Sample records for modeling programs comparison

  1. Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-6034E Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads Dandan Zhu1 , Tianzhen Energy, the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center for Building Energy Efficiency, of the U;Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads A joint effort between Lawrence Berkeley

  2. Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-6432E Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: HVAC Systems Xin Zhou1 , Tianzhen Hong2 programs (BEMPs) for HVAC calculations: EnergyPlus, DeST, and DOE-2.1E. This is a joint effort between purposes, BEMPs can be divided into load modules and HVAC system modules. This technical report

  3. Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Xin

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Mehry Yazdanian. Comparisons of HVAC Simulations betweeninformation Comparison of HVAC System Simulations inCLT (kW) Comparison of HVAC System Simulations in Different

  4. A comparison of three programming models for adaptive applications on the Origin2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shan, Hongzhang; Singh, Jaswinder Pal; Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak

    2001-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Adaptive applications have computational workloads and communication patterns which change unpredictably at runtime, requiring dynamic load balancing to achieve scalable performance on parallel machines. Efficient parallel implementations of such adaptive applications is therefore a challenging task. In this paper, we compare the performance of and the programming effort required for two major classes of adaptive applications under three leading parallel programming models on an SGI Origin2000 system, a machine which supports all three models efficiently. Results indicate that the three models deliver comparable performance; however, the implementations differ significantly beyond merely using explicit messages versus implicit loads/stores even though the basic parallel algorithms are similar. Compared with the message-passing (using MPI) and SHMEM programming models, the cache-coherent shared address space (CC-SAS) model provides substantial ease of programming at both the conceptual and program orchestration levels, often accompanied by performance gains. However, CC-SAS currently has portability limitations and may suffer from poor spatial locality of physically distributed shared data on large numbers of processors.

  5. Comparison of Home Retrofit Programs in Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, K.; Hannigan, E.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To explore ways to reduce customer barriers and increase home retrofit completions, several different existing home retrofit models have been implemented in the state of Wisconsin. This study compared these programs' performance in terms of savings per home and program cost per home to assess the relative cost-effectiveness of each program design. However, given the many variations in these different programs, it is difficult to establish a fair comparison based on only a small number of metrics. Therefore, the overall purpose of the study is to document these programs' performance in a case study approach to look at general patterns of these metrics and other variables within the context of each program. This information can be used by energy efficiency program administrators and implementers to inform home retrofit program design. Six different program designs offered in Wisconsin for single-family energy efficiency improvements were included in the study. For each program, the research team provided information about the programs' approach and goals, characteristics, achievements and performance. The program models were then compared with performance results -- program cost and energy savings -- to help understand the overall strengths and weaknesses or challenges of each model.

  6. Programming models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, David J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Pherson, Allen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thorp, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barrett, Richard [SNL; Clay, Robert [SNL; De Supinski, Bronis [LLNL; Dube, Evi [LLNL; Heroux, Mike [SNL; Janssen, Curtis [SNL; Langer, Steve [LLNL; Laros, Jim [SNL

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A programming model is a set of software technologies that support the expression of algorithms and provide applications with an abstract representation of the capabilities of the underlying hardware architecture. The primary goals are productivity, portability and performance.

  7. OSHWPP model programs guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Descriptions of model occupational health and safety programs implemented at DOE facilities are presented.

  8. Community Solar Program Comparison Chart

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chart is a supplement to the "Utility Community Solar Handbook: Understanding and Supporting Utility Program Development," provides the utility's perspective on community solar program development and is a resource for government officials, regulators, community organizers, solar energy advocates, non-profits, and interested citizens who want to support their local utilities in implementing projects.

  9. Model Fire Protection Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To facilitate conformance with its fire safety directives and the implementation of a comprehensive fire protection program, DOE has developed a number of "model" program documents. These include a comprehensive model fire protection program, model fire hazards analyses and assessments, fire protection system inspection and testing procedures, and related material.

  10. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Program Administrator Description

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Program Administrator Business Models, Program Administrator Description.

  11. Multidimensional Model Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Galen

    #12;Multidimensional Model Programming SQL Server 2012 Books Online Summary: Analysis Services provides several APIs that you can use to program against an Analysis Services instance this information to choose the programming interface that best meets the requirements of a particular project

  12. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.

    2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to compile information and conclusions gathered as part of three separate tasks undertaken as part of the overall project, “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs,” sponsored by the Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation office within the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address improvements to modeling in the near term, and note gaps in knowledge where future research is needed.

  13. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Non-Utility Program Administrator Business Model Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Non-Utility Program Administrator Business Model Non-utility program...

  14. Comparison of two different rating programs for sustainable homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjarnadottir, Margret Halla

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis compares two different rating programs for sustainable homes; The Code for Sustainable Homes in the United Kingdom, and LEED for Homes in the United States. The comparison is both in general and with respect ...

  15. Empirical Comparison of Statistical Pavement Performance Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sections from the American Association of State Highway Officials AASHO Road Test Highway Research BoardEmpirical Comparison of Statistical Pavement Performance Models Chih-Yuan Chu1 and Pablo L. Durango-Cohen2 Abstract: We conduct an empirical comparison of nine representative statistical pavement

  16. Community Renewables: Model Program Rules

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) has worked closely with The Vote Solar Initiative to develop model program rules for community-scale renewables that consider many of the basic issues facing community renewables programs. IREC’s model program rules address such issues as renewable system size, interconnection, eligibility for participation, allocation of the benefits flowing from participation, net metering of system production, and other essential features of a community renewables program. The goal of this effort is to provide stakeholders with program rules they can tailor to the individual circumstances and policy preferences of their state without having to reinvent the wheel at each turn.

  17. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide:...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Guide: HVAC Contractor Business Model Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: HVAC Contractor Business Model HVAC contractor business model...

  18. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide:...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Utility program administrator market utilityprogramadministratormarket.pdf More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Utility...

  19. Bayesian Model comparison of Higgs couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannes Bergstrom; Stella Riad

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the possibility of contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) to the Higgs couplings, in the light of the LHC data. The work is performed within an interim framework where the magnitude of the Higgs production and decay rates are rescaled though Higgs coupling scale factors. We perform Bayesian parameter inference on these scale factors, concluding that there is good compatibility with the SM. Furthermore, we carry out Bayesian model comparison on all models where any combination of scale factors can differ from their SM values and find that typically models with fewer free couplings are strongly favoured. We consider the evidence that each coupling individually equals the SM value, making the minimal assumptions on the other couplings. Finally, we make a comparison of the SM against a single "not-SM" model, and find that there is moderate to strong evidence for the SM.

  20. Comparison of Frictional Heating Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, Nicholas R [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work was to compare the predicted temperature rises using four well-known models for frictional heating under a few selected conditions in which similar variable inputs are provided to each model. Classic papers by Archard, Kuhlmann-Wilsdorf, Lim and Ashby, and Rabinowicz have been examined, and a spreadsheet (Excel ) was developed to facilitate the calculations. This report may be used in conjunction with that spreadsheet. It explains the background, assumptions, and rationale used for the calculations. Calculated flash temperatures for selected material combinations, under a range of applied loads and sliding speeds, are tabulated. The materials include AISI 52100 bearing steel, CDA 932 bronze, NBD 200 silicon nitride, Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and carbon-graphite material. Due to the assumptions made by the different models, and the direct way in which certain assumed quantities, like heat sink distances or asperity dimensions, enter into the calculations, frictional hearing results may differ significantly; however, they can be similar in certain cases in light of certain assumptions that are shared between the models.

  1. A comparison of Mexico's Border Industry Program with the Border Industry Program of South Africa and its Bantu homelands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Notzon, Brian Anthony

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMPARISON OF MEXICO'S BORDER INDUSTRY PROGRAM WITH THE BORDER INDUSTRY PROGRAM OF SOUTH AFRICA AND ITS BANTU HOMELANDS A Thesis by BRIAN ANTHONY NOTZON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1973 Ma)or Sub)ect: Economics A COMPARISON OP MEXICO'S BORDER INDUSTRY PROGRAM WITH THE BORDER INDUSTRY PROGRAM OF SOUTH AFRICA AND ITS BANTU HOMELANDS A Thesis by BRIAN ANTHONY NOTZON Approved...

  2. Modeling and Simulation Academic Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in analysis Refined accident-incident forecast (location, frequency, and severity) Recurrent and incident#12;#12;#12;Modeling and Simulation Academic Program #12;M&S Workforce Development Associate Implementation, Operations Engineer Design, Analysis Scientist Research, Development Partners in Providing World

  3. Comparison between VNIIEF computer programs used to study NPP safety and similar western codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pevnitsky, A.V.; Tarasov, V.A.; Solovyev, V.P. [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report gives schematic comparison between VNIIEF computer programs used to study NPP safety and similar western codes. This comparison is schematic and in no way pretends to be complete.

  4. State Energy Program: Kentucky Implementation Model Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below are resources associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs Office State Energy Program Kentucky Implementation Model.

  5. Comparison of open-source linear programming solvers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gearhart, Jared Lee; Adair, Kristin Lynn; Durfee, Justin D.; Jones, Katherine A.; Martin, Nathaniel; Detry, Richard Joseph

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When developing linear programming models, issues such as budget limitations, customer requirements, or licensing may preclude the use of commercial linear programming solvers. In such cases, one option is to use an open-source linear programming solver. A survey of linear programming tools was conducted to identify potential open-source solvers. From this survey, four open-source solvers were tested using a collection of linear programming test problems and the results were compared to IBM ILOG CPLEX Optimizer (CPLEX) [1], an industry standard. The solvers considered were: COIN-OR Linear Programming (CLP) [2], [3], GNU Linear Programming Kit (GLPK) [4], lp_solve [5] and Modular In-core Nonlinear Optimization System (MINOS) [6]. As no open-source solver outperforms CPLEX, this study demonstrates the power of commercial linear programming software. CLP was found to be the top performing open-source solver considered in terms of capability and speed. GLPK also performed well but cannot match the speed of CLP or CPLEX. lp_solve and MINOS were considerably slower and encountered issues when solving several test problems.

  6. Program Transformations in Weak Memory Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sevcik, Jaroslav

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyse the validity of common optimisations on multi-threaded programs in two memory models—the DRF guarantee and the Java Memory Model. Unlike in the single-threaded world, even simple program transformations, such ...

  7. Comparison of Photovoltaic Models in the System Advisor Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, N. J.; Dobos, A. P.; Gilman, P.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The System Advisor Model (SAM) is free software developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for predicting the performance of renewable energy systems and analyzing the financial feasibility of residential, commercial, and utility-scale grid-connected projects. SAM offers several options for predicting the performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems. The model requires that the analyst choose from three PV system models, and depending on that choice, possibly choose from three module and two inverter component models. To obtain meaningful results from SAM, the analyst must be aware of the differences between the model options and their applicability to different modeling scenarios. This paper presents an overview the different PV model options and presents a comparison of results for a 200-kW system using different model options.

  8. MDA based-approach for UML Models Complete Comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaouni, Samia Benabdellah; Mouline, Salma

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If a modeling task is distributed, it will frequently be necessary to integrate models developed by different team members. Problems occur in the models integration step and particularly, in the comparison phase of the integration. This issue had been discussed in several domains and various models. However, previous approaches have not correctly handled the semantic comparison. In the current paper, we provide a MDA-based approach for models comparison which aims at comparing UML models. We develop an hybrid approach which takes into account syntactic, semantic and structural comparison aspects. For this purpose, we use the domain ontology as well as other resources such as dictionaries. We propose a decision support system which permits the user to validate (or not) correspondences extracted in the comparison phase. For implementation, we propose an extension of the generic correspondence metamodel AMW in order to transform UML models to the correspondence model.

  9. A Comparison of Software Packages for Verified Linear Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Keil

    2008-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 11, 2008 ... ... is supported by the Mathematical Programming Society and by the Optimization Technology Center. Mathematical Programming Society.

  10. Energy Conservation Program: Data Collection and Comparison with Forecasted Unit Sales for Five Lamp Types, Notice of Data Availability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Data Collection and Comparison with Forecasted Unit Sales for Five Lamp Types, Notice of Data Availability

  11. Equipment Energy Models Using Spreadsheet Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J. S.

    EQUIPMENT ENERGY MODELS USING SPREADSHEET PROGRAMS Joel S. Gilbert, Dames & Moore, Bethesda, Maryland Engineering calculations on PC's are undergoing a revolution with the advent of spreadsheet programs. The author has found that virtually all...

  12. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Guide Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide Uses lessons learned from Better Buildings grantees, existing data, and private sector insights to highlight...

  13. Robust model comparison disfavors power law cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shafer, Daniel L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Late-time power law expansion has been proposed as an alternative to the standard cosmological model and shown to be consistent with some low-redshift data. We test power law expansion against the standard flat $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology using goodness-of-fit and model comparison criteria. We consider Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) data from two current compilations (Union2.1 and JLA) along with a current set of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements that includes the high-redshift Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest measurements from BOSS quasars. We find that neither power law expansion nor $\\Lambda$CDM is strongly preferred over the other when the SN Ia and BAO data are analyzed separately but that power law expansion is strongly disfavored by the combination. We treat the $R_\\text{h} = ct$ cosmology (a constant rate of expansion) separately and find that it is conclusively disfavored by all combinations of data that include SN Ia observations and a poor overall fit when systematic errors in the SN Ia measurements are ig...

  14. Comparison Between TRNSYS Software Simulation and PV F-Chart Program on Photovoltaic System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the comparisons of Photovoltaic System by TRNSYS simulation and PV F-Chart program to test TRNSYS simulation accuracy. The report starts with the Photovoltaic (PV) (PV) System introduction in Section one which is followed...

  15. Comparison Between TRNSYS Software Simulation and PV F-Chart Program on Photovoltaic System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the comparisons of Photovoltaic System by TRNSYS simulation and PV F-Chart program to test TRNSYS simulation accuracy. The report starts with the Photovoltaic (PV) (PV) System introduction in Section one which is followed...

  16. Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus Polymer Composites Research in the LM Materials Program Overview...

  17. Modeling the scalability of acrylic stream programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Jeremy Ng, 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the fact that the streaming application domain is becoming increasingly widespread, few studies have focused specifically on the performance characteristics of stream programs. We introduce two models by which the ...

  18. 3M's Model Rewards and Recognition Program Engages Employees...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3M's Model Rewards and Recognition Program Engages Employees and Drives Energy Savings Efforts 3M's Model Rewards and Recognition Program Engages Employees and Drives Energy...

  19. DOD low energy model installation program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, D.F. Jr.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Model Low Energy Installation Program is a demonstration of an installation-wide, comprehensive energy conservation program that meets the Department of Defense (DOD) energy management goals of reducing energy usage and costs by at least 20%. It employs the required strategies for meeting these goals, quantifies the environmental compliance benefits resulting from energy conservation and serves as a prototype for DOD wide application. This project will develop both analysis tools and implementation procedures as well as demonstrate the effectiveness of a comprehensive, coordinated energy conservation program based on state-of-the-art technologies.

  20. Status of state Brownfield programs -- A comparison of enabling legislation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogoff, M.J. [HDR Engineering, Inc., Tampa, FL (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Though a definitive count is impossible, the US General Accounting Office has estimated that there are between 130,000 and 400,000 Brownfield sites in the country. What accounts for this discrepancy is that many of these sites may not be contaminated at all, but merely perceived to require a prohibitively expensive cleanup before redeveloping. Many developers and lending institutions have been increasingly unwilling to take on the stringent municipal, state, and federal regulations required for remediation at these sites. As a result, development often times has taken place on greenfield sites which are located outside the confines of the inner city. This has frustrated the comprehensive plan goals of most communities which mandate urban infilling and use of existing public infrastructure. Over the past decade, however, there has been a movement in nearly half of the states away from stringent cleanup requirements. There are currently variations in what each state requires. Some states, which maintain strict State Superfund programs while some states provide a form of voluntary remediation actions by the property owner or developer. Other states are developing more flexible approaches for their Brownfield programs based on numeric or risk based standards. The degree of stringency may vary from state to state dependent on the degree of legislative emphasis placed on economic redevelopment of Brownfield properties. This paper will compare and contrast the major trends in enabling legislation of states which currently allow some form of brownfield program. A case study from Florida will highlight how one state is attempting to draft enabling legislation to initiate a comprehensive Brownfield program to respond to current state needs.

  1. PENSION PLAN/OPTIONAL RETIREMENT PROGRAM COMPARISON CHART State Retirement and Pension System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adali, Tulay

    in certain situations. Early Retirement Current Members & Transfers: 55 with 15 years of service -- reduced of service -- reduced .5% for every month before age 65 No early retirement provision; distribution beforePENSION PLAN/OPTIONAL RETIREMENT PROGRAM COMPARISON CHART State Retirement and Pension System (SRPS

  2. Phenotype Plasticity in Genetic Programming: A Comparison of Darwinian and Lamarckian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Phenotype Plasticity in Genetic Programming: A Comparison of Darwinian and Lamarckian Inheritance of phenotype plasticity in Genetic Pro­ gramming (GP). This takes the form of a set of real­valued numerical that plastic GP has significant benefits including faster evolution and adaptation in changing environments

  3. Climate Impact of Transportation A Model Comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girod, Bastien; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Grahn, Maria; Kitous, Alban; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation contributes to a significant and rising share of global energy use and GHG emissions. Therefore modeling future travel demand, its fuel use, and resulting CO2 emission is highly relevant for climate change mitigation. In this study we compare the baseline projections for global service demand (passenger-kilometers, ton-kilometers), fuel use, and CO2 emissions of five different global transport models using harmonized input assumptions on income and population. For four models we also evaluate the impact of a carbon tax. All models project a steep increase in service demand over the century. Technology is important for limiting energy consumption and CO2 emissions, but quite radical changes in the technology mix are required to stabilize or reverse the trend. While all models project liquid fossil fuels dominating up to 2050, they differ regarding the use of alternative fuels (natural gas, hydrogen, biofuels, and electricity), because of different fuel price projections. The carbon tax of US$200/tCO2 in 2050 stabilizes or reverses global emission growth in all models. Besides common findings many differences in the model assumptions and projections indicate room for improvement in modeling and empirical description of the transport system.

  4. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: HVAC Contractor Business Model Introduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: HVAC Contractor Business Model Introduction.

  5. Comparison of ?Z-structure function models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rislow, Benjamin C. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The ?Z-box is an important contribution to the proton's weak charge. The ?Z-box is calculated dispersively and depends on ?Z-structure functions, F{sub 1,2,3}{sup ?Z}(x,Q{sup 2}). At present there is no data for these structure functions and they must be modeled by modifying existing fits to electromagnetic data. Each group that has studied the ?Z-box used different modifications. The results of the PVDIS experiment at Jefferson Lab may provide a first test of the validity of each group's models. I present details of the different models and their predictions for the PVDIS result.

