National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for modeling programs comparison

  1. Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-6034E Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads Dandan Zhu1 , Tianzhen Energy, the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center for Building Energy Efficiency, of the U;Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads A joint effort between Lawrence Berkeley

  2. Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Dandan

    2014-01-01

    Shruti Kaserekar (2010). Solar gain and cooling loadcoefficient assumptions, the solar position calculation, andthe sky diffuse solar models. 2. DeST and EnergyPlus both

  3. Comparison of Home Retrofit Programs in Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, K.; Hannigan, E.

    2013-03-01

    To explore ways to reduce customer barriers and increase home retrofit completions, several different existing home retrofit models have been implemented in the state of Wisconsin. This study compared these programs' performance in terms of savings per home and program cost per home to assess the relative cost-effectiveness of each program design. However, given the many variations in these different programs, it is difficult to establish a fair comparison based on only a small number of metrics. Therefore, the overall purpose of the study is to document these programs' performance in a case study approach to look at general patterns of these metrics and other variables within the context of each program. This information can be used by energy efficiency program administrators and implementers to inform home retrofit program design. Six different program designs offered in Wisconsin for single-family energy efficiency improvements were included in the study. For each program, the research team provided information about the programs' approach and goals, characteristics, achievements and performance. The program models were then compared with performance results -- program cost and energy savings -- to help understand the overall strengths and weaknesses or challenges of each model.

  4. Comparison of Home Retrofit Programs in Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, Kerrie; Hannigan, Eileen

    2013-03-01

    To explore ways to reduce customer barriers and increase home retrofit completions, several different existing home retrofit models have been implemented in the state of Wisconsin. This study compared these programs' performance in terms of savings per home and program cost per home to assess the relative cost-effectiveness of each program design. However, given the many variations in these different programs, it is difficult to establish a fair comparison based on only a small number of metrics. Therefore, the overall purpose of the study is to document these programs' performance in a case study approach to look at general patterns of these metrics and other variables within the context of each program. This information can be used by energy efficiency program administrators and implementers to inform home retrofit program design. Six different program designs offered in Wisconsin for single-family energy efficiency improvements were included in the study. For each program, the research team provided information about the programs' approach and goals, characteristics, achievements and performance. The program models were then compared with performance results-program cost and energy savings-to help understand the overall strengths and weaknesses or challenges of each model.

  5. Programming models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matricesstudents working inProgrammingProgramming NERSC-8

  6. Community Solar Program Comparison Chart

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chart is a supplement to the "Utility Community Solar Handbook: Understanding and Supporting Utility Program Development," provides the utility's perspective on community solar program development and is a resource for government officials, regulators, community organizers, solar energy advocates, non-profits, and interested citizens who want to support their local utilities in implementing projects.

  7. Screening synteny blocks in pairwise genome comparisons through integer programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Haibao; Lyons, Eric; Pedersen, Brent; Schnable, James C; Paterson, Andrew H; Freeling, Michael

    2011-01-01

    comparisons through integer programming. BMC Bioinformaticscomparisons through integer programming Haibao Tang 1* ,known as “Binary Integer Programming” (BIP), which is solved

  8. Comparison of integral equation and physical scale modelling of the electromagnetic response of models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farquharson, Colin G.

    Comparison of integral equation and physical scale modelling of the electromagnetic response history of EM numerical modelling in geophysics. · Another integral equation modelling program;Introduction: a brief history · Two main approaches to numerical modelling: integral equation; finite

  9. Model Fire Protection Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To facilitate conformance with its fire safety directives and the implementation of a comprehensive fire protection program, DOE has developed a number of "model" program documents. These include a comprehensive model fire protection program, model fire hazards analyses and assessments, fire protection system inspection and testing procedures, and related material.

  10. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Program Administrator Description

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Program Administrator Business Models, Program Administrator Description.

  11. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.

    2007-11-08

    The purpose of this report is to compile information and conclusions gathered as part of three separate tasks undertaken as part of the overall project, “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs,” sponsored by the Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation office within the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address improvements to modeling in the near term, and note gaps in knowledge where future research is needed.

  12. Comparison of two different rating programs for sustainable homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjarnadottir, Margret Halla

    2009-01-01

    This thesis compares two different rating programs for sustainable homes; The Code for Sustainable Homes in the United Kingdom, and LEED for Homes in the United States. The comparison is both in general and with respect ...

  13. Stochastic Programming from Modeling Languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gondzio, Jacek

    i i i i Chapter 1 Stochastic Programming from Modeling Languages Emmanuel Fragni`ere1 and Jacek for mathematical programs. Algebraic modeling languages provide facility for the management of a math- ematical to deal with uncertain future 1 #12;i i i i 2 Chapter 1. Stochastic Programming from Modeling Languages

  14. Comparison of option prices in semimartingale models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rüschendorf, Ludger

    Comparison of option prices in semimartingale models Jan Bergenthum, Ludger R¨uschendorf Department.r.t. martingale pricing measures. The comparison is with respect to convex and also with respect to directionally characteristics of the stochastic logarithm of the stock price processes S, S . As examples we discuss

  15. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Non-Utility Program Administrator Business Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Non-Utility Program Administrator Business Model.

  16. Community Renewables: Model Program Rules

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) has worked closely with The Vote Solar Initiative to develop model program rules for community-scale renewables that consider many of the basic issues facing community renewables programs. IREC’s model program rules address such issues as renewable system size, interconnection, eligibility for participation, allocation of the benefits flowing from participation, net metering of system production, and other essential features of a community renewables program. The goal of this effort is to provide stakeholders with program rules they can tailor to the individual circumstances and policy preferences of their state without having to reinvent the wheel at each turn.

  17. Comparison of Competing Software Reliability Models: Bayesian Model Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Sanjib

    is in software development and testing. The goal of software reliability research is to quantify the performanceComparison of Competing Software Reliability Models: Bayesian Model Selection Sanjib Basu and Nader@math.niu.edu and nader@math.niu.edu Abstract Software reliability models are used to describe the evolution

  18. Anti-pattern Detection with Model Queries: A Comparison of Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferenc, Rudolf

    Anti-pattern Detection with Model Queries: A Comparison of Approaches Zoltán Ujhelyi, Ákos Horváth (EMF) as an underlying representation of program models processed by three general-purpose model query with a metamod- eling framework, such as the Eclipse Modeling Framework (EMF), which offers advanced tooling

  19. Use Concurrent Programming Models to Motivate Teaching of Programming Languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leavens, Gary T.

    Use Concurrent Programming Models to Motivate Teaching of Programming Languages Gary T. Leavens CS-TR-08-04a April 2008, revised May 2008 Keywords: Programming language curriculum, concepts, concurrency;Use Concurrent Programming Models to Motivate Teaching of Programming Languages Gary T. Leavens

  20. Starting laminar plumes: Comparison of laboratory and numerical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Keken, Peter

    Starting laminar plumes: Comparison of laboratory and numerical modeling Judith Vatteville Institut, France (davaille@fast.u-psud.fr) [1] A detailed comparison of starting laminar plumes in viscous fluids. Davaille (2009), Starting laminar plumes: Comparison of laboratory and numerical modeling, Geochem. Geophys

  1. An experimental comparison of current viscoplastic constitutive models at elevated temperature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, George Henry

    1986-01-01

    AN EXPERIMENTAL COMPARISON OF CURRENT VISCOPLASTIC CONSTITUTIVE MODELS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURE A Thesis by GEORGE HENRY JAMES III Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements..., And Rhode's Model. Bodner's Anisotropic Model. Miller's Model. Walker's Exponential Model. APPENDIX C - AUXILIARY MODEL RESULTS. APPENDIX D EXPERIMENTAL COMPUTER PROGRAMS. VITA. 127 137 137 139 143 144 147 154 176 217 LIST OF TABLES Table...

  2. A comparison of Mexico's Border Industry Program with the Border Industry Program of South Africa and its Bantu homelands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Notzon, Brian Anthony

    1973-01-01

    A COMPARISON OF MEXICO'S BORDER INDUSTRY PROGRAM WITH THE BORDER INDUSTRY PROGRAM OF SOUTH AFRICA AND ITS BANTU HOMELANDS A Thesis by BRIAN ANTHONY NOTZON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1973 Ma)or Sub)ect: Economics A COMPARISON OP MEXICO'S BORDER INDUSTRY PROGRAM WITH THE BORDER INDUSTRY PROGRAM OF SOUTH AFRICA AND ITS BANTU HOMELANDS A Thesis by BRIAN ANTHONY NOTZON Approved...

  3. Comparison of open-source linear programming solvers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gearhart, Jared Lee; Adair, Kristin Lynn; Durfee, Justin D.; Jones, Katherine A.; Martin, Nathaniel; Detry, Richard Joseph

    2013-10-01

    When developing linear programming models, issues such as budget limitations, customer requirements, or licensing may preclude the use of commercial linear programming solvers. In such cases, one option is to use an open-source linear programming solver. A survey of linear programming tools was conducted to identify potential open-source solvers. From this survey, four open-source solvers were tested using a collection of linear programming test problems and the results were compared to IBM ILOG CPLEX Optimizer (CPLEX) [1], an industry standard. The solvers considered were: COIN-OR Linear Programming (CLP) [2], [3], GNU Linear Programming Kit (GLPK) [4], lp_solve [5] and Modular In-core Nonlinear Optimization System (MINOS) [6]. As no open-source solver outperforms CPLEX, this study demonstrates the power of commercial linear programming software. CLP was found to be the top performing open-source solver considered in terms of capability and speed. GLPK also performed well but cannot match the speed of CLP or CPLEX. lp_solve and MINOS were considerably slower and encountered issues when solving several test problems.

  4. Comparison of Photovoltaic Models in the System Advisor Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, N. J.; Dobos, A. P.; Gilman, P.

    2013-08-01

    The System Advisor Model (SAM) is free software developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for predicting the performance of renewable energy systems and analyzing the financial feasibility of residential, commercial, and utility-scale grid-connected projects. SAM offers several options for predicting the performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems. The model requires that the analyst choose from three PV system models, and depending on that choice, possibly choose from three module and two inverter component models. To obtain meaningful results from SAM, the analyst must be aware of the differences between the model options and their applicability to different modeling scenarios. This paper presents an overview the different PV model options and presents a comparison of results for a 200-kW system using different model options.

  5. Hunt, Johnston, Abraham, Rodier, Garry, Putman and de la Barra Comparisons from the Sacramento Model Testbed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert A.

    Hunt, Johnston, Abraham, Rodier, Garry, Putman and de la Barra 1 Comparisons from the Sacramento Barra Three land use and transport interaction models were applied to the Sacramento, CA region futures. INTRODUCTION Background The Sacramento Model Testbed research program was established to apply

  6. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Non-Utility Program Administrator Introduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Non-Utility Program Administrator Business Model Introduction.

  7. Tarragon : a programming model for latency-hiding scientific computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cicotti, Pietro

    2011-01-01

    Chapter 2 Programming Model . . . . . . . . . 2.1vi Chapter 6 Dynamic programming . . . . . . . . . . 6.1 Theof related programming model implementations. . . . . .

  8. Wireless Gateway Programming Model Qadri Hamarsheh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Wireless Gateway Programming Model Qadri Hamarsheh Department of Computer Engineering, Faculty suggests architecture for Wireless Gateway Programming Model that consists of building blocks to solve the technical and business problems of wireless environment. The paper describes various fundamental aspects

  9. Introduction 1.1 Model Programming Languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, John C.

    Chapter 1 Introduction 1.1 Model Programming Languages The mathematical analysis of programming procedure call mechanisms, we might begin by identifying a simple programming language whose main constructs are procedure declara- tions and calls. We may then analyze this simpli#12;ed programming language without

  10. Energy Conservation Program: Data Collection and Comparison with Forecasted Unit Sales for Five Lamp Types, Notice of Data Availability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Data Collection and Comparison with Forecasted Unit Sales for Five Lamp Types, Notice of Data Availability

  11. The ASC Sequoia Programming Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seager, M

    2008-08-06

    In the late 1980's and early 1990's, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was deeply engrossed in determining the next generation programming model for the Integrated Design Codes (IDC) beyond vectorization for the Cray 1s series of computers. The vector model, developed in mid 1970's first for the CDC 7600 and later extended from stack based vector operation to memory to memory operations for the Cray 1s, lasted approximately 20 years (See Slide 5). The Cray vector era was deemed an extremely long lived era as it allowed vector codes to be developed over time (the Cray 1s were faster in scalar mode than the CDC 7600) with vector unit utilization increasing incrementally over time. The other attributes of the Cray vector era at LLNL were that we developed, supported and maintained the Operating System (LTSS and later NLTSS), communications protocols (LINCS), Compilers (Civic Fortran77 and Model), operating system tools (e.g., batch system, job control scripting, loaders, debuggers, editors, graphics utilities, you name it) and math and highly machine optimized libraries (e.g., SLATEC, and STACKLIB). Although LTSS was adopted by Cray for early system generations, they later developed COS and UNICOS operating systems and environment on their own. In the late 1970s and early 1980s two trends appeared that made the Cray vector programming model (described above including both the hardware and system software aspects) seem potentially dated and slated for major revision. These trends were the appearance of low cost CMOS microprocessors and their attendant, departmental and mini-computers and later workstations and personal computers. With the wide spread adoption of Unix in the early 1980s, it appeared that LLNL (and the other DOE Labs) would be left out of the mainstream of computing without a rapid transition to these 'Killer Micros' and modern OS and tools environments. The other interesting advance in the period is that systems were being developed with multiple 'cores' in them and called Symmetric Multi-Processor or Shared Memory Processor (SMP) systems. The parallel revolution had begun. The Laboratory started a small 'parallel processing project' in 1983 to study the new technology and its application to scientific computing with four people: Tim Axelrod, Pete Eltgroth, Paul Dubois and Mark Seager. Two years later, Eugene Brooks joined the team. This team focused on Unix and 'killer micro' SMPs. Indeed, Eugene Brooks was credited with coming up with the 'Killer Micro' term. After several generations of SMP platforms (e.g., Sequent Balance 8000 with 8 33MHz MC32032s, Allian FX8 with 8 MC68020 and FPGA based Vector Units and finally the BB&N Butterfly with 128 cores), it became apparent to us that the killer micro revolution would indeed take over Crays and that we definitely needed a new programming and systems model. The model developed by Mark Seager and Dale Nielsen focused on both the system aspects (Slide 3) and the code development aspects (Slide 4). Although now succinctly captured in two attached slides, at the time there was tremendous ferment in the research community as to what parallel programming model would emerge, dominate and survive. In addition, we wanted a model that would provide portability between platforms of a single generation but also longevity over multiple--and hopefully--many generations. Only after we developed the 'Livermore Model' and worked it out in considerable detail did it become obvious that what we came up with was the right approach. In a nutshell, the applications programming model of the Livermore Model posited that SMP parallelism would ultimately not scale indefinitely and one would have to bite the bullet and implement MPI parallelism within the Integrated Design Code (IDC). We also had a major emphasis on doing everything in a completely standards based, portable methodology with POSIX/Unix as the target environment. We decided against specialized libraries like STACKLIB for performance, but kept as many general purpose, portable math libraries as were needed by the co

  12. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Non-Utility Program Administrator Conclusion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Conclusion, Summary of Non-utility Program Administrator Insights.

  13. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Non-Utility Program Administrator Market

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Non-Utility Program Administrator Market.

  14. ARIMA Models versus Gene Expression Programming In Precipitation Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    ARIMA Models versus Gene Expression Programming In Precipitation Modeling ALINA BRBULESCU and ELENA, Precipitation 1 Introduction Time series are ubiquitous in the real world. They are usually generated

  15. Comparison Between TRNSYS Software Simulation and PV F-Chart Program on Photovoltaic System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.

    2012-01-01

    This report covers the comparisons of Photovoltaic System by TRNSYS simulation and PV F-Chart program to test TRNSYS simulation accuracy. The report starts with the Photovoltaic (PV) (PV) System introduction in Section one which is followed...

  16. Comparisons of Statistical Modeling for Constructing Gene Regulatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Kevin Patrick

    Comparisons of Statistical Modeling for Constructing Gene Regulatory Networks by Xiaohui Chen B. In this thesis, we compare a variety of existing regression models and apply them to construct regulatory network construction algorithm. Finally, we apply our models on a p53-related data set, NCI-60 data

  17. Building Energy Modeling (BEM) Program Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amir Roth, Ph.D. amir.roth@ee.doe.gov Building Energy Modeling (BEM) Program Overview http:energy.goveerebuildingsbuilding-energy-modeling 2 BEM: An Energy-Efficiency...

  18. Comparison of isotopic transmutation modelling codes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beard, Carl Allen

    1990-01-01

    test case involved modelling a fission pulse, while the second concerned the modelling of a long irradiation period. CINDER-10 was found to utilize an analytically based solution scheme allowing it to correctly model nearly all possible nuclear... Contribution of Fission Products to Total Decay Heat at a Cooling Time of 10 Seconds Due to a Fission Pulse . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Contribution of Fission Products tg Total Decay Heat at a Cooling Time of 10 Seconds Due to a Fission Pulse 31 III...

  19. Curriculum and Program Development 177 Modeling and Problem Solving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peszynska, Malgorzata

    Curriculum and Program Development 177 Modeling and Problem Solving: Curriculum and Program of curriculum and program devel- opment that can promote the students' interest and growing experience" constrain inclusion of interdisciplinary mathematical modeling in curriculum and programs and require

  20. Climate Impact of Transportation A Model Comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girod, Bastien; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Grahn, Maria; Kitous, Alban; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page

    2013-06-01

    Transportation contributes to a significant and rising share of global energy use and GHG emissions. Therefore modeling future travel demand, its fuel use, and resulting CO2 emission is highly relevant for climate change mitigation. In this study we compare the baseline projections for global service demand (passenger-kilometers, ton-kilometers), fuel use, and CO2 emissions of five different global transport models using harmonized input assumptions on income and population. For four models we also evaluate the impact of a carbon tax. All models project a steep increase in service demand over the century. Technology is important for limiting energy consumption and CO2 emissions, but quite radical changes in the technology mix are required to stabilize or reverse the trend. While all models project liquid fossil fuels dominating up to 2050, they differ regarding the use of alternative fuels (natural gas, hydrogen, biofuels, and electricity), because of different fuel price projections. The carbon tax of US$200/tCO2 in 2050 stabilizes or reverses global emission growth in all models. Besides common findings many differences in the model assumptions and projections indicate room for improvement in modeling and empirical description of the transport system.

  1. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Utility Program Administrator Introduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Introduction to the Utility Program Administrator Business Model, as posted on the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program website.

  2. MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING MODELS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Harvey J.

    ~ngenvironmental quality. The scope includes air, water, and land quality, stemming from the first works in the 1960s, and the mathematical program is designed to pre- scribe decisions for operations and planning to minimize cost subject. Sections 2-4 sum- marize the literature on mathematical programming models for air, land, and water quality

  3. Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus Polymer Composites Research in the LM Materials Program Overview...

  4. Modeling the scalability of acrylic stream programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Jeremy Ng, 1981-

    2004-01-01

    Despite the fact that the streaming application domain is becoming increasingly widespread, few studies have focused specifically on the performance characteristics of stream programs. We introduce two models by which the ...

  5. RELIABILITY COMPARISON MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES (OWT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Joseph B.

    RELIABILITY COMPARISON MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES (OWT) Yizhou Lu, T. M. Delorm, A. Christou of survivor functions R(t) of drive-trains, after 1 year of operation, between Offshore Wind Turbine (OWT) vs of the reliability of these 5 Types Surrogate failure rate data Onshore wind turbines (OT) 1-1.5MW CONCLUSIONS

  6. Bayesian Comparison of Spatially Regularised General Linear Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penny, Will

    Bayesian Comparison of Spatially Regularised General Linear Models Will Penny,1* Guillaume Flandin, London WC1N 3BG 2 Cuban Neuroscience Center, Havana, Cuba Abstract: In previous work (Penny et al., [2005. In neuroimaging, BMC is used in the analysis of func- tional integration [Penny et al., 2004]. This allows infer

  7. MicroShield/ISOCS gamma modeling comparison.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sansone, Kenneth R

    2013-08-01

    Quantitative radiological analysis attempts to determine the quantity of activity or concentration of specific radionuclide(s) in a sample. Based upon the certified standards that are used to calibrate gamma spectral detectors, geometric similarities between sample shape and the calibration standards determine if the analysis results developed are qualitative or quantitative. A sample analyzed that does not mimic a calibrated sample geometry must be reported as a non-standard geometry and thus the results are considered qualitative and not quantitative. MicroShieldR or ISOCSR calibration software can be used to model non-standard geometric sample shapes in an effort to obtain a quantitative analytical result. MicroShieldR and Canberra's ISOCSR software contain several geometry templates that can provide accurate quantitative modeling for a variety of sample configurations. Included in the software are computational algorithms that are used to develop and calculate energy efficiency values for the modeled sample geometry which can then be used with conventional analysis methodology to calculate the result. The response of the analytical method and the sensitivity of the mechanical and electronic equipment to the radionuclide of interest must be calibrated, or standardized, using a calibrated radiological source that contains a known and certified amount of activity.

  8. Connecticut Fuel Cell Activities: Markets, Programs, and Models...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activities: Markets, Programs, and Models Connecticut Fuel Cell Activities: Markets, Programs, and Models Presented by the Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology, Inc. at the...

  9. nIFTy Cosmology: Comparison of Galaxy Formation Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knebe, Alexander; Thomas, Peter A; Benson, Andrew; Blaizot, Jeremy; Bower, Richard; Carretero, Jorge; Castander, Francisco J; Cattaneo, Andrea; Cora, Sofia A; Croton, Darren J; Cui, Weiguang; Cunnama, Daniel; De Lucia, Gabriella; Devriendt, Julien E; Elahi, Pascal J; Font, Andreea; Fontanot, Fabio; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Gargiulo, Ignacio D; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Helly, John; Henriques, Bruno; Hirschmann, Michaela; Lee, Jaehyun; Mamon, Gary A; Monaco, Pierluigi; Onions, Julian; Padilla, Nelson D; Power, Chris; Pujol, Arnau; Skibba, Ramin A; Somerville, Rachel S; Srisawat, Chaichalit; Vega-Martinez, Cristian A; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2015-01-01

    We present a comparison of 14 galaxy formation models: 12 different semi-analytical models and 2 halo-occupation distribution models for galaxy formation based upon the same cosmological simulation and merger tree information derived from it. The participating codes have proven to be very successful in their own right but they have all been calibrated independently using various observational data sets, stellar models, and merger trees. In this paper we apply them without recalibration and this leads to a wide variety of predictions for the stellar mass function, specific star formation rates, stellar-to- halo mass ratios, and the abundance of orphan galaxies. The scatter is much larger than seen in previous comparison studies primarily because the codes have been used outside of their native environment within which they are well tested and calibrated. The purpose of the `nIFTy comparison of galaxy formation models' is to bring together as many different galaxy formation modellers as possible and to investig...

  10. Comparison Table of Department of Energy Mentor-Protege Program |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicleDepartment of Energy Programs » Mentor-Protégé

  11. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: HVAC Contractor Business Model Introduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: HVAC Contractor Business Model Introduction.

  12. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Retailer Business Model Conclusion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Retailer Business Model Conclusion, Summary of Retailer Insights.

  13. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Remodeler Business Model Conclusion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Remodeler Business Model Conclusion, Summary of Remodeler Insights.

  14. Locally Regularized Spatiotemporal Modeling and Model Comparison for Functional MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rotstein, Horacio G.

    and compare our model to the SPM-GLM method. Our findings sug- gest that our method offers a better approach

  15. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Utility Program Administrator Conclusion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Conclusion of the Utility Program Administrator Business Model Guide, as posted on the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program website.

  16. Comparison of numerical models of a pyrotechnic device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, K.G.

    1986-01-01

    The predictions of two numerical models of a hot-wire initiated pyrotechnic device are compared to each other and to experimental results. Both models employ finite difference approximations to the heat diffusion equation in cylindrical coordinates. The temperature dependence of the thermal properties of the pyrotechnic materials and of the bridgewire are modeled. An Arrhenius' model is used to describe the exothermic reaction in the powder. One model employs a single radial coordinate and predicts the radial temperature distribution in the bridgewire and surrounding powder mass. In addition to the radial coordinate, the other model also employs a longitudinal coordinate to predict the temperature distribution parallel to the axis of the bridgewire. The predictions of the two-dimensional model concerning the energy requirements for ignition and the energy losses from the ends of the bridgewire are presented. A comparison of the predictions of the two models and the development of thermal gradients are employed to define the regime where the assumption, in the one-dimensional model, of negligible heat transfer axial to the bridgewire does not lead to significant error. The general problems associated with predicting ignition from a diffusion model are also discussed.

  17. Model comparison for the density structure across solar coronal waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arregui, I; Ramos, A Asensio

    2015-01-01

    The spatial variation of physical quantities, such as the mass density, across solar atmospheric waveguides governs the timescales and spatial scales for wave damping and energy dissipation. The direct measurement of the spatial distribution of density, however, is difficult and indirect seismology inversion methods have been suggested as an alternative. We applied Bayesian inference, model comparison, and model-averaging techniques to the inference of the cross-field density structuring in solar magnetic waveguides using information on periods and damping times for resonantly damped magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) transverse kink oscillations. Three commonly employed alternative profiles were used to model the variation of the mass density across the waveguide boundary. Parameter inference enabled us to obtain information on physical quantities such as the Alfv\\'en travel time, the density contrast, and the transverse inhomogeneity length scale. The inference results from alternative density models were compared a...

  18. Comparison of Uncertainty of Two Precipitation Prediction Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shield, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Meteorological inputs are an important part of subsurface flow and transport modeling. The choice of source for meteorological data used as inputs has significant impacts on the results of subsurface flow and transport studies. One method to obtain the meteorological data required for flow and transport studies is the use of weather generating models. This paper compares the difference in performance of two weather generating models at Technical Area 54 of Los Alamos National Lab. Technical Area 54 is contains several waste pits for low-level radioactive waste and is the site for subsurface flow and transport studies. This makes the comparison of the performance of the two weather generators at this site particularly valuable.

  19. Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing: Future Programming Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Guang, R.

    2008-07-24

    The mission of the pmodel center project is to develop software technology to support scalable parallel programming models for terascale systems. The goal of the specific UD subproject is in the context developing an efficient and robust methodology and tools for HPC programming. More specifically, the focus is on developing new programming models which facilitate programmers in porting their application onto parallel high performance computing systems. During the course of the research in the past 5 years, the landscape of microprocessor chip architecture has witnessed a fundamental change – the emergence of multi-core/many-core chip architecture appear to become the mainstream technology and will have a major impact to for future generation parallel machines. The programming model for shared-address space machines is becoming critical to such multi-core architectures. Our research highlight is the in-depth study of proposed fine-grain parallelism/multithreading support on such future generation multi-core architectures. Our research has demonstrated the significant impact such fine-grain multithreading model can have on the productivity of parallel programming models and their efficient implementation.

  20. 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Program Peer Review Presentations...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    VA. The Advanced Grid Modeling Research Program leverages scientific research in mathematics for application to power system models and software tools. 17 projects were...

  1. Economic Modelling using Constraint Logic Programming Nelson Donovan & David Gilbert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, David

    Economic Modelling using Constraint Logic Programming Nelson Donovan & David Gilbert Computer of constraint logic programming (CLP) in economic modelling through the design and implementation of two economic models. The first model, the Desai­ Henry model contains only linear equations while the second

  2. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: HVAC Contractor Business Model Conclusion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: HVAC Contractor Business Model Conclusion, Summary of HVAC Contractor Insights.

  3. Retrievals of Carbon Dioxide from GOSAT: Validation, model comparison and approach development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Retrievals of Carbon Dioxide from GOSAT: Validation, model comparison and approach development properties of aerosol and cirrus particles. 3. Model Comparison Retrievals of XCO2 were performed on cloud and compared to the CarbonTracker model. The retrieval averaging kernels were applied to Carbon

  4. Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Xin

    2014-01-01

    combustion turbine chiller; electric chiller chiller; Screwturbine chillers, and electric chillers. DeST has screw

  5. Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Dandan

    2014-01-01

    Energy Management System ), External Interface, FMI ( Functional Mockup Interface ) Interoperability

  6. Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Xin

    2014-01-01

    energy balance on the water and air sides of the air/watercurves and performed on the water and air side of thebalance on the water and outdoor air web-bulb air/water

  7. Comparison of practical vertical ground heat exchanger sizing methods to a Fort Polk data/model benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, J.W.; McDowell, T.P.; Hughes, P.J.

    1997-09-01

    The results of five practical vertical ground heat exchanger sizing programs are compared against a detailed simulation model that has been calibrated to monitored data taken from one military family housing unit at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The calibration of the detailed model to data is described in a companion paper. The assertion that the data/detailed model is a useful benchmark for practical sizing methods is based on this calibration. The results from the comparisons demonstrate the current level of agreement between vertical ground heat exchanger sizing methods in common use. It is recommended that the calibration and comparison exercise be repeated with data sets from additional sites in order to build confidence in the practical sizing methods.

  8. Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan; Miller, William A; Huang, Yu; Levinson, Ronnen

    2014-01-01

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the United States Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs modern web technologies, usability design, and national average defaults as an interface to annual simulations of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim in order to provide estimated annual energy and cost savings. In addition to cool reflective roofs, RSC simulates multiple roof and attic configurations including different roof slopes, above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers, low-emittance roof surfaces, duct location, duct leakage rates, multiple substrate types, and insulation levels. A base case and energy-efficient alternative can be compared side-by-side to estimate monthly energy. RSC was benchmarked against field data from demonstration homes in Ft. Irwin, California; while cooling savings were similar, heating penalty varied significantly across different simulation engines. RSC results reduce cool roofing cost-effectiveness thus mitigating expected economic incentives for this countermeasure to the urban heat island effect. This paper consolidates comparison of RSC s projected energy savings to other simulation engines including DOE-2.1E, AtticSim, Micropas, and EnergyPlus, and presents preliminary analyses. RSC s algorithms for capturing radiant heat transfer and duct interaction in the attic assembly are considered major contributing factors to increased cooling savings and heating penalties. Comparison to previous simulation-based studies, analysis on the force multiplier of RSC cooling savings and heating penalties, the role of radiative heat exchange in an attic assembly, and changes made for increased accuracy of the duct model are included.

  9. Human factors engineering program review model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is performing nuclear power plant design certification reviews based on a design process plan that describes the human factors engineering (HFE) program elements that are necessary and sufficient to develop an acceptable detailed design specification and an acceptable implemented design. There are two principal reasons for this approach. First, the initial design certification applications submitted for staff review did not include detailed design information. Second, since human performance literature and industry experiences have shown that many significant human factors issues arise early in the design process, review of the design process activities and results is important to the evaluation of an overall design. However, current regulations and guidance documents do not address the criteria for design process review. Therefore, the HFE Program Review Model (HFE PRM) was developed as a basis for performing design certification reviews that include design process evaluations as well as review of the final design. A central tenet of the HFE PRM is that the HFE aspects of the plant should be developed, designed, and evaluated on the basis of a structured top-down system analysis using accepted HFE principles. The HFE PRM consists of ten component elements. Each element in divided into four sections: Background, Objective, Applicant Submittals, and Review Criteria. This report describes the development of the HFE PRM and gives a detailed description of each HFE review element.

  10. Hydraulic Habitat Model Comparison_12_03_09 Desiree Tullos and Beth Copeland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Hydraulic Habitat Model Comparison_12_03_09 Desiree Tullos and Beth Copeland Review of Hydraulic;Hydraulic Habitat Model Comparison_12_03_09 Desiree Tullos and Beth Copeland Name PHABSIM Spatial scale and Observations on Flow Determination in New Zealand Regulated Streams: Advances in Ecology. Plenum Press, New

  11. Equipment Energy Models Using Spreadsheet Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    Engineering calculations on PC's are undergoing a revolution with the advent of spreadsheet programs. The author has found that virtually all of the energy analysis types of programs can be cast into spreadsheet methods and thereby eliminate many...

  12. PySP: Modeling and Solving Stochastic Programs in Python

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-09-07

    Sep 6, 2010 ... Noname manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor). PySP: Modeling and Solving Stochastic Programs in. Python. Jean-Paul Watson · David ...

  13. Causes of variation in soil carbon simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    and benchmarks in Earth system models sitivity of the Amazonand benchmarks in Earth system models Thornton, P. E. ,simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison

  14. Systematic comparison of trip distribution laws and models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenormand, Maxime; Ramasco, José J

    2015-01-01

    Trip distribution laws are basic for the travel demand characterization needed in transport and urban planning. Several approaches have been considered in the last years. One of them is the so-called gravity law, in which the number of trips is assumed to be related to the population at origin and destination and to decrease with the distance. The mathematical expression of this law resembles Newton's law of gravity, which explains its name. Another popular approach is inspired by the theory of intervening opportunities and it has been concreted into the so-called radiation models. Individuals are supposed to travel until they find a job opportunity, so the population and jobs spatial distributions naturally lead to a trip flow network. In this paper, we perform a thorough comparison between the gravity and the radiation approaches in their ability at estimating commuting flows. We test the gravity and the radiation laws against empirical trip data at different scales and coming from different countries. Diff...

  15. Energy efficiency in nonprofit agencies: Creating effective program models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M.A.; Prindle, B.; Scherr, M.I.; White, D.L.

    1990-08-01

    Nonprofit agencies are a critical component of the health and human services system in the US. It has been clearly demonstrated by programs that offer energy efficiency services to nonprofits that, with minimal investment, they can educe their energy consumption by ten to thirty percent. This energy conservation potential motivated the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to conceive a project to help states develop energy efficiency programs for nonprofits. The purpose of the project was two-fold: (1) to analyze existing programs to determine which design and delivery mechanisms are particularly effective, and (2) to create model programs for states to follow in tailoring their own plans for helping nonprofits with energy efficiency programs. Twelve existing programs were reviewed, and three model programs were devised and put into operation. The model programs provide various forms of financial assistance to nonprofits and serve as a source of information on energy efficiency as well. After examining the results from the model programs (which are still on-going) and from the existing programs, several replicability factors'' were developed for use in the implementation of programs by other states. These factors -- some concrete and practical, others more generalized -- serve as guidelines for states devising program based on their own particular needs and resources.

  16. Comparison of low-level waste disposal programs of DOE and selected international countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meagher, B.G. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cole, L.T. [Cole and Associates (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to examine and compare the approaches and practices of selected countries for disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) with those of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The report addresses the programs for disposing of wastes into engineered LLW disposal facilities and is not intended to address in-situ options and practices associated with environmental restoration activities or the management of mill tailings and mixed LLW. The countries chosen for comparison are France, Sweden, Canada, and the United Kingdom. The countries were selected as typical examples of the LLW programs which have evolved under differing technical constraints, regulatory requirements, and political/social systems. France was the first country to demonstrate use of engineered structure-type disposal facilities. The UK has been actively disposing of LLW since 1959. Sweden has been disposing of LLW since 1983 in an intermediate-depth disposal facility rather than a near-surface disposal facility. To date, Canada has been storing its LLW but will soon begin operation of Canada`s first demonstration LLW disposal facility.

  17. Power Handling of the Bulk Tungsten Divertor Row at JET: First Measurements and Comparison to the GTM Thermal Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Handling of the Bulk Tungsten Divertor Row at JET: First Measurements and Comparison to the GTM Thermal Model

  18. Comparison between JET Profile Data and the Predictions of a Transport Model Based on ITG and Trapped Electron Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comparison between JET Profile Data and the Predictions of a Transport Model Based on ITG and Trapped Electron Modes

  19. Orchestration in Orc: A Deterministic Distributed Programming Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misra, Jayadev

    Orchestration in Orc: A Deterministic Distributed Programming Model William R. Cook and Jayadev}@cs.utexas.edu Abstract. Orc is a new model of distributed programming which pro- vides a strong theoretical foundation for internet computing based on compositions of web-services. Orc combines some of the power and flex- ibility

  20. Web Cube: a Programming Model for Reliable Web Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Web Cube: a Programming Model for Reliable Web Applications I.S.W.B. Prasetya, T.E.J. Vos, S UU-CS-2005-002 www.cs.uu.nl #12;Web Cube: a Programming Model for Reliable Web Applications I@cs.uu.nl, tanja@iti.upv.es, doaitse@cs.uu.nl, bela@cs.ui.ac.id Abstract Web Cube is a server side programming

  1. ENERGY INVESTMENTS UNDER CLIMATE POLICY: A COMPARISON OF GLOBAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCollum, David; Nagai, Yu; Riahi, Keywan; Marangoni, Giacomo; Calvin, Katherine V.; Pietzcker, Robert; Van Vliet, Jasper; van der Zwaan, Bob

    2013-11-01

    The levels of investment needed to mobilize an energy system transformation and mitigate climate change are not known with certainty. This paper aims to inform the ongoing dialogue and in so doing to guide public policy and strategic corporate decision making. Within the framework of the LIMITS integrated assessment model comparison exercise, we analyze a multi-IAM ensemble of long-term energy and greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. Our study provides insight into several critical but uncertain areas related to the future investment environment, for example in terms of where capital expenditures may need to flow regionally, into which sectors they might be concentrated, and what policies could be helpful in spurring these financial resources. We find that stringent climate policies consistent with a 2°C climate change target would require a considerable upscaling of investments into low-carbon energy and energy efficiency, reaching approximately $45 trillion (range: $30–$75 trillion) cumulative between 2010 and 2050, or about $1.1 trillion annually. This represents an increase of some $30 trillion ($10–$55 trillion), or $0.8 trillion per year, beyond what investments might otherwise be in a reference scenario that assumes the continuation of present and planned emissions-reducing policies throughout the world. In other words, a substantial "clean-energy investment gap" of some $800 billion/yr exists — notably on the same order of magnitude as present-day subsidies for fossil energy and electricity worldwide ($523 billion). Unless the gap is filled rather quickly, the 2°C target could potentially become out of reach.

