Nonisothermal.interscience.wiley.com). ABSTRACT: The modeling of thermal decomposition process of ten natural fibers commonly used in polymer

  3. Guiding the Discovery of Open Source Software Processes with a Reference Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scacchi, Walt

    Guiding the Discovery of Open Source Software Processes with a Reference Model Chris Jensen1 that characterize the process. Keywords. Reference model, open source, process discovery 1 Introduction OSS a reference model based approach for process discovery to assist in coding process evidence to reduce the risk

  4. Structural Informatics, Modeling, and Design with an Open-Source Molecular Software Library (MSL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senes, Alessandro

    Structural Informatics, Modeling, and Design with an Open-Source Molecular Software Library (MSL for the design, modeling, and analysis of macromolecules. Among the main features supported by the library coordinates (for modeling) and multiple amino acid identities at the same backbone position (for design

  5. AutoMoDe Notations, Methods, and Tools for Model-Based Development of Automotive Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Peter

    05AE-268 AutoMoDe ­ Notations, Methods, and Tools for Model-Based Development of Automotive describes the first results from the AutoMoDe project (Automotive Model-based Development), where an integrated methodology for model-based development of automotive control software is being developed

  6. Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Third year report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowley, T.J.; North, G.R.; Smith, N.R.

    1994-05-01

    This report was prepared by the Applied Research Corporation (ARC), College Station, Texas, under subcontract to Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate studies task. The task supports site characterization work required for the selection of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository and is part of the Performance Assessment Scientific Support (PASS) Program at PNL. The work is under the overall direction of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), US Department of Energy Headquarters, Washington, DC. The scope of the report is to present the results of the third year`s work on the atmospheric modeling part of the global climate studies task. The development testing of computer models and initial results are discussed. The appendices contain several studies that provide supporting information and guidance to the modeling work and further details on computer model development. Complete documentation of the models, including user information, will be prepared under separate reports and manuals.

  7. Commercial Building Energy Baseline Modeling Software: Performance Metrics and Method Testing with Open Source Models and Implications for Proprietary Software Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Phillip N.; Granderson, Jessica; Sohn, Michael; Addy, Nathan; Jump, David

    2013-09-01

    The overarching goal of this work is to advance the capabilities of technology evaluators in evaluating the building-level baseline modeling capabilities of Energy Management and Information System (EMIS) software. Through their customer engagement platforms and products, EMIS software products have the potential to produce whole-building energy savings through multiple strategies: building system operation improvements, equipment efficiency upgrades and replacements, and inducement of behavioral change among the occupants and operations personnel. Some offerings may also automate the quantification of whole-building energy savings, relative to a baseline period, using empirical models that relate energy consumption to key influencing parameters, such as ambient weather conditions and building operation schedule. These automated baseline models can be used to streamline the whole-building measurement and verification (M&V) process, and therefore are of critical importance in the context of multi-measure whole-building focused utility efficiency programs. This report documents the findings of a study that was conducted to begin answering critical questions regarding quantification of savings at the whole-building level, and the use of automated and commercial software tools. To evaluate the modeling capabilities of EMIS software particular to the use case of whole-building savings estimation, four research questions were addressed: 1. What is a general methodology that can be used to evaluate baseline model performance, both in terms of a) overall robustness, and b) relative to other models? 2. How can that general methodology be applied to evaluate proprietary models that are embedded in commercial EMIS tools? How might one handle practical issues associated with data security, intellectual property, appropriate testing ‘blinds’, and large data sets? 3. How can buildings be pre-screened to identify those that are the most model-predictable, and therefore those whose savings can be calculated with least error? 4. What is the state of public domain models, that is, how well do they perform, and what are the associated implications for whole-building measurement and verification (M&V)? Additional project objectives that were addressed as part of this study include: (1) clarification of the use cases and conditions for baseline modeling performance metrics, benchmarks and evaluation criteria, (2) providing guidance for determining customer suitability for baseline modeling, (3) describing the portfolio level effects of baseline model estimation errors, (4) informing PG&E’s development of EMIS technology product specifications, and (5) providing the analytical foundation for future studies about baseline modeling and saving effects of EMIS technologies. A final objective of this project was to demonstrate the application of the methodology, performance metrics, and test protocols with participating EMIS product vendors.

  8. Understanding the drivers affecting land use change in Ecuador: an application of the Land Change Modeler software 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishna Rajan, Dhruva

    2010-01-01

    deforestation and degradation) and related policy mechanisms has accelerated the need for modelling deforestation. This project looks at developing a methodology for modelling deforestation using the Land Change Modeler software. To generate the model of change...

  9. Model-Driven Development of Software Front Ends Marco Brambilla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbiano, Lorenzo

    the execution Types of models #12;CIM, PIM, PSM Modeling Levels Computation independent (CIM): describe, without any technical or technological details Platform-specific (PSM): define all the technological object description and constraints #12;Modeling levels - PSM How the functionality in the PIM is realized

  10. When security meets software engineering: A case of modelling secure information systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    When security meets software engineering: A case of modelling secure information systems Engineering: towards the Modeling of Secure Information Systems" paper presented at the 15th International. This is mainly because private information is stored in computer systems and without security, organisations (and

  11. Modeling and Implementing Software Architecture with Acme and ArchJava

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garlan, David

    Modeling and Implementing Software Architecture with Acme and ArchJava Marwan Abi-Antoun Jonathan+@cs.cmu.edu schmerl+@cs.cmu.edu nnahas@acm.org ttt@alumni.carnegiemellon.edu ABSTRACT We demonstrate a tool to incrementally synchronize an Acme architectural model described in the Acme Architectural Description Language

  12. Context-Bounded Model Checking of LTL Properties for ANSI-C Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Context-Bounded Model Checking of LTL Properties for ANSI-C Software Jeremy Morse1 , Lucas Cordeiro in low-level programming languages like ANSI- C. In this paper, we describe and experiment such as ANSI-C [9, 23, 17]. In context-bounded model checking, the state spaces of such applications

  13. GLOBAL DYNAMICS OF AN SEIR EPIDEMIC MODEL WITH VERTICAL TRANSMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Michael

    GLOBAL DYNAMICS OF AN SEIR EPIDEMIC MODEL WITH VERTICAL TRANSMISSION MICHAEL Y. LI, HAL L. SMITH population through both horizontal and vertical transmission. The total host population is assumed to have at an endemic equilibrium state if it initially exists. The contribution of the vertical transmission

  14. Development of the Global Earthquake Model's neotectonic fault database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Development of the Global Earthquake Model's neotectonic fault database Annemarie Christophersen1 database and a unique graphical interface for the compilation of new fault data. A key design principle is that of an electronic field notebook for capturing observations a geologist would make about a fault. The database

  15. Parallel Seismic Ray Tracing in a Global Earth Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genaud, Stéphane

    from the hypocenter (source) to one station. The #28;nal objective of the seismic tomography process1 Parallel Seismic Ray Tracing in a Global Earth Model Marc Grunberg * , Stéphane Genaud of the Earth interior, and seismic tomogra- phy is a means to improve knowledge in this #28;eld. In order

  16. SMT-Based Bounded Model Checking for Embedded ANSI-C Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordeiro, Lucas; Marques-Silva, Joao

    2009-01-01

    Propositional bounded model checking has been applied successfully to verify embedded software but is limited by the increasing propositional formula size and the loss of structure during the translation. These limitations can be reduced by encoding word-level information in theories richer than propositional logic and using SMT solvers for the generated verification conditions. Here, we investigate the application of different SMT solvers to the verification of embedded software written in ANSI-C. We have extended the encodings from previous SMT-based bounded model checkers to provide more accurate support for finite variables, bit-vector operations, arrays, structures, unions and pointers. We have integrated the CVC3, Boolector, and Z3 solvers with the CBMC front-end and evaluated them using both standard software model checking benchmarks and typical embedded applications from telecommunications, control systems and medical devices. The experiments show that our approach can analyze larger problems and sub...

  17. Ecological Modelling 143 (2001) 227243 A globally applicable model of daily solar irradiance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt Jr., E. Raymond

    2001-01-01

    Ecological Modelling 143 (2001) 227­243 A globally applicable model of daily solar irradiance at many ground stations, the total daily solar irradiance (Rs) received at the earth's surface to measured solar irradiance. In a global comparison for the year 1987, VP-RAD-estimated and satellite

  18. MODELING WIND TURBINES IN THE GRIDLAB-D SOFTWARE ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, J.C.; Schneider, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the rapid expansion of wind power has resulted in a need to more accurately model the effects of wind penetration on the electricity infrastructure. GridLAB-D is a new simulation environment developed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by the Pacifi c Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in cooperation with academic and industrial partners. GridLAB-D was originally written and designed to help integrate end-use smart grid technologies, and it is currently being expanded to include a number of other technologies, including distributed energy resources (DER). The specifi c goal of this project is to create a preliminary wind turbine generator (WTG) model for integration into GridLAB-D. As wind power penetration increases, models are needed to accurately study the effects of increased penetration; this project is a beginning step at examining these effects within the GridLAB-D environment. Aerodynamic, mechanical and electrical power models were designed to simulate the process by which mechanical power is extracted by a wind turbine and converted into electrical energy. The process was modeled using historic atmospheric data, collected over a period of 30 years as the primary energy input. This input was then combined with preliminary models for synchronous and induction generators. Additionally, basic control methods were implemented, using either constant power factor or constant power modes. The model was then compiled into the GridLAB-D simulation environment, and the power outputs were compared against manufacturers’ data and then a variation of the IEEE 4 node test feeder was used to examine the model’s behavior. Results showed the designs were suffi cient for a prototype model and provided output power similar to the available manufacturers’ data. The prototype model is designed as a template for the creation of new modules, with turbine-specifi c parameters to be added by the user.

  19. Global Biogeochemistry Models and Global Carbon Cycle Research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covey, C; Caldeira, K; Guilderson, T; Cameron-Smith, P; Govindasamy, B; Swanston, C; Wickett, M; Mirin, A; Bader, D

    2005-05-27

    The climate modeling community has long envisioned an evolution from physical climate models to ''earth system'' models that include the effects of biology and chemistry, particularly those processes related to the global carbon cycle. The widely reproduced Box 3, Figure 1 from the 2001 IPCC Scientific Assessment schematically describes that evolution. The community generally accepts the premise that understanding and predicting global and regional climate change requires the inclusion of carbon cycle processes in models to fully simulate the feedbacks between the climate system and the carbon cycle. Moreover, models will ultimately be employed to predict atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases as a function of anthropogenic and natural processes, such as industrial emissions, terrestrial carbon fixation, sequestration, land use patterns, etc. Nevertheless, the development of coupled climate-carbon models with demonstrable quantitative skill will require a significant amount of effort and time to understand and validate their behavior at both the process level and as integrated systems. It is important to consider objectively whether the currently proposed strategies to develop and validate earth system models are optimal, or even sufficient, and whether alternative strategies should be pursued. Carbon-climate models are going to be complex, with the carbon cycle strongly interacting with many other components. Off-line process validation will be insufficient. As was found in coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs, feedbacks between model components can amplify small errors and uncertainties in one process to produce large biases in the simulated climate. The persistent tropical western Pacific Ocean ''double ITCZ'' and upper troposphere ''cold pole'' problems are examples. Finding and fixing similar types of problems in coupled carbon-climate models especially will be difficult, given the lack of observations required for diagnosis and validation of biogeochemical processes.

  20. Interactive software for model predictive control with simultaneous identification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Echeverria Del Rio, Pablo

    2000-01-01

    This thesis is a unified practical framework in the theory of Model Predictive Control with Simultaneous Identification. The ability to change and visualize parameters on-line makes this toolbox attractive for control ...

  1. Global distribution and sources of dissolved inorganic nitrogen export to the coastal zone: Results from a spatially explicit, global model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seitzinger, Sybil

    Global distribution and sources of dissolved inorganic nitrogen export to the coastal zone: Results dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) export by rivers to coastal waters (NEWS-DIN). NEWS-DIN was developed as part of an internally consistent suite of global nutrient export models. Modeled and measured DIN

  2. Polychronous Interpretation of Synoptic, a Domain Specific Modeling Language for Embedded Flight-Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besnard, L; Ouy, J; Talpin, J -P; Bodeveix, J -P; Cortier, A; Pantel, M; Strecker, M; Garcia, G; Rugina, A; Buisson, J; Dagnat, F

    2010-01-01

    The SPaCIFY project, which aims at bringing advances in MDE to the satellite flight software industry, advocates a top-down approach built on a domain-specific modeling language named Synoptic. In line with previous approaches to real-time modeling such as Statecharts and Simulink, Synoptic features hierarchical decomposition of application and control modules in synchronous block diagrams and state machines. Its semantics is described in the polychronous model of computation, which is that of the synchronous language Signal.

  3. Modeling Techniques for a Risk Analysis Methodology for Software Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    instrumentation and control (I&C) systems for nuclear power plant system upgrades. (Arndt 2002) These approaches for nuclear power plant system upgrades. These approaches are directed towards analyzing the change in risk, System Modeling, UML, Z, EVES, Fault Trees #12;3 Abstract The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC

  4. Global search tool for the Advanced Photon Source Integrated Relational Model of Installed Systems (IRMIS) database.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quock, D. E. R.; Cianciarulo, M. B.; APS Engineering Support Division; Purdue Univ.

    2007-01-01

    The Integrated Relational Model of Installed Systems (IRMIS) is a relational database tool that has been implemented at the Advanced Photon Source to maintain an updated account of approximately 600 control system software applications, 400,000 process variables, and 30,000 control system hardware components. To effectively display this large amount of control system information to operators and engineers, IRMIS was initially built with nine Web-based viewers: Applications Organizing Index, IOC, PLC, Component Type, Installed Components, Network, Controls Spares, Process Variables, and Cables. However, since each viewer is designed to provide details from only one major category of the control system, the necessity for a one-stop global search tool for the entire database became apparent. The user requirements for extremely fast database search time and ease of navigation through search results led to the choice of Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX) technology in the implementation of the IRMIS global search tool. Unique features of the global search tool include a two-tier level of displayed search results, and a database data integrity validation and reporting mechanism.

  5. Enabling a Highly-Scalable Global Address Space Model for Petascale Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apra, Edoardo; Vetter, Jeffrey S; Yu, Weikuan

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, the trajectory to the petascale has been built on increased complexity and scale of the underlying parallel architectures. Meanwhile, software de- velopers have struggled to provide tools that maintain the productivity of computational science teams using these new systems. In this regard, Global Address Space (GAS) programming models provide a straightforward and easy to use addressing model, which can lead to improved produc- tivity. However, the scalability of GAS depends directly on the design and implementation of the runtime system on the target petascale distributed-memory architecture. In this paper, we describe the design, implementation, and optimization of the Aggregate Remote Memory Copy Interface (ARMCI) runtime library on the Cray XT5 2.3 PetaFLOPs computer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. We optimized our implementation with the flow intimation technique that we have introduced in this paper. Our optimized ARMCI implementation improves scalability of both the Global Arrays (GA) programming model and a real-world chemistry application NWChem from small jobs up through 180,000 cores.

  6. CAMELEON-RT: a Software Architecture Reference Model for Distributed, Migratable, and Plastic User

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAMELEON-RT: a Software Architecture Reference Model for Distributed, Migratable, and Plastic User the problem space of distributed, migratable and plastic user interfaces, and presents CAMELEON-RT1 for distributed, migratable, and plastic user inter- faces. We have developed an early implementation of a run

  7. The Journal on Software and Systems Modeling manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Journal on Software and Systems Modeling manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor-INRIA, Nantes, France 2 CITI/DI/FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal 3 TU Darmstadt, Germany 4 SAP. One of these problems is traceability management. In the European AMPLE project we are creating

  8. A Bayesian Model for Controlling Software Inspections V. Gupta, A.R. Patnaik, N. Goel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lung, Chung-Horng

    down with sparse data. Due to the general failure of CR models under realistic conditions, we investigated an alternative approach: the use of subjective estimates of effectiveness by the inspectors devoted to inspection of software requirement specifications has been reported by Doolan (Doolan 1992

  9. Hardware/Software Co-design for Energy-Efficient Seismic Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliker, Leonid

    Wave implementation can offer up to 8× and 3.5× energy efficiency improvement per node respectivelyHardware/Software Co-design for Energy-Efficient Seismic Modeling Jens Krueger , David Donofrio of conventional cluster technology has prompted investigation of architectural alternatives that offer higher

  10. SMT-Based Bounded Model Checking for Embedded ANSI-C Software Lucas Cordeiro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SMT-Based Bounded Model Checking for Embedded ANSI-C Software Lucas Cordeiro University to the verification of embedded soft- ware written in ANSI-C. We have extended the encod- ings from previous SMT and linear arithmetic were considered, but no encoding was provided for ANSI-C [6] constructs such as bit

  11. Sandia Energy - Software

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    modeling. The Morfeus framework provides software developers with useful software architecture building blocks or interfaces to be implemented for multiphysics application...

  12. Climate Models from the Joint Global Change Research Institute

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Staff at the Joint Institute develop and use models to simulate the economic and physical impacts of global change policy options. The GCAM, for example, gives analysts insight into how regional and national economies might respond to climate change mitigation policies including carbon taxes, carbon trading, and accelerated deployment of energy technology. Three available models are Phoenix, GCAM, and EPIC. Phoenix is a global, dynamic recursive, computable general equilibrium model that is solved in five-year time steps from 2005 through 2100 and divides the world into twenty-four regions. Each region includes twenty-six industrial sectors. Particular attention is paid to energy production in Phoenix. There are nine electricity-generating technologies (coal, natural gas, oil, biomass, nuclear, hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal) and four additional energy commodities: crude oil, refined oil products, coal, and natural gas. Phoenix is designed to answer economic questions related to international climate and energy policy and international trade. Phoenix replaces the Second Generation Model (SGM) that was formerly used for general equilibrium analysis at JGCRI. GCAM is the Global Change Assessment Model, a partial equilibrium model of the world with 14 regions. GCAM operates in 5 year time steps from 1990 to 2095 and is designed to examine long-term changes in the coupled energy, agriculture/land-use, and climate system. GCAM includes a 151-region agriculture land-use module and a reduced form carbon cycle and climate module in addition to its incorporation of demographics, resources, energy production and consumption. The model has been used extensively in a number of assessment and modeling activities such as the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF), the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program, and the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and IPCC assessment reports. GCAM is now freely available as a community model. The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) Model is a process-based agricultural systems model composed of simulation components for weather, hydrology, nutrient cycling, pesticide fate, tillage, crop growth, soil erosion, crop and soil management and economics. Staff at PNNL have been involved in the development of this model by integrating new sub-models for soil carbon dynamics and nitrogen cycling.

  13. International Environmental Modelling and Software Society (iEMSs) 2010 International Congress on Environmental Modelling and Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    energy utilization is one of the most important aspects of green buildings. The wind and solar energy://www.iemss.org/iemss2010/index.php?n=Main.Proceedings Modelling and control of a hybrid renewable energy system to supply demand of a green-building H. Dagdouguia,b , R. Minciardia , A. Ouammia,c , M. Robbaa , R. Sacilea

  14. Application of Hazard Analysis to Quality Modelling H. Zhu, at al. 05/02/02 Application of Hazard Analysis to Software Quality Modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Hong

    Analysis to Software Quality Modelling Hong Zhu, Yanlong Zhang, Qingning Huo and Sue Greenwood Dept | sgreenwood) @brookes.ac.uk Abstract Quality is a fundamental concept in software and information system for understanding, measuring and predicting qualities of software and information systems. It has been recognised

  15. AutoMoDe - Model-Based Development of Automotive Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziegenbein, Dirk; Freund, Ulrich; Bauer, Andreas; Romberg, Jan; Schatz, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes first results from the AutoMoDe (Automotive Model-Based Development) project. The overall goal of the project is to develop an integrated methodology for model-based development of automotive control software, based on problem-specific design notations with an explicit formal foundation. Based on the existing AutoFOCUS framework, a tool prototype is being developed in order to illustrate and validate the key elements of our approach.

  16. Carbon cost of plant nitrogen acquisition: A mechanistic, globally applicable model of plant nitrogen uptake, retranslocation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    in the new generation of Earth system models that aim to describe the global N cycle. Citation: Fisher, J. B

  17. Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan; Miller, William A; Huang, Yu; Levinson, Ronnen

    2014-01-01

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the United States Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs modern web technologies, usability design, and national average defaults as an interface to annual simulations of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim in order to provide estimated annual energy and cost savings. In addition to cool reflective roofs, RSC simulates multiple roof and attic configurations including different roof slopes, above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers, low-emittance roof surfaces, duct location, duct leakage rates, multiple substrate types, and insulation levels. A base case and energy-efficient alternative can be compared side-by-side to estimate monthly energy. RSC was benchmarked against field data from demonstration homes in Ft. Irwin, California; while cooling savings were similar, heating penalty varied significantly across different simulation engines. RSC results reduce cool roofing cost-effectiveness thus mitigating expected economic incentives for this countermeasure to the urban heat island effect. This paper consolidates comparison of RSC s projected energy savings to other simulation engines including DOE-2.1E, AtticSim, Micropas, and EnergyPlus, and presents preliminary analyses. RSC s algorithms for capturing radiant heat transfer and duct interaction in the attic assembly are considered major contributing factors to increased cooling savings and heating penalties. Comparison to previous simulation-based studies, analysis on the force multiplier of RSC cooling savings and heating penalties, the role of radiative heat exchange in an attic assembly, and changes made for increased accuracy of the duct model are included.

  18. Global horizontal irradiance clear sky models : implementation and analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Reno, Matthew J.

    2012-03-01

    Clear sky models estimate the terrestrial solar radiation under a cloudless sky as a function of the solar elevation angle, site altitude, aerosol concentration, water vapor, and various atmospheric conditions. This report provides an overview of a number of global horizontal irradiance (GHI) clear sky models from very simple to complex. Validation of clear-sky models requires comparison of model results to measured irradiance during clear-sky periods. To facilitate validation, we present a new algorithm for automatically identifying clear-sky periods in a time series of GHI measurements. We evaluate the performance of selected clear-sky models using measured data from 30 different sites, totaling about 300 site-years of data. We analyze the variation of these errors across time and location. In terms of error averaged over all locations and times, we found that complex models that correctly account for all the atmospheric parameters are slightly more accurate than other models, but, primarily at low elevations, comparable accuracy can be obtained from some simpler models. However, simpler models often exhibit errors that vary with time of day and season, whereas the errors for complex models vary less over time.

  19. Software Quality, Software Process,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamlet, Richard

    Software Quality, Software Process, and Software Testing Dick Hamlet Portland State University Department of Computer Science Center for Software Quality Research PO Box 751 Portland, OR 97207 Internet. However, unless testing goals are clearly related to true measurements of software quality, the testing

  20. A Vast Machine Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    A Vast Machine Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming Paul N. Edwards models, climate data, and the politics of global warming / Paul N. Edwards. p. cm. Includes this: Global warming is a myth. It's all model predictions, nothing but simulations. Before you believe

  1. http://www.jstor.org Modeling Global Macroclimatic Constraints on Ectotherm Energy Budgets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Bruce W.

    http://www.jstor.org Modeling Global Macroclimatic Constraints on Ectotherm Energy Budgets Author:154-178 (1992) Modeling Global Macroclimatic Constraints on Ectotherm Energy Budgets1 Bruce W. Grant2 and Warren describe a mechanistic individual-based model of how global macroclimatic constraints affect the energy

  2. Interoperability Building Information Modeling and acoustical analysis software - A demonstration of a performing arts hall design process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sunyoung; Coffeen, Robert C.; Sanguinetti, Paola

    2013-06-02

    By sharing and managing the database for a building model, Building Information Modeling (BIM) facilitates the design process at less cost. Some of BIM software has capabilities for acoustical analysis, but it is limited to noise level demonstration...

  3. A global scale mechanistic model of the photosynthetic capacity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ali, A. A.; Xu, C.; Rogers, A.; Fisher, R. A.; Wullschleger, S. D.; McDowell, N. G.; Massoud, E. C.; Vrugt, J. A.; Muss, J. D.; Fisher, J. B.; et al

    2015-08-10

    Although plant photosynthetic capacity as determined by the maximum carboxylation rate (i.e., Vc, max25) and the maximum electron transport rate (i.e., Jmax25) at a reference temperature (generally 25 °C) is known to vary substantially in space and time in response to environmental conditions, it is typically parameterized in Earth system models (ESMs) with tabulated values associated to plant functional types. In this study, we developed a mechanistic model of leaf utilization of nitrogen for assimilation (LUNA V1.0) to predict the photosynthetic capacity at the global scale under different environmental conditions, based on the optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture,more »electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The LUNA model was able to reasonably well capture the observed patterns of photosynthetic capacity in view that it explained approximately 55 % of the variation in observed Vc, max25 and 65 % of the variation in observed Jmax25 across the globe. Our model simulations under current and future climate conditions indicated that Vc, max25 could be most affected in high-latitude regions under a warming climate and that ESMs using a fixed Vc, max25 or Jmax25 by plant functional types were likely to substantially overestimate future global photosynthesis.« less

  4. MOGO: Model-Oriented Global Optimization of Petascale Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malony, Allen D.; Shende, Sameer S.

    2012-09-14

    The MOGO project was initiated under in 2008 under the DOE Program Announcement for Software Development Tools for Improved Ease-of-Use on Petascale systems (LAB 08-19). The MOGO team consisted of Oak Ridge National Lab, Argonne National Lab, and the University of Oregon. The overall goal of MOGO was to attack petascale performance analysis by developing a general framework where empirical performance data could be efficiently and accurately compared with performance expectations at various levels of abstraction. This information could then be used to automatically identify and remediate performance problems. MOGO was be based on performance models derived from application knowledge, performance experiments, and symbolic analysis. MOGO was able to make reasonable impact on existing DOE applications and systems. New tools and techniques were developed, which, in turn, were used on important DOE applications on DOE LCF systems to show significant performance improvements.

  5. A comparison of the gravity field over Central Europe from superconducting gravimeters, GRACE and global hydrological models, using EOF analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crossley, David; de Linage, Caroline; Hinderer, Jacques; Boy, Jean-Paul; Famiglietti, James

    2012-01-01

    Global modeling of land water and energy balances, part I:Global modeling of land water and energy balances, part II:

  6. A Vast Machine Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    A Vast Machine Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming Paul N. Edwards models, climate data, and the politics of global warming / Paul N. Edwards. p. cm. Includes. Climatology--History. 3. Meteorology--History. 4. Climatology--Technological innovation. 5. Global temperature

  7. Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUseful LinksGlass Stronger thanGlenn T.4Global

  8. 3F6 -Software Engineering and Design Software Management I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Steve

    ;Contents 1. Software Engineering 2. Software Life Cycle 3. Team Organisation 4. Product Development 5-design. These phases constitute the software life cycle. #12;2 Engineering Part IIA: 3F6 - Software Engineering and Design The Software Life Cycle WaterFall Model This view of the software life cycle is based

  9. Application of the Software as a Service Model to the Control of Complex Building Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Donadee, Jonathan; Marnay, Chris; Mendes, Goncalo; Appen, Jan von; Megel, Oliver; Bhattacharya, Prajesh; DeForest, Nicholas; Lai, Judy

    2011-03-17

    In an effort to create broad access to its optimization software, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with the University of California at Davis (UC Davis) and OSISoft, has recently developed a Software as a Service (SaaS) Model for reducing energy costs, cutting peak power demand, and reducing carbon emissions for multipurpose buildings. UC Davis currently collects and stores energy usage data from buildings on its campus. Researchers at LBNL sought to demonstrate that a SaaS application architecture could be built on top of this data system to optimize the scheduling of electricity and heat delivery in the building. The SaaS interface, known as WebOpt, consists of two major parts: a) the investment& planning and b) the operations module, which builds on the investment& planning module. The operational scheduling and load shifting optimization models within the operations module use data from load prediction and electrical grid emissions models to create an optimal operating schedule for the next week, reducing peak electricity consumption while maintaining quality of energy services. LBNL's application also provides facility managers with suggested energy infrastructure investments for achieving their energy cost and emission goals based on historical data collected with OSISoft's system. This paper describes these models as well as the SaaS architecture employed by LBNL researchers to provide asset scheduling services to UC Davis. The peak demand, emissions, and cost implications of the asset operation schedule and investments suggested by this optimization model are analysed.

  10. Application of the Software as a Service Model to the Control of Complex Building Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Donadee, Jon; Marnay, Chris; Lai, Judy; Mendes, Goncalo; Appen, Jan von; Mé gel, Oliver; Bhattacharya, Prajesh; DeForest, Nicholas; Lai, Judy

    2011-03-18

    In an effort to create broad access to its optimization software, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with the University of California at Davis (UC Davis) and OSISoft, has recently developed a Software as a Service (SaaS) Model for reducing energy costs, cutting peak power demand, and reducing carbon emissions for multipurpose buildings. UC Davis currently collects and stores energy usage data from buildings on its campus. Researchers at LBNL sought to demonstrate that a SaaS application architecture could be built on top of this data system to optimize the scheduling of electricity and heat delivery in the building. The SaaS interface, known as WebOpt, consists of two major parts: a) the investment& planning and b) the operations module, which builds on the investment& planning module. The operational scheduling and load shifting optimization models within the operations module use data from load prediction and electrical grid emissions models to create an optimal operating schedule for the next week, reducing peak electricity consumption while maintaining quality of energy services. LBNL's application also provides facility managers with suggested energy infrastructure investments for achieving their energy cost and emission goals based on historical data collected with OSISoft's system. This paper describes these models as well as the SaaS architecture employed by LBNL researchers to provide asset scheduling services to UC Davis. The peak demand, emissions, and cost implications of the asset operation schedule and investments suggested by this optimization model are analyzed.