  6. Model Comparison: A Key Challenge for Transformation Testing and Version Control in Model Driven Software Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey G.

    Model Comparison: A Key Challenge for Transformation Testing and Version Control in Model Driven practices associated with model transformation testing and version control of models. 1. Introduction target model). #12;· Version Control Tools do not Match the Structural Nature of Models An essential

  7. RELIABILITY COMPARISON MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES (OWT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Joseph B.

    RELIABILITY COMPARISON MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES (OWT) Yizhou Lu, T. M. Delorm, A. Christou of survivor functions R(t) of drive-trains, after 1 year of operation, between Offshore Wind Turbine (OWT) vs of the reliability of these 5 Types Surrogate failure rate data Onshore wind turbines (OT) 1-1.5MW CONCLUSIONS

  8. Comparison Between Synchronous and Asynchronous Implementation of Parallel Genetic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    the processing time by using a coarse-grained model for parallelization and an asyn- chronous migration. The problem chosen to examine the parallel GP is a mobile robot navigation problem. The experimental results environments that were different from the original one. As a result, the substantial pro- cessing time

  9. Simple SPICE model for comparison of CMOS output driver circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hermann, John Karl

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to monitor the ground nodes of output driver circuits for noise. Both relative performance and noise levels are generated through the simulations. A test device was built to confirm that the model was effective in speed and noise comparisons. Values were... on CMOS technologies. Journal model is IEEE 'I?ansactions on Automatic Control. A. Literature Survey Research has been done in the past concerning noise generated by digital logic de- vices. In particular, Advanced CMOS Logic (ACL) integrated circuits...

  10. MicroShield/ISOCS gamma modeling comparison.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sansone, Kenneth R

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative radiological analysis attempts to determine the quantity of activity or concentration of specific radionuclide(s) in a sample. Based upon the certified standards that are used to calibrate gamma spectral detectors, geometric similarities between sample shape and the calibration standards determine if the analysis results developed are qualitative or quantitative. A sample analyzed that does not mimic a calibrated sample geometry must be reported as a non-standard geometry and thus the results are considered qualitative and not quantitative. MicroShieldR or ISOCSR calibration software can be used to model non-standard geometric sample shapes in an effort to obtain a quantitative analytical result. MicroShieldR and Canberra's ISOCSR software contain several geometry templates that can provide accurate quantitative modeling for a variety of sample configurations. Included in the software are computational algorithms that are used to develop and calculate energy efficiency values for the modeled sample geometry which can then be used with conventional analysis methodology to calculate the result. The response of the analytical method and the sensitivity of the mechanical and electronic equipment to the radionuclide of interest must be calibrated, or standardized, using a calibrated radiological source that contains a known and certified amount of activity.

  11. Comparison of Hyperelastic Models for Granular Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul W. Humrickhouse; J. Phil Sharpe; Michael L. Corradini

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three recently proposed hyperelastic models for granular materials are compared with experiment data. Though all three are formulated to give elastic moduli that are power law functions of the mean stress, they have rather different dependencies on individual stresses, and generally differ from well established experimental forms. Predicted static stress distributions are in qualitative agreement with experiments, but do not differ greatly from isotropic linear elasticity, and similarly fail to account for variability in experiment data that presumably occurs due to a preparation dependence of granular materials.

  12. Hot Water Distribution System Program Documentation and Comparison to Experimental Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baskin, Evelyn [GE Infrastructure Energy; Craddick, William G [ORNL; Lenarduzzi, Roberto [ORNL; Wendt, Robert L [ORNL; Woodbury, Professor Keith A. [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003, the California Energy Commission s (CEC s) Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program funded Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to create a computer program to analyze hot water distribution systems for single family residences, and to perform such analyses for a selection of houses. This effort and its results were documented in a report provided to CEC in March, 2004 [1]. The principal objective of effort was to compare the water and energy wasted between various possible hot water distribution systems for various different house designs. It was presumed that water being provided to a user would be considered suitably warm when it reached 105 F. Therefore, what was needed was a tool which could compute the time it takes for water reaching the draw point to reach 105 F, and the energy wasted during this wait. The computer program used to perform the analyses was a combination of a calculational core, produced by Dr. Keith A. Woodbury, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director, Alabama Industrial Assessment Center, University of Alabama, and a user interface based on LabVIEW, created by Dr. Roberto Lenarduzzi of ORNL. At that time, the computer program was in a relatively rough and undocumented form adequate to perform the contracted work but not in a condition where it could be readily used by those not involved in its generation. Subsequently, the CEC provided funding through Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to improve the program s documentation and user interface to facilitate use by others, and to compare the program s results to experimental data generated by Dr. Carl Hiller. This report describes the program and provides user guidance. It also summarizes the comparisons made to experimental data, along with options built into the program specifically to allow these comparisons. These options were necessitated by the fact that some of the experimental data required options and features not originally included in the program. A more detailed description of these program modifications along with detailed comparisons to the experimental data are provided in a report produced by Dr. Woodbury, which accompanies this report as Appendix H.

  13. Strategies for Energy Efficient Resource Management of Hybrid Programming Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Strategies for Energy Efficient Resource Management of Hybrid Programming Models Dong Li Member, with the accelerating adoption of hybrid programming models, we increasingly need improved energy efficiency in hybrid hybrid programming models that use both message-passing and shared- memory, due to the increasing

  14. Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing: Future Programming Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Guang, R.

    2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the pmodel center project is to develop software technology to support scalable parallel programming models for terascale systems. The goal of the specific UD subproject is in the context developing an efficient and robust methodology and tools for HPC programming. More specifically, the focus is on developing new programming models which facilitate programmers in porting their application onto parallel high performance computing systems. During the course of the research in the past 5 years, the landscape of microprocessor chip architecture has witnessed a fundamental change – the emergence of multi-core/many-core chip architecture appear to become the mainstream technology and will have a major impact to for future generation parallel machines. The programming model for shared-address space machines is becoming critical to such multi-core architectures. Our research highlight is the in-depth study of proposed fine-grain parallelism/multithreading support on such future generation multi-core architectures. Our research has demonstrated the significant impact such fine-grain multithreading model can have on the productivity of parallel programming models and their efficient implementation.

  15. 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Program Peer Review Presentations...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Modeling Research Program leverages scientific research in mathematics for application to power system models and software tools. 17 projects were presented at the 2014 Advanced...

  16. Alternatives to traditional model comparison strategies for covariance structure models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preacher, K. J.; Cai, Li; MacCallum, R. C.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    involving an extension of recently introduced methods to nested model scenarios. Following our discussion of power, we further explore the potential value of adopting a model selection approach that avoids hypoth- a105 ?Chapter3?Preacher? ? 2007/2/12 ? 15... is literally true, there is an obvious logical problem in testing the null hypothesis that a model fits data perfectly in the population. Yet, this is precisely the hypothesis tested by the popular LR test of model a105 ?Chapter3?Preacher? ? 2007/2/12 ? 15...

  17. A comparison of water vapor quantities from model short-range forecasts and ARM observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hnilo, J J

    2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Model evolution and improvement is complicated by the lack of high quality observational data. To address a major limitation of these measurements the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program was formed. For the second quarter ARM metric we will make use of new water vapor data that has become available, and called the 'Merged-sounding' value added product (referred to as OBS, within the text) at three sites: the North Slope of Alaska (NSA), Darwin Australia (DAR) and the Southern Great Plains (SGP) and compare these observations to model forecast data. Two time periods will be analyzed March 2000 for the SGP and October 2004 for both DAR and NSA. The merged-sounding data have been interpolated to 37 pressure levels (e.g., from 1000hPa to 100hPa at 25hPa increments) and time averaged to 3 hourly data for direct comparison to our model output.

  18. Temporal Logics for Concurrent Recursive Programs: Satisfiability and Model Checking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bollig, Benedikt

    Temporal Logics for Concurrent Recursive Programs: Satisfiability and Model Checking Benedikt,cyriac,gastin,zeitoun}@lsv.ens-cachan.fr Abstract. We develop a general framework for the design of temporal logics for concurrent recursive programs. A program execution is modeled as a partial order with multiple nesting relations. To specify

  19. Melt coolability modeling and comparison to MACE test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An important question in the assessment of severe accidents in light water nuclear reactors is the ability of water to quench a molten corium-concrete interaction and thereby terminate the accident progression. As part of the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiment (MACE) Program, phenomenological models of the corium quenching process are under development. The modeling approach considers both bulk cooldown and crust-limited heat transfer regimes, as well as criteria for the pool thermal hydraulic conditions which separate the two regimes. The model is then compared with results of the MACE experiments.

  20. Melt coolability modeling and comparison to MACE test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An important question in the assessment of severe accidents in light water nuclear reactors is the ability of water to quench a molten corium-concrete interaction and thereby terminate the accident progression. As part of the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiment (MACE) Program, phenomenological models of the corium quenching process are under development. The modeling approach considers both bulk cooldown and crust-limited heat transfer regimes, as well as criteria for the pool thermal hydraulic conditions which separate the two regimes. The model is then compared with results of the MACE experiments.

  1. COMPARISON OF RF CAVITY TRANSPORT MODELS FOR BBU SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilkyoung Shin,Byung Yunn,Todd Satogata,Shahid Ahmed

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transverse focusing effect in RF cavities plays a considerable role in beam dynamics for low-energy beamline sections and can contribute to beam breakup (BBU) instability. The purpose of this analysis is to examine RF cavity models in simulation codes which will be used for BBU experiments at Jefferson Lab and improve BBU simulation results. We review two RF cavity models in the simulation codes elegant and TDBBU (a BBU simulation code developed at Jefferson Lab). elegant can include the Rosenzweig-Serafini (R-S) model for the RF focusing effect. Whereas TDBBU uses a model from the code TRANSPORT which considers the adiabatic damping effect, but not the RF focusing effect. Quantitative comparisons are discussed for the CEBAF beamline. We also compare the R-S model with the results from numerical simulations for a CEBAF-type 5-cell superconducting cavity to validate the use of the R-S model as an improved low-energy RF cavity transport model in TDBBU. We have implemented the R-S model in TDBBU. It will improve BBU simulation results to be more matched with analytic calculations and experimental results.

  2. Human factors engineering program review model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is performing nuclear power plant design certification reviews based on a design process plan that describes the human factors engineering (HFE) program elements that are necessary and sufficient to develop an acceptable detailed design specification and an acceptable implemented design. There are two principal reasons for this approach. First, the initial design certification applications submitted for staff review did not include detailed design information. Second, since human performance literature and industry experiences have shown that many significant human factors issues arise early in the design process, review of the design process activities and results is important to the evaluation of an overall design. However, current regulations and guidance documents do not address the criteria for design process review. Therefore, the HFE Program Review Model (HFE PRM) was developed as a basis for performing design certification reviews that include design process evaluations as well as review of the final design. A central tenet of the HFE PRM is that the HFE aspects of the plant should be developed, designed, and evaluated on the basis of a structured top-down system analysis using accepted HFE principles. The HFE PRM consists of ten component elements. Each element in divided into four sections: Background, Objective, Applicant Submittals, and Review Criteria. This report describes the development of the HFE PRM and gives a detailed description of each HFE review element.

  3. The Brasfield Hydroelectric Project: A model-prototype comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gulliver, J.S.; Voigt, R.L. Jr.; Hibbs, D.E. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations made during start-up and operation of the 3 MW Brasfield Hydroelectric Project provide an excellent means of comparing physical model results with the prototype installation. During start-up, the turbine generator unit was operated without the surface vortex suppression grid in place to allow engineers to observe vortex formation without, and later with, the grid. The model performance is reproduced in the prototype with regard to surface vortices. Field data has also been obtained at 0.7 in depth increments to provide dissolved oxygen (D.O.) concentrations profiles in the reservoir and in the nearfield zone surrounding the intake. Parallel D.O. measurements at the powerhouse outlet and 1.6 km downstream of the outlet provide a good means of determining the average depth of water column from which the water was removed. Measurements of model velocities, scaled to the prototype, multiplied times the field measurements of dissolved oxygen (D.O.) concentration and water temperature provide a model-predicted downstream D.O. concentration that also compares well to that measured in the prototype. This paper provides support for an unconventional design technique which may be applicable to many other sites facing similar environmental constraints. The model-prototype comparison also provides a strong verification of the combined use of both physical and mathematical models to solve such a design problem.

  4. PySP: Modeling and Solving Stochastic Programs in Python

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 6, 2010 ... Noname manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor). PySP: Modeling and Solving Stochastic Programs in. Python. Jean-Paul Watson · David ...

  5. The dc modeling program (DCMP): Version 2. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, D.G. (Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, MB (Canada))

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project one of the main objectives was the refinement of tools for the study of HVDC systems. The original software was prepared in project RP1964-2 (EL-4365) as power flow and stability program models for HVDC systems. In this project new modeling capabilities were added to both the power flow and stability models. Additionally, the HVDC specific model capabilities were integrated into a new program, termed the Standalone program, for use in the development and testing of HVDC models. This manual provides technical background for programmers and those interested in understanding, augmenting or transporting the dc models.

  6. Retrievals of Carbon Dioxide from GOSAT: Validation, model comparison and approach development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Retrievals of Carbon Dioxide from GOSAT: Validation, model comparison and approach development properties of aerosol and cirrus particles. 3. Model Comparison Retrievals of XCO2 were performed on cloud and compared to the CarbonTracker model. The retrieval averaging kernels were applied to Carbon

  7. Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Dandan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. Judkoff, R. ,room and calculation of air conditioning load. ASHRAE Trans,Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta, GA.

  8. Deadlock Detection in Basic Models of MPI Synchronization Communication Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Ming-xue

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model of MPI synchronization communication programs is presented and its three basic simplified models are also defined. A series of theorems and methods for deciding whether deadlocks will occur among the three models are given and proved strictly. These theories and methods for simple models' deadlock detection are the necessary base for real MPI program deadlock detection. The methods are based on a static analysis through programs and with runtime detection in necessary cases and they are able to determine before compiling whether it will be deadlocked for two of the three basic models. For another model, some deadlock cases can be found before compiling and others at runtime. Our theorems can be used to prove the correctness of currently popular MPI program deadlock detection algorithms. Our methods may decrease codes that those algorithms need to change to MPI source or profiling interface and may detects deadlocks ahead of program execution, thus the overheads can be reduced greatly.

  9. The dc modeling program (DCMP): Version 2. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, D.G. (Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, MB (Canada))

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project one of the main objectives was the refinement of tools for the study of HVDC systems. The original software was prepared in project RP1964-2 (EL-4365) as power flow and stability program models for HVDC systems. In this project new modeling capabilities were added to both the power flow and stability models. Additionally, the HVDC specific model capabilities were integrated into a new program, termed the Standalone program, for use in the development and testing of HVDC models.

  10. The dc modeling program (DCMP): Version 2. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, D.G. (Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, MB (Canada))

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project one of the main objectives was the refinement of tools for the study of HVDC systems. The original software was prepared in project RP1964-2 (EL-4365) as power flow and stability program models for HVDC systems. In this project new modeling capabilities were added to both the power flow and stability models. Additionally, the HVDC specific model capabilities were integrated into a new program, termed the Standalone program, for use in the development and testing of HVDC models. This volume provides information on the application of the software in the form of a User's Manual.

  11. Web Cube: a Programming Model for Reliable Web Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Web Cube: a Programming Model for Reliable Web Applications I.S.W.B. Prasetya, T.E.J. Vos, S UU-CS-2005-002 www.cs.uu.nl #12;Web Cube: a Programming Model for Reliable Web Applications I@cs.uu.nl, tanja@iti.upv.es, doaitse@cs.uu.nl, bela@cs.ui.ac.id Abstract Web Cube is a server side programming

  12. A Class-Object Model for Program Transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiba, Shigeru

    class-object model makes power- ful transformations not only of the compiler experts but alsoA Class-Object Model for Program Transformations Doctoral Program in Engineering University. The technology that enables the reuse of larger software components have become available with the emergence

  13. Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Huang, Yu (Joe) [White Box Technologies; Levinson, Ronnen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the United States Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs modern web technologies, usability design, and national average defaults as an interface to annual simulations of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim in order to provide estimated annual energy and cost savings. In addition to cool reflective roofs, RSC simulates multiple roof and attic configurations including different roof slopes, above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers, low-emittance roof surfaces, duct location, duct leakage rates, multiple substrate types, and insulation levels. A base case and energy-efficient alternative can be compared side-by-side to estimate monthly energy. RSC was benchmarked against field data from demonstration homes in Ft. Irwin, California; while cooling savings were similar, heating penalty varied significantly across different simulation engines. RSC results reduce cool roofing cost-effectiveness thus mitigating expected economic incentives for this countermeasure to the urban heat island effect. This paper consolidates comparison of RSC s projected energy savings to other simulation engines including DOE-2.1E, AtticSim, Micropas, and EnergyPlus, and presents preliminary analyses. RSC s algorithms for capturing radiant heat transfer and duct interaction in the attic assembly are considered major contributing factors to increased cooling savings and heating penalties. Comparison to previous simulation-based studies, analysis on the force multiplier of RSC cooling savings and heating penalties, the role of radiative heat exchange in an attic assembly, and changes made for increased accuracy of the duct model are included.

  14. Hydraulic Habitat Model Comparison_12_03_09 Desiree Tullos and Beth Copeland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Hydraulic Habitat Model Comparison_12_03_09 Desiree Tullos and Beth Copeland Review of Hydraulic;Hydraulic Habitat Model Comparison_12_03_09 Desiree Tullos and Beth Copeland Name PHABSIM Spatial scale and Observations on Flow Determination in New Zealand Regulated Streams: Advances in Ecology. Plenum Press, New

  15. Comparison of low-level waste disposal programs of DOE and selected international countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meagher, B.G. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cole, L.T. [Cole and Associates (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to examine and compare the approaches and practices of selected countries for disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) with those of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The report addresses the programs for disposing of wastes into engineered LLW disposal facilities and is not intended to address in-situ options and practices associated with environmental restoration activities or the management of mill tailings and mixed LLW. The countries chosen for comparison are France, Sweden, Canada, and the United Kingdom. The countries were selected as typical examples of the LLW programs which have evolved under differing technical constraints, regulatory requirements, and political/social systems. France was the first country to demonstrate use of engineered structure-type disposal facilities. The UK has been actively disposing of LLW since 1959. Sweden has been disposing of LLW since 1983 in an intermediate-depth disposal facility rather than a near-surface disposal facility. To date, Canada has been storing its LLW but will soon begin operation of Canada`s first demonstration LLW disposal facility.