  2. A Comparison of Frailty and Other Models for Bivariate Survival Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahu, Sujit K

    for bivariate data with the models based on bivariate exponential and Weibull distributions. Bayesian methodsA Comparison of Frailty and Other Models for Bivariate Survival Data Sujit K. Sahu Faculty appropriate modeling. Frailty models are the most popular for such failure time data. However, there are other

  3. A taxonomy for simulation modeling based on programming language principles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukherjee, Amlan

    A taxonomy for simulation modeling based on programming language principles PAUL A. FISHWICK many diverse areas employ simulation models, no agreed-upon taxonomy has been developed to categorize than the design structure of the model. We present a uniform model design taxonomy whose categories

  4. Linear programming model for optimum resource allocation in rural systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devadas, V. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Kharagpur (India)

    1997-07-01

    The article presents a model for optimum resource allocation in a rural system. Making use of linear programming, the objective function of the linear programming model is to maximize the revenue of the rural system, and optimum resource allocation is made subject to a number of energy- and nonenergy-related constraints relevant to the rural system. The model also quantifies the major yields as well as the by-products of different sectors of the rural economic system.

  5. Models of quantum computation and quantum programming languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Miszczak

    2011-12-03

    The goal of the presented paper is to provide an introduction to the basic computational models used in quantum information theory. We review various models of quantum Turing machine, quantum circuits and quantum random access machine (QRAM) along with their classical counterparts. We also provide an introduction to quantum programming languages, which are developed using the QRAM model. We review the syntax of several existing quantum programming languages and discuss their features and limitations.

  6. Comparison of multivariate methods for inferential modeling of soil carbon using visible/near-infrared spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    Comparison of multivariate methods for inferential modeling of soil carbon using visible Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy Visible/near-infrared spectroscopy Multivariate calibration Pre multivariate techniques (stepwise multiple linear regression, principal components regression, partial least

  7. Nested Sampling for Bayesian Model Comparison in the Context of Salmonella Disease Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dybowski, Richard; McKinley, Trevelyan J.; Mastroeni, Pietro; Restif, Olivier

    2013-12-20

    sciences. Here we demonstrate how nested sampling can be used for inference and model comparison in biological sciences. We present a reanalysis of data from experimental infection of mice with Salmonella enterica showing the distribution of bacteria...

  8. Model comparison for automatic characterization and classification of average ERPs using visual oddball paradigm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polikar, Robi

    Model comparison for automatic characterization and classification of average ERPs using visual December 2008 Keywords: EEG ERP Attention P300 N200 Oddball Pattern recognition Linear discriminant responses from averaged event-related potentials (ERPs) along with identifying appropriate features

  9. Comparison of Small Area Models in SAIPE Tapabrata Maiti and Eric V. Slud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    -squared errors, generalized linear mixed model, mixed effect logistic regression, loss function, small area-Herriot models for logarithms of county child poverty rates with a unit- (i.e., individual-) level logistic regression model with county-level random effects (GLMM). This comparison is based upon several loss criteria

  10. A Comparison Between Model Reduction and Controller Reduction: Application to a PWR Nuclear Planty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gevers, Michel

    A Comparison Between Model Reduction and Controller Reduction: Application to a PWR Nuclear Planty model reduction with controller reduction for the same PWR system. We show that closed-loop techniques to the design of a low-order con- troller for a realistic model of order 42 of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR

  11. Modeling for surge control of centrifugal compresssors: comparison with experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

    and rotational speed. A classical result in this ...eld is the axial compressor model of [5], where a model- sients on the surge dynamics, and on the compressor dynamics in general. A model describing this interac will also be taken here, but the modeling of the compressor pressure rise and torque will be modeled in more

  12. A comparison of current work-hardening models used in the analysis of plastic deformations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaughn, David Kenneth

    1973-01-01

    . 63 66 71 VIII THE MROZ MODEL, Basic Concepts Formulation. 77 77 83 IX COMPARISON OF UNIAXIAL AND BIAXIAL TEST DATA WITH MODEL PREDICTIONS Uniaxial Experimental Test 90 90 vi TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) CHAPTER PA. GE IX (Continued... in biaxial stress space. 67 Translational effect produced by the mechanical sublayer model. 68 12 Mechanical sublayer model idealization of the uniaxial stress-strain curve. 69 13 Translation of yield surface (Mroz model) 80 14 Compressive uniaxial...

  13. Applying stochastic programming models in financial risk management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Xi

    2010-01-01

    This research studies two modelling techniques that help seek optimal strategies in financial risk management. Both are based on the stochastic programming methodology. The first technique is concerned with market risk ...

  14. Mathematical Programming Models and Solution Strategies for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 Mathematical Programming Models and Solution Strategies for the Synthesis of Process Systems Ignacio E. Grossmann Center for Advanced Process Decision-making Dept of Chemical Engineering, Carnegie: Process Systems Engineering Oxygen Air Ethylene Chlorine Vinyl Chloride Hydrogen Chloride Ethylene

  15. Passive Reduced Order Modeling of Multiport Interconnects via Semidefinite Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahmood, Zohaib

    In this paper we present a passive reduced order modeling algorithm for linear multiport interconnect structures. The proposed technique uses rational fitting via semidefinite programming to identify a passive transfer ...

  16. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Uses lessons learned from Better Buildings grantees, existing data, and private sector insights to highlight business models that can help develop a sustainable residential energy efficiency market.

  17. Property:Data Comparison to Computational Models | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOfficesCollaborators JumpData Comparison to

  18. Electron-density comparisons between radar observations and 3-D ionospheric model calculations. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.W.

    1990-01-01

    A comparison of electron densities calculated from the Utah State University First-Principals Ionospheric Model with simultaneous observations taken at Sondrestrom, Millstone, and Arecibo incoherent-scatter radars was undertaken to better understanding the response of the ionosphere at these longitudinally similar yet latitudinally separated locations. The comparison included over 50 days distributed over 3 1/2 years roughly symmetrical about the last solar-minimum in 1986. The overall trend of the comparison was that to first-order the model reproduces electron densities responding to diurnal, seasonal, geomagnetic, and solar-cycle variations for all three radars. However, some model-observation discrepancies were found. These include, failure of the model to correctly produce an evening peak at Millstone, fall-spring equinox differences at Sondrestrom, tidal structure at Arecibo, and daytime NmF2 values at Arecibo.

  19. Comprehensive Electricity Competition Act: A Comparison of Model Results, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the Energy Information Administration's use of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to evaluate the effects of the Administration's restructuring proposal using the parameter settings and assumptions from the Policy Office Electricity Modeling System (POEMS) analysis.

  20. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in 3-D models: Comparison of triclinic anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in 3-D models: Comparison of triclinic anisotropy with simpler the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to the calculation of migrated sections in 3-D simple anisotropic. We test Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with different types of anisotropy

  1. Temperature and Water Vapor Variance Scaling in Global Models: Comparisons to Satellite and Aircraft Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    Infrared Sounder (AIRS) are compared to those generated by state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction controlling cloud processes at the subgrid scale in NWP and climate models (Cusack et al. 1999; Tompkins 2002Temperature and Water Vapor Variance Scaling in Global Models: Comparisons to Satellite

  2. Comparison Between Two Models for Interactions Between Electric and Magnetic Fields and Proteins in Cell Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halgamuge, Malka N.

    REVIEW Comparison Between Two Models for Interactions Between Electric and Magnetic Fields Lines; Interaction Models; Biological Effects Introduction Static magnetic and electric fields occur, and strong low-frequency electric or magnetic fields will induce electric currents in the body that lead

  3. A Comparison of Bayesian and Conditional Density Models in Probabilistic Ozone Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, William

    A Comparison of Bayesian and Conditional Density Models in Probabilistic Ozone Forecasting Song Cai to provide predictive distributions of daily maximum surface level ozone concentrations. Five forecast models forecasts for extreme events, namely poor air quality events defined as having ozone concentration 82 ppb

  4. Comparisons of box model calculations and measurements of formaldehyde from the 1997 North Atlantic Regional Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comparisons of box model calculations and measurements of formaldehyde from the 1997 North Atlantic October 2001; accepted 16 November 2001; published 18 April 2002. [1] Formaldehyde (CH2O) measurements: formaldehyde, photochemical modeling, aircraft measurements, North Atlantic troposphere 1. Introduction [2

  5. A comparison of option prices under different pricing measures in a stochastic volatility model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A comparison of option prices under different pricing measures in a stochastic volatility model option prices in an incomplete stochastic volatility model with correlation. In a general setting, we prove an ordering result which says that prices for European options with convex payoffs are decreasing

  6. A COMPARISON BETWEEN GLOBAL SOLAR MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC AND POTENTIAL FIELD SOURCE SURFACE MODEL RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    A COMPARISON BETWEEN GLOBAL SOLAR MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC AND POTENTIAL FIELD SOURCE SURFACE MODEL of the solar corona are (1) potential field source surface (PFSS) models, and (2) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD ABSTRACT The large-scale, steady-state magnetic field configuration of the solar corona is typically

  7. Comparison of Mesomechanical and Continuum Granular Flow Models for Ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, D. R.

    2006-07-28

    Constitutive models for the shear strength of ceramics undergoing fracture are needed for modeling long rod and shaped-charge jet penetration events in ceramic armor. The ceramic material ahead of the penetrator has been observed to be finely comminuted material that flows around the nose of the eroding penetrator (Shockey et al.). The most-used continuum models are of the Drucker-Prager type with an upper cutoff, or of the Mohr-Coulomb type with strain rate dependence and strain softening. A disadvantage of such models is that they have an unclear connection to the actual microscopic processes of granular flow and comminution. An alternate approach is to use mesomechanical models that describe the dynamics of the granular flow, as well as containing a description of the granular comminution and resultant material softening. However, a disadvantage of the mesomechanical models is that they are computationally more burdensome to apply. In the present paper, we compare the behaviors of a mesomechanical model, FRAGBED2, with the Walker and Johnson-Holmquist continuum models, where the granular material is subjected to simple strain histories under various confining pressures and strain rates. We conclude that the mesomechanical model can provide valuable input to the continuum models, both in interpretation of the continuum models' parameters and in suggesting their range of applicability.

  8. Comparison of integral equation and physical scale modeling of the electromagnetic responses of models with large conductivity contrasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    Comparison of integral equation and physical scale modeling of the electromagnetic responses geophysical electromagnetic responses: a numerical approach based upon the electric-field integral equa- tion and the physical scale modeling approach. The particular implementation of the integral-equation solution

  9. Comparison of Uncertainty of Two Precipitation Prediction Models...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lab Technical Area 54 Meteorological inputs are an important part of subsurface flow and transport modeling. The choice of source for meteorological data used as inputs has...

  10. Comparison of Real World Energy Consumption to Models and DOE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    energy performance of appliances and equipment as it compares with models and test procedures. The study looked to determine whether DOE and industry test procedures...

  11. Comparison of Joint Modeling Approaches Including Eulerian Sliding...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the geologic model are well suited for such an analysis. Unfortunately, current meshing tools are unable to automatically generate adequate hexahedral meshes for large numbers of...

  12. The Programming Model and Practice Technical Lead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    -Grbovic Software Engineer Tutorials, June 19th 2009 #12;Yet another MapReduce tutorial? Some tutorials you might for popular queries, e.g. Google Trend Processing of satellite imagery data Language model processing in a new GMail cluster Similar servers running GMail elsware not affected Same version of the software

  13. Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Mellor-Crummey

    2008-02-29

    Rice University's achievements as part of the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing include: (1) design and implemention of cafc, the first multi-platform CAF compiler for distributed and shared-memory machines, (2) performance studies of the efficiency of programs written using the CAF and UPC programming models, (3) a novel technique to analyze explicitly-parallel SPMD programs that facilitates optimization, (4) design, implementation, and evaluation of new language features for CAF, including communication topologies, multi-version variables, and distributed multithreading to simplify development of high-performance codes in CAF, and (5) a synchronization strength reduction transformation for automatically replacing barrier-based synchronization with more efficient point-to-point synchronization. The prototype Co-array Fortran compiler cafc developed in this project is available as open source software from http://www.hipersoft.rice.edu/caf.

  14. Unbiased Statistical Comparison of Creep and Shrinkage Prediction Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , important for designing durable and safe concrete structures. Statistical methods of standard and several to improper data sampling in the database, and then examines Bazant and Baweja's model B3, ACI model, CEB of least squares, which is the standard and the only statistically correct method, dictated by the maximum

  15. Comparison between third and second generation ocean wave models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bratos, Steven Martin

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the relative performance of a second generation (2G) model, WISWAVE (Hubertz 1992), and a third generation (3G) model, WAM (WAMDI 1988), in deep water. High-quality wind fields, with detailed spatial...

  16. Posters Comparison Between General Circulation Model Simulation and Central Equatorial

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgram Guidelines This document outlines the majorL.Posters

  17. Comparison of Real World Energy Consumption to Models and DOE Test Procedures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels|Programs |ChartPresentations:UlJmately , the1Report 2009Comparison

  18. Model Fire Protection Program | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPAEnergy6-09.docAERMOD-PRIME, Units 4, 1,RidgeModel Fire

  19. Transforming PLC Programs into Formal Models for Verification Purposes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darvas, D; Blanco, E

    2013-01-01

    Most of CERN’s industrial installations rely on PLC-based (Programmable Logic Controller) control systems developed using the UNICOS framework. This framework contains common, reusable program modules and their correctness is a high priority. Testing is already applied to find errors, but this method has limitations. In this work an approach is proposed to transform automatically PLC programs into formal models, with the goal of applying formal verification to ensure their correctness. We target model checking which is a precise, mathematical-based method to check formalized requirements automatically against the system.

  20. Comparison of cosmological models using standard rulers and candles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiaolei; Zheng, Xiaogang; Biesiada, Marek; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we used standard rulers and standard candles (separately and jointly) to explore five popular dark energy models under assumption of spatial flatness of the Universe. As standard rulers, we used a data set comprising 118 galactic-scale strong lensing systems (individual standard rulers if properly calibrated for the mass density profile) combined with BAO diagnostics (statistical standard ruler). Supernovae Ia served asstandard candles. Unlike in the most of previous statistical studies involving strong lensing systems, we relaxed the assumption of singular isothermal sphere (SIS) in favor of its generalization: the power-law mass density profile. Therefore, along with cosmological model parameters we fitted the power law index and its first derivative with respect to the redshift (thus allowing for mass density profile evolution). It turned out that the best fitted $\\gamma$ parameters are in agreement with each other irrespective of the cosmological model considered. This demonstrates that gal...

  1. Comparison of {gamma}Z-structure function models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rislow, Benjamin C.

    2013-11-01

    The {gamma}Z-box is an important contribution to the proton's weak charge. The {gamma}Z-box is calculated dispersively and depends on {gamma}Z-structure functions, F{sub {gamma}Z1,2,3}(x,Q{sup 2}) . At present there is no data for these structure functions and they must be modeled by modifying existing fits to electromagnetic data. Each group that has studied the {gamma}Z-box used different modifications. The results of the PVDIS experiment at Jefferson Lab may provide a first test of the validity of each group's models. I present details of the different models and their predictions for the PVDIS result.

  2. Comparison of a radial fractional transport model with tokamak experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kullberg, A. Morales, G. J.; Maggs, J. E.

    2014-03-15

    A radial fractional transport model [Kullberg et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 052115 (2013)], that correctly incorporates the geometric effects of the domain near the origin and removes the singular behavior at the outer boundary, is compared to results of off-axis heating experiments performed in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP), ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D tokamak devices. This comparative study provides an initial assessment of the presence of fractional transport phenomena in magnetic confinement experiments. It is found that the nonlocal radial model is robust in describing the steady-state temperature profiles from RTP, but for the propagation of heat waves in ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D the model is not clearly superior to predictions based on Fick's law. However, this comparative study does indicate that the order of the fractional derivative, ?, is likely a function of radial position in the devices surveyed.

  3. Comparison of Thermal Properties Predicted by Interatomic Potential Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Wei

    ). The state-of-the-art free energy methods are used to determine the melting points of these models within]. In the "free-energy" method, the Gibbs free energies of the solid and liquid phases are computed as functions of temperature, and the melting point is determined by their intersection point. The free energy method has been

  4. An Empirical Comparison of Field Defect Modeling Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    operating system as judged by the Theil forecasting statistic (explained in section 4). We conjecture about Management, Measurement, Reliability, Experimentation, Defect modeling, empirical research, COTS, maintenance-based and metrics-based approach, as judged by the Theil forecasting statistic. We suggest possible conditions

  5. Models vs. Simulations: a comparison by their Theoretical Symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longo, Giuseppe

    Handbook of Model-Based Science (editors: M. Dorato, L. Magnani and T. Bertolotti). Centre Cavaillès have become crucial in Natural Sciences, as well as in architecture, economics, humanities the World by symmetries. They constitute a fundamental "principle of (conceptual) construction

  6. 3He Neutron Detector Pressure Effect and Comparison to Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Stromswold, David C.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-01-14

    Reported here are the results of measurements performed to determine the efficiency of 3He filled proportional counters as a function of gas pressure in the SAIC system. Motivation for these measurements was largely to validate the current model of the SAIC system. Those predictions indicated that the neutron detection efficiency plotted as a function of pressure has a simple, logarithmic shape. As for absolute performance, the model results indicated the 3He pressure in the current SAIC system could not be reduced appreciably while meeting the current required level of detection sensitivity. Thus, saving 3He by reducing its pressure was predicted not to be a viable option in the current SAIC system.

  7. Comparison of Wake Model Simulations with Offshore Wind Turbine Wake Profiles Measured by Sodar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    a ship-mounted sodar at a small offshore wind farm. The experiments were conducted at varying distances Offshore wind farms have increased in size from the first phase of installation with up to 20 turbinesComparison of Wake Model Simulations with Offshore Wind Turbine Wake Profiles Measured by Sodar R

  8. A simple model of cooling neutron stars with superfluid cores: comparison with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A simple model of cooling neutron stars with superfluid cores: comparison with observations K.­Petersburg, Russia \\Lambday Abstract Cooling of neutron stars (NSs) with superfluid cores is simulated taking into account neutrino emission pro­ duced by Cooper pairing of nucleons. Two cooling regimes of NSs composed

  9. Comparison of Reduced Order Lithium-Ion Battery Models for Control Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    Comparison of Reduced Order Lithium-Ion Battery Models for Control Applications C. Speltino, D. Di Domenico, G. Fiengo and A. Stefanopoulou Abstract-- Lithium-ion batteries are the core of new plug (HEV). In most cases the lithium-ion battery performances play an important role in the vehicle energy

  10. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without gradients: Comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without gradients: Comparison@seis.karlov.mff.cuni.cz Summary We use the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to calculate migrated sections in simple anisotropic is isotropic and homogeneous. We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to both heterogeneous

  11. A comparison of various models in predicting ignition delay in single-particle coal combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the varying properties and chemical structure of different coal types [2], and by the fact that the coal properties change significantly throughout a coal particle's lifetime in a combustor [3­5]. The coal particleA comparison of various models in predicting ignition delay in single-particle coal combustion

  12. The controls on net ecosystem productivity along an Arctic transect: a model comparison with ux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    production (NEP) at sites with widely differing vegetation structure and moss/lichen cover. Errors were mostly associated with the predictions of maximum NEP; the likely cause of such discrepancies was (i for an actual reduction in NEP caused by water stress on warm, dry days at some sites. The model±¯ux comparison

  13. Comparison of a thermospheric photochemical model with Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) observations of nitric oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Scott

    and of time. There are two principal energy sources that lead to the production of nitric oxideComparison of a thermospheric photochemical model with Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) observations of nitric oxide C. A. Barth Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado

  14. STRUCTURAL DAMAGE CLASSIFICATION COMPARISON USING SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINE AND BAYESIAN MODEL SELECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    STRUCTURAL DAMAGE CLASSIFICATION COMPARISON USING SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINE AND BAYESIAN MODEL, CA, USA 92093-0085 mdtodd@ucsd.edu ABSTRACT Since all damage identification strategies inevitably in the decision-making process of damage detection, classification, and prognosis, which employs training data (or

  15. Analysing protein energy data by a stochastic model for cooperative interactions: comparison and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roma Tor Vergata, Università di

    Analysing protein energy data by a stochastic model for cooperative interactions: comparison deal here with estimation of unknown parameters from protein energy data. One of these parameters. We analyse both simulated data of the Markov chain, and protein energy data obtained by molecular dy

  16. LABORATORY-NUMERICAL MODEL COMPARISONS OF CANYON FLOWS: A PARAMETER STUDY.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LABORATORY-NUMERICAL MODEL COMPARISONS OF CANYON FLOWS: A PARAMETER STUDY. DON L. BOYER Cite Scientifique ­ 59655 - Villeneuve d'Ascq cedex (France) ABSTRACT An integrated set of laboratory surrounding a coastal canyon and, further, to explore the degree to which laboratory experiments can provide

  17. Final Map Draft Comparison Report WIND ENERGY RESOURCE MODELING AND MEASUREMENT PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    II Final Map Draft Comparison Report #12;WIND ENERGY RESOURCE MODELING AND MEASUREMENT PROJECT Tel: 978-749-9591 Fax: 978-749-9713 mbrower@awstruewind.com August 10, 2004 #12;2 WIND ENERGY RESOURCE issues. 1 Background In Task 2 of the project, five promising areas of the state for wind energy

  18. Edinburgh Research Explorer Comparison of models for estimation of long-term exposure to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    -term exposure to air pollution in cohort studies' Atmospheric Environment, vol 62, pp. 530-539., 10.1016/j to Air Pollution in Cohort Studies Beverland, I.J.* Department of Civil Engineering, University.L. and Agius, R.M. (2012) Comparison of models for estimation of long-term exposure to air pollution in cohort

  19. Fracture populations on the Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland: Comparison with experimental clay models of oblique rifting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fracture populations on the Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland: Comparison with experimental clay models have used high-resolution scanned air photos and field measurements to analyze fracture population on the evolution of fracture populations on the Reykjanes Peninsula, SW Iceland. The peninsula is oriented

  20. Comparison of problem model change mechanisms issued from CSP and TRIZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Comparison of problem model change mechanisms issued from CSP and TRIZ RRoollaanndd DDee GGuuiioo satisfaction problem (CSP), on the other hand. Keywords: over-constrained problems, dialectical methods issued from CSP and TRIZ 2 · a set of evaluation parameters, which represent the objective of the problem

  1. Comparison of model estimates of the effects of aviation emissions on atmospheric ozone and methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Mark

    of the world econ- omy and demand for aviation and its emissions are expected to increase in the future from aviation (mainly carbon dioxide (CO2), water vapor (H2O), nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2), VOCsComparison of model estimates of the effects of aviation emissions on atmospheric ozone and methane

  2. NATIONAL SURVEY OF ADOLESCENT WELL-BEING (NSCAW): A COMPARISON OF MODEL AND DESIGN BASED ANALYSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the design based setting also provided conflicting results regarding the question of interest. To determineNATIONAL SURVEY OF ADOLESCENT WELL-BEING (NSCAW): A COMPARISON OF MODEL AND DESIGN BASED ANALYSES members of society. The Department of Health and Human Services sponsored the National Survey of Child

  3. A comparison of various models in predicting ignition delay in single-particle coal combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A comparison of various models in predicting ignition delay in single-particle coal combustion November 2013 Accepted 7 January 2014 Available online xxxx Keywords: Coal Devolatilization Ignition delay a b s t r a c t In this paper, individual coal particle combustion under laminar conditions

  4. Approximate Dynamic Programming for Networks: Fluid Models and Constraint Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veatch, Michael H.

    of approximating functions for the differential cost. The first contribution of this paper is identifying new or piece-wise quadratic. Fluid cost has been used to initialize the value iteration algorithm [5Approximate Dynamic Programming for Networks: Fluid Models and Constraint Reduction Michael H

  5. First Steps Towards a Social Comparison Model of Crowds Natalie Fridman, Gal A. Kaminka and Meytal Traub

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminka, Gal A.

    on Festinger's Social Comparison Theory (SCT). We evaluate the SCT model on general pedestrian movement & Kaminka, 2009); and second, it is inspired by social psychology theory. In particular, the model is based on Social Comparison Theory (SCT) (Festinger, 1954), a popular social psychology theory that has been

  6. Using true concurrency to model execution of parallel programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Asher, Y.; Farchi, E.

    1994-08-01

    Parallel execution of a program R (intuitively regarded as a partial order) is usually modeled by sequentially executing one of the total orders (interleavings) into which it can be embedded. Our work deviates from this serialization principle by using true concurrency to model parallel execution. True concurrency is represented via completions of R to semi total orders, called time diagrams. These orders are characterized via a set of conditions (denoted by Ct), yielding orders of time diagrams which preserve some degree of the intended parallelism in R. Another way to express semi total orders is to use re-writing or derivation rules (denoted by Cx) which for any program R generates a set of semi-total orders. This paper includes a classification of parallel execution into three classes according to three different types of Ct conditions. For each class a suitable Cx is found and a proof of equivalence between the set of all time diagrams satisfying Ct and the set of all terminal Cx derivations of R is devised. This equivalence between time diagram conditions and derivation rules is used to define a novel notion of correctness for parallel programs. This notion is demonstrated by showing that a specific asynchronous program enforces synchronous execution, which always halts, showing that true concurrency can be useful in the context of parallel program verification.

  7. THE TRUE COST OF PAIR PROGRAMMING: DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPREHENSIVE MODEL AND TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Wenying

    2011-09-19

    To advance the nomological net and theory, this dissertation proposed a comprehensive pair programming research model where the relationships among system complexity, programming methods, pair composition, effort, duration, ...

  8. A Comparison of Multi-Parametric Programming, Mixed-Integer Programming, Gradient Descent Based, and the Embedding Approach on Four Published Hybrid Optimal Control Examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Richard; DeCarlo, Raymond A

    2012-01-01

    This paper compares the embedding approach for solving hybrid optimal control problems to multi-parameter programming, mixed-integer programming, and gradient-descent based methods in the context of four published examples. The four examples include a spring-mass system, moving-target tracking for a mobile robot, two-tank filling, and a DC-DC boost converter. Numerical advantages of the embedding approach are set forth and validated for each example: significantly faster solution time, no ad hoc assumptions (such as predetermined mode sequences) or control models, lower performance index costs, and algorithm convergence when other methods fail. Specific (theoretical) advantages of the embedding approach over the other methods are also described: guaranteed existence of a solution under mild conditions, convexity of the embedded optimization problem solvable with traditional techniques such as sequential quadratic programming with no need for any mixed-integer programming, applicability to nonlinear systems, e...

  9. Garnering the Industrial Sector: A Comparison of Cutting Edge Industrial DSM Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyricopoulos, P. F.; Wikler, G. A.; Faruqui, A.; Wood, B. G.

    1995-01-01

    The industrial sector has posed a daunting DSM challenge to utilities throughout North America, even to those with successful and creative residential and commercial DSM programs. Most utilities have had great difficulty ...

  10. Summary of multi-core hardware and programming model investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Suzanne Marie; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Levenhagen, Michael J.

    2008-05-01

    This report summarizes our investigations into multi-core processors and programming models for parallel scientific applications. The motivation for this study was to better understand the landscape of multi-core hardware, future trends, and the implications on system software for capability supercomputers. The results of this study are being used as input into the design of a new open-source light-weight kernel operating system being targeted at future capability supercomputers made up of multi-core processors. A goal of this effort is to create an agile system that is able to adapt to and efficiently support whatever multi-core hardware and programming models gain acceptance by the community.

  11. A comparison of chemistry and dust cloud formation in ultracool dwarf model atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ch. Helling; A. Ackerman; F. Allard; M. Dehn; P. Hauschildt; D. Homeier; K. Lodders; M. Marley; F. Rietmeijer; T. Tsuji; P. Woitke

    2008-09-24

    The atmospheres of substellar objects contain clouds of oxides, iron, silicates, and other refractory condensates. Water clouds are expected in the coolest objects. The opacity of these `dust' clouds strongly affects both the atmospheric temperature-pressure profile and the emergent flux. Thus any attempt to model the spectra of these atmospheres must incorporate a cloud model. However the diversity of cloud models in atmospheric simulations is large and it is not always clear how the underlying physics of the various models compare. Likewise the observational consequences of different modeling approaches can be masked by other model differences, making objective comparisons challenging. In order to clarify the current state of the modeling approaches, this paper compares five different cloud models in two sets of tests. Test case 1 tests the dust cloud models for a prescribed L, L--T, and T-dwarf atmospheric (temperature T, pressure p, convective velocity vconv)-structures. Test case 2 compares complete model atmosphere results for given (effective temperature Teff, surface gravity log g). All models agree on the global cloud structure but differ in opacity-relevant details like grain size, amount of dust, dust and gas-phase composition. Comparisons of synthetic photometric fluxes translate into an modelling uncertainty in apparent magnitudes for our L-dwarf (T-dwarf) test case of 0.25 < \\Delta m < 0.875 (0.1 < \\Delta m M 1.375) taking into account the 2MASS, the UKIRT WFCAM, the Spitzer IRAC, and VLT VISIR filters with UKIRT WFCAM being the most challenging for the models. (abr.)

  12. Modeling Time Series of Real Systems using Genetic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dilip P. Ahalpara; Jitendra C. Parikh

    2006-07-14

    Analytic models of two computer generated time series (Logistic map and Rossler system) and two real time series (ion saturation current in Aditya Tokamak plasma and NASDAQ composite index) are constructed using Genetic Programming (GP) framework. In each case, the optimal map that results from fitting part of the data set also provides a very good description of rest of the data. Predictions made using the map iteratively range from being very good to fair.

  13. The comparison of the 3-fluid dynamic model with experimental data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kizka, V A

    2015-01-01

    The method of comparison of theoretical predictions with experimental data had been developed.This method allows estimate the quality of theory. Published theoretical data of the three-fluid dynamic (3FD) model applied to the experimental data from heavy-ion collisions at the energy range $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}\\,=\\,2.7 - 63$ GeV were used as example of application of the developed methodology.

  14. The comparison of the 3-fluid dynamic model with experimental data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Kizka

    2015-08-13

    The method of comparison of theoretical predictions with experimental data had been developed.This method allows estimate the quality of theory. Published theoretical data of the three-fluid dynamic (3FD) model applied to the experimental data from heavy-ion collisions at the energy range $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}\\,=\\,2.7 - 63$ GeV were used as example of application of the developed methodology.

  15. A model for a national low level waste program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blankenhorn, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    A national program for the management of low level waste is essential to the success of environmental clean-up, decontamination and decommissioning, current operations and future missions. The value of a national program is recognized through procedural consistency and a shared set of resources. A national program requires a clear waste definition and an understanding of waste characteristics matched against available and proposed disposal options. A national program requires the development and implementation of standards and procedures for implementing the waste hierarchy, with a specitic emphasis on waste avoidance, minimization and recycling. It requires a common set of objectives for waste characterization based on the disposal facility's waste acceptance criteria, regulatory and license requirements and performance assessments. Finally, a national waste certification program is required to ensure compliance. To facilitate and enhance the national program, a centralized generator services organization, tasked with providing technical services to the generators on behalf of the national program, is necessary. These subject matter experts are the interface between the generating sites and the disposal facility(s). They provide an invaluable service to the generating organizations through their involvement in waste planning prior to waste generation and through championing implementation of the waste hierarchy. Through their interface, national treatment and transportation services are optimized and new business opportunities are identified. This national model is based on extensive experience in the development and on-going management of a national transuranic waste program and management of the national repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The Low Level Program at the Savannah River Site also successfully developed and implemented the waste hierarchy, waste certification and waste generator services concepts presented below. The Savannah River Site services over forty generators and has historically managed over 12,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The results of the waste minimization program at the site resulted in over 900 initiatives, avoiding over 220,000 cubic meters of waste for a life cycle cost savings of $275 million. At the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the low level waste program services over 20 major generators and several hundred smaller generators that produce over 4,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The Los Alamos National Laboratory low level waste program utilizes both on-site and off-site disposal capabilities. Off-site disposal requires the implementation of certification requirements to utilize both federal and commercial options. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is the US Department of Energy's first deep geological repository for the permanent disposal of Transuanic waste. Transuranic waste was generated and retrievably stored at 39 sites across the US. Transuranic waste is defined as waste with a radionuclide concentration equal to or greater than 100 nCi/g consisting of radionuclides with half-lives greater than 20 years and with an atomic mass greater than uranium. Combining the lessons learned from the national transuranic waste program, the successful low level waste program at Savannah River Site and the experience of off-site disposal options at Los Alamos National Laboratory provides the framework and basis for developing a viable national strategy for managing low level waste.

  16. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Utility Program Administrator Business Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following sections focus on the five core components of a utility’s business model, highlighting the critical elements of how utilities function within the market and how other organizations within the market can best collaborate with them.

  17. 8/30/2001 Parallel Programming -Fall 2001 1 Models of Parallel Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Browne, James C.

    8/30/2001 Parallel Programming - Fall 2001 1 Models of Parallel Computation Philosophy Parallel of parallel programming. #12;8/30/2001 Parallel Programming - Fall 2001 2 Models of Parallel Computation will discuss parallelism from the viewpoint of programming but with connections to other domains. #12;8/30/2001

  18. Comparison Between TRNSYS Software Simulation and F-Chart Program on Pool Heating System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to test the accuracy of TRNSYS simulation of Solar Pool Heating System by comparing with F-Chart program which is an authoritative tool to analyze solar system and was developed in 1970s. This report is organized...

  19. Comparison of finite-difference and ray-theory seismograms in the elastic SEG/EAGE Salt Model,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Comparison of finite-difference and ray-theory seismograms in the elastic SEG/EAGE Salt Model, shot-difference seismograms for a selected shot and two receiver configurations com- puted in the elastic SEG/EAGE Salt Model-waves and converted S-waves in the smoothed elastic SEG/EAGE Salt Model are computed. Keywords Elastic velocity model

  20. Clustering of categorical data: a comparison of a model-based and a distance-based approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennig, Christian

    Clustering of categorical data: a comparison of a model-based and a distance-based approach Laura categorical data, a latent class model-based approach (LCC) with local independence is compared was evaluated by both a model-based as well as a distance-based criterion. LCC was better according to the model-based

  1. Recursive Programming Model for Crop Production on the Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reneau, D. R.; Lacewell, R. D.; Ellis, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    A flexible, recursive programming model of crop production on the Texas High Plains was developed. Besides the linear programming (LP) Optimization routine and recursive feedback section, the model also includes a matrix generator and report writer...

  2. Probabilistic Constraint Programming for Parameters Optimisation of Generative Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zanin, Massimiliano; Sousa, Pedro A C; Cruz, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Complex networks theory has commonly been used for modelling and understanding the interactions taking place between the elements composing complex systems. More recently, the use of generative models has gained momentum, as they allow identifying which forces and mechanisms are responsible for the appearance of given structural properties. In spite of this interest, several problems remain open, one of the most important being the design of robust mechanisms for finding the optimal parameters of a generative model, given a set of real networks. In this contribution, we address this problem by means of Probabilistic Constraint Programming. By using as an example the reconstruction of networks representing brain dynamics, we show how this approach is superior to other solutions, in that it allows a better characterisation of the parameters space, while requiring a significantly lower computational cost.

  3. Is My DSL a Modeling or Programming Language? , Zekai Demirezen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey G.

    Is My DSL a Modeling or Programming Language? Yu Sun1 , Zekai Demirezen1 , Marjan Mernik2, 1 , Jeff the differences between programming and modeling languages. As an example, the term "domain-specific language" has languages, which has caused subtle misconceptions. The borders between a modeling and programming language

  4. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Utility Program Administrator Market

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Utility Program Administrator Market, as posted on the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program website.

  5. Tsunami inundation modeling in constructed environments: A physical and numerical comparison of free-surface elevation, velocity, and momentum flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynett, Patrick

    Tsunami inundation modeling in constructed environments: A physical and numerical comparison April 2013 Available online 17 May 2013 Keywords: Tsunami Inundation Macro-roughness Benchmark COULWAVE Friction factor A laboratory benchmark test for tsunami inundation through an urban waterfront including

  6. Modelling vegetation dynamics at global scale due to climate changes: Comparison of two approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belotelov, N.V.; Bogatyrev, B.G.; Lobanov, A.I.

    1996-12-31

    Climate changes will influence vegetation dynamics. One of the ways of forecasting these changes is the creation of mathematical models describing vegetation dynamics. Computer experiments can then be conducted under climate change scenarios. Two main approaches are used to create such models. The first approach is based on a bioclimatic dynamic approach. The second approach is based on modelling the main eco-physiological processes. The bioclimatic dynamic approach consists of hypotheses about vegetation types or biomes, and their interrelationships with climate. In the eco-physiological approach, a detailed description of the processes, such as production, mortality, plants migration and their competition is presented. A number of computer experiments has been conducted for several climatic scenario for Russia and the whole world. A qualitative comparison of the results with the results of an earlier bioclimatic model has been done.

  7. Comparison of Chiller Models for Use in Model-Based Fault Detection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sreedhara, P.; Haves, P.

    2001-01-01

    Selecting the model is an important and essential step in model based fault detection and diagnosis (FDD). Factors that are considered in evaluating a model include accuracy, training data requirements, calibration effort, generality...

  8. Parallel phase model : a programming model for high-end parallel machines with manycores.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Junfeng (Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY); Wen, Zhaofang; Heroux, Michael Allen; Brightwell, Ronald Brian

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents a parallel programming model, Parallel Phase Model (PPM), for next-generation high-end parallel machines based on a distributed memory architecture consisting of a networked cluster of nodes with a large number of cores on each node. PPM has a unified high-level programming abstraction that facilitates the design and implementation of parallel algorithms to exploit both the parallelism of the many cores and the parallelism at the cluster level. The programming abstraction will be suitable for expressing both fine-grained and coarse-grained parallelism. It includes a few high-level parallel programming language constructs that can be added as an extension to an existing (sequential or parallel) programming language such as C; and the implementation of PPM also includes a light-weight runtime library that runs on top of an existing network communication software layer (e.g. MPI). Design philosophy of PPM and details of the programming abstraction are also presented. Several unstructured applications that inherently require high-volume random fine-grained data accesses have been implemented in PPM with very promising results.