  11. California Wintertime Precipitation in Regional and Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, P M

    2009-04-27

    In this paper, wintertime precipitation from a variety of observational datasets, regional climate models (RCMs), and general circulation models (GCMs) is averaged over the state of California (CA) and compared. Several averaging methodologies are considered and all are found to give similar values when model grid spacing is less than 3{sup o}. This suggests that CA is a reasonable size for regional intercomparisons using modern GCMs. Results show that reanalysis-forced RCMs tend to significantly overpredict CA precipitation. This appears to be due mainly to overprediction of extreme events; RCM precipitation frequency is generally underpredicted. Overprediction is also reflected in wintertime precipitation variability, which tends to be too high for RCMs on both daily and interannual scales. Wintertime precipitation in most (but not all) GCMs is underestimated. This is in contrast to previous studies based on global blended gauge/satellite observations which are shown here to underestimate precipitation relative to higher-resolution gauge-only datasets. Several GCMs provide reasonable daily precipitation distributions, a trait which doesn't seem tied to model resolution. GCM daily and interannual variability is generally underpredicted.

  12. Intercomparison of the Cloud Water Phase among Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komurcu, Muge; Storelvmo, Trude; Tan, Ivy; Lohmann, U.; Yun, Yuxing; Penner, Joyce E.; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong; Takemura, T.

    2014-03-27

    Mixed-phase clouds (clouds that consist of both cloud droplets and ice crystals) are frequently present in the Earth’s atmosphere and influence the Earth’s energy budget through their radiative properties, which are highly dependent on the cloud water phase. In this study, the phase partitioning of cloud water is compared among six global climate models (GCMs) and with Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization retrievals. It is found that the GCMs predict vastly different distributions of cloud phase for a given temperature, and none of them are capable of reproducing the spatial distribution or magnitude of the observed phase partitioning. While some GCMs produced liquid water paths comparable to satellite observations, they all failed to preserve sufficient liquid water at mixed-phase cloud temperatures. Our results suggest that validating GCMs using only the vertically integrated water contents could lead to amplified differences in cloud radiative feedback. The sensitivity of the simulated cloud phase in GCMs to the choice of heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization is also investigated. The response to a change in ice nucleation is quite different for each GCM, and the implementation of the same ice nucleation parameterization in all models does not reduce the spread in simulated phase among GCMs. The results suggest that processes subsequent to ice nucleation are at least as important in determining phase and should be the focus of future studies aimed at understanding and reducing differences among the models.

  13. CDF THERORY SOFTWARE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003883WKSTN00 cDF Theory Software for mesoscopic modeling of equilibrium and transport phenomena  store.pnnl.gov 

  14. Implementation of New Process Models for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures into Processing Software Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Smith, Mark T.

    2010-02-23

    This report describes the work conducted under the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) (Nr. 260) between the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Autodesk, Inc. to develop and implement process models for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs) in processing software packages. The structure of this report is organized as follows. After the Introduction Section (Section 1), Section 2 summarizes the current fiber orientation models developed for injection-molded short-fiber thermoplastics (SFTs). Section 3 provides an assessment of these models to determine their capabilities and limitations, and the developments needed for injection-molded LFTs. Section 4 then focuses on the development of a new fiber orientation model for LFTs. This model is termed the anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure (ARD-RSC) model as it explores the concept of anisotropic rotary diffusion to capture the fiber-fiber interaction in long-fiber suspensions and uses the reduced strain closure method of Wang et al. to slow down the orientation kinetics in concentrated suspensions. In contrast to fiber orientation modeling, before this project, no standard model was developed to predict the fiber length distribution in molded fiber composites. Section 5 is therefore devoted to the development of a fiber length attrition model in the mold. Sections 6 and 7 address the implementations of the models in AMI, and the conclusions drawn from this work is presented in Section 8.

  15. Interpretation of simulated global warming using a simple model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watterson, I.G.

    2000-01-01

    A simple energy balance model with two parameters, an effective heat capacity and an effective climate sensitivity, is used to interpret six GCM simulations of greenhouse gas-induced global warming. By allowing the parameters to vary in time, the model can be accurately calibrated for each run. It is found that the sensitivity can be approximated as a constant in each case. However, the effective heat capacity clearly varies, and it is important that the energy equation is formulated appropriately, and thus unlike many such models. For simulations with linear forcing and from a cold start, the capacity is in each case close to that of a homogeneous ocean with depth initially 200 m, but increasing some 4.3 m each year, irrespective of the sensitivity and forcing growth rate. Analytic solutions for t his linear capacity function are derived, and these reproduce the GCM runs well, even for cases where the forcing is stabilized after a century or so. The formation of a subsurface maximum in the mean ocean temperature anomaly is a significant feature of such cases. A simple model for a GCM run with a realistic forcing scenario starting from 1,880 is constructed using component results for forcing segments. Given this, an estimate of the cold start error of a simulation of the warming due to forcing after the present would be given by the negative of the temperature drift of the anomaly due to the past forcing. The simple model can evidently be used to give an indication of likely warming curves, at lest for this range of scenarios and GCM sensitivities.

  16. An Aspect Oriented Model for Software Energy Efficiency in Decentralised Servers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaodong

    interests with the increasing impact of IT in energy consumption. Green-ness in software however, can Green software is a matter of concern with increasing energy bills and environmental impact, the green software research focus is mainly on energy efficiency [2]­[4]. Most green software techniques

  17. Model-Driven Evolution of Software Architectures Delft University of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Bas

    tasks can be automated, the impact of the use of software product lines, and the possibilities-driven techniques in the context of software product-lines. We recognise four tasks related to software evolution as a software product line [2] their commonalities and variabilities are made explicit in a product-line

  18. The China-in-Global Energy Model Tianyu Qi, Niven Winchester, Da Zhang,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of production, consumption and trade among multiple global regions and sectors ­ including five energyThe China-in-Global Energy Model Tianyu Qi, Niven Winchester, Da Zhang, Xiliang Zhang and Valerie J to communicate research results and improve public understanding of global environment and energy challenges

  19. Resolving Convection in a Global Hypohydrostatic Model by S. T. Garner1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallis, Geoff

    -resolution, nonhydrostatic model free of convective parameterization, and describe the effect on the global climate of very that the huge scale separation creates for numerical climate modeling might be safely removed by effectivelyResolving Convection in a Global Hypohydrostatic Model by S. T. Garner1 , D. M. W. Frierson2 , I. M

  20. This course teaches essential methods, algorithms, and data models for building geospatial software. Students are introduced to raster and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenny, Bernhard

    This course teaches essential methods, algorithms, and data models for building geospatial software. Students are introduced to raster and vector data models and algorithms for the manipulation of this course, algorithms for modeling, analyzing and visualizing geographic informa- tion are discussed

  1. An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environmental changes. Being data-driven, the Program uses extensive Earth system and economic data and models System Model (IGSM), an integrated assessment model that couples an Earth system model of intermediate's Integrated Global System Model. Through this integrated model, the Program seeks to: discover new

  2. Open source software maturity model based on linear regression and Bayesian analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Dongmin

    2009-05-15

    Open Source Software (OSS) is widely used and is becoming a significant and irreplaceable part of the software engineering community. Today a huge number of OSS exist. This becomes a problem if one needs to choose from ...

  3. A constraint solver for software engineering : finding models and cores of large relational specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torlak, Emina, 1979-

    2009-01-01

    Relational logic is an attractive candidate for a software description language, because both the design and implementation of software often involve reasoning about relational structures: organizational hierarchies in the ...

  4. Conceptual understanding of climate change with a globally resolved energy balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dommenget, Dietmar

    on the surface energy balance by very simple repre- sentations of solar and thermal radiation, the atmosphericConceptual understanding of climate change with a globally resolved energy balance model Dietmar will introduce a very simple, globally resolved energy bal- ance (GREB) model, which is capable of simulating

  5. Risk Management for a Global Supply Chain Planning under Uncertainty: Models and Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Risk Management for a Global Supply Chain Planning under Uncertainty: Models and Algorithms Fengqi In this paper we consider the risk management for mid-term planning of a global multi-product chemical supply solve the resulting large scale industrial size problems. We also introduce risk management models

  6. Studies of global stability of field-reversed configuration plasmas using a rigid body model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Hantao

    stability of field-reversed configuration FRC plasmas has been studied using a simple rigid body model to be unstable to many global magnetohydrody- namic MHD modes. However, FRC plasmas formed in - pinch devices of motion for each global mode is formulated and analyzed using a rigid body model of the FRC plasma

  7. Global sea-salt modeling: Results and validation against multicampaign shipboard measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global sea-salt modeling: Results and validation against multicampaign shipboard measurements of sea-salt concentrations from five different campaigns are used to validate the sea-salt). The validity of the sea-salt parameterizations is tested by employing a global forecasting model and transport

  8. GLOBAL STABILITY FOR A VIRUS DYNAMICS MODEL WITH NONLINEAR INCIDENCE OF INFECTION AND REMOVAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GLOBAL STABILITY FOR A VIRUS DYNAMICS MODEL WITH NONLINEAR INCIDENCE OF INFECTION AND REMOVAL PAUL GEORGESCU AND YING-HEN HSIEH Abstract. Global dynamics of a compartmental model which describes virus and the removal rate of the virus are assumed to be nonlinear. In the case where the functional quotient between

  9. Selection of Ground Motion Prediction Equations for the Global Earthquake Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Selection of Ground Motion Prediction Equations for the Global Earthquake Model Jonathan P are developed. Keywords: Engineering seismology, ground-motion prediction, site effects, Global Earthquake Model.EERI, and Peter J. Stafford, h) M.EERI Ground-motion prediction equations (GMPEs) relate ground-motion intensity

  10. Abstract--Software testing requires the use of a model to guide such efforts as test selection and test verification. In this

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Abstract-- Software testing requires the use of a model to guide such efforts as test selection and trajectory information to evolve and test general software. Finally, we close with a discussion of how our-Based testing; Genetic Programming Test Generator; Finite State Machine. I. INTRODUCTION Software behavior can

  11. Uncertainty in atmospheric CO? predictions from a parametric uncertainty analysis of a global carbon cycle model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holian, Gary L.; Sokolov, Andrei P.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    Key uncertainties in the global carbon cycle are explored with a 2-D model for the oceanic carbon sink. By calibrating the key parameters of this ocean carbon sink model to widely referenced values, it produces an average ...

  12. A higher order discontinuous Galerkin, global shallow water model: Global ocean tides and aquaplanet benchmarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    and aquaplanet benchmarks H. Salehipour , G.R. Stuhne, W.R. Peltier Physics Department, University of Toronto, not only under modern global warming conditions but also in the deep past (Griffiths and Peltier, 2008; Griffiths and Peltier, 2009; Egbert et al., 2004; Uehara et al., 2006). In order to better address all

  13. IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering (to appear). Empirical Studies of a Prediction Model for Regression Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothermel, Gregg

    Regression testing is an important activity that can account for a large proportion of the cost of software testing technique that (1) chooses a subset of a test suite that was used to test the software before the modifications, and then (2) uses this subset to test the modified software. Selective regression testing

  14. The Need for Biological Computation System Models | GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2012.10.09 Hello everyone, I'm Maria Zavodszky and I work in the Computational Biology and Biostatistics Lab at GE Global Research in Niskayuna, New York. This being our...

  15. Global Ocean Circulation Modeling with an Isopycnic Coordinate Model. Final Report for May 1, 1998 - April 30, 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bleck, R.

    2004-05-19

    The overall aim of this project was to continue development of a global version of the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model (MICOM) with the intent of turning it into a full-fledged oceanic component of an earth system model.

  16. Modeling international cooperation for the global environmental problematique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadeh, E.

    1997-12-31

    The focus of this study is on international cooperative decision-making related to global change issues concerning stratospheric ozone depletion and global climate warming. Such anthropogenic alteration of the Earth`s biosphere has given rise to a global environmental problematique that is demarcated by two dimensions. The first dimension is that global environmental Issues are demarcated by international environmental commons. Commons are defined as physical or biological systems that lie outside the jurisdiction of any individual state and are valued environmental resources globally. A second dimension pertains to tile collective action problem which results from a {open_quotes}tragedy of the commons.{close_quotes} According to traditional realist conception of international relations, that states behave in their rational self-interest, a {open_quotes}tragedy of the commons{close_quotes} ensues. The tragedy is a function of damage to the global environment, such as the production of economic resources that release greenhouse gases into the Earth`s biosphere, that is nonappropriable. Commons resources relative to the Earth`s biosphere are not limitless. At issue, is the realization of sustainable economic development promoted by cooperative political patterns that mitigate the negative consequences of this tragedy.

  17. A New Teaching Model For The Subject Of Software Project Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qureshi, M Rizwan Jameel; Nadeem, Muhammad; Mehmood, Asif

    2012-01-01

    Software (SW) development is a very tough task which requires a skilled project leader for its success. If the project leader is not skilled enough then project may fail. In the real world of SW engineering 65% of the SW projects fail to meet their objectives as in [1]. The main reason is lack of training of the project mangers. This extreme ratio of failure can be reduced by teaching SW project management (SPM) to the future project managers in the practical manner, so that they may be skillful enough to handle the project in a better way. This paper intends to propose a model to be used to teach SPM to the student of SW engineering to reduce the failure rate of projects.

  18. MetNet: Software to Build and Model the Biogenetic Lattice ofArabidopsis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wurtele, Eve Syrkin; Li, Jie; Diao, Lixia; Zhang, Hailong; Foster, Carol M.; Fatland, Beth; Dickerson, Julie; Brown, Andrew; Cox, Zach; Cook, Dianne; et al

    2003-01-01

    MetNet (http://www.botany.iastate.edu/?mash/metnetex/metabolicnetex.html) is publicly available software in development for analysis of genome-wide RNA, protein and metabolite profiling data. The software is designed to enable the biologist to visualize, statistically analyse and model a metabolic and regulatory network map ofArabidopsis, combined with gene expression profiling data. It contains a JAVA interface to an interactions database (MetNetDB) containing information on regulatory and metabolic interactions derived from a combination of web databases (TAIR, KEGG, BRENDA) and input from biologists in their area of expertise. FCModeler captures input from MetNetDB in a graphical form. Sub-networks can be identified and interpreted using simple fuzzy cognitivemore »maps. FCModeler is intended to develop and evaluate hypotheses, and provide a modelling framework for assessing the large amounts of data captured by high-throughput gene expression experiments. FCModeler and MetNetDB are currently being extended to three-dimensional virtual reality display. The MetNet map, together with gene expression data, can be viewed using multivariate graphics tools in GGobi linked with the data analytic tools in R. Users can highlight different parts of the metabolic network and see the relevant expression data highlighted in other data plots. Multi-dimensional expression data can be rotated through different dimensions. Statistical analysis can be computed alongside the visual. MetNet is designed to provide a framework for the formulation of testable hypotheses regarding the function of specific genes, and in the long term provide the basis for identification of metabolic and regulatory networks that control plant composition and development.« less

  19. MetNet: Software to Build and Model the Biogenetic Lattice of Arabidopsis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wurtele, Eve Syrkin; Li, Jie; Diao, Lixia; Zhang, Hailong; Foster, Carol M.; Fatland, Beth; Dickerson, Julie; Brown, Andrew; Cox, Zach; Cook, Dianne; et al

    2003-01-01

    MetNet (http://www.botany.iastate.edu/?mash/metnetex/metabolicnetex.html) is publicly available software in development for analysis of genome-wide RNA, protein and metabolite profiling data. The software is designed to enable the biologist to visualize, statistically analyse and model a metabolic and regulatory network map of Arabidopsis , combined with gene expression profiling data. It contains a JAVA interface to an interactions database (MetNetDB) containing information on regulatory and metabolic interactions derived from a combination of web databases (TAIR, KEGG, BRENDA) and input from biologists in their area of expertise. FCModeler captures input from MetNetDB in a graphical form. Sub-networks can be identified and interpreted usingmore »simple fuzzy cognitive maps. FCModeler is intended to develop and evaluate hypotheses, and provide a modelling framework for assessing the large amounts of data captured by high-throughput gene expression experiments. FCModeler and MetNetDB are currently being extended to three-dimensional virtual reality display. The MetNet map, together with gene expression data, can be viewed using multivariate graphics tools in GGobi linked with the data analytic tools in R. Users can highlight different parts of the metabolic network and see the relevant expression data highlighted in other data plots. Multi-dimensional expression data can be rotated through different dimensions. Statistical analysis can be computed alongside the visual. MetNet is designed to provide a framework for the formulation of testable hypotheses regarding the function of specific genes, and in the long term provide the basis for identification of metabolic and regulatory networks that control plant composition and development. « less

  20. Using HOMER Software, NREL's Micropower Optimization Model, to Explore the Role of Gen-sets in Small Solar Power Systems; Case Study: Sri Lanka

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Givler, T.; Lilienthal, P.

    2005-05-01

    This paper discusses using HOMER Software, NREL's Micropower Optimization Model, to explore the role of gen-sets in small solar power systems in Sri Lanka.

  1. Global patterns of nitrogen limitation: confronting two global biogeochemical models with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Templer, Pamela

    representations of Earth System Models have included the carbon (C) cycle (Friedlingstein et al., 2006

  2. OASIS4: A Coupling Software for Next Generation Earth System Modelling Ren Redler (1), Sophie Valcke (2) and Hubert Ritzdorf (3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OASIS4: A Coupling Software for Next Generation Earth System Modelling René Redler (1), Sophie system modelling, Geosci. Model. Dev., 3, 87 ­ 104 Link ­ https://oasistrac.cerfacs.fr Financial support ­ R. Redler, S. Valcke and H. Ritzdorf, 2010: OASIS4 ­ a coupling software for next generation earth

  3. An adaptive reduction algorithm for efficient chemical calculations in global atmospheric chemistry models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santillana, Mauricio

    An adaptive reduction algorithm for efficient chemical calculations in global atmospheric chemistry: Atmospheric chemistry Multi-scale analysis Time-scale separation Reduction of chemical kinetics a b s t r a c of the concentrations of chemical species in global 3-D models of atmospheric chemistry. Our strategy consists

  4. SO2 emissions and lifetimes: Estimates from inverse modeling using in situ and global, spacebased

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    SO2 emissions and lifetimes: Estimates from inverse modeling using in situ and global, spacebased 18 March 2011. [1] Topdown constraints on global sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions are inferred through of GEOSChem for inversion of SO2 columns to emissions. The seasonal mean SO2 lifetime calculated with the GEOS

  5. A simple model for evolution of proteins towards the global minimum of free energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unger, Ron

    in a simple model of protein folding. Results: Three possible evolutionary processes are explored. First can be achieved. The assumption that proteins fold to a conformation which is in the global minimum sequences that can find the global minimum [5]. In computer science terms this means that `protein folding

  6. Global optimization by coupled local minimizers and its application to FE model updating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -3001 Heverlee, Belgium Received 2 August 2002; accepted 3 July 2003 Abstract Coupled local minimizersGlobal optimization by coupled local minimizers and its application to FE model updating Anne (CLM) is a new method applicable to global optimization of functions with multiple local minima. In CLM

  7. Defining a consistent strategy to model ground-motion parameters for the GEM-PEER Global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    : The project entitled Global Ground Motion Prediction Equations is funded by the Global Earthquake Model (GEM Project S. Akkar Earthquake Engineering Research Center, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara, Turkey J. Douglas BRGM, Orleans, France C. Di Alessandro Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center

  8. Polar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotko, William

    of electric potential, field-aligned current and Poynting flux derived from the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry globalPolar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations P. D submitted to J. Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 15 June 2007 #12;with updated simulation results

  9. Polar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotko, William

    of electric potential, field-aligned current and Poynting flux derived from the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry globalPolar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations P. D from the Preprint submitted to J. Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 11 July 2008 #12;DMSP F13

  10. Creating a methodology and tool to capture and resolve conflicts in developing software requirements: Requirement Lifecycle Modeling Views manager (RLMV) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Leeha Rae-Lyn

    2013-02-22

    aspects of the system, as it is developed. RLMV works with existing software tools created by a corporation named Rational. The tool itself is implemented using Java and Oracle. RLMV is designed to trace pre-defined requirements to modeling diagrams...

  11. Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua New, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    , multiple substrate types, and insulation levels. A base case and energy-efficient alternative canComparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua New, Oak Ridge National Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors

  12. NuDE 2.0: A Model-based Software Development Environment for the PLC & FPGA based Digital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , such as RPS (Reactor Protection System) and ESF-CCS (Engineered Safety Features - Components Control System in Nuclear Power Plants Junbeom Yoo , Eui-Sub Kim , Dong-Ah Lee Computer Science and Enginering Konkuk426, jslee}@kaeri.re.kr Abstract--NuDE 2.0 (Nuclear Development Environment) is a model-based software

  13. The oceanic and cratonic upper mantle: Clues from joint interpretation of global velocity and attenuation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asthenosphere Seismic attenuation Seismic velocity Anelasticity Partial melt Combined interpretation of seismicThe oceanic and cratonic upper mantle: Clues from joint interpretation of global velocity anelastic dispersion (Karato and Jung, 1998; Karato, 2003). A unique interpretation of seismological models

  14. Modeling the impact of atmospheric moisture transport on global ice volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nisancioglu, Kerim Hestnes, 1975-

    2004-01-01

    Following Milankovitch's original hypothesis most model studies of changes in global ice volume on orbital time scales have focused on the impact of ablation on ice sheet mass balance. In most cases, poleward moisture flux ...

  15. Global vegetation model diversity and the risks of climate-driven ecosystem shifts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2013-11-08

    Climate change is modifying global biogeochemical cycles, and is expected to exert increasingly large effects in the future. How these changes will in turn affect and interact with the structure and function of particular ecosystems is unclear, however, both because of scientific uncertainties and the very diversity of global vegetation models in use. Writing in Environmental Research Letters, Warszawski et al. (1) aggregate results from a group of models, across a range of emissions scenarios and climate data, to investigate these risks. Although the models frequently disagree about which specific regions are at risk, they consistently predict a greater chance of ecosystem restructuring with more warming; this risk roughly doubles between 2 and 3 °C increases in global mean temperature. The innovative work of Warszawski et al. represents an important first step towards fully consistent multi-model, multi-scenario assessments of the future risks to global ecosystems.

  16. The Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) Software Development: Applications, Infrastructure, and Middleware/Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N.

    2011-06-30

    The status of and future plans for the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) hinge on software that PCMDI is either currently distributing or plans to distribute to the climate community in the near future. These software products include standard conventions, national and international federated infrastructures, and community analysis and visualization tools. This report also mentions other secondary software not necessarily led by or developed at PCMDI to provide a complete picture of the overarching applications, infrastructures, and middleware/networks. Much of the software described anticipates the use of future technologies envisioned over the span of next year to 10 years. These technologies, together with the software, will be the catalyst required to address extreme-scale data warehousing, scalability issues, and service-level requirements for a diverse set of well-known projects essential for predicting climate change. These tools, unlike the previous static analysis tools of the past, will support the co-existence of many users in a productive, shared virtual environment. This advanced technological world driven by extreme-scale computing and the data it generates will increase scientists’ productivity, exploit national and international relationships, and push research to new levels of understanding.

  17. GLOBAL STABILITY OF A 9-DIMENSIONAL HSV-2 EPIDEMIC MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9-dimensional epidemiological model for the transmission dy— namics of HSV-2. The model incorporates heterosexual inter- actions in which a single male ...

  18. The global gridded crop model intercomparison: Data and modeling protocols for Phase 1 (v1.0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, J.; Müller, C.; Deryng, D.; Chryssanthacopoulos, J.; Boote, K. J.; Büchner, M.; Foster, I.; Glotter, M.; Heinke, J.; Iizumi, T.; Izaurralde, R. C.; Mueller, N. D.; Ray, D. K.; Rosenzweig, C.; Ruane, A. C.; Sheffield, J.

    2015-02-11

    We present protocols and input data for Phase 1 of the Global Gridded Crop Model Intercomparison, a project of the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP). The project consist of global simulations of yields, phenologies, and many land-surface fluxes using 12–15 modeling groups for many crops, climate forcing data sets, and scenarios over the historical period from 1948 to 2012. The primary outcomes of the project include (1) a detailed comparison of the major differences and similarities among global models commonly used for large-scale climate impact assessment, (2) an evaluation of model and ensemble hindcasting skill, (3) quantification of key uncertainties from climate input data, model choice, and other sources, and (4) a multi-model analysis of the agricultural impacts of large-scale climate extremes from the historical record.

  19. The global gridded crop model intercomparison: Data and modeling protocols for Phase 1 (v1.0)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Elliott, J.; Müller, C.; Deryng, D.; Chryssanthacopoulos, J.; Boote, K. J.; Büchner, M.; Foster, I.; Glotter, M.; Heinke, J.; Iizumi, T.; et al

    2015-02-11

    We present protocols and input data for Phase 1 of the Global Gridded Crop Model Intercomparison, a project of the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP). The project consist of global simulations of yields, phenologies, and many land-surface fluxes using 12–15 modeling groups for many crops, climate forcing data sets, and scenarios over the historical period from 1948 to 2012. The primary outcomes of the project include (1) a detailed comparison of the major differences and similarities among global models commonly used for large-scale climate impact assessment, (2) an evaluation of model and ensemble hindcasting skill, (3) quantification ofmore »key uncertainties from climate input data, model choice, and other sources, and (4) a multi-model analysis of the agricultural impacts of large-scale climate extremes from the historical record.« less

  20. Globalization of biopharmaceutical manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pande, Rachna

    2011-01-01

    The biomanufacturing industry is changing due to increasing globalization. However, it is changing differently from other high tech industries like software/ semiconductor/ automobiles. In this study we use global ...

  1. SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Configuration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Configuration Management Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Configuration Management...

  2. Studies of Global Stability of Field-Reversed Con guration Plasmas Using A Rigid Body Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    guration FRC plasmas has been stud- ied using a simple rigid body model in the parameter space of s ratio stability of FRC's with large E prolate depends on s=E. It is found that plasma rotation due to ion. 2 #12;II. MODELS OF FRC PLASMAS A. Solovev model of FRC plasmas The global modes of a plasma

  3. Global and multi-scale features of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling: From modeling to forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitnov, Mikhail I.

    Global and multi-scale features of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling: From modeling to forecasting issue. This paper presents a data-derived model of the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling that combines of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling: From modeling to forecasting, Geophys. Res. Lett., 31, L08802, doi:10

  4. SOFTWARE CATALOG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beyers, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    No Test Output Comments NRCC SOFTWARE REQUEST FORM Recipienti s t i c a 1 Mechanics . Software Too 1 s .. Other Libra ro o o 79 o • o •..•. 85 NRCC Software Library Order

  5. Modeling aviation's global emissions, uncertainty analysis, and applications to policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joosung Joseph, 1974-

    2005-01-01

    (cont.) fuel burn results below 3000 ft. For emissions, the emissions indices were the most influential uncertainties for the variance in model outputs. By employing the model, this thesis examined three policy options for ...

  6. Development and initial application of the global-through-urban weather research and forecasting model with chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yang

    Development and initial application of the global-through-urban weather research and forecasting application of the global-through-urban weather research and forecasting model with chemistry (GU-WRF/Chem), J. In this work, a global-through-urban WRF/Chem model (i.e., GU-WRF/Chem) has been developed to provide

  7. Modelling the local and global cloud formation on HD 189733b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, G; Dobbs-Dixon, I; Juncher, D

    2015-01-01

    Context. Observations suggest that exoplanets such as HD 189733b form clouds in their atmospheres which have a strong feedback onto their thermodynamical and chemical structure, and overall appearance. Aims. Inspired by mineral cloud modelling efforts for Brown Dwarf atmospheres, we present the first spatially varying kinetic cloud model structures for HD 189733b. Methods. We apply a 2-model approach using results from a 3D global radiation-hydrodynamic simulation of the atmosphere as input for a detailed, kinetic cloud formation model. Sampling the 3D global atmosphere structure with 1D trajectories allows us to model the spatially varying cloud structure on HD 189733b. The resulting cloud properties enable the calculation of the scattering and absorption properties of the clouds. Results. We present local and global cloud structure and property maps for HD 189733b. The calculated cloud properties show variations in composition, size and number density of cloud particles which are strongest between the daysi...

  8. Data Assimilation Tools for CO2 Reservoir Model Development – A Review of Key Data Types, Analyses, and Selected Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Sullivan, E. C.; Murray, Christopher J.; Last, George V.; Black, Gary D.

    2009-09-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has embarked on an initiative to develop world-class capabilities for performing experimental and computational analyses associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. The ultimate goal of this initiative is to provide science-based solutions for helping to mitigate the adverse effects of greenhouse gas emissions. This Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative currently has two primary focus areas—advanced experimental methods and computational analysis. The experimental methods focus area involves the development of new experimental capabilities, supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL) housed at PNNL, for quantifying mineral reaction kinetics with CO2 under high temperature and pressure (supercritical) conditions. The computational analysis focus area involves numerical simulation of coupled, multi-scale processes associated with CO2 sequestration in geologic media, and the development of software to facilitate building and parameterizing conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reservoirs that represent geologic repositories for injected CO2. This report describes work in support of the computational analysis focus area. The computational analysis focus area currently consists of several collaborative research projects. These are all geared towards the development and application of conceptual and numerical models for geologic sequestration of CO2. The software being developed for this focus area is referred to as the Geologic Sequestration Software Suite or GS3. A wiki-based software framework is being developed to support GS3. This report summarizes work performed in FY09 on one of the LDRD projects in the computational analysis focus area. The title of this project is Data Assimilation Tools for CO2 Reservoir Model Development. Some key objectives of this project in FY09 were to assess the current state-of-the-art in reservoir model development, the data types and analyses that need to be performed in order to develop and parameterize credible and robust reservoir simulation models, and to review existing software that is applicable to these analyses. This report describes this effort and highlights areas in which additional software development, wiki application extensions, or related GS3 infrastructure development may be warranted.

  9. Development of Global Sea Ice 6.0 CICE configuration for the Met Office Global Coupled Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rae, J. G. L. [Met Office Hadley Centre; Hewitt, H. T. [Met Office Hadley Centre; Keen, A. B. [Met Office Hadley Centre; Ridley, J. K. [Met Office Hadley Centre; West, A. E. [Met Office Hadley Centre; Harris, C. M. [Met Office Hadley Centre; Hunke, E. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA; Walters, D. N. [Met Office Hadley Centre

    2015-01-01

    The new sea ice configuration GSI6.0, used in the Met Office global coupled configuration GC2.0, is described and the sea ice extent, thickness and volume are compared with the previous configuration and with observationally-based datasets. In the Arctic, the sea ice is thicker in all seasons than in the previous configuration, and there is now better agreement of the modelled concentration and extent with the HadISST dataset. In the Antarctic, a warm bias in the ocean model has been exacerbated at the higher resolution of GC2.0, leading to a large reduction in ice extent and volume; further work is required to rectify this in future configurations.