  16. A MODEL FOR THE DESIGN AND PROGRAMMING OF MULTICORES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesshope, Chris

    A MODEL FOR THE DESIGN AND PROGRAMMING OF MULTICORES Microgrid of reconfigurable microthreaded control 12 Summary of the model 15 /. SVP memory model 16 Shared memory 17 Synchronising memory 17 0 model provides a foundation for significant advances i8 both computer architecture as we7 as operating

  17. A taxonomy for simulation modeling based on programming language principles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukherjee, Amlan

    A taxonomy for simulation modeling based on programming language principles PAUL A. FISHWICK many diverse areas employ simulation models, no agreed-upon taxonomy has been developed to categorize than the design structure of the model. We present a uniform model design taxonomy whose categories

  18. Development and Implementation of a Program Management Maturity Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartwig, Laura; Smith, Matt

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2006, Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) announced an updatedvision statement for the organization. The vision is “To be the most admired team within the NNSA [National Nuclear Security Administration] for our relentless drive to convert ideas into the highest quality products and services for National Security by applying the right technology, outstanding program management and best commercial practices.” The challenge to provide outstanding program management was taken up by the Program Management division and the Program Integration Office (PIO) of the company. This article describes how Honeywell developed and deployed a program management maturity model to drive toward excellence.

  19. Models of quantum computation and quantum programming languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Miszczak

    2011-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the presented paper is to provide an introduction to the basic computational models used in quantum information theory. We review various models of quantum Turing machine, quantum circuits and quantum random access machine (QRAM) along with their classical counterparts. We also provide an introduction to quantum programming languages, which are developed using the QRAM model. We review the syntax of several existing quantum programming languages and discuss their features and limitations.

  20. Causes of variation in soil carbon simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and benchmarks in Earth system models sitivity of the Amazonand benchmarks in Earth system models Thornton, P. E. ,simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison

  1. Comparison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov1CompactComparison of ion

  2. Equipment Energy Models Using Spreadsheet Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J. S.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the problems of documentation, modification, verification, and validation that plague conventional programming approaches. Specific examples of heat pump and cogeneration power system analysis, steam properties interpolation, boiler and combustion efficiency...

  3. Modelling of the Current Profile Control with Neutral Beam Injection at ASDEX Upgrade and Comparison to JET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modelling of the Current Profile Control with Neutral Beam Injection at ASDEX Upgrade and Comparison to JET

  4. Power Handling of the Bulk Tungsten Divertor Row at JET: First Measurements and Comparison to the GTM Thermal Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Handling of the Bulk Tungsten Divertor Row at JET: First Measurements and Comparison to the GTM Thermal Model

  5. Transport Analysis of Trace Tritium Experiments on JET using TRANSP Code and Comparison with Theory-Based Transport Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transport Analysis of Trace Tritium Experiments on JET using TRANSP Code and Comparison with Theory-Based Transport Models

  6. Applying stochastic programming models in financial risk management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Xi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research studies two modelling techniques that help seek optimal strategies in financial risk management. Both are based on the stochastic programming methodology. The first technique is concerned with market risk ...

  7. EPRI PEAC Corp.: Certification Model Program and Interconnection Agreement Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarizes the work of EPRI PEAC Corp., under contract to DOE's Distribution and Interconnection R&D, to develop a certification model program and interconnection agreement tools to support the interconnection of distributed energy resources.

  8. Optimization Modeling and Programming in Xpress-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    the business problem in the Mosel algebraic modeling language · Ex: Capital Budgeting · Set of projects resources · Select set of projects to maximize return #12;Developing an optimization model Building Block 1-user · protects intellectual property · platform independent · efficient #12;More Mosel Features · Modeling

  9. Photovoltaic subsystem marketing and distribution model: programming manual. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complete documentation of the marketing and distribution (M and D) computer model is provided. The purpose is to estimate the costs of selling and transporting photovoltaic solar energy products from the manufacturer to the final customer. The model adjusts for the inflation and regional differences in marketing and distribution costs. The model consists of three major components: the marketing submodel, the distribution submodel, and the financial submodel. The computer program is explained including the input requirements, output reports, subprograms and operating environment. The program specifications discuss maintaining the validity of the data and potential improvements. An example for a photovoltaic concentrator collector demonstrates the application of the model.

  10. ENERGY INVESTMENTS UNDER CLIMATE POLICY: A COMPARISON OF GLOBAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCollum, David; Nagai, Yu; Riahi, Keywan; Marangoni, Giacomo; Calvin, Katherine V.; Pietzcker, Robert; Van Vliet, Jasper; van der Zwaan, Bob

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The levels of investment needed to mobilize an energy system transformation and mitigate climate change are not known with certainty. This paper aims to inform the ongoing dialogue and in so doing to guide public policy and strategic corporate decision making. Within the framework of the LIMITS integrated assessment model comparison exercise, we analyze a multi-IAM ensemble of long-term energy and greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. Our study provides insight into several critical but uncertain areas related to the future investment environment, for example in terms of where capital expenditures may need to flow regionally, into which sectors they might be concentrated, and what policies could be helpful in spurring these financial resources. We find that stringent climate policies consistent with a 2°C climate change target would require a considerable upscaling of investments into low-carbon energy and energy efficiency, reaching approximately $45 trillion (range: $30–$75 trillion) cumulative between 2010 and 2050, or about $1.1 trillion annually. This represents an increase of some $30 trillion ($10–$55 trillion), or $0.8 trillion per year, beyond what investments might otherwise be in a reference scenario that assumes the continuation of present and planned emissions-reducing policies throughout the world. In other words, a substantial "clean-energy investment gap" of some $800 billion/yr exists — notably on the same order of magnitude as present-day subsidies for fossil energy and electricity worldwide ($523 billion). Unless the gap is filled rather quickly, the 2°C target could potentially become out of reach.

  11. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Uses lessons learned from Better Buildings grantees, existing data, and private sector insights to highlight business models that can help develop a sustainable residential energy efficiency market.

  12. Comparison of the ATP version of the EMTP and the NETOMAC program for simulation of HVdc systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehn, P.; Rittiger, J. [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany)] [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany); Kulicke, B. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany)] [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the capabilities and limitations of the EMTP and NETOMAC program as applied to HVdc system simulation. The fundamental differences between the two programs and their effect on simulation results are described. Consistency of the results obtained from these programs is examined through simulation of a test HVdc network. As expected, a very high degree of agreement between the two sets of simulation results proved to be achievable, but only when particular care was taken to overcome internal program differences. Finally, the new advanced stability feature of NETOMAC is briefly discussed and then tested against the complex transient models established in the EMTP and in the NETOMAC transients program section.

  13. Psychophysiological Reactivity to Self and Model Images in an Upward Social Comparison Manipulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamez, Jeannine

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The current study examined affective reactivity to oneself in an upward socialcomparison manipulation using autonomic physiological responses. Study I was conducted to select images of thin and average size models used to elicit a social comparison...

  14. Social comparison test using women's subjective and physiological reactivity to thin and average size models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamez, Jeannine Paola

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The current study examined the subjective and physiological reactivity to body image stimuli among females engaging in a social comparison task. Study I was conducted to select images of thin and average size models and neutral objects for Study...

  15. Second Level Cluster Dependencies: A Comparison of Modeling Software and Missing Data Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larsen, Ross Allen Andrew

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    SECOND LEVEL CLUSTER DEPENDENCIES: A COMPARISON OF MODELING SOFTWARE AND MISSING DATA TECHNIQUES A Dissertation by ROSS ALLEN ANDREW LARSEN Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2010 Major Subject: Educational Psychology SECOND LEVEL CLUSTER DEPENDENCIES: A COMPARISON OF MODELING SOFTWARE AND MISSING DATA TECHNIQUES A Dissertation by ROSS ALLEN ANDREW LARSEN Submitted...

  16. Comparison of a Recurrent Neural Network PV System Model with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeled performance from the RNN were compared to measured performance data. The Sandia Photovoltaic Array Performance Model (SAPM) and Grid Connected Photovoltaic Inverter model...

  17. Solving seismological problems using sgraph program: II-waveform modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdelwahed, Mohamed F. [Geological Hazards Research Unit, King Abdulaziz University (Saudi Arabia) and National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics (NRIAG), Helwan (Egypt)

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the seismological programs to manipulate seismic data is SGRAPH program. It consists of integrated tools to perform advanced seismological techniques. SGRAPH is considered a new system for maintaining and analyze seismic waveform data in a stand-alone Windows-based application that manipulate a wide range of data formats. SGRAPH was described in detail in the first part of this paper. In this part, I discuss the advanced techniques including in the program and its applications in seismology. Because of the numerous tools included in the program, only SGRAPH is sufficient to perform the basic waveform analysis and to solve advanced seismological problems. In the first part of this paper, the application of the source parameters estimation and hypocentral location was given. Here, I discuss SGRAPH waveform modeling tools. This paper exhibits examples of how to apply the SGRAPH tools to perform waveform modeling for estimating the focal mechanism and crustal structure of local earthquakes.

  18. Evaluation of Transport and Dispersion Models: A Controlled Comparison of HPAC and NARAC Predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, S; Heagy, J F; Platt, N; Larson, D; Sugiyama, G; Nasstrom, J S; Foster, K T; Bradley, S; Bieberbach, G

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During fiscal year 2000, a series of studies in support of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) was begun. The goal of these studies is to improve the verification, validation, and accreditation (VV&A) of hazard prediction and assessment models and capabilities. These studies are part of a larger joint VV&A collaborative effort that DTRA and the Department of Energy (DOE), via the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), are conducting. This joint effort includes comparisons of the LLNL and DTRA transport and dispersion (T&D) modeling systems, NARAC and HPAC, respectively. The purpose of this work is to compare, in a systematic way, HPAC and NARAC model predictions for a set of controlled hypothetical release scenarios. Only ''model-versus-model'' comparisons are addressed in this work. Model-to-field trial comparisons for HPAC and NARAC have been addressed in a recent companion study, in support of the same joint VV&A effort.

  19. A Comparison Between Model Reduction and Controller Reduction: Application to a PWR Nuclear Planty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gevers, Michel

    A Comparison Between Model Reduction and Controller Reduction: Application to a PWR Nuclear Planty model reduction with controller reduction for the same PWR system. We show that closed-loop techniques to the design of a low-order con- troller for a realistic model of order 42 of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR

  20. Integer programming models for the branchwidth problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulusal, Elif

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    and undirected graphs and presented a randomized algorithm for the element disjoint STPP. In 2007, Lau presented a polynomial time constant factor approximation algorithm for the edge-disjoint STPP. The minimum multicast congestion problem is a generalization... tree packing problem. The third formulation is based on the notion of laminar separations. We utilize upper and lower bounds obtained by heuristic algorithms, reduction techniques and cutting planes to increase the efficiency of our models. We use all...

  1. A model technology transfer program for independent operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoeling, L.G.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In August 1992, the Energy Research Center (ERC) at the University of Kansas was awarded a contract by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a technology transfer regional model. This report describes the development and testing of the Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM) which is to be utilized as a regional model for the development of other technology transfer programs for independent operators throughout oil-producing regions in the US. It describes the linkage of the regional model with a proposed national technology transfer plan, an evaluation technique for improving and assessing the model, and the methodology which makes it adaptable on a regional basis. The report also describes management concepts helpful in managing a technology transfer program.

  2. Transforming PLC Programs into Formal Models for Verification Purposes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darvas, D; Blanco, E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of CERN’s industrial installations rely on PLC-based (Programmable Logic Controller) control systems developed using the UNICOS framework. This framework contains common, reusable program modules and their correctness is a high priority. Testing is already applied to find errors, but this method has limitations. In this work an approach is proposed to transform automatically PLC programs into formal models, with the goal of applying formal verification to ensure their correctness. We target model checking which is a precise, mathematical-based method to check formalized requirements automatically against the system.

  3. A comparison of option prices under different pricing measures in a stochastic volatility model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howison, Sam

    A comparison of option prices under different pricing measures in a stochastic volatility model with correlation Vicky Henderson Princeton University David Hobson § University of Bath Sam Howison ¶ University option prices in an incomplete stochastic volatility model with correlation. In a general setting, we

  4. Comparison of model estimates of the effects of aviation emissions on atmospheric ozone and methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Mark

    Comparison of model estimates of the effects of aviation emissions on atmospheric ozone and methane is the effects of aviation emissions on ozone and atmospheric chemistry. In this study the effects of aviation emissions on atmospheric ozone for 2006 and two projections for 2050 are compared among seven models

  5. Modeling of Plate-Like Precipitates in Aluminum Alloys--Comparison between Phase Field and Cellular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    Modeling of Plate-Like Precipitates in Aluminum Alloys--Comparison between Phase Field and Cellular artificial ageing of aluminum alloys: the phase field and the cellular automaton methods. Although both and computationally effective for the application of precipitation modeling. Keywords Aluminum alloys, Cellular

  6. COMPARISON OF NETWORK-BASED MODELS FOR RUBBER ANTOINE GLORIA, PATRICK LE TALLEC, AND MARINA VIDRASCU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    COMPARISON OF NETWORK-BASED MODELS FOR RUBBER ANTOINE GLORIA, PATRICK LE TALLEC, AND MARINA been proposed to describe rubber elasticity. Recently, Alicandro, Cicalese, and the first author have rigorously derived a continuum theory of rubber elasticity from a discrete model by variational convergence

  7. A Comparison of the AC and DC Power Flow Models for LMP Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Comparison of the AC and DC Power Flow Models for LMP Calculations Thomas J. Overbye, Xu Cheng power flow model for LMP-based market calculations. The paper first provides a general discussion of balanced, three phase, electric power transmission networks is through the solution of the power flow. From

  8. Incident and in situ irradiance in Lakes Cadagno and Lucerne: A comparison of methods and models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommaruga, Ruben

    Incident and in situ irradiance in Lakes Cadagno and Lucerne: A comparison of methods and models Key words: Lake Lucerne, Lake Cadagno, PAR, UV-A, UV-B, irradiance regime, radiative transfer models) at the field stations Kastanienbaum at Lake Lucerne (434 m a.s.l.) and Piora at Lake Cadagno (1923 m a

  9. Numerical comparison between relaxation and nonlinear equilibrium models. Application to chemical engineering.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    d'Orléans, Université

    processes widely used in chemical engineering: distillation and chromatography. Distillation is a wellNumerical comparison between relaxation and nonlinear equilibrium models. Application to chemical engineering. F. James 1 M. Postel 2 M. Sep'ulveda 3 Abstract A model to take into account the finite exchange

  10. The International Urban Energy Balance Models Comparison Project: First Results from Phase 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    The International Urban Energy Balance Models Comparison Project: First Results from Phase 1 C. S and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece h University of Lo´ dz´, Lo´ dz´, Poland i Royal) ABSTRACT A large number of urban surface energy balance models now exist with different assumptions about

  11. Use of a lidar forward model for global comparisons of cloud fraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    555 Use of a lidar forward model for global comparisons of cloud fraction between the ICESat lidar in extinction-to-backscatter ratio and effective radius affect the forward modeled mean cloud fraction by no more than 10%. 1. Introduction Clouds play a major role in the Earth's radiation budget and predictions

  12. Integer linear programming models for a cement delivery problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hertz, Alain

    Integer linear programming models for a cement delivery problem Alain Hertz D´epartement de math.uldry@unifr.ch and marino.widmer@unifr.ch April 4, 2011 Abstract We consider a cement delivery problem with an heterogeneous in [14], [15] and [16] and are reviewed in [4]. In this paper, we study a cement delivery problem which

  13. Approximate Dynamic Programming for Networks: Fluid Models and Constraint Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veatch, Michael H.

    of approximating functions for the differential cost. The first contribution of this paper is identifying new or piece-wise quadratic. Fluid cost has been used to initialize the value iteration algorithm [5Approximate Dynamic Programming for Networks: Fluid Models and Constraint Reduction Michael H

  14. Artificial Neural Network Model for fMRI timeseries and a Framework for Comparison of Convolution Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Finn Årup

    Artificial Neural Network Model for fMRI timeseries and a Framework for Comparison of Convolution of the hemodynamic response was proposed in [5]. Here we propose an artificial neural network (ANN) model. Method The specific neural network we will use is a two­layer feed­forward type. Parameters are optimized

  15. final report for Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Ralph E

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of the work on parallel programming patterns that was part of the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing

  16. Using true concurrency to model execution of parallel programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Asher, Y.; Farchi, E.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parallel execution of a program R (intuitively regarded as a partial order) is usually modeled by sequentially executing one of the total orders (interleavings) into which it can be embedded. Our work deviates from this serialization principle by using true concurrency to model parallel execution. True concurrency is represented via completions of R to semi total orders, called time diagrams. These orders are characterized via a set of conditions (denoted by Ct), yielding orders of time diagrams which preserve some degree of the intended parallelism in R. Another way to express semi total orders is to use re-writing or derivation rules (denoted by Cx) which for any program R generates a set of semi-total orders. This paper includes a classification of parallel execution into three classes according to three different types of Ct conditions. For each class a suitable Cx is found and a proof of equivalence between the set of all time diagrams satisfying Ct and the set of all terminal Cx derivations of R is devised. This equivalence between time diagram conditions and derivation rules is used to define a novel notion of correctness for parallel programs. This notion is demonstrated by showing that a specific asynchronous program enforces synchronous execution, which always halts, showing that true concurrency can be useful in the context of parallel program verification.

  17. Energy efficiency and the cost of GHG abatement: A comparison of bottom-up and hybrid models for the US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy efficiency and the cost of GHG abatement: A comparison of bottom-up and hybrid models energy­economy models. Using the CIMS hybrid model, we conducted simulations for comparison with the Mc February 2011 Accepted 16 August 2011 Available online 17 September 2011 Keywords: Energy efficiency

  18. Statistics for the Evaluation and Comparison of Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willmott, Cort J.; Ackleson, Steven G.; Davis, Robert E.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Klink, Katherine M.; Legates, David R.; O'Donnell, James; Rowe, Clinton M.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    per- formance, has received relatively little attention in the geo- physical literature. The problem is magnified by a lack of agreement among scientists regarding the most suitable mea- sures and procedures for determining (1) model accuracy, i....e., the extent to which model-predicted events approach a corre- sponding set of independently obtained, reliable observations (usually measured), and precision, i.e., the degree to which model-predicted values approach a linear function of the reli- able...

  19. Comparison of Real World Energy Consumption to Models and DOE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    energy performance of appliances and equipment as it compares with models and test procedures. The study looked to determine whether DOE and industry test procedures...