  9. A Programming Model Performance Study Using the NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shan, Hongzhang; Blagojevi?, Filip; Min, Seung-Jai; Hargrove, Paul; Jin, Haoqiang; Fuerlinger, Karl; Koniges, Alice; Wright, Nicholas J.

    2010-01-01

    Harnessing the power of multicore platforms is challenging due to the additional levels of parallelism present. In this paper we use the NAS Parallel Benchmarks to study three programming models, MPI, OpenMP and PGAS to understand their performance and memory usage characteristics on current multicore architectures. To understand these characteristics we use the Integrated Performance Monitoring tool and other ways to measure communication versus computation time, as well as the fraction of the run time spent in OpenMP. The benchmarks are run on two different Cray XT5 systems and an Infiniband cluster. Our results show that in general the threemore »programming models exhibit very similar performance characteristics. In a few cases, OpenMP is significantly faster because it explicitly avoids communication. For these particular cases, we were able to re-write the UPC versions and achieve equal performance to OpenMP. Using OpenMP was also the most advantageous in terms of memory usage. Also we compare performance differences between the two Cray systems, which have quad-core and hex-core processors. We show that at scale the performance is almost always slower on the hex-core system because of increased contention for network resources.« less

  10. Hypothetical Distance Learning Program Costs Model A framework for thinking about the comprehensive costs of hosting a DL program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    Hypothetical Distance Learning Program Costs Model A framework for thinking about the comprehensive costs of hosting a DL program Start-Up Ongoing Explanation 100,000$ 100,000$ FTE needed to develop any or repurpose old courses for the online context. Infrastructure Costs tbd tbd Cost of adding or improving

  11. Model Close Match as a Criterion for Structured Model Comparison and Its Robust Statistical Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Libo; Bentler, Peter M

    2006-01-01

    Model Selection. Manuscript. Curran, P. J. , Bollen, K. A. ,316. Bollen, K. A. , & Curran, P. J. (2006). Latent Curveare given by Bollen and Curran (2006), Byrne (2006), Hays,

  12. Neutronics model of the bulk shielding reactor (BSR): validation by comparison of calculations with the experimental measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.O.; Miller, L.F.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1981-05-01

    A neutronics model for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Bulk Shielding Reactor (ORNL-SAR) was developed and verified by experimental measurements. A cross-section library was generated from the 218 group Master Library using the AMPX Block Code system. A series of one-, two-, and three-dimensional neutronics calculations were performed utilizing both transport and diffusion theory. Spectral comparison was made with /sup 58/Ni(n,p) reaction. The results of the comparison between the calculational model and other experimental measurements showed agreement within 10% and therefore the model was determined to be adequate for calculating the neutron fluence for future irradiation experiments in the ORNL-BSR.

  13. Current Transportation Models Used in the Vehicle Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-04-06

    A summary of various transportation models (VISION, TRUCK, GREET, Oil Peaking Model, Feebate Model, Oil Security Metrics Model, ORNL PHEV Choice Model: Version 1, PSAT, PSAT-PRO,

  14. The SubAntarctic Flux and Dynamics Experiment (SAFDE): Renewal Proposal for Data Analysis and Model Comparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    The Sub­Antarctic Flux and Dynamics Experiment (SAFDE): Renewal Proposal for Data Analysis and Model Comparisons A "Group Proposal" Submitted to the National Science Foundation Division of Ocean's modeling work is fully funded by LANL, he does not require additional funding from NSF, except that some

  15. Comparison of QM-Only and QM/MM Models for the Mechanism of Tungsten-Dependent Acetylene Hydratase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Rongzhen

    Comparison of QM-Only and QM/MM Models for the Mechanism of Tungsten-Dependent Acetylene Hydratase-only and QM/MM approaches for the modeling of enzymatic reactions. For this purpose, we present a QM/MM case of the previously suggested one-water attack mechanism. The QM/MM calculations with the minimal QM region M1 (32

  16. Model Test Setup and Program for Experimental Estimation of Surface Loads of the SSG Kvitsy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Model Test Setup and Program for Experimental Estimation of Surface Loads of the SSG Kvitsøy Pilot Engineering No. 32 ISSN: 1603-9874 Model Test Setup and Program for Experimental Estimation of Surface Loads University October, 2005 #12;#12;Preface This report presents the preparations done prior to model tests

  17. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP): A Model-Data Comparison System for Evaluation of Coupled Biosphere-Atmosphere Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Forrest M; Randerson, Jim; Thornton, Peter E; Mahowald, Natalie; Bonan, Gordon; Running, Steven; Fung, Inez

    2009-01-01

    The need to capture important climate feebacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in new efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, now often referred to as Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results, suggesting that a more rigorous set of offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are warranted. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) provides a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). C-LAMP provides feedback to the modeling community regarding model improvements and to the measurement community by suggesting new observational campaigns. C-LAMP Experiment 1 consists of a set of uncoupled simulations of terrestrial carbon models specifically designed to examine the ability of the models to reproduce surface carbon and energy fluxes at multiple sites and to exhibit the influence of climate variability, prescribed atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), nitrogen (N) deposition, and land cover change on projections of terrestrial carbon fluxes during the 20th century. Experiment 2 consists of partially coupled simulations of the terrestrial carbon model with an active atmosphere model exchanging energy and moisture fluxes. In all experiments, atmospheric CO{sub 2} follows the prescribed historical trajectory from C{sup 4}MIP. In Experiment 2, the atmosphere model is forced with prescribed sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and corresponding sea ice concentrations from the Hadley Centre; prescribed CO{sub 2} is radiatively active; and land, fossil fuel, and ocean CO{sub 2} fluxes are advected by the model. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3) in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): The CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon-nitrogen (CN) model of Thornton. Comparisons against Ameriflus site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) site measurements, and other datasets have been performed and are described in Randerson et al. (2009). The C-LAMP diagnostics package was used to validate improvements to CASA and CN for use in the next generation model, CLM4. It is hoped that this effort will serve as a prototype for an international carbon-cycle model benchmarking activity for models being used for the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report. More information about C-LAMP, the experimental protocol, performance metrics, output standards, and model-data comparisons from the CLM3-CASA and CLM3-CN models are available at http://www.climatemodeling.org/c-lamp.

  18. The Program for climate Model diagnosis and Intercomparison: 20-th anniversary Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, Gerald L; Bader, David C; Riches, Michael; Bamzai, Anjuli; Joseph, Renu

    2011-01-05

    Twenty years ago, W. Lawrence (Larry) Gates approached the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Research (now the Office of Science) with a plan to coordinate the comparison and documentation of climate model differences. This effort would help improve our understanding of climate change through a systematic approach to model intercomparison. Early attempts at comparing results showed a surprisingly large range in control climate from such parameters as cloud cover, precipitation, and even atmospheric temperature. The DOE agreed to fund the effort at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in part because of the existing computing environment and because of a preexisting atmospheric science group that contained a wide variety of expertise. The project was named the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI), and it has changed the international landscape of climate modeling over the past 20 years. In spring 2009 the DOE hosted a 1-day symposium to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of PCMDI and to honor its founder, Larry Gates. Through their personal experiences, the morning presenters painted an image of climate science in the 1970s and 1980s, that generated early support from the international community for model intercomparison, thereby bringing PCMDI into existence. Four talks covered Gates���¢��������s early contributions to climate research at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), the RAND Corporation, and Oregon State University through the founding of PCMDI to coordinate the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP). The speakers were, in order of presentation, Warren Washington [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)], Kelly Redmond (Western Regional Climate Center), George Boer (Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis), and Lennart Bengtsson [University of Reading, former director of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF)]. The afternoon session emphasized the scientific ideas that are the basis of PCMDI���¢��������s success, summarizing their evolution and impact. Four speakers followed the various PCMDI-supported climate model intercomparison projects, beginning with early work on cloud representations in models, presented by Robert D. Cess (Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Stony Brook University), and then the latest Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Projects (CFMIPs) led by Sandrine Bony (Laboratoire de M�������©t�������©orologie Dynamique). Benjamin Santer (LLNL) presented a review of the climate change detection and attribution (D & A) work pioneered at PCMDI, and Gerald A. Meehl (NCAR) ended the day with a look toward the future of climate change research.

  19. Bayesian Neural Networks for Uncertainty Analysis of Hydrologic Modeling: A Comparison of Two Schemes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Zhao, Kaiguang

    2012-06-01

    Bayesian Neural Networks (BNNs) have been shown as useful tools to analyze modeling uncertainty of Neural Networks (NNs). This research focuses on the comparison of two BNNs. The first BNNs (BNN-I) use statistical methods to describe the characteristics of different uncertainty sources (input, parameter, and model structure) and integrate these uncertainties into a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) framework to estimate total uncertainty. The second BNNs (BNN-II) lump all uncertainties into a single error term (i.e. the residual between model prediction and measurement). In this study, we propose a simple BNN-II, which use Genetic Algorithms (GA) and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) to calibrate Neural Networks with different structures (number of hidden units) and combine the predictions from different NNs to derive predictions and uncertainty analysis. We tested these two BNNs in two watersheds for daily and monthly hydrologic simulation. The BMA based BNNs developed in this study outperforms BNN-I in the two watersheds in terms of both accurate prediction and uncertainty estimation. These results show that, given incomplete understanding of the characteristics associated with each uncertainty source, the simple lumped error approach may yield better prediction and uncertainty estimation.

  20. Ex-Vessel Core Melt Modeling Comparison between MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH and MELCOR 2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robb, Kevin R.; Farmer, Mitchell; Francis, Matthew W.

    2014-03-01

    System-level code analyses by both United States and international researchers predict major core melting, bottom head failure, and corium-concrete interaction for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1). Although system codes such as MELCOR and MAAP are capable of capturing a wide range of accident phenomena, they currently do not contain detailed models for evaluating some ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes containing more detailed modeling are available for melt spreading such as MELTSPREAD as well as long-term molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) and debris coolability such as CORQUENCH. In a preceding study, Enhanced Ex-Vessel Analysis for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1: Melt Spreading and Core-Concrete Interaction Analyses with MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH, the MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH codes predicted the 1F1 core melt readily cooled in contrast to predictions by MELCOR. The user community has taken notice and is in the process of updating their systems codes; specifically MAAP and MELCOR, to improve and reduce conservatism in their ex-vessel core melt models. This report investigates why the MELCOR v2.1 code, compared to the MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH 3.03 codes, yield differing predictions of ex-vessel melt progression. To accomplish this, the differences in the treatment of the ex-vessel melt with respect to melt spreading and long-term coolability are examined. The differences in modeling approaches are summarized, and a comparison of example code predictions is provided.

  1. Designing On-Road Vehicle Test Programs for the Development of Effective Vehicle Emission Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younglove, T; Scora, G; Barth, M

    2005-01-01

    Uncertainty in Highway Vehicle Emission Factors,” EmissionPrograms for Effective Vehicle Emission Model DevelopmentU.S. EPA’s Mobile Vehicle Emission Simulator) are becoming

  2. Microgrid Reliability Modeling and Battery Scheduling Using Stochastic Linear Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardoso, Goncalo

    2014-01-01

    wind power and market prices. In [23], two-stage stochastic mixed-integer linear programming is used to design

  3. Land-use change trajectories up to 2050: insights from a global agro-economic model comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, Christoph; van Meijl, Hans; Kyle, G. Page; Nelson, Gerald C.; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Gurgel, Angelo; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Popp, Alexander; Sands, Ronald; Tabeau, Andrzej; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; von Lampe, Martin; Wise, Marshall A.; Blanc, Elodie; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Kavallari, Aikaterini; Valin, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Changes in agricultural land use have important implications for environmental services. Previous studies of agricultural land-use futures have been published indicating large uncertainty due to different model assumptions and methodologies. In this article we present a first comprehensive comparison of global agro-economic models that have harmonized drivers of population, GDP, and biophysical yields. The comparison allows us to ask two research questions: (1) How much cropland will be used under different socioeconomic and climate change scenarios? (2) How can differences in model results be explained? The comparison includes four partial and six general equilibrium models that differ in how they model land supply and amount of potentially available land. We analyze results of two different socioeconomic scenarios and three climate scenarios (one with constant climate). Most models (7 out of 10) project an increase of cropland of 10–25% by 2050 compared to 2005 (under constant climate), but one model projects a decrease. Pasture land expands in some models, which increase the treat on natural vegetation further. Across all models most of the cropland expansion takes place in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. In general, the strongest differences in model results are related to differences in the costs of land expansion, the endogenous productivity responses, and the assumptions about potential cropland.

  4. Comparison of Langevin and Markov channel noise models for neuronal signal generation B. Sengupta,* S. B. Laughlin, and J. E. Niven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comparison of Langevin and Markov channel noise models for neuronal signal generation B. Sengupta reproduces the channel noise produced by the Markov model remains unclear. Here we present a comparison between Langevin and Markov models of channel noise in neurons using single compartment Hodgkin

  5. Computational Modeling and the Experimental Plasma Research Program A White Paper Submitted to the FESAC Subcommittee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computational Modeling and the Experimental Plasma Research Program A White Paper Submitted of the fusion energy program. The experimental plasma research (EPR) program is well positioned to make major in fusion development and promote scientific discovery. Experimental plasma research projects explore

  6. Comparison of high pressure transient PVT measurements and model predictions. Part I.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.; Winters, William Stanley, Jr.

    2010-07-01

    A series of experiments consisting of vessel-to-vessel transfers of pressurized gas using Transient PVT methodology have been conducted to provide a data set for optimizing heat transfer correlations in high pressure flow systems. In rapid expansions such as these, the heat transfer conditions are neither adiabatic nor isothermal. Compressible flow tools exist, such as NETFLOW that can accurately calculate the pressure and other dynamical mechanical properties of such a system as a function of time. However to properly evaluate the mass that has transferred as a function of time these computational tools rely on heat transfer correlations that must be confirmed experimentally. In this work new data sets using helium gas are used to evaluate the accuracy of these correlations for receiver vessel sizes ranging from 0.090 L to 13 L and initial supply pressures ranging from 2 MPa to 40 MPa. The comparisons show that the correlations developed in the 1980s from sparse data sets perform well for the supply vessels but are not accurate for the receivers, particularly at early time during the transfers. This report focuses on the experiments used to obtain high quality data sets that can be used to validate computational models. Part II of this report discusses how these data were used to gain insight into the physics of gas transfer and to improve vessel heat transfer correlations. Network flow modeling and CFD modeling is also discussed.

  7. Results of an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model comparison using a state accepted statistical protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciolek, J.T. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant, located approximately 26 km northwest of downtown Denver, Colorado, has developed an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model for complex terrain applications. Plant personnel would use the model, known as the Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC) (Hodgin 1985) to project plume impacts and provide off-site protective action recommendations to the State of Colorado should a hazardous material release occur from the facility. The Colorado Department of Health (CDH) entered into an interagency agreement with the Rocky Flats Plant prime contractor, EG&G Rocky Flats, and the US Department of Energy to evaluate TRAC as an acceptable emergency response tool. After exhaustive research of similar evaluation processes from other emergency response and regulatory organizations, the interagency committee devised a formal acceptance process. The process contains an evaluation protocol (Hodgin and Smith 1992), descriptions of responsibilities, an identified experimental data set to use in the evaluation, and judgment criteria for model acceptance. The evaluation protocol is general enough to allow for different implementations. This paper explains one implementation, shows protocol results for a test case, and presents results of a comparison between versions of TRAC with different wind Field codes: a two dimensional mass consistent code called WINDS (Fosberg et al. 1976) that has been extended to three dimensions, and a fully 3 dimensional mass conserving code called NUATMOS (Ross and Smith 1987, Ross et al. 1988).

  8. Stochastic Programming Models for Strategic Planning: An Application to Electric Utilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bienstock, Daniel

    This paper reports on the application of stochastic programming with recourse models to strategic planning problems typical of those faced by an electric utility. A prototype model was constructed using realistic data, and ...

  9. Chapter 5: Long-term benefits analysis of EERE's Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    This chapter provides an overview of the modeling approach used in MARKAL-GPRA05 to evaluate the benefits of EERE R&D programs and technologies. The program benefits reported in this section result from comparisons of each Program Case to the Baseline Case, as modeled in MARKAL-GPRA05.

  10. COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS TO CFD MODELS FOR BLENDING IN A TANK USING DUAL OPPOSING JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, R.

    2011-08-07

    Research has been completed in a pilot scale, eight foot diameter tank to investigate blending, using a pump with dual opposing jets. The jets re-circulate fluids in the tank to promote blending when fluids are added to the tank. Different jet diameters and different horizontal and vertical orientations of the jets were investigated. In all, eighty five tests were performed both in a tank without internal obstructions and a tank with vertical obstructions similar to a tube bank in a heat exchanger. These obstructions provided scale models of several miles of two inch diameter, serpentine, vertical cooling coils below the liquid surface for a full scale, 1.3 million gallon, liquid radioactive waste storage tank. Two types of tests were performed. One type of test used a tracer fluid, which was homogeneously blended into solution. Data were statistically evaluated to determine blending times for solutions of different density and viscosity, and the blending times were successfully compared to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. The other type of test blended solutions of different viscosity. For example, in one test a half tank of water was added to a half tank of a more viscous, concentrated salt solution. In this case, the fluid mechanics of the blending process was noted to significantly change due to stratification of fluids. CFD models for stratification were not investigated. This paper is the fourth in a series of papers resulting from this research (Leishear, et.al. [1- 4]), and this paper documents final test results, statistical analysis of the data, a comparison of experimental results to CFD models, and scale-up of the results to a full scale tank.

  11. Comparison between Model Simulations and Measurements of Hyperspectral Far- infrared Radiation from FIRST during the RHUBC-II Campaign 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baugher, Elizabeth

    2012-02-14

    for its dry, cold, and dominantly clear atmosphere, which is optimal for studying the effects, that water vapor and cirrus clouds have on the far-IR. Comparisons with Line-By-Line Discrete Ordinants Radiative Transfer model, LBLDIS, show that FIRST...

  12. Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua New, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    , multiple substrate types, and insulation levels. A base case and energy-efficient alternative canComparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua New, Oak Ridge National Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors

  13. 1 Copyright 2008 by ASME VIV MODEL TEST DATA COMPARISON WITH SHEAR7 V4.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Copyright © 2008 by ASME VIV MODEL TEST DATA COMPARISON WITH SHEAR7 V4.5 G. Yang/ExxonMobil the riser span) and the use of strain gages in the experiments, the 2003 ExxonMobil data allows for a direct Upstream Research Company W.R. Frank/ExxonMobil Development Company R.B. Campbell/ExxonMobil Upstream

  14. Bayesian Comparison of Models for Images Alex H. Barnett and David J.C. MacKay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKay, David J.C.

    Bayesian Comparison of Models for Images Alex H. Barnett and David J.C. MacKay Cavendish Laboratory.H. Barnett and D.J.C. MacKay `susie' `mouse' `redspot' `trees' `sky' `parrot' `m100cen' `ngc1068' Figure 1

  15. Energy efficiency and the cost of GHG abatement: A comparison of bottom-up and hybrid models for the US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy efficiency and the cost of GHG abatement: A comparison of bottom-up and hybrid models February 2011 Accepted 16 August 2011 Available online 17 September 2011 Keywords: Energy efficiency that a large potential for profitable energy efficiency exists in the US, and that substantial greenhouse gas

  16. Comparison of the PHISICS/RELAP5-3D Ring and Block Model Results for Phase I of the OECD MHTGR-350 Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom

    2014-04-01

    The INL PHISICS code system consists of three modules providing improved core simulation capability: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. Coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been finalized, and as part of the code verification and validation program the exercises defined for Phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR 350 MW Benchmark were completed. This paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark, and presents selected results of the three steady state exercises 1-3 defined for Phase I. For Exercise 1, a stand-alone steady-state neutronics solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) was calculated with INSTANT, using the provided geometry, material descriptions, and detailed cross-section libraries. Exercise 2 required the modeling of a stand-alone thermal fluids solution. The RELAP5-3D results of four sub-cases are discussed, consisting of various combinations of coolant bypass flows and material thermophysical properties. Exercise 3 combined the first two exercises in a coupled neutronics and thermal fluids solution, and the coupled code suite PHISICS/RELAP5-3D was used to calculate the results of two sub-cases. The main focus of the paper is a comparison of the traditional RELAP5-3D “ring” model approach vs. a much more detailed model that include kinetics feedback on individual block level and thermal feedbacks on a triangular sub-mesh. The higher fidelity of the block model is illustrated with comparison results on the temperature, power density and flux distributions, and the typical under-predictions produced by the ring model approach are highlighted.

  17. Modeling Activities in the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Sciences Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Schwartz, Stephen E.

    2009-03-01

    The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Science Program (ASP) conducts research pertinent to radiative forcing of climate change by atmospheric aerosols. The program consists of approximately 40 highly interactive peer-reviewed research projects that examine aerosol properties and processes and the evolution of aerosols in the atmosphere. Principal components of the program are instrument development, laboratory experiments, field studies, theoretical investigations, and modeling. The objectives of the Program are to 1) improve the understanding of aerosol processes associated with light scattering and absorption properties and interactions with clouds that affect Earth's radiative balance and to 2) develop model-based representations of these processes that enable the effects of aerosols on Earth's climate system to be properly represented in global-scale numerical climate models. Although only a few of the research projects within ASP are explicitly identified as primarily modeling activities, modeling actually comprises a substantial component of a large fraction of ASP research projects. This document describes the modeling activities within the Program as a whole, the objectives and intended outcomes of these activities, and the linkages among the several modeling components and with global-scale modeling activities conducted under the support of the Department of Energy's Climate Sciences Program and other aerosol and climate research programs.

  18. Modelling and Formal Verification of Timing Aspects in Large PLC Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez Adiego, B; Blanco Vinuela, E; Tournier, J-C; Gonzalez Suarez, V M; Blech, J O

    2014-01-01

    One of the main obstacle that prevents model checking from being widely used in industrial control systems is the complexity of building formal models out of PLC programs, especially when timing aspects need to be integrated. This paper brings an answer to this obstacle by proposing a methodology to model and verify timing aspects of PLC programs. Two approaches are proposed to allow the users to balance the trade-off between the complexity of the model, i.e. its number of states, and the set of specifications possible to be verified. A tool supporting the methodology which allows to produce models for different model checkers directly from PLC programs has been developed. Verification of timing aspects for real-life PLC programs are presented in this paper using NuSMV.

  19. User's guide to the MESOI diffusion model and to the utility programs UPDATE and LOGRVU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Athey, G.F.; Allwine, K.J.; Ramsdell, J.V.

    1981-11-01

    MESOI is an interactive, Lagrangian puff trajectory diffusion model. The model is documented separately (Ramsdell and Athey, 1981); this report is intended to provide MESOI users with the information needed to successfully conduct model simulations. The user is also provided with guidance in the use of the data file maintenance and review programs; UPDATE and LOGRVU. Complete examples are given for the operaton of all three programs and an appendix documents UPDATE and LOGRVU.

  20. Accelerating Energy Savings Performance Contracting Through Model Statewide Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides suggestions on how to accelerateEnergy Savings Performance Contracting programs and information about the types of assistance provided under the 'Accelerated Energy Savings Performance Contracting' initiative. Author: Energy Services Coalition

  1. Fractured rock modeling in the National Waste Terminal Storage Program: a review of requirements and status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    St. John, C.; Krug, A.; Key, S.; Monsees, J.

    1983-05-01

    Generalized computer codes capable of forming the basis for numerical models of fractured rock masses are being used within the NWTS program. Little additional development of these codes is considered justifiable, except in the area of representation of discrete fractures. On the other hand, model preparation requires definition of medium-specific constitutive descriptions and site characteristics and is therefore legitimately conducted by each of the media-oriented projects within the National Waste Terminal Storage program. However, it is essential that a uniform approach to the role of numerical modeling be adopted, including agreement upon the contribution of modeling to the design and licensing process and the need for, and means of, model qualification for particular purposes. This report discusses the role of numerical modeling, reviews the capabilities of several computer codes that are being used to support design or performance assessment, and proposes a framework for future numerical modeling activities within the NWTS program.

  2. Modelling of offshore wind turbine wakes with the wind farm program FLaP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Modelling of offshore wind turbine wakes with the wind farm program FLaP Bernhard Lange(1) , Hans from the Danish offshore wind farm Vindeby. Vertical wake profiles and mean turbulence intensities are not modelled satisfactorily. Keywords: Offshore, wind farm, wake model, Vindeby, turbulence intensity

  3. A Structure-Conveying Modelling Language for Mathematical and Stochastic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grothey, Andreas

    A Structure-Conveying Modelling Language for Mathematical and Stochastic Programming Marco Colombo present a structure-conveying algebraic modelling language for mathematical pro- gramming. The proposed language extends AMPL with object-oriented features that allows the user to construct models from sub

  4. Sensitivity Analysis of a Dynamic Fleet Management Model Using Approximate Dynamic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Topaloglu, Huseyin

    of fleet management models is to make the vehicle repositioning and vehicle-to-load assignment decisions soSensitivity Analysis of a Dynamic Fleet Management Model Using Approximate Dynamic Programming present tractable algorithms to assess the sensitivity of a stochastic dynamic fleet management model

  5. A Domain-Specific Language for Programming in the Tile Assembly Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, David

    A Domain-Specific Language for Programming in the Tile Assembly Model David Doty Matthew J. Patitz-purpose programming languages. The language is implemented as a class library in Python (a so-called internal DSL Abstract We introduce a domain-specific language (DSL) for creating sets of tile types for simulations

  6. Transcriptional programs: Modelling higher order structure in transcriptional control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, John E; Ott, Sascha; Wernisch, Lorenz

    2009-07-16

    : identifying regulatory modules and their condition-specific regulators from gene expression 22. Gerber GK, Dowell RD, Jaakkola TS, Gifford DK: Automated dis- covery of functional generality of human gene expression programs. PLoS Comput Biol 2007, 3(8):e148...

  7. Sporting Good Manufacturing Company: Optimal Manufacturing and Shipping Cost Through Linear Programming Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malik, Ejaz

    2009-05-15

    total manufacturing capacity. Data regarding the factory workers, machines, warehouse staff, and scheduling were not relevant and, therefore, were not considered in the creation of the linear programming model. All of the basic steps of generating a...

  8. Social comparison, ethnicity, body image, and media exposure to thin-ideal models: an experimental study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Cortney Soderlind

    2009-06-02

    Social comparison theory offers a useful conceptual framework to understand how mainstream American sociocultural values of appearance may shape the development of body image disturbance and eating disorders. Some ...

  9. Comparison and validation of HEU and LEU modeling results to HEU experimental benchmark data for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology MITR reactor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newton, T. H.; Wilson, E. H; Bergeron, A.; Horelik, N.; Stevens, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (MIT Nuclear Reactor Lab.)

    2011-03-02

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like the MITR-II reactor. Towards this goal, comparisons of MCNP5 Monte Carlo neutronic modeling results for HEU and LEU cores have been performed. Validation of the model has been based upon comparison to HEU experimental benchmark data for the MITR-II. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a model which could represent the experimental HEU data, and therefore could provide a basis to demonstrate LEU core performance. This report presents an overview of MITR-II model geometry and material definitions which have been verified, and updated as required during the course of validation to represent the specifications of the MITR-II reactor. Results of calculations are presented for comparisons to historical HEU start-up data from 1975-1976, and to other experimental benchmark data available for the MITR-II Reactor through 2009. This report also presents results of steady state neutronic analysis of an all-fresh LEU fueled core. Where possible, HEU and LEU calculations were performed for conditions equivalent to HEU experiments, which serves as a starting point for safety analyses for conversion of MITR-II from the use of HEU fuel to the use of UMo LEU fuel.

  10. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Introduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Uses lessons learned from Better Buildings grantees, existing data, and private sector insights to highlight business models that can help develop a sustainable residential energy efficiency market.

  11. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Executive Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Uses lessons learned from Better Buildings grantees, existing data, and private sector insights to highlight business models that can help develop a sustainable residential energy efficiency market.

  12. Wind energy conversion system analysis model (WECSAM) computer program documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downey, W T; Hendrick, P L

    1982-07-01

    Described is a computer-based wind energy conversion system analysis model (WECSAM) developed to predict the technical and economic performance of wind energy conversion systems (WECS). The model is written in CDC FORTRAN V. The version described accesses a data base containing wind resource data, application loads, WECS performance characteristics, utility rates, state taxes, and state subsidies for a six state region (Minnesota, Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, Ohio, and Indiana). The model is designed for analysis at the county level. The computer model includes a technical performance module and an economic evaluation module. The modules can be run separately or together. The model can be run for any single user-selected county within the region or looped automatically through all counties within the region. In addition, the model has a restart capability that allows the user to modify any data-base value written to a scratch file prior to the technical or economic evaluation. Thus, any user-supplied data for WECS performance, application load, utility rates, or wind resource may be entered into the scratch file to override the default data-base value. After the model and the inputs required from the user and derived from the data base are described, the model output and the various output options that can be exercised by the user are detailed. The general operation is set forth and suggestions are made for efficient modes of operation. Sample listings of various input, output, and data-base files are appended. (LEW)

  13. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program, plant parameters envelopes: Comparison with ranges of values for four hypothetical sites. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this volume is to report the results of the comparison of the ALWR plan parameters envelope with values of site characteristics developed for our hypothetical sites that generally represent conditions encountered within the United States. This effort is not intended to identify or address the suitability of any existing site, site area, or region in the United States. Also included in this volume is Appendix F, SERCH Summaries Regarding Siting.

  14. Connecticut Fuel Cell Activities: Markets, Programs, and Models |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12Power,5Energy Works' SuccessOil, and GasWorking

  15. Connecticut Fuel Cell Activities: Markets, Programs, and Models

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels|ProgramsLake Paiute ReservationResourcesMarch2 DOE1 Connecticut Fuel

  16. 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Program Peer Review | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3 Racetracks2 DOEEnergy Los Alamos3and 20144 AMO

  17. Automated verification of model-based programs under uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahtab, Tazeen, 1981-

    2004-01-01

    Highly robust embedded systems have been enabled through software executives that have the ability to reason about their environment. Those that employ the model-based autonomy paradigm automatically diagnose and plan ...

  18. Modelling and solving the stable marriage problem using constraint programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manlove, D.F.

    Manlove,D.F. O'Malley,G. Proceedings of the Fifth Workshop on Modelling and Solving Problems with Constraints, held at the 19th International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI 2005) pp 10-17

  19. Modeling a bender element test using Abaqus Finite Element Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Sean (Sean Michael)

    2011-01-01

    Finite Element Methods hold promise for modeling the behavior of an unsaturated soil specimen subjected to bender element agitation. The immediate objective of this research project is to reproduce a bender element test ...

  20. A Mathematical Programming Model for Optimal Layout Considering Quantitative Risk Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    A Mathematical Programming Model for Optimal Layout Considering Quantitative Risk Analysis Nancy risk analysis; Plant layout *Corresponding author. Phone: +52-461-611-7575 Ext. 5577. E-mail: arturo of plant layout with safety considerations. The model considers a quantitative risk analysis to take safety

  1. Project Title Economic Modeling & Unconventional Gas Resource Appraisal Program Line Tough Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    support to assess the economic viability of new tough gas plays (tight gas, shale gas, CBM). Project are illustrated using the US shale gas plays as case templates. Discounted cash flow models are applied1 Project Title Economic Modeling & Unconventional Gas Resource Appraisal Program Line Tough Gas

  2. A multi-objective programming model for assessment the GHG emissions in MSW management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavrotas, George; Skoulaxinou, Sotiria; Gakis, Nikos; Katsouros, Vassilis; Georgopoulou, Elena

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • The multi-objective multi-period optimization model. • The solution approach for the generation of the Pareto front with mathematical programming. • The very detailed description of the model (decision variables, parameters, equations). • The use of IPCC 2006 guidelines for landfill emissions (first order decay model) in the mathematical programming formulation. - Abstract: In this study a multi-objective mathematical programming model is developed for taking into account GHG emissions for Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) management. Mathematical programming models are often used for structure, design and operational optimization of various systems (energy, supply chain, processes, etc.). The last twenty years they are used all the more often in Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) management in order to provide optimal solutions with the cost objective being the usual driver of the optimization. In our work we consider the GHG emissions as an additional criterion, aiming at a multi-objective approach. The Pareto front (Cost vs. GHG emissions) of the system is generated using an appropriate multi-objective method. This information is essential to the decision maker because he can explore the trade-offs in the Pareto curve and select his most preferred among the Pareto optimal solutions. In the present work a detailed multi-objective, multi-period mathematical programming model is developed in order to describe the waste management problem. Apart from the bi-objective approach, the major innovations of the model are (1) the detailed modeling considering 34 materials and 42 technologies, (2) the detailed calculation of the energy content of the various streams based on the detailed material balances, and (3) the incorporation of the IPCC guidelines for the CH{sub 4} generated in the landfills (first order decay model). The equations of the model are described in full detail. Finally, the whole approach is illustrated with a case study referring to the application of the model in a Greek region.

  3. Dynamic soil-structure interaction-comparison of FEM model with experimental results 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Palanivel Rajan

    2000-01-01

    Linearly elastic finite element models are developed for particular scale-model gravity retaining wall structures. The sand is modeled as a homogenous isotropic linearly elastic continuum. Models are created in four different configurations...

  4. Comparison of Simulation Methods for Evaluating Improved Fenestration Using the DOE-2.1E Building Energy Simulation Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, J.; Haberl, J. S.

    2006-01-01

    ). In the shading coefficient (SC) method, the program first calculates the angle-dependent solar heat gain using transmission coefficients for clear, 1/8” glass using the angle-dependent polynomial developed by ASHRAE Task Group on Energy Requirements- TGER... coefficient (SHGC) values which are used by the DOE-2.1e program. A number of studies have shown that the SHGC more accurately accounts for the angle-dependent transmittance properties than the SC method of assessing solar heat gain through windows...

  5. Microgrid Reliability Modeling and Battery Scheduling Using Stochastic Linear Programming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardoso, Goncalo; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; DeForest, Nicholas; Barbosa-Povoa, Ana; Ferrao, Paulo

    2013-05-23

    This paper describes the introduction of stochastic linear programming into Operations DER-CAM, a tool used to obtain optimal operating schedules for a given microgrid under local economic and environmental conditions. This application follows previous work on optimal scheduling of a lithium-iron-phosphate battery given the output uncertainty of a 1 MW molten carbonate fuel cell. Both are in the Santa Rita Jail microgrid, located in Dublin, California. This fuel cell has proven unreliable, partially justifying the consideration of storage options. Several stochastic DER-CAM runs are executed to compare different scenarios to values obtained by a deterministic approach. Results indicate that using a stochastic approach provides a conservative yet more lucrative battery schedule. Lower expected energy bills result, given fuel cell outages, in potential savings exceeding 6percent.

  6. Comparison of 3D phase field and Peierls-Nabarro modeling of dislocation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    ), phase field (PF) · PF & PN formulations · energy densities · stacking fault energy (SFE) · interface energy scaling · results · comparison of dissociation in PF & PN · dislocation loops under loading-Nabarro (Frenkel; red) · phase field (double well; green) · Volterra (blue) order parameter density stress across

  7. Numerical simulation of the 2011 Tohoku tsunami: Comparison with field observations and sensitivity to model parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Numerical simulation of the 2011 Tohoku tsunami: Comparison with field observations and sensitivity history, created a major tsunami that caused numerous deaths and enormous destruction on the nearby Hon- shu coast. Various tsunami sources were developed for this event, based on inverting seismic or GPS

  8. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Task 23: Phase IV Results Regarding Floating Wind Turbine Modeling; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonkman, J.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Nygaard, T.; Maus, K.; Karimirad, M.; Gao, Z.; Moan, T.; Fylling, I.

    2010-04-01

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, which operates under Subtask 2 of the International Energy Agency Wind Task 23. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating spar buoy in 320 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants' codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

  9. Kinetic Model Reduction using Integer and Semi-infinite Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Philosophy in Chemical Engineering Abstract In this work an optimization-based approach to kinetic model Submitted to the Department of Chemical Engineering in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Chemical Engineering at the MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

  10. Performance Modeling of Shared Memory Programsof SharedMemory Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teo, Yong-Meng

    nus edu sg/~teoymURL: www.comp.nus.edu.sg/ teoym 7th Workshop on High Performance Computing UPM Analysis l i l d l­ Analytical Model · Summary 1 November 2011 47th Workshop on High Performance Computing November 2011 57th Workshop on High Performance Computing (invited talk) #12;R l t d W kRelated Work

  11. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matricesstudents working inProgramming Programming

  12. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matricesstudents working inProgrammingProgramming

  13. Compiler Comparisons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparisons Compiler Comparisons Compiler Comparisons on Hopper There are five compilers available to users on Hopper, the NERSC XE6. All of the compilers on this system are...

  14. Atmospheric Environment 38 (2004) 44274436 Statistical comparison of observed and CMAQ modeled daily

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun, Mikyoung

    2004-01-01

    2004 Abstract New statistical procedures to evaluate the Models-3/Community Multiscale Air Quality reserved. Keywords: Air quality model; Model evaluation; Space­time process; Separable covariance function 1. Introduction The Models-3/Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system has been

  15. Discussion of possible evidence for non-linear BCS resistance in SRF cavity data to model comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, P.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab; Ciovati, G.L.; /Jefferson Lab; Eremeev, G.; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Gurevich, A.; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Lilje, L.; /DESY; Visentin, B.; /Saclay

    2005-07-01

    Very powerful RF cavities are now being developed for future large-scale particle accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC). The basic model for the cavity quality factor Q-slope in high gradient SRF cavities, i.e. the reduction of Q with increasing operating electric and magnetic fields, is the so-called thermal feedback model (TFBM). Most important for the agreement between the model and experimental data, however, is which different surface resistance contributions are included in the TFBM. This paper attempts to further clarify if the non-linear pair-breaking correction to the BCS resistance [1,2] is among those surface resistance contributions, through a comparison of TFBM calculations with experimental data from bulk Nb cavities built and tested at several different laboratories.