  10. Development of global sea ice 6.0 CICE configuration for the Met Office global coupled model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rae, J. . G. L; Hewitt, H. T.; Keen, A. B.; Ridley, J. K.; West, A. E.; Harris, C. M.; Hunke, E. C.; Walters, D. N.

    2015-03-05

    The new sea ice configuration GSI6.0, used in the Met Office global coupled configuration GC2.0, is described and the sea ice extent, thickness and volume are compared with the previous configuration and with observationally-based datasets. In the Arctic, the sea ice is thicker in all seasons than in the previous configuration, and there is now better agreement of the modelled concentration and extent with the HadISST dataset. In the Antarctic, a warm bias in the ocean model has been exacerbated at the higher resolution of GC2.0, leading to a large reduction in ice extent and volume; further work is requiredmore »to rectify this in future configurations.« less

  11. Global ASM-Modeling Capability : Bruce A. McCarl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    multiproduct US model with a lot of supply response but with aggregate representatives of trade with the rest do not model supply response and are single or just a couple of commodities. 3. A detailed of the world. In particular, heaving an excess demand curve from the rest of the world without detail on where

  12. GLOBAL PLATE MOTION FRAMES: TOWARD A UNIFIED MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torsvik, Trond Helge

    to a reference system such as the Earth's mantle, are still poorly understood. Accurate absolute plate motion magnetic dipole axis are not necessarily fixed to the mantle reference system. Absolute plate motion models and a paleomagnetic absolute plate reference system into a ``hybrid'' model for the time period from the assembly

  13. A Global Model of $?^-$-Decay Half-Lives Using Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Costiris; E. Mavrommatis; K. A. Gernoth; J. W. Clark

    2007-01-31

    Statistical modeling of nuclear data using artificial neural networks (ANNs) and, more recently, support vector machines (SVMs), is providing novel approaches to systematics that are complementary to phenomenological and semi-microscopic theories. We present a global model of $\\beta^-$-decay halflives of the class of nuclei that decay 100% by $\\beta^-$ mode in their ground states. A fully-connected multilayered feed forward network has been trained using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, Bayesian regularization, and cross-validation. The halflife estimates generated by the model are discussed and compared with the available experimental data, with previous results obtained with neural networks, and with estimates coming from traditional global nuclear models. Predictions of the new neural-network model are given for nuclei far from stability, with particular attention to those involved in r-process nucleosynthesis. This study demonstrates that in the framework of the $\\beta^-$-decay problem considered here, global models based on ANNs can at least match the predictive performance of the best conventional global models rooted in nuclear theory. Accordingly, such statistical models can provide a valuable tool for further mapping of the nuclidic chart.

  14. Global empirical wind model for the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. I. Prevailing wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Global empirical wind model for the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. I. Prevailing wind Y. I. An updated empirical climatic zonally aver- aged prevailing wind model for the upper mesosphere/ lower of monthly mean winds from meteor radar and MF radar measurements at more than 40 stations, well distributed

  15. Multiscale models of atmospheric mercury: bromine chemistry, air-sea exchange, and global transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, Christopher D.

    by atomic bromine (Br) in the tropo- sphere by combining kinetic data for the Hg-Br system with modeledMultiscale models of atmospheric mercury: bromine chemistry, air-sea exchange, and global transport rights reserved. #12;iii Dissertation Advisor Author Professor Daniel J. Jacob Christopher D. Holmes

  16. Temperature and Water Vapor Variance Scaling in Global Models: Comparisons to Satellite and Aircraft Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    Infrared Sounder (AIRS) are compared to those generated by state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction controlling cloud processes at the subgrid scale in NWP and climate models (Cusack et al. 1999; Tompkins 2002Temperature and Water Vapor Variance Scaling in Global Models: Comparisons to Satellite

  17. Using beryllium-7 to assess cross-tropopause1 transport in global models2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongyu

    1 Using beryllium-7 to assess cross-tropopause1 transport in global models2 3 Hongyu Liu1 , David B, MA13 14 Short Title: Beryllium-7 and cross-tropopause transport15 Index Terms: 0368 Troposphere Initiative (GMI) modeling framework the29 utility of cosmogenic beryllium-7 (7 Be), a natural aerosol tracer

  18. ECONOMIC MODELING OF THE GLOBAL ADOPTION OF CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECONOMIC MODELING OF THE GLOBAL ADOPTION OF CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES J. R. Mc of carbon capture and sequestration technologies as applied to electric generating plants. The MIT Emissions, is used to model carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies based on a natural gas combined cycle

  19. A COMPARISON BETWEEN GLOBAL SOLAR MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC AND POTENTIAL FIELD SOURCE SURFACE MODEL RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    A COMPARISON BETWEEN GLOBAL SOLAR MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC AND POTENTIAL FIELD SOURCE SURFACE MODEL of the solar corona are (1) potential field source surface (PFSS) models, and (2) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD ABSTRACT The large-scale, steady-state magnetic field configuration of the solar corona is typically

  20. "Big Picture" Process Modeling Tools |GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using process modeling tools to attain cost-effective results for GE customers Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click...

  1. REPRESENTING AEROSOLS IN GLOBAL MODELS: FROM MICROMETERS TO MEGAMETERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    mainly from gas-to- particle conversion of low-volatility gaseous species, mainly sulfuric acid to represent aerosol processes and forcing "on-line" in climate models in order to capture the feedbacks

  2. Present and Future of Modeling Global Environmental Change: Toward Integrated Modeling, Eds., T. Matsuno and H. Kida, pp. 145172.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    145 Present and Future of Modeling Global Environmental Change: Toward Integrated Modeling, Eds., T, NH 03824, U.S.A. Abstract--Here we examine the cause, size and future of the U.S. carbon sink.4%, with the remainder due to land use. To forecast the future of the U.S. carbon sink, we used the Ecosystem Demography

  3. Supergiant: global model I rms =0.376 %

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freytag, Bernd

    . Conclusions . The granule sizes in late­type stars with deep solar­like convection zones scales at the surface. Outlook To improve the quality of the models the ra­ diation transport needs to be refined. Stellar granulation The observed pattern of solar granulation is well reproduced by numerical simulations

  4. Gammasphere software development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piercey, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    Activities of the nuclear physics group are described. Progress was made in organizing the Gammasphere Software Working Group, establishing a nuclear computing facility, participating in software development at Lawrence Berkeley, developing a common data file format, and adapting the ORNL UPAK software to run at Gammasphere. A universal histogram object was developed that defines a file format and provides for an objective-oriented programming model. An automated liquid nitrogen fill system was developed for Gammasphere (110 Ge detectors comprise the sphere).

  5. A UNIFIED HARDWARE/SOFTWARE PRIORITY SCHEDULING MODEL FOR GENERAL PURPOSE SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preston, Keith Alan

    2012-05-31

    be applied past the scheduling decision itself to also reduce the non-predictable delays associated with interrupts and timers. By expanding the window of hardware/software co-design to these invocation mechanisms, we seek to understand if the jitter...

  6. Modeling and Learning Interaction-based Accidents for Safety-Critical Software Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Tim

    of knowledge bases are constructed in- dependently using a feature-based classification and a domain specific Mahmood, Edmund Kazmierczak Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering The University Science University of York, UK tim.kelly@cs.york.ac.uk Dennis Plunkett PBR Australia Pty Ltd Melbourne

  7. Long-Range Atmospheric Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: A Global 3-D Model Analysis Including Evaluation of Arctic Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Carey

    We use the global 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem to simulate long-range atmospheric transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). To evaluate the model’s ability to simulate PAHs with different volatilities, ...

  8. The AeroCom Evaluation and Intercomparison of Organic Aerosol in Global Models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tsigaridis, Kostas [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Center for Climate Systems Research; NASA Goddard Inst. for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States); Daskalakis, N. [Univ. of Crete, Heraklion (Greece). Environmental Chemical Processes Lab.; Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, Patras (Greece); Inst. of Chemical Engineering; Kanakidou, M. [Univ. of Crete, Heraklion (Greece). Environmental Chemical Processes Lab.; ; Adams, P. J. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Dept. of Engineering and Public Policy; Artaxo, Paulo [Univ. of Sao Paulo (Brazil). Dept of Applied Physics; Bahadur, R. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Inst. of Oceanography; Balkanski, Y. [Lab. des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bauer, S. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Center for Climate Systems Research; NASA Goddard Inst. for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States); Bellouin, N. [Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter (United Kingdom); Benedetti, Angela [ECMWF, Reading (United Kingdom); Bergman, T. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Kuopio (Finland); Berntsen, T. [Univ. of Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Geosciences; CICERO, Oslo (Norway); Beukes, J. P. [North-West Univ., Potchestroom (South Africa). Environmental Sciences and Management; Bian, Huisheng [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County, MD (United States). Joint Center for Environmental Technology; Carslaw, K. S. [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom). School of Earth and Environment; Chin, M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Curci, Gabriele [Univ. of L'Aquila (Italy). Dept of Physics CETEMPS; Diehl, Thomas [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and Universities Space Research Association, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Easter, Richard C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ghan, Steven J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gong, S. [Meteorological Service of Canada, Toronto (Canada). Air Quality Research Branch; Hodzic, Alma [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Hoyle, Christopher R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Inst. for Forest Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) - Inst. for Snow and Avalanche Research (SLF), Davos (Switzerland); Iversen, T. [ECMWF, Reading (United Kingdom); Univ. of Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Geosciences; Norwegian Meteorological Inst., Oslo (Norway); Jathar, S. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Jimenez, J. L. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Kaiser, J. W. [ECMWF, Reading (United Kingdom); King's College London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geography; Max Planck Society, Mainz (Germany). Max Planck Inst. for Chemistry, Dept. of Atmospheric Chemistry; ; Kirkevag, A. [Norwegian Meteorological Inst., Oslo (Norway); Koch, Dorothy [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Center for Climate Systems Research; NASA Goddard Inst. for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States); Kokkola, H. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Kuopio (Finland); Lee, Y. H. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Lin, G. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Science; Liu, Xiaohong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Luo, Gan [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Albany, NY (United States); Ma, Xiaoyan [Environment Canada, Victoria, BC (Canada); Mann, G. W. [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom). National Centre for Atmospheric Science and School of Earth and Environment; Mihalopoulos, Nikos [Univ. of Crete, Heraklion (Greece). Environmental Chemical Processes Lab.; Morcrette, J. -J. [ECMWF, Reading (United Kingdom); Muller, J. F. [Belgian Inst. for Space Aeronomy, Brussels (Belgium); Myhre, G. [Center for International Climate and Environmental Research (CICERO), Oslo (Norway)

    2014-01-01

    This paper evaluates the current status of global modeling of the organic aerosol (OA) occurrence in the troposphere and analyzes the differences calculated between models as well as between models and observations. Thirty-one global chemistry/transport and general circulation models have participated in this intercomparison, in the framework of AeroCom phase II. The simulation of OA varies greatly between models in terms of the magnitude of primary emissions, secondary OA (SOA) formation, the number of OA species used (2 to 62), the complexity of OA parameterizations (gas-particle partitioning, chemical aging, multiphase chemistry, aerosol microphysics), and the OA physical, chemical and optical properties. The diversity of the global OA simulation results has increased since earlier AeroCom experiments, mainly due to the increasing complexity of the SOA parameterization in models, and the implementation of new, highly uncertain, OA sources. Diversity of over an order of magnitude exists in the modeled vertical distribution of OA that deserves a dedicated future study. Furthermore, although the OA/OC ratio depends on OA sources and atmospheric processing and is important for model evaluation against OA and OC observations, it is resolved only by few global models. The median global primary OA source strength is 56 Tg a-1 (range 34 - 144 Tg a-1) and the median secondary OA source strength (natural and anthropogenic) is 19 Tg a-1 (range 13-121 Tg a-1). Among the models that take into account the semi-volatile SOA nature, the median source is calculated to be 51 Tg a-1 (range 16-121 Tg a-1), much larger than the median value of the models that calculate SOA in a more simplistic way (19 Tg a-1; range 13-20 Tg a-1, with one model at 37 Tg a-1). The median atmospheric burden of OA is 1.4 Tg (24 models in the range of 0.6-2.0 Tg and 4 between 2.4-3.8 Tg) with a median OA lifetime of 5.4 days (range 3.8-9.6 days). In models that reported both OA and sulfate burdens, the median value of the OA/sulfate burden ratio of is calculated to be 0.77; 13 models calculate a ratio lower than 1, and 9 models higher than 1. For 26 models that reported OA deposition fluxes, the median wet removal is 70 Tg a-1 (range 28-209 Tg a-1), which is on average 85% of the total OA deposition.

  9. Software Copyright and Piracy in China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jia

    2010-01-14

    , which represent globalization and anti-globalization processes surrounding software copyright and piracy. Mittleman and Chin's (2005) theoretical framework was adopted to interpret material and spiritual tensions between human/material factors...

  10. A Global Climate Model Agent for High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Lynn S.; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Henry, Michael J.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Dazlich, Donald A.; Heikes, Ross P.; Randall, David

    2015-02-01

    Fine cell granularity in modern climate models can produce terabytes of data in each snapshot, causing significant I/O overhead. To address this issue, a method of reducing the I/O latency of high-resolution climate models by identifying and selectively outputting regions of interest is presented. Working with a Global Cloud Resolving Model and running with up to 10240 processors on a Cray XE6, this method provides significant I/O bandwidth reduction depending on the frequency of writes and size of the region of interest. The implementation challenges of determining global parameters in a strictly core-localized model and properly formatting output files that only contain subsections of the global grid are addressed, as well as the overall bandwidth impact and benefits of the method. The gains in I/O throughput provided by this method allow dual output rates for high-resolution climate models: a low-frequency global snapshot as well as a high-frequency regional snapshot when events of particular interest occur.

  11. Bayesian Proteoform Modeling Improves Protein Quantification of Global Proteomic Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Datta, Susmita; Payne, Samuel H.; Kang, Jiyun; Bramer, Lisa M.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Metz, Thomas O.; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.; Tardiff, Mark F.; McDermott, Jason E.; Pounds, Joel G.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2014-12-01

    As the capability of mass spectrometry-based proteomics has matured, tens of thousands of peptides can be measured simultaneously, which has the benefit of offering a systems view of protein expression. However, a major challenge is that with an increase in throughput, protein quantification estimation from the native measured peptides has become a computational task. A limitation to existing computationally-driven protein quantification methods is that most ignore protein variation, such as alternate splicing of the RNA transcript and post-translational modifications or other possible proteoforms, which will affect a significant fraction of the proteome. The consequence of this assumption is that statistical inference at the protein level, and consequently downstream analyses, such as network and pathway modeling, have only limited power for biomarker discovery. Here, we describe a Bayesian model (BP-Quant) that uses statistically derived peptides signatures to identify peptides that are outside the dominant pattern, or the existence of multiple over-expressed patterns to improve relative protein abundance estimates. It is a research-driven approach that utilizes the objectives of the experiment, defined in the context of a standard statistical hypothesis, to identify a set of peptides exhibiting similar statistical behavior relating to a protein. This approach infers that changes in relative protein abundance can be used as a surrogate for changes in function, without necessarily taking into account the effect of differential post-translational modifications, processing, or splicing in altering protein function. We verify the approach using a dilution study from mouse plasma samples and demonstrate that BP-Quant achieves similar accuracy as the current state-of-the-art methods at proteoform identification with significantly better specificity. BP-Quant is available as a MatLab ® and R packages at https://github.com/PNNL-Comp-Mass-Spec/BP-Quant.

  12. ITOUGH2 software qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finsterle, S.; Pruess, K.; Fraser, P.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide all software baseline documents necessary for the software qualification of ITOUGH2. ITOUGH2 is a computer program providing inverse modeling capabilities for TOUGH2. TOUGH2 is a numerical simulation code for multi-dimensional coupled fluid and heat flow of multiphase, multicomponent fluid mixtures in porous and fractured media.

  13. Computational Differentiation in Global Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    Computational Differentiation in Global Optimization Software This talk will present: 1. The general problem framework in optimization software. 2. An example of effectiveness of computational differentiation in optimization packages. 3. Particular importance of computational differentiation verified

  14. Existence of global weak solution for a reduced gravity two and a half layer model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Zhenhua Li, Zilai Yao, Lei

    2013-12-15

    We investigate the existence of global weak solution to a reduced gravity two and a half layer model in one-dimensional bounded spatial domain or periodic domain. Also, we show that any possible vacuum state has to vanish within finite time, then the weak solution becomes a unique strong one.

  15. On the Aggregation of Local Risk Models for Global Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the Aggregation of Local Risk Models for Global Risk Management Greg Anderson Vice President: portfolio risk, total risk, optimization, positive definite. 2 #12;1 Introduction Portfolio managers is a revised version of an article written in 2003 under the title "Forecasting Total Risk". #12;Abstract Given

  16. Studies of Global Stability of FieldReversed Configuration Plasmas Using A Rigid Body Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas has been stud­ ied using a simple rigid body model in the parameter space (oblate), while the tilt stability of FRC's with large E (prolate) depends on s=E. It is found that plasma to be unstable to many global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. However, FRC plasmas formed in `­pinch devices

  17. Modeling the Dynamics of Desakota Regions: Global - Local Nexus in the Taipei Metropolitan Area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Bing-Sheng

    2010-10-12

    in 1991, focuses on how internal domestic and local forces drive the specific rural-urban transformation in Asia. However, the McGee-Ginsburg model does not emphasize the importance of globalization on Asian urbanization. To fill the gap, this study...

  18. Observations and modelling of the global distribution and long-term trend of atmospheric 14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (IWR), University of Heidelberg, INF 368, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany, now at Electrical Engineering for Australian Weather and Climate Research / CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research (CMAR), Private Bag No. 1 and sinks, using the coarse-grid carbon cycle model GRACE. Dedicated simulations of global trends and inter

  19. System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets - Vol. II, Model Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    The second volume provides a data implementation guide that lists all naming conventions and model constraints. In addition, Volume 1 has two appendixes that provide a schematic of the System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) structure and a listing of the source code, respectively.

  20. Why are there large differences between models in global budgets of tropospheric ozone?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shiliang

    Why are there large differences between models in global budgets of tropospheric ozone? Shiliang Wu for tropospheric ozone. The ozone production rate in the troposphere, P(Ox), varies from 2300 to 5300 Tg yrŔ1 compounds (NMVOCs, mostly biogenic isoprene), and ozone influx from stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE

  1. System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets - Vol. I, Model Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    Documents the objectives and the conceptual and methodological approach used in the development of projections for the International Energy Outlook. The first volume of this report describes the System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) methodology and provides an in-depth explanation of the equations of the model.

  2. A statistical study of magnetosphereionosphere coupling in the LyonFedderMobarry global MHD model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotko, William

    processes acting between the two regions. The Earth's magnetosphere supplies energy to the ionosphere while state (Lotko, 2007). In global MHD models of the solar wind- magnetosphere­ionosphere system, the MI of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH03755, USA b High Altitude Observatory, National Center

  3. $5D$ Solutions to $?$CDM Universe Derived from Global Brane Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yongli Ping; Lixin Xu; Baorong Chang; Molin Liu; Hongya Liu

    2008-01-20

    An exact solution of brane universe is studied and the result indicates that Friedmann equations on the brane are modified with an extra term. This term can play the role of dark energy and make the universe accelerate. In order to derive the $\\Lambda$CDM Universe from this global brane model, the new solutions are obtained to describe the $5D$ manifold.

  4. ENERGY INVESTMENTS UNDER CLIMATE POLICY: A COMPARISON OF GLOBAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCollum, David; Nagai, Yu; Riahi, Keywan; Marangoni, Giacomo; Calvin, Katherine V.; Pietzcker, Robert; Van Vliet, Jasper; van der Zwaan, Bob

    2013-11-01

    The levels of investment needed to mobilize an energy system transformation and mitigate climate change are not known with certainty. This paper aims to inform the ongoing dialogue and in so doing to guide public policy and strategic corporate decision making. Within the framework of the LIMITS integrated assessment model comparison exercise, we analyze a multi-IAM ensemble of long-term energy and greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. Our study provides insight into several critical but uncertain areas related to the future investment environment, for example in terms of where capital expenditures may need to flow regionally, into which sectors they might be concentrated, and what policies could be helpful in spurring these financial resources. We find that stringent climate policies consistent with a 2°C climate change target would require a considerable upscaling of investments into low-carbon energy and energy efficiency, reaching approximately $45 trillion (range: $30–$75 trillion) cumulative between 2010 and 2050, or about $1.1 trillion annually. This represents an increase of some $30 trillion ($10–$55 trillion), or $0.8 trillion per year, beyond what investments might otherwise be in a reference scenario that assumes the continuation of present and planned emissions-reducing policies throughout the world. In other words, a substantial "clean-energy investment gap" of some $800 billion/yr exists — notably on the same order of magnitude as present-day subsidies for fossil energy and electricity worldwide ($523 billion). Unless the gap is filled rather quickly, the 2°C target could potentially become out of reach.

  5. Software Productivity Measurement Using Multiple Size Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Doo-Hwan

    Software Productivity Measurement Using Multiple Size Measures Software Productivity MeasurementContents Introduction Background Related work Motivation Productivity measurement - Measurement model - Productivity measure construction - Productivity analysis Conclusion Discussion #12;Software Engineering Lab, KAIST 3

  6. SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Design...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Design Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Design Checklist This checklist is intended to...

  7. RELAP-7 SOFTWARE VERIFICATION AND VALIDATION PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Curtis L; Choi, Yong-Joon; Zou, Ling

    2014-09-01

    This INL plan comprehensively describes the software for RELAP-7 and documents the software, interface, and software design requirements for the application. The plan also describes the testing-based software verification and validation (SV&V) process—a set of specially designed software models used to test RELAP-7.

  8. Towards Direct Simulation of Future Tropical Cyclone Statistics in a High-Resolution Global Atmospheric Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wehner, Michael F.; Bala, G.; Duffy, Phillip; Mirin, Arthur A.; Romano, Raquel

    2010-01-01

    We present a set of high-resolution global atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) simulations focusing on the model's ability to represent tropical storms and their statistics. We find that the model produces storms of hurricane strength with realistic dynamical features. We also find that tropical storm statistics are reasonable, both globally and in the north Atlantic, when compared to recent observations. The sensitivity of simulated tropical storm statistics to increases in sea surface temperature (SST) is also investigated, revealing that a credible late 21st century SST increase produced increases in simulated tropical storm numbers and intensities in all ocean basins. Whilemore »this paper supports previous high-resolution model and theoretical findings that the frequency of very intense storms will increase in a warmer climate, it differs notably from previous medium and high-resolution model studies that show a global reduction in total tropical storm frequency. However, we are quick to point out that this particular model finding remains speculative due to a lack of radiative forcing changes in our time-slice experiments as well as a focus on the Northern hemisphere tropical storm seasons.« less

  9. Modeling the global emission, transport and deposition of trace elements associated with mineral dust

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Y.; Mahowald, N.; Scanza, R.; Journet, E.; Desboeufs, K.; Albani, S.; Kok, J.; Zhuang, G.; Chen, Y.; Cohen, D. D.; et al

    2014-12-17

    Trace element deposition from desert dust has important impacts on ocean primary productivity. In this study, emission inventories for 8 elements, which are primarily of soil origin, Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe, K, Al, and Si were determined based on a global mineral dataset and a soils dataset. Datasets of elemental fractions were used to drive the desert dust model in the Community Earth System Model (CESM) in order to simulate the elemental concentrations of atmospheric dust. Spatial variability of mineral dust elemental fractions was evident on a global scale, particularly for Ca. Simulations of global variations in the Camore »/ Al ratio, which typically ranged from around 0.1 to 5.0 in soil sources, were consistent with observations, suggesting this ratio to be a good signature for dust source regions. The simulated variable fractions of chemical elements are sufficiently different that estimates of deposition should include elemental variations, especially for Ca, Al and Fe. The model results have been evaluated with observational elemental aerosol concentration data from desert regions and dust events in non-dust regions, providing insights into uncertainties in the modeling approach. The ratios between modeled and observed elemental fractions ranged from 0.7 to 1.6 except for 3.4 and 3.5 for Mg and Mn, respectivly. Using the soil data base improved the correspondence of the spatial hetereogeneity in the modeling of several elements (Ca, Al and Fe) compared to observations. Total and soluble dust associated element fluxes into different ocean basins and ice sheets regions have been estimated, based on the model results. Annual inputs of soluble Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe and K associated with dust using mineral dataset were 0.28 Tg, 16.89 Gg, 1.32 Tg, 22.84 Gg, 0.068 Tg, and 0.15 Tg to global oceans and ice sheets.« less

  10. Global 3-D model analysis of the seasonal cycle of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide: Implications for terrestrial vegetation uptake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    Global 3-D model analysis of the seasonal cycle of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide: Implications of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS) to interpret observations at a network of surface sites. We aim to identify, and D. J. Jacob (2008), Global 3-D model analysis of the seasonal cycle of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide

  11. Impact of emissions, chemistry, and climate on atmospheric carbon monoxide : 100-year predictions from a global chemistry-climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chien.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    The possible trends for atmospheric carbon monoxide in the next 100 yr have been illustrated using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate model driven by emissions predicted by a global economic development model. ...

  12. Intercomparison and evaluation of global aerosol microphysical properties among AeroCom models of a range of complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ridley, David Andrew

    Many of the next generation of global climate models will include aerosol schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. These models enable aerosol optical ...

  13. Evaluating spectral radiances simulated by the HadGEM2 global climate model using longwave satellite measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Emma Catherine

    2015-06-30

    A 'model-to-radiance' comparison of simulated brightness temperatures and radiances from the Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model 2 (HadGEM2-A) with longwave measurements from the High Resolution Infrared Radiation ...

  14. Is the Ozone Depletion Regime a Model for an Emerging Regime on Global Warming?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang, Winfried

    1991-01-01

    the for- mation of a global warming regime produces a highlydepletion and the global warming regimes was recognized byan Emerging Regime on Global Warming? by Winfried Lang I.

  15. Assessing the Effects of Anthropogenic Aerosols on Pacific Storm Track Using a Multiscale Global Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J.; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan; Molina, Mario J.

    2014-05-13

    Atmospheric aerosols impact weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track using a multi-scale global aerosol-climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and pre-industrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by - 2.5 and + 1.3 W m-2, respectively, by emission changes from pre-industrial to present day, and an increased cloud-top height indicates invigorated mid-latitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides for the first time a global perspective of the impacts of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multi-scale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on the global scale.

  16. Modelling estimation on the impacts of global warming on rice production in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Futang

    1997-12-31

    In this paper, based on the validation and sensitivity analyses of two rice growth models (ORYZA1 and DRISIC--Double Rice Cropping Simulation Model for China), and their joining with global warming scenarios projected by GCMs (GFDL, UKMO-H, MPI and DKRZ OPYC, DKRZ LSG, respectively), the modelling experiments were carried out on the potential impacts of global warming on rice production in China. The results show that although there are the some features for each rice cropping patterns because of different models and estimated methods, the rice production for all cropping patterns in China will trend to decrease with different degrees. In average, early, middle and later rice production, as well as, double-early and double-later rice production in different areas of China will decrease 3.7%, 10.5% and 10.4%, as well as, 15.9% and 14.4%, respectively. It do illustrates that the advantage effects induced by elevated CO{sub 2} concentration on photosynthesis does not compensate the adverse effects of temperature increase. Thus, it is necessary to adjusting rice cropping patterns, cultivars and farming techniques to the global warming timely.

  17. Modeling the global emission, transport and deposition of trace elements associated with mineral dust

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Y.; Mahowald, N.; Scanza, R. A.; Journet, E.; Desboeufs, K.; Albani, S.; Kok, J. F.; Zhuang, G.; Chen, Y.; Cohen, D. D.; et al

    2015-10-12

    Trace element deposition from desert dust has important impacts on ocean primary productivity, the quantification of which could be useful in determining the magnitude and sign of the biogeochemical feedback on radiative forcing. However, the impact of elemental deposition to remote ocean regions is not well understood and is not currently included in global climate models. In this study, emission inventories for eight elements primarily of soil origin, Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe, K, Al, and Si are determined based on a global mineral data set and a soil data set. The resulting elemental fractions are used to drive themore »desert dust model in the Community Earth System Model (CESM) in order to simulate the elemental concentrations of atmospheric dust. Spatial variability of mineral dust elemental fractions is evident on a global scale, particularly for Ca. Simulations of global variations in the Ca / Al ratio, which typically range from around 0.1 to 5.0 in soils, are consistent with observations, suggesting that this ratio is a good signature for dust source regions. The simulated variable fractions of chemical elements are sufficiently different; estimates of deposition should include elemental variations, especially for Ca, Al and Fe. The model results have been evaluated with observations of elemental aerosol concentrations from desert regions and dust events in non-dust regions, providing insights into uncertainties in the modeling approach. The ratios between modeled and observed elemental fractions range from 0.7 to 1.6, except for Mg and Mn (3.4 and 3.5, respectively). Using the soil database improves the correspondence of the spatial heterogeneity in the modeling of several elements (Ca, Al and Fe) compared to observations. Total and soluble dust element fluxes to different ocean basins and ice sheet regions have been estimated, based on the model results. The annual inputs of soluble Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe and K associated with dust using the mineral data set are 0.30 Tg, 16.89 Gg, 1.32 Tg, 22.84 Gg, 0.068 Tg, and 0.15 Tg to global oceans and ice sheets.« less

  18. The Golden Age of Software Architecture: A Comprehensive Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , technology maturation, history of software engineering #12;The Golden Age of Software Architecture results have moved into practice. Keywords: Software architecture, technology maturation, history of a technology maturation model, matching significant accomplishments in software architecture to the stages

  19. The emerging market for Web-based enterprise software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Göldi, Andreas (Andreas Jakob)

    2007-01-01

    Web-based enterprise software - sometimes referred to as "Software as a Service" (SaaS) or "on demand software" - is a major wave of innovation that introduces a new technical and economic model to enterprise software. The ...