  20. A comparison of Mexico's Border Industry Program with the Border Industry Program of South Africa and its Bantu homelands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Notzon, Brian Anthony

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to permit develop- ment of interior areas. The p1ants assemble products from compo- nents manufactured in the United States, and under U. S. Tariff Items 806. 30 and 807. 00, the finished products may be exported to the United States subJect to duties... the Programs And Increasing Their Effectiveness 97 Additional Comments on Racial Policies and. Decentralization Efforts in South Africa 109 Concluding Remarks 113 APPENDIX: UNITED STATES TARIFF PROVISIONS 122 LIST OF TABLES TABLE I: MINIMUM DAILY WAGES...

  1. Comparison of Selected Model Evaluation Criteria for Maintenance Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Samuel H.

    , Louisville, KY 40292, USA Model-based preventive maintenance relies on creating models that can either loss, and as a whole a sluggish system, the focus has shifted to preventive maintenance. Computerized maintenance systems aid in improving the efficiency of maintenance tasks [28]. The approach of preventive

  2. Comparison between third and second generation ocean wave models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bratos, Steven Martin

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to assess the relative performance of a second generation (2G) model, WISWAVE (Hubertz 1992), and a third generation (3G) model, WAM (WAMDI 1988), in deep water. High-quality wind fields, with detailed spatial...

  3. A Comparison of Three Total Variation Based Texture Extraction Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    Goldfarb b , Stanley Osher c aRice University, Department of Computational and Applied Mathematics, 6100 models for signal/image texture extraction based on total variation minimization: the Meyer [2], the Vese using 1D oscillating signals and 2D images reveal their differences: the Meyer model tends to extract

  4. HotStrength of Ferritic CreepResistant Steels Comparison of Neural Network and Genetic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    recently analysed how the strength of creep­resistant ferritic steels depends on the test­rupture provides a ready method for estimating expensive creep data using ordinary tensile tests [1]. AnotherHot­Strength of Ferritic Creep­Resistant Steels Comparison of Neural Network and Genetic

  5. A Comparison of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic Modeling...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - Better chance to predict emissions CFD model - Most true to flow, mixing, and heat loss processes 5 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy ORNL HCCI engine...

  6. Final Report: Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellor-Crummey, John [William Marsh Rice University] [William Marsh Rice University

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing, Rice University collaborated with project partners in the design, development and deployment of language, compiler, and runtime support for parallel programming models to support application development for the “leadership-class” computer systems at DOE national laboratories. Work over the course of this project has focused on the design, implementation, and evaluation of a second-generation version of Coarray Fortran. Research and development efforts of the project have focused on the CAF 2.0 language, compiler, runtime system, and supporting infrastructure. This has involved working with the teams that provide infrastructure for CAF that we rely on, implementing new language and runtime features, producing an open source compiler that enabled us to evaluate our ideas, and evaluating our design and implementation through the use of benchmarks. The report details the research, development, findings, and conclusions from this work.

  7. Summary of multi-core hardware and programming model investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Suzanne Marie; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Levenhagen, Michael J.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes our investigations into multi-core processors and programming models for parallel scientific applications. The motivation for this study was to better understand the landscape of multi-core hardware, future trends, and the implications on system software for capability supercomputers. The results of this study are being used as input into the design of a new open-source light-weight kernel operating system being targeted at future capability supercomputers made up of multi-core processors. A goal of this effort is to create an agile system that is able to adapt to and efficiently support whatever multi-core hardware and programming models gain acceptance by the community.

  8. 8/30/2001 Parallel Programming -Fall 2001 1 Models of Parallel Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Browne, James C.

    8/30/2001 Parallel Programming - Fall 2001 1 Models of Parallel Computation Philosophy Parallel of parallel programming. #12;8/30/2001 Parallel Programming - Fall 2001 2 Models of Parallel Computation will discuss parallelism from the viewpoint of programming but with connections to other domains. #12;8/30/2001

  9. A model for a national low level waste program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blankenhorn, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A national program for the management of low level waste is essential to the success of environmental clean-up, decontamination and decommissioning, current operations and future missions. The value of a national program is recognized through procedural consistency and a shared set of resources. A national program requires a clear waste definition and an understanding of waste characteristics matched against available and proposed disposal options. A national program requires the development and implementation of standards and procedures for implementing the waste hierarchy, with a specitic emphasis on waste avoidance, minimization and recycling. It requires a common set of objectives for waste characterization based on the disposal facility's waste acceptance criteria, regulatory and license requirements and performance assessments. Finally, a national waste certification program is required to ensure compliance. To facilitate and enhance the national program, a centralized generator services organization, tasked with providing technical services to the generators on behalf of the national program, is necessary. These subject matter experts are the interface between the generating sites and the disposal facility(s). They provide an invaluable service to the generating organizations through their involvement in waste planning prior to waste generation and through championing implementation of the waste hierarchy. Through their interface, national treatment and transportation services are optimized and new business opportunities are identified. This national model is based on extensive experience in the development and on-going management of a national transuranic waste program and management of the national repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The Low Level Program at the Savannah River Site also successfully developed and implemented the waste hierarchy, waste certification and waste generator services concepts presented below. The Savannah River Site services over forty generators and has historically managed over 12,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The results of the waste minimization program at the site resulted in over 900 initiatives, avoiding over 220,000 cubic meters of waste for a life cycle cost savings of $275 million. At the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the low level waste program services over 20 major generators and several hundred smaller generators that produce over 4,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The Los Alamos National Laboratory low level waste program utilizes both on-site and off-site disposal capabilities. Off-site disposal requires the implementation of certification requirements to utilize both federal and commercial options. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is the US Department of Energy's first deep geological repository for the permanent disposal of Transuanic waste. Transuranic waste was generated and retrievably stored at 39 sites across the US. Transuranic waste is defined as waste with a radionuclide concentration equal to or greater than 100 nCi/g consisting of radionuclides with half-lives greater than 20 years and with an atomic mass greater than uranium. Combining the lessons learned from the national transuranic waste program, the successful low level waste program at Savannah River Site and the experience of off-site disposal options at Los Alamos National Laboratory provides the framework and basis for developing a viable national strategy for managing low level waste.

  10. Comparison of Reduced Order Lithium-Ion Battery Models for Control Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    Comparison of Reduced Order Lithium-Ion Battery Models for Control Applications C. Speltino, D. Di Domenico, G. Fiengo and A. Stefanopoulou Abstract-- Lithium-ion batteries are the core of new plug (HEV). In most cases the lithium-ion battery performances play an important role in the vehicle energy

  11. A COMPARISON BETWEEN TWO SIMPLIFIED DYNAMICAL MODELS FOR THE HUMAN GAIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Llanos, Diego R.

    A COMPARISON BETWEEN TWO SIMPLIFIED DYNAMICAL MODELS FOR THE HUMAN GAIT A.Ortega 1 , F.Montoya 1 and J.Finat 2 , MoBiVA Group. 1 ETS Ing. Industrial, Paseo del Cauce, Univ. Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid to a passive approach to maintain the upright position and locomotion with a view to their applications

  12. A COMPARISON BETWEEN CODYRUN AND TRNSYS, SIMULATION MODELS FOR THERMAL BUILDINGS BEHAVIOUR.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A COMPARISON BETWEEN CODYRUN AND TRNSYS, SIMULATION MODELS FOR THERMAL BUILDINGS BEHAVIOUR. F different configurations and were build for different purposes. Simulations have been carried out on two; E.Mail : lucas@iremia.univ-reunion.fr ABSTRACT: Simulation codes of thermal behaviour could

  13. A comparison of various models in predicting ignition delay in single-particle coal combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A comparison of various models in predicting ignition delay in single-particle coal combustion November 2013 Accepted 7 January 2014 Available online xxxx Keywords: Coal Devolatilization Ignition delay a b s t r a c t In this paper, individual coal particle combustion under laminar conditions

  14. header for SPIE use Laboratory Data and Model Comparisons of the Transport of Chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cal, Mark P.

    header for SPIE use Laboratory Data and Model Comparisons of the Transport of Chemical Signatures to examine the breadth of conditions that impact chemical signature transport, from the buried location results from the T2TNT code, specifically developed to evaluate the buried landmine chemical transport

  15. Topology in CP(N-1) models: a critical comparison of different cooling techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Alles; L. Cosmai; M. D'Elia; A. Papa

    1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Various cooling methods, including a recently introduced one which smoothes out only quantum fluctuations larger than a given threshold, are applied to the study of topology in 2d CP(N-1) models. A critical comparison of their properties is performed.

  16. Comparison of Model Prediction With Measurements of Galactic Background Noise at L-Band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    with measurements made with several modern L-band remote sensing radiometers. The comparison validates the model and ocean salinity that are needed for understanding the hydrological cycle, ocean circu- lation, and energy surface salinity, which requires high radiometric accuracy (at L-band the sensitivity to salinity

  17. Comparison of a thermospheric photochemical model with Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) observations of nitric oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Scott

    and of time. There are two principal energy sources that lead to the production of nitric oxideComparison of a thermospheric photochemical model with Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) observations of nitric oxide C. A. Barth Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado

  18. Comparison of Wake Model Simulations with Offshore Wind Turbine Wake Profiles Measured by Sodar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    a ship-mounted sodar at a small offshore wind farm. The experiments were conducted at varying distances Offshore wind farms have increased in size from the first phase of installation with up to 20 turbinesComparison of Wake Model Simulations with Offshore Wind Turbine Wake Profiles Measured by Sodar R

  19. STRUCTURAL DAMAGE CLASSIFICATION COMPARISON USING SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINE AND BAYESIAN MODEL SELECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    STRUCTURAL DAMAGE CLASSIFICATION COMPARISON USING SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINE AND BAYESIAN MODEL, CA, USA 92093-0085 mdtodd@ucsd.edu ABSTRACT Since all damage identification strategies inevitably in the decision-making process of damage detection, classification, and prognosis, which employs training data (or

  20. Experimental comparison of classical pid and model-free control: position control of a shape memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Experimental comparison of classical pid and model-free control: position control of a shape memory://www.ensieta.fr Universit´e europ´eenne de Bretagne, France Abstract Shape memory alloys (sma) are more and more integrated in engineering applications. These materials with their shape memory effect permit to sim- 6 This work

  1. Final Map Draft Comparison Report WIND ENERGY RESOURCE MODELING AND MEASUREMENT PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOLUTIONS, LLC (now AWS Truewind LLC) 255 FULLER ROAD, SUITE 274 ALBANY, NEW YORK Michael Brower PrincipalII Final Map Draft Comparison Report #12;WIND ENERGY RESOURCE MODELING AND MEASUREMENT PROJECT Tel: 978-749-9591 Fax: 978-749-9713 mbrower@awstruewind.com August 10, 2004 #12;2 WIND ENERGY RESOURCE

  2. Comparison of Machine Learning Techniques with Classical Statistical Models in Predicting Health Outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitnitski, Arnold B.

    ,5]. The aim of our report is to compare the performance of sev- eral well known machine learning techniquesComparison of Machine Learning Techniques with Classical Statistical Models in Predicting Health Faculty of Computer Science, Dalhousie University, Canada Abstract Several machine learning techniques

  3. Review and comparison of methods to study the contribution of variables in artificial neural network models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lek, Sovan

    , Greece Abstract Convinced by the predictive quality of artificial neural network (ANN) models in ecology. # 2002 Published by Elsevier Science B.V. Keywords: Artificial neural networks; Backpropagation; NonReview and comparison of methods to study the contribution of variables in artificial neural

  4. Comparison of problem model change mechanisms issued from CSP and TRIZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Comparison of problem model change mechanisms issued from CSP and TRIZ RRoollaanndd DDee GGuuiioo satisfaction problem (CSP), on the other hand. Keywords: over-constrained problems, dialectical methods issued from CSP and TRIZ 2 · a set of evaluation parameters, which represent the objective of the problem

  5. Edinburgh Research Explorer Comparison of models for estimation of long-term exposure to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    -term exposure to air pollution in cohort studies' Atmospheric Environment, vol 62, pp. 530-539., 10.1016/j to Air Pollution in Cohort Studies Beverland, I.J.* Department of Civil Engineering, University.L. and Agius, R.M. (2012) Comparison of models for estimation of long-term exposure to air pollution in cohort

  6. COMPARISON OF SEISMIC RISK ESTIMATES USING DIFFERENT METHODS TO MODEL FRAGILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 COMPARISON OF SEISMIC RISK ESTIMATES USING DIFFERENT METHODS TO MODEL FRAGILITY Pierre Gehl1 , Ariane Ducellier2 , Caterina Negulescu3 , Jaime Abad4 and John Douglas5 Seismic risk evaluations play of decades hundreds of such studies have been conducted. However, the assessment of seismic risk is always

  7. A portfolio analysis of grain options and futures in hedging context with a comparison of Quadratic Programming, MOTAD and Target MOTAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferdinandsen, John

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A PORTFOLIO ANALYSIS OF GRAIN OPTIONS AND FUTURES IN A HEDGING CONTEXT WITH A COMPARISON OF QUADRATIC PROGRAMMING, MOTAD AND TARGET MOTAD A THESIS JOHN FERDINANDSEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8dd University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December, 1988 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics A PORTFOLIO ANALYSIS OF GRAIN OPTIONS AND FUTURES IN A HEDGING CONTEXT WITH A COMPARISON OF QUADRATIC PROGRfaiIING, MOTAD...

  8. Surrogate and reduced-order modeling: a comparison of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peraire, Jaime

    . Second, sam- pling may be complicated by the large dimensionality of the input space--as when the inputs or accelerating evaluations of a stochastic model for the data, and thus are also applicable in a frequentist and multiscale approaches, and stochastic spectral approaches. Second, the dimension of the input space can

  9. Modeling for surge control of centrifugal compresssors: comparison with experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

    con- trol design, of a centrifugal compression system is vali- dated. Compressor surge is an unwanted pressure rise and e¢ciency, and it narrows the operating range of the compressor. Ac- tive surge control is validated. The background for this is the need for a energy based model including the rotational speed

  10. Conversion of three-dimensional graphic building models into input data for building energy calculation program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayek, Raja Fares

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Reliability of the Translator . . DEVELOPMENT OF TRANSLATION PROGRAM Vl Vl1 1X Xl 13 17 17 18 18 18 19 20 CHAPTER The Modelling Pmgram . . Modelling Progratns Criteria for Selection of a Modelling Program Selection of a Modelling Program... APPENDICES . . APPENDIX I ELINK USER'S MANUAL II ELINK TUTORIAL III ADDITIONAL RELIABILITY TESTING RUNS IV ELINK PROGRAM LISTING VITA 60 60 61 64 65 67 69 70 81 91 96 133 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE 1. Sequence of building project phases 2...

  11. 3He Neutron Detector Pressure Effect and Comparison to Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Stromswold, David C.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Reported here are the results of measurements performed to determine the efficiency of 3He filled proportional counters as a function of gas pressure in the SAIC system. Motivation for these measurements was largely to validate the current model of the SAIC system. Those predictions indicated that the neutron detection efficiency plotted as a function of pressure has a simple, logarithmic shape. As for absolute performance, the model results indicated the 3He pressure in the current SAIC system could not be reduced appreciably while meeting the current required level of detection sensitivity. Thus, saving 3He by reducing its pressure was predicted not to be a viable option in the current SAIC system.

  12. Comparison of Blade-Strike Modeling Results with Empirical Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.

    2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is the initial stage of further investigation into the dynamics of injury to fish during passage through a turbine runner. As part of the study, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) estimated the probability of blade strike, and associated injury, as a function of fish length and turbine operating geometry at two adjacent turbines in Powerhouse 1 of Bonneville Dam. Units 5 and 6 had identical intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, and draft tubes, but Unit 6 had a new runner and curved discharge ring to minimize gaps between the runner hub and blades and between the blade tips and discharge ring. We used a mathematical model to predict blade strike associated with two Kaplan turbines and compared results with empirical data from biological tests conducted in 1999 and 2000. Blade-strike models take into consideration the geometry of the turbine blades and discharges as well as fish length, orientation, and distribution along the runner.

  13. The controls on net ecosystem productivity along an Arctic transect: a model comparison with ux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The controls on net ecosystem productivity along an Arctic transect: a model comparison with ¯ux , * J O S E P H P . M C F A D D E N ² and F . S T U A R T C H A P I N I I I ² 2 *The Ecosystems Center ecosystem CO2-exchange data along a transect in northern Alaska. We use an extant process-based model

  14. Cosmological parameter estimation and Bayesian model comparison using VSA data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anze Slosar; Pedro Carreira; Kieran Cleary; Rod D. Davies; Richard J. Davis; Clive Dickinson; Ricardo Genova-Santos; Keith Grainge; Carlos M. Gutierrez; Yaser A. Hafez; Michael P. Hobson; Michael E. Jones; Rudiger Kneissl; Katy Lancaster; Anthony Lasenby; J. P. Leahy; Klaus Maisinger; Phil J. Marshall; Guy G. Pooley; Rafael Rebolo; Jose Alberto Rubino-Martin; Ben Rusholme; Richard D. E. Saunders; Richard Savage; Paul F. Scott; Pedro J. Sosa Molina; Angela C. Taylor; David Titterington; Elizabeth Waldram; Robert A. Watson; Althea Wilkinson

    2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We constrain the basic comological parameters using the first observations by the Very Small Array (VSA) in its extended configuration, together with existing cosmic microwave background data and other cosmological observations. We estimate cosmological parameters for four different models of increasing complexity. In each case, careful consideration is given to implied priors and the Bayesian evidence is calculated in order to perform model selection. We find that the data are most convincingly explained by a simple flat Lambda-CDM cosmology without tensor modes. In this case, combining just the VSA and COBE data sets yields the 68 per cent confidence intervals Omega_b h^2=0.034 (+0.007, -0.007), Omega_dm h^2 = 0.18 (+0.06, -0.04), h=0.72 (+0.15,-0.13), n_s=1.07 (+0.06,-0.06) and sigma_8=1.17 (+0.25, -0.20). The most general model considered includes spatial curvature, tensor modes, massive neutrinos and a parameterised equation of state for the dark energy. In this case, by combining all recent cosmological data, we find, in particular, 95 percent limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio R < 0.63 and on the fraction of massive neutrinos f_nu < 0.11; we also obtain the 68 per cent confidence interval w=-1.06 (+0.20, -0.25) on the equation of state of dark energy.

  15. Discussion on a Code Comparison Effort for the Geothermal Technologies...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Discussion on a Code Comparison Effort for the Geothermal Technologies Program Discussion on a Code Comparison Effort for the Geothermal Technologies Program Code comparison...

  16. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Utility Program Administrator Business Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following sections focus on the five core components of a utility’s business model, highlighting the critical elements of how utilities function within the market and how other organizations within the market can best collaborate with them.