  16. Inter-comparison of Computer Codes for TRISO-based Fuel Micro-Modeling and Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Boer; Chang Keun Jo; Wen Wu; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Donald McEachren; Francesco Venneri

    2010-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), the Deep Burn Pebble Bed Reactor (DB-PBR) and the Deep Burn Prismatic Block Reactor (DB-PMR) are all based on fuels that use TRISO particles as their fundamental constituent. The TRISO particle properties include very high durability in radiation environments, hence the designs reliance on the TRISO to form the principal barrier to radioactive materials release. This durability forms the basis for the selection of this fuel type for applications such as Deep Bun (DB), which require exposures up to four times those expected for light water reactors. It follows that the study and prediction of the durability of TRISO particles must be carried as part of the safety and overall performance characterization of all the designs mentioned above. Such evaluations have been carried out independently by the performers of the DB project using independently developed codes. These codes, PASTA, PISA and COPA, incorporate models for stress analysis on the various layers of the TRISO particle (and of the intervening matrix material for some of them), model for fission products release and migration then accumulation within the SiC layer of the TRISO particle, just next to the layer, models for free oxygen and CO formation and migration to the same location, models for temperature field modeling within the various layers of the TRISO particle and models for the prediction of failure rates. All these models may be either internal to the code or external. This large number of models and the possibility of different constitutive data and model formulations and the possibility of a variety of solution techniques makes it highly unlikely that the model would give identical results in the modeling of identical situations. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of an inter-comparison between the codes and to identify areas of agreement and areas that need reconciliation. The inter-comparison has been carried out by the cooperating institutions using a set of pre-defined TRISO conditions (burnup levels, temperature or power levels, etc.) and the outcome will be tabulated in the full length paper. The areas of agreement will be pointed out and the areas that require further modeling or reconciliation will be shown. In general the agreement between the codes is good within less than one order of magnitude in the prediction of TRISO failure rates.

  17. Cross-comparison of spacecraft-environment interaction model predictions applied to Solar Probe Plus near perihelion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchand, R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada); Miyake, Y.; Usui, H. [Graduate School of System Informatics, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Deca, J.; Lapenta, G. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Mathematics Department, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Matéo-Vélez, J. C. [Department of Space Environment, Onera—The French Aerospace Lab, Toulouse (France); Ergun, R. E.; Sturner, A. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Génot, V. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie, Université de Toulouse, France and CNRS, IRAP, 9 Av. colonel Roche, BP 44346, 31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Hilgers, A. [ESA, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, PO Box 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Markidis, S. [High Performance Computing and Visualization Department, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-06-15

    Five spacecraft-plasma models are used to simulate the interaction of a simplified geometry Solar Probe Plus (SPP) satellite with the space environment under representative solar wind conditions near perihelion. By considering similarities and differences between results obtained with different numerical approaches under well defined conditions, the consistency and validity of our models can be assessed. The impact on model predictions of physical effects of importance in the SPP mission is also considered by comparing results obtained with and without these effects. Simulation results are presented and compared with increasing levels of complexity in the physics of interaction between solar environment and the SPP spacecraft. The comparisons focus particularly on spacecraft floating potentials, contributions to the currents collected and emitted by the spacecraft, and on the potential and density spatial profiles near the satellite. The physical effects considered include spacecraft charging, photoelectron and secondary electron emission, and the presence of a background magnetic field. Model predictions obtained with our different computational approaches are found to be in agreement within 2% when the same physical processes are taken into account and treated similarly. The comparisons thus indicate that, with the correct description of important physical effects, our simulation models should have the required skill to predict details of satellite-plasma interaction physics under relevant conditions, with a good level of confidence. Our models concur in predicting a negative floating potential V{sub fl}??10V for SPP at perihelion. They also predict a “saturated emission regime” whereby most emitted photo- and secondary electron will be reflected by a potential barrier near the surface, back to the spacecraft where they will be recollected.

  18. The MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model : revisions, sensitivities, and comparisons of results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babiker, Mustafa H.M.; Reilly, John M.; Mayer, Monika.; Eckaus, Richard S.; Sue Wing, Ian.; Hyman, Robert C.

    The Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model is a component of the MIT Integrated Earth Systems Model (IGSM). Here, we provide an overview of the model accessible to a broad audience and present the detailed ...

  19. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94305 SGP-TR-42 PROCEEDINGS SPECIAL PANEL ON GEOTHERMAL MODEL INTERCOMPARISON STUDY held in conjunction with The Code Comparison Contracts issued by Department of Energy Division of Geothermal Energy San Francisco Operations Office

  20. A comparison of current models for nonlinear rate-dependent material behavior of crystalline solids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beek, Joachim Michael

    1986-01-01

    1986) Joachim Michael Reek, B. S. , Texas AlkH Univer sit, y Chair of Advisor y Committee: Dr. D. H. Allen This thesis reviews three theories for prediction of inelastic defor mation which are based on considerations of the microstr uctural.... . . . 90 . . . 95 . . 102 COMPARISON OF THEORY TQ EXPERIMENT . 107 Qualitative Review of Predictive Capabilities. . . . . . 107 Review of Integration Technique . . 109 Compar i son of' Numer ical Pr edf. cti one to Exper imerrt . . 110 SUMMARY...

  1. The spectral evolution of impulsive solar X-ray flares. II.Comparison of observations with models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo C. Grigis; Arnold O. Benz

    2005-01-20

    We study the evolution of the spectral index and the normalization (flux) of the non-thermal component of the electron spectra observed by RHESSI during 24 solar hard X-ray flares. The quantitative evolution is confronted with the predictions of simple electron acceleration models featuring the soft-hard-soft behaviour. The comparison is general in scope and can be applied to different acceleration models, provided that they make predictions for the behavior of the spectral index as a function of the normalization. A simple stochastic acceleration model yields plausible best-fit model parameters for about 77% of the 141 events consisting of rise and decay phases of individual hard X-ray peaks. However, it implies unphysically high electron acceleration rates and total energies for the others. Other simple acceleration models such as constant rate of accelerated electrons or constant input power have a similar failure rate. The peaks inconsistent with the simple acceleration models have smaller variations in the spectral index. The cases compatible with a simple stochastic model require typically a few times 10^36 electrons accelerated per second at a threshold energy of 18 keV in the rise phases and 24 keV in the decay phases of the flare peaks.

  2. Fourth update of the Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program. Phase IV, Final report. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.E.; Brown, P.E.; Kaminski, R.S.; Smith, M.H.; Ziegler, E.J.

    1981-09-01

    EEDB deals with the development of cost data for nuclear and comparison electric power plants. Its objective is to provide periodic updates of technical and cost (capital, fuel and operating and maintenance) information for use in evaluating and monitoring US civilian nuclear power programs. It contains six nuclear power plant technical models and five comparison coal-fired fossil power plant technical models. (DLC)

  3. Bringing Automated Model Checking to PLC Program Development - A CERN Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez Adiego, B; Tournier, J-C; Blanco Vinuela, E; Gonzalez Suarez, V M

    2014-01-01

    Verification of critical software is a high priority but a challenging task for industrial control systems. Model checking appears to be an appropriate approach for this purpose. However, this technique is not widely used in industry yet, due to some obstacles. The main obstacles encountered when trying to apply formal verification techniques at industrial installations are the difficulty of creating models out of PLC programs and defining formally the specification requirements. In addition, models produced out of real-life programs have a huge state space, thus preventing the verification due to performance issues. Our work at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) focuses on developing efficient automatic verification methods for industrial critical installations based on PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) control systems. In this paper, we present a tool generating automatically formal models out of PLC code. The tool implements a general methodology which can support several input languages, ...

  4. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matricesstudents working inProgramming

  5. Comparison of the Accuracy and Speed of Transient Mobile A/C System Simulation Models: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiss, T.; Lustbader, J.

    2014-03-01

    The operation of air conditioning (A/C) systems is a significant contributor to the total amount of fuel used by light- and heavy-duty vehicles. Therefore, continued improvement of the efficiency of these mobile A/C systems is important. Numerical simulation has been used to reduce the system development time and to improve the electronic controls, but numerical models that include highly detailed physics run slower than desired for carrying out vehicle-focused drive cycle-based system optimization. Therefore, faster models are needed even if some accuracy is sacrificed. In this study, a validated model with highly detailed physics, the 'Fully-Detailed' model, and two models with different levels of simplification, the 'Quasi-Transient' and the 'Mapped- Component' models, are compared. The Quasi-Transient model applies some simplifications compared to the Fully-Detailed model to allow faster model execution speeds. The Mapped-Component model is similar to the Quasi-Transient model except instead of detailed flow and heat transfer calculations in the heat exchangers, it uses lookup tables created with the Quasi-Transient model. All three models are set up to represent the same physical A/C system and the same electronic controls. Speed and results of the three model versions are compared for steady state and transient operation. Steady state simulated data are also compared to measured data. The results show that the Quasi-Transient and Mapped-Component models ran much faster than the Fully-Detailed model, on the order of 10- and 100-fold, respectively. They also adequately approach the results of the Fully-Detailed model for steady-state operation, and for drive cycle-based efficiency predictions

  6. Optimisation and comparison of integrated models of direct-drive linear machines for wave energy conversion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crozier, Richard Carson

    2014-06-30

    Combined electrical and structural models of five types of permanent magnet linear electrical machines suitable for direct-drive power take-off on wave energy applications are presented. Electromagnetic models were ...

  7. Phosphorus water quality model evaluation and comparison for natural and constructed wetlands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paasch, Mary Margaret

    1998-01-01

    model, and the detailed ecosystem model, were evaluated at three wetland sites across the U.S. The three sites included: Boney Marsh Experimental Area, Florida; Jackson Bottom Experimental Wetlands, Oregon; and the Des Plaines River Wetland Demonstration...

  8. COMPARISON OF PROPORTIONAL AND ON/OFF COLLECTOR LOOP CONTROL STRATEGIES USING A DYNAMIC COLLECTOR MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiller, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    liquid through flat-plate solar collectors are disc~ssed andDYNM1IC The FLAT~PLATE SOLAR COLLECTOR MODEL Hottel~\\>of a flat~plate solar collector. The model is based upon a

  9. Low density expansion and isospin dependence of nuclear energy functional: comparison between relativistic and Skyrme models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Providencia; D. P. Menezes; L. Brito; Ph. Chomaz

    2007-04-26

    In the present work we take the non relativistic limit of relativistic models and compare the obtained functionals with the usual Skyrme parametrization. Relativistic models with both constant couplings and with density dependent couplings are considered. While some models present very good results already at the lowest order in the density, models with non-linear terms only reproduce the energy functional if higher order terms are taken into account in the expansion.

  10. Safety relief valve sizing: comparison of two-phase flow models to empirical data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meiller, Paul Robert

    2013-02-22

    in this study: The Two-Phase-Homogenous-Equilibrium Model (TPHEM), proposed by the Center for Chemical Process Safety (CCPS), and the Homogenous-Nonequilibrium Model proposed by Fauske. These models were evaluated against steam/water data (both sub-cooled...

  11. Workflow-based composition of web-services: a business model or a programming paradigm?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lupu, Emil C.

    Workflow-based composition of web-services: a business model or a programming paradigm? Dinesh SOAP/XML is perceived as the appropriate interoperability level for web-services, companies compete to provide workflow-based tools for web-service integration. This paper presents the design

  12. Formal Modeling and Verification of Operational Flight Program in a Small-Scale Unmanned Helicopter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formal Modeling and Verification of Operational Flight Program in a Small-Scale Unmanned Helicopter helicopter and its onboard embedded computing system for flight control and real-time transmission and application services for an unmanned helicopter. It will be used for responding to disasters such as forest

  13. Evaluating the Cisco Networking Academy Program's Instructional Model against Bloom's Taxonomy for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Evaluating the Cisco Networking Academy Program's Instructional Model against Bloom's Taxonomy the use of Bloom's learning taxonomy to help address this lack of theoretical basis. The paper further's taxonomy. Keywords: Information Security Education, Bloom's Taxonomy, Blended Learning, E-learning 1

  14. Scientific Programming 11 (2003) 159176 159 A performance-prediction model for PIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vlad, Gregorio

    2003-01-01

    Scientific Programming 11 (2003) 159­176 159 IOS Press A performance-prediction model for PIC hierarchical workload decomposition strategies for particle in cell (PIC) codes on Clusters of Symmetric Multi of parallelization efficiency are compared with the predicted results. 1. Introduction Particle-in-cell (PIC

  15. Theory of Dynamical Model Reductions in Systems Biology and Implementation in Constraint Logic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radulescu, Ovidiu

    qualitative [Gay et al, 2010, 2011, Fages et al., 2012] and quantitative models [Crudu et al., 2009, Gorban et Programming PhD Thesis Subject, Advisors: François Fages, Inria Paris-Rocquencourt, http al, 2004, 2008 & 2010; Radulescu et al, 2008, 2012; Noel et al 2011]. The subject of the Thesis

  16. Inter-frame dependent rate and distortion models for statistical multiplexing of video programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Inter-frame dependent rate and distortion models for statistical multiplexing of video programs@lss.supelec.fr Abstract--Statistical multiplexing (SM) is a useful technique for transmitting multiple video streams over of efficient SM algorithms is based on Rate and Distortion (R-D) information extracted from successive encoded

  17. Rainfall-Runoff Modelling Using Genetic Programming Jayawardena, A. W., 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    algorithms; Genetic programming. EXTENDED ABSTRACT The problem of accurately determining river flows from and the function set) are defined initially, and the learning method subsequently finds both the optimal structure predictions. In contrast to the not so satisfactory performance by the GP models for predicting the run

  18. Results and Comparison from the SAM Linear Fresnel Technology Performance Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the new Linear Fresnel technology performance model in NREL's System Advisor Model. The model predicts the financial and technical performance of direct-steam-generation Linear Fresnel power plants, and can be used to analyze a range of system configurations. This paper presents a brief discussion of the model formulation and motivation, and provides extensive discussion of the model performance and financial results. The Linear Fresnel technology is also compared to other concentrating solar power technologies in both qualitative and quantitative measures. The Linear Fresnel model - developed in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute - provides users with the ability to model a variety of solar field layouts, fossil backup configurations, thermal receiver designs, and steam generation conditions. This flexibility aims to encompass current market solutions for the DSG Linear Fresnel technology, which is seeing increasing exposure in fossil plant augmentation and stand-alone power generation applications.

  19. WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; McNeil, Michael; Dunham_Whitehead, Camilla; Letschert, Virginie; della_Cava, Mirka

    2008-02-28

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) influences the market for plumbing fixtures and fittings by encouraging consumers to purchase products that carry the WaterSense label, which certifies those products as performing at low flow rates compared to unlabeled fixtures and fittings. As consumers decide to purchase water-efficient products, water consumption will decline nationwide. Decreased water consumption should prolong the operating life of water and wastewater treatment facilities.This report describes the method used to calculate national water savings attributable to EPA?s WaterSense program. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet model, the National Water Savings (NWS) analysis model, accompanies this methodology report. Version 1.0 of the NWS model evaluates indoor residential water consumption. Two additional documents, a Users? Guide to the spreadsheet model and an Impacts Report, accompany the NWS model and this methodology document. Altogether, these four documents represent Phase One of this project. The Users? Guide leads policy makers through the spreadsheet options available for projecting the water savings that result from various policy scenarios. The Impacts Report shows national water savings that will result from differing degrees of market saturation of high-efficiency water-using products.This detailed methodology report describes the NWS analysis model, which examines the effects of WaterSense by tracking the shipments of products that WaterSense has designated as water-efficient. The model estimates market penetration of products that carry the WaterSense label. Market penetration is calculated for both existing and new construction. The NWS model estimates savings based on an accounting analysis of water-using products and of building stock. Estimates of future national water savings will help policy makers further direct the focus of WaterSense and calculate stakeholder impacts from the program.Calculating the total gallons of water the WaterSense program saves nationwide involves integrating two components, or modules, of the NWS model. Module 1 calculates the baseline national water consumption of typical fixtures, fittings, and appliances prior to the program (as described in Section 2.0 of this report). Module 2 develops trends in efficiency for water-using products both in the business-as-usual case and as a result of the program (Section 3.0). The NWS model combines the two modules to calculate total gallons saved by the WaterSense program (Section 4.0). Figure 1 illustrates the modules and the process involved in modeling for the NWS model analysis.The output of the NWS model provides the base case for each end use, as well as a prediction of total residential indoor water consumption during the next two decades. Based on the calculations described in Section 4.0, we can project a timeline of water savings attributable to the WaterSense program. The savings increase each year as the program results in the installation of greater numbers of efficient products, which come to compose more and more of the product stock in households throughout the United States.

  20. A comparison of three turbulence models with an application to the West Pacific Warm Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anne-Claire Bennis; Macarena Gomez Marmol; Roger Lewandowski; Tomas Chacon Rebollo; Françoise Brossier

    2007-07-16

    In this work, we compare three turbulence models used to parameterize the oceanic boundary layer. These three models depend on the bulk Richardson number, which is coherent with the studied region, the West Pacific Warm Pool, because of the large mean shear associated with the equatorial undercurrent. One of these models, called R224, is new and the others are Pacanowski and Philander's model (R213 model) and Gent's model (R23 model). The numerical implementation is based on a non-conservative numerical scheme. The following (three criteria) are used to compare the models: the surface current intensity, the pycnocline's form and the mixed layer depth. We initialize the code with realistic velocity and density profiles thanks the TOGA-TAO array (McPhaden, 1995). In case of static instability zone on the initial density profile, only the R224 model gives realistic results. Afterwards, we study a mixed layer induced by the wind stress. In this case, the R224 results and the Pacanowski and Philander's results are similar. Furthermore, we simulate a long time case. We obtain a linear solution for all models that is in agreement with Bennis and al.

  1. Comparison of Test Procedures and Energy Efficiency Criteria in Selected International Standards & Labeling Programs for Copy Machines, External Power Supplies, LED Displays, Residential Gas Cooktops and Televisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2013-01-01

    2010. “Top Runner Program. ” Revised Edition March 2010.2010. “Top Runner Program. ” Revised Edition March 2010.2010. “Top Runner Program. ” Revised Edition March 2010.

  2. A comparison of turbulence models in airship steady-state CFD simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voloshin, Vitaly; Calay, Rajnish K

    2012-01-01

    The accuracy and resource consumption of the four different turbulence models based on the eddy viscosity assumption, namely, $k-\\varepsilon$, two $k-\\omega$ and Spallart-Allmaram models, in modeling airships are investigated. The test airship shape is a conventional shape. Three different angles of attack are considered. The results are checked against the wind tunnel experimental data. The resource consumption study is based on the benchmark of 1500 iterations. Based on all data obtained it is evident that Spallart-Allmaras model is the most optimal one in the majority of cases.

  3. COMPARISON OF QUENCHED AND ANNEALED INVARIANCE PRINCIPLES FOR RANDOM CONDUCTANCE MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barlow, Martin T.

    of percolation see [BeB, MP, SS], and for the Random Conductance Model with µe i.i.d see [BP, M1, BD, ABDH

  4. Comparison of transition densities in the DDHMS model of pre-equilibrium emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brito, L.; Carlson, B. V.

    2014-11-11

    The DDHMS (double differential hybrid Monte Carlo simulation) model treats nucleon-induced pre-equilibrium reactions as a series of particle-particle and particle-hole interactions in the space of energy and angle. This work compares spectra obtained within the model using diferent approximations to the density of accessible states. The calculations are performed with the EMPIRE reaction model code, a modular system containing several nuclear reaction models that permits a fairly complete descritpion of the reaction, from elastic scattering and absorption through the pre-equilbrium stage to the final decay by statistical emission.

  5. Biological effects of long-term exposure to low dose-rate radiation -- Comparisons of WAM model and LQ model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wada, Takahiro; Nakamura, Issei; Tsunoyama, Yuichi; Nakajima, Hiroo; Bando, Masako

    2015-01-01

    Newly proposed Whack-A-Mole (WAM) model which is to be used to estimate the biological effects of artificial radiations is compared with conventionally used Linear-Quadratic model. Basic properties of WAM model are discussed emphasizing on the dose-rate dependence. By adopting the parameters that are determined to fit the mega mouse experiments, biological effects of long-term exposure to extremely low dose-rate radiation are discussed. In WAM model, the effects of the long-term exposure show a saturation property, which makes a clear distinction from the LNT hypothesis which predicts a linear increase of the effects with time.

  6. A comparison of geospatially modeled fire behavior and fire management utility of three data sources in the southeastern United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollingsworth, LaWen T.; Kurth, Laurie,; Parresol, Bernard, R.; Ottmar, Roger, D.; Prichard, Susan J.

    2012-01-01

    Landscape-scale fire behavior analyses are important to inform decisions on resource management projects that meet land management objectives and protect values from adverse consequences of fire. Deterministic and probabilistic geospatial fire behavior analyses are conducted with various modeling systems including FARSITE, FlamMap, FSPro, and Large Fire Simulation System. The fundamental fire intensity algorithms in these systems require surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy cover to model surface fire behavior. Canopy base height, stand height, and canopy bulk density are required in addition to surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy cover to model crown fire activity. Several surface fuel and canopy classification efforts have used various remote sensing and ecological relationships as core methods to develop the spatial layers. All of these methods depend upon consistent and temporally constant interpretations of crown attributes and their ecological conditions to estimate surface fuel conditions. This study evaluates modeled fire behavior for an 80,000 ha tract of land in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern US using three different data sources. The Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS) was used to build fuelbeds from intensive field sampling of 629 plots. Custom fire behavior fuel models were derived from these fuelbeds. LANDFIRE developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy attributes for the US using satellite imagery informed by field data. The Southern Wildfire Risk Assessment (SWRA) developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy cover for the southeastern US using satellite imagery. Differences in modeled fire behavior, data development, and data utility are summarized to assist in determining which data source may be most applicable for various land management activities and required analyses. Characterizing fire behavior under different fuel relationships provides insights for natural ecological processes, management strategies for fire mitigation, and positive and negative features of different modeling systems. A comparison of flame length, rate of spread, crown fire activity, and burn probabilities modeled with FlamMap shows some similar patterns across the landscape from all three data sources, but there are potentially important differences. All data sources showed an expected range of fire behavior. Average flame lengths ranged between 1 and 1.4 m. Rate of spread varied the greatest with a range of 2.4-5.7 m min{sup -1}. Passive crown fire was predicted for 5% of the study area using FCCS and LANDFIRE while passive crown fire was not predicted using SWRA data. No active crown fire was predicted regardless of the data source. Burn probability patterns across the landscape were similar but probability was highest using SWRA and lowest using FCCS.

  7. A Parallel Programming Model for a Multi-FPGA Multiprocessor Manuel Alejandro Salda~na De Fuentes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moshovos, Andreas

    A Parallel Programming Model for a Multi-FPGA Multiprocessor Machine by Manuel Alejandro Salda~na by Manuel Alejandro Salda~na De Fuentes #12;#12;A Parallel Programming Model for a Multi-FPGA Multiprocessor Machine Manuel Alejandro Salda~na De Fuentes Master of Applied Sciences Graduate Department of Electrical

  8. Aalborg Universitet Comparison of Steady-State SVC Models in Load Flow Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    that the electrical distance between the generators and the load centers is controlled. The shunt- connected FACTS-state models of static var compensator (SVC), i.e. the generator-fixed susceptance model, the total susceptance bus, equivalent SVC susceptance at the fundamental frequency and the load flow convergence rate when

  9. AgentBased Models of Financial Markets: A Comparison with Experimental Markets \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    in experimental­market settings with human subjects, to model complex interactions among artificially­intelligent by the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, the Center for Biological and Computational Learning, and the Laboratory: Agent­Based Models; Artificial Markets; Experimental Markets; Market Mi­ crostructure JEL Classification

  10. Method Comparison For Estimation Of Distributed Parameters In Permittivity Models Using Reflectance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;1 Introduction There is a current interest in the integration of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for both static matrix composites. In order to model the reflectance, one must specify a model for the complex have hypothesized that as the CMC under study (a ceramic matrix with a silicon carbide fiber

  11. A Comparison of the AC and DC Power Flow Models for LMP Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    power flow model for LMP-based market calculations. The paper first provides a general discussion values include generator AVR status, LTC and phase shifting transformer tap positions, discrete switched shifting transformers is often dependent upon the transformer's tap value. Last, the power flow models

  12. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Contractor/Retailer Business Models

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Business models information focused on remodelers, HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) contractors, home performance contractors, or retailers.

  13. Comparison of different capillary bridge models for application in the discrete element method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anton Gladkyy; Ruediger Schwarze

    2014-09-12

    Weakly wetted granular material is the subject of many studies. Several formulations were proposed to calculate the capillary forces between wet particles. In this paper some of such models have been implemented in a DEM-framework, and simulation results were compared to experimental measurements. Also, the influence of capillary model type on macro parameters like local shear viscosity and cohesive parameters of sheared material have been investigated through the simulation of spherical beads using a DEM-model of a split-bottom shear-cell. It was concluded that the water content, simulated with the help of capillary bridge models, changes the macro-properties of the simulated granular material. Different capillary bridge models do not influence the macroscopic results visibly.

  14. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Home Performance Contractor Business Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The home performance contractor model walks through the “one-stop-shop” model for home energy upgrades. It illustrates both the opportunities and barriers for starting as a home performance contractor company from the beginning, rather than expanding from an existing model, such as a remodeler.

  15. Env. Sci 310/550 --Stella or Vensim? Both Stella and Vensim are excellent programs for dynamic modeling, and both are explained and used in Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    Env. Sci 310/550 -- Stella or Vensim? Both Stella and Vensim are excellent programs for dynamic modeling, and both are explained and used in Modeling the Environment: 2nd Edition. You can select either program for this course. Previous students' experiences may help you decide which software is best for you

  16. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Home Performance Contractor Business Model Conclusion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The summary details important observations on home performance contractors and those observations’ impact on potential expansion into the residential energy efficiency market. Understanding these impacts can help home performance contractors, program administrators, and other actors create and/or sustain a business that promotes energy efficiency.

  17. A Comparison of Measured Crab and Vela Glitch Healing Parameters with Predictions of Neutron Star Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fronefield Crawford; Marek Demianski

    2003-06-11

    There are currently two well-accepted models that explain how pulsars exhibit glitches, sudden changes in their regular rotational spin-down. According to the starquake model, the glitch healing parameter, Q, which is measurable in some cases from pulsar timing, should be equal to the ratio of the moment of inertia of the superfluid core of a neutron star (NS) to its total moment of inertia. Measured values of the healing parameter from pulsar glitches can therefore be used in combination with realistic NS structure models as one test of the feasibility of the starquake model as a glitch mechanism. We have constructed NS models using seven representative equations of state of superdense matter to test whether starquakes can account for glitches observed in the Crab and Vela pulsars, for which the most extensive and accurate glitch data are available. We also present a compilation of all measured values of Q for Crab and Vela glitches to date which have been separately published in the literature. We have computed the fractional core moment of inertia for stellar models covering a range of NS masses and find that for stable NSs in the realistic mass range 1.4 +/- 0.2 solar masses, the fraction is greater than 0.55 in all cases. This range is not consistent with the observational restriction Q 0.7) are consistent with the starquake model predictions and support previous conclusions that starquakes can be the cause of Crab glitches.

  18. Charge state evolution in the solar wind. III. Model comparison with observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landi, E.; Oran, R.; Lepri, S. T.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Fisk, L. A.; Van der Holst, B.

    2014-08-01

    We test three theoretical models of the fast solar wind with a set of remote sensing observations and in-situ measurements taken during the minimum of solar cycle 23. First, the model electron density and temperature are compared to SOHO/SUMER spectroscopic measurements. Second, the model electron density, temperature, and wind speed are used to predict the charge state evolution of the wind plasma from the source regions to the freeze-in point. Frozen-in charge states are compared with Ulysses/SWICS measurements at 1 AU, while charge states close to the Sun are combined with the CHIANTI spectral code to calculate the intensities of selected spectral lines, to be compared with SOHO/SUMER observations in the north polar coronal hole. We find that none of the theoretical models are able to completely reproduce all observations; namely, all of them underestimate the charge state distribution of the solar wind everywhere, although the levels of disagreement vary from model to model. We discuss possible causes of the disagreement, namely, uncertainties in the calculation of the charge state evolution and of line intensities, in the atomic data, and in the assumptions on the wind plasma conditions. Last, we discuss the scenario where the wind is accelerated from a region located in the solar corona rather than in the chromosphere as assumed in the three theoretical models, and find that a wind originating from the corona is in much closer agreement with observations.

  19. Comparison of LMA and LOW Solar Solution Predictions in an SO(10) GUT Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl H. Albright; S. Geer

    2002-02-15

    Within the framework of an SO(10) GUT model that can accommodate both the LMA and LOW solar neutrino mixing solutions by appropriate choice of the right-handed Majorana matrix elements, we present explicit predictions for the neutrino oscillation parameters \\Delta m^2_{21}, \\sin^2 2\\theta_{12}, \\sin^2 2\\theta_{23}, \\sin^2 2\\theta_{13}, and \\delta_{CP}. Given the observed near maximality of the atmospheric mixing, the model favors the LMA solution and predicts that \\delta_{CP} is small. The suitability of Neutrino Superbeams and Neutrino Factories for precision tests of the two model versions is discussed.

  20. Posters A Comparison of Model-Simulated Relative Humidity with Satellite-Derived Cloudiness

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgram Guidelines This document outlines the majorL.Posters Posters

  1. Comparison of Models of Critical Opacity in the Quark-Gluon Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiangdong Li; C. M. Shakin

    2004-07-20

    In this work we discuss two methods of calculation of quark propagation in the quark-gluon plasma. Both methods make use of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. The essential difference of these calculations is the treatment of deconfinement. A model of confinement is not included in the work of Gastineau, Blanquier and Aichelin [hep-ph/0404207], however, the meson states they consider are still bound for temperatures greater than the deconfinement temperature T_c. On the other hand, our model deals with unconfined quarks and includes a description of the q(bar)q resonances found in lattice QCD studies that make use of the maximum entropy method (MEM). We compare the q{bar)q cross sections calculated in these models.

  2. Comparison of alternative models for simulating anomalous solute transport in a large heterogeneous soil column

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    ). Each of these models was used to fit the breakthrough curve (BTC) at each distance individually not explain the distinct BTC tailing satisfactorily. In contrast to MIM, CTRW bet- ter simulated the long

  3. A comparison of Bayesian versus deterministic formulation for dynamic data integration into reservoir models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rojas Paico, Danny H.

    2001-01-01

    The integration of dynamic data into reservoir models is known as automatic history matching, and it requires the solution of an inverse problem through the minimization of an objective function. The objective function to ...

  4. Second Level Cluster Dependencies: A Comparison of Modeling Software and Missing Data Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larsen, Ross Allen Andrew

    2011-10-21

    Dependencies in multilevel models at the second level have never been thoroughly examined. For certain designs first-level subjects are independent over time, but the second level subjects may exhibit nonzero covariances ...

  5. Improved Building Energy Performance Modelling through Comparison of Measured Data with Simulated Results 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bambrook, S.; Jacob, D.

    2008-01-01

    the building and comparing simulated results to the measured data. The simulated building energy performance results achieved in the first stage of computer modelling show a reasonable correlation with measured data, however, further work is required to create...

  6. Comparison of Single, Double, and Triple Linear Flow Models for Shale Gas/Oil Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tivayanonda, Vartit

    2012-10-19

    There have been many attempts to use mathematical method in order to characterize shale gas/oil reservoirs with multi-transverse hydraulic fractures horizontal well. Many authors have tried to come up with a suitable and practical mathematical model...

  7. Pyrite oxidation in saturated and Unsaturated Porous Media Flow: A Comparison of alternative mathematical modeling approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tianfu; White, Stephen P.; Pruess, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    is the primary source of acid drainage from mines and waste1981, Biogeochemistry of acid mine drainage and a method toR. , 1995, Modeling Acid Mine Drainage in Waste Rock Dumps,

  8. A Comparison of Data-Derived and Knowledge-Based Modeling of Pronunciation Variation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wester, Mirjam; Fosler-Lussier, Eric

    This paper focuses on modeling pronunciation variation in two different ways: data-derived and knowledge-based. The knowledge-based approach consists of using phonological rules to generate variants. The data-derived approach consists of performing...

  9. Nonlinear Modeling of the Dynamic Effects of Infused Insulin on Glucose: Comparison of Compartmental With Volterra Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markakis, Michail

    This paper presents the results of a computational study that compares simulated compartmental (differential equation) and Volterra models of the dynamic effects of insulin on blood glucose concentration in humans. In the ...

  10. Computational models to quantify uncertain emergency search techniques -- A comparison of measured and synthetic gamma-ray detector response functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.M.; Goldsby, M.E.; Wilcox, W.B. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Hensley, W.K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Hansen, R.G. [Bechtel Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Remote Sensing Lab.

    1997-11-01

    As recent world events show, criminal and terrorist access to nuclear materials is a growing national concern. The national laboratories have developed quantitative models to simulate the response of detection equipment when looking for lost or stolen nuclear material. SYNTH, a code written to synthesize typical gamma-ray spectroscopy experiments, and QUEST, a model to Quantify Uncertain Emergency Search Techniques, calculate the response functions of gamma-ray detectors for arbitrary source types and shielding configurations. In addition, QUEST provides an interactive, three-dimensional user interface supporting the virtual quest for nuclear materials, making possible quantitative comparisons of various sensor technologies and inspection methodologies. The probability of detecting a radioactive source during an inspection is a function of many different variables, including source type, structure geometry (including shielding), inspection dynamics (path and speed), detector (type, size, and resolution), and analysis algorithms. The authors present the results of their study comparing the synthetic Sodium Iodide (NaI) and Germanium (Ge) detector responses generated by both SYNTH and QUEST with those generated by real detectors deployed in the field. Quantitative models, such as the ones presented here, are important since they, (1) allow inspection teams to maximize the probability of finding materials of interest, (2) aid in the development of new instruments and detection techniques, and (3) support other diverse applications including environmental monitoring, nuclear facilities inspections, and radiation safety responder training.

  11. Validation and Comparison of Carbon Sequestration Project Cost Models with Project Cost Data Obtained from the Southwest Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Lee; Reid Grigg; Brian McPherson

    2011-04-15

    Obtaining formal quotes and engineering conceptual designs for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration sites and facilities is costly and time-consuming. Frequently, when looking at potential locations, managers, engineers and scientists are confronted with multiple options, but do not have the expertise or the information required to quickly obtain a general estimate of what the costs will be without employing an engineering firm. Several models for carbon compression, transport and/or injection have been published that are designed to aid in determining the cost of sequestration projects. A number of these models are used in this study, including models by J. Ogden, MIT's Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies Program Model, the Environmental Protection Agency and others. This report uses the information and data available from several projects either completed, in progress, or conceptualized by the Southwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) to determine the best approach to estimate a project's cost. The data presented highlights calculated versus actual costs. This data is compared to the results obtained by applying several models for each of the individual projects with actual cost. It also offers methods to systematically apply the models to future projects of a similar scale. Last, the cost risks associated with a project of this scope are discussed, along with ways that have been and could be used to mitigate these risks.

  12. MULTI-FLUID MODEL OF A STREAMER AT SOLAR MINIMUM AND COMPARISON WITH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofman, Leon [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Abbo, Lucia; Giordano, Silvio, E-mail: Leon.Ofman@nasa.gov [INAF Astronomical Observatory of Turin (Italy)

    2011-06-10

    We present the results of a time-dependent 2.5-dimensional three-fluid magnetohydrodynamic model of the coronal streamer belt, which is compared with the slow solar wind plasma parameters obtained in the extended corona by the UV spectroscopic data from the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on board SOHO during the past minimum of solar activity (Carrington Rotation 1913). Our previous three-fluid streamer model has been improved by considering the solar magnetic field configuration relevant for solar minimum conditions, and preferential heating for O{sup 5+} ions. The model was run until a fully self-consistent streamer solution was obtained in the quasi-steady state. The plasma parameters from the multi-fluid model were used to compute the expected UV observables from H I Ly{alpha} 1216 A and O VI 1032 A spectral lines, and the results were compared in detail with the UVCS measurements. A good agreement between the model and the data was found. The results of the study provide insight into the acceleration and heating of the multi-ion slow solar wind.

  13. Spectral irradiance variations: Comparison between observations and the SATIRE model on solar rotation time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yvonne C. Unruh; Natalie A. Krivova; Sami K. Solanki; Jerald W. Harder; Greg Kopp

    2008-02-28

    Aims: We test the reliability of the observed and calculated spectral irradiance variations between 200 and 1600 nm over a time span of three solar rotations in 2004. Methods: We compare our model calculations to spectral irradiance observations taken with SORCE/SIM, SoHO/VIRGO and UARS/SUSIM. The calculations assume LTE and are based on the SATIRE (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction) model. We analyse the variability as a function of wavelength and present time series in a number of selected wavelength regions covering the UV to the NIR. We also show the facular and spot contributions to the total calculated variability. Results: In most wavelength regions, the variability agrees well between all sets of observations and the model calculations. The model does particularly well between 400 and 1300 nm, but fails below 220 nm as well as for some of the strong NUV lines. Our calculations clearly show the shift from faculae-dominated variability in the NUV to spot-dominated variability above approximately 400 nm. We also discuss some of the remaining problems, such as the low sensitivity of SUSIM and SORCE for wavelengths between approximately 310 and 350 nm, where currently the model calculations still provide the best estimates of solar variability.

  14. Quark sector of S3 models: classification and comparison with experimental data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canales, F González; Mondragón, M; Salazar, U J Saldaña; Velasco-Sevilla, L

    2013-01-01

    S3 models offer a low energy approach to describe the observed pattern of masses and mixing, of both quarks and leptons. In this work, we first revisit an S3 model with only one Higgs electroweak doublet, where the flavour symmetry must be broken in order to produce an acceptable pattern of masses and mixing for fermions. Then, we analyse different S3 models, where the flavour symmetry is preserved as an exact, but hidden symmetry of the low energy spectra, after the electroweak symmetry breaking. The latter models require the addition of two more Higgs electroweak doublets which are accommodated in an S3 doublet. We also explore the consequences of adding a fourth Higgs electroweak doublet, thus occupying all three irreducible representations of S3. We show how the various S3-invariant mass matrices of the different models can reproduce the two texture zeroes and Nearest Neighbour Interaction matrix forms, which have been found to provide a viable and universal treatment of mixing for both quarks and leptons...