  20. Software packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Software and codes for matrix computations. If you cannot access any code, please email me. A hierarchically semiseparable (HSS) package. Matlab codes ...

  1. Useful Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue's Engineering Computer Network has SSH clients available for Purdue faculty, staff, and students. Below is a link to the ECN software download page: ...

  2. FRAMES-2.0 Software System: Linking to the Groundwater Modeling System (GMS) RT3D and MT3DMS Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, Gene; Castleton, Karl J.; Pelton, Mitch A.

    2007-08-08

    Linkages to the Groundwater Modeling System have been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to enable the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to more realistically assess the risk to the public of radioactive contaminants at NRC-licensed sites. Common software tools presently in use are limited in that they cannot assess contaminant migration through complex natural environments. The purpose of this initiative is to provide NRC with a licensing safety-analysis tool with sufficient power, flexibility, and utility that it can serve as the primary software platform for analyzing the hazards associated with licensing actions at those “complex” sites at which the traditional tools are inappropriate. As a tool designed to realistically approximate prospective doses to the public, this initiative addresses NRC’s safety-performance goal by confirming that licensing actions do not result in undue risk to the public.

  3. The impact of global nuclear mass model uncertainties on $r$-process abundance predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Mumpower; R. Surman; A. Aprahamian

    2014-11-14

    Rapid neutron capture or `$r$-process' nucleosynthesis may be responsible for half the production of heavy elements above iron on the periodic table. Masses are one of the most important nuclear physics ingredients that go into calculations of $r$-process nucleosynthesis as they enter into the calculations of reaction rates, decay rates, branching ratios and Q-values. We explore the impact of uncertainties in three nuclear mass models on $r$-process abundances by performing global monte carlo simulations. We show that root-mean-square (rms) errors of current mass models are large so that current $r$-process predictions are insufficient in predicting features found in solar residuals and in $r$-process enhanced metal poor stars. We conclude that the reduction of global rms errors below $100$ keV will allow for more robust $r$-process predictions.

  4. Evolution of Meteorological Base Models for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.S

    2013-01-01

    -11-01 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Energy Procedia 00 (2013) 000–000 www.elsevier.com/locate/procedia 2013 ISES Solar World Congress Evaluation of Meteorological Base Models for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas Kee Han..., U.S.A. Abstract Building thermal performance and potential solar applications depend on the quality of the solar resource data available. Unfortunately, most of the locations do not account for measured solar radiation data and, as a result, rely...

  5. The AeroCom Evaluation and Intercomparison of Organic Aerosol in Global Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsigaridis, Kostas; Daskalakis, N.; Kanakidou, M.; Adams, P. J.; Artaxo, Paulo; Bahadur, R.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.; Benedetti, Angela; Bergman, T.; Berntsen, T.; Beukes, J. P.; Bian, Huisheng; Carslaw, K. S.; Chin, M.; Curci, Gabriele; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Gong, S.; Hodzic, Alma; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Iversen, T.; Jathar, S.; Jimenez, J. L.; Kaiser, J. W.; Kirkevag, A.; Koch, Dorothy; Kokkola, H.; Lee, Y. H.; Lin, G.; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Gan; Ma, Xiaoyan; Mann, G. W.; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Morcrette, J. -J.; Muller, J. F.; Myhre, G.; Myriokefalitakis, S.; Ng, Nga L.; O'Donell, D.; Penner, J. E.; Pozzoli, L.; Pringle, K. J.; Russell, Lynn; Schulz, M.; Sciare, J.; Seland, O.; Shindell, Drew; Sillman, S.; Skeie, R. B.; Spracklen, D. V.; Stavrakou, T.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Takemura, T.; Tiitta, P.; Tilmes, S.; Tost, H.; van Noije, T.; van Zyl, P. G.; von Salzen, Knut; Yu, Fangqun; Wang, Zaizi; Wang, Zhilli; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Xiaoye

    2014-10-15

    This paper evaluates the current status of global modeling of the organic aerosol (OA) occurrence in the troposphere and analyzes the differences calculated between models as well as between models and observations. Thirty-one global chemistry/transport and general circulation models have participated in this intercomparison, in the framework of AeroCom phase II. The simulation of OA varies greatly between models in terms of the magnitude of primary emissions, secondary OA (SOA) formation, the number of OA species used (2 to 62), the complexity of OA parameterizations (gas-particle partitioning, chemical aging, multiphase chemistry, aerosol microphysics), and the OA physical, chemical and optical properties. The diversity of the global OA simulation results has increased since earlier AeroCom experiments, mainly due to the increasing complexity of the SOA parameterization in models, and the implementation of new, highly uncertain, OA sources. Diversity of over an order of magnitude exists in the modeled vertical distribution of OA that deserves a dedicated future study. Furthermore, although the OA/OC ratio depends on OA sources and atmospheric processing and is important for model evaluation against OA and OC observations, it is resolved only by few global models. The median global primary OA source strength is 56 Tg a-1 (range 34 - 144 Tg a-1) and the median secondary OA source strength (natural and anthropogenic) is 19 Tg a-1 (range 13-121 Tg a-1). Among the models that take into account the semi-volatile SOA nature, the median source is calculated to be 51 Tg a-1 (range 16-121 Tg a-1), much larger than the median value of the models that calculate SOA in a more simplistic way (19 Tg a-1; range 13-20 Tg a-1, with one model at 37 Tg a-1). The median atmospheric burden of OA is 1.4 Tg (24 models in the range of 0.6-2.0 Tg and 4 between 2.4-3.8 Tg) with a median OA lifetime of 5.4 days (range 3.8-9.6 days). In models that reported both OA and sulfate burdens, the median value of the OA/sulfate burden ratio of is calculated to be 0.77; 13 models calculate a ratio lower than 1, and 9 models higher than 1. For 26 models that reported OA deposition fluxes, the median wet removal is 70 Tg a-1 (range 28-209 Tg a-1), which is on average 85% of the total OA deposition.

  6. Progress in the Development of Global Medium-Energy Nucleon-Nucleus Optical Model Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David G. Madland

    1997-02-14

    Two existing global medium-energy nucleon-nucleus phenomenological optical model potentials are described and compared with experiment and with each other. The first of these employs a Dirac approach (second-order reduction) that is global in projectile energy and projectile isospin and applies to the target nucleus 208-Pb. Here the standard S-V (isoscalar-scalar, isoscalar-vector) model has been extended to include the corresponding isovector components by introduction of a relativistic Lane model. The second of these employs a relativistic equivalent to the Schroedinger equation and is global in projectile energy, projectile isospin, and target (Z,A). Here, particular attention is given to predictions for the integrated scattering observables - neutron total cross sections and proton total reaction cross sections - and their sensitivity to the absorptive parts of the potential. Finally, current work is described and the influence of the nuclear bound state problem (treated in relativistic mean field theory) on the Dirac scattering problem is mentioned.

  7. Statistical Global Model of beta- Half-lives and r-Process Nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. J. Costiris; E. Mavrommatis; K. A. Gernoth; J. W. Clark

    2013-09-02

    Purpose: Our objective is to apply an improved statistical global model of beta^- decay half-life systematics [1] generated by machine-learning techniques to the prediction of beta half-lives relevant to r-process nuclei. The primary aim of this application is to complement existing r-process-clock and matter-flow studies, thereby providing additional theoretical support for the planning of future activities of the world's network of rare-isotope laboratories. Results: Results are presented for nuclides situated on the r-ladders at N=50, 82, and 126 where abundances peak, as well as for nuclides that affect abundances between peaks or may be relevant to r-processes under different astrophysical scenarios. The half-lives of some of the targeted neutron-rich nuclides have either been recently measured or will be accessible at rare-isotope laboratories in the relatively near future. The results of our large-scale data-driven half-life calculations (generated by a "theory-thin" global statistical model) are compared to available experimental data, including recent measurements on very neutron-rich nuclei along an r-process path far from the valley of $\\beta$ stability. Comparison is also made with corresponding results from traditional global models derived by semi-phenomenological "theory-thick" approaches.

  8. Evaluation of the Suitability of Polarimetric Scattering and Emissivity Models with Scene Generation Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gartley, Michael G.

    Evaluation of the Suitability of Polarimetric Scattering and Emissivity Models with Scene models and hardware based infrared scene projectors commonly utilize analytical forms of polarized bi, polarimetric imaging sensors and payloads can benefit greatly from polarization capable synthetic image

  9. Application of the Software as a Service Model to the Control of Complex Building Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Modeling with Combined Heat and Power Applications”,DG) equipment, combined heat and power (CHP), and electrical

  10. Development of the first nonhydrostatic nested-grid grid-point global atmospheric modeling system on parallel machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kao, C.Y.J.; Langley, D.L.; Reisner, J.M.; Smith, W.S.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Evaluating the importance of global and regional climate response to increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases requires a comprehensive global atmospheric modeling system (GAMS) capable of simulations over a wide range of atmospheric circulations, from complex terrain to continental scales, on high-performance computers. Unfortunately, all of the existing global circulation models (GCMs) do not meet this requirements, because they suffer from one or more of the following three shortcomings: (1) use of the hydrostatic approximation, which makes the models potentially ill-posed; (2) lack of a nested-grid (or multi-grid) capability, which makes it difficult to consistently evaluate the regional climate response to the global warming, and (3) spherical spectral (opposed to grid-point finite-difference) representation of model variables, which hinders model performance for parallel machine applications. The end product of the research is a highly modularized, multi-gridded, self-calibratable (for further parameterization development) global modeling system with state-of-the-science physics and chemistry. This system will be suitable for a suite of atmospheric problems: from local circulations to climate, from thunderstorms to global cloud radiative forcing, from urban pollution to global greenhouse trace gases, and from the guiding of field experiments to coupling with ocean models. It will also provide a unique testbed for high-performance computing architecture.

  11. Environmental Modelling & Software 15 (2000) 681692 www.elsevier.com/locate/envsoft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    2000-01-01

    -scale air pollution modelling using adaptive unstructured meshes A.S. Tomlin a,* , S. Ghorai a , G. Hart of Computer Studies, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK Abstract High resolution models of air pollution but less so in meteorological and air pollution models. However, it is well known that grid resolution has

  12. Two loop neutrino model and dark matter particles with global B?L symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, Seungwon; Okada, Hiroshi; Toma, Takashi E-mail: hokada@kias.re.kr

    2014-06-01

    We study a two loop induced seesaw model with global U(1){sub B?L} symmetry, in which we consider two component dark matter particles. The dark matter properties are investigated together with some phenomenological constraints such as electroweak precision test, neutrino masses and mixing and lepton flavor violation. In particular, the mixing angle between the Standard Model like Higgs and an extra Higgs is extremely restricted by the direct detection experiment of dark matter. We also discuss the contribution of Goldstone boson to the effective number of neutrino species ?N{sub eff} ? 0.39 which has been reported by several experiments.

  13. An MILP-MINLP decomposition method for the global optimization of a source based model of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    and regulatory specifications of products. For example, the economic and operability benefits from optimal crude-oilAn MILP-MINLP decomposition method for the global optimization of a source based model. In this work we present two major contributions for the global solution of the problem. The first one

  14. GFDL's ESM2 Global Coupled ClimateCarbon Earth System Models. Part I: Physical Formulation and Baseline Simulation Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wittenberg, Andrew

    GFDL's ESM2 Global Coupled Climate­Carbon Earth System Models. Part I: Physical Formulation coupled carbon­climate Earth System Models, ESM2M and ESM2G, are described. These models demonstrate al. 2002; Delworth et al. 2006). Our approach has been to de- velop two Earth System Models

  15. Network Statistics and Modeling the Global Trade Economy: Exponential Random Graph Models and Latent Space Models: Is Geography Dead?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howell, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Warwick, M. ( 2005). Geographies of Globalization. LondonIntegration: The End of Geography. 1992. Foreign RelationsInstitutions, Integration, and Geography: In Search of the

  16. Modeling Total Solar Irradiance Variations Using Automated Classification Software on Mount Wilson Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulrich, R. K.; Parker, D.; Bertello, L.; Boyden, J.

    2010-01-01

    Star: Solar and Stellar Irradiance Variations, IAU Colloq.4 Modeling Total Solar Irradiance Variations Using Automatedcorrelated with total solar irradiance (TSI) to yield a set

  17. Appendix F Software F.1 Software packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the software used are specified. A comparison of software calculation quality for two primary packages employedAppendix F Software F.1 Software packages The following table contains the list of software used in the Griffin experiment. The primary use of the software, the software manufacturer and version number

  18. Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locatelli, R.

    A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model ...

  19. The AeroCom evaluation and intercomparison of organic aerosol in global models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tsigaridis, K.; Daskalakis, N.; Kanakidou, M.; Adams, P. J.; Artaxo, P.; Bahadur, R.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Benedetti, A.; et al

    2014-10-15

    This paper evaluates the current status of global modeling of the organic aerosol (OA) in the troposphere and analyzes the differences between models as well as between models and observations. Thirty-one global chemistry transport models (CTMs) and general circulation models (GCMs) have participated in this intercomparison, in the framework of AeroCom phase II. The simulation of OA varies greatly between models in terms of the magnitude of primary emissions, secondary OA (SOA) formation, the number of OA species used (2 to 62), the complexity of OA parameterizations (gas-particle partitioning, chemical aging, multiphase chemistry, aerosol microphysics), and the OA physical, chemicalmore »and optical properties. The diversity of the global OA simulation results has increased since earlier AeroCom experiments, mainly due to the increasing complexity of the SOA parameterization in models, and the implementation of new, highly uncertain, OA sources. Diversity of over one order of magnitude exists in the modeled vertical distribution of OA concentrations that deserves a dedicated future study. Furthermore, although the OA / OC ratio depends on OA sources and atmospheric processing, and is important for model evaluation against OA and OC observations, it is resolved only by a few global models. The median global primary OA (POA) source strength is 56 Tg a–1 (range 34–144 Tg a?1) and the median SOA source strength (natural and anthropogenic) is 19 Tg a–1 (range 13–121 Tg a?1). Among the models that take into account the semi-volatile SOA nature, the median source is calculated to be 51 Tg a–1 (range 16–121 Tg a?1), much larger than the median value of the models that calculate SOA in a more simplistic way (19 Tg a–1; range 13–20 Tg a–1, with one model at 37 Tg a?1). The median atmospheric burden of OA is 1.4 Tg (24 models in the range of 0.6–2.0 Tg and 4 between 2.0 and 3.8 Tg), with a median OA lifetime of 5.4 days (range 3.8–9.6 days). In models that reported both OA and sulfate burdens, the median value of the OA/sulfate burden ratio is calculated to be 0.77; 13 models calculate a ratio lower than 1, and 9 models higher than 1. For 26 models that reported OA deposition fluxes, the median wet removal is 70 Tg a–1 (range 28–209 Tg a?1), which is on average 85% of the total OA deposition. Fine aerosol organic carbon (OC) and OA observations from continuous monitoring networks and individual field campaigns have been used for model evaluation. At urban locations, the model–observation comparison indicates missing knowledge on anthropogenic OA sources, both strength and seasonality. The combined model–measurements analysis suggests the existence of increased OA levels during summer due to biogenic SOA formation over large areas of the USA that can be of the same order of magnitude as the POA, even at urban locations, and contribute to the measured urban seasonal pattern. Global models are able to simulate the high secondary character of OA observed in the atmosphere as a result of SOA formation and POA aging, although the amount of OA present in the atmosphere remains largely underestimated, with a mean normalized bias (MNB) equal to –0.62 (–0.51) based on the comparison against OC (OA) urban data of all models at the surface, –0.15 (+0.51) when compared with remote measurements, and –0.30 for marine locations with OC data. The mean temporal correlations across all stations are low when compared with OC (OA) measurements: 0.47 (0.52) for urban stations, 0.39 (0.37) for remote stations, and 0.25 for marine stations with OC data. The combination of high (negative) MNB and higher correlation at urban stations when compared with the low MNB and lower correlation at remote sites suggests that knowledge about the processes that govern aerosol processing, transport and removal, on top of their sources, is important at the remote stations. There is no clear change in model skill with increasing model complexity with regard to OC or OA mass concentration. As a

  20. Measuring Flexibility in Software Project Muhammad Ali Khan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Leon, Alex R.

    the quality of a software project schedule. Most of the existing measures of schedule quality define-factoring [4], global software development [5, 6] and open source initiative [7], to develop quality software1 Measuring Flexibility in Software Project Schedules Muhammad Ali Khan Department of Mathematics

  1. Building robust chemical reaction mechanisms : next generation of automatic model construction software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Jing, 1972-

    2004-01-01

    Building proper reaction mechanisms is crucial to model the system dynamic properties for many industrial processes with complex chemical reaction phenomena. Because of the complexity of a reaction mechanism, computer-aided ...

  2. Second Level Cluster Dependencies: A Comparison of Modeling Software and Missing Data Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larsen, Ross Allen Andrew

    2011-10-21

    Dependencies in multilevel models at the second level have never been thoroughly examined. For certain designs first-level subjects are independent over time, but the second level subjects may exhibit nonzero covariances ...

  3. Services and the Business Models of Product Firms: An Empirical Analysis of the Software Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suarez, Fernando F.

    Some product firms increasingly rely on service revenues as part of their business models. One possible explanation is that they turn to services to generate additional profits when their product industries mature and ...

  4. Evaluating Clouds, Aerosols, and their Interactions in Three Global Climate Models using COSP and Satellite Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ban-Weiss, George; Jin, Ling; Bauer, S.; Bennartz, Ralph; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai; Ming, Yi; Guo, Huan; Jiang, Jonathan

    2014-09-23

    Accurately representing aerosol-cloud interactions in global climate models is challenging. As parameterizations evolve, it is important to evaluate their performance with appropriate use of observations. In this work we compare aerosols, clouds, and their interactions in three climate models (AM3, CAM5, ModelE) to MODIS satellite observations. Modeled cloud properties were diagnosed using the CFMIP Observations Simulator Package (COSP). Cloud droplet number concentrations (N) were derived using the same algorithm for both satellite-simulated model values and observations. We find that aerosol optical depth tau simulated by models is similar to observations. For N, AM3 and CAM5 capture the observed spatial pattern of higher values in near-coast versus remote ocean regions, though modeled values in general are higher than observed. In contrast, ModelE simulates lower N in most near-coast versus remote regions. Aerosol- cloud interactions were computed as the sensitivity of N to tau for marine liquid clouds off the coasts of South Africa and Eastern Asia where aerosol pollution varies in time. AM3 and CAM5 are in most cases more sensitive than observations, while the sensitivity for ModelE is statistically insignificant. This widely used sensitivity could be subject to misinterpretation due to the confounding influence of meteorology on both aerosols and clouds. A simple framework for assessing the N – tau sensitivity at constant meteorology illustrates that observed sensitivity can change from positive to statistically insignificant when including the confounding influence of relative humidity. Satellite simulated values of N were compared to standard model output and found to be higher with a bias of 83 cm-3.

  5. Accessing Big (Commercial) Data across a Global Research Infrastructure - Modelling Consumer Behaviour in China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lloyd, Ashley D.; Antonioletti, Mario A.; Sloan, Terence M.

    2014-08-26

    The use of globally distributed computing systems and globally distributed data to understand and manage global organisations is a well-established vision. It can be found in patents awarded for electrical communications systems that are integrated...

  6. Decoding {beta}-decay systematics: A global statistical model for {beta}{sup -} half-lives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costiris, N. J.; Mavrommatis, E.; Gernoth, K. A.; Clark, J. W. [Physics Department, Division of Nuclear Physics and Particle Physics, University of Athens, GR-15771 Athens (Greece); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johannes-Kepler-Universitaet, A-4040 Linz (Austria) and School of Physics and Astronomy, Schuster Building, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences and Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States); Complexo Interdisciplinar, Centro de Mathematica e Aplicacoes Fundamentals, University of Lisbon, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal) and Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon, 1096 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2009-10-15

    Statistical modeling of nuclear data provides a novel approach to nuclear systematics complementary to established theoretical and phenomenological approaches based on quantum theory. Continuing previous studies in which global statistical modeling is pursued within the general framework of machine learning theory, we implement advances in training algorithms designed to improve generalization, in application to the problem of reproducing and predicting the half-lives of nuclear ground states that decay 100% by the {beta}{sup -} mode. More specifically, fully connected, multilayer feed-forward artificial neural network models are developed using the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization algorithm together with Bayesian regularization and cross-validation. The predictive performance of models emerging from extensive computer experiments is compared with that of traditional microscopic and phenomenological models as well as with the performance of other learning systems, including earlier neural network models as well as the support vector machines recently applied to the same problem. In discussing the results, emphasis is placed on predictions for nuclei that are far from the stability line, and especially those involved in r-process nucleosynthesis. It is found that the new statistical models can match or even surpass the predictive performance of conventional models for {beta}-decay systematics and accordingly should provide a valuable additional tool for exploring the expanding nuclear landscape.

  7. Detailed Modeling of Industrial Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in an Integrated Assessment Model of Long-term Global Change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinha, P.; Wise, M.; Smith, S.

    2006-01-01

    Conference 2006 Session 11 – Industrial Energy Modeling: What is the State of the Art? Detailed Modeling of Industrial Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in an Integrated Assessment Model of Long-term Global Change ParamitaSinha 1 MarshallWise 2* ,and...StevenSmith 2 1 UniversityofMaryland,CollegePark. 2 PacificNorthwestNationalLaboratory,JointGlobalChangeResearch Institute,CollegePark,MD. 1. Introduction Thispaperpresentsanewapproachtounderstandingthepotentiallong-termevolutionofenergy demandsinthe...

  8. Seminar on Software Engineering Software Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feitelson, Dror

    APIs and protocols Process standards Quality standards Software engineering terminology Lifecycle- operability Certification, guidelines Assurances #12;Software Standards Quality standards are rare - HardSeminar on Software Engineering Software Standards #12;"the good thing about standards

  9. Software Engineering M3 / 2012 Software Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Jeremy

    Software Engineering M3 / 2012 1 Software Engineering In a 21st century knowledge-based economy, computer software is of vital importance. For instance to 3% of the total UK economy. Furthermore, software infrastructure of some kind

  10. Sensitivity of a global climate model to the critical Richardson number in the boundary layer parameterization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Ning; Liu, Yangang; Gao, Zhiqiu; Li, Dan

    2015-04-27

    The critical bulk Richardson number (Ricr) is an important parameter in planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterization schemes used in many climate models. This paper examines the sensitivity of a Global Climate Model, the Beijing Climate Center Atmospheric General Circulation Model, BCC_AGCM to Ricr. The results show that the simulated global average of PBL height increases nearly linearly with Ricr, with a change of about 114 m for a change of 0.5 in Ricr. The surface sensible (latent) heat flux decreases (increases) as Ricr increases. The influence of Ricr on surface air temperature and specific humidity is not significant. The increasingmore »Ricr may affect the location of the Westerly Belt in the Southern Hemisphere. Further diagnosis reveals that changes in Ricr affect stratiform and convective precipitations differently. Increasing Ricr leads to an increase in the stratiform precipitation but a decrease in the convective precipitation. Significant changes of convective precipitation occur over the inter-tropical convergence zone, while changes of stratiform precipitation mostly appear over arid land such as North Africa and Middle East.« less

  11. On the characteristics of aerosol indirect effect based on dynamic regimes in global climate models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, S.; Wang, M.; Ghan, S. J.; Ding, A.; Wang, H.; Zhang, K.; Neubauer, D.; Lohmann, U.; Ferrachat, S.; Takeamura, T.; et al

    2015-09-02

    Aerosol-cloud interactions continue to constitute a major source of uncertainty for the estimate of climate radiative forcing. The variation of aerosol indirect effects (AIE) in climate models is investigated across different dynamical regimes, determined by monthly mean 500 hPa vertical pressure velocity (?500), lower-tropospheric stability (LTS) and large-scale surface precipitation rate derived from several global climate models (GCMs), with a focus on liquid water path (LWP) response to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. The LWP sensitivity to aerosol perturbation within dynamic regimes is found to exhibit a large spread among these GCMs. It is in regimes of strong large-scale ascendmore »(?500 ?1) and low clouds (stratocumulus and trade wind cumulus) where the models differ most. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing is also found to differ significantly among different regimes. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing in ascending regimes is as large as that in stratocumulus regimes, which indicates that regimes with strong large-scale ascend are as important as stratocumulus regimes in studying AIE. It is further shown that shortwave aerosol indirect forcing over regions with high monthly large-scale surface precipitation rate (> 0.1 mm d?1) contributes the most to the total aerosol indirect forcing (from 64 to nearly 100 %). Results show that the uncertainty in AIE is even larger within specific dynamical regimes than that globally, pointing to the need to reduce the uncertainty in AIE in different dynamical regimes.« less

  12. A PHYSICS-BASED SOFTWARE FRAMEWORK FOR SUN-EARTH CONNECTION MODELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stout, Quentin F.

    . The solar wind transfers significant mass, momentum and energy to the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and upper several more components (for example Solar Energetic Particles and Radiation Belt). It can also on the power grids used by millions of households. As an illustrative example of modeling multiple domains

  13. Automated Software Engineering Process Assessment: Supporting Diverse Models using an Ontology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    , ISO 9001). It also provides an in-the-loop automated process assessment capability that can help, ISO 9001), and suitable performance and scalability. The approach can reduce the effort required, and common reference model assessment standards utilize external audits (CMMI [3], ISO 15504 [4], and ISO

  14. Collaborative Proposal: Transforming How Climate System Models are Used: A Global, Multi-Resolution Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estep, Donald

    2013-04-15

    Despite the great interest in regional modeling for both weather and climate applications, regional modeling is not yet at the stage that it can be used routinely and effectively for climate modeling of the ocean. The overarching goal of this project is to transform how climate models are used by developing and implementing a robust, efficient, and accurate global approach to regional ocean modeling. To achieve this goal, we will use theoretical and computational means to resolve several basic modeling and algorithmic issues. The first task is to develop techniques for transitioning between parameterized and high-fidelity regional ocean models as the discretization grid transitions from coarse to fine regions. The second task is to develop estimates for the error in scientifically relevant quantities of interest that provide a systematic way to automatically determine where refinement is needed in order to obtain accurate simulations of dynamic and tracer transport in regional ocean models. The third task is to develop efficient, accurate, and robust time-stepping schemes for variable spatial resolution discretizations used in regional ocean models of dynamics and tracer transport. The fourth task is to develop frequency-dependent eddy viscosity finite element and discontinuous Galerkin methods and study their performance and effectiveness for simulation of dynamics and tracer transport in regional ocean models. These four projects share common difficulties and will be approach using a common computational and mathematical toolbox. This is a multidisciplinary project involving faculty and postdocs from Colorado State University, Florida State University, and Penn State University along with scientists from Los Alamos National Laboratory. The completion of the tasks listed within the discussion of the four sub-projects will go a long way towards meeting our goal of developing superior regional ocean models that will transform how climate system models are used.

  15. Agriculture and Climate Change in Global Scenarios: Why Don't the Models Agree

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Gerald; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; Ahammad, Helal; Blanc, Elodie; Calvin, Katherine V.; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Kyle, G. Page; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; von Lampe, Martin; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; van Meijl, Hans; Mueller, C.; Reilly, J. M.; Robertson, Richard; Sands, Ronald; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Valin, Hugo; Willenbockel, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Agriculture is unique among economic sectors in the nature of impacts from climate change. The production activity that transforms inputs into agricultural outputs makes direct use of weather inputs. Previous studies of the impacts of climate change on agriculture have reported substantial differences in outcomes of key variables such as prices, production, and trade. These divergent outcomes arise from differences in model inputs and model specification. The goal of this paper is to review climate change results and underlying determinants from a model comparison exercise with 10 of the leading global economic models that include significant representation of agriculture. By providing common productivity drivers that include climate change effects, differences in model outcomes are reduced. All models show higher prices in 2050 because of negative productivity shocks from climate change. The magnitude of the price increases, and the adaptation responses, differ significantly across the various models. Substantial differences exist in the structural parameters affecting demand, area, and yield, and should be a topic for future research.

  16. HESFIRE: a global fire model to explore the role of anthropogenic and weather drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Page, Yannick LB; Morton, Douglas; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Pereira, Jose M.; Hurtt, George C.

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation fires are a major driver of ecosystem dynamics and greenhouse gas emissions. Anticipating potential changes in fire activity and their impacts relies first on a realistic model of fire activity (e.g., fire incidence and interannual variability) and second on a model accounting for fire impacts (e.g., mortality and emissions). In this paper, we focus on our understanding of fire activity and describe a new fire model, HESFIRE (Human–Earth System FIRE), which integrates the influence of weather, vegetation characteristics, and human activities on fires in a stand-alone framework. It was developed with a particular emphasis on allowing fires to spread over consecutive days given their major contribution to burned areas in many ecosystems. A subset of the model parameters was calibrated through an optimization procedure using observation data to enhance our knowledge of regional drivers of fire activity and improve the performance of the model on a global scale. Modeled fire activity showed reasonable agreement with observations of burned area, fire seasonality, and interannual variability in many regions, including for spatial and temporal domains not included in the optimization procedure. Significant discrepancies are investigated, most notably regarding fires in boreal regions and in xeric ecosystems and also fire size distribution. The sensitivity of fire activity to model parameters is analyzed to explore the dominance of specific drivers across regions and ecosystems. The characteristics of HESFIRE and the outcome of its evaluation provide insights into the influence of anthropogenic activities and weather, and their interactions, on fire activity.

  17. Institute for Software Technology Software Maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Institute for Software Technology Software Maintenance VU 3.0 WS 2006 Univ.Prof. Dr. Franz Wotawa Institut für Softwaretechnologie wotawa@ist.tugraz.at VU Software Maintenance 2Institute for Software Technology Wozu Software Maintenance? Meine Software ist immer korrekt! Keine Modifikationen. Nur neue

  18. Structural analysis of three global land models on carbon cycle simulations using a traceability framework

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rafique, R.; Xia, J.; Hararuk, O.; Luo, Y.