  17. Susceptibilities in the PNJL model with 8q interactions and comparison with lQCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    João Moreira; Brigitte Hiller; Alexander Osipov; Alex Blin

    2013-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present some results pertaining quantities which are regarded as good indicators of the pseudo-critical temperatures for the deconfinement and partial chiral restoration transitions using a polynomial form for the Polyakov potential part and an extended version of the NJL model which includes 6 and 8 quark interaction terms. Some comparisons with results from the lattice formulation of QCD (lQCD) are performed and results for the location of the critical endoint in the phase diagram are also presented. It is shown that the comparison with lQCD results favors a moderately strong OZI-violating 8 quark interaction term.

  18. Physical Modeling of the Motions of a Container Ship Moored to a Dock with Comparison to Numerical Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi, Yuanzhe

    2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    model experimental results of solid dock are also compared with the numerical simulation. These comparisons indicate that the motion characteristics of the model container ship represent similar trends for both rotations and translations...

  19. Dynamic Code Overlay of SDF-Modeled Programs on Low-end Embedded Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ha, Soonhoi

    Dynamic Code Overlay of SDF-Modeled Programs on Low-end Embedded Systems Hae-woo Park Kyoungjoo Oh of synchronous data-flow (SDF) ­modeled program for low-end embedded systems which lack MMU- support-program code, dynamic loader and linker script files from the given SDF- modeled blocks and schematic, so we

  20. Comparison of Joint Modeling Approaches Including Eulerian Sliding Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomov, I; Antoun, T; Vorobiev, O

    2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate representation of discontinuities such as joints and faults is a key ingredient for high fidelity modeling of shock propagation in geologic media. The following study was done to improve treatment of discontinuities (joints) in the Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN (Lomov and Liu 2005). Lagrangian methods with conforming meshes and explicit inclusion of joints in the geologic model are well suited for such an analysis. Unfortunately, current meshing tools are unable to automatically generate adequate hexahedral meshes for large numbers of irregular polyhedra. Another concern is that joint stiffness in such explicit computations requires significantly reduced time steps, with negative implications for both the efficiency and quality of the numerical solution. An alternative approach is to use non-conforming meshes and embed joint information into regular computational elements. However, once slip displacement on the joints become comparable to the zone size, Lagrangian (even non-conforming) meshes could suffer from tangling and decreased time step problems. The use of non-conforming meshes in an Eulerian solver may alleviate these difficulties and provide a viable numerical approach for modeling the effects of faults on the dynamic response of geologic materials. We studied shock propagation in jointed/faulted media using a Lagrangian and two Eulerian approaches. To investigate the accuracy of this joint treatment the GEODYN calculations have been compared with results from the Lagrangian code GEODYN-L which uses an explicit treatment of joints via common plane contact. We explore two approaches to joint treatment in the code, one for joints with finite thickness and the other for tight joints. In all cases the sliding interfaces are tracked explicitly without homogenization or blending the joint and block response into an average response. In general, rock joints will introduce an increase in normal compliance in addition to a reduction in shear strength. In the present work we consider the limiting case of stiff discontinuities that only affect the shear strength of the material.

  1. Property:Data Comparison to Computational Models | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid Jump to: navigation, searchto Computational Models Jump

  2. SEISMIC DIAGNOSTICS OF RED GIANTS: FIRST COMPARISON WITH STELLAR MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montalban, J.; Miglio, A.; Noels, A.; Scuflaire, R. [Institut d'Astrophysique et Geophysique de l'Universite de Liege, Allee du six Aout, 17 B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Ventura, P. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma-INAF, via Frascati 33, Monteporzio Catone, Rome (Italy)

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The clear detection with CoRoT and KEPLER of radial and non-radial solar-like oscillations in many red giants paves the way for seismic inferences on the structure of such stars. We present an overview of the properties of the adiabatic frequencies and frequency separations of radial and non-radial oscillation modes for an extended grid of models. We highlight how their detection allows a deeper insight into the internal structure and evolutionary state of red giants. In particular, we find that the properties of dipole modes constitute a promising seismic diagnostic tool of the evolutionary state of red giant stars. We compare our theoretical predictions with the first 34 days of KEPLER data and predict the frequency diagram expected for red giants in the CoRoT exofield in the galactic center direction.

  3. Comparison Between TRNSYS Software Simulation and F-Chart Program on Pool Heating System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to test the accuracy of TRNSYS simulation of Solar Pool Heating System by comparing with F-Chart program which is an authoritative tool to analyze solar system and was developed in 1970s. This report is organized...

  4. Comparison Between TRNSYS Software Simulation and F-Chart Program on Pool Heating System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to test the accuracy of TRNSYS simulation of Solar Pool Heating System by comparing with F-Chart program which is an authoritative tool to analyze solar system and was developed in 1970s. This report is organized...

  5. Development of a Modelling and Simulation Method Comparison and Selection Framework for Health Services Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun, Gyuchan T; Morris, Zoe; Eldabi, Tillal; Harper, Paul; Naseer, Aisha; Patel, Brijesh; Clarkson, John P

    2011-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulation, Mathematical Programming/Optimisation Methods, Markov Models, Queuing Theory, Structural Equation Modelling, System Dynamics, Process Mapping, Spatial Mapping, Monte Carlo Simulation, Cognitive Mapping, Soft Systems Methodology 2. Simulation... analysis Table 2 Twenty eight methods identified for the selection tool Categories No. Methods Problem Structuring Methods 1 Drama Theory & Confrontation Analysis 2 Robustness Analysis 3 Soft Systems Methodology 4 Strategic Choice Approach 5 Strategic...

  6. Modeling National Impacts for the Building America Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie M.; McNeil, Michael A.

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present a model to estimate the nationalenergy and economic impacts of the Department of Energy Building Americaprogram. The program goal is to improve energy performance in newresidential construction, by working with builders to design andconstruct energy-efficient homes at minimal cost. The model is anadaptation of the method used to calculate the national energy savingsfor appliance energy efficiency standards. The main difference is thatthe key decision here is not the consumer decision to buy anefficienthouse, but rather the builder decision to offer such a house inthe market. The builder decision is treated by developing a number ofscenarios in which the relative importance of first costs vs. energysavings is varied.

  7. Parallel phase model : a programming model for high-end parallel machines with manycores.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Junfeng (Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY); Wen, Zhaofang; Heroux, Michael Allen; Brightwell, Ronald Brian

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a parallel programming model, Parallel Phase Model (PPM), for next-generation high-end parallel machines based on a distributed memory architecture consisting of a networked cluster of nodes with a large number of cores on each node. PPM has a unified high-level programming abstraction that facilitates the design and implementation of parallel algorithms to exploit both the parallelism of the many cores and the parallelism at the cluster level. The programming abstraction will be suitable for expressing both fine-grained and coarse-grained parallelism. It includes a few high-level parallel programming language constructs that can be added as an extension to an existing (sequential or parallel) programming language such as C; and the implementation of PPM also includes a light-weight runtime library that runs on top of an existing network communication software layer (e.g. MPI). Design philosophy of PPM and details of the programming abstraction are also presented. Several unstructured applications that inherently require high-volume random fine-grained data accesses have been implemented in PPM with very promising results.

  8. Hypothetical Distance Learning Program Costs Model A framework for thinking about the comprehensive costs of hosting a DL program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    Hypothetical Distance Learning Program Costs Model A framework for thinking about the comprehensive costs of hosting a DL program Start-Up Ongoing Explanation 100,000$ 100,000$ FTE needed to develop any or repurpose old courses for the online context. Infrastructure Costs tbd tbd Cost of adding or improving

  9. Improvements in Hanford TRU Program Utilizing Systems Modeling and Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baynes, P.A.; Bailey, K.B.; McKenney, D.E. [Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Uytioco, E. [Fluor Government Group, Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford's Transuranic (TRU) Program is responsible for certifying contact-handled (CH) TRU waste and shipping the certified waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Hanford's CH TRU waste includes material that is in retrievable storage as well as above ground storage, and newly generated waste. Certifying a typical container entails retrieving and then characterizing it (Non-Destructive Examination [NDE], Non-Destructive Assay [NDA], and Head Space Gas Sampling [HSG]), validating records (data review and reconciliation), and designating the container for a payload. The certified payload is then shipped to WIPP. Systems modeling and analysis techniques were applied to Hanford's TRU Program to help streamline the certification process and increase shipping rates. The modeling and analysis yields several benefits: - Maintains visibility on system performance and predicts downstream consequences of production issues. - Predicts future system performance with higher confidence, based on tracking past performance. - Applies speculation analyses to determine the impact of proposed changes (e.g., apparent shortage of feed should not be used as basis to reassign personnel if more feed is coming in the queue). - Positively identifies the appropriate queue for all containers (e.g., discovered several containers that were not actively being worked because they were in the wrong 'physical' location - method used previously for queuing up containers). - Identifies anomalies with the various data systems used to track inventory (e.g., dimensional differences for Standard Waste Boxes). A model of the TRU Program certification process was created using custom queries of the multiple databases for managing waste containers. The model was developed using a simplified process chart based on the expected path for a typical container. The process chart was augmented with the remediation path for containers that do not meet acceptance criteria for WIPP. Containers are sorted into queues based on their current status in the process. A container can be in only one queue at any given time. Existing data systems are queried to establish the quantity of containers in each queue on any given day. This sets the amount of feed available that is then modeled to be processed according to the daily production plans. The daily production plans were created by identifying the equipment necessary and the staff that performs each process step, and determining the expected production rate for each step. Production performance is monitored on a weekly basis with Project senior staff to establish a total operating efficiency (TOE) for each step (comparing actual performance to production capacity). The unit operations were modeled to be constrained by each day's feed queue plus the performance of the preceding step. The TOE for each unit operation was applied to an integrated model to determine bottlenecks and identify areas for improvement. All of the steps were linked to predict future system performance based on available feed and integrated system-level TOE. It has been determined that at times sub-optimization of a particular unit operation is necessary to ensure the system remains balanced (e.g., having excess capacity in assay does no good if there is no feed available because the real-time radiography [RTR] is working at half capacity). Several recommendations have been provided to the Project management team resulting in improvements in the performance of TRU certification activities by Hanford's TRU Program. (authors)

  10. Comparison of finite-difference and ray-theory seismograms in the elastic SEG/EAGE Salt Model,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Comparison of finite-difference and ray-theory seismograms in the elastic SEG/EAGE Salt Model, shot-difference seismograms for a selected shot and two receiver configurations com- puted in the elastic SEG/EAGE Salt Model-waves and converted S-waves in the smoothed elastic SEG/EAGE Salt Model are computed. Keywords Elastic velocity model

  11. Model-based, event-driven programming paradigm for interactive web applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milicevic, Aleksandar

    Applications are increasingly distributed and event-driven. Advances in web frameworks have made it easier to program standalone servers and their clients, but these applications remain hard to write. A model-based programming ...

  12. Comparison of Chiller Models for Use in Model-Based Fault Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sreedhara, P.; Haves, P.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and computational requirements. The objective of this study was to evaluate different modeling approaches for their applicability to model based FDD of vapor compression chillers. Three different models were studied: the Gordon and Ng Universal Chiller model (2nd...

  13. Human intake fraction of toxic pollutants: a model comparison between caltox and uses-lca

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; Geelen, Loes M.J.; Hertwich, Edgar G.; McKone, Thomas E.; van de Meent, Dik

    2004-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In Life Cycle Assessment and Comparative Risk Assessment potential human exposure to toxic pollutants can be expressed as the human intake fraction (iF), representing the fraction of the quantity emitted that enters the human population. To assess model uncertainty in the human intake fraction, ingestion and inhalation iFs of 367 substances emitted to air and freshwater were calculated with two commonly applied multi-media fate and exposure models, CalTOX and USES-LCA. Comparison of the model outcomes reveal that uncertainty in the ingestion iFs was up to a factor of 70. The uncertainty in the inhalation iFs was up to a factor of 865,000. The comparison showed that relatively few model differences account for the uncertainties found. An optimal model structure in the calculation of human intake fractions can be achieved by including (1) rain and no-rain scenarios, (2) a continental sea water compartment, (3) drinking water purification, (4) pH-correction of chemical properties, and (5) aerosol-associated deposition on plants. Finally, vertical stratification of the soil compartment combined with a chemical-dependent soil depth may be considered in future intake fraction calculations.

  14. Comparison of QM-Only and QM/MM Models for the Mechanism of Tungsten-Dependent Acetylene Hydratase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Rongzhen

    Comparison of QM-Only and QM/MM Models for the Mechanism of Tungsten-Dependent Acetylene Hydratase study on the formation of vinyl alcohol in the catalytic cycle of tungsten-dependent acetylene hydratase

  15. Spatial distributions in static heavy-light mesons: a comparison of quark models with lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damir Becirevic; Emmanuel Chang; Alain Le Yaouanc Luis Oliver; Jean-Claude Raynal

    2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Lattice measurements of spatial distributions of the light quark bilinear densities in static mesons allow to test directly and in detail the wave functions of quark models. These distributions are gauge invariant quantities directly related to the spatial distribution of wave functions. We make a detailed comparison of the recent lattice QCD results with our own quark models, formulated previously for quite different purposes. We find a striking agreement not only between our two quark models, but also with the lattice QCD data for the ground state in an important range of distances up to about 4/GeV. Moreover the agreement extends to the L=1 states [j^P=(1/2)^+]. An explanation of several particular features completely at odds with the non-relativistic approximation is provided. A rather direct, somewhat unexpected and of course approximate relation between wave functions of certain quark models and QCD has been established.

  16. Comparisons of empirical viscous-fingering models and their calibration for heterogeneous problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fayers, F.J.; Blunt, M.J.; Christie, M.A. (BP Research Center (GB))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the formulation and parameters for three principal empirical viscous-fingering models: the Kovl, Todd and Longstaff, and Fayers methods. All three methods give similar levels of accuracy when compared with linear homogeneous experiments, but they differ in performance in 2D applications. This arises from differences in the formulation of the total mobility terms. The superiority of the Todd and Longstaff and Fayers methods is demonstrated for 2D and gravity-influenced flows by comparison with experiments and high-resolution simulation. The use of high-resolution simulation to calibrate empirical models in a systematic manner is described. Results from detailed simulation demonstrate the sensitivity of empirical model parameters to viscous/gravity ratio, recovery process (secondary, tertiary, or water-alternating-gas (WAG)), and geological heterogeneity. For large amplitude heterogeneities with short correlation lengths, the accuracy of the empirical models is shown to be less satisfactory, but improved by the addition of a diffusive term.

  17. Model Test Setup and Program for Experimental Estimation of Surface Loads of the SSG Kvitsy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Model Test Setup and Program for Experimental Estimation of Surface Loads of the SSG Kvitsøy Pilot Engineering No. 32 ISSN: 1603-9874 Model Test Setup and Program for Experimental Estimation of Surface Loads University October, 2005 #12;#12;Preface This report presents the preparations done prior to model tests

  18. Alternative mixed-integer linear programming models of a maritime inventory routing problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Alternative mixed-integer linear programming models of a maritime inventory routing problem Jiang is enhanced by reformulating the time assignment constraints. Next, we present a model based on event points. Sherali et al (1999) formulated a mixed-integer programming model based on a discrete time representation

  19. The Program for climate Model diagnosis and Intercomparison: 20-th anniversary Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, Gerald L; Bader, David C; Riches, Michael; Bamzai, Anjuli; Joseph, Renu

    2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Twenty years ago, W. Lawrence (Larry) Gates approached the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Research (now the Office of Science) with a plan to coordinate the comparison and documentation of climate model differences. This effort would help improve our understanding of climate change through a systematic approach to model intercomparison. Early attempts at comparing results showed a surprisingly large range in control climate from such parameters as cloud cover, precipitation, and even atmospheric temperature. The DOE agreed to fund the effort at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in part because of the existing computing environment and because of a preexisting atmospheric science group that contained a wide variety of expertise. The project was named the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI), and it has changed the international landscape of climate modeling over the past 20 years. In spring 2009 the DOE hosted a 1-day symposium to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of PCMDI and to honor its founder, Larry Gates. Through their personal experiences, the morning presenters painted an image of climate science in the 1970s and 1980s, that generated early support from the international community for model intercomparison, thereby bringing PCMDI into existence. Four talks covered Gates���¢��������s early contributions to climate research at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), the RAND Corporation, and Oregon State University through the founding of PCMDI to coordinate the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP). The speakers were, in order of presentation, Warren Washington [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)], Kelly Redmond (Western Regional Climate Center), George Boer (Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis), and Lennart Bengtsson [University of Reading, former director of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF)]. The afternoon session emphasized the scientific ideas that are the basis of PCMDI���¢��������s success, summarizing their evolution and impact. Four speakers followed the various PCMDI-supported climate model intercomparison projects, beginning with early work on cloud representations in models, presented by Robert D. Cess (Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Stony Brook University), and then the latest Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Projects (CFMIPs) led by Sandrine Bony (Laboratoire de M�������©t�������©orologie Dynamique). Benjamin Santer (LLNL) presented a review of the climate change detection and attribution (D & A) work pioneered at PCMDI, and Gerald A. Meehl (NCAR) ended the day with a look toward the future of climate change research.

  20. Computational Modeling and the Experimental Plasma Research Program A White Paper Submitted to the FESAC Subcommittee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computational Modeling and the Experimental Plasma Research Program A White Paper Submitted of the fusion energy program. The experimental plasma research (EPR) program is well positioned to make major in fusion development and promote scientific discovery. Experimental plasma research projects explore

  1. Multiple Model Robust Dynamic Programming Eric C. Whitman and Christopher G. Atkeson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -- Modeling error is a common problem for model- based control techniques. We present multiple model dynamic programming (MMDP) as a method to generate controllers that are robust to modeling error. Our method generates controllers that are approximately optimal for a collection of models, thereby forcing the controller

  2. Stochastic Programming Models for Strategic Planning: An Application to Electric Utilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bienstock, Daniel

    This paper reports on the application of stochastic programming with recourse models to strategic planning problems typical of those faced by an electric utility. A prototype model was constructed using realistic data, and ...

  3. Preliminary Model Comparison Results From the Sim-SEQ Project Using TOUGH2, STOMP, Eclipse, and VESA Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Doughty, Christine A.; Bacon, Diana H.; Bacci, Giacomo; Govindan, Rajesh; Shi, Ji-Quan; Gasda, Sarah E.; Ramanathan, Ramya; Nicot, Jean-Philippe; Hosseini, Seyyed; Birkholzer, Jens

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sim-SEQ is an international initiative on model comparison for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS), with an objective to understand and, if possible, quantify model uncertainties. Model comparison efforts in Sim-SEQ are initially limited to one specific field test site, hereafter referred to as the Sim-SEQ Study site (or S-3 site). Within Sim-SEQ, different modeling teams are developing conceptual models of CO2 injection at the S-3 site. One of the conceptual models, developed by the LBNL team, is based on TOUGH2/EOS7C. In this paper, we present some preliminary model predictions of the S-3 site using the TOUGH2/EOS7C simulator. We also compare the predictions of the TOUGH2 simulator with three other conceptual models, developed by three different organizations, of the S-3 site.