  15. Comparison of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous CFD Fuel Models for Phase I of the IAEA CRP on HTR Uncertainties Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom; Su-Jong Yoon

    2014-04-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) evaluation of homogeneous and heterogeneous fuel models was performed as part of the Phase I calculations of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinate Research Program (CRP) on High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Uncertainties in Modeling (UAM). This study was focused on the nominal localized stand-alone fuel thermal response, as defined in Ex. I-3 and I-4 of the HTR UAM. The aim of the stand-alone thermal unit-cell simulation is to isolate the effect of material and boundary input uncertainties on a very simplified problem, before propagation of these uncertainties are performed in subsequent coupled neutronics/thermal fluids phases on the benchmark. In many of the previous studies for high temperature gas cooled reactors, the volume-averaged homogeneous mixture model of a single fuel compact has been applied. In the homogeneous model, the Tristructural Isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles in the fuel compact were not modeled directly and an effective thermal conductivity was employed for the thermo-physical properties of the fuel compact. On the contrary, in the heterogeneous model, the uranium carbide (UCO), inner and outer pyrolytic carbon (IPyC/OPyC) and silicon carbide (SiC) layers of the TRISO fuel particles are explicitly modeled. The fuel compact is modeled as a heterogeneous mixture of TRISO fuel kernels embedded in H-451 matrix graphite. In this study, a steady-state and transient CFD simulations were performed with both homogeneous and heterogeneous models to compare the thermal characteristics. The nominal values of the input parameters are used for this CFD analysis. In a future study, the effects of input uncertainties in the material properties and boundary parameters will be investigated and reported.

  16. Preliminary validation of rock mass models by comparison to laboratory frictional sliding experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobolik, S.R.; Miller, J.D.

    1996-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) is studying Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada as a potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Site characterization will be facilitated by the construction of an Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). The ESF and potential repository will be excavated from both nonwelded and welded ashflow tuff with varying rock quality (degree of welding, rock mass strength, etc.) and fault and fracture characteristics. Design concerns for the construction of these facilities include the integrity of the structure during underground testing operations and, if it occurs, the emplacement and storage of high-level nuclear waste which could increase the local temperatures in the underground rock mass to as high as 300{degrees}C. Because of the associated issues regarding personnel and long-term environmental safety, sophisticated jointed rock mass models will be required to provide a high degree of confidence for decisions regarding the design, site characterization, and licensing of such facilities. The objective of the work documented in this report is to perform code validation calculations for three rock-mass computer models. The three rock-mass computer models used for this report are the discrete element code UDEC, Version 1.82; and the finite element continuum joint models JAC2D Version 5.10 and JAS3D Version 1.1. The rock mass behavior predicted by the models are compared to the results of laboratory experiments on layered polycarbonate (Lexan) and granite plate experiments. These experiments examine the rock mass behavior of well-defined jointed rock structures or models of jointed structures under uniaxial and biaxial loading. The laboratory environment allows control over the boundary conditions, material properties, and quality and quantity of the data obtained.

  17. Automated Eukaryotic Gene Structure Annotation Using EVidenceModeler and the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, B J; Salzberg, S L; Zhu, W; Pertea, M; Allen, J E; Orvis, J; White, O; Buell, C R; Wortman, J R

    2007-12-10

    EVidenceModeler (EVM) is presented as an automated eukaryotic gene structure annotation tool that reports eukaryotic gene structures as a weighted consensus of all available evidence. EVM, when combined with the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA), yields a comprehensive, configurable annotation system that predicts protein-coding genes and alternatively spliced isoforms. Our experiments on both rice and human genome sequences demonstrate that EVM produces automated gene structure annotation approaching the quality of manual curation.

  18. A hybrid programming model for compressible gas dynamics using openCL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergen, Benjamin Karl [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daniels, Marcus G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Weber, Paul M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The current trend towards multicore/manycore and accelerated architectures presents challenges, both in portability, and also in the choices that developers must make on how to use the resources that these architectures provide. This paper explores some of the possibilities that are enabled by the Open Computing Language (OpenCL), and proposes a programming model that allows developers and scientists to more fully subscribe hybrid compute nodes, while, at the same time, reducing the impact of system failure.

  19. A comparison of observed and modeled surface waves in southern Lake Michigan and the implications for models of sediment resuspension.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawley, N.; Lesht, B. M.; Schwab, D. J.; Environmental Research; Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab

    2004-06-25

    Subsurface pressure sensors were used to make measurements of surface waves during 18 deployments in southern Lake Michigan between 1998 and 2000. Most of the observations were made during the unstratified period (November--May) in water depths between 10 and 55 m. The observations (as well as those obtained from the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) buoy 45007, which is located in the middle of the southern basin of the lake) were compared to the results obtained from the Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL)-Donelan wave model implemented on a 2-km grid. The results show that the wave model does a good job of calculating the wave heights, but consistently underestimates the wave periods. In over 80% of the cases the bottom stresses calculated from both the observations and the wave model results agree as to whether or not resuspension occurs, but over 70% of this agreement is for cases when resuspension does not occur; both stresses predict resuspension about 6% of the time. Since the bottom stresses calculated from the model results are usually lower than those calculated from the observations, resuspension estimates based on the wave model parameters are also lower than those calculated from the observed waves.

  20. A Comparison of Shell Model Results for Some properties of the Even-Even Ge Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. J. Q. Robinson; L. Zamick; Y. Y. Sharon

    2010-07-13

    In this work we examine two recent effective shell model interactions, JUN45 and JJ4B, that have been proposed for use in the $f_{5/2},p_{3/2}, p_{1/2}, g_{9/2}$ model space for both protons and neutrons. We calculate a number of quantities that did not enter into the fits undertaken to fix the parameters of both interactions. In particular we consider static quadrupole moments (Q's) of excited states of the even-even $^{70-76}$Ge isotopes, as well as the B(E2) values in these nuclei. (We have previously studied $^{70}$Zn isotopes using JJ4B.) Some striking disagreements between the JUN45 prediction and the experimental results had already been noted for the quadrupole moments of the $2_1^+$ states of these nuclei. We investigate whether these discrepancies also occur for the JJ4B interaction. Subsequently, we also apply both interactions to calculate the Q's of some more highly excited states and compare the two sets of predictions regarding the nature of the nuclear states under consideration. In order to gain insight into these more complex large-scale shell-model calculations, we examine the corresponding and much simpler single-j shell model calculations in the $g_{9/2}$ neutron shell.

  1. The spin-boson model with a structured environment: A comparison of approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. K. Wilhelm; S. Kleff; J. von Delft

    2003-10-10

    In the spin-boson model, the properties of the oscillator bath are fully characterized by the spectral density of oscillators $J(\\omega)$. We study the case when this function is of Breit-Wigner shape and has a sharp peak at a frequency $\\Omega$ with width $\\Gamma\\ll\\Omega$. We use a number of approaches such as the weak-coupling Bloch-Redfield equation, the non-interacting blip approximation (NIBA) and the flow-equation renormalization scheme. We show, that if $\\Omega$ is much larger than the qubit energy scales, the dynamics corresponds to an Ohmic spin-boson model with a strongly reduced tunnel splitting. We also show that the direction of the scaling of the tunnel splitting changes sign when the bare splitting crosses $\\Omega$. We find good agreement between our analytical approximations and numerical results. We illuminate how and why different approaches to the model account for these features and discuss the interpretation of this model in the context of an application to quantum computation and read-out.

  2. Comparison Between Two Models for Interactions Between Electric and Magnetic Fields and Proteins in Cell Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halgamuge, Malka N.

    of a static magnetic field is required, and biological effects can be expected for frequencies below a few for exposures to low-frequency magnetic fields in the mili-Tesla range. No resonance frequencies or amplitude Lines; Interaction Models; Biological Effects Introduction Static magnetic and electric fields occur

  3. Comparison of Two Models for Identifying Low Gradient, Unconfined Streams and Valley Bottom Extent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In Support of Stream Temperature Modeling Associated with Fire Effects USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain, bedrock controlled channels. In order to test the influence of valley confinement on stream temperature, we developed an in-house algorithm to delineate wide, flat valley bottoms using DEM data as input. We

  4. Duality, thermodynamics, and the linear programming problem in constraint-based models of metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick B. Warren; Janette L. Jones

    2007-08-24

    It is shown that the dual to the linear programming problem that arises in constraint-based models of metabolism can be given a thermodynamic interpretation in which the shadow prices are chemical potential analogues, and the objective is to minimise free energy consumption given a free energy drain corresponding to growth. The interpretation is distinct from conventional non-equilibrium thermodynamics, although it does satisfy a minimum entropy production principle. It can be used to motivate extensions of constraint-based modelling, for example to microbial ecosystems.

  5. A model for including Arduino microcontroller programming in the introductory physics lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haugen, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes a curricular framework for introducing microcontroller programming in the University Physics lab. The approach makes use of Modeling Instruction, an effective approach for teaching science at the secondary level in which student learn the standard material by developing and deploying models of the physical world. In our approach, students engage with a context-rich problem that can be solved with one or more sensors and a microcontroller. The solution path we describe then consists of developing a mathematical model for how the sensors' data can be mapped to a meaningful measurement, and further, developing an algorithmic model that will be implemented in the microcontroller. Once the system is developed and implemented, students are given an array of similar problems in which they can deploy their data collection system. Results from the implementation of this idea, in two University Physics sections, using Arduino microcontrollers, are also described.

  6. COMPARISON OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION Bernhard Lange(1), Jrgen Hjstrup(2), Sren Larsen(2), Rebecca Barthelmie(2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    COMPARISON OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION Bernhard Lange(1 Large offshore wind farms are being built in several countries in Europe. The economic viability of such projects depends on the favourable wind conditions of offshore sites, since the higher energy yield has

  7. Comparison of the EXAFS Spectra of Heteronuclear MnCa/Sr Model Complexes to the Oxygen-Evolving Mn(4)Ca Complex of Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, A.; Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Abboud, K.A.; Yachandra, V.K.; Christou, G.

    2009-06-03

    Heterometallic Mn-Ca and Mn-Sr complexes have been prepared and employed as model complexes for Ca and Sr EXAFS spectral comparisons with the Oxygen-Evolving Complex (OEC) of Photosystem II (PS II); these have revealed similarities that support the presence of at least one O atom bridge between the Mn and Ca/Sr in the OEC.

  8. Composites Science and Technology, Vol. 64, no. 7-8, pp. 1011-1020 (2004) Comparison of Two Models of SWCN Polymer Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odegard, Gregory M.

    2004-01-01

    Composites Science and Technology, Vol. 64, no. 7-8, pp. 1011-1020 (2004) Comparison of Two Models of SWCN Polymer Composites G.M. Odegarda , R.B. Pipesb , P. Hubertc a National Institute of Aerospace, 144 Abstract Two approaches for predicting elastic properties of SWCN/polymer composites, equivalent- continuum

  9. Results from baseline tests of the SPRE I and comparison with code model predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairelli, J.E.; Geng, S.M.; Skupinski, R.C.

    1994-09-01

    The Space Power Research Engine (SPRE), a free-piston Stirling engine with linear alternator, is being tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center as part of the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) as a candidate for high capacity space power. This paper presents results of base-line engine tests at design and off-design operating conditions. The test results are compared with code model predictions.

  10. Comparison of Jupiter Interior Models Derived from First-Principles Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Militzer; W. B. Hubbard

    2008-07-27

    Recently two groups used first-principles computer simulations to model Jupiter's interior. While both studies relied on the same simulation technique, density functional molecular dynamics, the groups derived very different conclusions. In particular estimates for the size of Jupiter's core and the metallicity of its hydrogen-helium mantle differed substantially. In this paper, we discuss the differences of the approaches and give an explanation for the differing conclusions.

  11. A Comparison of Storage Ring Modeling with COSY INFINITY, ZGOUBI, and MAD8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hipple, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Currently there is significant interest in the use of storage rings to search for an electric dipole moment (EDM) in hadrons. This requires utilizing the storage ring as a precision measuring device. Part of understanding the detailed behavior of storage rings comes from careful analysis of fringe fields, but the various tracking codes available differ in their ability to model such behavior. It is the purpose of this paper to investigate these differences.

  12. A comparison of general circulation model predictions to sand drift and dune orientations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumberg, D.G.; Greeley, R.

    1996-12-01

    The growing concern over climate change and decertification stresses the importance of aeolian process prediction. In this paper the use of a general circulation model to predict current aeolian features is examined. A GCM developed at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center was used in conjunction with White`s aeolian sand flux model to produce a global potential aeolian transport map. Surface wind shear stress predictions were used from the output of a GCM simulation that was performed as part of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project on 1979 climate conditions. The spatial resolution of this study (as driven by the GCM) is 4{degrees} X 5{degrees}; instantaneous 6-hourly wind stress data were saved by the GCM and used in this report. A global map showing potential sand transport was compared to drift potential directions as inferred from Landsat images from the 1980s for several sand seas and a coastal dune field. Generally, results show a good correlation between the simulated sand drift direction and the drift direction inferred for dune forms. Discrepancies between the drift potential and the drift inferred from images were found in the North American deserts and the Arabian peninsula. An attempt to predict the type of dune that would be formed in specific regions was not successful. The model could probably be further improved by incorporating soil moisture, surface roughness, and vegetation information for a better assessment of sand threshold conditions. The correlation may permit use of a GCM to analyze {open_quotes}fossil{close_quotes} dunes or to forecast aeolian processes. 48 refs., 8 figs.

  13. A Comparison between Two Simple Models of a Slug Flow in a Long Flexible Marine Riser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollio, A

    2009-01-01

    Slug flows are extremely interesting multiphase regime phenomena which frequently occur in flexible marine risers used by the petroleum industry in offshore environments and have both a liquid and gaseous phase. This paper describes two simple models of the slug flow regime by means of an equivalent monophase flow with a non-constant density. The slug regime is modelled as a monophase density-varying flow with a sinusoidal density, travelling along the pipe itself towards the top end node of the riser. Starting from the bottom end, it is characterized by adiabatic processes and energy loss along the entire length of the pipe. In the first model, the slug wavelength is supposed to be independent of the riser inclination, while in the second one a simple linear relationship between the slug wavelength and the pipe inclination was imposed. The global equation of the motion of the riser (written in a two-dimensional domain throughout the plane containing the riser) was solved using a Matlab code in the time domai...

  14. Comparison of Two Gas Selection Methodologies: An Application of Bayesian Model Averaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renholds, Andrea S.; Thompson, Sandra E.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Chilton, Lawrence K.

    2006-03-31

    One goal of hyperspectral imagery analysis is the detection and characterization of plumes. Characterization includes identifying the gases in the plumes, which is a model selection problem. Two gas selection methods compared in this report are Bayesian model averaging (BMA) and minimum Akaike information criterion (AIC) stepwise regression (SR). Simulated spectral data from a three-layer radiance transfer model were used to compare the two methods. Test gases were chosen to span the types of spectra observed, which exhibit peaks ranging from broad to sharp. The size and complexity of the search libraries were varied. Background materials were chosen to either replicate a remote area of eastern Washington or feature many common background materials. For many cases, BMA and SR performed the detection task comparably in terms of the receiver operating characteristic curves. For some gases, BMA performed better than SR when the size and complexity of the search library increased. This is encouraging because we expect improved BMA performance upon incorporation of prior information on background materials and gases.

  15. Transactors: A Programming Model for Maintaining Globally Consistent Distributed State in Unreliable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bystroff, Chris

    .3.3 [Programming Languages]: Language Constructs and Features--concurrent programming structures; F.3.2 [Logics and Meanings of Programs]: Semantics of Programming Languages--operational semantics.3 [Programming Techniques]: Concurrent Programming--distributed programming General Terms Languages, Reliability

  16. Comparison of modeled and measured performance of a GSO crystal as gamma detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parno, Diana Syemour [Carnegie Mellon U.; Friend, Megan Lynn [Carnegie Mellon U.; Mamyan, Vahe [Virginia U.; Benmokhtar, Fatiha [Duquesne U.; Camsonne, Alexandre [JLAB; Franklin, Gregg B. [Carnegie Mellon U.; Paschke, Kent D. [Virginia U.; Quinn, Brian Patrick [Carnegie Mellon U.

    2013-11-01

    We have modeled, tested, and installed a large, cerium-activated Gd{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} crystal scintillator for use as a detector of gamma rays. We present the measured detector response to two types of incident photons: nearly monochromatic photons up to 40 MeV, and photons from a continuous Compton backscattering spectrum up to 200 MeV. Our GEANT4 simulations, developed to determine the analyzing power of the Compton polarimeter in Hall A of Jefferson Lab, reproduce the measured spectra well.

  17. A comparison of two lung clearance models based on the dissolution rates of oxidized depleted uranium 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crist, Kevin Craig

    1983-01-01

    qain inf'ormai. ion on the human risk associated with the inhalation of uranium oxide particles produced when firing anti-tank shells called penetrators, The penetrators are formed from uranium metal rods produced from a raw st'ock of uranium...A CUMRARISON Ul 1MD LUNG CLLARANCE MODEl S BASED ON THE OISSOLLlTION RA1FS OF OXIDIZED DErIETED URANIUM A The" is KEVIN CRAIG CRIST Submitt. ed to the Graduate Co11ege of Texas A 8 M University in parti a1 fu1fi 1 1men t of the requirement...

  18. Comparison of Real World Energy Consumption to Models and Department of Energy Test Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goetzler, William; Sutherland, Timothy; Kar, Rahul; Foley, Kevin

    2011-09-01

    This study investigated the real-world energy performance of appliances and equipment as it compared with models and test procedures. The study looked to determine whether the U.S. Department of Energy and industry test procedures actually replicate real world conditions, whether performance degrades over time, and whether installation patterns and procedures differ from the ideal procedures. The study first identified and prioritized appliances to be evaluated. Then, the study determined whether real world energy consumption differed substantially from predictions and also assessed whether performance degrades over time. Finally, the study recommended test procedure modifications and areas for future research.

  19. Comparison of the Amanzi Model against Analytical Solutions and the FEHM

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnect Collider Tests of theSignaturesComponentselectron beam meltingModel

  20. Comparisons among the five ground-motion models developed using RESORCE for the1 prediction of response spectral accelerations due to earthquakes in Europe and the Middle East2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Comparisons among the five ground-motion models developed using RESORCE for the1 prediction of response spectral accelerations due to earthquakes in Europe and the Middle East2 John Douglas1 , Sinan, characteristics of the models and predicted9 peak ground and response spectral accelerations. Comparisons are also

  1. HELIOSPHERIC PROPAGATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS: COMPARISON OF NUMERICAL WSA-ENLIL+CONE MODEL AND ANALYTICAL DRAG-BASED MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vršnak, B.; Žic, T.; Dumbovi?, M.; Temmer, M.; Möstl, C.; Veronig, A. M.; Taktakishvili, A.; Mays, M. L.; Odstr?il, D. E-mail: tzic@geof.hr E-mail: manuela.temmer@uni-graz.at E-mail: astrid.veronig@uni-graz.at E-mail: m.leila.mays@nasa.gov

    2014-08-01

    Real-time forecasting of the arrival of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at Earth, based on remote solar observations, is one of the central issues of space-weather research. In this paper, we compare arrival-time predictions calculated applying the numerical ''WSA-ENLIL+Cone model'' and the analytical ''drag-based model'' (DBM). Both models use coronagraphic observations of CMEs as input data, thus providing an early space-weather forecast two to four days before the arrival of the disturbance at the Earth, depending on the CME speed. It is shown that both methods give very similar results if the drag parameter ? = 0.1 is used in DBM in combination with a background solar-wind speed of w = 400 km s{sup –1}. For this combination, the mean value of the difference between arrival times calculated by ENLIL and DBM is ?-bar =0.09±9.0 hr with an average of the absolute-value differences of |?|-bar =7.1 hr. Comparing the observed arrivals (O) with the calculated ones (C) for ENLIL gives O – C = –0.3 ± 16.9 hr and, analogously, O – C = +1.1 ± 19.1 hr for DBM. Applying ? = 0.2 with w = 450 km s{sup –1} in DBM, one finds O – C = –1.7 ± 18.3 hr, with an average of the absolute-value differences of 14.8 hr, which is similar to that for ENLIL, 14.1 hr. Finally, we demonstrate that the prediction accuracy significantly degrades with increasing solar activity.

  2. TransCom N[subscript 2]O model inter-comparison – Part 1: Assessing the influence of transport and surface fluxes on tropospheric N[subscript 2]O variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, R. L.

    We present a comparison of chemistry-transport models (TransCom-N2O) to examine the importance of atmospheric transport and surface fluxes on the variability of N2O mixing ratios in the troposphere. Six different models ...

  3. Multiaxial cyclic ratcheting in coiled tubing -- Part 2. Experimental program and model evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolovic, R.; Tipton, S.M.

    2000-04-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the plasticity model proposed in a separate paper (Part 1). Constant pressure, cyclic bend-straighten tests were performed to identify material parameters required by the analytical model. Block pressure, bend-straighten tests were conducted to evaluate the proposed model. Experiments were performed on full-size coiled steel tubing samples using a specialized test machine. Two commonly used coiled tubing materials and four specimen sizes were subjected to load histories consisting of bending-straightening cycles with varying levels of internal pressure. It was observed that cyclic ratcheting rates can be reversed without reversing the mean stress, i.e., diametral growth of coiled tubing can be followed by diametral shrinkage even when the internal pressure is kept positive, depending on the loading history. This material behavior is explained in the context of the new theory. The correlation between the predictions and the test data is very good.

  4. M. KOVA^I^, S. SEN^I^: MODELING OF PM10 EMISSION WITH GENETIC PROGRAMMING MODELING OF PM10 EMISSION WITH GENETIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    M. KOVA^I^, S. SEN^I^: MODELING OF PM10 EMISSION WITH GENETIC PROGRAMMING MODELING OF PM10 EMISSION tools to evaluate the outcomes and costs associated with various emission-reduction strategies. However cannot be implemented through deterministic modeling. The article presents an attempt of PM10 emission

  5. Stack and cell modelling with SOFC3D: a computer program for the 3D simulations of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbin, Raphaèle

    Stack and cell modelling with SOFC3D: a computer program for the 3D simulations of solid oxide fuel, France 1 Introduction SOFC3D is a computer program, which simulates the behaviour of a solid oxide fuel or the channels, the electrical potential \\Phi at any point of the solid part of the SOFC, and the molar fractions

  6. COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTS TO CFD MODELS FOR MIXING USING DUAL OPPOSING JETS IN TANKS WITH AND WITHOUT INTERNAL OBSTRUCTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Fowley, M.

    2012-06-26

    This paper documents testing methods, statistical data analysis, and a comparison of experimental results to CFD models for blending of fluids, which were blended using a single pump designed with dual opposing nozzles in an eight foot diameter tank. Overall, this research presents new findings in the field of mixing research. Specifically, blending processes were clearly shown to have random, chaotic effects, where possible causal factors such as turbulence, pump fluctuations, and eddies required future evaluation. CFD models were shown to provide reasonable estimates for the average blending times, but large variations -- or scatter -- occurred for blending times during similar tests. Using this experimental blending time data, the chaotic nature of blending was demonstrated and the variability of blending times with respect to average blending times were shown to increase with system complexity. Prior to this research, the variation in blending times caused discrepancies between CFD models and experiments. This research addressed this discrepancy, and determined statistical correction factors that can be applied to CFD models, and thereby quantified techniques to permit the application of CFD models to complex systems, such as blending. These blending time correction factors for CFD models are comparable to safety factors used in structural design, and compensate variability that cannot be theoretically calculated. To determine these correction factors, research was performed to investigate blending, using a pump with dual opposing jets which re-circulate fluids in the tank to promote blending when fluids are added to the tank. In all, eighty-five tests were performed both in a tank without internal obstructions and a tank with vertical obstructions similar to a tube bank in a heat exchanger. These obstructions provided scale models of vertical cooling coils below the liquid surface for a full scale, liquid radioactive waste storage tank. Also, different jet diameters and different horizontal orientations of the jets were investigated with respect to blending. Two types of blending tests were performed. The first set of eighty-one tests blended small quantities of tracer fluids into solution. Data from these tests were statistically evaluated to determine blending times for the addition of tracer solution to tanks, and blending times were successfully compared to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models. The second set of four tests blended bulk quantities of solutions of different density and viscosity. For example, in one test a quarter tank of water was added to a three quarters of a tank of a more viscous salt solution. In this case, the blending process was noted to significantly change due to stratification of fluids, and blending times increased substantially. However, CFD models for stratification and the variability of blending times for different density fluids was not pursued, and further research is recommended in the area of blending bulk quantities of fluids. All in all, testing showed that CFD models can be effectively applied if statistically validated through experimental testing, but in the absence of experimental validation CFD model scan be extremely misleading as a basis for design and operation decisions.

  7. Type II supernova energetics and comparison of light curves to shock-cooling models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Adam; De Cia, Annalisa; Horesh, Assaf; Khazov, Danny; Ofek, Eran O; Kulkarni, S R; Arcavi, Iair; Manulis, Ilan; Yaron, Ofer; Vreeswijk, Paul; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Perley, Daniel A; Cao, Yi; Cenko, S Bradley; Rebbapragada, Umaa D; Wo?niak, P R; Filippenko, Alexei V; Clubb, K I; Nugent, Peter E; Pan, Y -C; Badenes, C; Howell, D Andrew; Valenti, Stefano; Sand, David; Sollerman, J; Johansson, Joel; Leonard, Douglas C; Horst, J Chuck; Armen, Stephen F; Fedrow, Joseph M; Quimby, Robert M; Mazzali, Paulo; Pian, Elena; Sternberg, Assaf; Matheson, Thomas; Sullivan, M; Maguire, K; Lazarevic, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    During the first few days after explosion, Type II supernovae (SNe) are dominated by relatively simple physics. Theoretical predictions regarding early-time SN light curves in the ultraviolet (UV) and optical bands are thus quite robust. We present, for the first time, a sample of $57$ $R$-band Type II SN light curves that are well monitored during their rise, having $>5$ detections during the first 10 days after discovery, and a well-constrained time of explosion to within $1-3$ days. We show that the energy per unit mass ($E/M$) can be deduced to roughly a factor of five by comparing early-time optical data to the model of Rabinak & Waxman (2011), while the progenitor radius cannot be determined based on $R$-band data alone. We find that Type II SN explosion energies span a range of $E/M=(0.2-20)\\times 10^{51} \\; \\rm{erg/(10 M}_\\odot$), and have a mean energy per unit mass of $\\left\\langle E/M \\right\\rangle = 0.85\\times 10^{51} \\; \\rm{erg/(10 M}_\\odot$), corrected for Malmquist bias. Assuming a small sp...

  8. A Comparison of TWP-ICE Observational Data with Cloud-Resolving Model Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fridlind, A. M.; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Grabowski, Wojciech W.; Hill, A.; Jones, T. R.; Khaiyer, M. M.; Liu, G.; Minnis, Patrick; Morrison, H.; Nguyen, L.; Park, S.; Petch, Jon C.; Pinty, Jean-Pierre; Schumacher, Courtney; Shipway, Ben; Varble, A. C.; Wu, Xiaoqing; Xie, Shaocheng; Zhang, Minghua

    2012-03-13

    Observations made during the TWP-ICE campaign are used to drive and evaluate thirteen cloud-resolving model simulations with periodic lateral boundary conditions. The simulations employ 2D and 3D dynamics, one- and two-moment microphysics, several variations on large-scale forcing, and the use of observationally derived aerosol properties to prognose droplet numbers. When domain means are averaged over a 6-day active monsoon period, all simulations reproduce observed surface precipitation rate but not its structural distribution. Simulated fractional areas covered by convective and stratiform rain are uncorrelated with one another, and are both variably overpredicted by up to a factor of {approx}2. Stratiform area fractions are strongly anticorrelated with outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) but are negligibly correlated with ice water path (IWP), indicating that ice spatial distribution controls OLR more than mean IWP. Overpredictions of OLR tend to be accompanied by underpredictions of reflected shortwave radiation (RSR). When there are two simulations differing only in microphysics scheme or large-scale forcing, the one with smaller stratiform area tends to exhibit greater OLR and lesser RSR by similar amounts. After {approx}10 days, simulations reach a suppressed monsoon period with a wide range of mean precipitable water vapor, attributable in part to varying overprediction of cloud-modulated radiative flux divergence compared with observationally derived values. Differences across the simulation ensemble arise from multiple sources, including dynamics, microphysics, and radiation treatments. Close agreement of spatial and temporal averages with observations may not be expected, but the wide spreads of predicted stratiform fraction and anticorrelated OLR indicate a need for more rigorous observation-based evaluation of the underlying micro- and macrophysical properties of convective and stratiform structures.

  9. MT3D: a 3 dimensional magnetotelluric modeling program (user's guide and documentation for Rev. 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutter, C.; Wannamaker, P.E.

    1980-11-01

    MT3D.REV1 is a non-interactive computer program written in FORTRAN to do 3-dimensional magnetotelluric modeling. A 3-D volume integral equation has been adapted to simulate the MT response of a 3D body in the earth. An integro-difference scheme has been incorporated to increase the accuracy. This is a user's guide for MT3D.REV1 on the University of Utah Research Institute's (UURI) PRIME 400 computer operating under PRIMOS IV, Rev. 17.

  10. Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (NUREG-0711)Revision 3: Update Methodology and Key Revisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.; Fleger, S.

    2012-07-22

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the human factors engineering (HFE) programs of applicants for nuclear power plant construction permits, operating licenses, standard design certifications, and combined operating licenses. The purpose of these safety reviews is to help ensure that personnel performance and reliability are appropriately supported. Detailed design review procedures and guidance for the evaluations is provided in three key documents: the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800), the HFE Program Review Model (NUREG-0711), and the Human-System Interface Design Review Guidelines (NUREG-0700). These documents were last revised in 2007, 2004 and 2002, respectively. The NRC is committed to the periodic update and improvement of the guidance to ensure that it remains a state-of-the-art design evaluation tool. To this end, the NRC is updating its guidance to stay current with recent research on human performance, advances in HFE methods and tools, and new technology being employed in plant and control room design. NUREG-0711 is the first document to be addressed. We present the methodology used to update NUREG-0711 and summarize the main changes made. Finally, we discuss the current status of the update program and the future plans.

  11. World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3): Multi-Model Dataset Archive at PCMDI (Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    In response to a proposed activity of the WCRP's Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM),PCMDI volunteered to collect model output contributed by leading modeling centers around the world. Climate model output from simulations of the past, present and future climate was collected by PCMDI mostly during the years 2005 and 2006, and this archived data constitutes phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3). In part, the WGCM organized this activity to enable those outside the major modeling centers to perform research of relevance to climate scientists preparing the Fourth Asssessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The IPCC was established by the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environmental Program to assess scientific information on climate change. The IPCC publishes reports that summarize the state of the science. This unprecedented collection of recent model output is officially known as the WCRP CMIP3 multi-model dataset. It is meant to serve IPCC's Working Group 1, which focuses on the physical climate system - atmosphere, land surface, ocean and sea ice - and the choice of variables archived at the PCMDI reflects this focus. A more comprehensive set of output for a given model may be available from the modeling center that produced it. As of November 2007, over 35 terabytes of data were in the archive and over 303 terabytes of data had been downloaded among the more than 1200 registered users. Over 250 journal articles, based at least in part on the dataset, have been published or have been accepted for peer-reviewed publication. Countries from which models have been gathered include Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany and Korea, Italy, Japan, Norway, Russia, Great Britain and the United States. Models, variables, and documentation are collected and stored. Check http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/data_status_tables.htm to see at a glance the output that is available. (Description taken from http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/about_ipcc.php)

  12. Programming and Fold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evens, Aden

    2009-01-01

    in the digital more generally. Programming presents a vexingthe extent to which programming is indeed mechanistic buthelp generate richer programming habits and better models

  13. Performance Characterization of High-Level Programming Models for GPU Graph Analytics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yuduo; Wang, Yangzihao; Pan, Yuechao; Yang, Carl; Owens, John D.

    2015-01-01

    and Practice of Parallel Programming, PPoPP ’12, Feb. 2012,and Practice of Parallel Programming, PPoPP ’13, Feb. 2013,and Practice of Parallel Programming, PPoPP 2015, Feb. 2015,

  14. Dosimetric accuracy of a deterministic radiation transport based {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy treatment planning system. Part III. Comparison to Monte Carlo simulation in voxelized anatomical computational models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zourari, K.; Pantelis, E.; Moutsatsos, A.; Sakelliou, L.; Georgiou, E.; Karaiskos, P.; Papagiannis, P. [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athens (Greece); Department of Physics, Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, University of Athens, Ilisia, 157 71 Athens (Greece); Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athens (Greece)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To compare TG43-based and Acuros deterministic radiation transport-based calculations of the BrachyVision treatment planning system (TPS) with corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results in heterogeneous patient geometries, in order to validate Acuros and quantify the accuracy improvement it marks relative to TG43. Methods: Dosimetric comparisons in the form of isodose lines, percentage dose difference maps, and dose volume histogram results were performed for two voxelized mathematical models resembling an esophageal and a breast brachytherapy patient, as well as an actual breast brachytherapy patient model. The mathematical models were converted to digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) image series for input to the TPS. The MCNP5 v.1.40 general-purpose simulation code input files for each model were prepared using information derived from the corresponding DICOM RT exports from the TPS. Results: Comparisons of MC and TG43 results in all models showed significant differences, as reported previously in the literature and expected from the inability of the TG43 based algorithm to account for heterogeneities and model specific scatter conditions. A close agreement was observed between MC and Acuros results in all models except for a limited number of points that lay in the penumbra of perfectly shaped structures in the esophageal model, or at distances very close to the catheters in all models. Conclusions: Acuros marks a significant dosimetry improvement relative to TG43. The assessment of the clinical significance of this accuracy improvement requires further work. Mathematical patient equivalent models and models prepared from actual patient CT series are useful complementary tools in the methodology outlined in this series of works for the benchmarking of any advanced dose calculation algorithm beyond TG43.

  15. North American Carbon Program (NACP) Regional Interim Synthesis: Terrestrial Biospheric Model Intercomparision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntzinger, Deborah [University of Michigan; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Michalak, Anna [University of Michigan; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Jacobson, Andrew [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Baker, Ian [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Chen, Jing M. [University of Toronto; Davis, Kenneth [Pennsylvania State University; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Jain, Atul [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Liu, Shuguang [United States Geological Survey, Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (USGS EROS); Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Neilson, Ronald [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Poulter, Ben [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Tian, Hanqin [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Tomelleri, Enrico [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Viovy, Nicolas [National Center for Scientific Research, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Xiao, Jingfeng [Purdue University; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere can be improved through direct observations and experiments, as well as through modeling activities. Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding to much larger terrestrial regions. Although models vary in their specific goals and approaches, their central role within carbon cycle science is to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms currently controlling carbon exchange. Recently, the North American Carbon Program (NACP) organized several interim-synthesis activities to evaluate and inter-compare models and observations at local to continental scales for the years 2000-2005. Here, we compare the results from the TBMs collected as part of the regional and continental interim-synthesis (RCIS) activities. The primary objective of this work is to synthesize and compare the 19 participating TBMs to assess current understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle in North America. Thus, the RCIS focuses on model simulations available from analyses that have been completed by ongoing NACP projects and other recently published studies. The TBM flux estimates are compared and evaluated over different spatial (1{sup o} x 1{sup o} and spatially aggregated to different regions) and temporal (monthly and annually) scales. The range in model estimates of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) for North America is much narrower than estimates of productivity or respiration, with estimates of NEP varying between -0.7 and 2.2 PgC yr{sup -1}, while gross primary productivity and heterotrophic respiration vary between 12.2 and 32.9 PgC yr{sup -1} and 5.6 and 13.2 PgC yr{sup -1}, respectively. The range in estimates from the models appears to be driven by a combination of factors, including the representation of photosynthesis, the source and of environmental driver data and the temporal variability of those data, as well as whether nutrient limitation is considered in soil carbon decomposition. The disagreement in current estimates of carbon flux across North America, including whether North America is a net biospheric carbon source or sink, highlights the need for further analysis through the use of model runs following a common simulation protocol, in order to isolate the influences of model formulation, structure, and assumptions on flux estimates.

  16. anQCD: Fortran programs for couplings at complex momenta in various analytic QCD models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayala, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    We provide three Fortran programs which evaluate the QCD analytic (holomorphic) couplings $\\mathcal{A}_{\

  17. Comparison of Test Procedures and Energy Efficiency Criteria in Selected International Standards and Labeling Programs for Clothes Washers, Water Dispensers, Vending Machines and CFLs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2010-01-01

    lumens. The Energy Star program also includes luminous fluxprograms, energy efficiency is defined as initial luminousthe initial 100-hour luminous flux. Besides Energy Star, all

  18. Comparison of Test Procedures and Energy Efficiency Criteria in Selected International Standards and Labeling Programs for Clothes Washers, Water Dispensers, Vending Machines and CFLs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2010-01-01

    in the Energy Star, Australia, Brazil and EU programs butBesides Energy Star, all China, Australia, Brazil and EUBrazil, South Korea and Australia also have mandatory energy

  19. COMPARISON OF WIND AND WIND SHEAR CLIMATOLOGIES DERIVED FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION RADIOSONDES AND THE ECMWF MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    COMPARISON OF WIND AND WIND SHEAR CLIMATOLOGIES DERIVED FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION RADIOSONDES wind and its vertical gradient, i.e. wind-shear, is characterized as a function of climate region. For a better representation of the average atmospheric wind and shear and their variabilities, high

  20. Continental Scale Comparisons of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks Estimated from Satellite Data and Ecosystem Modeling 1982-1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    ecosystem (tundra and boreal) sinks for atmospheric CO2. Key Words: carbon dioxide, ecosystems, remote "missing sink" for carbon dioxide emissions. Measured atmospheric CO2, 13 C, and O2/N2 distributionsContinental Scale Comparisons of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks Estimated from Satellite Data

  1. Frequency dependent elastic properties and attenuation in heavy-oil sands: comparison between mea-sured and modeled data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frequency dependent elastic properties and attenuation in heavy-oil sands: comparison between mea) properties of heavy-oil sands over a range of frequencies (2 - 2000Hz) covering the seismic bandwidth and at ultrasonic frequencies (0.8MHz). The measurements were carried on heavy-oil sand sample from Asphalt Ridge

  2. Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    their potential and pursue opportunities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Through Expanding Your Horizon (EYH) Network programs, we provide STEM role models...