    2014-06-27

    Modeled carbon (C) storage capacity is largely determined by the C residence time and net primary productivity (NPP). Extensive research has been done on NPP dynamics but the residence time and their relationships with C storage are much less studied. In this study, we implemented a traceability analysis to understand the modeled C storage and residence time in three land surface models: CSIRO's Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE) with 9 C pools, Community Land Model (version 3.5) combined with Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CLM3.5-CASA) with 12 C pools and Community Land Model (version 4) (CLM4) with 26 C pools. The globally averagedmore »C storage and residence time was computed at both individual pool and total ecosystem levels. The spatial distribution of total ecosystem C storage and residence time differ greatly among the three models. The CABLE model showed a closer agreement with measured C storage and residence time in plant and soil pools than CLM3.5-CASA and CLM4. However, CLM3.5-CASA and CLM4 were close to each other in modeled C storage but not with measured data. CABLE stores more C in root whereas CLM3.5-CASA and CLM4 store more C in woody pools, partly due to differential NPP allocation in respective pools. The C residence time in individual C pools is greatly different among models, largely because of different transfer coefficient values among pools. CABLE had higher bulk residence time for soil C pools than the other two models. Overall, the traceability analysis used in this study can help fully characterizes the behavior of complex land models.« less

  19. Direct Painting Software for Tracing on 3D Brain Surfaces with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct Painting Software for Tracing on 3D Brain Surfaces with Global Conformal Parameterization 1 4 Illustrates tracing on the brain surface with the direct painting software. (a) shows the global

  20. Critical Decisions in Software Development: Updating the State of the Practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crandall, W.

    This article focuses on how to choose the "right" software development process, how to structure global software design chains, how to manage the interaction of project structure and software design, and how to balance ...

  1. Using CORE Model-Based Systems Engineering Software to Support Program Management in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Project: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, C.; Sandor, D.; Simpkins, P.

    2006-11-01

    This paper describes how a model-based systems engineering software, CORE, is helping the U. S. Department of Energy's Office of Biomass Program assist with bringing biomass-derived biofuels to the market. This software tool provides information to guide informed decision-making as biomass-to-biofuels systems are advanced from concept to commercial adoption. It facilitates management and communication of program status by automatically generating custom reports, Gantt charts, and tables using the widely available programs of Microsoft Word, Project and Excel.

  2. Assessing the Potential of Developing a Tool for Residential Facility Management Using Building Information Modeling Software 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madhani, Himanshu 1986-

    2012-11-29

    -least one owner with similar type of house as in other group. 1st group is shown a video demonstration of this tool and provided with a model with certain maintenance issues. The video provides step by step tutorial on how the participants can deal..., this tool with the help of web-based search engines could provide links to tutorial videos. Companies like Google could get involved in developing this tool further and could have their search engine attached to the maintenance alerts. This would help...

  3. Long-memory effects in linear-response models of Earth's temperature and implications for future global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rypdal, Martin

    2013-01-01

    A linearized energy-balance model for global temperature is formulated, featuring a scale-free long-range memory (LRM) response and stochastic forcing representing the influence on the ocean heat reservoir from atmospheric weather systems. The model is parametrized by an effective response strength, the stochastic forcing strength, and the memory exponent. The instrumental global surface temperature record and the deterministic component of the forcing are used to estimate these parameters by means of the maximum-likelihood method. The residual obtained by subtracting the deterministic solution from the observed record is analyzed as a noise process and shown to be consistent with a long-memory time-series model and inconsistent with a short-memory model. By decomposing the forcing record in contributions from solar, volcanic, and anthropogenic activity one can estimate the contribution of each to 20'th century global warming. The LRM model is applied with a reconstruction of the forcing for the last millenni...

  4. Entwurf und Verifikation von Hardware/Software -SystemenEntwurf und Verifikation von Hardware/Software -Systemen Lehrstuhl fr Technische Informatik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ould Ahmedou, Mohameden

    Entwurf und Verifikation von Hardware/Software - SystemenEntwurf und Verifikation von Hardware/Software-Level- Konfigurat. Software: C/C++ global Header Skript-basierte Konfiguration Analyse- datenbank SystemC Simulation Bewertung hardwarenaher SoftwareEntwurf und Bewertung hardwarenaher Software C C R T OS R T OS PV / PVT PV

  5. Global model of a gridded-ion thruster powered by a radiofrequency inductive coil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chabert, P.; Arancibia Monreal, J.; Bredin, J.; Popelier, L.; Aanesland, A. [LPP, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UPMC, Paris XI, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2012-07-15

    A global (volume-averaged) model of a gridded-ion thruster is proposed. The neutral propellant (xenon gas) is injected into the thruster chamber at a fixed rate and a plasma is generated by circulating a radiofrequency current in an inductive coil. The ions generated in this plasma are accelerated out of the thruster by a pair of DC biased grids. The neutralization downstream is not treated. Xenon atoms also flow out of the thruster across the grids. The model, based on particle and energy balance equations, solves for four global variables in the thruster chamber: the plasma density, the electron temperature, the neutral gas (atom) density, and the neutral gas temperature. The important quantities to evaluate the thruster efficiency and performances are calculated from these variables and from the voltage across the grids. It is found that the mass utilization efficiency rapidly decreases with the gas flow rate. However, the radiofrequency power transfer efficiency increases significantly with the injected gas flow rate. Therefore, there is a compromise to be found between these two quantities.

  6. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  7. Global well-posedness of strong solutions to a tropical climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jinkai

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the Cauchy problem to the TROPIC CLIMATE MODEL derived by Frierson-Majda-Pauluis in [Comm. Math. Sci, Vol. 2 (2004)] which is a coupled system of the barotropic and the first baroclinic modes of the velocity and the typical midtropospheric temperature. The system considered in this paper has viscosities in the momentum equations, but no diffusivity in the temperature equation. We establish here the global well-posedness of strong solutions to this model. In proving the global existence of strong solutions, to overcome the difficulty caused by the absence of the diffusivity in the temperature equation, we introduce a new velocity $w$ (called the pseudo baroclinic velocity), which has more regularities than the original baroclinic mode of the velocity. An auxiliary function $\\phi$, which looks like the effective viscous flux for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, is also introduced to obtain the $L^\\infty$ bound of the temperature. Regarding the uniqueness, we use the idea of p...

  8. Calculation and Optimization of Thresholds for Sets of Software Metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grabowski, Jens

    ,grabowski,waack}@cs.uni-goettingen.de Abstract. Many software quality models use software metrics to determine qual- ity attributes of software/IEC, 2005). To up- hold the required standard of quality, the assessment and assurance of software quality characteristics are an import part of the execution of software projects. In many models to assess the quality

  9. Global solution to the Cauchy problem on a universe fireworks model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhenglu Jiang; Hongjiong Tian

    2008-06-06

    We prove existence and uniqueness of the global solution to the Cauchy problem on a universe fireworks model with finite total mass at the initial state when the ratio of the mass surviving the explosion, the probability of the explosion of fragments and the probability function of the velocity change of a surviving particle satisfy the corresponding physical conditions. Although the nonrelativistic Boltzmann-like equation modeling the universe fireworks is mathematically easy, this paper leads rather theoretically to an understanding of how to construct contractive mappings in a Banach space for the proof of the existence and uniqueness by means of methods taken from the famous work by DiPerna & Lions about the Boltzmann equation. We also show both the regularity and the time-asymptotic behavior of solution to the Cauchy problem.

  10. An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change: the MIT IGSM-CAM (version 1.0)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    This paper describes a computationally efficient framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model ...

  11. Hardware Sizing for Software Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaminathan, Ganesh

    2009-05-15

    Hardware sizing is an approximation of the hardware resources required to support a software implementation. Just like any theoretical model, hardware sizing model is an approximation of the reality. Depending on the infrastructure needs, workload...

  12. Gammasphere software development. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piercey, R.B.

    1993-05-01

    Activities of the nuclear physics group are described. Progress was made in organizing the Gammasphere Software Working Group, establishing a nuclear computing facility, participating in software development at Lawrence Berkeley, developing a common data file format, and adapting the ORNL UPAK software to run at Gammasphere. A universal histogram object was developed that defines a file format and provides for an objective-oriented programming model. An automated liquid nitrogen fill system was developed for Gammasphere (110 Ge detectors comprise the sphere).

  13. Accounting for Global Climate Model Projection Uncertainty in Modern Statistical Downscaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johannesson, G

    2010-03-17

    Future climate change has emerged as a national and a global security threat. To carry out the needed adaptation and mitigation steps, a quantification of the expected level of climate change is needed, both at the global and the regional scale; in the end, the impact of climate change is felt at the local/regional level. An important part of such climate change assessment is uncertainty quantification. Decision and policy makers are not only interested in 'best guesses' of expected climate change, but rather probabilistic quantification (e.g., Rougier, 2007). For example, consider the following question: What is the probability that the average summer temperature will increase by at least 4 C in region R if global CO{sub 2} emission increases by P% from current levels by time T? It is a simple question, but one that remains very difficult to answer. It is answering these kind of questions that is the focus of this effort. The uncertainty associated with future climate change can be attributed to three major factors: (1) Uncertainty about future emission of green house gasses (GHG). (2) Given a future GHG emission scenario, what is its impact on the global climate? (3) Given a particular evolution of the global climate, what does it mean for a particular location/region? In what follows, we assume a particular GHG emission scenario has been selected. Given the GHG emission scenario, the current batch of the state-of-the-art global climate models (GCMs) is used to simulate future climate under this scenario, yielding an ensemble of future climate projections (which reflect, to some degree our uncertainty of being able to simulate future climate give a particular GHG scenario). Due to the coarse-resolution nature of the GCM projections, they need to be spatially downscaled for regional impact assessments. To downscale a given GCM projection, two methods have emerged: dynamical downscaling and statistical (empirical) downscaling (SDS). Dynamic downscaling involves configuring and running a regional climate model (RCM) nested within a given GCM projection (i.e., the GCM provides bounder conditions for the RCM). On the other hand, statistical downscaling aims at establishing a statistical relationship between observed local/regional climate variables of interest and synoptic (GCM-scale) climate predictors. The resulting empirical relationship is then applied to future GCM projections. A comparison of the pros and cons of dynamical versus statistical downscaling is outside the scope of this effort, but has been extensively studied and the reader is referred to Wilby et al. (1998); Murphy (1999); Wood et al. (2004); Benestad et al. (2007); Fowler et al. (2007), and references within those. The scope of this effort is to study methodology, a statistical framework, to propagate and account for GCM uncertainty in regional statistical downscaling assessment. In particular, we will explore how to leverage an ensemble of GCM projections to quantify the impact of the GCM uncertainty in such an assessment. There are three main component to this effort: (1) gather the necessary climate-related data for a regional SDS study, including multiple GCM projections, (2) carry out SDS, and (3) assess the uncertainty. The first step is carried out using tools written in the Python programming language, while analysis tools were developed in the statistical programming language R; see Figure 1.

  14. Software Developers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Because SEED will provide a common, open-source data framework, software developers will be able to write applications that access the data in a consistent way (with proper permissions), or build functionalities onto the SEED platform in a replicable way.

  15. A sensitivity study of the thermodynamic environment on GFDL model hurricane intensity: Implications for global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, W.; Tuleya, R.E.; Ginis, I.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the effect of thermodynamic environmental changes on hurricane intensity is extensively investigated with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory hurricane model for a suite of experiments with different initial upper-tropospheric temperature anomalies up to {+-}4 C and sea surface temperatures ranging from 26 to 31 C given the same relative humidity profile. The results indicate that stabilization in the environmental atmosphere and sea surface temperature (SST) increase cause opposing effects on hurricane intensity. The offsetting relationship between the effects of atmospheric stability increase (decrease) and SST increase (decrease) is monotonic and systematic in the parameter space. This implies that hurricane intensity increase due to a possible global warming associated with increased CO{sub 2} is considerably smaller than that expected from warming of the oceanic waters alone. The results also indicate that the intensity of stronger (weaker) hurricanes is more (less) sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes. The model-attained hurricane intensity is found to be well correlated with the maximum surface evaporation and the large-scale environmental convective available potential energy. The model-attained hurricane intensity if highly correlated with the energy available from wet-adiabatic ascent near the eyewall relative to a reference sounding in the undisturbed environment for all the experiments. Coupled hurricane-ocean experiments show that hurricane intensity becomes less sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes since the ocean coupling causes larger (smaller) intensity reduction for stronger (weaker) hurricanes. This implies less increase of hurricane intensity related to a possible global warming due to increased CO{sub 2}.

  16. Efficient Global Optimization Under Conditions of Noise and Uncertainty A Multi-Model Multi-Grid Windowing Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    Efficient Global Optimization Under Conditions of Noise and Uncertainty ­ A Multi-Model Multi. By understanding how noise, bias, and topographical inaccuracy in the objective function vary with model resolution into the calculation of the objective function in an optimization problem, producing noise, bias, and topo- graphical

  17. Global estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy

    -relative-humidity-based two-source (ARTS) E model that simulates the surface energy balance, soil water balanceGlobal estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water balance model H. Yan a, , S.Q. Wang b , D. Billesbach c , W. Oechel d , J.H. Zhang e , T. Meyers f , T

  18. HESFIRE: a global fire model to explore the role of anthropogenic and weather drivers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Le Page, Yannick LB; Morton, Douglas; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Pereira, Jose M.; Hurtt, George C.

    2015-02-13

    Vegetation fires are a major driver of ecosystem dynamics and greenhouse gas emissions. Anticipating potential changes in fire activity and their impacts relies first on a realistic model of fire activity (e.g., fire incidence and interannual variability) and second on a model accounting for fire impacts (e.g., mortality and emissions). In this paper, we focus on our understanding of fire activity and describe a new fire model, HESFIRE (Human–Earth System FIRE), which integrates the influence of weather, vegetation characteristics, and human activities on fires in a stand-alone framework. It was developed with a particular emphasis on allowing fires to spreadmore »over consecutive days given their major contribution to burned areas in many ecosystems. A subset of the model parameters was calibrated through an optimization procedure using observation data to enhance our knowledge of regional drivers of fire activity and improve the performance of the model on a global scale. Modeled fire activity showed reasonable agreement with observations of burned area, fire seasonality, and interannual variability in many regions, including for spatial and temporal domains not included in the optimization procedure. Significant discrepancies are investigated, most notably regarding fires in boreal regions and in xeric ecosystems and also fire size distribution. The sensitivity of fire activity to model parameters is analyzed to explore the dominance of specific drivers across regions and ecosystems. The characteristics of HESFIRE and the outcome of its evaluation provide insights into the influence of anthropogenic activities and weather, and their interactions, on fire activity.« less

  19. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prusa, Joseph

    2012-05-08

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG�s advanced dynamics core with the �physics� of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer- reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  20. The Future of Food Demand: Understanding Differences in Global Economic Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valin, Hugo; Sands, Ronald; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; Nelson, Gerald; Ahammad, Helal; Blanc, Elodie; Bodirsky, Benjamin; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Kyle, G. Page; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Paltsev, S.; Rolinski, Susanne; Tabeau, Andrzej; van Meijl, Hans; von Lampe, Martin; Willenbockel, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the capacity of agricultural systems to feed the world population under climate change requires a good prospective vision on the future development of food demand. This paper reviews modeling approaches from ten global economic models participating to the AgMIP project, in particular the demand function chosen and the set of parameters used. We compare food demand projections at the horizon 2050 for various regions and agricultural products under harmonized scenarios. Depending on models, we find for a business as usual scenario (SSP2) an increase in food demand of 59-98% by 2050, slightly higher than FAO projection (54%). The prospective for animal calories is particularly uncertain with a range of 61-144%, whereas FAO anticipates an increase by 76%. The projections reveal more sensitive to socio-economic assumptions than to climate change conditions or bioenergy development. When considering a higher population lower economic growth world (SSP3), consumption per capita drops by 9% for crops and 18% for livestock. Various assumptions on climate change in this exercise do not lead to world calorie losses greater than 6%. Divergences across models are however notable, due to differences in demand system, income elasticities specification, and response to price change in the baseline.

  1. A complete desktop phase-equilibria software package using object-oriented programming and the component object model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Jairo Medina

    2002-01-01

    -equilibria and pressure/vapor/temperature (PVT) software package similar to the commercial ones was developed, maintaining the main three premises of OOP: encapsulation, inheritance, and polymorphism. This package includes a Win32 user interface and a library...

  2. 1 Open Source Software licensing software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verschelde, Jan

    Outline 1 Open Source Software licensing software copyright and copyleft 2 Modules and Packages Science Jan Verschelde, 6 March 2015 Intro to Computer Science (MCS 260) software licensing & packages L-23 6 March 2015 1 / 29 #12;software licensing modules and packages 1 Open Source Software licensing

  3. Dealing with software: the research data issues 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Neil Chue

    2014-08-26

    Software underpins much of the scientific research undertaken today. As well as the “traditional” use of software for modelling and simulation, it is used to manage and control instruments, and analyse and visualise data. This permeation of the use...

  4. Euclid Software and Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Software and Tools Software and Tools The table below shows the software installed on Euclid that is managed by modules. Package Category Version Module Install Date Date Made...

  5. Statistical Software - Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Leeuw, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Review of Statistical Software. International As- sociationStatistical Methods Need Software: A View of Statisti- calJournal of Statistical Software, 13, 2004. URL http://www.

  6. Statistical Software - Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan De Leeuw

    2011-01-01

    Review of Statistical Software. International As- sociationStatistical Methods Need Software: A View of Statisti- calJournal of Statistical Software, 13, 2004. URL http://www.

  7. TOUGH2 Software Qualification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    lower temperatures. TOUGH2 SOFTWARE QUALIFICATION - FEBRUARY131 TOUGH2 SOFTWARE QUALIFICATION - FEBRUARY 1996 v . LISTmesh generators. TOUGH2 SOFTWARE QUALIFICATION - FEBRUARY

  8. Software Modeling and Verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahám, Erika

    Swaminathan (Uni Oldenburg, D) Dr. Hagen Voelzer (IBM Zurich, CH) Mikhail Volkov (Ural State University, Russia) Dr. Verena Wolf (EPFL, CH) 2 #12;Overview The years 2007 and 2008 have been extremely dynamic

  9. Global energy and water balance: Characteristics from finite-volume atmospheric model of the IAP/LASG (FAMIL1)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Linjiong; Bao, Qing; Liu, Yimin; Wu, Guoxiong; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Wang, Xiaocong; He, Bian; Yu, Haiyang; Li, Jiandong

    2015-03-01

    This paper documents version 1 of the Finite-volume Atmospheric Model of the IAP/LASG (FAMIL1), which has a flexible horizontal resolution up to a quarter of 1°. The model, currently running on the ‘‘Tianhe 1A’’ supercomputer, is the atmospheric component of the third-generation Flexible Global Ocean-Atmosphere-Land climate System model (FGOALS3) which will participate in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6). In addition to describing the dynamical core and physical parameterizations of FAMIL1, this paper describes the simulated characteristics of energy and water balances and compares them with observational/reanalysis data. The comparisons indicate that the model simulates well the seasonalmore »and geographical distributions of radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface, as well as the surface latent and sensible heat fluxes. A major weakness in the energy balance is identified in the regions where extensive and persistent marine stratocumulus is present. Analysis of the global water balance also indicates realistic seasonal and geographical distributions with the global annual mean of evaporation minus precipitation being approximately 10?? mm d?ą. We also examine the connections between the global energy and water balance and discuss the possible link between the two within the context of the findings from the reanalysis data. Finally, the model biases as well as possible solutions are discussed.« less

  10. Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (EGEMS): A New Generation of Energy Efficiency Policy Planning Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; McMahon, James E.

    2009-05-29

    This paper presents efforts to date and prospective goals towards development of a modelling and analysis framework which is comprehensive enough to address the global climate crisis, and detailed enough to provide policymakers with concrete targets and achievable outcomes. In terms of energy efficiency policy, this requires coverage of the entire world, with emphasis on countries and regions with large and/or rapidly growing energy-related emissions, and analysis at the 'technology' level-building end use, transport mode or industrial process. These elements have not been fully addressed by existing modelling efforts, which usually take either a top-down approach, or concentrate on a few fully industrialized countries where energy demand is well-understood. Inclusion of details such as appliance ownership rates, use patterns and efficiency levels throughout the world allows for a deeper understanding of the demand for energy today and, more importantly, over the coming decades. This is a necessary next step for energy analysts and policy makers in assessment of mitigation potentials. The modelling system developed at LBNL over the past 3 years takes advantage of experience in end use demand and in forecasting markets for energy-consuming equipment, in combination with known technology-based efficiency opportunities and policy types. A particular emphasis has been placed on modelling energy growth in developing countries. Experiences to date include analyses covering individual countries (China and India), end uses (refrigerators and air conditioners) and policy types (standards and labelling). Each of these studies required a particular effort in data collection and model refinement--they share, however, a consistent approach and framework which allows comparison, and forms the foundation of a comprehensive analysis system leading to a roadmap to address the greenhouse gas mitigation targetslikely to be set in the coming years.

  11. Atmospheric test models and numerical experiments for the simulation of the global distribution of weather data transponders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossman, A; Molenkamp, C R

    1999-08-25

    A proposal has been made to establish a high density global network of atmospheric micro transponders to record time, temperature, and wind data with time resolution of {le} 1 minute, temperature accuracy of {+-} 1 K, spatial resolution no poorer than {approx}3km horizontally and {approx}0.1km vertically, and 2-D speed accuracy of {le} 1m/s. This data will be used in conjunction with advanced numerical weather prediction models to provide increases in the reliability of long range weather forecasts. Major advances in data collection technology will be required to provide the proposed high-resolution data collection network. Systems studies must be undertaken to determine insertion requirements, spacing, and evolution of the transponder ensemble, which will be used to collect the data. Numerical models which provide realistic global weather pattern simulations must be utilized in order to perform these studies. A global circulation model with a 3{sup o} horizontal resolution has been used for initial simulations of the generation and evolution of transponder distributions. These studies indicate that reasonable global coverage of transponders can be achieved by a launch scenario consisting of the sequential launch of transponders at specified heights from a globally distributed set of launch sites.

  12. FTT:Power : A global model of the power sector with induced technological change and natural resource depletion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercure, J -F

    2012-01-01

    This work introduces a model of Future Technology Transformations for the power sector (FTT:Power), a representation of global power systems based on market competition, induced technological change (ITC) and natural resource use and depletion. It is the first component of a family of sectoral bottom-up models of technology, designed for integration into the global macroeconometric model E3MG. ITC occurs as a result of technological learning produced by cumulative investment and leads to highly nonlinear, irreversible and path dependent technological transitions. The model uses a dynamic coupled set of logistic differential equations. As opposed to traditional bottom-up energy models based on systems optimisation, such differential equations offer an appropriate treatment of the times and structure of change involved in sectoral technology transformations, as well as a much reduced computational load. Resource use and depletion are represented by local cost-supply curves, which give rise to different regional...

  13. Intercomparison and Evaluation of Global Aerosol Microphysical Properties among AeroCom Models of a Range of Complexity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, G. W.; Carslaw, K. S.; Reddington, C. L.; Pringle, K. J.; Schulz, M.; Asmi, A.; Spracklen, D. V.; Ridley, D. A.; Woodhouse, M. T.; Lee, L. A.; Zhang, Kai; Ghan, Steven J.; Easter, Richard C.; Liu, Xiaohong; Stier, P.; Lee, Y. H.; Adams, P. J.; Tost, H.; Lelieveld, J.; Bauer, S.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; van Noije, T.; Strunk, A.; Vignati, E.; Bellouin, N.; Dalvi, M.; Johnson, C. E.; Bergman, T.; Kokkola, H.; Von Salzen, Knut; Yu, Fangqun; Luo, Gan; Petzold, A.; Heintzenberg, J.; Clarke, A. D.; Ogren, J. A.; Gras, J.; Baltensperger, Urs; Kaminski, U.; Jennings, S. G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Harrison, R. M.; Beddows, D. C.; Kulmala, M.; Viisanen, Y.; Ulevicius, V.; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Zdimal, V.; Fiebig, M.; Hansson, H. C.; Swietlicki, E.; Henzing, J. S.

    2014-05-13

    Many of the next generation of global climate models will include aerosol schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. These models enable aerosol optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations to be determined by fundamental aerosol processes, which should lead to a more physically based simulation of aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcings. This study examines the global variation in particle size distribution simulated by twelve global aerosol microphysics models to quantify model diversity and to identify any common biases against observations. Evaluation against size distribution measurements from a new European network of aerosol supersites shows that the mean model agrees quite well with the observations at many sites on the annual mean, but there are some seasonal biases common to many sites. In particular, at many of these European sites, the accumulation mode number concentration is biased low during winter and Aitken mode concentrations tend to be overestimated in winter and underestimated in summer. At high northern latitudes, the models strongly underpredict Aitken and accumulation particle concentrations compared to the measurements, consistent with previous studies that have highlighted the poor performance of global aerosol models in the Arctic. In the marine boundary layer, the models capture the observed meridional variation in the size distribution, which is dominated by the Aitken mode at high latitudes, with an increasing concentration of accumulation particles with decreasing latitude. Considering vertical profiles, the models reproduce the observed peak in total particle concentrations in the upper troposphere due to new particle formation, although modelled peak concentrations tend to be biased high over Europe. Overall, the results suggest that most global aerosol microphysics models simulate the global variation of the particle size distribution with a good degree of skill, but some models are in poor agreement with the observations. Further work is required to better constrain size-resolved primary and secondary particle number sources, and an improved understanding of nucleation and growth (e.g. the role of nitrate and secondary organics) will improve the fidelity of simulated particle size distributions.

  14. Introduction to Software Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Syllabus Background References Homework Videos Project Introduction to Software Engineering AERSP Exam Conclusions Appendix Links Hits Software Engineering: AERSP 440 http Confidence Aerospace Software (2006) IEEE Computer Society SE Portal Software Engineering: AERSP 440 http

  15. Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, Brett; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2011-11-23

    Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7). Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA), phytoplanktonproduced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and methane sulfonate (MS{sup -}) are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr{sup -1}, for the Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS{sup -} (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms) contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr{sup -1}, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ngm{sup -3}, with values up to 400 ngm{sup -3} over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that despite revealed discrepancies (often more than a factor of 2), both Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011) parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The largest increases (up to 20 %) in CCN (at a supersaturation (S) of 0.2 %) number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming marine organics are internally-mixed with sea-salt provides diverse results with increases and decreases in the concentration of CCN over different parts of the ocean. The sign of the CCN change due to the addition of marine organics to seasalt aerosol is determined by the relative significance of the increase in mean modal diameter due to addition of mass, and the decrease in particle hygroscopicity due to compositional changes in marine aerosol. Based on emerging evidence for increased CCN concentration over biologically active surface ocean areas/periods, our study suggests that treatment of sea spray in global climate models (GCMs) as an internal mixture of marine organic aerosols and sea-salt will likely lead to an underestimation in CCN number concentration.

  16. Global existence for a hydrogen storage model with full energy balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonetti, Elena; Laurençot, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    A thermo-mechanical model describing hydrogen storage by use of metal hydrides has been recently proposed in a paper by Bonetti, Fr\\'emond and Lexcellent. It describes the formation of hydrides using the phase transition approach. By virtue of the laws of continuum thermo-mechanics, the model leads to a phase transition problem in terms of three state variables: the temperature, the phase parameter representing the fraction of one solid phase, and the pressure, and is derived within a generalization of the principle of virtual powers proposed by Fr\\'emond accounting for micro-forces, responsible for the phase transition, in the whole energy balance of the system. Three coupled nonlinear partial differential equations combined with initial and boundary conditions have to be solved. The main difficulty in investigating the resulting system of partial differential equations relies on the presence of the squared time derivative of the order parameter in the energy balance equation. Here, the global existence of a...

  17. Software design for panoramic astronomical pipeline processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lior Shamir; Robert J. Nemiroff; David O. Torrey; Wellesley E. Pereira

    2005-11-23

    We describe the software requirement and design specifications for all-sky panoramic astronomical pipelines. The described software aims to meet the specific needs of super-wide angle optics, and includes cosmic-ray hit rejection, image compression, star recognition, sky opacity analysis, transient detection and a web server allowing access to real-time and archived data. The presented software is being regularly used for the pipeline processing of 11 all-sky cameras located in some of the world's premier observatories. We encourage all-sky camera operators to use our software and/or our hosting services and become part of the global Night Sky Live network.

  18. Formalizing Style to Understand Descriptions of Software Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of interaction between those components, global system properties (such as throughput and latency), and life­cycleFormalizing Style to Understand Descriptions of Software Architecture Gregory Abowd Robert Allen of Software Architecture,'' Proc. SIGSOFT'93: Foundations of Software Engineering, December 1993. Abstract

  19. Global and local cancer risks after the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident as seen from Chernobyl: A modeling study for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousseau, Timothy A.

    Global and local cancer risks after the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident as seen from-model Death risks The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in Japan resulted with iodine isotopes and noble gasses) after nuclear releases. The main purpose is to provide preliminary

  20. Enhancing the resolution of sea ice in long-term global ocean general circulation model (gcm) integrations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Joong Tae

    2007-09-17

    Open water in sea ice, such as leads and polynyas, plays a crucial role in determining the formation of deep- and bottom-water, as well as their long-term global properties and circulation. Ocean general circulation models (GCMs) designed...