  4. An exploration of the stages of change model in a group treatment program for male batterers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Robert Davis

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2004 Major Subject: Counseling Psychology AN EXPLORATION OF THE STAGES OF CHANGE MODEL IN A GROUP TREATMENT PROGRAM...) __________________________ Michael R. Benz (Head of Department) December 2004 Major Subject: Counseling Psychology iii ABSTRACT An Exploration of the Stages of Change Model in a Group Treatment Program for Male Batterers. (December 2004...

  5. Development of Distributed Programming Developing Tool-Kit Based on Object Group Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joo, Su-Chong

    Development of Distributed Programming Developing Tool-Kit Based on Object Group Model Jeong of the grouped distributed objects[10-14], as a logical unit of distributed application service, and developed a distributed programming developing tool-kit based on object group model(OGM-DPD Tool-Kit). This Tool- Kit can

  6. Integer Programming Model for Automated Structure-based NMR Richard Jang , Xin Gao , and Ming Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterloo, University of

    Integer Programming Model for Automated Structure-based NMR Assignment Richard Jang , Xin Gao. The core of the solution is a novel integer linear programming model, which is a general framework for many N2L 6P7 Technical Report CS-2009-32 Abstract. We introduce the "Automated Structure-based Assignment

  7. A synchronous model of the PLC programming language ST Fernando Jimenez-Fraustro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A synchronous model of the PLC programming language ST Fernando Jimenez-Fraustro IRISA / INRIA F of a synchronous model of the PLC programming lan- guage ST. This work is part of the integration of the IEC 1131 Logic Controllers (PLC) architec- tures. Their design relies on standards like the IEC 1131 norm

  8. Connecticut Fuel Cell Activities: Markets, Programs, and Models...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Center for Advanced Technology, Inc. at the bi-monthly informational call for the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program on December 16, 2009 ccathydrogenct.pdf More Documents &...

  9. Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Canada * VEHMA International * Ford Motor CO. Barriers * High cost of lightweight materials solutions supported by Materials Technology Program to meet national objectives for...

  10. Comparison of particle-tracking and lumped-parameter age-distribution models for evaluating vulnerability of production wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groundwaterage . Contamination . Numerical modeling . Water supply . USA Introduction Drinking-water productionComparison of particle-tracking and lumped-parameter age-distribution models for evaluating-source contaminant inputs at the water table, some representation of the distribution of groundwater ages in the well

  11. Comparison of Statistical Multifragmentation Model simulations with Canonical Thermodynamical Model results: a few representative cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Botvina; G. Chaudhuri; S. Das Gupta; I. Mishustin

    2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) has been widely used to explain experimental data of intermediate energy heavy ion collisions. A later entrant in the field is the canonical thermodynamic model (CTM) which is also being used to fit experimental data. The basic physics of both the models is the same, namely that fragments are produced according to their statistical weights in the available phase space. However, they are based on different statistical ensembles, and the methods of calculation are different: while the SMM uses Monte-Carlo simulations, the CTM solves recursion relations. In this paper we compare the predictions of the two models for a few representative cases.

  12. Characterizing the performance of ecosystem models across time scales: A spectral analysis of the North American Carbon Program site-level synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dietze, Michael; Vargas, Rodrigo; Richardson, Andrew D.; Stoy, Paul C.; Barr, Alan; Anderson, Ryan; Arain, M. A.; Baker, Ian; Black, T. Andrew; Chen, Jing Ming; Ciais, Philippe; Flanagan, Lawrence; Gough, Christopher; Grant, R. F.; Hollinger, D.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Kucharik, Chris; Lafleur, Peter; Liu, Shuguang; Lokupitiya, Erandathie; Luo, Yiqi; Munger, J. W.; Peng, Changhui; Poulter, Benjamin; Price, David T.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Riley, William; Sahoo, Alok Kumar; Schaefer, Kevin; Suyker, Andrew E.; Tian, Hanqin; Tonitto, Christine; Verbeeck, Hans; Verma, Shashi B.; Wang, Weifeng; Weng, Ensheng

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystem models are important tools for diagnosing the carbon cycle and projecting its behavior across space and time. Most assessments of model performance occur at individual temporal scales, but ecosystems respond to drivers at multiple time scales. Spectral methods, such as wavelet analyses, present an alternative approach that enables the identification of the dominant time scales contributing to model performance in the frequency domain. In this study we used wavelet analyses to synthesize the performance of twenty-one ecosystem models at nine eddy-covariance towers as part of the North American Carbon Program's site-level inter-comparison. This study expands upon previous single-site and single-model analyses to determine what patterns of model failure are consistent across a diverse range of models and sites.

  13. Applicability of daylighting computer modeling in real case studies: Comparison between measured and simulated daylight availability and lighting consumption. Building and Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Atif

    this paper is published in / Une version de ce document se trouve dans : IEA (International Energy Agency) Task 21 / Annex 29: Daylight in Buildings, November 1998, 68 pp. www.nrc.ca/irc/ircpubs NRCC-42862 Subtask C: Daylighting Design Tools T21/C1-21/CAN/98-11 Applicability of Daylighting Computer Modeling in Real Case Studies: Comparison between Measured and Simulated Daylight Availability and Lighting Consumption A report of IEA SHC Task 21 / IEA ECBCS Annex 29 Daylight in Buildings Subtask C: Daylighting Design Tools Report T21/C1-21/CAN/98-11 Applicability of Daylighting Computer Modeling in Real Case Studies: Comparison between Measured and Simulated Daylight Availability and Lighting Consumption by Anca D. Galasiu * Morad R. Atif * A report of IEA SHC Task 21 / IEA ECBCS Annex 29 * National Research Council Canada, Institute for Research in Construction, Indoor Environment Research Program Subtask C: Daylighting Design Tools Report T21/C1-21/CAN/98-11 IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Programme (IEA SHC) The International Energy Agency (IEA) was established in 1974 as an autonomous agency within the framework of the Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to carry out a comprehensive program of energy cooperation among its 24 member countries and the Commission of the European Communities. An important part of the Agency's program involves collaboration in the research, development and demonstration of new energy technologies to reduce excessive reliance on imported oil, increase long-term energy security and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The IEA's R&D activities are headed by the Committee on Energy Research and Technology (CERT) and supported by a small Secretariat staff, headquartered in Paris. In addition, three Working Parties are charged with monitorin...

  14. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP): A Model-Data Comparison System for Evaluation of Coupled Biosphere-Atmosphere Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Randerson, Jim [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Mahowald, Natalie [Cornell University; Bonan, Gordon [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Running, Steven [University of Montana, Missoula; Fung, Inez [University of California, Berkeley

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need to capture important climate feebacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in new efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, now often referred to as Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results, suggesting that a more rigorous set of offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are warranted. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) provides a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). C-LAMP provides feedback to the modeling community regarding model improvements and to the measurement community by suggesting new observational campaigns. C-LAMP Experiment 1 consists of a set of uncoupled simulations of terrestrial carbon models specifically designed to examine the ability of the models to reproduce surface carbon and energy fluxes at multiple sites and to exhibit the influence of climate variability, prescribed atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), nitrogen (N) deposition, and land cover change on projections of terrestrial carbon fluxes during the 20th century. Experiment 2 consists of partially coupled simulations of the terrestrial carbon model with an active atmosphere model exchanging energy and moisture fluxes. In all experiments, atmospheric CO{sub 2} follows the prescribed historical trajectory from C{sup 4}MIP. In Experiment 2, the atmosphere model is forced with prescribed sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and corresponding sea ice concentrations from the Hadley Centre; prescribed CO{sub 2} is radiatively active; and land, fossil fuel, and ocean CO{sub 2} fluxes are advected by the model. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3) in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): The CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon-nitrogen (CN) model of Thornton. Comparisons against Ameriflus site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) site measurements, and other datasets have been performed and are described in Randerson et al. (2009). The C-LAMP diagnostics package was used to validate improvements to CASA and CN for use in the next generation model, CLM4. It is hoped that this effort will serve as a prototype for an international carbon-cycle model benchmarking activity for models being used for the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report. More information about C-LAMP, the experimental protocol, performance metrics, output standards, and model-data comparisons from the CLM3-CASA and CLM3-CN models are available at http://www.climatemodeling.org/c-lamp.

  15. Modeling Activities in the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Sciences Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Schwartz, Stephen E.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Science Program (ASP) conducts research pertinent to radiative forcing of climate change by atmospheric aerosols. The program consists of approximately 40 highly interactive peer-reviewed research projects that examine aerosol properties and processes and the evolution of aerosols in the atmosphere. Principal components of the program are instrument development, laboratory experiments, field studies, theoretical investigations, and modeling. The objectives of the Program are to 1) improve the understanding of aerosol processes associated with light scattering and absorption properties and interactions with clouds that affect Earth's radiative balance and to 2) develop model-based representations of these processes that enable the effects of aerosols on Earth's climate system to be properly represented in global-scale numerical climate models. Although only a few of the research projects within ASP are explicitly identified as primarily modeling activities, modeling actually comprises a substantial component of a large fraction of ASP research projects. This document describes the modeling activities within the Program as a whole, the objectives and intended outcomes of these activities, and the linkages among the several modeling components and with global-scale modeling activities conducted under the support of the Department of Energy's Climate Sciences Program and other aerosol and climate research programs.

  16. Modelling and Formal Verification of Timing Aspects in Large PLC Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez Adiego, B; Blanco Vinuela, E; Tournier, J-C; Gonzalez Suarez, V M; Blech, J O

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main obstacle that prevents model checking from being widely used in industrial control systems is the complexity of building formal models out of PLC programs, especially when timing aspects need to be integrated. This paper brings an answer to this obstacle by proposing a methodology to model and verify timing aspects of PLC programs. Two approaches are proposed to allow the users to balance the trade-off between the complexity of the model, i.e. its number of states, and the set of specifications possible to be verified. A tool supporting the methodology which allows to produce models for different model checkers directly from PLC programs has been developed. Verification of timing aspects for real-life PLC programs are presented in this paper using NuSMV.

  17. User's guide to the MESOI diffusion model and to the utility programs UPDATE and LOGRVU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Athey, G.F.; Allwine, K.J.; Ramsdell, J.V.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MESOI is an interactive, Lagrangian puff trajectory diffusion model. The model is documented separately (Ramsdell and Athey, 1981); this report is intended to provide MESOI users with the information needed to successfully conduct model simulations. The user is also provided with guidance in the use of the data file maintenance and review programs; UPDATE and LOGRVU. Complete examples are given for the operaton of all three programs and an appendix documents UPDATE and LOGRVU.

  18. Land-use change trajectories up to 2050: insights from a global agro-economic model comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, Christoph; van Meijl, Hans; Kyle, G. Page; Nelson, Gerald C.; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Gurgel, Angelo; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Popp, Alexander; Sands, Ronald; Tabeau, Andrzej; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; von Lampe, Martin; Wise, Marshall A.; Blanc, Elodie; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Kavallari, Aikaterini; Valin, Hugo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in agricultural land use have important implications for environmental services. Previous studies of agricultural land-use futures have been published indicating large uncertainty due to different model assumptions and methodologies. In this article we present a first comprehensive comparison of global agro-economic models that have harmonized drivers of population, GDP, and biophysical yields. The comparison allows us to ask two research questions: (1) How much cropland will be used under different socioeconomic and climate change scenarios? (2) How can differences in model results be explained? The comparison includes four partial and six general equilibrium models that differ in how they model land supply and amount of potentially available land. We analyze results of two different socioeconomic scenarios and three climate scenarios (one with constant climate). Most models (7 out of 10) project an increase of cropland of 10–25% by 2050 compared to 2005 (under constant climate), but one model projects a decrease. Pasture land expands in some models, which increase the treat on natural vegetation further. Across all models most of the cropland expansion takes place in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. In general, the strongest differences in model results are related to differences in the costs of land expansion, the endogenous productivity responses, and the assumptions about potential cropland.

  19. Ex-Vessel Core Melt Modeling Comparison between MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH and MELCOR 2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robb, Kevin R [ORNL; Farmer, Mitchell [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Francis, Matthew W [ORNL

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    System-level code analyses by both United States and international researchers predict major core melting, bottom head failure, and corium-concrete interaction for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1). Although system codes such as MELCOR and MAAP are capable of capturing a wide range of accident phenomena, they currently do not contain detailed models for evaluating some ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes containing more detailed modeling are available for melt spreading such as MELTSPREAD as well as long-term molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) and debris coolability such as CORQUENCH. In a preceding study, Enhanced Ex-Vessel Analysis for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1: Melt Spreading and Core-Concrete Interaction Analyses with MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH, the MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH codes predicted the 1F1 core melt readily cooled in contrast to predictions by MELCOR. The user community has taken notice and is in the process of updating their systems codes; specifically MAAP and MELCOR, to improve and reduce conservatism in their ex-vessel core melt models. This report investigates why the MELCOR v2.1 code, compared to the MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH 3.03 codes, yield differing predictions of ex-vessel melt progression. To accomplish this, the differences in the treatment of the ex-vessel melt with respect to melt spreading and long-term coolability are examined. The differences in modeling approaches are summarized, and a comparison of example code predictions is provided.

  20. A model technology transfer program for independent operators: Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoeling, L.G.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the development and testing of the Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM) which is to be utilized as a regional model for the development of other technology transfer programs for independent operators throughout oil-producing regions in the US. It describes the linkage of the regional model with a proposed national technology transfer plan, an evaluation technique for improving and assessing the model, and the methodology which makes it adaptable on a regional basis. The report also describes management concepts helpful in managing a technology transfer program. The original Tertiary Oil Recovery Project (TORP) activities, upon which the KTTM is based, were developed and tested for Kansas and have proved to be effective in assisting independent operators in utilizing technology. Through joint activities of TORP and the Kansas Geological Survey (KGS), the KTTM was developed and documented for application in other oil-producing regions. During the course of developing this model, twelve documents describing the implementation of the KTTM were developed as deliverables to DOE. These include: (1) a problem identification (PI) manual describing the format and results of six PI workshops conducted in different areas of Kansas, (2) three technology workshop participant manuals on advanced waterflooding, reservoir description, and personal computer applications, (3) three technology workshop instructor manuals which provides instructor material for all three workshops, (4) three technologies were documented as demonstration projects which included reservoir management, permeability modification, and utilization of a liquid-level acoustic measuring device, (5) a bibliography of all literature utilized in the documents, and (6) a document which describes the KTTM.

  1. Ur/Web: A Simple Model for Programming the Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chlipala, Adam

    The World Wide Web has evolved gradually from a document delivery platform to an architecture for distributed programming. This largely unplanned evolution is apparent in the set of interconnected languages and protocols ...

  2. Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP) Modeling System Programming Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, R.; Hoffpauir, R.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WRAP interface program was developed as a Fortran QuickWin application. SIM simulates the river/reservoir water allocation/management/use system for input sequences of monthly naturalized flows and net evaporation rates. (Chapter 2) SIMD (D for daily... management, and other utility functions. Many different Fortran compiler/IDE packages are sold by various companies. The WRAP programs are in standard Fortran that can be compiled with the various compilers. The compiler, linker, and development...

  3. Intercomparison study of atmospheric mercury models: 1. Comparison of models with short-term measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the Irish west coast. The modelled concentrations of total particulate mercury (TPM) were generally 358, Roskilde, Denmark d NOAA Air Resources Laboratory, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring MD 20910 Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology, Tzarigradsko chaussee 66, 1785 Sofia, Bulgaria h Swedish

  4. Comparison of high pressure transient PVT measurements and model predictions. Part I.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.; Winters, William Stanley, Jr.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments consisting of vessel-to-vessel transfers of pressurized gas using Transient PVT methodology have been conducted to provide a data set for optimizing heat transfer correlations in high pressure flow systems. In rapid expansions such as these, the heat transfer conditions are neither adiabatic nor isothermal. Compressible flow tools exist, such as NETFLOW that can accurately calculate the pressure and other dynamical mechanical properties of such a system as a function of time. However to properly evaluate the mass that has transferred as a function of time these computational tools rely on heat transfer correlations that must be confirmed experimentally. In this work new data sets using helium gas are used to evaluate the accuracy of these correlations for receiver vessel sizes ranging from 0.090 L to 13 L and initial supply pressures ranging from 2 MPa to 40 MPa. The comparisons show that the correlations developed in the 1980s from sparse data sets perform well for the supply vessels but are not accurate for the receivers, particularly at early time during the transfers. This report focuses on the experiments used to obtain high quality data sets that can be used to validate computational models. Part II of this report discusses how these data were used to gain insight into the physics of gas transfer and to improve vessel heat transfer correlations. Network flow modeling and CFD modeling is also discussed.

  5. Fractured rock modeling in the National Waste Terminal Storage Program: a review of requirements and status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    St. John, C.; Krug, A.; Key, S.; Monsees, J.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generalized computer codes capable of forming the basis for numerical models of fractured rock masses are being used within the NWTS program. Little additional development of these codes is considered justifiable, except in the area of representation of discrete fractures. On the other hand, model preparation requires definition of medium-specific constitutive descriptions and site characteristics and is therefore legitimately conducted by each of the media-oriented projects within the National Waste Terminal Storage program. However, it is essential that a uniform approach to the role of numerical modeling be adopted, including agreement upon the contribution of modeling to the design and licensing process and the need for, and means of, model qualification for particular purposes. This report discusses the role of numerical modeling, reviews the capabilities of several computer codes that are being used to support design or performance assessment, and proposes a framework for future numerical modeling activities within the NWTS program.