  3. The photovoltaic market analysis program : background, model development, applications and extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lilien, Gary L.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe and motivate the market analysis program for photovoltaics that has developed over the last several years. The main objective of the program is to develop tools and procedures to ...

  4. Implications for Dual Language Administrative Leadership: A Comparison of the English Reading Achievement of Third Grade Students among Three Instructional Programs in a Rural School District 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trejo, Martha A.

    2015-08-12

    This quantitative study is derived from a need to know how the leadership can support the teachers in a Two Way Dual Language (TWDL) program and a need of a comparative analysis to compare the English reading Texas Assessment ...

  5. Model Development and Loads Analysis of an Offshore Wind Turbine on a Tension Leg Platform with a Comparison to Other Floating Turbine Concepts: April 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matha, D.

    2010-02-01

    This report presents results of the analysis of a 5-MW wind turbine located on a floating offshore tension leg platform (TLP) that was conducted using the fully coupled time-domain aero-hydro-servo-elastic design code FAST with AeroDyn and HydroDyn. The report also provides a description of the development process of the TLP model. The model has been verified via comparisons to frequency-domain calculations. Important differences have been identified between the frequency-domain and time-domain simulations, and have generated implications for the conceptual design process. An extensive loads and stability analysis for ultimate and fatigue loads according to the procedure of the IEC 61400-3 offshore wind turbine design standard was performed with the verified TLP model. This report compares the loads for the wind turbine on the TLP to those of an equivalent land-based turbine. Major instabilities for the TLP are identified and described.

  6. Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudley, Junqiao Han

    2010-01-01

    Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy CampusPerformance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campusevents. In this paper, an EnergyPlus model of the building

  7. Causes of variation in soil carbon simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    and benchmarks in Earth system models sitivity of the Amazonand benchmarks in Earth system models Thornton, P. E. ,and evaluation of an Earth-System model – HadGEM2, Geosci-

  8. A comparison of the gravity field over Central Europe from superconducting gravimeters, GRACE and global hydrological models, using EOF analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crossley, David; de Linage, Caroline; Hinderer, Jacques; Boy, Jean-Paul; Famiglietti, James

    2012-01-01

    Global modeling of land water and energy balances, part I:Global modeling of land water and energy balances, part II:

  9. Causes of variation in soil carbon simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    C. Soil carbon [Pg C] Database or model name Original gridCircumpolar Soil Carbon Database (NCSCD). Model estimates ofmodel outputs to the global Harmonized World Soil Database (

  10. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Models Guide, October 27, 2011.

  11. DOE/DHS INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEM CYBER SECURITY PROGRAMS: A MODEL FOR USE IN NUCLEAR FACILITY SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Anderson; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Paul Moskowitz

    2011-07-01

    Many critical infrastructure sectors have been investigating cyber security issues for several years especially with the help of two primary government programs. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National SCADA Test Bed and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program have both implemented activities aimed at securing the industrial control systems that operate the North American electric grid along with several other critical infrastructure sectors (ICS). These programs have spent the last seven years working with industry including asset owners, educational institutions, standards and regulating bodies, and control system vendors. The programs common mission is to provide outreach, identification of cyber vulnerabilities to ICS and mitigation strategies to enhance security postures. The success of these programs indicates that a similar approach can be successfully translated into other sectors including nuclear operations, safeguards, and security. The industry regulating bodies have included cyber security requirements and in some cases, have incorporated sets of standards with penalties for non-compliance such as the North American Electric Reliability Corporation Critical Infrastructure Protection standards. These DOE and DHS programs that address security improvements by both suppliers and end users provide an excellent model for nuclear facility personnel concerned with safeguards and security cyber vulnerabilities and countermeasures. It is not a stretch to imagine complete surreptitious collapse of protection against the removal of nuclear material or even initiation of a criticality event as witnessed at Three Mile Island or Chernobyl in a nuclear ICS inadequately protected against the cyber threat.

  12. U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model Program RM1: Experimental...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Science & Engineering University of Minnesota Minneapolis, MN Prepared for: Wind and Water Power Technologies Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S....

  13. Comparison of the Dynamic Wake Meandering Model, Large-Eddy Simulation, and Field Data at the Egmond aan Zee Offshore Wind Plant: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churchfield, M. J.; Moriarty, P. J.; Hao, Y.; Lackner, M. A.; Barthelmie, R.; Lundquist, J.; Oxley, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    The focus of this work is the comparison of the dynamic wake meandering model and large-eddy simulation with field data from the Egmond aan Zee offshore wind plant composed of 36 3-MW turbines. The field data includes meteorological mast measurements, SCADA information from all turbines, and strain-gauge data from two turbines. The dynamic wake meandering model and large-eddy simulation are means of computing unsteady wind plant aerodynamics, including the important unsteady meandering of wakes as they convect downstream and interact with other turbines and wakes. Both of these models are coupled to a turbine model such that power and mechanical loads of each turbine in the wind plant are computed. We are interested in how accurately different types of waking (e.g., direct versus partial waking), can be modeled, and how background turbulence level affects these loads. We show that both the dynamic wake meandering model and large-eddy simulation appear to underpredict power and overpredict fatigue loads because of wake effects, but it is unclear that they are really in error. This discrepancy may be caused by wind-direction uncertainty in the field data, which tends to make wake effects appear less pronounced.

  14. Joint Program Report 164 Appendix B page 1 Appendix B: Comparison of U.S. Marginal Abatement Cost Curves from a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by fuel type and overall reductions in energy use. We cannot easily assign distinct technologies 60 Energyuse(EJ) Coal Petrol. Prod. Gas Nuclear Hydro Renewables Biomass liquids Reduced Use -60 -50 Program Report 164 Appendix B ­ page 3 energy. Similarly, some uses of coal are reduced at low costs

  15. Financial comparison of time-of-use pricing with technical DSM programs and generating plants as electric-utility resource options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, L.J.

    1994-04-01

    Changing electricity prices to more closely reflect production costs has a significant impact on the consumption of electricity. It is known, for example, that most of the efficiency gains in the electric power sectors of the industrialized world since the first international oil price shock in 1973 are attributable to the rising trend of electricity prices. This was due to the rising average price of electricity. Because of the unique characteristics of producing electricity, its marginal cost is higher than its average cost during many hours of the day. This study shows that, for utilities not reflecting these cost differences in their rates, there is ample room to satisfy a portion of their resource needs by exploiting the load-shaping properties of time-of-use (TOU) rates. Satisfying a portion of resource requirements by implementing a TOU-pricing program, however, is not costless. Metering and administering TOU pricing requires a financial commitment by an electric utility. And the commitment has an opportunity cost. That is, the funds could be used to construct generating plants or run DSM programs (other than a TOU-pricing program) and satisfy the same resource needs that TOU pricing does. The question addressed in this study is whether a utility is better-served financially by (i) implementing TOU pricing or (ii) running technical DSM programs and building power plants. The answer is that TOU pricing compares favorably on a financial basis with other resources under a wide set of conditions that real-world utilities confront.

  16. Evaluation of horizontal and vertical queueing models: comparison to observed trajectory data in a signalized urban traffic network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    model VCM LINK MODEL upstream node downstream node internal link upstream node downstream node internal and CTM) Link Arrivals: (VCM and CTM) upstream node downstream node internal link Figure 3 A photo

  17. A Comparison of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic Modeling Results over a Wide Rangeof Gasoline Range Surrogate Fuel Blends

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kinetic models of fuels are needed to allow the simulation of engine performance for research, design, or verification purposes.

  18. Comparison of the prediction accuracy of daily and monthly regression models for energy consumption in commercial buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jinrong

    1996-01-01

    -retrofit weather is generally different from the weather used for model development, the prediction error of the baseline model may be different from the fitting error. Daily and monthly baseline models were developed for a midsize commercial building with (i) dual...

  19. Radioactive Waste Characterization Strategies; Comparisons Between AK/PK, Dose to Curie Modeling, Gamma Spectroscopy, and Laboratory Analysis Methods- 12194

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singledecker, Steven J.; Jones, Scotty W.; Dorries, Alison M.; Henckel, George; Gruetzmacher, Kathleen M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    In the coming fiscal years of potentially declining budgets, Department of Energy facilities such as the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) will be looking to reduce the cost of radioactive waste characterization, management, and disposal processes. At the core of this cost reduction process will be choosing the most cost effective, efficient, and accurate methods of radioactive waste characterization. Central to every radioactive waste management program is an effective and accurate waste characterization program. Choosing between methods can determine what is classified as low level radioactive waste (LLRW), transuranic waste (TRU), waste that can be disposed of under an Authorized Release Limit (ARL), industrial waste, and waste that can be disposed of in municipal landfills. The cost benefits of an accurate radioactive waste characterization program cannot be overstated. In addition, inaccurate radioactive waste characterization of radioactive waste can result in the incorrect classification of radioactive waste leading to higher disposal costs, Department of Transportation (DOT) violations, Notice of Violations (NOVs) from Federal and State regulatory agencies, waste rejection from disposal facilities, loss of operational capabilities, and loss of disposal options. Any one of these events could result in the program that mischaracterized the waste losing its ability to perform it primary operational mission. Generators that produce radioactive waste have four characterization strategies at their disposal: - Acceptable Knowledge/Process Knowledge (AK/PK); - Indirect characterization using a software application or other dose to curie methodologies; - Non-Destructive Analysis (NDA) tools such as gamma spectroscopy; - Direct sampling (e.g. grab samples or Surface Contaminated Object smears) and laboratory analytical; Each method has specific advantages and disadvantages. This paper will evaluate each method detailing those advantages and disadvantages including; - Cost benefit analysis (basic materials costs, overall program operations costs, man-hours per sample analyzed, etc.); - Radiation Exposure As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) program considerations; - Industrial Health and Safety risks; - Overall Analytical Confidence Level. The concepts in this paper apply to any organization with significant radioactive waste characterization and management activities working to within budget constraints and seeking to optimize their waste characterization strategies while reducing analytical costs. (authors)

  20. The North American Carbon Program Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project Part 1: Overview and experimental design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntzinger, D.N.; Schwalm, C.; Michalak, A.M; Schaefer, K.; King, A.W.; Wei, Y.; Jacobson, A.; Liu, S.; Cook, R.; Post, W.M.; Berthier, G.; Hayes, D.; Huang, M.; Ito, A.; Lei, H.; Lu, C.; Mao, J.; Peng, C.H.; Peng, S.; Poulter, B.; Riccuito, D.; Shi, X.; Tian, H.; Wang, W.; Zeng, N.; Zhao, F.; Zhu, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding of land-atmosphere carbon exchange to larger regions. The North American Carbon Program (NACP) Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP) is a formal model intercomparison and evaluation effort focused on improving the diagnosis and attribution of carbon exchange at regional and global scales. MsTMIP builds upon current and past synthesis activities, and has a unique framework designed to isolate, interpret, and inform understanding of how model structural differences impact estimates of carbon uptake and release. Here we provide an overview of the MsTMIP effort and describe how the MsTMIP experimental design enables the assessment and quantification of TBM structural uncertainty. Model structure refers to the types of processes considered (e.g. nutrient cycling, disturbance, lateral transport of carbon), and how these processes are represented (e.g. photosynthetic formulation, temperature sensitivity, respiration) in the models. By prescribing a common experimental protocol with standard spin-up procedures and driver data sets, we isolate any biases and variability in TBM estimates of regional and global carbon budgets resulting from differences in the models themselves (i.e. model structure) and model-specific parameter values. An initial intercomparison of model structural differences is represented using hierarchical cluster diagrams (a.k.a. dendrograms), which highlight similarities and differences in how models account for carbon cycle, vegetation, energy, and nitrogen cycle dynamics. We show that, despite the standardized protocol used to derive initial conditions, models show a high degree of variation for GPP, total living biomass, and total soil carbon, underscoring the influence of differences in model structure and parameterization on model estimates.

  1. A comparison of two models for simulating the water balance of soil covers under semi-arid conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chammas, G.A.; Geddis, M.; McCaulou, D.R.

    1999-07-01

    Numerical water-balance modeling of store-and-release soil covers for hypothetical mine tailings was conducted using the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) and SoilCover models. The objective of the modeling was to compare the utility of both models in a semi-arid environment. Although values for input parameters were chosen to make simulations as identical as possible between models, differences in model solution methods and discretization led to different water-balance predictions. Specifically, SoilCover predicted less percolation than HELP, because HELP uses simplified water-routing algorithms which may over predict infiltration and under predict subsequent evapotranspiration. Since SoilCover explicitly solves physically based governing equations for heat and water flow, its predictions more accurately represent the water balance in semi-arid regions where evapotranspiration dominates, HELP can only conservatively predict percolation in dry environments.

  2. Measurements of OH and HO2 concentrations during the MCMA-2006 field campaign - Part 2: Model comparison and radical budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    Pilling, M. J. : Urban atmospheric chemistry during the PUMAmechanism for regional atmospheric chemistry modeling, J.3.0 License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Measurements

  3. A comparison of geospatially modeled fire behavior and potential application to fire and fuels management for the Savannah River Site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurth, Laurie; Hollingsworth, LaWen; Shea, Dan

    2011-12-20

    This study evaluates modeled fire behavior for the Savannah River Site in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern U.S. using three data sources: FCCS, LANDFIRE, and SWRA. The Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS) was used to build fuelbeds from intensive field sampling of 629 plots. Custom fire behavior fuel models were derived from these fuelbeds. LANDFIRE developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy attributes for the U.S. using satellite imagery informed by field data. The Southern Wildfire Risk Assessment (SWRA) developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy cover for the southeastern U.S. using satellite imagery.

  4. Comparative evaluation of network flow programming and conventional reservoir system simulation models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yerramreddy, Anilkumar

    1993-01-01

    Rights Types Multiple-Reservoir Release Rules Hydroelectric Power Operations Negative Incremental Streamflow Options Salinity Constraints 59 61 64 65 65 66 66 66 68 71 76 76 77 80 81 84 89 90 91 VI COMPARISON OF ALTERNATIVE..., hydroelectric power generated, water supply diversions and diversion shortages, and(or water quality pa- rameter values. Water resources development agencies and others responsible for planning, construction, and management of reservoir projects have applied...

  5. A cost/benefit model for insertion of technological innovation into a total quality management program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratliff, William L

    1997-01-01

    This study provides economic justification for insertion of technological innovation into a total quality management (TQM) program in a remanufacturing environment. One of the core principles of TQM is continuous improvement. A preferred metric...

  6. Conversion of three-dimensional graphic building models into input data for building energy calculation program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayek, Raja Fares

    1994-01-01

    Building energy use calculation programs require descriptions of the building geometry as well as data relating to climate, materials, occupancy, among other aspects. Powerful micro-computers and sophisticated building ...

  7. Bayesian Model Bayes rule for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penny, Will

    Bayesian Model Comparison Will Penny Bayes rule for models Bayes factors Nonlinear Models Model Comparison Will Penny June 2nd 2011 #12;Bayesian Model Comparison Will Penny Bayes rule for models and the denominator is given by p(y) = m p(y|m )p(m ) #12;Bayesian Model Comparison Will Penny Bayes rule for models

  8. Interstellar hydrogen fluxes measured by IBEX-Lo in 2009: numerical modeling and comparison with the data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katushkina, O A; Alexashov, D B; Schwadron, N A; McComas, D J

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we perform numerical modeling of the interstellar hydrogen fluxes measured by IBEX-Lo during orbit 23 (spring 2009) using a state-of-the-art kinetic model of the interstellar neutral hydrogen distribution in the heliosphere. This model takes into account the temporal and heliolatitudinal variations of the solar parameters as well as non-Maxwellian kinetic properties of the hydrogen distribution due to charge exchange in the heliospheric interface. We found that there is a qualitative difference between the IBEX-Lo data and the modeling results obtained with the three-dimensional, time-dependent model. Namely, the model predicts a larger count rate in energy bin~2 (20-41 eV) than in energy bin~1 (11-21 eV), while the data shows the opposite case. We perform study of the model parameter effects on the IBEX-Lo fluxes and the ratio of fluxes in two energy channels. We shown that the most important parameter, which has a major influence on the ratio of the fluxes in the two energy bins, is the solar...

  9. Development of a Rhesus Monkey Lung Geometry Model and Application to Particle Deposition in Comparison to Humans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asgharian, Bahman; Price, Owen; McClellan, Gene; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Harkema, Jack R.; Carey, Stephen A.; Schelegle, Edward; Hyde, D.; Kimbell, Julia; Miller, Frederick J.

    2012-11-01

    The exposure-dose-response characterization of an inhalation hazard established in an animal species needs to be translated to an equivalent characterization in humans relative to comparable doses or exposure scenarios. Here, the first geometry model of the conducting airways for rhesus monkeys is developed based upon CT images of the conducting airways of a 6-month-old male, rhesus monkey. An algorithm was developed for adding the alveolar region airways using published rhesus morphometric data. The resultant lung geometry model can be used in mechanistic particle or gaseous dosimetry models. Such dosimetry models require estimates of the upper respiratory tract volume of the animal and the functional residual capacity, as well as of the tidal volume and breathing frequency of the animal. The relationship of these variables to rhesus monkeys of differing body weights was established by synthesizing and modeling published data as well as modeling pulmonary function measurements on 121 rhesus control animals. Deposition patterns of particles up to 10 ?m in size were examined for endotracheal and and up to 5 ?m for spontaneous breathing in infant and young adult monkeys and compared to those for humans. Deposition fraction of respirable size particles was found to be higher in the conducting airways of infant and young adult rhesus monkeys compared to humans. Due to the filtering effect of the conducting airways, pulmonary deposition in rhesus monkeys was lower than that in humans. Future research areas are identified that would either allow replacing assumptions or improving the newly developed lung model.

  10. Bounding A Protein's Free Energy In Lattice Models Via Linear Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Alantha

    useful abstractions in understanding protein structure. In these models, a protein folds to maximize H of protein folding in the Hydrophobic- Hydrophilic (HP) model. The widely-studied HP model was introduced by Ken Dill [5, 6]. This model abstracts the dominant force in protein folding: the hydrophobic

  11. Comparison of numerical, analytical, and empirical models to estimate wetting patterns for surface and subsurface drip irrigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandelous, Maziar M.; Šim?nek, Ji?í

    2010-01-01

    and clay (33.5%), and water contents for pressures of -33times, antecedent water contents, and emitter locations, andthe saturated soil water content as one of the model

  12. In the proceedings of the Pacific Graphics 2003, Canmore, Canada, Oct. 2003 Shape-Similarity Comparison of 3D Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohbuchi, Ryutarou

    and file formats for many proprietary computer- animation software packages. As it is one of the most-shi, Japan Abstract As the number of in-house and public-domain 3D shape models increase, importance of shape

  13. Comparison of Average Transport and Dispersion Among a Gaussian, a Two-Dimensional, and a Three-Dimensional Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) code for predicting off-siteconsequences, MACCS2 (Chanin, et al. 1998) (MELCOR Accident Consequence CodeSystem, Version 2), uses a simplified model for...

  14. A comparison of rotordynamic-coefficient predictions for annular honeycomb gas seals using different friction-factor models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Sousa, Rohan Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Predictions of rotordynamic-coefficients for annular honeycomb gas seals are compared using different friction-factor models. Analysis shows that the fundamental improvement in predicting the rotordynamic-coefficients ...

  15. Seismological comparisons of solar models with element diffusion using the MHD, OPAL, and SIREFF equations of state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzik, J.A.; Swenson, F.J.

    1997-12-01

    We compare the thermodynamic and helioseismic properties of solar models evolved using three different equation of state (EOS) treatments: the Mihalas, D{umlt a}ppen & Hummer EOS tables (MHD); the latest Rogers, Swenson, & Iglesias EOS tables (OPAL), and a new analytical EOS (SIREFF) developed by Swenson {ital et al.} All of the models include diffusive settling of helium and heavier elements. The models use updated OPAL opacity tables based on the 1993 Grevesse & Noels solar element mixture, incorporating 21 elements instead of the 14 elements used for earlier tables. The properties of solar models that are evolved with the SIREFF EOS agree closely with those of models evolved using the OPAL or MHD tables. However, unlike the MHD or OPAL EOS tables, the SIREFF in-line EOS can readily account for variations in overall Z abundance and the element mixture resulting from nuclear processing and diffusive element settling. Accounting for Z abundance variations in the EOS has a small, but non-negligible, effect on model properties (e.g., pressure or squared sound speed), as much as 0.2{percent} at the solar center and in the convection zone. The OPAL and SIREFF equations of state include electron exchange, which produces models requiring a slightly higher initial helium abundance, and increases the convection zone depth compared to models using the MHD EOS. However, the updated OPAL opacities are as much as 5{percent} lower near the convection zone base, resulting in a small decrease in convection zone depth. The calculated low-degree nonadiabatic frequencies for all of the models agree with the observed frequencies to within a few microhertz (0.1{percent}). The SIREFF analytical calibrations are intended to work over a wide range of interior conditions found in stellar models of mass greater than 0.25M{sub {circle_dot}} and evolutionary states from pre-main-sequence through the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). It is significant that the SIREFF EOS produces solar models that both measure up to the stringent requirements imposed by solar oscillation observations and inferences, and are more versatile than EOS tables. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  16. 2D MHD and 1D HD models of a solar flare -- a comprehensive comparison of the results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falewicz, R; Murawski, K; Srivastava, A K

    2015-01-01

    Without any doubt solar flaring loops possess a multi-thread internal structure that is poorly resolved and there are no means to observe heating episodes and thermodynamic evolution of the individual threads. These limitations cause fundamental problems in numerical modelling of flaring loops, such as selection of a structure and a number of threads, and an implementation of a proper model of the energy deposition process. A set of 1D hydrodynamic and 2D magnetohydrodynamic models of a flaring loop are developed to compare energy redistribution and plasma dynamics in the course of a prototypical solar flare. Basic parameters of the modeled loop are set according to the progenitor M1.8 flare recorded in the AR10126 on September 20, 2002 between 09:21 UT and 09:50 UT. The non-ideal 1D models include thermal conduction and radiative losses of the optically thin plasma as energy loss mechanisms, while the non-ideal 2D models take into account viscosity and thermal conduction as energy loss mechanisms only. The 2...

  17. Methods and Models of the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, PNNL-MA-860

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Bihl, Donald E.; Maclellan, Jay A.; Antonio, Cheryl L.; Hill, Robin L.

    2009-09-30

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (HIDP) provides internal dosimetry support services for operations at the Hanford Site. The HIDP is staffed and managed by the Radiation and Health Technology group, within the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Operations supported by the HIDP include research and development, the decontamination and decommissioning of facilities formerly used to produce and purify plutonium, and waste management activities. Radioelements of particular interest are plutonium, uranium, americium, tritium, and the fission and activation product radionuclides 137Cs, 90Sr, and 60Co. This manual describes the technical basis for the design of the routine bioassay monitoring program and for assessment of internal dose. The purposes of the manual are as follows: • Provide assurance that the HIDP derives from a sound technical base. • Promote the consistency and continuity of routine program activities. • Provide a historical record. • Serve as a technical reference for radiation protection personnel. • Aid in identifying and planning for future needs.

  18. Mechanism to support generic collective communication across a variety of programming models

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Almasi, Gheorghe (Ardsley, NY); Dozsa, Gabor (Ardsley, NY); Kumar, Sameer (White Plains, NY)

    2011-07-19

    A system and method for supporting collective communications on a plurality of processors that use different parallel programming paradigms, in one aspect, may comprise a schedule defining one or more tasks in a collective operation, an executor that executes the task, a multisend module to perform one or more data transfer functions associated with the tasks, and a connection manager that controls one or more connections and identifies an available connection. The multisend module uses the available connection in performing the one or more data transfer functions. A plurality of processors that use different parallel programming paradigms can use a common implementation of the schedule module, the executor module, the connection manager and the multisend module via a language adaptor specific to a parallel programming paradigm implemented on a processor.

  19. SIGMOIDAL ACTIVE REGION ON THE SUN: COMPARISON OF A MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICAL SIMULATION AND A NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savcheva, A.; Van Ballegooijen, A.; DeLuca, E.; Pariat, E.; Aulanier, G.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we show that when accurate nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) models are analyzed together with high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, we can determine the physical causes for the coronal mass ejection (CME) eruption on 2007 February 12. We compare the geometrical and topological properties of the three-dimensional magnetic fields given by both methods in their pre-eruptive phases. We arrive at a consistent picture for the evolution and eruption of the sigmoid. Both the MHD simulation and the observed magnetic field evolution show that flux cancellation plays an important role in building the flux rope. We compute the squashing factor, Q, in different horizontal maps in the domains. The main shape of the quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) is very similar between the NLFFF and MHD models. The main QSLs lie on the edge of the flux rope. While the QSLs in the NLFFF model are more complex due to the intrinsic large complexity in the field, the QSLs in the MHD model are smooth and possess lower maximum value of Q. In addition, we demonstrate the existence of hyperbolic flux tubes (HFTs) in both models in vertical cross sections of Q. The main HFT, located under the twisted flux rope in both models, is identified as the most probable site for reconnection. We also show that there are electric current concentrations coinciding with the main QSLs. Finally, we perform torus instability analysis and show that a combination between reconnection at the HFT and the resulting expansion of the flux rope into the torus instability domain is the cause of the CME in both models.

  20. AURORA: A FORTRAN program for modeling well stirred plasma and thermal reactors with gas and surface reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meeks, E.; Grcar, J.F.; Kee, R.J.; Moffat, H.K.

    1996-02-01

    The AURORA Software is a FORTRAN computer program that predicts the steady-state or time-averaged properties of a well mixed or perfectly stirred reactor for plasma or thermal chemistry systems. The software was based on the previously released software, SURFACE PSR which was written for application to thermal CVD reactor systems. AURORA allows modeling of non-thermal, plasma reactors with the determination of ion and electron concentrations and the electron temperature, in addition to the neutral radical species concentrations. Well stirred reactors are characterized by a reactor volume, residence time or mass flow rate, heat loss or gas temperature, surface area, surface temperature, the incoming temperature and mixture composition, as well as the power deposited into the plasma for non-thermal systems. The model described here accounts for finite-rate elementary chemical reactions both in the gas phase and on the surface. The governing equations are a system of nonlinear algebraic relations. The program solves these equations using a hybrid Newton/time-integration method embodied by the software package TWOPNT. The program runs in conjunction with the new CHEMKIN-III and SURFACE CHEMKIN-III packages, which handle the chemical reaction mechanisms for thermal and non-thermal systems. CHEMKIN-III allows for specification of electron-impact reactions, excitation losses, and elastic-collision losses for electrons.

  1. Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) RAPID Engineering Program, Project 7: Development of Field Exposure Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bracken, T.D.; Rankin, R.F.; Wiley, J.A.

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a conceptual model for estimating magnetic field (EMF) personal exposure (PE) of individuals or groups and construct a working model using existing data.

  2. Three dimensional simulations of plasma filaments in the scrape off layer: A comparison with models of reduced dimensionality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Easy, L.; Militello, F.; Omotani, J.; Havlí?ková, E.; Dudson, B.; Tamain, P.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A. H.

    2014-12-15

    This paper presents simulations of isolated 3D filaments in a slab geometry obtained using a newly developed 3D reduced fluid code, written using the BOUT++ framework. First, systematic scans were performed to investigate how the dynamics of a filament are affected by its amplitude, perpendicular size, and parallel extent. The perpendicular size of the filament was found to have a strong influence on its motions, as it determined the relative importance of parallel currents to polarization and viscous currents, whilst drift-wave instabilities were observed if the initial amplitude of the blob was increased sufficiently. Next, the 3D simulations were compared to 2D simulations using different parallel closures; namely, the sheath dissipation closure, which neglects parallel gradients, and the vorticity advection closure, which neglects the influence of parallel currents. The vorticity advection closure was found to not replicate the 3D perpendicular dynamics and overestimated the initial radial acceleration of all the filaments studied. In contrast, a more satisfactory comparison with the sheath dissipation closure was obtained, even in the presence of significant parallel gradients, where the closure is no longer valid. Specifically, it captured the contrasting dynamics of filaments with different perpendicular sizes that were observed in the 3D simulations which the vorticity advection closure failed to replicate. However, neither closure successfully replicated the Boltzmann spinning effects nor the associated poloidal drift of the blob that was observed in the 3D simulations. Although the sheath dissipation closure was concluded to be more successful in replicating the 3D dynamics, it is emphasized that the vorticity advection closure may still be relevant for situations where the parallel current is inhibited from closing through the sheath due to effects such as strong magnetic shear around X points or increased resistivity near the targets.

  3. A Parallelizable and Approximate Dynamic Programming-Based Dynamic Fleet Management Model with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Topaloglu, Huseyin

    -based dynamic fleet management model that can handle random load arrivals, random travel times and multiple-based model for the dynamic fleet management problem with random load arrivals, random travel times-based models for fleet management problems with random load arrivals, deterministic travel times and a single

  4. Modeling Wildcard-Free MPI Programs for Verification Stephen F. Siegel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avrunin, George S.

    . Categories and Subject Descriptors D.2.4 [Software Engineering]: Software/Program Verifi- cation, including economic policy, environmental regulation, and the safety and performance of such things as cars, such as freedom from deadlock or the absence of specified race con- ditions. These techniques construct a finite

  5. ZOR -Methods and Models of Operations Research (1989) 33:341-362 A Linear Programming Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabak, Esteban G.

    1989-01-01

    to Water-Resources Optimization By P. M. Jacovkis, H. Gradowczyk, A. M. Freisztav and E. G. Tabak 1 The optimal planning of a multipurpose water resources system, that is, the design of the "best" system optimization by means of a linear programming approach and the results obtained. The reasons of this approach

  6. Ferrocyanide safety program: Updated thermal analysis model for ferrocyanide tanks with application to Tank 241-BY-104

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaren, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    During the middle to late 1950`s, a program was begun to concentrate the radioactive waste products of the uranium and plutonium recovery processes. This program used sodium nickel ferrocyanide to precipitate radioactive cesium from the waste streams. The precipitate was then stored in large, underground single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site in south central Washington. Several of the tanks have been stabilized, a process that included removing as much pumpable liquid as possible from the tanks. This liquid contained heat-producing radionuclides. Because of the many transfers involved, the lack of accurate inventory data for the various waste streams, and the absence of a need for an accurate value of the heat load, the heat loads of the ferrocyanide waste storage tanks have only been estimated. As a result of the intense radiation field within these tanks, the chemical content of the waste has changed. This, coupled with the fact that the characteristics of the input waste were not well known, has resulted in uncertainty in the thermal characteristics of the stored sludge. All of these parameters are needed to evaluate the safety of these tanks. The purposes of this report are to document the updated thermal analysis model for ferrocyanide tanks and to use the model to determine the heat load of Tank 241-BY-104. This new model utilizes several new parameters and a new technique, which are described in this report. The new model is considered more accurate than the previous model, and all future thermal analyses of ferrocyanide tanks will use this updated model.

  7. Frequency dependent elastic properties and attenuation in heavy-oil sands: comparison between mea-sured and modeled data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) properties of heavy-oil sands over a range of frequencies (2 - 2000Hz) covering the seismic bandwidth. The results show reason- ably good agreement between the measured data and modeled response especially at non larger than that of conventional light oil. Current methods of produc- tion from heavy-oil reservoirs

  8. Hanbury-Brown-Twiss Interferometry with Identical Bosons in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions: Comparisons with Hadronic Scattering Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas J. Humanic

    2005-10-17

    Identical boson Hanbury-Brown-Twiss interferometry as applied to relativistic heavy-ion collisions is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the use of hadronic scattering models to interpret the physical significance of experimental results. Interferometric studies with center-of-mass energies from < 1 GeV/nucleon up to 5500 GeV/nucleon are considered.

  9. Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudley, Junqiao Han; Black, Doug; Apte, Mike; Piette, Mary Ann; Berkeley, Pam

    2010-05-14

    We have studied a low energy building on a campus of the University of California. It has efficient heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, consisting of a dual-fan/dual-duct variable air volume (VAV) system. As a major building on the campus, it was included in two demand response (DR) events in the summers of 2008 and 2009. With chilled water supplied by thermal energy storage in the central plant, cooling fans played a critical role during DR events. In this paper, an EnergyPlus model of the building was developed and calibrated. We compared both whole-building and HVAC fan energy consumption with model predictions to understand why demand savings in 2009 were much lower than in 2008. We also used model simulations of the study building to assess pre-cooling, a strategy that has been shown to improve demand saving and thermal comfort in many types of building. This study indicates a properly calibrated EnergyPlus model can reasonably predict demand savings from DR events and can be useful for designing or optimizing DR strategies.

  10. Reduced model simulations of the scrape-off-layer heat-flux width and comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myra, J. R. [Lodestar Research Corporation; Russell, D. A. [Lodestar Research Corporation; D'Ippolito, D. A. [Lodestar Research Corporation; Ahn, Joon-Wook [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Maingi, Rajesh [ORNL; Maqueda, R. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Lundberg, D. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Stotler, D. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Zweben, S. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Boedo, J. [University of California, San Diego; Umansky, M.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

    2011-01-01

    Reduced model simulations of turbulence in the edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) region of a spherical torus or tokamak plasma are employed to address the physics of the scrape-off-layer heat-flux width. The simulation model is an electrostatic two-dimensional fluid turbulence model, applied in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field at the outboard midplane of the torus. The model contains curvature-driven-interchange modes, sheath losses, and both perpendicular turbulent diffusive and convective (blob) transport. These transport processes compete with classical parallel transport to set the SOL width. Midplane SOL profiles of density, temperature, and parallel heat flux are obtained from the simulation and compared with experimental results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment [S. M. Kaye et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 1977 (2001)] to study the scaling of the heat-flux width with power and plasma current. It is concluded that midplane turbulence is the main contributor to the SOL heat-flux width for the low power H-mode discharges studied, while additional physics is required to fully explain the plasma current scaling of the SOL heat-flux width observed experimentally in higher power discharges. Intermittent separatrix-spanning convective cells are found to be the main mechanism that sets the near-SOL width in the simulations. The roles of sheared flows and blob trapping versus emission are discussed.

  11. Reduced model simulations of the scrape-off-layer heat-flux width and comparison with experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Myra, J. R. [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States); Russell, D. A. [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States); D'Ippolito, D. A. [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States); Ahn, J- W [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Maingi, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Maqueda, R. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Lundberg, D. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Stotler, D. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Zweben, S. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Boedo, J. [Univ. of California at San Diego, CA (United States); Umansky, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-01-10

    Reduced model simulations of turbulence in the edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) region of a spherical torus or tokamak plasma are employed to address the physics of the scrape-off-layer heat flux width. The simulation model is an electrostatic two-dimensional fluid turbulence model, applied in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field at the outboard midplane of the torus. The model contains curvature-driven-interchange modes, sheath losses, and both perpendicular turbulent diffusive and convective (blob) transport. These transport processes compete with classical parallel transport to set the SOL width. Midplane SOL profiles of density, temperature and parallel heat flux are obtained from the simulation and compared with experimental results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [S. M. Kaye, et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 1977 (2001)] to study the scaling of the heat flux width with power and plasma current. It is concluded that midplane turbulence is the main contributor to the SOL heat flux width for the low power H-mode discharges studied, while additional physics is required to explain the plasma current scaling of the SOL heat flux width observed experimentally in higher power discharges. Intermittent separatrix spanning convective cells are found to be the main mechanism that sets the near-SOL width in the simulations. The roles of sheared flows and blob trapping vs. emission are discussed.

  12. A nested grid model of the Oregon Coastal Transition Zone: Simulations and comparisons with observations during the 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    several hundred kilometers offshore where shelf flows interact with the northern California Current. A primitive-equation numerical ocean model is used to study the upwelling circulation in this region from 1 is realistic representation of coastal jet separation and eddy formation offshore of Cape Blanco. Three

  13. A generalized coordinate ocean model and a comparison of the bottom boundary layer dynamics in terrain-following

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezer,Tal

    -order turbulence closure scheme that provides surface and BBL mixing and results in a quite re- alistic climatology-following grid. However, with the same turbulence scheme but using a z-level grid, the model was unable in the two grids is due to the larger vertical mixing generated by the turbulence scheme over the step

  14. Reduced model simulations of the scrape-off-layer heat-flux width and comparison with experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Myra, J. R.; Russell, D. A.; D’Ippolito, D. A.; Ahn, J.-W.; Maingi, R.; Maqueda, R. J.; Lundberg, D. P.; Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J.; Boedo, J.; et al

    2011-01-01

    Reduced model simulations of turbulence in the edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) region of a spherical torus or tokamak plasma are employed to address the physics of the scrape-off-layer heat flux width. The simulation model is an electrostatic two-dimensional fluid turbulence model, applied in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field at the outboard midplane of the torus. The model contains curvature-driven-interchange modes, sheath losses, and both perpendicular turbulent diffusive and convective (blob) transport. These transport processes compete with classical parallel transport to set the SOL width. Midplane SOL profiles of density, temperature and parallel heat flux are obtained from themore »simulation and compared with experimental results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to study the scaling of the heat flux width with power and plasma current. It is concluded that midplane turbulence is the main contributor to the SOL heat flux width for the low power H-mode discharges studied, while additional physics is required to explain the plasma current scaling of the SOL heat flux width observed experimentally in higher power discharges. Intermittent separatrix spanning convective cells are found to be the main mechanism that sets the near-SOL width in the simulations. The roles of sheared flows and blob trapping vs. emission are discussed.« less

  15. Modeling Stellar Atmospheres with a Spherically Symmetric Version of the Atlas Code: Testing the Code by Comparisons to Interferometric Observations and PHOENIX Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilding R. Neilson; John B. Lester

    2008-09-01

    One of the current opportunities for stellar atmospheric modeling is the interpretation of optical interferometric data of stars. Starting from the robust, open source ATLAS atmospheric code (Kurucz, 1979), we have developed a spherically symmetric code, SATLAS, as a new option for modeling stellar atmospheres of low gravity stars. The SATLAS code is tested against both interferometric observations of M giants by Wittkowski and collaborators, and spherically symmetric M giant NextGen models from the PHOENIX code. The SATLAS models predict interferometric visibilities that agree with the observed visibilities and with predicted visibilities, and the SATLAS atmospheric structures also agree with those from spherical PHOENIX models, with just small differences in temperature and pressure at large depths in the atmospheres.