  1. Global modeling of cancer gene expression signa-Cancer leads to permanent changes in cell's physiological state and various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    Global modeling of cancer gene expression signa- tures Cancer leads to permanent changes in cell cancer types. Less is known about the underlying biological processes, or relationships between different cancer types with respect to these changes. While each specific cancer type has a set of unique

  2. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutowski, William J.; Prusa, Joseph M.; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2012-05-08

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the "physics" of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited. 3a. EULAG Advances EULAG is a non-hydrostatic, parallel computational model for all-scale geophysical flows. EULAG's name derives from its two computational options: EULerian (flux form) or semi-LAGrangian (advective form). The model combines nonoscillatory forward-in-time (NFT) numerical algorithms with a robust elliptic Krylov solver. A signature feature of EULAG is that it is formulated in generalized time-dependent curvilinear coordinates. In particular, this enables grid adaptivity. In total, these features give EULAG novel advantages over many existing dynamical cores. For EULAG itself, numerical advances included refining boundary conditions and filters for optimizing model performance in polar regions. We also added flexibility to the model's underlying formulation, allowing it to work with the pseudo-compressible equation set of Durran in addition to EULAG's standard anelastic formulation. Work in collaboration with others also extended the demonstrated range of validity of soundproof models, showing that they are more broadly applicable than some had previously thought. Substantial testing of EULAG included application and extension of the Jablonowski-Williamson baroclinic wave test - an archetype of planetary weather - and further analysis of multi-scale interactions arising from collapse of temperature fronts in both the baroclinic wave test and simulations of the Held-Suarez idealized climate. These analyses revealed properties of atmospheric gravity waves not seen in previous work and further demonstrated the ability of EULAG to simulate realistic behavior over several orders of magnitude of length scales. Additional collaborative work enhanced capability for modeling atmospheric flows with adaptive moving meshes and demonstrated the ability of EULAG to move into petascale computing. 3b. CAM-EULAG Advances We have developed CAM-EULAG in collaboration with former project postdoc, now University of Cape Town Assistant Professor, Babatunde Abiodun. Initial study documented good model performance in aqua-planet simulations. In particular, we showed that the grid adaptivity (stretching) implemented in CAM-EULAG allows higher resolution in selected regions without causing anomalous behavior such as spurious wave reflection. We then used the stretched-grid version to analyze simulated extreme precipitation events in West Africa, comparing the precipitation and event environment with observed behavior. The model simulates fairly well the spatial scale and the interannual and intraseasonal variability of the extreme events, although its extreme precipitation intensity is weaker than observed. In addition, both observations and the simulations show possible forcing of extreme events by African easterly waves. 3c. Other Contributions Through our collaborations, we have made contributions to a wide range of outcomes. For research focused on terrestrial behavior, these have included (1) upwind schemes for gas dynamics, (2) a nonlinear perspective on the dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation, (3) numerical realism of thermal co

  3. Crowdsourcing Software Announcement | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding in Actinide SandwichCrayCrosscuttingGE, MIT Build

  4. Crowdsourcing Software Award | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding in Actinide SandwichCrayCrosscuttingGE, MIT

  5. Improving Healthcare Using Software | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THE SITE-218 58 84(TechnicalImproving Healthcare

  6. Discouraging Software Piracy Using Software Aging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Discouraging Software Piracy Using Software Aging Markus Jakobsson Michael Reiter Abstract Most people consider frequent software updates a nuisance. However, we show how this common phenomenon can be turned into a feature that protects against software piracy. We define a protocol for "drop-in" upgrades

  7. An Urban Parameterization for a Global Climate Model. Part II: Sensitivity to Input Parameters and the Simulated Urban Heat Island in Offline Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleson, Keith W.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Vertenstein, M.

    2008-01-01

    -Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 An Urban Parameterization for a Global Climate Model. Part II: Sensitivity to Input Parameters and the Simulated Urban Heat Island in Offline Simulations K. W. OLESON AND G. B. BONAN Climate and Global Dynamics... Model. Here the robustness of the model is tested through sensitivity studies and the model’s ability to simulate urban heat islands in different environments is evaluated. Findings show that heat storage and sensible heat flux are most sensitive...

  8. Modeling the Oil Transition: A Summary of the Proceedings of the DOE/EPA Workshop on the Economic and Environmental Implications of Global Energy Transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L

    2007-02-01

    The global energy system faces sweeping changes in the next few decades, with potentially critical implications for the global economy and the global environment. It is important that global institutions have the tools necessary to predict, analyze and plan for such massive change. This report summarizes the proceedings of an international workshop concerning methods of forecasting, analyzing, and planning for global energy transitions and their economic and environmental consequences. A specific case, it focused on the transition from conventional to unconventional oil and other energy sources likely to result from a peak in non-OPEC and/or global production of conventional oil. Leading energy models from around the world in government, academia and the private sector met, reviewed the state-of-the-art of global energy modeling and evaluated its ability to analyze and predict large-scale energy transitions.

  9. Comparing a spherical harmonic model of the global electric field distribution with Astrid-2 observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eriksson, Stefan

    of not measuring the global instantaneous two-dimensional potential distribution, which is important in studying in the past to provide analytical tools for the global potential distri- bution, such as those by Heppner potential distribution. The coefficients are assumed to depend on the IMF, the solar wind velocity

  10. Global warming and climate change - predictive models for temperate and tropical regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malini, B.H.

    1997-12-31

    Based on the assumption of 4{degree}C increase of global temperature by the turn of 21st century due to the accumulation of greenhouse gases an attempt is made to study the possible variations in different climatic regimes. The predictive climatic water balance model for Hokkaido island of Japan (a temperate zone) indicates the possible occurrence of water deficit for two to three months, which is a unknown phenomenon in this region at present. Similarly, India which represents tropical region also will experience much drier climates with increased water deficit conditions. As a consequence, the thermal region of Hokkaido which at present is mostly Tundra and Micro thermal will change into a Meso thermal category. Similarly, the moisture regime which at present supports per humid (A2, A3 and A4) and Humid (B4) climates can support A1, B4, B3, B2 and B1 climates indicating a shift towards drier side of the climatic spectrum. Further, the predictive modes of both the regions have indicated increased evapotranspiration rates. Although there is not much of change in the overall thermal characteristics of the Indian region the moisture regime indicates a clear shift towards the aridity in the country.

  11. Studies of Global Stability of Fluid-reversed Configuration Plasmas using a Rigid Body Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    First Author = H. Ji [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ 08543 (US); M. Yamada [PPPL; R. Kulsrud [PPPL; N. Pomphrey [PPPL

    1998-04-01

    Global stability of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas has been studied using a simple rigid body model in the parameter space ofs (ratio of separatrix radius to average ion gyroradius) and plasma elongation E (ratio of separatrix length to separatrix diameter). Tilt stability is predicted, independent of s, for FRC`s with low E(oblate), while the tilt stability of FRC`s with large E (prolate)depends on s/E. It is found that plasma rotation due to ion diamagnetic drift can stabilize the tilt mode when s/E is less than or equal to1.7. The so-called collisionless ion gyroviscosity also is identified to stabilize tilt when s/E is less than or equal to 2.2. Combining these two effects, the stability regime broadens to s/E is less than or equal to 2.8, consistent with previously developed theories. A small additional rotation (e.g., a Mach number of 0.2) can improve tilt stability significantly at large E. A similar approach is taken to study the physics of the shift stability. It is found that radial shift is unstable when E is < 1 WHILE AXIAL SHIFT IS UNSTABLE WHEN E is> 1. However, unlike tilt stability, gyroviscosity has little effect onshift stability.

  12. A coupled model of the global cycles of carbonyl sulfide and CO2: A possible new window on the carbon cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    A coupled model of the global cycles of carbonyl sulfide and CO2: A possible new window] Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is an atmospheric trace gas that participates in some key reactions of the carbon model of the global cycles of carbonyl sulfide and CO2: A possible new window on the carbon cycle, J

  13. CSP 587: Software Quality Management S. Kan, Software Quality engineering, Addison-Wesley.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    CSP 587: Software Quality Management Texts S. Kan, Software Quality engineering, Addison hours · Quality Appraisal Programs 5 hours SEI's Capability Maturity Model ISO 9000 Total 45 hours CSP

  14. Atmospheric Test Models and Numerical Experiments for the Simulation of the Global Distributions of Weather Data Transponders III. Horizontal Distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molenkamp, C.R.; Grossman, A.

    1999-12-20

    A network of small balloon-borne transponders which gather very high resolution wind and temperature data for use by modern numerical weather predication models has been proposed to improve the reliability of long-range weather forecasts. The global distribution of an array of such transponders is simulated using LLNL's atmospheric parcel transport model (GRANTOUR) with winds supplied by two different general circulation models. An initial study used winds from CCM3 with a horizontal resolution of about 3 degrees in latitude and longitude, and a second study used winds from NOGAPS with a 0.75 degree horizontal resolution. Results from both simulations show that reasonable global coverage can be attained by releasing balloons from an appropriate set of launch sites.

  15. August CSE 360/Fall 2014 1/4 Introduction to Software Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 425/426 Course Description (CSE/ASU catalogue): Software life cycle models; project management, team, theories, and practices. Software life cycle models Commonly used process models Strengths development environments and methodologies; software architectures; quality assurance and standards; legal

  16. NIMASTEP: a software to modelize, study and analyze the dynamics of various small objects orbiting specific bodies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Delsate; A. Compčre

    2012-04-06

    NIMASTEP is a dedicated numerical software developed by us, which allows one to integrate the osculating motion (using cartesian coordinates) in a Newtonian approach of an object considered as a point-mass orbiting a homogeneous central body that rotates with a constant rate around its axis of smallest inertia. The code can be applied to objects such as particles, artificial or natural satellites or space debris. The central body can be either any terrestrial planet of the solar system, any dwarf-planet, or even an asteroid. In addition, very many perturbations can be taken into account, such as the combined third-body attraction of the Sun, the Moon, or the planets, the direct solar radiation pressure (with the central body shadow), the non-homogeneous gravitational field caused by the non-sphericity of the central body, and even some thrust forces. The simulations were performed using different integration algorithms. Two additional tools were integrated in the software package; the indicator of chaos MEGNO and the frequency analysis NAFF. NIMASTEP is designed in a flexible modular style and allows one to (de)select very many options without compromising the performance. It also allows one to easily add other possibilities of use. The code has been validated through several tests such as comparisons with numerical integrations made with other softwares or with semi-analytical and analytical studies. The various possibilities of NIMASTEP are described and explained and some tests of astrophysical interest are presented. At present, the code is proprietary but it will be released for use by the community in the near future. Information for contacting its authors and (in the near future) for obtaining the software are available on the web site http://www.fundp.ac.be/en/research/projects/page_view/10278201/

  17. Global Warming, endogenous risk and irreversibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony C.; Narain, Urvashi

    2002-01-01

    The economics of global warming, Institute for InternationalEconomic Models of Global Warming, Cambridge, Mass. MITstochastic losses from global warming, Risk Analysis 16(2):

  18. Moral purpose, economic incentive and global trade : why new business models are needed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samel, Hiram M

    2006-01-01

    Globalization has occurred in various forms over the past century, yet only recently has it become daily news. This evolving process has created numerous underlying tensions that are not well understood. While western ...

  19. Using a total landed cost model to foster global logistics strategy in the electronics industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jearasatit, Apichart

    2010-01-01

    Global operation strategies have been widely used in the last several decades as many companies and industries have taken advantage of lower production costs. However, in choosing a location, companies often only consider ...

  20. Climate change and agriculture : global and regional effects using an economic model of international trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Empirical estimates of the economic welfare implications of the impact of climate change on global agricultural production are made. Agricultural yield changes resulting from climate scenarios associated with a doubling ...

  1. Global precipitation retrieval algorithm trained for SSMIS using a numerical weather prediction model: Design and evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surussavadee, Chinnawat

    This paper presents and evaluates a global precipitation retrieval algorithm for the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS). It is based on those developed earlier for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) ...

  2. A user's guide to the GoldSim/BLT-MS integrated software package:a low-level radioactive waste disposal performance assessment model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knowlton, Robert G.; Arnold, Bill Walter; Mattie, Patrick D.

    2007-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), a U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratory, has over 30 years experience in the assessment of radioactive waste disposal and at the time of this publication is providing assistance internationally in a number of areas relevant to the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal systems. In countries with small radioactive waste programs, international technology transfer program efforts are often hampered by small budgets, schedule constraints, and a lack of experienced personnel. In an effort to surmount these difficulties, Sandia has developed a system that utilizes a combination of commercially available software codes and existing legacy codes for probabilistic safety assessment modeling that facilitates the technology transfer and maximizes limited available funding. Numerous codes developed and endorsed by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and codes developed and maintained by United States Department of Energy are generally available to foreign countries after addressing import/export control and copyright requirements. From a programmatic view, it is easier to utilize existing codes than to develop new codes. From an economic perspective, it is not possible for most countries with small radioactive waste disposal programs to maintain complex software, which meets the rigors of both domestic regulatory requirements and international peer review. Therefore, revitalization of deterministic legacy codes, as well as an adaptation of contemporary deterministic codes, provides a credible and solid computational platform for constructing probabilistic safety assessment models. This document is a reference users guide for the GoldSim/BLT-MS integrated modeling software package developed as part of a cooperative technology transfer project between Sandia National Laboratories and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) in Taiwan for the preliminary assessment of several candidate low-level waste repository sites. Breach, Leach, and Transport-Multiple Species (BLT-MS) is a U.S. NRC sponsored code which simulates release and transport of contaminants from a subsurface low-level waste disposal facility. GoldSim is commercially available probabilistic software package that has radionuclide transport capabilities. The following report guides a user through the steps necessary to use the integrated model and presents a successful application of the paradigm of renewing legacy codes for contemporary application.

  3. Designing supportability into software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirolkar, Prashant A., 1973-

    2004-01-01

    Background: Despite the identification of a "software crisis" in the 1960s, large software projects are full of defects even today [19]. These defects cause the software to behave unexpectedly. The cause generally is ...

  4. Designing security into software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Chang Tony

    2006-01-01

    When people talk about software security, they usually refer to security applications such as antivirus software, firewalls and intrusion detection systems. There is little emphasis on the security in the software itself. ...

  5. Software for Multilevel Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan de Leeuw; Ita Kreft

    2011-01-01

    SOFTWARE FOR MULTILEVEL ANALYSIS JAN DE LEEUW AND ITA G.G.of the more important software programs and packages thatstatistical and numerical software does not have and does

  6. The Other Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McWilliams, Chandler B.

    2009-01-01

    F. 1997. There is No Software. in Literature, Media,F. 2008. Language. in Software Studies. M. FULLER, Ed. MITThe Other Software Chandler B. McWilliams University of

  7. Leica Confocal Software LCS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yavuz, Deniz

    Leica Confocal Software LCS User manual (for Leica TCS SP2 systems) #12;Version: RK09052000 Page 2......................................................................................2 2 The Leica Confocal Software: An overview...............................................7 2.1 Starting the software..........................................................................7 2

  8. Simulated diurnal rainfall physics in a multi-scale global climate model with embedded explicit convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Michael Stephen

    2011-01-01

    their Community Earth System Model (Richard Neale, personaldevelopment of Earth system models capable of reproducing

  9. Software Architecture and Software Configuration Bernhard Westfechtel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westfechtel, Bernhard

    through- out the entire software life cycle. Project management deals with coordination issues support for the management of evolving software objects throughout the whole life cycle. Several problems the software life cycle. In addition, it supports system building (creation of derived objects from

  10. Global data set of biogenic VOC emissions calculated by the MEGAN model over the last 30 years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sindelarova, K.; Granier, Claire; Bouarar, I.; Guenther, Alex B.; Tilmes, S.; Stavrakou, T.; Muller, J. F.; Kuhn, U.; Stefani, P.; Knorr, W.

    2014-09-09

    The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGANv2.1) together with the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) meteorological fields were used to create a global emission dataset of biogenic VOCs available on a monthly basis for the time period of 1980 - 2010. This dataset is called MEGAN-MACC. The model estimated mean annual total BVOC emission of 760 Tg(C) yr1 consisting of isoprene (70%), monoterpenes (11%), methanol (6%), acetone (3%), sesquiterpenes (2.5%) and other BVOC species each contributing less than 2 %. Several sensitivity model runs were performed to study the impact of different model input and model settings on isoprene estimates and resulted in differences of * 17% of the reference isoprene total. A greater impact was observed for sensitivity run applying parameterization of soil moisture deficit that led to a 50% reduction of isoprene emissions on a global scale, most significantly in specific regions of Africa, South America and Australia. MEGAN-MACC estimates are comparable to results of previous studies. More detailed comparison with other isoprene in ventories indicated significant spatial and temporal differences between the datasets especially for Australia, Southeast Asia and South America. MEGAN-MACC estimates of isoprene and*-pinene showed a reasonable agreement with surface flux measurements in the Amazon andthe model was able to capture the seasonal variation of emissions in this region.

  11. software installation page

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The PDE software infrastructure. Once you download and untar the software, you can run it interpreted or compiled. The file all.scm includes the sources for the ...

  12. software installation page

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Installing software used in CS/MA 615. There are sources for various software packages. Gambit web site. You can download install packages for Windows and

  13. ESTSC - Software Best Practices

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    reviews for sensitivity and export control. Exclusions. Software that meets the following criteria need not be announced to ESTSC: operational systems software that is site...

  14. Texas A&M University Central Texas CISK 480.110 Software Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diestel, Geoff

    2012 1.0 Course Overview and description: Emphasizes the production of high quality software for medium to developing quality software. Students study a software life-cycle model, fundamental software engineering to software development; which provides knowledge of how to produce higher quality, maintainable software

  15. Constraints on Interpretation of Ecological Niche Models by Limited Environmental Ranges on Calibration Areas: Software Script Appendix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, Hannah L.; Campbell, Lindsay P.; Dornak, Laura Lynnette; Saupe, Erin E.; Barve, Narayani; Soberó n, Jorge; Ingenloff, Kathryn; Lira-Noriega, André s; Hensz, Christopher; Myers, Corinne E.; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2012-09-21

    A common application of correlational models of ecological niches of species is to transfer model rules onto other sets of conditions to evaluate distributional potential under those conditions. As with any model fitting ...

  16. Global self-weighted and local quasi-maximum exponential likelihood estimators for ARMA--GARCH/IGARCH models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Ke; 10.1214/11-AOS895

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the asymptotic theory of the quasi-maximum exponential likelihood estimators (QMELE) for ARMA--GARCH models. Under only a fractional moment condition, the strong consistency and the asymptotic normality of the global self-weighted QMELE are obtained. Based on this self-weighted QMELE, the local QMELE is showed to be asymptotically normal for the ARMA model with GARCH (finite variance) and IGARCH errors. A formal comparison of two estimators is given for some cases. A simulation study is carried out to assess the performance of these estimators, and a real example on the world crude oil price is given.

  17. Global Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben D

    2006-01-01

    of Globalization: Statistics Weiss, L. (1997). "of Globalization: Statistics Milanovic, B. (1999). Truethe focus of global statistics, particularly in relation to

  18. Development and Initial Application of the Global-Through-Urban Weather Research1 and Forecasting Model with Chemistry (GU-WRF/Chem)2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nenes, Athanasios

    1 Development and Initial Application of the Global-Through-Urban Weather Research1 and Forecasting-cloud-radiation-precipitation-climate interactions. In this work, a global-through-urban33 WRF/Chem model (i.e., GU-WRF/Chem) has been developed photolysis rate, near-surface temperature, wind speed at 10-m, planetary boundary layer height,40

  19. Passive millimeter-wave retrieval of global precipitation utilizing satellites and a numerical weather prediction model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surussavadee, Chinnawat

    2007-01-01

    This thesis develops and validates the MM5/TBSCAT/F([lambda]) model, composed of a mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP) model (MM5), a two-stream radiative transfer model (TBSCAT), and electromagnetic models for ...

  20. Multi-century Changes to Global Climate and Carbon Cycle: Results from a Coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Delire, C

    2005-02-17

    In this paper, we use a coupled climate and carbon cycle model to investigate the global climate and carbon cycle changes out to year 2300 that would occur if CO{sub 2} emissions from all the currently estimated fossil fuel resources were released to the atmosphere. By year 2300, the global climate warms by about 8 K and atmospheric CO{sub 2} reaches 1423 ppmv. The warming is higher than anticipated because the sensitivity to radiative forcing increases as the simulation progresses. In our simulation, the rate of emissions peak at over 30 PgC yr{sup -1} early in the 22nd century. Even at year 2300, nearly 50% of cumulative emissions remain in the atmosphere. In our simulations both soils and living biomass are net carbon sinks throughout the simulation. Despite having relatively low climate sensitivity and strong carbon uptake by the land biosphere, our model projections suggest severe long-term consequences for global climate if all the fossil-fuel carbon is ultimately released to the atmosphere.

  1. Natural biogeochemical cycle of mercury in a global three-dimensional ocean tracer model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyatt Jaeglé

    (HgP aq). Our Hg parameterization takes into account redox chemistry in ocean waters, air-sea exchange global mean concentrations of 0.16 pM for total Hg, partitioned as 80% HgII aq, 14% Hg0 aq, and 6% HgP aq

  2. Land-use change trajectories up to 2050: insights from a global agro-economic model comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, Christoph; van Meijl, Hans; Kyle, G. Page; Nelson, Gerald C.; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Gurgel, Angelo; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Popp, Alexander; Sands, Ronald; Tabeau, Andrzej; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; von Lampe, Martin; Wise, Marshall A.; Blanc, Elodie; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Kavallari, Aikaterini; Valin, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Changes in agricultural land use have important implications for environmental services. Previous studies of agricultural land-use futures have been published indicating large uncertainty due to different model assumptions and methodologies. In this article we present a first comprehensive comparison of global agro-economic models that have harmonized drivers of population, GDP, and biophysical yields. The comparison allows us to ask two research questions: (1) How much cropland will be used under different socioeconomic and climate change scenarios? (2) How can differences in model results be explained? The comparison includes four partial and six general equilibrium models that differ in how they model land supply and amount of potentially available land. We analyze results of two different socioeconomic scenarios and three climate scenarios (one with constant climate). Most models (7 out of 10) project an increase of cropland of 10–25% by 2050 compared to 2005 (under constant climate), but one model projects a decrease. Pasture land expands in some models, which increase the treat on natural vegetation further. Across all models most of the cropland expansion takes place in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. In general, the strongest differences in model results are related to differences in the costs of land expansion, the endogenous productivity responses, and the assumptions about potential cropland.

  3. Moisture Flux Convergence in Regional and Global Climate Models: Implications for Droughts in the Southwestern United States Under Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yanhong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Salathe, E.; Dominguez, Francina; Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-05-10

    The water cycle of the southwestern United States (SW) is dominated by winter storms that maintain a positive annual net precipitation. Analysis of the control and future climate from four pairs of regional and global climate models (RCMs and GCMs) shows that the RCMs simulate a higher fraction of transient eddy moisture fluxes because the hydrodynamic instabilities associated with flow over complex terrain are better resolved. Under global warming, this enables the RCMs to capture the response of transient eddies to increased atmospheric stability that allows more moisture to converge on the windward side of the mountains by blocking. As a result, RCMs simulate enhanced transient eddy moisture convergence in the SW compared to GCMs, although both robustly simulate drying due to enhanced moisture divergence by the divergent mean flow in a warmer climate. This enhanced convergence leads to reduced susceptibility to hydrological change in the RCMs compared to GCMs.

  4. Scientific Final Report: COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William J. Gutowski; Joseph M. Prusa, Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz

    2012-04-09

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the 'physics' of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  5. IBM Software Providesacomprehensivesolutionfor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stageinthedevelopmentlifecycle Solutions for embedded software development IBM Rational software teams with Wind River Devices delivering them on time and within budget. IBM Rational® software is teaming with Wind River® to help build management and quality management--throughout the software development lifecycle. Wind River

  6. Scan Software 1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alford, Simon

    Scan Software 1 Introduction Scan is a graphical user interface designed to control a confocal microscope BIORAD MRC- 600. The software can acquire simultaneously two channels, scanning an area of 0. In addition, the software can control the stage position and amplifiers setup. The software runs on the Matlab

  7. Global and regional modeling of clouds and aerosols in the marine boundary layer during VOCALS: the VOCA intercomparison

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wyant, M. C.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Wood, Robert; Carmichael, Gregory; Clarke, A. D.; Fast, Jerome D.; George, R.; Gustafson, William I.; Hannay, Cecile; Lauer, Axel; et al

    2015-01-09

    A diverse collection of models are used to simulate the marine boundary layer in the southeast Pacific region during the period of the October–November 2008 VOCALS REx (VAMOS Ocean Cloud Atmosphere Land Study Regional Experiment) field campaign. Regional models simulate the period continuously in boundary-forced free-running mode, while global forecast models and GCMs (general circulation models) are run in forecast mode. The models are compared to extensive observations along a line at 20° S extending westward from the South American coast. Most of the models simulate cloud and aerosol characteristics and gradients across the region that are recognizably similar tomore »observations, despite the complex interaction of processes involved in the problem, many of which are parameterized or poorly resolved. Some models simulate the regional low cloud cover well, though many models underestimate MBL (marine boundary layer) depth near the coast. Most models qualitatively simulate the observed offshore gradients of SO2, sulfate aerosol, CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentration in the MBL as well as differences in concentration between the MBL and the free troposphere. Most models also qualitatively capture the decrease in cloud droplet number away from the coast. However, there are large quantitative intermodel differences in both means and gradients of these quantities. Many models are able to represent episodic offshore increases in cloud droplet number and aerosol concentrations associated with periods of offshore flow. Most models underestimate CCN (at 0.1% supersaturation) in the MBL and free troposphere. The GCMs also have difficulty simulating coastal gradients in CCN and cloud droplet number concentration near the coast. The overall performance of the models demonstrates their potential utility in simulating aerosol–cloud interactions in the MBL, though quantitative estimation of aerosol–cloud interactions and aerosol indirect effects of MBL clouds with these models remains uncertain.« less

  8. Global and regional modeling of clouds and aerosols in the marine boundary layer during VOCALS: the VOCA intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyant, M. C.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Wood, Robert; Carmichael, Gregory; Clarke, A. D.; Fast, Jerome D.; George, R.; Gustafson, William I.; Hannay, Cecile; Lauer, Axel; Lin, Yanluan; Morcrette, J. -J.; Mulcahay, Jane; Saide, Pablo; Spak, S. N.; Yang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    A diverse collection of models are used to simulate the marine boundary layer in the southeast Pacific region during the period of the October–November 2008 VOCALS REx (VAMOS Ocean Cloud Atmosphere Land Study Regional Experiment) field campaign. Regional models simulate the period continuously in boundary-forced free-running mode, while global forecast models and GCMs (general circulation models) are run in forecast mode. The models are compared to extensive observations along a line at 20° S extending westward from the South American coast. Most of the models simulate cloud and aerosol characteristics and gradients across the region that are recognizably similar to observations, despite the complex interaction of processes involved in the problem, many of which are parameterized or poorly resolved. Some models simulate the regional low cloud cover well, though many models underestimate MBL (marine boundary layer) depth near the coast. Most models qualitatively simulate the observed offshore gradients of SO2, sulfate aerosol, CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentration in the MBL as well as differences in concentration between the MBL and the free troposphere. Most models also qualitatively capture the decrease in cloud droplet number away from the coast. However, there are large quantitative intermodel differences in both means and gradients of these quantities. Many models are able to represent episodic offshore increases in cloud droplet number and aerosol concentrations associated with periods of offshore flow. Most models underestimate CCN (at 0.1% supersaturation) in the MBL and free troposphere. The GCMs also have difficulty simulating coastal gradients in CCN and cloud droplet number concentration near the coast. The overall performance of the models demonstrates their potential utility in simulating aerosol–cloud interactions in the MBL, though quantitative estimation of aerosol–cloud interactions and aerosol indirect effects of MBL clouds with these models remains uncertain.

  9. Towards a three-dimensional software model of the oral cavity for tongue surgery Muriel Brix1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payan, Yohan

    exploit a 3D biomechanical model of the tongue (finite element modelling), in which major tongue muscles with reconstruction are modelled: a hemiglossectomy and an enlarged mouth floor resection. The impact of the flap. For the mouth floor resection, the nature of the flap had a strong impact on tongue movements, especially

  10. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON RELIABILITY, VOL. 49, NO. 1, MARCH 2000 37 Failure Correlation in Software Reliability Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goseva-Popstojanova, Katerina

    property of the developed Markov renewal modeling approach is its flexibility. It allows con- struction the analysis either on Markov chain theory or on renewal process theory. Thus, our modeling approach Reliability Models Katerina Goseva-Popstojanova, Member, IEEE, and Kishor S. Trivedi, Fellow, IEEE Abstract

  11. Continuous mutual improvement of macromolecular structure models in the PDB and of X-ray crystallographic software: The dual role of deposited experimental data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Bricogne, Gerard

    2014-09-30

    Accurate crystal structures of macromolecules are of high importance in the biological and biomedical fields. Models of crystal structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) are in general of very high quality as deposited. However, methods for obtaining the best model of a macromolecular structure from a given set of experimental X-ray data continue to progress at a rapid pace, making it possible to improve most PDB entries after their deposition by re-analyzing the original deposited data with more recent software. This possibility represents a very significant departure from the situation that prevailed when the PDB was created, when itmore »was envisioned as a cumulative repository of static contents. A radical paradigm shift for the PDB is therefore proposed, away from the static archive model towards a much more dynamic body of continuously improving results in symbiosis with continuously improving methods and software. These simultaneous improvements in methods and final results are made possible by the current deposition of processed crystallographic data (structure-factor amplitudes) and will be supported further by the deposition of raw data (diffraction images). It is argued that it is both desirable and feasible to carry out small-scale and large-scale efforts to make this paradigm shift a reality. Small-scale efforts would focus on optimizing structures that are of interest to specific investigators. Large-scale efforts would undertake a systematic re-optimization of all of the structures in the PDB, or alternatively the redetermination of groups of structures that are either related to or focused on specific questions. All of the resulting structures should be made generally available, along with the precursor entries, with various views of the structures being made available depending on the types of questions that users are interested in answering.« less

  12. Global SO(3) x SO(3) x U(1) symmetry of the Hubbard model on bipartite lattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmelo, J.M.P.; Ostlund, Stellan; Sampaio, M.J.