  6. A comparison between the fission matrix method, the diffusion model and the transport model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehaye, B.; Hugot, F. X.; Diop, C. M. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Direction de l'Energie Nucleaire, Departement de Modelisation des Systemes et Structures, CEA DEN/DM2S, PC 57, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fission matrix method may be used to solve the critical eigenvalue problem in a Monte Carlo simulation. This method gives us access to the different eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the transport or fission operator. We propose to compare the results obtained via the fission matrix method with those of the diffusion model, and an approximated transport model. To do so, we choose to analyse the mono-kinetic and continuous energy cases for a Godiva-inspired critical sphere. The first five eigenvalues are computed with TRIPOLI-4{sup R} and compared to the theoretical ones. An extension of the notion of the extrapolation distance is proposed for the modes other than the fundamental one. (authors)

  7. Modelling of offshore wind turbine wakes with the wind farm program FLaP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Modelling of offshore wind turbine wakes with the wind farm program FLaP Bernhard Lange(1) , Hans from the Danish offshore wind farm Vindeby. Vertical wake profiles and mean turbulence intensities are not modelled satisfactorily. Keywords: Offshore, wind farm, wake model, Vindeby, turbulence intensity

  8. Comparison of surface meteorological data representativeness for the Weldon Spring transport and dispersion modeling analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazaro, M.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy is conducting the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project under the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). The major goals of the SFMP are to eliminate potential hazards to the public and the environment that associated with contamination at SFMP sites and to make surplus property available for other uses to the extent possible. This report presents the results of analysis of available meteorological data from stations near the Weldon Spring site. Data that are most representative of site conditions are needed to accurately model the transport and dispersion of air pollutants associated with remedial activities. Such modeling will assist the development of mitigative measures. 17 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Mode Estimation of Model-based Programs: Monitoring Systems with Complex Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    - active programming constructs with probabilistic, constraint-based modeling, and that offers a sim- ple controllers, have simple behaviors. However, the above trajectory spends most of its time wend- ing its way

  10. Mode Estimation of Model-based Programs: Monitoring Systems with Complex Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    that combines reactive programming constructs with probabilistic, constraint-based modeling, and that offers wending its way through software functions. DS-1 is an instance of modern embedded systems whose

  11. Attachment F: Summary Checklist of Model AIP Provisions and Program Policies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In response to concerns expressed by DOE and State AIP program representatives, the Office of Environmental Activities has developed a list of mandatory and non-mandatory model language provisions...

  12. A FAST MODEL-BUILDING METHOD FOR TIME SERIES USING GENETIC PROGRAMMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    A FAST MODEL-BUILDING METHOD FOR TIME SERIES USING GENETIC PROGRAMMING I. Yoshihara Faculty) financial problems e.g. stock price indices and gold prices. The experiments lead us to the conclusion

  13. Testing Concurrent Programs on Relaxed Memory Models Jacob Burnim Koushik Sen Christos Stergiou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Koushik

    Testing Concurrent Programs on Relaxed Memory Models Jacob Burnim Koushik Sen Christos Stergiou that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice

  14. Comparison of the PHISICS/RELAP5-3D Ring and Block Model Results for Phase I of the OECD MHTGR-350 Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INL PHISICS code system consists of three modules providing improved core simulation capability: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. Coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been finalized, and as part of the code verification and validation program the exercises defined for Phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR 350 MW Benchmark were completed. This paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark, and presents selected results of the three steady state exercises 1-3 defined for Phase I. For Exercise 1, a stand-alone steady-state neutronics solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) was calculated with INSTANT, using the provided geometry, material descriptions, and detailed cross-section libraries. Exercise 2 required the modeling of a stand-alone thermal fluids solution. The RELAP5-3D results of four sub-cases are discussed, consisting of various combinations of coolant bypass flows and material thermophysical properties. Exercise 3 combined the first two exercises in a coupled neutronics and thermal fluids solution, and the coupled code suite PHISICS/RELAP5-3D was used to calculate the results of two sub-cases. The main focus of the paper is a comparison of the traditional RELAP5-3D “ring” model approach vs. a much more detailed model that include kinetics feedback on individual block level and thermal feedbacks on a triangular sub-mesh. The higher fidelity of the block model is illustrated with comparison results on the temperature, power density and flux distributions, and the typical under-predictions produced by the ring model approach are highlighted.

  15. Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua New, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    , multiple substrate types, and insulation levels. A base case and energy-efficient alternative canComparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua New, Oak Ridge National Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors

  16. Modeling the barotropic response of the global ocean to atmospheric wind and pressure forcing -comparisons with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling the barotropic response of the global ocean to atmospheric wind and pressure forcing] A global simulation of the ocean response to atmospheric wind and pressure forcing has been run during the barotropic response of the global ocean to atmospheric wind and pressure forcing - comparisons

  17. Modeling Information Scent: A Comparison of LSA, PMI and GLSA Similarity Measures on Common Tests and Corpora

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Information Scent: A Comparison of LSA, PMI and GLSA Similarity Measures on Common Tests, & Royer, 2005). We compare all these techniques on a unique corpus (TASA) and, for PMI and GLSA, we also that for large corpora PMI works best on word sim- ilarity tests, and GLSA on synonymy tests. For the smaller

  18. Accident Sequence Precursor Program Large Early Release Frequency Model Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, T.D.; Brownson, D.A.; Duran, F.A.; Gregory, J.J.; Rodrick, E.G.

    1999-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives for the ASP large early release frequency (LERF) model development work is to build a Level 2 containment response model that would capture all of the events necessary to define LERF as outlined in Regulatory Guide 1.174, can be directly interfaced with the existing Level 1 models, is technically correct, can be readily modified to incorporate new information or to represent another plant, and can be executed in SAPHIRE. The ASP LERF models being developed will meet these objectives while providing the NRC with the capability to independently assess the risk impact of plant-specific changes proposed by the utilities that change the nuclear power plants' licensing basis. Together with the ASP Level 1 models, the ASP LERF models provide the NRC with the capability of performing equipment and event assessments to determine their impact on a plant's LERF for internal events during power operation. In addition, the ASP LERF models are capable of being updated to reflect changes in information regarding the system operations and phenomenological events, and of being updated to assess the potential for early fatalities for each LERF sequence. As the ASP Level 1 models evolve to include more analysis capabilities, the LERF models will also be refined to reflect the appropriate level of detail needed to demonstrate the new capabilities. An approach was formulated for the development of detailed LERF models using the NUREG-1150 APET models as a guide. The modifications to the SAPHIRE computer code have allowed the development of these detailed models and the ability to analyze these models in a reasonable time. Ten reference LERF plant models, including six PWR models and four BWR models, which cover a wide variety of containment and nuclear steam supply systems designs, will be complete in 1999. These reference models will be used as the starting point for developing the LERF models for the remaining nuclear power plants.

  19. Comparison of the KAMELEON fire model to large-scale open pool fire data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicolette, V.F.; Gritzo, L.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Holen, J.; Magnussen, B.F. [SINEF/Norweigian Inst. of Tech., Trondheim (Norway). Div. of Applied Thermodynamics

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparison of the KAMELEON Fire model to large-scale open pool fire experimental data is presented. The model was used to calculate large-scale JP-4 pool fires with and without wind, and with and without large objects in the fire. The effect of wind and large objects on the fire environment is clearly seen. For the pool fire calculations without any object in the fire, excellent agreement is seen in the location of the oxygen-starved region near the pool center. Calculated flame temperatures are about 200--300 K higher than measured. This results in higher heat fluxes back to the fuel pool and higher fuel evaporation rates (by a factor of 2). Fuel concentrations at lower elevations and peak soot concentrations are in good agreement with data. For pool fire calculations with objects, similar trends in the fire environment are observed. Excellent agreement is seen in the distribution of the heat flux around a cylindrical calorimeter in a rectangular pool with wind effects. The magnitude of the calculated heat flux to the object is high by a factor of 2 relative to the test data, due to the higher temperatures calculated. For the case of a large flat plate adjacent to a circular pool, excellent qualitative agreement is seen in the predicted and measured flame shapes as a function of wind.

  20. A cash-flow economic model for analyzing utility/ESCO solar hot water programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bircher, C. [ENSTAR, De Pere, WI (United States); DeLaune, J.L. [Wisconsin Public Service Corp., Green Bay, WI (United States); Lyons, C.R. [Energy Alliance Group, Boston, MA (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wisconsin Public Service Corporation (WPSC), in partnership with Energy Alliance Group (EAG), has developed a robust cash-flow economic model to analyze an energy service company (ESCO) approach to utility solar water heating programs. This paper describes the ESCO approach and its potential to increase penetration of solar water heating. The economic model is presented, and its use in designing WPSC`s Solar-Wise Water Heating Service program is described. The model`s results for WPSC are positive, indicating that an ESCO approach has strong potential. A feasibility study of ESCO solar water heating programs for a varied sample of other US utilities was also conducted using the model, and the results are summarized. Sensitivity analyses from the study reveal that the three key drivers of ESCO solar water heating success are electric rate, length of the service agreement, and the amount of the customer`s payment for the service.

  1. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Executive Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Uses lessons learned from Better Buildings grantees, existing data, and private sector insights to highlight business models that can help develop a sustainable residential energy efficiency market.

  2. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Introduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Uses lessons learned from Better Buildings grantees, existing data, and private sector insights to highlight business models that can help develop a sustainable residential energy efficiency market.

  3. analyze model programs: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    We model tandem repeats by percent identity and frequency of indels between adjacent pattern copies and use statistically based recognition criteria. We demonstrate the...

  4. EnergyPlusDeST DOE-2.1E Building energy modeling programs comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ST #12; 1 IEA BESTest ASHRAE Standard 140[1] [2] 1 EnergyPlus, DeST, DOE-2, ESP, BLAST TRNSYS 1 ASHRAE RP865[1] 2ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140 [4] 3 IEA SHC BESTest / [5] EnergyPlus [6] [7

  5. Comparison between cylindrical model and experimental observation on the study of resistive wall mode in reversed field pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Z. R.; Guo, S. C.; Bolzonella, T.; Baruzzo, M. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione Euratom ENEA sulla Fusione, Corso Stati Uniti 4, Padova 35127 (Italy); Shi, L.; Wang, X. G. [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A cylindrical magnetohydrodynamic model including plasma pressure and longitudinal flow has been employed for the study of resistive wall mode (RWM) in reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas. In order to validate the model, a careful comparison with the experimental measurements in RFX-mod [P. Sonato et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 66-68, 161 (2003)] on the mode growth rates has been made by well matching the equilibrium parameters F, THETA, and beta{sub p}. The RWM instability spectrum, which varies with the equilibrium parameters, is also calculated for comparison. The sensitivity of the mode growth rate to the equilibrium parameters is studied in details. It is concluded that the model can provide consistent accuracy in studies of RWM in RFP plasmas. The analysis based on the balance of the potential energy components has been carried out in order to obtain the physical understanding on the mode behavior.

  6. Final Report - From Measurements to Models: Cross-Comparison of Measured and Simulated Behavioral States of the Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Genio, Anthony D; Hoffman, Forrest M; Hargrove, Jr, William W

    2007-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM sites and the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) were constructed to make measurements of the atmosphere and radiation system in order to quantify deficiencies in the simulation of clouds within models and to make improvements in those models. While the measurement infrastructure of ARM is well-developed and a model parameterization testbed capability has been established, additional effort is needed to develop statistical techniques which permit the comparison of simulation output from atmospheric models with actual measurements. Our project establishes a new methodology for objectively comparing ARM measurements to the outputs of leading global climate models and reanalysis data. The quantitative basis for this comparison is provided by a statistical procedure which establishes an exhaustive set of mutually-exclusive, recurring states of the atmosphere from sets of multivariate atmospheric and cloud conditions, and then classifies multivariate measurements or simulation outputs into those states. Whether measurements and models classify the atmosphere into the same states at specific locations through time provides an unequivocal comparison result. Times and locations in both geographic and state space of model-measurement agreement and disagreement will suggest directions for the collection of additional measurements at existing sites, provide insight into the global representativeness of the current ARM sites (suggesting locations and times for use of the AMF), and provide a basis for improvement of models. Two different analyses were conducted: One, using the Parallel Climate Model, focused on an IPCC climate change scenario and clusters that characterize long-term changes in the hydrologic cycle. The other, using the GISS Model E GCM and the ARM Active Remotely Sensed Cloud Layers product, explored current climate cloud regimes in the Tropical West Pacific.

  7. The SROV program for data analysis and regression model identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brauner, Neima

    ) regression models comprised of linear combination of independent variables and their non-linear functions. # 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Stepwise regression; Colinearity; Non have been intro- duced for selection of the optimal model in linear regression (for detailed reviews

  8. B Computer Program Listings for Cement Hydration Model Program disrealnew.c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    been */ /* modified. */ /* Heat of formation data added: 12/92 */ /* Three-dimensional version created consumption based on values */ /* given in Geiker thesis on chemical shrinkage */ /* Modelling of induction

  9. A Mathematical Programming Model for Optimal Layout Considering Quantitative Risk Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    A Mathematical Programming Model for Optimal Layout Considering Quantitative Risk Analysis Nancy of plant layout with safety considerations. The model considers a quantitative risk analysis to take safety aims at providing a more elaborate analysis of risk sources by considering a complete quantitative risk

  10. Genetic Programming Approach for Fault Modeling of Electronic Hardware Ajith Abraham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    performance monitoring of electronic circuits and systems. Reliability modeling of electronic circuits can discussed in Section 2. This technique can be extended to simple electronic components and for complicatedGenetic Programming Approach for Fault Modeling of Electronic Hardware Ajith Abraham School

  11. A multi-objective programming model for assessment the GHG emissions in MSW management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavrotas, George, E-mail: mavrotas@chemeng.ntua.gr [National Technical University of Athens, Iroon Polytechniou 9, Zografou, Athens, 15780 (Greece); Skoulaxinou, Sotiria [EPEM SA, 141 B Acharnon Str., Athens, 10446 (Greece); Gakis, Nikos [FACETS SA, Agiou Isidorou Str., Athens, 11471 (Greece); Katsouros, Vassilis [Athena Research and Innovation Center, Artemidos 6 and Epidavrou Str., Maroussi, 15125 (Greece); Georgopoulou, Elena [National Observatory of Athens, Thisio, Athens, 11810 (Greece)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • The multi-objective multi-period optimization model. • The solution approach for the generation of the Pareto front with mathematical programming. • The very detailed description of the model (decision variables, parameters, equations). • The use of IPCC 2006 guidelines for landfill emissions (first order decay model) in the mathematical programming formulation. - Abstract: In this study a multi-objective mathematical programming model is developed for taking into account GHG emissions for Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) management. Mathematical programming models are often used for structure, design and operational optimization of various systems (energy, supply chain, processes, etc.). The last twenty years they are used all the more often in Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) management in order to provide optimal solutions with the cost objective being the usual driver of the optimization. In our work we consider the GHG emissions as an additional criterion, aiming at a multi-objective approach. The Pareto front (Cost vs. GHG emissions) of the system is generated using an appropriate multi-objective method. This information is essential to the decision maker because he can explore the trade-offs in the Pareto curve and select his most preferred among the Pareto optimal solutions. In the present work a detailed multi-objective, multi-period mathematical programming model is developed in order to describe the waste management problem. Apart from the bi-objective approach, the major innovations of the model are (1) the detailed modeling considering 34 materials and 42 technologies, (2) the detailed calculation of the energy content of the various streams based on the detailed material balances, and (3) the incorporation of the IPCC guidelines for the CH{sub 4} generated in the landfills (first order decay model). The equations of the model are described in full detail. Finally, the whole approach is illustrated with a case study referring to the application of the model in a Greek region.

  12. Modelling and solving the stable marriage problem using constraint programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manlove, D.F.

    Manlove,D.F. O'Malley,G. Proceedings of the Fifth Workshop on Modelling and Solving Problems with Constraints, held at the 19th International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI 2005) pp 10-17

  13. Automated verification of model-based programs under uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahtab, Tazeen, 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly robust embedded systems have been enabled through software executives that have the ability to reason about their environment. Those that employ the model-based autonomy paradigm automatically diagnose and plan ...

  14. Exploring and mapping: A comparison of the IEA-MARKAL and CEC-EFOM technical energy system models and the ANL electric utility model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wene, Clas-Otto.

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study is to conduct technical and conceptual inter-comparisons of three quite different, state-of-the-art energy-emissions models that can select least-cost measures for controlling emissions, calculate future emissions, and analyze energy technology options. The goal is to provide an improved basis for selecting and applying models to address complex energy/environmental issues. 49 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program, plant parameters envelopes: Comparison with ranges of values for four hypothetical sites. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this volume is to report the results of the comparison of the ALWR plan parameters envelope with values of site characteristics developed for our hypothetical sites that generally represent conditions encountered within the United States. This effort is not intended to identify or address the suitability of any existing site, site area, or region in the United States. Also included in this volume is Appendix F, SERCH Summaries Regarding Siting.

  16. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94305 SGP-TR-42 PROCEEDINGS SPECIAL PANEL ON GEOTHERMAL MODEL INTERCOMPARISON STUDY held in conjunction with The Code Comparison Contracts issued by Department of Energy Division of Geothermal Energy San Francisco Operations Office

  17. Microgrid Reliability Modeling and Battery Scheduling Using Stochastic Linear Programming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardoso, Goncalo; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; DeForest, Nicholas; Barbosa-Povoa, Ana; Ferrao, Paulo

    2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the introduction of stochastic linear programming into Operations DER-CAM, a tool used to obtain optimal operating schedules for a given microgrid under local economic and environmental conditions. This application follows previous work on optimal scheduling of a lithium-iron-phosphate battery given the output uncertainty of a 1 MW molten carbonate fuel cell. Both are in the Santa Rita Jail microgrid, located in Dublin, California. This fuel cell has proven unreliable, partially justifying the consideration of storage options. Several stochastic DER-CAM runs are executed to compare different scenarios to values obtained by a deterministic approach. Results indicate that using a stochastic approach provides a conservative yet more lucrative battery schedule. Lower expected energy bills result, given fuel cell outages, in potential savings exceeding 6percent.

  18. Comparison and validation of HEU and LEU modeling results to HEU experimental benchmark data for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology MITR reactor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newton, T. H.; Wilson, E. H; Bergeron, A.; Horelik, N.; Stevens, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (MIT Nuclear Reactor Lab.)

    2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like the MITR-II reactor. Towards this goal, comparisons of MCNP5 Monte Carlo neutronic modeling results for HEU and LEU cores have been performed. Validation of the model has been based upon comparison to HEU experimental benchmark data for the MITR-II. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a model which could represent the experimental HEU data, and therefore could provide a basis to demonstrate LEU core performance. This report presents an overview of MITR-II model geometry and material definitions which have been verified, and updated as required during the course of validation to represent the specifications of the MITR-II reactor. Results of calculations are presented for comparisons to historical HEU start-up data from 1975-1976, and to other experimental benchmark data available for the MITR-II Reactor through 2009. This report also presents results of steady state neutronic analysis of an all-fresh LEU fueled core. Where possible, HEU and LEU calculations were performed for conditions equivalent to HEU experiments, which serves as a starting point for safety analyses for conversion of MITR-II from the use of HEU fuel to the use of UMo LEU fuel.