  16. SU-E-T-86: Comparison of Two Commercially Available Programs for the Evaluation of Delivered Daily Dose Using Cone Beam CT (CBCT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuohy, R; Bosse, C; Mavroidis, P; Shi, Z; Crownover, R; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In this study, two commercially available programs were compared for the evaluation of delivered daily dose using cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods: Thirty (n=30) patients previously treated in our clinic (10 prostate, 10 SBRT lung and 10 abdomen) were used in this study. The patients' plans were optimized and calculated using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. The daily CBCT scans were imported into Velocity and RayStation along with the corresponding planning CTs, structure sets and 3D dose distributions for each patient. The organs at risk (OAR) were contoured on each CBCT by the prescribing physician and were included in the evaluation of the daily delivered dose. Each CBCT was registered to the planning CT, once with rigid registration and then again, separately, with deformable registration. After registering each CBCT, the dose distribution from the planning CT was overlaid and the dose volume histograms (DVH) for the OAR and the planning target volumes (PTV) were calculated. Results: For prostate patients, we observed daily volume changes for the OARs. The DVH analysis for those patients showed variation in the sparing of the OARs while PTV coverage remained virtually unchanged using both Velocity and RayStation systems. Similar results were observed for abdominal patients. In contrast, for SBRT lung patients, the DVH for the OARs and target were comparable to those from the initial treatment plan. Differences in organ volume and organ doses were also observed when comparing the daily fractions using deformable and rigid registrations. Conclusion: By using daily CBCT dose reconstruction, we proved PTV coverage for prostate and abdominal targets is adequate. However, there is significant dosimetric change for the OARs. For lung SBRT patients, the delivered daily dose for both PTV and OAR is comparable to the planned dose with no significant differences.

  17. Comparison of "warm and wet" and "cold and icy" scenarios for early Mars in a 3D climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wordsworth, Robin D; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T; Forget, Francois; Head, James W

    2015-01-01

    We use a 3D general circulation model to compare the primitive Martian hydrological cycle in "warm and wet" and "cold and icy" scenarios. In the warm and wet scenario, an anomalously high solar flux or intense greenhouse warming artificially added to the climate model are required to maintain warm conditions and an ice-free northern ocean. Precipitation shows strong surface variations, with high rates around Hellas basin and west of Tharsis but low rates around Margaritifer Sinus (where the observed valley network drainage density is nonetheless high). In the cold and icy scenario, snow migration is a function of both obliquity and surface pressure, and limited episodic melting is possible through combinations of seasonal, volcanic and impact forcing. At surface pressures above those required to avoid atmospheric collapse (~0.5 bar) and moderate to high obliquity, snow is transported to the equatorial highland regions where the concentration of valley networks is highest. Snow accumulation in the Aeolis quadr...

  18. Detecting Unknown Turning Points Using Piecewise Growth Mixture Models: A Comparison of ML/EM versus Bayesian Estimation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ning, Ling

    2015-08-05

    (IC) statistics, (b) nested model likelihood ratio test derivative, (c) the entropy statistic and entropy-penalty based indexes, (d) goodness of fit tests (Bauer & Curran, 2003b; Liu & Hancock, 2014; Peugh & Fan, 2012; Peugh & Fan, 2015; Tofighi... rescaled entropy 18 measure proposed by Ramaswamy, DeSarbo, Reibstein, and Robinson (1993). The rescaled entropy ranges from 0 to 1 with 1 indicating perfect classification (Bauer & Curran, 2003a; B. Muthén & Muthén, 2000). Celeux & Soromenho (1996...

  19. Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

    2013-07-01

    The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing:A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues,recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, anddescriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

  20. A comparison of dose and dose-rate conversion factors from the Soviet Union, United Kingdom, US Department of Energy, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Fusion Safety Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rood, A.S.; Abbott, M.L.

    1991-12-01

    Several independent data sets of radiological dose and dose-rate conversion factors (DCF/DRCF) have been tabulated or developed by the international community both for fission and fusion safety purposes. This report compares sets from the US Department of Energy, the Soviet Union, and the United Kingdom with those calculated by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Fusion Safety Program. The objectives were to identify trends and potential outlying values for specific radionuclides and contribute to a future benchmark evaluation of the CARR computer code. Fifty-year committed effective dose equivalent factors were compared for the inhalation and ingestion pathways. External effective dose equivalent rates were compared for the air immersion and ground surface exposure pathways. Comparisons were made by dividing dose factors in the different data bases by the values in the FSP data base. Differences in DCF/DRCF values less than a factor of 2 were considered to be in good agreement and are likely due to the use of slightly different decay data, variations in the number of organs considered for calculating CEDE, and rounding errors. DCF/DRCF values that differed by greater than a factor of 10 were considered to be significant. These differences are attributed primarily to the use of different radionuclide decay data, selection and nomenclature for different isomeric states, treatment of progeny radionuclides, differences in calculational methodology, and assumptions on a radionuclide's chemical form.

  1. A comparison of dose and dose-rate conversion factors from the Soviet Union, United Kingdom, US Department of Energy, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Fusion Safety Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rood, A.S.; Abbott, M.L.

    1991-12-01

    Several independent data sets of radiological dose and dose-rate conversion factors (DCF/DRCF) have been tabulated or developed by the international community both for fission and fusion safety purposes. This report compares sets from the US Department of Energy, the Soviet Union, and the United Kingdom with those calculated by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Fusion Safety Program. The objectives were to identify trends and potential outlying values for specific radionuclides and contribute to a future benchmark evaluation of the CARR computer code. Fifty-year committed effective dose equivalent factors were compared for the inhalation and ingestion pathways. External effective dose equivalent rates were compared for the air immersion and ground surface exposure pathways. Comparisons were made by dividing dose factors in the different data bases by the values in the FSP data base. Differences in DCF/DRCF values less than a factor of 2 were considered to be in good agreement and are likely due to the use of slightly different decay data, variations in the number of organs considered for calculating CEDE, and rounding errors. DCF/DRCF values that differed by greater than a factor of 10 were considered to be significant. These differences are attributed primarily to the use of different radionuclide decay data, selection and nomenclature for different isomeric states, treatment of progeny radionuclides, differences in calculational methodology, and assumptions on a radionuclide`s chemical form.

  2. Compiler Comparisons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsCluster Compatibilitydefault SignEnvironmentAprilCompiler Comparisons

  3. The Effects of Parceling on Testing Group Differences in Second-Order CFA Models: A Comparison between Multi-Group CFA and MIMIC Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Yuanyuan

    2010-10-12

    Using multi-group confirmatory factor analysis (MCFA) and multiple-indicator-multiple-cause (MIMIC) to investigate group difference in the context of the second-order factor model with either the unparceled or parceled ...

  4. Identification of Transition-Based Models of Biological Systems using Logic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    the identification of: pure Petri nets; extended Petri nets; networks that re-use sub-nets; network from data Sydney 2052, Australia #12;Abstract Transition systems like Petri nets have been widely used to model networks and to capture the dynamics of system behaviour. To date, these models have mostly been specified

  5. Bounding A Protein's Free Energy In Lattice Models Via Linear Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Alantha

    in understanding protein structure prediction. In these models, a protein folds to maximize H-H contacts (minimize [4], abstracts the dominant force in protein folding: the hydrophobic interaction. The hydrophobicity of protein folding in the Hydro- phobic-Hydrophilic (HP) model. We formulate several di#11;erent integer

  6. Comparison of collisional radiative models for edge electron density reconstruction from Li I (2s-2p) emission profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoschus, H.; Hudson, B.; Munoz Burgos, J. M. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 (United States); Thomas, D. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Schweinzer, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Four collisional radiative models (CRMs) for reconstruction of the edge electron density profile from the measured Li I (2s-2p) emission profile of an accelerated lithium beam are compared using experimental data from DIII-D. It is shown for both L- and H-mode plasmas that edge density profiles reconstructed with the CRMs DDD2, ABSOLUT, [Sasaki et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 1699 (1993)] and a new model developed at DIII-D agree in a density scan from n{sub e}{sup ped}= (2.0-6.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} within 20%, 20%, <5%, and 40%, respectively, of the pedestal density measured with Thomson scattering. Profile shape and absolute density vary in a scan of the effective ion charge Z{sub eff}= 1-6 up to a factor of two but agree with Thomson data for Z{sub eff}= 1-2 within the error bars.

  7. A Cross-model Comparison of Global Long-term Technology Diffusion under a 2?C Climate Change Control Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Zwaan, Bob; Rosler, Hilke; Kober, Tom; Aboumahboub, Tino; Calvin, Katherine V.; Gernaat, David; Marangoni, Giacomo; McCollum, David

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the long-term global energy technology diffusion patterns required to reach a stringent climate change target with a maximum average atmospheric temperature increase of 2°C. If the anthropogenic temperature increase is to be limited to 2°C, total CO2 emissions have to be reduced massively, so as to reach substantial negative values during the second half of the century. Particularly power sector CO2 emissions should become negative from around 2050 onwards according to most models used for this analysis in order to compensate for GHG emissions in other sectors where abatement is more costly. The annual additional capacity deployment intensity (expressed in GW/yr) for solar and wind energy until 2030 needs to be around that recently observed for coal-based power plants, and will have to be several times higher in the period 2030–2050. Relatively high agreement exists across models in terms of the aggregated low-carbon energy system cost requirements on the supply side until 2050, which amount to about 50 trillion US$.

  8. The 0.4-Mo Eclipsing Binary CU Cancri: Absolute Dimensions, Comparison with Evolutionary Models and Possible Evidence for a Circumstellar Dust Disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Ribas

    2002-11-05

    Photometric observations in the R and I bands of the detached M-type double-lined eclipsing binary CU Cnc have been acquired and analysed. The photometric elements obtained from the analysis of the light curves have been combined with an existing spectroscopic solution to yield high-precision (errors<2%) absolute dimensions: M_A=0.4333+/-0.0017 Mo, M_B=0.3980+/-0.0014 Mo, R_A=0.4317+/-0.0052 Ro, and R_B=0.3908+/-0.0094 Ro. The mean effective temperature of the system has been estimated to be Teff=3140+/-150 K by comparing multi-band photometry with synthetic colors computed from model atmospheres. Additionally, we have been able to obtain an estimate for the age (~320 Myr) and chemical composition ([Fe/H]~0.0) of the binary system through its membership of the Castor moving group. With all these observational constraints, we have carried out a critical test of recent stellar models for low-mass stars. The comparison reveals that most evolutionary models underestimate the radius of the stars by as much as 10%, thus confirming the trend observed by Torres & Ribas (2002) for YY Gem and V818 Tau. In the mass-absolute magnitude diagram, CU Cnc is observed to be dimmer than other stars of the same mass. After ruling out a number of different scenarios, the apparent faintness of CU Cnc can be explained if its components are some 10% cooler than similar-mass stars or if there is some source of circumstellar dust absorption. The latter could be a tantalizing indirect evidence for a coplanar (Vega-like) dusty disk around this relatively young M-type binary.

  9. A comparison of methods used in mapping of Pleistocene-bedrock unconformity: Conventional manual versus surface modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weibel, C.P.; Abert, C.C.; Kempton, J.P. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Surface modeling software packages allow geologists to model and map topographic and stratigraphic horizons. These map products, however, often differ from maps prepared without computerized mapping. The authors mapping of the Pleistocene-bedrock unconformity in east-central Illinois (1:100,000-scale), which includes the Mahomet paleovalley, illustrates this situation and demonstrates how both mapping methods, manual and computer, contribute to a better understanding of the paleovalley. A conventional hand-drawn map was constructed over a number of years by manually plotting and contouring bedrock elevations, primarily from water well logs, onto various county and local topographic bases. A computer-generated map of the same area was completed as part of a recent project to map the bedrock geology. It was prepared by carefully selecting data, which included geographic coordinates, unique well identification numbers, and bedrock elevations. Primary data sources were hydrocarbon exploration and storage wells. Digitizing the hand-drawn map allowed the two maps to be overlaid and compared. Several significant geomorphic features appeared on one map and not the other because of the use of different databases and inconsistent selection of data used for the hand-drawn map. The hand-drawn map appears more realistic, i.e., like a modern surface, because the mappers used their knowledge of geomorphic concepts in drawing the contours. Most of the data selection for the computer-generated map was completed prior to plotting of the map and therefore is less susceptible to bias interpretations. The computer-generated map, however, is less topographically realistic in areas where data are sparse because the extrapolation methods used to define the surface do not recognize geologic processes or bedrock lithology.

  10. Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4 »ProgrammingScience (SC) Regional &

  11. Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing - Towards Enhancing OpenMP for Manycore and Heterogeneous Nodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbara Chapman

    2012-02-01

    OpenMP was not well recognized at the beginning of the project, around year 2003, because of its limited use in DoE production applications and the inmature hardware support for an efficient implementation. Yet in the recent years, it has been graduately adopted both in HPC applications, mostly in the form of MPI+OpenMP hybrid code, and in mid-scale desktop applications for scientific and experimental studies. We have observed this trend and worked deligiently to improve our OpenMP compiler and runtimes, as well as to work with the OpenMP standard organization to make sure OpenMP are evolved in the direction close to DoE missions. In the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing project, the HPCTools team at the University of Houston (UH), directed by Dr. Barbara Chapman, has been working with project partners, external collaborators and hardware vendors to increase the scalability and applicability of OpenMP for multi-core (and future manycore) platforms and for distributed memory systems by exploring different programming models, language extensions, compiler optimizations, as well as runtime library support.

  12. Unsupervised Detection and Semi-Automatic Extraction of Contours Using a Statistical Model and Dynamic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mignotte, Max

    remove the noise from the set by finding the global minimum of a corres- ponding energy function using present the statistical model for contours. Section 4 presents in de- tails the estimation procedure

  13. Extraction of the second-order nonlinear response from model test data in random seas and comparison of the Gaussian and non-Gaussian models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Nungsoo

    2006-04-12

    , employing the quadratic Volterra model. The effects of sea severity and data length on the estimation of response are also investigated at the same time. The data sets used in this study are surge forces on a fixed barge, a surge motion of a compliant mini...

  14. Comparison of Optimal Thermodynamic Models of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle from Heterotrophs, Cyanobacteria, and Green Sulfur Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Dennis G.; Jaramillo Riveri, Sebastian I.; Baxter, Douglas J.; Cannon, William R.

    2014-12-15

    We have applied a new stochastic simulation approach to predict the metabolite levels, energy flow, and material flux in the different oxidative TCA cycles found in E. coli and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, and in the reductive TCA cycle typical of chemolithoautotrophs and phototrophic green sulfur bacteria such as Chlorobaculum tepidum. The simulation approach is based on equations of state and employs an assumption similar to that used in transition state theory. The ability to evaluate the thermodynamics of metabolic pathways allows one to understand the relationship between coupling of energy and material gradients in the environment and the selforganization of stable biological systems, and it is shown that each cycle operates in the direction expected due to its environmental niche. The simulations predict changes in metabolite levels and flux in response to changes in cofactor concentrations that would be hard to predict without an elaborate model based on the law of mass action. In fact, we show that a thermodynamically unfavorable reaction can still have flux in the forward direction when it is part of a reaction network. The ability to predict metabolite levels, energy flow and material flux should be significant for understanding the dynamics of natural systems and for understanding principles for engineering organisms for production of specialty chemicals, such as biofuels.

  15. DIRECT N-BODY MODELING OF THE OLD OPEN CLUSTER NGC 188: A DETAILED COMPARISON OF THEORETICAL AND OBSERVED BINARY STAR AND BLUE STRAGGLER POPULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geller, Aaron M.; Hurley, Jarrod R.; Mathieu, Robert D. E-mail: mathieu@astro.wisc.edu

    2013-01-01

    Following on from a recently completed radial-velocity survey of the old (7 Gyr) open cluster NGC 188 in which we studied in detail the solar-type hard binaries and blue stragglers of the cluster, here we investigate the dynamical evolution of NGC 188 through a sophisticated N-body model. Importantly, we employ the observed binary properties of the young (180 Myr) open cluster M35, where possible, to guide our choices for parameters of the initial binary population. We apply pre-main-sequence tidal circularization and a substantial increase to the main-sequence tidal circularization rate, both of which are necessary to match the observed tidal circularization periods in the literature, including that of NGC 188. At 7 Gyr the main-sequence solar-type hard-binary population in the model matches that of NGC 188 in both binary frequency and distributions of orbital parameters. This agreement between the model and observations is in a large part due to the similarities between the NGC 188 and M35 solar-type binaries. Indeed, among the 7 Gyr main-sequence binaries in the model, only those with P {approx}> 1000 days begin to show potentially observable evidence for modifications by dynamical encounters, even after 7 Gyr of evolution within the star cluster. This emphasizes the importance of defining accurate initial conditions for star cluster models, which we propose is best accomplished through comparisons with observations of young open clusters like M35. Furthermore, this finding suggests that observations of the present-day binaries in even old open clusters can provide valuable information on their primordial binary populations. However, despite the model's success at matching the observed solar-type main-sequence population, the model underproduces blue stragglers and produces an overabundance of long-period circular main-sequence-white-dwarf binaries as compared with the true cluster. We explore several potential solutions to the paucity of blue stragglers and conclude that the model dramatically underproduces blue stragglers through mass-transfer processes. We suggest that common-envelope evolution may have been incorrectly imposed on the progenitors of the spurious long-period circular main-sequence-white-dwarf binaries, which perhaps instead should have gone through stable mass transfer to create blue stragglers, thereby bringing both the number and binary frequency of the blue straggler population in the model into agreement with the true blue stragglers in NGC 188. Thus, improvements in the physics of mass transfer and common-envelope evolution employed in the model may in fact solve both discrepancies with the observations. This project highlights the unique accessibility of open clusters to both comprehensive observational surveys and full-scale N-body simulations, both of which have only recently matured sufficiently to enable such a project, and underscores the importance of open clusters to the study of star cluster dynamics.

  16. Non-collective Parallel I/O for Global Address Space Programming Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Piernas Canovas, Juan; Tipparaju, Vinod; Nieplocha, Jaroslaw; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2007-09-13

    Achieving high performance for out-of-core applications typically involves explicit management of the movement of data between the disk and the physical memory. We are developing a programming environment in which the different levels of the memory hierarchy are handled efficiently in a unified transparent framework. In this paper, we present our experiences with implementing efficient non-collective I/O (GPC-IO) as part of this framework. As a generalization of the Remote Procedure Call (RPC) that was used as a foundation for the Sun NFS system, we developed a global procedure call (GPC) to invoke procedures on a remote node to handle non-collective I/O. We consider alternative approaches that can be employed in implementing this functionality. The approaches are evaluated using a representative computation from quantum chemistry. The results demonstrate that GPC-IO achieves better absolute execution times, strong-scaling, and weakscaling than the alternatives considered.

  17. Earth System Modeling -- Director`s initiative. LDRD Program final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacCracken, M.; Penner, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Atmospheric Science Div.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of the Earth System Modeling Director`s Initiative is to develop and test a framework for interactively coupling subsystem models that represent the physical, chemical, and biological processes which determine the state of the atmosphere, ocean, land surface and vegetation. Most studies of the potential for human perturbations of the climate system made previously have treated only limited components of the Earth system. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the capability of coupling all relevant components in a flexible framework that will permit a wide variety of tests to be conducted to assure realistic interactions. A representation of the Earth system is shown and its important interactions.

  18. Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL LBNL and SNL for the UFD Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes laboratory and field observations and numerical modeling related to coupled processes involving brine and vapor migration in geologic salt, focusing on recent developments and studies conducted at Sandia, Los Alamos, and Berkeley National Laboratories. Interest into the disposal of heat-generating waste in salt has led to interest into water distribution and migration in both run-of-mine crushed and intact geologic salt. Ideally a fully coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical simulation is performed using numerical models with validated constitutive models and parameters. When mechanical coupling is not available, mechanical effects are prescribed in hydraulic models as source, boundary, or initial conditions. This report presents material associated with developing appropriate initial conditions for a non-mechanical hydrologic simulation of brine migration in salt. Due to the strong coupling between the mechanical and hydrologic problems, the initial saturation will be low for the excavation disturbed zone surrounding the excavation. Although most of the material in this report is not new, the author hopes it is presented in a format making it useful to other salt researchers.

  19. Models and Tools for Evaluating Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Programs Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this webinar, attendees will learn about the models and tools developed by DOE and its partners to assist Tribes in assessing renewable energy and energy efficiency project potential. The webinar is held from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mountain Standard Time on May 27, 2015.

  20. A FAST MODEL-BUILDING METHOD FOR TIME SERIES USING GENETIC PROGRAMMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    generation, initial values of the parameters in an model (offspring) are inherited from the parents. step-2 series and applied it to lots of time series: (1) computer generated chaos e.g. Logistic, Loessler is made by using a set of finite number of past values measured from the system )x,,x,(xfx~ n-t2-t1-tt

  1. FocusCheck: A Tool for Model Checking and Debugging Sequential C Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Samik

    , Stony Brook {dsaha, sas}@cs.sunysb.edu Abstract. We present the FocusCheck model-checking tool.): TACAS 2005, LNCS 3440, pp. 563­569, 2005. c Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005 #12;564 C.W. Keller

  2. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Home Performance Contractor Introduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The home performance contractor is a firm whose business is to deliver customized and complete home energy upgrade solutions directly to consumers. This is a relatively new contractor model; it addresses companies that provide services from the energy assessment stage of the home energy upgrade process through the installation and quality assurance stages.

  3. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: survey of models for concrete degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Benjamin W; Huang, Hai

    2014-08-01

    Concrete has been used in the construction of nuclear facilities because of two primary properties: its structural strength and its ability to shield radiation. Concrete structures have been known to last for hundreds of years, but they are also known to deteriorate in very short periods of time under adverse conditions. The use of concrete in nuclear facilities for containment and shielding of radiation and radioactive materials has made its performance crucial for the safe operation of the facility. The goal of this report is to review and document the main aging mechanisms of concern for concrete structures in nuclear power plants (NPPs) and the models used in simulations of concrete aging and structural response of degraded concrete structures. This is in preparation for future work to develop and apply models for aging processes and response of aged NPP concrete structures in the Grizzly code. To that end, this report also provides recommendations for developing more robust predictive models for aging effects of performance of concrete.

  4. Using CORE Model-Based Systems Engineering Software to Support Program Management in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Project: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, C.; Sandor, D.; Simpkins, P.

    2006-11-01

    This paper describes how a model-based systems engineering software, CORE, is helping the U. S. Department of Energy's Office of Biomass Program assist with bringing biomass-derived biofuels to the market. This software tool provides information to guide informed decision-making as biomass-to-biofuels systems are advanced from concept to commercial adoption. It facilitates management and communication of program status by automatically generating custom reports, Gantt charts, and tables using the widely available programs of Microsoft Word, Project and Excel.

  5. Java Programming Certificate Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    Java Programming Certificate Program COMPUTER PROGRAMMING The Java programming language lies that fuel the Internet economy. In addition, the portability inherent in Java is useful for programming languages are likely to encounter projects in the near future that require knowledge of Java. Who Should

  6. Java Programming Certificate Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    Java Programming Certificate Program COMPUTER PROGRAMMING The Java programming language lies that fuel the Internet economy. In addition, the portability inherent in Java is useful for programming are likely to encounter projects in the near future that require knowledge of Java. Who Should Enroll

  7. Development of the Symbolic Manipulator Laboratory modeling package for the kinematic design and optimization of the Future Armor Rearm System robot. Ammunition Logistics Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March-Leuba, S.; Jansen, J.F.; Kress, R.L.; Babcock, S.M.; Dubey, R.V.

    1992-08-01

    A new program package, Symbolic Manipulator Laboratory (SML), for the automatic generation of both kinematic and static manipulator models in symbolic form is presented. Critical design parameters may be identified and optimized using symbolic models as shown in the sample application presented for the Future Armor Rearm System (FARS) arm. The computer-aided development of the symbolic models yields equations with reduced numerical complexity. Important considerations have been placed on the closed form solutions simplification and on the user friendly operation. The main emphasis of this research is the development of a methodology which is implemented in a computer program capable of generating symbolic kinematic and static forces models of manipulators. The fact that the models are obtained trigonometrically reduced is among the most significant results of this work and the most difficult to implement. Mathematica, a commercial program that allows symbolic manipulation, is used to implement the program package. SML is written such that the user can change any of the subroutines or create new ones easily. To assist the user, an on-line help has been written to make of SML a user friendly package. Some sample applications are presented. The design and optimization of the 5-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) FARS manipulator using SML is discussed. Finally, the kinematic and static models of two different 7-DOF manipulators are calculated symbolically.

  8. Automatic Calibration of a Building Energy Simulation Model Using a Global Optimization Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, S. U.; Claridge, D.

    2002-01-01

    , Proceedings of the ACEEE 1988 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 10, 14-26. Balcomb, J.D., Burch, J.D., Subbarao, K., 1993. Short-term energy monitoring of residences, ASHRAE Transactions, 99 (2): 935-944. Balcomb, J.D., Burch, J.D...-259. Sorooshian, S., Gupta, V.K., 1983. Automatic calibration of conceptual rainfall-runoff models - the question of parameter observability and uniqueness, Water Resources Res., 19 (1): 260- 268. Subbarao, K., Burch, J., Hancock, C.E., Lekov, A., Balcomb, J.D...

  9. An exploration of the stages of change model in a group treatment program for male batterers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Robert Davis

    2005-02-17

    of behavior change (TTM or TMBC; 1982, 1986). Both the TTM and the GCQ-S have enjoyed widespread use in research. Safe at Home Instrument (SAHI) This review of the stages of change will begin first with an overview of the transtheoretical model of change... been used to identify the processes by which individuals are able to effect changes in health related behaviors, and to determine the effects of interventions to predict outcome. In their seminal article Prochaska and DiClemente (1982) described...

  10. Validation of updated neutronic calculation models proposed for Atucha-II PHWR. Part I: Benchmark comparisons of WIMS-D5 and DRAGON cell and control rod parameters with MCNP5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mollerach, R. [Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A., Arribenos 3619, Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina); Leszczynski, F. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avenida del Libertador 8250, Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina); Fink, J. [Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A., Arribenos 3619, Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina)

    2006-07-01

    In 2005 the Argentine Government took the decision to complete the construction of the Atucha-II nuclear power plant, which has been progressing slowly during the last ten years. Atucha-II is a 745 MWe nuclear station moderated and cooled with heavy water, of German (Siemens) design located in Argentina. It has a pressure-vessel design with 451 vertical coolant channels, and the fuel assemblies (FA) are clusters of 37 natural UO{sub 2} rods with an active length of 530 cm. For the reactor physics area, a revision and update calculation methods and models (cell, supercell and reactor) was recently carried out covering cell, supercell (control rod) and core calculations. As a validation of the new models some benchmark comparisons were done with Monte Carlo calculations with MCNP5. This paper presents comparisons of cell and supercell benchmark problems based on a slightly idealized model of the Atucha-I core obtained with the WIMS-D5 and DRAGON codes with MCNP5 results. The Atucha-I core was selected because it is smaller, similar from a neutronic point of view, and more symmetric than Atucha-II Cell parameters compared include cell k-infinity, relative power levels of the different rings of fuel rods, and some two-group macroscopic cross sections. Supercell comparisons include supercell k-infinity changes due to the control rods (tubes) of steel and hafnium. (authors)

  11. A physically-based heat pump model was connected to an optimization program to form a computer code for use in the design of high-efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    #12;ABSTRACT A physically-based heat pump model was connected to an optimization program to form a computer code for use in the design of high-efficiency heat pumps. The method used allows efficiency of conventional heat pumps, ten variables were optimized while heating capacity was fixed

  12. Comparison of Mixed Layer Heights from Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar, Ground-based Measurements, and the WRP-Chem Model during CalNex and CARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarino, Amy Jo; Obland, Michael; Fast, Jerome D.; Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Berg, Larry K.; Lefer, Barry; Haman, C.; Hair, John; Rogers, Ray; Butler, Carolyn; Cook, A. L.; Harper, David

    2014-06-05

    The California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) and Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) field campaigns during May and June 2010 provided a data set appropriate for studying characteristics of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) was deployed to California onboard the NASA LaRC B-200 aircraft to aid incharacterizing aerosol properties during these two field campaigns. Measurements of aerosol extinction (532 nm), backscatter (532 and 1064 nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064 nm) profiles during 31 flights, many in coordination with other research aircraft and ground sites, constitute a diverse data set for use in characterizing the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols, as well as the depth and variability of the daytime mixed layer (ML), which is a subset within the PBL. This work illustrates the temporal and spatial variability of the ML in the vicinity of Los Angeles and Sacramento, CA. ML heights derived from HSRL measurements are compared to PBL heights derived from radiosonde profiles, ML heights measured from ceilometers, and simulated PBL heights from the Weather Research and Forecasting Chemistry (WRF-Chem) community model. Comparisons between the HSRL ML heights and the radiosonde profiles in Sacramento result in a correlation coefficient value (R) of 0.93 (root7 mean-square (RMS) difference of 157 m and bias difference (HSRL radiosonde) of 5 m). HSRL ML heights compare well with those from the ceilometer in the LA Basin with an R of 0.89 (RMS difference of 108 m and bias difference (HSRL Ceilometer) of -9.7 m) for distances of up to 30 km between the B-200 flight track and the ceilometer site. Simulated PBL heights from WRF-Chem were compared with those obtained from all flights for each campaign, producing an R of 0.58 (RMS difference of 604 m and a bias difference (WRF-Chem HSRL) of -157 m) for CalNex and 0.59 (RMS difference of 689 m and a bias difference (WRF-Chem HSRL) of 220 m) for CARES. Aerosol backscatter simulations are also available from WRF15 Chem and are compared to those from HSRL to examine differences among the methods used to derive ML heights.

  13. Effects of Pre-Existing Ice Crystals on Cirrus Clouds and Comparison between Different Ice Nucleation Parameterizations with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Xiangjun; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the treatment of ice nucleation in a more realistic manner in the Community Atmospheric Model version 5.3 (CAM5.3), the effects of preexisting ice crystals on ice nucleation in cirrus clouds are considered. In addition, by considering the in-cloud variability in ice saturation ratio, homogeneous nucleation takes place spatially only in a portion of cirrus cloud rather than in the whole area of cirrus cloud. With these improvements, the two unphysical limiters used in the representation of ice nucleation are removed. Compared to observations, the ice number concentrations and the probability distributions of ice number concentration are both improved with the updated treatment. The preexisting ice crystals significantly reduce ice number concentrations in cirrus clouds, especially at mid- to high latitudes in the upper troposphere (by a factor of ~10). Furthermore, the contribution of heterogeneous ice nucleation to cirrus ice crystal number increases considerably.Besides the default ice nucleation parameterization of Liu and Penner (2005, hereafter LP) in CAM5.3, two other ice nucleation parameterizations of Barahona and Nenes (2009, hereafter BN) and Kärcher et al. (2006, hereafter KL) are implemented in CAM5.3 for the comparison. In-cloud ice crystal number concentration, percentage contribution from heterogeneous ice nucleation to total ice crystal number, and preexisting ice effects simulated by the three ice nucleation parameterizations have similar patterns in the simulations with present-day aerosol emissions. However, the change (present-day minus pre-industrial times) in global annual mean column ice number concentration from the KL parameterization (3.24×106 m-2) is obviously less than that from the LP (8.46×106 m-2) and BN (5.62×106 m-2) parameterizations. As a result, experiment using the KL parameterization predicts a much smaller anthropogenic aerosol longwave indirect forcing (0.24 W m-2) than that using the LP (0.46 W m-2) and BN (0.39 W m-2) parameterizations.

  14. COMPARISONS OF NEEDLE INSERTION IN BRACHYTHERAPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Promayon, Emmanuel

    COMPARISONS OF NEEDLE INSERTION IN BRACHYTHERAPY PROTOCOLS USING A SOFT TISSUE MODEL M. MARCHAL, E aims at comparing the results of different prostate brachytherapy protocols concerning needle insertion order and its influence on tissue deformations. Prostate brachytherapy

  15. The Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) Software Development: Applications, Infrastructure, and Middleware/Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N.

    2011-06-30

    The status of and future plans for the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) hinge on software that PCMDI is either currently distributing or plans to distribute to the climate community in the near future. These software products include standard conventions, national and international federated infrastructures, and community analysis and visualization tools. This report also mentions other secondary software not necessarily led by or developed at PCMDI to provide a complete picture of the overarching applications, infrastructures, and middleware/networks. Much of the software described anticipates the use of future technologies envisioned over the span of next year to 10 years. These technologies, together with the software, will be the catalyst required to address extreme-scale data warehousing, scalability issues, and service-level requirements for a diverse set of well-known projects essential for predicting climate change. These tools, unlike the previous static analysis tools of the past, will support the co-existence of many users in a productive, shared virtual environment. This advanced technological world driven by extreme-scale computing and the data it generates will increase scientists’ productivity, exploit national and international relationships, and push research to new levels of understanding.

  16. Report for the ASC CSSE L2 Milestone (4873) - Demonstration of Local Failure Local Recovery Resilient Programming Model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heroux, Michael A.; Teranishi, Keita

    2014-06-01

    Recovery from process loss during the execution of a distributed memory parallel application is presently achieved by restarting the program, typically from a checkpoint file. Future computer system trends indicate that the size of data to checkpoint, the lack of improvement in parallel file system performance and the increase in process failure rates will lead to situations where checkpoint restart becomes infeasible. In this report we describe and prototype the use of a new application level resilient computing model that manages persistent storage of local state for each process such that, if a process fails, recovery can be performed locally without requiring access to a global checkpoint file. LFLR provides application developers with an ability to recover locally and continue application execution when a process is lost. This report discusses what features are required from the hardware, OS and runtime layers, and what approaches application developers might use in the design of future codes, including a demonstration of LFLR-enabled MiniFE code from the Matenvo mini-application suite.

  17. Computer programs for developing source terms for a UF{sub 6} dispersion model to simulate postulated UF{sub 6} releases from buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, W.R.

    1985-03-01

    Calculational methods and computer programs for the analysis of source terms for postulated releases of UF{sub 6} are presented. Required thermophysical properties of UF{sub 6}, HF, and H{sub 2}O are described in detail. UF{sub 6} reacts with moisture in the ambient environment to form HF and H{sub 2}O. The coexistence of HF and H{sub 2}O significantly alters their pure component properties, and HF vapor polymerizes. Transient compartment models for simulating UF{sub 6} releases inside gaseous diffusion plant feed and withdrawl buildings and cascade buildings are also described. The basic compartment model mass and energy balances are supported by simple heat transfer, ventilation system, and deposition models. A model that can simulate either a closed compartment or a steady-state ventilation system is also discussed. The transient compartment models provide input to an atmospheric dispersion model as output.

  18. Supercomputing Challenge Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    program that teaches mid school and high school students how to use powerful computers to model real-world problems and to explore computational approaches to their...

  19. Additional Programming Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge KiosksAbout AwardedAcronyms This isfor

  20. Validation of updated neutronic calculation models proposed for Atucha-II PHWR. Part II: Benchmark comparisons of PUMA core parameters with MCNP5 and improvements due to a simple cell heterogeneity correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant, C. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av del Libertador 8250, Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina); Mollerach, R. [Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A., Arribenos 3619, Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina); Leszczynski, F.; Serra, O.; Marconi, J. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av del Libertador 8250, Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina); Fink, J. [Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A., Arribenos 3619, Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina)

    2006-07-01

    In 2005 the Argentine Government took the decision to complete the construction of the Atucha-II nuclear power plant, which has been progressing slowly during the last ten years. Atucha-II is a 745 MWe nuclear station moderated and cooled with heavy water, of German (Siemens) design located in Argentina. It has a pressure vessel design with 451 vertical coolant channels and the fuel assemblies (FA) are clusters of 37 natural UO{sub 2} rods with an active length of 530 cm. For the reactor physics area, a revision and update of reactor physics calculation methods and models was recently carried out covering cell, supercell (control rod) and core calculations. This paper presents benchmark comparisons of core parameters of a slightly idealized model of the Atucha-I core obtained with the PUMA reactor code with MCNP5. The Atucha-I core was selected because it is smaller, similar from a neutronic point of view, more symmetric than Atucha-II, and has some experimental data available. To validate the new models benchmark comparisons of k-effective, channel power and axial power distributions obtained with PUMA and MCNP5 have been performed. In addition, a simple cell heterogeneity correction recently introduced in PUMA is presented, which improves significantly the agreement of calculated channel powers with MCNP5. To complete the validation, the calculation of some of the critical configurations of the Atucha-I reactor measured during the experiments performed at first criticality is also presented. (authors)

  1. A model-data intercomparison of CO2 exchange across North America: Results from the North American Carbon Program Site Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwalm, C.R.; Williams, C.A.; Schaefer, K.; Anderson, R.; Arain, M.A.; Baker, I.; Black, T.A.; Chen, G.; Ciais, P.; Davis, K. J.; Desai, A. R.; Dietze, M.; Dragoni, D.; Fischer, M.L.; Flanagan, L.B.; Grant, R.F.; Gu, L.; Hollinger, D.; Izaurralde, R.C.; Kucharik, C.; Lafleur, P.M.; Law, B.E.; Li, L.; Li, Z.; Liu, S.; Lokupitiya, E.; Luo, Y.; Ma, S.; Margolis, H.; Matamala, R.; McCaughey, H.; Monson, R. K.; Oechel, W. C.; Peng, C.; Poulter, B.; Price, D.T.; Riciutto, D.M.; Riley, W.J.; Sahoo, A.K.; Sprintsin, M.; Sun, J.; Tian, H.; Tonitto, C.; Verbeeck, H.; Verma, S.B.