    2010-08-15

    In this paper the global symmetry of the Hubbard model on a bipartite lattice is found to be larger than SO(4). The model is one of the most studied many-particle quantum problems, yet except in one dimension it has no exact solution, so that there remain many open questions about its properties. Symmetry plays an important role in physics and often can be used to extract useful information on unsolved non-perturbative quantum problems. Specifically, here it is found that for on-site interaction U {ne} 0 the local SU(2) x SU(2) x U(1) gauge symmetry of the Hubbard model on a bipartite lattice with N{sub a}{sup D} sites and vanishing transfer integral t = 0 can be lifted to a global [SU(2) x SU(2) x U(1)]/Z{sub 2}{sup 2} = SO(3) x SO(3) x U(1) symmetry in the presence of the kinetic-energy hopping term of the Hamiltonian with t > 0. (Examples of a bipartite lattice are the D-dimensional cubic lattices of lattice constant a and edge length L = N{sub a}a for which D = 1, 2, 3,... in the number N{sub a}{sup D} of sites.) The generator of the new found hidden independent charge global U(1) symmetry, which is not related to the ordinary U(1) gauge subgroup of electromagnetism, is one half the rotated-electron number of singly occupied sites operator. Although addition of chemical-potential and magnetic-field operator terms to the model Hamiltonian lowers its symmetry, such terms commute with it. Therefore, its 4{sup N}{sub a}{sup D} energy eigenstates refer to representations of the new found global [SU(2) x SU(2) x U(1)]/Z{sub 2}{sup 2} = SO(3) x SO(3) x U(1) symmetry. Consistently, we find that for the Hubbard model on a bipartite lattice the number of independent representations of the group SO(3) x SO(3) x U(1) equals the Hilbert-space dimension 4{sup N}{sub a}{sup D}. It is confirmed elsewhere that the new found symmetry has important physical consequences.

  13. Continuous mutual improvement of macromolecular structure models in the PDB and of X-ray crystallographic software: the dual role of deposited experimental data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87507 (United States); Bricogne, Gerard, E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Global Phasing Ltd, Sheraton House, Castle Park, Cambridge CB3 0AX (United Kingdom); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87507 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Macromolecular structures deposited in the PDB can and should be continually reinterpreted and improved on the basis of their accompanying experimental X-ray data, exploiting the steady progress in methods and software that the deposition of such data into the PDB on a massive scale has made possible. Accurate crystal structures of macromolecules are of high importance in the biological and biomedical fields. Models of crystal structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) are in general of very high quality as deposited. However, methods for obtaining the best model of a macromolecular structure from a given set of experimental X-ray data continue to progress at a rapid pace, making it possible to improve most PDB entries after their deposition by re-analyzing the original deposited data with more recent software. This possibility represents a very significant departure from the situation that prevailed when the PDB was created, when it was envisioned as a cumulative repository of static contents. A radical paradigm shift for the PDB is therefore proposed, away from the static archive model towards a much more dynamic body of continuously improving results in symbiosis with continuously improving methods and software. These simultaneous improvements in methods and final results are made possible by the current deposition of processed crystallographic data (structure-factor amplitudes) and will be supported further by the deposition of raw data (diffraction images). It is argued that it is both desirable and feasible to carry out small-scale and large-scale efforts to make this paradigm shift a reality. Small-scale efforts would focus on optimizing structures that are of interest to specific investigators. Large-scale efforts would undertake a systematic re-optimization of all of the structures in the PDB, or alternatively the redetermination of groups of structures that are either related to or focused on specific questions. All of the resulting structures should be made generally available, along with the precursor entries, with various views of the structures being made available depending on the types of questions that users are interested in answering.

  14. Global stability of an age-structure model for TB and its applications ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1998-07-14

    pendent transmission rates on a model for TB dynamics in a population with or without a vaccination program. The formulation of an age-structure model for.

  15. Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

    2012-03-28

    In this DOE project the improvements to parameterization of marine primary organic matter (POM) emissions, hygroscopic properties of marine POM, marine isoprene derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) emissions, surfactant effects, new cloud droplet activation parameterization have been implemented into Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.0), with a seven mode aerosol module from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)���¢��������s Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). The effects of marine aerosols derived from sea spray and ocean emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on microphysical properties of clouds were explored by conducting 10 year CAM5.0-MAM7 model simulations at a grid resolution 1.9�������°��������2.5�������° with 30 vertical layers. Model-predicted relationship between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of CCN in remote marine atmosphere was compared to data from the A-Train satellites (MODIS, CALIPSO, AMSR-E). Model simulations show that on average, primary and secondary organic aerosol emissions from the ocean can yield up to 20% increase in Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% Supersaturation, and up to 5% increases in droplet number concentration of global maritime shallow clouds. Marine organics were treated as internally or externally mixed with sea salt. Changes associated with cloud properties reduced (absolute value) the model-predicted short wave cloud forcing from -1.35 Wm-2 to -0.25 Wm-2. By using different emission scenarios, and droplet activation parameterizations, this study suggests that addition of marine primary aerosols and biologically generated reactive gases makes an important difference in radiative forcing assessments. All baseline and sensitivity simulations for 2001 and 2050 using global-through-urban WRF/Chem (GU-WRF) were completed. The main objective of these simulations was to evaluate the capability of GU-WRF for an accurate representation of the global atmosphere by exploring the most accurate configuration of physics options in GWRF for global scale modeling in 2001 at a horizontal grid resolution of 1�������° x 1�������°. GU-WRF model output was evaluated using observational datasets from a variety of sources including surface based observations (NCDC and BSRN), model reanalysis (NCEP/ NCAR Reanalysis and CMAP), and remotely-sensed data (TRMM) to evaluate the ability of GU-WRF to simulate atmospheric variables at the surface as well as aloft. Explicit treatment of nanoparticles produced from new particle formation in GU-WRF/Chem-MADRID was achieved by expanding particle size sections from 8 to 12 to cover particles with the size range of 1.16 nm to 11.6 �������µm. Simulations with two different nucleation parameterizations were conducted for August 2002 over a global domain at a 4�������º by 5�������º horizontal resolution. The results are evaluated against field measurement data from the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Real Time Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as satellite and reanalysis data. We have also explored the relationship between ���¢��������clean marine���¢������� aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses

  16. Interpreting the Global 21-cm Signal from High Redshifts. II. Parameter Estimation for Models of Galaxy Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirocha, Jordan; Burns, Jack O

    2015-01-01

    Following our previous work, which related generic features in the sky-averaged (global) 21-cm signal to properties of the intergalactic medium, we now investigate the prospects for constraining a simple galaxy formation model with current and near-future experiments. Markov-Chain Monte Carlo fits to our synthetic dataset, which includes a realistic galactic foreground, a plausible model for the signal, and noise consistent with 100 hours of integration by an ideal instrument, suggest that a simple four-parameter model that links the production rate of Lyman-$\\alpha$, Lyman-continuum, and X-ray photons to the growth rate of dark matter halos can be well-constrained (to $\\sim 0.1$ dex in each dimension) so long as all three spectral features expected to occur between $40 \\lesssim \

  17. A global conformance quality model. A new strategic tool for minimizing defects caused by variation, error, and complexity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinckley, C.M.

    1994-01-01

    The performance of Japanese products in the marketplace points to the dominant role of quality in product competition. Our focus is motivated by the tremendous pressure to improve conformance quality by reducing defects to previously unimaginable limits in the range of 1 to 10 parts per million. Toward this end, we have developed a new model of conformance quality that addresses each of the three principle defect sources: (1) Variation, (2) Human Error, and (3) Complexity. Although the role of variation in conformance quality is well documented, errors occur so infrequently that their significance is not well known. We have shown that statistical methods are not useful in characterizing and controlling errors, the most common source of defects. Excessive complexity is also a root source of defects, since it increases errors and variation defects. A missing link in the defining a global model has been the lack of a sound correlation between complexity and defects. We have used Design for Assembly (DFA) methods to quantify assembly complexity and have shown that assembly times can be described in terms of the Pareto distribution in a clear exception to the Central Limit Theorem. Within individual companies we have found defects to be highly correlated with DFA measures of complexity in broad studies covering tens of millions of assembly operations. Applying the global concepts, we predicted that Motorola`s Six Sigma method would only reduce defects by roughly a factor of two rather than orders of magnitude, a prediction confirmed by Motorola`s data. We have also shown that the potential defects rates of product concepts can be compared in the earliest stages of development. The global Conformance Quality Model has demonstrated that the best strategy for improvement depends upon the quality control strengths and weaknesses.

  18. LONG-TERM GLOBAL WATER USE PROJECTIONS USING SIX SOCIOECONOMIC SCENARIOS IN AN INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT MODELING FRAMEWORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.; Moss, Richard H.; Kim, Son H.

    2014-01-19

    In this paper, we assess future water demands for the agricultural (irrigation and livestock), energy (electricity generation, primary energy production and processing), industrial (manufacturing and mining), and municipal sectors, by incorporating water demands into a technologically-detailed global integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change – the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Base-year water demands—both gross withdrawals and net consumptive use—are assigned to specific modeled activities in a way that maximizes consistency between bottom-up estimates of water demand intensities of specific technologies and practices, and top-down regional and sectoral estimates of water use. The energy, industrial, and municipal sectors are represented in fourteen geopolitical regions, with the agricultural sector further disaggregated into as many as eighteen agro-ecological zones (AEZs) within each region. We assess future water demands representing six socioeconomic scenarios, with no constraints imposed by future water supplies. The scenarios observe increases in global water withdrawals from 3,578 km3 year-1 in 2005 to 5,987 – 8,374 km3 year-1 in 2050, and to 4,719 – 12,290 km3 year-1 in 2095. Comparing the projected total regional water withdrawals to the historical supply of renewable freshwater, the Middle East exhibits the highest levels of water scarcity throughout the century, followed by India; water scarcity increases over time in both of these regions. In contrast, water scarcity improves in some regions with large base-year electric sector withdrawals, such as the USA and Canada, due to capital stock turnover and the almost complete phase-out of once-through flow cooling systems. The scenarios indicate that: 1) water is likely a limiting factor in climate change mitigation policies, 2) many regions can be expected to increase reliance on non-renewable groundwater, water reuse, and desalinated water, but they also highlight an important role for development and deployment of water conservation technologies and practices.

  19. Emulating maize yields from global gridded crop models using statistical estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanc, E.

    This study estimates statistical models emulating maize yield responses to changes in temperature and

  20. Global Software and its Provenance: Generification Work in the Design of Global Software Packages 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, N.; Williams, R.; D'Adderio, Luciana

    2007-04-01

    This paper addresses the seemingly implausible project of establishing a ‘generic’ organizational information system. The is an apparent contradiction: on the one hand, we are told of the diversity of specific organizational ...

  1. Global warming, global research, and global governing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preining, O.

    1997-12-31

    The anticipated dangers of Global Warming can be mitigated by reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, especially CO{sub 2}. To reach acceptable, constant levels within the next couple of centuries it might be necessary to accept stabilization levels higher than present ones, The annual CO{sub 2} emissions must be reduced far below today`s values. This is a very important result of the models discussed in the 1995 IPCC report. However, any even very modest scenario for the future must take into account a substantial increase in the world population which might double during the 21st century, There is a considerable emission reduction potential of the industrialized world due to efficiency increase, However, the demand for energy services by the growing world population will, inspite of the availability of alternative energy resources, possibly lead to a net increase in fossil fuel consumption. If the climate models are right, and the science community believes they are, we will experience a global warming of the order of a couple of degrees over the next century; we have to live with it. To be prepared for the future it is essential for us to use new research techniques embracing not only the familiar fields of hard sciences but also social, educational, ethical and economic aspects, We must find a way to build up the essential intellectual capacities needed to deal with these kinds of general problems within all nations and all societies. But this is not Although, we also have to find the necessary dynamical and highly flexible structures for a global governing using tools such as the environmental regime. The first step was the Framework Convention On Climate Change, UN 1992; for resolution of questions regarding implementations the Conference of the Parties was established.

  2. Real-time Global Flood Estimation using Satellite-based Precipitation and a Coupled Land Surface and Routing Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Huan; Adler, Robert F.; Tian, Yudong; Huffman, George; Li, Hongyi; Wang, Jianjian

    2014-04-09

    A community land surface model, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, is coupled with a newly developed hierarchical dominant river tracing-based runoff-routing model to form the Dominant river tracing-Routing Integrated with VIC Environment (DRIVE) model system, which serves as the new core of the real-time Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS). The GFMS uses real-time satellite-based precipitation to derive flood-monitoring parameters for the latitude-band 50{degree sign}N-50{degree sign}S at relatively high spatial (~12km) and temporal (3-hourly) resolution. Examples of model results for recent flood events are computed using the real-time GFMS (http://flood.umd.edu). To evaluate the accuracy of the new GFMS, the DRIVE model is run retrospectively for 15 years using both research-quality and real-time satellite precipitation products. Statistical results are slightly better for the research-quality input and significantly better for longer duration events (three-day events vs. one-day events). Basins with fewer dams tend to provide lower false alarm ratios. For events longer than three days in areas with few dams, the probability of detection is ~0.9 and the false alarm ratio is ~0.6. In general, these statistical results are better than those of the previous system. Streamflow was evaluated at 1,121 river gauges across the quasi-global domain. Validation using real-time precipitation across the tropics (30şS-30şN) gives positive daily Nash-Sutcliffe Coef?cients for 107 out of 375 (28%) stations with a mean of 0.19 and 51% of the same gauges at monthly scale with a mean of 0.33. There were poorer results in higher latitudes, probably due to larger errors in the satellite precipitation input.

  3. Use of North American and European air quality networks to evaluate global chemistry-climate modeling of surface ozone

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schnell, J. L.; Prather, M. J.; Josse, B.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Bergmann, D.; Zeng, G.; Plummer, D. A.; Sudo, K.; et al

    2015-04-16

    We test the current generation of global chemistry-climate models in their ability to simulate observed, present-day surface ozone. Models are evaluated against hourly surface ozone from 4217 stations in North America and Europe that are averaged over 1° × 1° grid cells, allowing commensurate model-measurement comparison. Models are generally biased high during all hours of the day and in all regions. Most models simulate the shape of regional summertime diurnal and annual cycles well, correctly matching the timing of hourly (~ 15:00) and monthly (mid-June) peak surface ozone abundance. The amplitude of these cycles is less successfully matched. The observedmore »summertime diurnal range (~ 25 ppb) is underestimated in all regions by about 7 ppb, and the observed seasonal range (~ 21 ppb) is underestimated by about 5 ppb except in the most polluted regions where it is overestimated by about 5 ppb. The models generally match the pattern of the observed summertime ozone enhancement, but they overestimate its magnitude in most regions. Most models capture the observed distribution of extreme episode sizes, correctly showing that about 80% of individual extreme events occur in large-scale, multi-day episodes of more than 100 grid cells. The observed linear relationship showing increases in ozone by up to 6 ppb for larger-sized episodes is also matched.« less

  4. Educational Software Engineering: Where Software Engineering, Education, and Gaming Meet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Tao

    Educational Software Engineering: Where Software Engineering, Education, and Gaming Meet Tao Xie and advocate the subfield of educational software engineering (i.e., software engineering for education), which develops software engineering technologies (e.g., software testing and analysis, software analytics

  5. A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maret, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Review: A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, andEdwards, Paul N. A Vast Machine: Computer Models, ClimateEdwards, Paul N. 2004. "A vast machine: standards as social

  6. A scalable high-order discontinuous Galerkin method for global atmospheric modeling Hae-Won Choia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Ramachandran D.

    system model will require a highly scalable and accurate flux-form formulation of atmospheric dynamics supercomputers. 1. INTRODUCTION The future evolution of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) into an Earth

  7. Global oceanic rainfall estimation from AMSR-E data based on a radiative transfer model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Kyoung-Wook

    2006-04-12

    An improved physically-based rainfall algorithm was developed using AMSR-E data based on a radiative transfer model. In addition, error models were designed and embedded in the algorithm to assess retrieval errors ...

  8. Using Citizen Science Data to Model the Distributions of Common Songbirds of Turkey Under Different Global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Using Citizen Science Data to Model the Distributions of Common Songbirds of Turkey Under Different an ornithological citizen science initiative (www.kusbank.org) with maximum entropy modeling and eight bioclimatic (2013) Using Citizen Science Data to Model the Distributions of Common Songbirds of Turkey Under

  9. A Unified Model for Hardware/Software Codesign Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Professor Leslie A. Kolodziejski Chair, Department Committee on Graduate Students #12;2 #12;A Unified Model, Joe Stoy, Jamey Hicks, Kattamuri Ekanadham, Derek Chiou, James Hoe, and John Ankcorn for their advice

  10. Software Tools for Technology Transfer Software Monitoring with Controllable Overhead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zadok, Erez

    Software Tools for Technology Transfer Software Monitoring with Controllable Overhead Xiaowan Huang Stony Brook University Appears in the Proceedings of Software Tools for Technology Transfer Abstract. We

  11. Track 2 Commercial Grade Dedication of Software.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of other types of software - Instrumentation & control software - Software development Design and Analysis Software * Finite element analysis * Piping analysis * Seismic...

  12. Human factors in software development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, B.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents an overview of ergonomics/human factors in software development, recent research, and classic papers. Articles are drawn from the following areas of psychological research on programming: cognitive ergonomics, cognitive psychology, and psycholinguistics. Topics examined include: theoretical models of how programmers solve technical problems, the characteristics of programming languages, specification formats in behavioral research and psychological aspects of fault diagnosis.

  13. Software Engineering Introduction to SWE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razak, Saquib

    the requirements of the house. o He plans and designs the model of house in a piece of paper. According document of the product is called Software Requirement Specifications (SRS) which constitutes a contract. · Deliverables: SRS #12;Unit 23 6 Design Phase · The aim of the design phase is to determine how the product

  14. A global view of gravity waves in the Martian atmosphere inferred from a high-resolution general circulation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Yi?it, Erdal; Hartogh, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Global characteristics of the small-scale gravity wave (GW) field in the Martian atmosphere obtained from a high-resolution general circulation model (GCM) are presented for the first time. The simulated GW-induced temperature variances are in a good agreement with available radio occultation data in the lower atmosphere between 10 and 30 km. The model reveals a latitudinal asymmetry with stronger wave generation in the winter hemisphere, and two distinctive sources of GWs: mountainous regions and the meandering winter polar jet. Orographic GWs are filtered while propagating upward, and the mesosphere is primarily dominated by harmonics with faster horizontal phase velocities. Wave fluxes are directed mainly against the local wind. GW dissipation in the upper mesosphere generates body forces of tens of m~s$^{-1}$~sol$^{-1}$, which tend to close the simulated jets. The results represent a realistic surrogate for missing observations, which can be used for constraining GW parameterizations and validating GCM si...

  15. some information about software.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greg Buzzard: Software Please email me (buzzard at math dot purdue dot edu) to obtain software for finding optimal binary filters, as described in D.S. Wilcox, et ...

  16. User' Software Manual

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MM-Group Home MMG Advisory Committees 4-ID-D Home Recent Publications Beamline Info Optics Instrumentation Software User Info FAQs 4-ID-D Beamline Software Manual Introduction...

  17. Intel Architecture Software Developer's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinda, Peter A.

    Intel Architecture Software Developer's Manual Volume 1: Basic Architecture NOTE: The Intel Architecture Software Developer's Manual consists of three volumes: Basic Architecture, Order Number 243190 sustaining applications. Intel may make changes to specifications and product descriptions at any time

  18. Use of North American and European air quality networks to evaluate global chemistry–climate modeling of surface ozone

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schnell, J. L.; Prather, M. J.; Josse, B.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Bergmann, D.; Zeng, G.; Plummer, D. A.; Sudo, K.; et al

    2015-09-25

    We test the current generation of global chemistry–climate models in their ability to simulate observed, present-day surface ozone. Models are evaluated against hourly surface ozone from 4217 stations in North America and Europe that are averaged over 1° × 1° grid cells, allowing commensurate model–measurement comparison. Models are generally biased high during all hours of the day and in all regions. Most models simulate the shape of regional summertime diurnal and annual cycles well, correctly matching the timing of hourly (~ 15:00 local time (LT)) and monthly (mid-June) peak surface ozone abundance. The amplitude of these cycles is less successfullymore »matched. The observed summertime diurnal range (~ 25 ppb) is underestimated in all regions by about 7 ppb, and the observed seasonal range (~ 21 ppb) is underestimated by about 5 ppb except in the most polluted regions, where it is overestimated by about 5 ppb. The models generally match the pattern of the observed summertime ozone enhancement, but they overestimate its magnitude in most regions. Most models capture the observed distribution of extreme episode sizes, correctly showing that about 80 % of individual extreme events occur in large-scale, multi-day episodes of more than 100 grid cells. The models also match the observed linear relationship between episode size and a measure of episode intensity, which shows increases in ozone abundance by up to 6 ppb for larger-sized episodes. We conclude that the skill of the models evaluated here provides confidence in their projections of future surface ozone.« less

  19. Author's personal copy Two-way coupling of an ENSO model to the global climate model CLIMBER-3a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levermann, Anders

    it is possible to introduce ENSO variability to an Earth system Model of Intermediate Complexity (EMIC we are using here. In this study we couple the Earth system model of intermediate complexity (EMIC

  20. Software Function Allocation Methodology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neal, Michael Ralph

    1988-01-01

    ABSTRACT Software Function Allocation Methodology. (May 1988) Michael Ralph O'Neal, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. William Lively Modern distributed computer systems are very powerful and useful; they also offer new... software system designers with a thorough and flexible method to allocate software functions among the hardware components of a distributed computer system. Software designers select and rank relevant Design Parameters, analyze how well different...

  1. Internal dosimetry software comparison 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulmer, Judith Renee

    1992-01-01

    , Richland, WA. 32 organ and effective dose equivalents from chronic or acute exposures. CINDY software may be used to assess both annual and committed dose equivalents. Calculations are performed by the software using a differential equations solver... computing system is recommended when using the software, though an IBM AT compatible system may be used when ingrowth of radioactive daughters is not of concern. The CINDY software requires a * International Business Machines, Boca Raton, FL. 33...

  2. What is the value of scientific knowledge? An application to global warminig using the PRICE model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordhaus, W.D.; Popp, D.

    1997-02-01

    The question that this study addresses is: What is the value of the new knowledge about climate change? If natural and social scientists succeed in improving their understanding, what will be the payoff in terms of improved economic performance? For example, if the uncertainties are resolved in favor of those who argue that global warming will be minimal or beneficial, then this knowledge will allow countries to avoid expensive investments in non-carbon energy technologies or in expensive conservation efforts. On the other hand, if the worst fears prove correct, then the globe can mend its ways early so as to prevent later dislocations, famines, or inundations. To the extent that the investments are expensive or the consequences are grave, early information can be extremely valuable. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Non-collective Parallel I/O for Global Address Space Programming Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Piernas Canovas, Juan; Tipparaju, Vinod; Nieplocha, Jaroslaw; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2007-09-13

    Achieving high performance for out-of-core applications typically involves explicit management of the movement of data between the disk and the physical memory. We are developing a programming environment in which the different levels of the memory hierarchy are handled efficiently in a unified transparent framework. In this paper, we present our experiences with implementing efficient non-collective I/O (GPC-IO) as part of this framework. As a generalization of the Remote Procedure Call (RPC) that was used as a foundation for the Sun NFS system, we developed a global procedure call (GPC) to invoke procedures on a remote node to handle non-collective I/O. We consider alternative approaches that can be employed in implementing this functionality. The approaches are evaluated using a representative computation from quantum chemistry. The results demonstrate that GPC-IO achieves better absolute execution times, strong-scaling, and weakscaling than the alternatives considered.

  4. An isospin dependent global nucleon-nucleus optical model at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. P. Weppner; R. B. Penney; G. W. Diffendale; G. Vittorini

    2014-03-04

    A global nucleon-nucleus optical potential for elastic scattering has been produced which replicates experimental data to high accuracy and compares well with other recently formulated potentials. The calculation that has been developed describes proton and neutron scattering from target nuclei ranging from carbon to nickel and is applicable for projectile energies from 30 to 160 MeV. With these ranges it is suitable for calculations associated with experiments performed by exotic beam accelerators. The potential is also isospin dependent and has both real and imaginary isovector asymmetry terms to better describe the dynamics of chains of isotopes and mirror nuclei. An analysis of the validity and strength of the asymmetry term is included with connections established to other optical potentials and charge-exchange reaction data. An on-line observable calculator is available for this optical potential.

  5. CliCrop: a Crop Water-Stress and Irrigation Demand Model for an Integrated Global Assessment Model Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fant, C.A.

    This paper describes the use of the CliCrop model in the context of climate change general assessment

  6. Software for managing scientific workflows.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Debugging and Profiling Data, Visualization, and Analytics Grid Software and Services Workflow Software NERSC Software Downloads Policies User Surveys NERSC Users Group User...

  7. Global behavior of a multi-group SIS epidemic model with age ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-10-22

    Dec 10, 2004 ... Security Agency (NSA) and Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. ... into the model may provide additional and important information which may be ...

  8. Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (EGEMS): A New Generation of Energy Efficiency Policy Planning Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    driver for the energy demand forecast. The basic assumptionglobal bottom-up energy demand forecasts, and a frameworkin modelling energy demand is to forecast activity. Activity

  9. Engineering secure software 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jetly, Prateek

    2001-01-01

    -the-fact fixes in the form of software patches. The root causes for security problems in software are explored. A survey of research attempts at engineering secure software is presented. The techniques discussed range from those that are very similar...

  10. Globalization Nationalized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazlish, Bruce

    Globalism and globalization have been seen as competitors to other allegiances, namely regionalism and nationalism. A look at recent efforts at reconceptualizing global history in China, Korea and the U.S., however, suggests ...

  11. A global model simulation for 3-D radiative transfer impact on surface hydrology over the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, W.-L.; Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Leung, L. R.; Hsu, H.-H.

    2015-05-19

    We investigate 3-D mountain effects on solar flux distributions and their impact on surface hydrology over the western United States, specifically the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada, using the global CCSM4 (Community Climate System Model version 4; Community Atmosphere Model/Community Land Model – CAM4/CLM4) with a 0.23° × 0.31° resolution for simulations over 6 years. In a 3-D radiative transfer parameterization, we have updated surface topography data from a resolution of 1 km to 90 m to improve parameterization accuracy. In addition, we have also modified the upward-flux deviation (3-D–PP (plane-parallel)) adjustment to ensure that the energy balance atmore »the surface is conserved in global climate simulations based on 3-D radiation parameterization. We show that deviations in the net surface fluxes are not only affected by 3-D mountains but also influenced by feedbacks of cloud and snow in association with the long-term simulations. Deviations in sensible heat and surface temperature generally follow the patterns of net surface solar flux. The monthly snow water equivalent (SWE) deviations show an increase in lower elevations due to reduced snowmelt, leading to a reduction in cumulative runoff. Over higher-elevation areas, negative SWE deviations are found because of increased solar radiation available at the surface. Simulated precipitation increases for lower elevations, while it decreases for higher elevations, with a minimum in April. Liquid runoff significantly decreases at higher elevations after April due to reduced SWE and precipitation.« less

  12. 1 CIS 480 Software Engineering Fall 2012 Texas A&M University Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diestel, Geoff

    for a practical approach to developing quality software. Students study a software life-cycle model, fundamental quality, maintainable software on a group project. 3. Students will learn by participation how to manage1 CIS 480 Software Engineering ­ Fall 2012 Texas A&M University Central Texas CISK 480.110 Software

  13. Lifecycle Model

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-05-21

    This chapter describes the lifecycle model used for the Departmental software engineering methodology.

  14. A global model simulation for 3-D radiative transfer impact on surface hydrology over Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, W. -L.; Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Leung, L. R.; Hsu, H. -H.

    2014-12-15

    We investigate 3-D mountain effects on solar flux distributions and their impact on surface hydrology over the Western United States, specifically the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada using CCSM4 (CAM4/CLM4) global model with a 0.23° × 0.31° resolution for simulations over 6 years. In 3-D radiative transfer parameterization, we have updated surface topography data from a resolution of 1 km to 90 m to improve parameterization accuracy. In addition, we have also modified the upward-flux deviation [3-D - PP (plane-parallel)] adjustment to ensure that energy balance at the surface is conserved in global climate simulations based on 3-D radiation parameterization.more »We show that deviations of the net surface fluxes are not only affected by 3-D mountains, but also influenced by feedbacks of cloud and snow in association with the long-term simulations. Deviations in sensible heat and surface temperature generally follow the patterns of net surface solar flux. The monthly snow water equivalent (SWE) deviations show an increase in lower elevations due to reduced snowmelt, leading to a reduction in cumulative runoff. Over higher elevation areas, negative SWE deviations are found because of increased solar radiation available at the surface. Simulated precipitation increases for lower elevations, while decreases for higher elevations with a minimum in April. Liquid runoff significantly decreases in higher elevations after April due to reduced SWE and precipitation.« less

  15. Modelling vegetation dynamics at global scale due to climate changes: Comparison of two approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belotelov, N.V.; Bogatyrev, B.G.; Lobanov, A.I.

    1996-12-31

    Climate changes will influence vegetation dynamics. One of the ways of forecasting these changes is the creation of mathematical models describing vegetation dynamics. Computer experiments can then be conducted under climate change scenarios. Two main approaches are used to create such models. The first approach is based on a bioclimatic dynamic approach. The second approach is based on modelling the main eco-physiological processes. The bioclimatic dynamic approach consists of hypotheses about vegetation types or biomes, and their interrelationships with climate. In the eco-physiological approach, a detailed description of the processes, such as production, mortality, plants migration and their competition is presented. A number of computer experiments has been conducted for several climatic scenario for Russia and the whole world. A qualitative comparison of the results with the results of an earlier bioclimatic model has been done.

  16. Accelerating Bayesian inference in computationally expensive computer models using local and global approximations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Patrick Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Computational models of complex phenomena are an important resource for scientists and engineers. However, many state-of-the-art simulations of physical systems are computationally expensive to evaluate and are black ...

  17. A Model of Global Learning: How Students Change Through International High-Impact Experiences 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redwine, Tobin Dean

    2014-12-12

    is warranted. The purpose of this study was to develop a model to explain the viewpoints of student changes by students who participate in a study abroad experience. To meet that purpose, three objectives were utilized. First, a qualitative phenomenology...

  18. Global models of planetary system formation in radiatively-inefficient protoplanetary discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellary, Phil

    2011-01-01

    (Abridged) We present the results of N-body simulations of planetary systems formation in radiatively-inefficient disc models, where positive corotation torques may counter the rapid inward migration of low mass planets driven by Lindblad torques. The aim of this work is to examine the nature of planetary systems that arise from oligarchic growth in such discs. We adapt the commonly-used Mercury-6 symplectic integrator by including simple prescriptions for planetary migration (types I and II), planetary atmospheres that enhance the probability of planetesimal accretion by protoplanets, gas accretion onto forming planetary cores, and gas disc dispersal. We perform a suite of simulations for a variety of disc models with power-law surface density and tempera- ture profiles, with a focus on models in which unsaturated corotation torques can drive outward migration of protoplanets. In some models we account for the quenching of corotation torques that arises when planetary orbits become eccentric. Approximately h...

  19. Parameterization of urban sub-grid scale processes in global atmospheric chemistry models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calbó, Josep.; Pan, Wen Wei.; Webster, Mort David.; Prinn, Ronald G.; McRae, Gregory J.

    We have derived a parameterization consisting of a set of analytical expressions that approximate the predictions by the CIT Urban Airshed Model for the net export to the environment (i.e., effective emissions) of several ...

  20. HAZARD ANALYSIS SOFTWARE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, S; Tinh Tran, T

    2008-04-08

    Washington Safety Management Solutions, LLC developed web-based software to improve the efficiency and consistency of hazard identification and analysis, control selection and classification, and to standardize analysis reporting at Savannah River Site. In the new nuclear age, information technology provides methods to improve the efficiency of the documented safety analysis development process which includes hazard analysis activities. This software provides a web interface that interacts with a relational database to support analysis, record data, and to ensure reporting consistency. A team of subject matter experts participated in a series of meetings to review the associated processes and procedures for requirements and standard practices. Through these meetings, a set of software requirements were developed and compiled into a requirements traceability matrix from which software could be developed. The software was tested to ensure compliance with the requirements. Training was provided to the hazard analysis leads. Hazard analysis teams using the software have verified its operability. The software has been classified as NQA-1, Level D, as it supports the analysis team but does not perform the analysis. The software can be transported to other sites with alternate risk schemes. The software is being used to support the development of 14 hazard analyses. User responses have been positive with a number of suggestions for improvement which are being incorporated as time permits. The software has enforced a uniform implementation of the site procedures. The software has significantly improved the efficiency and standardization of the hazard analysis process.

  1. Do Coupled Climate Models Correctly SImulate the Upward Branch of the Deept Ocean Global Conveyor?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarmiento, Jorge L; Downes, Stephanie; Bianchi, Daniele

    2013-01-17

    The large-scale meridional overturning circulation (MOC) connects the deep ocean, a major reservoir of carbon, to the other components of the climate system and must therefore be accurately represented in Earth System Models. Our project aims to address the specific question of the pathways and mechanisms controlling the upwelling branch of the MOC, a subject of significant disagreement between models and observational syntheses, and among general circulation models. Observations of these pathways are limited, particularly in regions of complex hydrography such as the Southern Ocean. As such, we rely on models to examine theories of the overturning circulation, both physically and biogeochemically. This grant focused on a particular aspect of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) where there is currently significant disagreement between models and observationally based analyses of the MOC, and amongst general circulation models. In particular, the research focused on addressing the following questions: 1. Where does the deep water that sinks in the polar regions rise to the surface? 2. What processes are responsible for this rise? 3. Do state-of-the-art coupled GCMs capture these processes? Our research had three key components: observational synthesis, model development and model analysis. In this final report we outline the key results from these areas of research for the 2007 to 2012 grant period. The research described here was carried out primarily by graduate student, Daniele Bianchi (now a Postdoc at McGill University, Canada), and Postdoc Stephanie Downes (now a Research Fellow at The Australian national University, Australia). Additional support was provided for programmers Jennifer Simeon as well as Rick Slater.

  2. Tear-off versus global existence for a structured model of adhesion mediated by transient elastic linkages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuk Milisic; Dietmar Oelz

    2015-06-03

    We consider a microscopic model for friction mediated by transient elastic linkages introduced in [V. Milisic and D. Oelz. SIAM J. on Math. Anal. (2015). V. Milisic and D. Oelz. J. Math. Pures Appl. (2011)]. In the present study we prove existence and uniqueness of a solution to the coupled system under weaker hypotheses. The theory we present covers the case where the off-rate of linkages is unbounded but increasing at most linearly with respect to the mechanical load. The time of existence is typically bounded and corresponds to tear-off where the moving binding site does not have any bonds with the substrate. However, under additional assumptions on the external force we prove global in time existence of a solution that consequently stays attached to the substrate.

  3. Incorporating Urban Systems in Global Climate Models: The Role of GIScience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feddema, Johannes J.

    2006-11-15

    city with H/W=0.5,?,3.0 Simulated Urban Heat Island ? NCEP atmospheric forcing ? Rural grassland ? Default city with H/W=0.5,?,3.0 With Q f Without Q f Variability in Simulated Heat Island caused by Climate and Rural Environment ?Atmospheric forcing... from CAM (offline model) ?Default city with H/W=0.5,?,3.0 ?Rural environment from CLM Surface Data Model Validation: ? At a given height to width ratio, a wide range of heat islands is simulated depending on prevailing meteorological conditions...

  4. Post-2020 climate agreements in the major economies assessed in the light of global models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tavoni, Massimo; Kriegler, Elmar; Riahi, Keywan; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Aboumahboub, Tino; Bowen, Alex; Calvin, Katherine V.; Campiglio, Emanuele; Kober, Tom; Jewell, Jessica; Luderer, Gunnar; Marangoni, Giacomo; McCollum, David; van Sluisveld, Mariesse; Zimmer, Anne; van der Zwaan, Bob

    2014-12-15

    Integrated assessment models can help in quantifying the implications of international climate agreements and regional climate action. This paper reviews scenario results from model intercomparison projects to explore different possible outcomes of post-2020 climate negotiations, recently announced pledges and their relation to the 2°C target. We provide key information for all the major economies, such as the year of emission peaking, regional carbon budgets and emissions allowances. We highlight the distributional consequences of climate policies, and discuss the role of carbon markets for financing clean energy investments, and achieving efficiency and equity.

  5. An Urban Parameterization for a Global Climate Model. Part I: Formulation and Evaluation for Two Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleson, Keith W.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Vertenstein, M.; Grimmond, C.S.B.

    2008-01-01

    stream_size 70935 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Feddema_Urban_Parameterization_Climate Model_PtI.pdf.txt stream_source_info Feddema_Urban_Parameterization_Climate Model_PtI.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type..., all of these studies have focused on land use/land cover re- lated to changes in vegetation types. Urbanization, or the expansion of built-up areas, is an important yet less studied aspect of anthropogenic land use/land cover change in climate science...

  6. The Coronal Global Evolutionary Model (CGEM): Using HMI Vector Magnetogram and Doppler Data to Model the Buildup of Free Magnetic Energy in the Solar Corona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, George H; Bercik, David J; Kazachenko, Maria D; Lynch, Benjamin J; Welsch, Brian T; Hoeksema, J Todd; Hayashi, Keiji; Liu, Yang; Norton, Aimee A; Dalda, Alberto Sainz; Sun, Xudong; DeRosa, Marc L; Cheung, Mark C M

    2015-01-01

    The most violent space weather events (eruptive solar flares and coronal mass ejections) are driven by the release of free magnetic energy stored in the solar corona. Energy can build up on timescales of hours to days, and then may be suddenly released in the form of a magnetic eruption, which then propagates through interplanetary space, possibly impacting the Earth's space environment. Can we use the observed evolution of the magnetic and velocity fields in the solar photosphere to model the evolution of the overlying solar coronal field, including the storage and release of magnetic energy in such eruptions? The objective of CGEM, the Coronal Global Evolutionary Model, funded by the NASA/NSF Space Weather Modeling program, is to develop and evaluate such a model for the evolution of the coronal magnetic field. The evolving coronal magnetic field can then be used as a starting point for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the corona, which can then be used to drive models of heliospheric evolution and predi...

  7. Harmonizing Systems and Software Cost Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gan

    2009-07-19

    The objective of this paper is to examine the gaps and overlaps between software and systems engineering cost models with intent to harmonize the estimates in engineering engineering estimation. In particular, we evaluate ...

  8. Daylighting Prediction Software: Comparative Analysis and Application 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estes, J. M. Jr.; Schreppler, S.; Newsom, T.

    2004-01-01

    for the calibrated modeling of light scattered in enclosed spaces. These software packages used algorithms based on either total radiosity (flux transfer) computations or physically accurate ray tracing. A summary of this survey along with the selection criteria used...

  9. Exploration games for UML software design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tenzer, Jennifer

    The Unified Modeling Language (UML) has become the standard language for the design of object-oriented software systems over the past decade. Even though there exist various tools which claim to support design with UML, ...

  10. A simple object-oriented and open-source model for scientific and policy analyses of the global climate system – Hector v1.0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hartin, Corinne A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Schwarber, Adria; Link, Robert P.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Simple climate models play an integral role in the policy and scientific communities. They are used for climate mitigation scenarios within integrated assessment models, complex climate model emulation, and uncertainty analyses. Here we describe Hector v1.0, an open source, object-oriented, simple global climate carbon-cycle model. This model runs essentially instantaneously while still representing the most critical global-scale earth system processes. Hector has a three-part main carbon cycle: a one-pool atmosphere, land, and ocean. The model's terrestrial carbon cycle includes primary production and respiration fluxes, accommodating arbitrary geographic divisions into, e.g., ecological biomes or political units. Hector actively solves the inorganicmore »carbon system in the surface ocean, directly calculating air–sea fluxes of carbon and ocean pH. Hector reproduces the global historical trends of atmospheric [CO2], radiative forcing, and surface temperatures. The model simulates all four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) with equivalent rates of change of key variables over time compared to current observations, MAGICC (a well-known simple climate model), and models from the 5th Coupled Model Intercomparison Project. Hector's flexibility, open-source nature, and modular design will facilitate a broad range of research in various areas.« less

  11. A simple object-oriented and open source model for scientific and policy analyses of the global climate system–Hector v1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartin, Corinne A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Schwarber, Adria; Link, Robert P.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Simple climate models play an integral role in policy and scientific communities. They are used for climate mitigation scenarios within integrated assessment models, complex climate model emulation, and uncertainty analyses. Here we describe Hector, an open source, object-oriented, simple global climate carbon-cycle model. This model runs essentially instantaneously while still representing the most critical global scale earth system processes. Hector has three main carbon pools: an atmosphere, land, and ocean. The model’s terrestrial carbon cycle includes respiration and primary production, accommodating arbitrary geographic divisions into, e.g., ecological biomes or political units. Hector’s actively solves the inorganic carbon system in the surface ocean, directly calculating air-sea fluxes of carbon and ocean pH. Hector reproduces the global historical trends of atmospheric [CO2] and surface temperatures. The model simulates all four Representative Concentration Pathways with high correlations (R >0.7) with current observations, MAGICC (a well-known simple climate model), and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project version 5. Hector is freely available under an open source license, and its modular design will facilitate a broad range of research in various areas.

  12. Can Fully Accounting for Clouds in Data Assimilation Improve Short-Term Forecasts by Global Models?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert, Pincus

    ? ROBERT PINCUS AND ROBERT J. PATRICK HOFMANN University of Colorado and NOAA/Earth System Research for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado JEFFREY S. WHITAKER NOAA/Earth Systems Research Laboratory using a single ensemble data assimilation system coupled to two present-generation climate models

  13. The Transition-Zone Water Filter Model for Global Material Circulation: Where Do We Stand?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with a small melt fraction, highly incompatible elements including hydro- gen, helium and argon are sequestered the fraction of water is small. Models have been developed to understand the structure of a melt layer Hilst, et al., 1997]), then the whole mantle is depleted with only a small volume (~10%) of relatively

  14. Global dynamics of a SEIR model with varying total population size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Michael

    State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762, USA b Department of Medical Informatics, Albert Szent fraction persists and a unique endemic equilibrium state is shown, under a mild restriction. Introduction Studies of epidemic models that incorporate disease caused death and varying total population have

  15. Large spatial performance models: Think global, Analyse local! Chris Guenther, Jeremy Bradley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imperial College, London

    and P. G. Harrison, "Using Fluid Queues to Model Energy Storage and Distribution," in Imperial College the vulnerabilities of the internet. To assess risk we need to: Understand how infections spread [3] How well do increased the energy footprint of data centers. However, to date only a small percentage of the required

  16. HotSpot Software Configuration Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, H; Homann, S G

    2009-03-12

    This Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP) describes the software configuration management procedures used to ensure that the HotSpot dispersion model meets the requirements of its user base, which includes: (1) Users of the PC version of HotSpot for consequence assessment, hazard assessment and safety analysis calculations; and (2) Users of the NARAC Web and iClient software tools, which allow users to run HotSpot for consequence assessment modeling These users and sponsors of the HotSpot software and the organizations they represent constitute the intended audience for this document. This plan is intended to meet Critical Recommendations 1 and 3 from the Software Evaluation of HotSpot and DOE Safety Software Toolbox Recommendation for inclusion of HotSpot in the Department of Energy (DOE) Safety Software Toolbox. HotSpot software is maintained for the Department of Energy Office of Emergency Operations by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). An overview of HotSpot and NARAC are provided.

  17. Bayesiannetwork Confirmation of Software Testing Uncertainties Debra J. Richardson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziv, Hadar

    Bayesian­network Confirmation of Software Testing Uncertainties Hadar Ziv Debra J. Richardson presentation of uncertainty in software testing. We then propose that a specific technique, known as Bayesian Belief Networks, be used to model software testing uncertainties. We demonstrate the use of Bayesian

  18. A Software Certification Consortium and its Top 9 Hurdles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawford, Mark

    , Computer Science and Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA c Software Quality Research improve the quality of these real-time software systems and thereby reduce the risk to the public quality, it is not always clear to software practitioners how well these theoretical techniques model real

  19. Evalutation and network of ec-decision support systems in the field of hydrological dispension models and of aquatic radioecological research Assessment of environmental models anf software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monte, L; Hofman, Dimitry

    2005-01-01

    Evalutation and network of ec-decision support systems in the field of hydrological dispension models and of aquatic radioecological research

  20. Automatic Calibration of a Building Energy Simulation Model Using a Global Optimization Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, S. U.; Claridge, D.

    2002-01-01

    , Proceedings of the ACEEE 1988 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 10, 14-26. Balcomb, J.D., Burch, J.D., Subbarao, K., 1993. Short-term energy monitoring of residences, ASHRAE Transactions, 99 (2): 935-944. Balcomb, J.D., Burch, J.D...-259. Sorooshian, S., Gupta, V.K., 1983. Automatic calibration of conceptual rainfall-runoff models - the question of parameter observability and uniqueness, Water Resources Res., 19 (1): 260- 268. Subbarao, K., Burch, J., Hancock, C.E., Lekov, A., Balcomb, J.D...

  1. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard A. Ferrare; David D. Turner

    2011-09-01

    Project goals: (1) Use the routine surface and airborne measurements at the ARM SGP site, and the routine surface measurements at the NSA site, to continue our evaluations of model aerosol simulations; (2) Determine the degree to which the Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol scattering and extinction can be used to remotely characterize the aerosol humidification factor; (3) Use the high temporal resolution CARL data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; and (4) Use the high temporal resolution CARL and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds.

  2. Hopper Software and Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    File Storage and IO Software and Tools Debugging and profiling Performance and Optimization Cray XE Documentation Cluster Compatibility Mode PDSF Genepool Testbeds Retired...

  3. Fenestration Software Tools

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    dccurcija@lbl.gov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Fenestration Software Tools 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review 2 Project Summary Timeline: Start date: 1012013...

  4. Modeling U.S. Energy Use Changes with Global Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Stanton W; Erickson III, David J; Hernandez Figueroa, Jose L

    2006-09-01

    Using a general circulation model of Earth climate (PCM-IBIS) to drive an energy use model (DD-NEMS), we calculated the energy use changes for each year from 2003-2025 for the nine U.S. Census regions. We used five scenarios: 1) a reference with no change in temperatures from the 1970-2003 average, 2) a gradual 1 F rise in temperature by 2025, 3) a gradual 3 F rise by 2025, 4) a climate simulation with low temperature response to CO2 doubling in the atmosphere, and 5) a climate simulation with a more extreme response. The low-?T scenario had a cumulative reduction in energy of 2.1 Quads but an increase in cost of $14.8 billion. The northern states had reductions in cost over the entire period, but most other regions had increases in costs because increases in cooling costs outweighed reductions in heating and other energy uses. Higher temperature sensitivity resulted in increased warming, especially in the winter months. Because heating needs decreased, total energy requirements declined by a cumulative 4.2 Quads. However, total cost still increased $6.1 billion and carbon emissions still rose as coal-based electricity for cooling needs grew.

  5. Parametric Sensitivity Analysis of Precipitation at Global and Local Scales in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qian, Yun; Yan, Huiping; Hou, Zhangshuan; Johannesson, G.; Klein, Stephen A.; Lucas, Donald; Neale, Richard; Rasch, Philip J.; Swiler, Laura P.; Tannahill, John; et al

    2015-04-10

    We investigate the sensitivity of precipitation characteristics (mean, extreme and diurnal cycle) to a set of uncertain parameters that influence the qualitative and quantitative behavior of the cloud and aerosol processes in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5). We adopt both the Latin hypercube and quasi-Monte Carlo sampling approaches to effectively explore the high-dimensional parameter space and then conduct two large sets of simulations. One set consists of 1100 simulations (cloud ensemble) perturbing 22 parameters related to cloud physics and convection, and the other set consists of 256 simulations (aerosol ensemble) focusing on 16 parameters related to aerosols and cloud microphysics.more »Results show that for the 22 parameters perturbed in the cloud ensemble, the six having the greatest influences on the global mean precipitation are identified, three of which (related to the deep convection scheme) are the primary contributors to the total variance of the phase and amplitude of the precipitation diurnal cycle over land. The extreme precipitation characteristics are sensitive to a fewer number of parameters. The precipitation does not always respond monotonically to parameter change. The influence of individual parameters does not depend on the sampling approaches or concomitant parameters selected. Generally the GLM is able to explain more of the parametric sensitivity of global precipitation than local or regional features. The total explained variance for precipitation is primarily due to contributions from the individual parameters (75-90% in total). The total variance shows a significant seasonal variability in the mid-latitude continental regions, but very small in tropical continental regions.« less

  6. The potential of different artificial neural network (ANN) techniques in daily global solar radiation modeling based on meteorological data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrang, M.A.; Assareh, E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Young Researchers Club, Islamic Azad University, Dezful Branch (Iran); Ghanbarzadeh, A.; Noghrehabadi, A.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz (Iran)

    2010-08-15

    The main objective of present study is to predict daily global solar radiation (GSR) on a horizontal surface, based on meteorological variables, using different artificial neural network (ANN) techniques. Daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours, evaporation, and wind speed values between 2002 and 2006 for Dezful city in Iran (32 16'N, 48 25'E), are used in this study. In order to consider the effect of each meteorological variable on daily GSR prediction, six following combinations of input variables are considered: (I)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature and relative humidity as inputs and daily GSR as output. (II)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature and sunshine hours as inputs and daily GSR as output. (III)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity and sunshine hours as inputs and daily GSR as output. (IV)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours and evaporation as inputs and daily GSR as output. (V)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours and wind speed as inputs and daily GSR as output. (VI)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours, evaporation and wind speed as inputs and daily GSR as output. Multi-layer perceptron (MLP) and radial basis function (RBF) neural networks are applied for daily GSR modeling based on six proposed combinations. The measured data between 2002 and 2005 are used to train the neural networks while the data for 214 days from 2006 are used as testing data. The comparison of obtained results from ANNs and different conventional GSR prediction (CGSRP) models shows very good improvements (i.e. the predicted values of best ANN model (MLP-V) has a mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) about 5.21% versus 10.02% for best CGSRP model (CGSRP 5)). (author)

  7. A Cross-model Comparison of Global Long-term Technology Diffusion under a 2?C Climate Change Control Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Zwaan, Bob; Rosler, Hilke; Kober, Tom; Aboumahboub, Tino; Calvin, Katherine V.; Gernaat, David; Marangoni, Giacomo; McCollum, David

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the long-term global energy technology diffusion patterns required to reach a stringent climate change target with a maximum average atmospheric temperature increase of 2°C. If the anthropogenic temperature increase is to be limited to 2°C, total CO2 emissions have to be reduced massively, so as to reach substantial negative values during the second half of the century. Particularly power sector CO2 emissions should become negative from around 2050 onwards according to most models used for this analysis in order to compensate for GHG emissions in other sectors where abatement is more costly. The annual additional capacity deployment intensity (expressed in GW/yr) for solar and wind energy until 2030 needs to be around that recently observed for coal-based power plants, and will have to be several times higher in the period 2030–2050. Relatively high agreement exists across models in terms of the aggregated low-carbon energy system cost requirements on the supply side until 2050, which amount to about 50 trillion US$.

  8. System implementation for US Air Force Global Theater Weather Analysis and Prediction System (GTWAPS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simunich, K.L.; Pinkerton, S.C.; Michalakes, J.G.; Christiansen, J.H.

    1997-03-01

    The Global Theater Weather Analysis and Prediction System (GTWAPS) is intended to provide war fighters and decision makers with timely, accurate, and tailored meteorological and oceanographic (METOC) information to enhance effective employment of battlefield forces. Of critical importance to providing METOC theater information is the generation of meteorological parameters produced by numerical prediction models and application software at the Air Force Global Weather Central (AFGWC), Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. Ultimately, application-derived data will be produced by the regional Joint METOC Forecast Units and by the deployed teams within a theater. The USAF Air Staff contracted with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for assistance in defining a hardware and software solution using off-the-shelf technology that would give the USAF the flexibility of testing various meteorological models and the ability to use the system within their daily operational constraints.

  9. Global SAXS Data Analysis for Multilamellar Vesicles: Evolution of the Scattering Density Profile (SDP) Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heftberger, Peter [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria] [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria; Kollmitzer, Benjamin [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria] [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL] [ORNL; Pan, Jianjun [ORNL] [ORNL; Rappolt, Michael [University of Leeds, UK] [University of Leeds, UK; Amenitsch, Heinz [Graz University of Technology] [Graz University of Technology; Kucerka, Norbert [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,; Katsaras, John [ORNL] [ORNL; Pabst, georg [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria] [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria

    2014-01-01

    The highly successful scattering density profile (SDP) model, used to jointly analyze small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering data from unilamellar vesicles, has been adapted for use with data from fully hydrated, liquid crystalline multilamellar vesicles (MLVs). Using a genetic algorithm, this new method is capable of providing high-resolution structural information, as well as determining bilayer elastic bending fluctuations from standalone X-ray data. Structural parameters such as bilayer thickness and area per lipid were determined for a series of saturated and unsaturated lipids, as well as binary mixtures with cholesterol. The results are in good agreement with previously reported SDP data, which used both neutron and X-ray data. The inclusion of deuterated and non-deuterated MLV neutron data in the analysis improved the lipid backbone information but did not improve, within experimental error, the structural data regarding bilayer thickness and area per lipid.

  10. Cirrus clouds in a global climate model with a statistical cirrus cloud scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.

    2010-06-21

    A statistical cirrus cloud scheme that accounts for mesoscale temperature perturbations is implemented in a coupled aerosol and atmospheric circulation model to better represent both subgrid-scale supersaturation and cloud formation. This new scheme treats the effects of aerosol on cloud formation and ice freezing in an improved manner, and both homogeneous freezing and heterogeneous freezing are included. The scheme is able to better simulate the observed probability distribution of relative humidity compared to the scheme that was implemented in an older version of the model. Heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN) are shown to decrease the frequency of occurrence of supersaturation, and improve the comparison with observations at 192 hPa. Homogeneous freezing alone can not reproduce observed ice crystal number concentrations at low temperatures (<205 K), but the addition of heterogeneous IN improves the comparison somewhat. Increases in heterogeneous IN affect both high level cirrus clouds and low level liquid clouds. Increases in cirrus clouds lead to a more cloudy and moist lower troposphere with less precipitation, effects which we associate with the decreased convective activity. The change in the net cloud forcing is not very sensitive to the change in ice crystal concentrations, but the change in the net radiative flux at the top of the atmosphere is still large because of changes in water vapor. Changes in the magnitude of the assumed mesoscale temperature perturbations by 25% alter the ice crystal number concentrations and the net radiative fluxes by an amount that is comparable to that from a factor of 10 change in the heterogeneous IN number concentrations. Further improvements on the representation of mesoscale temperature perturbations, heterogeneous IN and the competition between homogeneous freezing and heterogeneous freezing are needed.

  11. Conserving Software-based Artwork through Software Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchese, Francis

    Conserving Software-based Artwork through Software Engineering Francis T. Marchese Department is offered for conserving software-based digital art in perpetuity based on software engineering practice. Software engineering is a rigorous, formalized practice approach to preservation that engages all

  12. Empowering Software Development Environments by Automatic Software Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westfechtel, Bernhard

    Empowering Software Development Environments by Automatic Software Measurement Bernhard Daubner.daubner@uni-bayreuth.de Abstract In order to facilitate the application of software mea- surement the gathering of software measures should be automated as far as possible by the integration of the software measurement process

  13. The Software Industry and Software Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feitelson, Dror

    engineeringproduction science Amateurs and virtuosos Knowledge does not propagate Waste of materials Small scale it anew Documentation of libraries etc. #12;Path to True Engineering Define body of knowledge needed... #12;What Software Companies Do You Know? Microsoft is not the only one... #12;Classification I

  14. Engineering Careers: Software Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenster, Sam

    Analysis HR, Payroll, Inventory Control #12;Custom software Help run my business Online banking High it #12;It is "professional" programing Software Engineering hacking up some code It is not what you do day #12;I am part of a team Programmers + Product Managers + Business Managers #12;You're stifling me

  15. RETROSPECTIVE: Software Pipelining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lam, Monica

    RETROSPECTIVE: Software Pipelining: An Effective Scheduling Technique for VLIW Machines Monica S. Lam Computer Systems Laboratory Stanford University ABSTRACT The basic idea behind software pipelining was first developed by Patel and Davidson for scheduling hardware pipe-lines. As instruction- level

  16. Tax Deduction Qualified Software

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On this page you'll find information about the EnergyGauge Summit version 3.20 (incorporating DOE-2.1E (v120)) qualified computer software (buildings.energy.gov/qualified_software.html), which calculates energy and power cost savings that meet federal tax incentive requirements for commercial buildings.

  17. Tax Deduction Qualified Software

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On this page you'll find information about the EnergyGauge Summit version 3.22 (incorporating DOE-2.1E (v120)) qualified computer software (buildings.energy.gov/qualified_software.html), which calculates energy and power cost savings that meet federal tax incentive requirements for commercial buildings.

  18. Tax Deduction Qualified Software

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On this page you'll find information about the EnergyGauge Summit version 3.21 (incorporating DOE-2.1E (v120)) qualified computer software (buildings.energy.gov/qualified_software.html), which calculates energy and power cost savings that meet federal tax incentive requirements for commercial buildings.

  19. Scalable System Software for Parallel Programming | Argonne Leadership...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the software environment for leadership-class applications through programming models, high-performance IO, and analysis. In all three areas, researchers are exploring ways...

  20. Final scientific report for DOE award title: Improving the Representation of Ice Sedimentation Rates in Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, David L.

    2013-09-05

    It is well known that cirrus clouds play a major role in regulating the earth’s climate, but the details of how this works are just beginning to be understood. This project targeted the main property of cirrus clouds that influence climate processes; the ice fall speed. That is, this project improves the representation of the mass-weighted ice particle fall velocity, Vm, in climate models, used to predict future climate on global and regional scales. Prior to 2007, the dominant sizes of ice particles in cirrus clouds were poorly understood, making it virtually impossible to predict how cirrus clouds interact with sunlight and thermal radiation. Due to several studies investigating the performance of optical probes used to measure the ice particle size distribution (PSD), as well as the remote sensing results from our last ARM project, it is now well established that the anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals often reported prior to 2007 were measurement artifacts. Advances in the design and data processing of optical probes have greatly reduced these ice artifacts that resulted from the shattering of ice particles on the probe tips and/or inlet tube, and PSD measurements from one of these improved probes (the 2-dimensional Stereo or 2D-S probe) are utilized in this project to parameterize Vm for climate models. Our original plan in the proposal was to parameterize the ice PSD (in terms of temperature and ice water content) and ice particle mass and projected area (in terms of mass- and area-dimensional power laws or m-D/A-D expressions) since these are the microphysical properties that determine Vm, and then proceed to calculate Vm from these parameterized properties. But the 2D-S probe directly measures ice particle projected area and indirectly estimates ice particle mass for each size bin. It soon became apparent that the original plan would introduce more uncertainty in the Vm calculations than simply using the 2D-S measurements to directly calculate Vm. By calculating Vm directly from the measured PSD, ice particle projected area and estimated mass, more accurate estimates of Vm are obtained. These Vm values were then parameterized for climate models by relating them to (1) sampling temperature and ice water content (IWC) and (2) the effective diameter (De) of the ice PSD. Parameterization (1) is appropriate for climate models having single-moment microphysical schemes whereas (2) is appropriate for double-moment microphysical schemes and yields more accurate Vm estimates. These parameterizations were developed for tropical cirrus clouds, Arctic cirrus, mid-latitude synoptic cirrus and mid-latitude anvil cirrus clouds based on field campaigns in these regions. An important but unexpected result of this research was the discovery of microphysical evidence indicating the mechanisms by which ice crystals are produced in cirrus clouds. This evidence, derived from PSD measurements, indicates that homogeneous freezing ice nucleation dominates in mid-latitude synoptic cirrus clouds, whereas heterogeneous ice nucleation processes dominate in mid-latitude anvil cirrus. Based on these findings, De was parameterized in terms of temperature (T) for conditions dominated by (1) homo- and (2) heterogeneous ice nucleation. From this, an experiment was designed for global climate models (GCMs). The net radiative forcing from cirrus clouds may be affected by the means ice is produced (homo- or heterogeneously), and this net forcing contributes to climate sensitivity (i.e. the change in mean global surface temperature resulting from a doubling of CO2). The objective of this GCM experiment was to determine how a change in ice nucleation mode affects the predicted global radiation balance. In the first simulation (Run 1), the