    2011-06-01

    Our current understanding of terrestrial carbon processes is represented in various models used to integrate and scale measurements of CO{sub 2} exchange from remote sensing and other spatiotemporal data. Yet assessments are rarely conducted to determine how well models simulate carbon processes across vegetation types and environmental conditions. Using standardized data from the North American Carbon Program we compare observed and simulated monthly CO{sub 2} exchange from 44 eddy covariance flux towers in North America and 22 terrestrial biosphere models. The analysis period spans {approx}220 site-years, 10 biomes, and includes two large-scale drought events, providing a natural experiment to evaluate model skill as a function of drought and seasonality. We evaluate models' ability to simulate the seasonal cycle of CO{sub 2} exchange using multiple model skill metrics and analyze links between model characteristics, site history, and model skill. Overall model performance was poor; the difference between observations and simulations was {approx}10 times observational uncertainty, with forested ecosystems better predicted than nonforested. Model-data agreement was highest in summer and in temperate evergreen forests. In contrast, model performance declined in spring and fall, especially in ecosystems with large deciduous components, and in dry periods during the growing season. Models used across multiple biomes and sites, the mean model ensemble, and a model using assimilated parameter values showed high consistency with observations. Models with the highest skill across all biomes all used prescribed canopy phenology, calculated NEE as the difference between GPP and ecosystem respiration, and did not use a daily time step.

  2. Essential and model programs for teaching and learning centers as reported by directors in selected research extensive universities: a Delphi study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pchenitchnaia, Larissa V.

    2009-05-15

    ESSENTIAL AND MODEL PROGRAMS FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING CENTERS AS REPORTED BY DIRECTORS IN SELECTED RESEARCH EXTENSIVE UNIVERSITIES: A DELPHI STUDY A Dissertation by LARISSA V. PCHENITCHNAIA Submitted to the Office of Graduate... AS REPORTED BY DIRECTORS IN SELECTED RESEARCH EXTENSIVE UNIVERSITIES: A DELPHI STUDY A Dissertation by LARISSA V. PCHENITCHNAIA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  3. Ensure Program Correctness Programming Languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    Ensure Program Correctness Programming Languages and Formal Methods Research Group Lab Coordinator Bow-Yaw Wang The Programming Languages and Formal Methods Research Group develops techniques to help ensure program correctness. Our research in programming languages focuses on syntactic, semantic

  4. Development of preference models for regular dissemination of informational and educational programming through cable television systems of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Larry Arnold

    1973-01-01

    Systems Program Interest of Texas CATV Systems . 19 19 26 37 V SUhl4ARY, CONCLUSIONS, AND RECOMMENDATIONS Summary Conclusions Recommendations REFERENCES APPENDICES APPENDIX A APPENDIX B APPENDIX C VITA 79 79 85 90 91 93 94 100 102... of Subscribers Served 45 49 ix LIST OF TABLES (Continued) Table 13. Second Choice Preferences of Texas CATV Systems for Regular Program Topi cs by Number of Subscribers Served . Page 51 14. 15. Third Choice Preferences of Texas CATV Systems...

  5. Comparison of the ANP model with the data for neutrino induced single pion production from the MiniBooNE and MINER$?$A experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -Y. Yu; E. A. Paschos; I. Schienbein

    2014-11-24

    We present theoretical predictions in the framework of the ANP model for single pion production ($\\pi^+, \\pi^0$) in $\

  6. Comparison of Hydrodynamic Load Predictions Between Engineering Models and Computational Fluid Dynamics for the OC4-DeepCwind Semi-Submersible: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benitz, M. A.; Schmidt, D. P.; Lackner, M. A.; Stewart, G. M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2014-09-01

    Hydrodynamic loads on the platforms of floating offshore wind turbines are often predicted with computer-aided engineering tools that employ Morison's equation and/or potential-flow theory. This work compares results from one such tool, FAST, NREL's wind turbine computer-aided engineering tool, and the computational fluid dynamics package, OpenFOAM, for the OC4-DeepCwind semi-submersible analyzed in the International Energy Agency Wind Task 30 project. Load predictions from HydroDyn, the offshore hydrodynamics module of FAST, are compared with high-fidelity results from OpenFOAM. HydroDyn uses a combination of Morison's equations and potential flow to predict the hydrodynamic forces on the structure. The implications of the assumptions in HydroDyn are evaluated based on this code-to-code comparison.

  7. Peng, McKenna, Fenves, Law1 An Open Collaborative Model for Development of Finite Element Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    a reality. The open source software development process reflects a powerful global trend toward networked and engineers can easily incorporate new element technologies and solution strategies. The distributed element engineering analysis programs. In current engineering practice, finite element packages need to be able

  8. Survey and discussion of models applicable to the transport and fate thrust area of the Department of Energy Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    The availability and easy production of toxic chemical and biological agents by domestic and international terrorists pose a serious threat to US national security, especially to civilian populations in and around urban areas. To address this threat, the Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (CBNP) with the goal of focusing the DOE`s technical resources and expertise on capabilities to deny, deter, mitigate and respond to clandestine releases of chemical and biological agents. With the intent to build on DOE core competencies, the DOE has established six technology thrust areas within the CBNP Program: Biological Information Resources; Point Sensor Systems; Stand-off Detection; Transport and Fate; Decontamination; and Systems Analysis and Integration. The purpose of the Transport and Fate Thrust is to accurately predict the dispersion, concentration and ultimate fate of chemical and biological agents released into the urban and suburban environments and has two major goals: (1) to develop an integrated and validated state-of-the-art atmospheric transport and fate modeling capability for chemical and biological agent releases within the complex urban environment from the regional scale down to building and subway interiors, and (2) to apply this modeling capability in a broad range of simulation case studies of chemical and biological agent release scenarios in suburban, urban and confined (buildings and subways) environments and provide analysis for the incident response user community. Sections of this report discuss subway transport and fate models; buildings interior transport and fate modeling; models for flow and transport around buildings; and local-regional meteorology and dispersion models.

  9. This letter is to inform AHAM that DOE is adopting a new policy regarding DOE ENERGY STAR verification testing of models that are part of the AHAM verification program.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This letter is to inform AHAM that DOE is adopting a new policy regarding DOE ENERGY STAR verification testing of models that are part of the AHAM verification program.

  10. Comparison of isotropic elasto-plastic models for the plastic metric tensor $C_p=F_p^T\\, F_p$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrizio Neff; Ionel-Dumitrel Ghiba

    2014-10-08

    We discuss in detail existing isotropic elasto-plastic models based on 6-dimensional flow rules for the positive definite plastic metric tensor $C_p=F_p^T\\, F_p$ and highlight their properties and interconnections. We show that seemingly different models are equivalent in the isotropic case.

  11. Comparison of isotropic elasto-plastic models for the plastic metric tensor $C_p=F_p^T\\, F_p$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrizio Neff; Ionel-Dumitrel Ghiba

    2015-10-29

    We discuss in detail existing isotropic elasto-plastic models based on 6-dimensional flow rules for the positive definite plastic metric tensor $C_p=F_p^T\\, F_p$ and highlight their properties and interconnections. We show that seemingly different models are equivalent in the isotropic case.

  12. Mean Comparisons August 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    is based on information from all randomly selected students for both your institution and your comparison item. Means are provided for your institution and all comparison groups. For more information V ariable integrating ideas or information from various sources Included diverse perspectives (different races

  13. An indoorâ??outdoor building energy simulator to study urban modification effects on building energy use â?? Model description and validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghoobian, Neda; Kleissl, Jan

    2012-01-01

    T.   Williamson, Urban surface energy balance modelsmodel of the international urban energy balance model comparison, The International Urban Energy Balance Models  Comparison 

  14. An Approach to Locality-Conscious Load Balancing and Transparent Memory Hierarchy Management with a Global-Address-Space Parallel Programming Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Catalyurek, Umit; Nieplocha, Jarek; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2006-04-25

    This paper describes a global-addressspace framework for the convenient specification and effi- cient execution of parallel out-of-core applications operating on block-sparse data. The programming model provides a global view of block-sparse matrices and a mechanism for the expression of parallel tasks that operate on blocksparse data. The tasks are automatically partitioned into phases that operate on memory-resident data, and mapped onto processors to optimize load balance and data locality. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the utility of the approach.

  15. Using Linear Genetic Programming to Develop a C/C++ Simulation Model of a Waste Incinerator. Larry M Deschaine PE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    /C++ computer simulation model that mimics the performance of the concentrations of carbon dioxide. It #12;involves variable input material properties (solids, liquids and gaseous), high temperature, large

  16. Program School/ Career: Descripton ISIS Program Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Program School/ Career: Descripton ISIS Program Codes Program Career: Descripton College School;Program School/ Career: Descripton ISIS Program Codes Program Career: Descripton College School/ College 1

  17. TransCom N[subscript 2]O model inter-comparison – Part 2: Atmospheric inversion estimates of N[subscript 2]O emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, R. L.

    This study examines N[subscript 2]O emission estimates from five different atmospheric inversion frameworks based on chemistry transport models (CTMs). The five frameworks differ in the choice of CTM, meteorological data, ...

  18. Integrated Transport Property Program for Key Systems: Data, Models, and Simulation M. Huber, A. Laesecke, and R. Perkins (838)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    alkanes n-octane, n-nonane, n-decane, and n-dodecane. These are the first such models for the heavier and extrapolate in a physically meaningful manner. Our models for n-octane, n- nonane, n-decane, and n enhancement similar to that known for the thermal conductivity, but extending much farther

  19. 6 Model Evaluation III -Radiosonde and radar wind profiler cluster This section describes some of the cluster by cluster comparisons between the WRFb simulations and the radiosonde

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    excess moisture transport from the Gulf of Mexico. For wind speed, the most striking feature6 Model Evaluation III - Radiosonde and radar wind profiler cluster analysis This section describes wind profiler clusters. The clusters and the method used to obtain them are described in detail in de

  20. What causes the large extensions of red-supergiant atmospheres? Comparisons of interferometric observations with 1-D hydrostatic, 3-D convection, and 1-D pulsating model atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arroyo-Torres, B; Chiavassa, A; Scholz, M; Freytag, B; Marcaide, J M; Hauschildt, P H; Wood, P R; Abellan, F J

    2015-01-01

    We present the atmospheric structure and the fundamental parameters of three red supergiants, increasing the sample of RSGs observed by near-infrared spectro-interferometry. Additionally, we test possible mechanisms that may explain the large observed atmospheric extensions of RSGs. We carried out spectro-interferometric observations of 3 RSGs in the near-infrared K-band with the VLTI/AMBER instrument at medium spectral resolution. To comprehend the extended atmospheres, we compared our observational results to predictions by available hydrostatic PHOENIX, available 3-D convection, and new 1-D self-excited pulsation models of RSGs. Our near-infrared flux spectra are well reproduced by the PHOENIX model atmospheres. The continuum visibility values are consistent with a limb-darkened disk as predicted by the PHOENIX models, allowing us to determine the angular diameter and the fundamental parameters of our sources. Nonetheless, in the case of V602 Car and HD 95686, the PHOENIX model visibilities do not predict ...

  1. Construction of Energy Functions for Lattice Heteropolymer Models: A Case Study in Constraint Satisfaction Programming and Adiabatic Quantum Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan Babbush; Alejandro Perdomo-Ortiz; Bryan O'Gorman; William Macready; Alán Aspuru-Guzik

    2013-06-11

    Optimization problems associated with the interaction of linked particles are at the heart of polymer science, protein folding and other important problems in the physical sciences. In this review we explain how to recast these problems as constraint satisfaction problems such as linear programming, maximum satisfiability, and pseudo-boolean optimization. By encoding problems this way, one can leverage substantial insight and powerful solvers from the computer science community which studies constraint programming for diverse applications such as logistics, scheduling, artificial intelligence, and circuit design. We demonstrate how to constrain and embed lattice heteropolymer problems using several strategies. Each strikes a unique balance between number of constraints, complexity of constraints, and number of variables. Finally, we show how to reduce the locality of couplings in these energy functions so they can be realized as Hamiltonians on existing quantum annealing machines. We intend that this review be used as a case study for encoding related combinatorial optimization problems in a form suitable for adiabatic quantum optimization.

  2. The diurnal variation of NO, N( sup 2 D), and ions in the thermosphere: A comparison of satellite measurements to a model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusch, D.W. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (USA)); Gerard, J.C. (Univ. de Liege, Liege-Ougee (Belgium)); Fesen, C.G. (Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (USA))

    1991-07-01

    A data base derived from Atmosphere Explorer C measurements of parameters important to the understanding of the diurnal variation of odd-nitrogen and ions in the thermosphere near equinox, at low latitudes, and for quiet geomagnetic conditions is presented. The data were taken during the period from August to September 1974, when perigee was near the equator and reached an altitude of about 135 km. The data base contains profiles of the odd-nitrogen species NO, and N({sup 2}D); the ions NO{sup +}, O{sub 2}{sup +}, O{sup +}, N{sub 2}{sup +}, and N{sup +}; the total ion density; O an N{sub 2}; and the neutral, ion, and electron temperatures. The measured time-dependent variations of NO, N({sup 2}D), O{sub 2}{sup +}, and NO{sup +} compare favorably to the results of a time dependent, photochemical, diffusion model for odd-nitrogen and ion chemistry. In particular, the model reproduces the rapid increase in NO density in the morning hours, the mid-afternoon maximum, and the late afternoon decrease. The model also predicts the measured absolute densities for NO to within 20% over most of the diurnal cycle but falls below the measured density by as much as a factor of 2 in the late afternoon. The agreement between the data and the model indicates that the most important chemical processes for the production and loss of odd-nitrogen in the Earth's thermosphere are induced in the model.

  3. Program Administration

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume describes program administration that establishes and maintains effective organizational management and control of the emergency management program. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.

  4. Interlanguage Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interlanguage Programming Interlanguage Programming This page provides examples of compilation and running scripts when mixing CC++ with Fortran codes. CMPI Main Calling Fortran...

  5. Comparison of the National Green Building Standard (ICC 700-2008) and LEED for Homes to the Residential Provisions of the 2009 IECC for the Delaware Green for Green Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britt, Michelle L.; Makela, Eric J.

    2011-01-30

    Adhering to Delaware’s Green for Green program specifications results in homes being built to more energy-efficient levels than the 2009 IECC levels. Specifically: • Certifying at the Silver Performance Level for the ICC 700 standard using either the Prescriptive or Performance Paths will result in a residential building that is more efficient than if the building only complied with the 2009 IECC. • Certifying at the Silver level under LEED for Homes standard, including mandatory compliance with ENERGY STAR 2006 and earning two additional energy points will result in a residential building that is more efficient than if the building only complied with the 2009 IECC.

  6. Grafton County residents had more than 7,600 contacts with UNH Cooperative Extension staff and programs from October 2013 to September 2014. In the spirit of the regional program model, residents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Visits and Forest Management Services Natural Resources Grafton County Residents Participated in the Following Natural Resources Programs · Broadband Planning and Technical Support · Forest Laws for Municipal in the Following Community and Economic Development Programs Education Center & Info Line Master Gardener

  7. Rockingham County residents had more than 13,000 contacts with UNH Cooperative Extension staff and programs between October 2013 and September 2014. In the spirit of the regional program model,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Conservation Conference · Tree Inspection and Landowner SiteVisits Natural Resources Rockingham County Residents Participated in the Following Natural Resources Programs · Broadband Training and Technical and Economic Development Programs Education Center & Info Line Master Gardener vo

  8. Accessible programming using program synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Rishabh

    2014-01-01

    New computing platforms have greatly increased the demand for programmers, but learning to program remains a big challenge. Program synthesis techniques have the potential to revolutionize programming by making it more ...

  9. Reproducible Surface Extraction for Variance Comparison in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reproducible Surface Extraction for Variance Comparison in 3D Computed Tomography Christoph Heinzl1 surfaces models from distorted volume datasets in 3D computed tomography (3D-CT). As all 3D-CT datasets common 3D image processing filters: First of all we use an edge preserving diffusion filter to reduce

  10. Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Tomography, Satellite Altimetry, and Modeling The ATOC to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore in the advective heat flux. Changes in oceanic heat storage are a major expected element of future climate shifts

  11. COMPARISON OF UNCERTAINTY PARAMETERISATIONS FOR H ROBUST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    COMPARISON OF UNCERTAINTY PARAMETERISATIONS FOR H ROBUST CONTROL OF TURBOCHARGED DIESEL ENGINES arose during the model validation for a turbocharged diesel engine (cf. Sections 2 and 3). Mismatches PROBLEM The plant to be controlled is a turbocharged pas- senger car diesel engine equipped with exhaust

  12. Impact of hydrological variations on modeling of peatland CO2 fluxes: Results from the North American Carbon Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    in ecosystem models due to differences in nutrients, peat properties, and plant communities. Citation: Sulman cycle due to large carbon pools resulting from the long-term accumulation of organic matter in peat of the water table exposes peat soils to oxygen, resulting in higher rates of ecosystem respiration (ER

  13. Memprot: a program to model the detergent corona around a membrane protein based on SEC–SAXS data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pérez, Javier, E-mail: javier.perez@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, BP 48, Saint-Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Koutsioubas, Alexandros [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Outstation at MLZ, Lichtenbergstrasse 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, BP 48, Saint-Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-01-01

    Systematic SAXS simulations have been analysed over a wide range of parameters in order to better understand the detergent corona around a membrane protein. The application of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to structural investigations of transmembrane proteins in detergent solution has been hampered by two main inherent hurdles. On the one hand, the formation of a detergent corona around the hydrophobic region of the protein strongly modifies the scattering curve of the protein. On the other hand, free micelles of detergent without a precisely known concentration coexist with the protein–detergent complex in solution, therefore adding an uncontrolled signal. To gain robust structural information on such systems from SAXS data, in previous work, advantage was taken of the online combination of size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and SAXS, and the detergent corona around aquaporin-0, a membrane protein of known structure, could be modelled. A precise geometrical model of the corona, shaped as an elliptical torus, was determined. Here, in order to better understand the correlations between the corona model parameters and to discuss the uniqueness of the model, this work was revisited by analyzing systematic SAXS simulations over a wide range of parameters of the torus.

  14. Current Comparison of Advanced Fuel Cycle Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Piet; B. W. Dixon; A. Goldmann; R. N. Hill; J. J. Jacobson; G. E. Matthern; J. D. Smith; A. M. Yacout

    2006-03-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle includes mining, enrichment, nuclear power plants, recycling (if done), and residual waste disposition. The U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) has four program objectives to guide research on how best to glue these pieces together, as follows: waste management, proliferation resistance, energy recovery, and systematic management/economics/safety. We have developed a comprehensive set of metrics to evaluate fuel cycle options against the four program objectives. The current list of metrics is long-term heat, long-term dose, radiotoxicity and weapons usable material. This paper describes the current metrics and initial results from comparisons made using these metrics. The data presented were developed using a combination of “static” calculations and a system dynamic model, DYMOND. In many cases, we examine the same issue both dynamically and statically to determine the robustness of the observations. All analyses are for the U.S. reactor fleet. This work aims to clarify many of the issues being discussed within the AFCI program, including Inert Matrix Fuel (IMF) versus Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel, single-pass versus multi-pass recycling, thermal versus fast reactors, and the value of separating cesium and strontium. The results from a series of dynamic simulations evaluating these options are included in this report. The model interface includes a few “control knobs” for flying or piloting the fuel cycle system into the future. The results from the simulations show that the future is dark (uncertain) and that the system is sluggish with slow time response times to changes (i.e., what types of reactors are built, what types of fuels are used, and the capacity of separation and fabrication plants). Piloting responsibilities are distributed among utilities, government, and regulators, compounding the challenge of making the entire system work and respond to changing circumstances. We identify four approaches that would increase our chances of a sustainable fuel cycle system: (1) have a recycle strategy that could be implemented before the 2030-2050 approximate period when current reactors retire so that replacement reactors fit into the strategy, (2) establish an option such as multi-pass blended-core IMF as a downward Pu control knob and accumulate waste management benefits early, (3) establish fast reactors with flexible conversion ratio as a future control knob that slowly becomes available if/when fast reactors are added to the fleet, and (4) expand exploration of heterogeneous assemblies and cores, which appear to have advantages such as increased agility. Initial results suggest multi-pass full-core MOX appears to be a less effective way than multi-pass blended core IMF to manage the fuel cycle system because it requires higher TRU throughput while accruing waste management benefits at a slower rate. Single-pass recycle approaches for LWRs do not meet AFCI program objectives and could be considered a “dead end.” We did not study the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Fast reactors appear to be effective options but a significant number of fast reactors must be deployed before the benefit of such strategies can be observed.

  15. arXiv:nlin/0607029v1[nlin.CD]14Jul2006 APS/123-QED Modeling Time Series of Real Systems using Genetic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Genetic Programming Dilip P. Ahalpara Institute for Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Gandhinagar

  16. Small-angle fragmentation of carbon ions at 0.6 GeV/n: A comparison with models of ion-ion interactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Krutenkova, A. P.; Abramov, B. M.; Alekseev, P. N.; Borodin, Yu. A.; Bulychjov, S. A.; Dukhovskoy, I. A.; Khanov, A. I.; Kulikov, V. V.; Martemianov, M. A.; Mashnik, S. G.; et al

    2015-05-29

    Momentum distributions of hydrogen and helium isotopes from ¹²C fragmentation at 3.5° were measured at 0.6 GeV/nucleon in the FRAGM experiment at ITEP TWA heavy ion accelerator. The fragments were selected by correlated time of flight and dE/dx measurements with a magnetic spectrometer with scintillation counters. The main attention was drawn to the high momentum region where the fragment velocity exceeds the velocity of the projectile nucleus. The momentum spectra of fragments span the region of the fragmentation peak as well as the cumulative region. The differential cross sections cover six orders of magnitude. The distributions measured are compared tomore »the predictions of three ion-ion interaction models: BC, QMD and LAQGSM03.03. The kinetic energy spectra of fragments in the projectile rest frame have an exponential shape with two temperatures, being defined by their slope parameters.« less

  17. Improving in vitro Sertoli cell/gonocyte co-culture model for assessing male reproductive toxicity: Lessons learned from comparisons of cytotoxicity versus genomic responses to phthalates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu Xiaozhong; Hong, Sung Woo; Moreira, Estefania G.; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2009-09-15

    Gonocytes exist in the neonatal testis and represent a transient population of male germ-line stem cells. It has been shown that stem cell self-renewal and progeny production is probably controlled by the neighboring differentiated cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) in vivo known as niches. Recently, we developed an in vitro three-dimensional (3D) Sertoli cell/gonocyte co-culture (SGC) model with ECM overlay, which creates an in vivo-like niche and supports germ-line stem cell functioning within a 3D environment. In this study, we applied morphological and cytotoxicity evaluations, as well as microarray-based gene expression to examine the effects of different phthalate esters (PE) on this model. Known in vivo male developmentally toxic PEs (DTPE) and developmentally non-toxic PEs (DNTPE) were evaluated. We observed that DTPE induced significantly greater dose-dependent morphological changes, a decrease in cell viability and an increase in cytotoxicity compared to those treated with DNTPE. Moreover, the gene expression was more greatly altered by DTPE than by DNTPE and non-supervised cluster analysis allowed the discrimination of DTPE from the DNTPE. Our systems-based GO-Quant analysis showed significant alterations in the gene pathways involved in cell cycle, phosphate transport and apoptosis regulation with DTPE but not with DNTPE treatment. Disruptions of steroidogenesis related-gene expression such as Star, Cyp19a1, Hsd17b8, and Nr4a3 were observed in the DTPE group, but not in the DNTPE group. In summary, our observation on cell viability, cytotoxicity, and microarray-based gene expression analysis induced by PEs demonstrate that our in vitro 3D-SGC system mimicked in vivo responses for PEs and suggests that the 3D-SGC system might be useful in identifying developmental reproductive toxicants.

  18. Comparison of MELCOR modeling techniques and effects of vessel water injection on a low-pressure, short-term, station blackout at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, J.J.

    1995-06-01

    A fully qualified, best-estimate MELCOR deck has been prepared for the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station and has been run using MELCOR 1.8.3 (1.8 PN) for a low-pressure, short-term, station blackout severe accident. The same severe accident sequence has been run with the same MELCOR version for the same plant using the deck prepared during the NUREG-1150 study. A third run was also completed with the best-estimate deck but without the Lower Plenum Debris Bed (BH) Package to model the lower plenum. The results from the three runs have been compared, and substantial differences have been found. The timing of important events is shorter, and the calculated source terms are in most cases larger for the NUREG-1150 deck results. However, some of the source terms calculated by the NUREG-1150 deck are not conservative when compared to the best-estimate deck results. These results identified some deficiencies in the NUREG-1150 model of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station. Injection recovery sequences have also been simulated by injecting water into the vessel after core relocation started. This marks the first use of the new BH Package of MELCOR to investigate the effects of water addition to a lower plenum debris bed. The calculated results indicate that vessel failure can be prevented by injecting water at a sufficiently early stage. No pressure spikes in the vessel were predicted during the water injection. The MELCOR code has proven to be a useful tool for severe accident management strategies.

  19. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459 heat sweep model for estimating energy recovery from fractured geothermal reservoirs based on early

  20. DYNAMIC AND CLASSICAL PRA: A BWR SBO CASE COMPARISON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandelli, Diego; Smith, Curtis L; Ma, Zhegang

    2011-07-01

    As part of the Light-Water Sustainability Program (LWRS), the purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margin management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain the safety of current NPPs. In this paper, we describe the RISMC analysis process illustrating how mechanistic (i.e., dynamic system simulators) and probabilistic (stochastic sampling strategies) approaches are combined in a dynamic PRA fashion in order to estimate safety margins. We use the scenario of a “station blackout” (SBO) wherein offsite power and onsite power are lost, thereby causing a challenge to plant safety systems. We describe the RISMC approach, illustrate the station blackout modeling, and compare this with traditional risk analysis modeling for this type of accident scenario. In the RISMC approach the dataset obtained consists of set of simulation runs (performed by using codes such as RELAP5/3D) where timing and ordering of events is changed accordingly to the stochastic sampling strategy adopted. On the other side, classical PRA methods, which are based on event-tree (FT) and fault-tree (FT) structures, generate minimal cut sets and probability values associated to each ET branch. The comparison of the classical and RISMC approaches is performed not only in terms of overall core damage probability but also considering statistical differences in the actual sequence of events. The outcome of this comparison analysis shows similarities and dissimilarities between the approaches but also highlights the greater amount of information that can be generated by using the RISMC approach.

  1. A Review of DOE Biofuels Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Algae Model Harmonization Initiative * The Biomass Program uses a baseline algal production scenario with model-based quantitative metrics to inform strategic planning *...

  2. Nonlinear force-free field modeling of the solar magnetic carpet and comparison with SDO/HMI and Sunrise/IMAX observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chitta, L. P.; Kariyappa, R. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; DeLuca, E. E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street MS-58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Solanki, S. K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-10-01

    In the quiet solar photosphere, the mixed polarity fields form a magnetic carpet that continuously evolves due to dynamical interaction between the convective motions and magnetic field. This interplay is a viable source to heat the solar atmosphere. In this work, we used the line-of-sight (LOS) magnetograms obtained from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment instrument on the Sunrise balloon-borne observatory, as time-dependent lower boundary conditions, to study the evolution of the coronal magnetic field. We use a magneto-frictional relaxation method, including hyperdiffusion, to produce a time series of three-dimensional nonlinear force-free fields from a sequence of photospheric LOS magnetograms. Vertical flows are added up to a height of 0.7 Mm in the modeling to simulate the non-force-freeness at the photosphere-chromosphere layers. Among the derived quantities, we study the spatial and temporal variations of the energy dissipation rate and energy flux. Our results show that the energy deposited in the solar atmosphere is concentrated within 2 Mm of the photosphere and there is not sufficient energy flux at the base of the corona to cover radiative and conductive losses. Possible reasons and implications are discussed. Better observational constraints of the magnetic field in the chromosphere are crucial to understand the role of the magnetic carpet in coronal heating.

  3. The internal rotation profile of the B-type star KIC\\,10526294 from frequency inversion of its dipole gravity modes and statistical model comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triana, Santiago Andrés; Pápics, Péter; Aerts, Conny; Kawaler, Steven D; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jörgen

    2015-01-01

    The internal angular momentum distribution of a star is key to determine its evolution. Fortunately, the stellar internal rotation can be probed through studies of rotationally-split non-radial oscillation modes. In particular, detection of non-radial gravity modes (g modes) in massive young stars has become feasible recently thanks to the Kepler space mission. Our aim is to derive the internal rotation profile of the Kepler B8V star KIC 10526294 through asteroseismology. We interpret the observed rotational splittings of its dipole g modes using four different approaches based on the best seismic models of the star and their rotational kernels. We show that these kernels can resolve differential rotation the radiative envelope if a smooth rotational profile is assumed and the observational errors are small. Based on Kepler data, we find that the rotation rate near the core-envelope boundary is well constrained to $163\\pm89$ nHz. The seismic data are consistent with rigid rotation but a profile with counter-r...

  4. Equation of State for Macromolecules of Variable Flexibility in Good Solvents: A Comparison of Techniques for Monte Carlo Simulations of Lattice Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Ivanov; E. A. An; L. A. Spirin; M. R. Stukan; M. Mueller; W. Paul; K. Binder

    2007-07-23

    The osmotic equation of state for the athermal bond fluctuation model on the simple cubic lattice is obtained from extensive Monte Carlo simulations. For short macromolecules (chain length N=20) we study the influence of various choices for the chain stiffness on the equation of state. Three techniques are applied and compared in order to critically assess their efficiency and accuracy: the repulsive wall method, the thermodynamic integration method (which rests on the feasibility of simulations in the grand canonical ensemble), and the recently advocated sedimentation equilibrium method, which records the density profile in an external (e.g. gravitation-like) field and infers, via a local density approximation, the equation of state from the hydrostatic equilibrium condition. We confirm the conclusion that the latter technique is far more efficient than the repulsive wall method, but we find that the thermodynamic integration method is similarly efficient as the sedimentation equilibrium method. For very stiff chains the onset of nematic order enforces the formation of isotropic-nematic interface in the sedimentation equilibrium method leading to strong rounding effects and deviations from the true equation of state in the transition regime.

  5. Technical reference book for the Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.E.; Benedict, R.G.; Hodson, J.S.

    1984-09-01

    The Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program is sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the purpose of developing current technical and cost information for nuclear and comparison electric power generating stations. The EEDB contains a variety of nuclear and coal-fired power plant technical data models. Each of these data models is a complete and detailed conceptual design for a single unit, commercial, steam electric, power generating station located on a standard hypothetical Middletown site. A major effort for the Sixth Update (1983) has been the updating of the system design descriptions and selected engineering drawings for the technical data models. This update took the form of revising and expanding the system design descriptions and engineering drawings contained in the Base Data Studies, to include the technical information developed and recorded in the first five EEDB updates. The results of the update effort are contained in this EEDB Program Technical Reference Book.

  6. Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Program to Measure the Flow Phenomena in a Scaled Model of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor Lower Plenum for Validation of CFD Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hugh M. McIlroy Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

    2008-09-01

    The experimental program that is being conducted at the Matched Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Flow Facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to obtain benchmark data on measurements of flow phenomena in a scaled model of a prismatic gas-cooled reactor lower plenum using 3-D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is presented. A description of the scaling analysis, experimental facility, 3-D PIV system, measurement uncertainties and analysis, experimental procedures and samples of the data sets that have been obtained are included. Samples of the data set that will be presented include mean-velocity-field and turbulence data in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GTMHR) design. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. The flow in the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate flow scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. The model is fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the mineral oil working fluid. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits high-quality measurements to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL MIR system is its large size which allows improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean average flow rate) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. The measurements reveal developing, non-uniform flow in the inlet jets and complicated flow patterns in the model lower plenum. Data include three-dimensional vector plots, data displays along the coordinate planes (slices) and charts that describe the component flows at specific regions in the model. Information on inlet velocity profiles is also presented.

  7. Cost and Performance Comparison Of Stationary Hydrogen Fueling Appliances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cost and Performance Comparison Of Stationary Hydrogen Fueling Appliances Duane B. Myers, Gregory D.directedtechnologies.com/ pubs/DTI_Task2_Report.html. 1 Proceedings of the 2002 U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Review NREL/CP-610 vehicles (FCV's) and the cost of hydrogen produced by these HFA's. In previous studies we evaluated

  8. Integrating Photovoltaic Systems into Low-Income Housing Developments: A Case Study on the Creation of a New Residential Financing Model and Low-Income Resident Job Training Program, September 2011 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, J.; Smith-Dreier, C.; Mekonnen, G.; Hawthorne, W.

    2011-09-01

    This case study covers the process of successfully integrating photovoltaic (PV) systems into a low-income housing development in northeast Denver, Colorado, focusing specifically on a new financing model and job training. The Northeast Denver Housing Center (NDHC), working in cooperation with Del Norte Neighborhood Development Corporation, Groundwork Denver, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was able to finance the PV system installations by blending private equity funding with utility rebates, federal tax credits, and public sector funding. A grant provided by the Governor's Energy Office allowed for the creation of the new financing model. In addition, the program incorporated an innovative low-income job training program and an energy conservation incentive program.

  9. IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program Results for CY2009 IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program Results for CY2009...

  10. Automated Comparison of Building Energy Simulation Engines (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polly, B.; Horowitz, S.; Booten, B.; Kruis, N.; Christensen, C.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation describes the BEopt comparative test suite, which is a tool that facilitates the automated comparison of building energy simulation engines. It also demonstrates how the test suite is improving the accuracy of building energy simulation programs. Building energy simulation programs inform energy efficient design for new homes and energy efficient upgrades for existing homes. Stakeholders rely on accurate predictions from simulation programs. Previous research indicates that software tends to over-predict energy usage for poorly-insulated leaky homes. NREL is identifying, investigating, and resolving software inaccuracy issues. Comparative software testing is one method of many that NREL uses to identify potential software issues.

  11. Comparison of Bottom-Up and Top-Down Forecasts: Vision Industry Energy Forecasts with ITEMS and NEMS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roop, J. M.; Dahowski, R. T

    2000-01-01

    Comparisons are made of energy forecasts using results from the Industrial module of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and an industrial economic-engineering model called the Industrial Technology and Energy Modeling System (ITEMS), a model...

  12. Program Generation Considered Easy Invited Talk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamin, Sam

    Program Generation Considered Easy Invited Talk Sam Kamin* Computer Science Department University program generators using the simple model of programs as text. The essence of this approach is its lack, in finding a willing audience for program generation among working programmers. Jumbo is a system

  13. IS THERE A VIABILITY-VULNERABILITY TRADEOFF? SEX DIFFERENCES IN FETAL PROGRAMMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDMAN, CURT A; GLYNN, LAURA M; DAVIS, ELYSIA POGGI

    2013-01-01

    in developmental programming models. Reproduction. 2013;Matthews SG. Fetal programming of hypothalamo- pituitary-Bale TL. Sex-specific programming of offspring emotionality

  14. Object-oriented concurrent programming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yonezawa, A.; Tokoro, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book deals with a major theme of the Japanese Fifth Generation Project, which emphasizes logic programming, parallelism, and distributed systems. It presents a collection of tutorials and research papers on a new programming and design methodology in which the system to be constructed is modeled as a collection of abstract entities called ''objects'' and concurrent messages passing among objects. The book includes proposals for programming languages that support this methodology, as well as the applications of object-oriented concurrent programming to such areas as artificial intelligence, software engineering, music synthesis, office information systems, and system programming.

  15. Counterintelligence Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-09-04

    To establish the policies, procedures, and specific responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Counterintelligence (CI) Program. This directive does not cancel any other directive.

  16. Counterintelligence Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-12-10

    The Order establishes Counterintelligence Program requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy, including the National Nuclear Security Administration. Supersedes DOE 5670.3.

  17. Program Summaries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Program Summaries Brochures Reports Accomplishments Presentations BES and Congress Science for Energy Flow Seeing...

  18. Programming Stage

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-05-21

    This chapter addresses plans for the acquisition and installation of operating environment hardware and software and design of a training program.

  19. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BIOMASS PROGRAM

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workshop 10 | Biomass Program eere.energy.gov * The Biomass Program uses a baseline algal production scenario with model-based quantitative metrics to inform strategic planning *...

  20. Distributed Quantum Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellie D'Hondt; Yves Vandriessche

    2010-01-11

    In this paper we explore the structure and applicability of the Distributed Measurement Calculus (DMC), an assembly language for distributed measurement-based quantum computations. We describe the formal language's syntax and semantics, both operational and denotational, and state several properties that are crucial to the practical usability of our language, such as equivalence of our semantics, as well as compositionality and context-freeness of DMC programs. We show how to put these properties to use by constructing a composite program that implements distributed controlled operations, in the knowledge that the semantics of this program does not change under the various composition operations. Our formal model is the basis of a quantum virtual machine construction for distributed quantum computations, which we elaborate upon in the latter part of this work. This virtual machine embodies the formal semantics of DMC such that programming execution no longer needs to be analysed by hand. Far from a literal translation, it requires a substantial concretisation of the formal model at the level of data structures, naming conventions and abstraction mechanisms. At the same time we provide automatisation techniques for program specification where possible to obtain an expressive and user-friendly programming environment.