  19. Aspect-oriented Programming as Model Driven Evolution Mattia Monga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monga, Mattia

    ] by Xerox PARC. As- pectJ aims at managing tangled concerns at the level of Java code. AspectJ allows concern considered orthogonal to the others. The augmentation is applied automatically to a code base the power of abstracting from the code base the model they pre- fer. Then, the augmentations described

  20. Performance Modeling of Shared Memory Programsof SharedMemory Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teo, Yong-Meng

    nus edu sg/~teoymURL: www.comp.nus.edu.sg/ teoym 7th Workshop on High Performance Computing UPM Analysis l i l d l­ Analytical Model · Summary 1 November 2011 47th Workshop on High Performance Computing November 2011 57th Workshop on High Performance Computing (invited talk) #12;R l t d W kRelated Work

  1. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News,Program Direction and Analysis DeputyStructure

  2. Translation techniques for distributed-shared memory programming models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Douglas James

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high performance computing community has experienced an explosive improvement in distributed-shared memory hardware. Driven by increasing real-world problem complexity, this explosion has ushered in vast numbers of new systems. Each new system presents new challenges to programmers and application developers. Part of the challenge is adapting to new architectures with new performance characteristics. Different vendors release systems with widely varying architectures that perform differently in different situations. Furthermore, since vendors need only provide a single performance number (total MFLOPS, typically for a single benchmark), they only have strong incentive initially to optimize the API of their choice. Consequently, only a fraction of the available APIs are well optimized on most systems. This causes issues porting and writing maintainable software, let alone issues for programmers burdened with mastering each new API as it is released. Also, programmers wishing to use a certain machine must choose their API based on the underlying hardware instead of the application. This thesis argues that a flexible, extensible translator for distributed-shared memory APIs can help address some of these issues. For example, a translator might take as input code in one API and output an equivalent program in another. Such a translator could provide instant porting for applications to new systems that do not support the application's library or language natively. While open-source APIs are abundant, they do not perform optimally everywhere. A translator would also allow performance testing using a single base code translated to a number of different APIs. Most significantly, this type of translator frees programmers to select the most appropriate API for a given application based on the application (and developer) itself instead of the underlying hardware.

  3. Towards an Abstraction-Friendly Programming Model for High Productivity and High Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, C; Quinlan, D; Panas, T

    2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    General purpose languages, such as C++, permit the construction of various high level abstractions to hide redundant, low level details and accelerate programming productivity. Example abstractions include functions, data structures, classes, templates and so on. However, the use of abstractions significantly impedes static code analyses and optimizations, including parallelization, applied to the abstractions complex implementations. As a result, there is a common perception that performance is inversely proportional to the level of abstraction. On the other hand, programming large scale, possibly heterogeneous high-performance computing systems is notoriously difficult and programmers are less likely to abandon the help from high level abstractions when solving real-world, complex problems. Therefore, the need for programming models balancing both programming productivity and execution performance has reached a new level of criticality. We are exploring a novel abstraction-friendly programming model in order to support high productivity and high performance computing. We believe that standard or domain-specific semantics associated with high level abstractions can be exploited to aid compiler analyses and optimizations, thus helping achieving high performance without losing high productivity. We encode representative abstractions and their useful semantics into an abstraction specification file. In the meantime, an accessible, source-to-source compiler infrastructure (the ROSE compiler) is used to facilitate recognizing high level abstractions and utilizing their semantics for more optimization opportunities. Our initial work has shown that recognizing abstractions and knowing their semantics within a compiler can dramatically extend the applicability of existing optimizations, including automatic parallelization. Moreover, a new set of optimizations have become possible within an abstraction-friendly and semantics-aware programming model. In the future, we will apply our programming model to more large scale applications. In particular, we plan to classify and formalize more high level abstractions and semantics which are relevant to high performance computing. We will also investigate better ways to allow language designers, library developers and programmers to communicate abstraction and semantics information with each other.

  4. Advanced Modeling Grid Research Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyDepartment ofATVM LoanActiveMission »Advanced Modeling

  5. Fourth update of the Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program. Phase IV, Final report. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.E.; Brown, P.E.; Kaminski, R.S.; Smith, M.H.; Ziegler, E.J.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EEDB deals with the development of cost data for nuclear and comparison electric power plants. Its objective is to provide periodic updates of technical and cost (capital, fuel and operating and maintenance) information for use in evaluating and monitoring US civilian nuclear power programs. It contains six nuclear power plant technical models and five comparison coal-fired fossil power plant technical models. (DLC)

  6. Bringing Automated Model Checking to PLC Program Development - A CERN Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez Adiego, B; Tournier, J-C; Blanco Vinuela, E; Gonzalez Suarez, V M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Verification of critical software is a high priority but a challenging task for industrial control systems. Model checking appears to be an appropriate approach for this purpose. However, this technique is not widely used in industry yet, due to some obstacles. The main obstacles encountered when trying to apply formal verification techniques at industrial installations are the difficulty of creating models out of PLC programs and defining formally the specification requirements. In addition, models produced out of real-life programs have a huge state space, thus preventing the verification due to performance issues. Our work at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) focuses on developing efficient automatic verification methods for industrial critical installations based on PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) control systems. In this paper, we present a tool generating automatically formal models out of PLC code. The tool implements a general methodology which can support several input languages, ...

  7. Evaluating the Cisco Networking Academy Program's Instructional Model against Bloom's Taxonomy for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Evaluating the Cisco Networking Academy Program's Instructional Model against Bloom's Taxonomy the use of Bloom's learning taxonomy to help address this lack of theoretical basis. The paper further's taxonomy. Keywords: Information Security Education, Bloom's Taxonomy, Blended Learning, E-learning 1

  8. DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS FOR ONE-SHOT SYSTEMS USING MULTIPLE-STATE DESIGN RELIABILITY MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    semiconductors, microelectronics, lasers, electronic devices, and mechanical components, to obtain timely information on the reliability of both products and components. Breyfogle [5] and Meeker and Escobar [4] note1 DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS FOR ONE-SHOT SYSTEMS USING MULTIPLE-STATE DESIGN RELIABILITY MODELS

  9. Inter-frame dependent rate and distortion models for statistical multiplexing of video programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Inter-frame dependent rate and distortion models for statistical multiplexing of video programs@lss.supelec.fr Abstract--Statistical multiplexing (SM) is a useful technique for transmitting multiple video streams over of efficient SM algorithms is based on Rate and Distortion (R-D) information extracted from successive encoded

  10. Job Scheduling Using successive Linear Programming Approximations of a Sparse Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Job Scheduling Using successive Linear Programming Approximations of a Sparse Model Stephane of parallel jobs on a set of processors either in a cluster or in a multiprocessor computer. For the makespan objective, i.e., the comple- tion time of the last job, this problem has been shown to be NP

  11. Studying the Causes of Recent Climate Change Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    1 Studying the Causes of Recent Climate Change Ben Santer Program for Climate Model Diagnosis of evidence suggests a discernible human influence on global climate" "There is new and stronger evidence that most of the warming observed over the last 50 years is attributable to human activities" "Most

  12. USE OF BESTEST PROCEDURE TO IMPROVE A BUILDING THERMAL SIMULATION PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    USE OF BESTEST PROCEDURE TO IMPROVE A BUILDING THERMAL SIMULATION PROGRAM T. SOUBDHAN*, T. A. MARA Validation of building energy simulation programs is of major interest to both users and modellers. KEYWORDS Building energy simulation; validation; BESTEST; inter program comparison DESCRIPTION BESTEST

  13. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Task 23: Phase IV Results Regarding Floating Wind Turbine Modeling; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonkman, J.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Nygaard, T.; Maus, K.; Karimirad, M.; Gao, Z.; Moan, T.; Fylling, I.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, which operates under Subtask 2 of the International Energy Agency Wind Task 23. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating spar buoy in 320 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants' codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

  14. On the spherically symmetrical combustion of methyl decanoate droplets and comparisons with detailed numerical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    .53­0.57 mm and the combustion gas is normal atmospheric pressure air. A detailed numerical simulationOn the spherically symmetrical combustion of methyl decanoate droplets and comparisons Biodiesel Biofuel Microgravity Numerical Droplet combustion a b s t r a c t This study presents

  15. Community Leadership Certificate Program Program Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Community Leadership Certificate Program Program Overview The undergraduate Community Leadership Certificate Program is an interdisciplinary program where students from any major can explore leadership in community engagement and leadership. The program is based on a social justice model of leadership

  16. WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; McNeil, Michael; Dunham_Whitehead, Camilla; Letschert, Virginie; della_Cava, Mirka

    2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) influences the market for plumbing fixtures and fittings by encouraging consumers to purchase products that carry the WaterSense label, which certifies those products as performing at low flow rates compared to unlabeled fixtures and fittings. As consumers decide to purchase water-efficient products, water consumption will decline nationwide. Decreased water consumption should prolong the operating life of water and wastewater treatment facilities.This report describes the method used to calculate national water savings attributable to EPA?s WaterSense program. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet model, the National Water Savings (NWS) analysis model, accompanies this methodology report. Version 1.0 of the NWS model evaluates indoor residential water consumption. Two additional documents, a Users? Guide to the spreadsheet model and an Impacts Report, accompany the NWS model and this methodology document. Altogether, these four documents represent Phase One of this project. The Users? Guide leads policy makers through the spreadsheet options available for projecting the water savings that result from various policy scenarios. The Impacts Report shows national water savings that will result from differing degrees of market saturation of high-efficiency water-using products.This detailed methodology report describes the NWS analysis model, which examines the effects of WaterSense by tracking the shipments of products that WaterSense has designated as water-efficient. The model estimates market penetration of products that carry the WaterSense label. Market penetration is calculated for both existing and new construction. The NWS model estimates savings based on an accounting analysis of water-using products and of building stock. Estimates of future national water savings will help policy makers further direct the focus of WaterSense and calculate stakeholder impacts from the program.Calculating the total gallons of water the WaterSense program saves nationwide involves integrating two components, or modules, of the NWS model. Module 1 calculates the baseline national water consumption of typical fixtures, fittings, and appliances prior to the program (as described in Section 2.0 of this report). Module 2 develops trends in efficiency for water-using products both in the business-as-usual case and as a result of the program (Section 3.0). The NWS model combines the two modules to calculate total gallons saved by the WaterSense program (Section 4.0). Figure 1 illustrates the modules and the process involved in modeling for the NWS model analysis.The output of the NWS model provides the base case for each end use, as well as a prediction of total residential indoor water consumption during the next two decades. Based on the calculations described in Section 4.0, we can project a timeline of water savings attributable to the WaterSense program. The savings increase each year as the program results in the installation of greater numbers of efficient products, which come to compose more and more of the product stock in households throughout the United States.

  17. Expand the Modeling Capabilities of DOE's EnergyPlus Building Energy Simulation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Shirey

    2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    EnergyPlus{trademark} is a new generation computer software analysis tool that has been developed, tested, and commercialized to support DOE's Building Technologies (BT) Program in terms of whole-building, component, and systems R&D (http://www.energyplus.gov). It is also being used to support evaluation and decision making of zero energy building (ZEB) energy efficiency and supply technologies during new building design and existing building retrofits. Version 1.0 of EnergyPlus was released in April 2001, followed by semiannual updated versions over the ensuing seven-year period. This report summarizes work performed by the University of Central Florida's Florida Solar Energy Center (UCF/FSEC) to expand the modeling capabilities of EnergyPlus. The project tasks involved implementing, testing, and documenting the following new features or enhancement of existing features: (1) A model for packaged terminal heat pumps; (2) A model for gas engine-driven heat pumps with waste heat recovery; (3) Proper modeling of window screens; (4) Integrating and streamlining EnergyPlus air flow modeling capabilities; (5) Comfort-based controls for cooling and heating systems; and (6) An improved model for microturbine power generation with heat recovery. UCF/FSEC located existing mathematical models or generated new model for these features and incorporated them into EnergyPlus. The existing or new models were (re)written using Fortran 90/95 programming language and were integrated within EnergyPlus in accordance with the EnergyPlus Programming Standard and Module Developer's Guide. Each model/feature was thoroughly tested and identified errors were repaired. Upon completion of each model implementation, the existing EnergyPlus documentation (e.g., Input Output Reference and Engineering Document) was updated with information describing the new or enhanced feature. Reference data sets were generated for several of the features to aid program users in selecting proper model inputs. An example input data file, suitable for distribution to EnergyPlus users, was created for each new or improved feature to illustrate the input requirements for the model.

  18. Modeling geologic storage of carbon dioxide: Comparison of non-hysteretic chracteristic curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doughty, Christine

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the emissions of a 1,000 MW coal fired power plant for 30Emissions Research and Technology) and GEO-SEQ programs, through the Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Office of Coal and Power

  19. Modeling geologic storage of carbon dioxide: Comparison of non-hysteretic and hysteretic characteristic curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doughty, Christine

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the emissions of a 1,000 MW coal fired power plant for 30Emissions Research and Technology) and GEO-SEQ programs, through the Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Office of Coal and Power

  20. Inter-comparison of Computer Codes for TRISO-based Fuel Micro-Modeling and Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Boer; Chang Keun Jo; Wen Wu; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Donald McEachren; Francesco Venneri

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), the Deep Burn Pebble Bed Reactor (DB-PBR) and the Deep Burn Prismatic Block Reactor (DB-PMR) are all based on fuels that use TRISO particles as their fundamental constituent. The TRISO particle properties include very high durability in radiation environments, hence the designs reliance on the TRISO to form the principal barrier to radioactive materials release. This durability forms the basis for the selection of this fuel type for applications such as Deep Bun (DB), which require exposures up to four times those expected for light water reactors. It follows that the study and prediction of the durability of TRISO particles must be carried as part of the safety and overall performance characterization of all the designs mentioned above. Such evaluations have been carried out independently by the performers of the DB project using independently developed codes. These codes, PASTA, PISA and COPA, incorporate models for stress analysis on the various layers of the TRISO particle (and of the intervening matrix material for some of them), model for fission products release and migration then accumulation within the SiC layer of the TRISO particle, just next to the layer, models for free oxygen and CO formation and migration to the same location, models for temperature field modeling within the various layers of the TRISO particle and models for the prediction of failure rates. All these models may be either internal to the code or external. This large number of models and the possibility of different constitutive data and model formulations and the possibility of a variety of solution techniques makes it highly unlikely that the model would give identical results in the modeling of identical situations. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of an inter-comparison between the codes and to identify areas of agreement and areas that need reconciliation. The inter-comparison has been carried out by the cooperating institutions using a set of pre-defined TRISO conditions (burnup levels, temperature or power levels, etc.) and the outcome will be tabulated in the full length paper. The areas of agreement will be pointed out and the areas that require further modeling or reconciliation will be shown. In general the agreement between the codes is good within less than one order of magnitude in the prediction of TRISO failure rates.

  1. Atmospheric Environment 38 (2004) 44274436 Statistical comparison of observed and CMAQ modeled daily

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun, Mikyoung

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004 Abstract New statistical procedures to evaluate the Models-3/Community Multiscale Air Quality reserved. Keywords: Air quality model; Model evaluation; Space­time process; Separable covariance function 1. Introduction The Models-3/Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system has been

  2. Comparison of Strong Gravitational Lens Model Software II. HydraLens: Computer-Assisted Strong Gravitational Lens Model Generation and Translation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefor, Alsn T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of strong gravitational lens model software in the analysis of lens models is not necessarily consistent among the various software available, suggesting that the use of several models may enhance the understanding of the system being studied. Among the publicly available codes, the model input files are heterogeneous, making the creation of multiple models tedious. An enhanced method of creating model files and a method to easily create multiple models, may increase the number of comparison studies. HydraLens simplifies the creation of model files for four strong gravitational lens model software packages, including Lenstool, Gravlens/Lensmodel, glafic and PixeLens, using a custom designed GUI for each of the four codes that simplifies the entry of the model for each of these codes, obviating the need for user manuals to set the values of the many flags and in each data field. HydraLens is designed in a modular fashion, which simplifies the addition of other strong gravitational lens codes in th...

  3. The MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model : revisions, sensitivities, and comparisons of results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babiker, Mustafa H.M.; Reilly, John M.; Mayer, Monika.; Eckaus, Richard S.; Sue Wing, Ian.; Hyman, Robert C.

    The Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model is a component of the MIT Integrated Earth Systems Model (IGSM). Here, we provide an overview of the model accessible to a broad audience and present the detailed ...

  4. Comparison of five benchmarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huss, J. E.; Pennline, J. A.

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Five benchmark programs were obtained and run on the NASA Lewis CRAY X-MP/24. A comparison was made between the programs codes and between the methods for calculating performance figures. Several multitasking jobs were run to gain experience in how parallel performance is measured.

  5. Comparison of co-expression measures: mutual information, correlation, and model based indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Lin; Langfelder, Peter; Horvath, Steve

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that non- linear association measures, especially regressioncontrast, regression models capture non-linear gene pairwiseand spline regression models to measure non-linear

  6. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Home Performance Contractor Business Model Conclusion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The summary details important observations on home performance contractors and those observations’ impact on potential expansion into the residential energy efficiency market. Understanding these impacts can help home performance contractors, program administrators, and other actors create and/or sustain a business that promotes energy efficiency.

  7. Comparison of Simulation Methods for Evaluating Improved Fenestration Using the DOE-2.1E Building Energy Simulation Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, J.; Haberl, J. S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - performance glazing technology pushed researchers at LBNL to develop new and more sophisticated algorithms for fenestration simulation software (Arasteh et al. 1998). Research by Rubin (1982a, 1982b) and later Arasteh et al. (1989) played a key role... performance of fenestration systems under realistic conditions and compared the results with those obtained from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories (LBNL) simulation models (Klems 1989; Klems et al. 1995). DOE-2.1e gives several options...

  8. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Contractor/Retailer Business Models

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Business models information focused on remodelers, HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) contractors, home performance contractors, or retailers.

  9. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Home Performance Contractor Business Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The home performance contractor model walks through the “one-stop-shop” model for home energy upgrades. It illustrates both the opportunities and barriers for starting as a home performance contractor company from the beginning, rather than expanding from an existing model, such as a remodeler.

  10. EIA models and capacity building in Viet Nam: an analysis of development aid programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doberstein, Brent

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been a decided lack of empirical research examining development aid agencies as 'agents of change' in environmental impact assessment (EIA) systems in developing countries, particularly research examining the model of environmental planning practice promoted by aid agencies as part of capacity building. This paper briefly traces a conceptual framework of EIA, then introduces the concept of 'EIA capacity building'. Using Viet Nam as a case study, the paper then outlines the empirical results of the research, focusing on the extent to which aid agency capacity-building programs promoted a Technical vs. Planning Model of EIA and on the coherence of capacity-building efforts across all aid programs. A discussion follows, where research results are interpreted within the Vietnamese context, and implications of research results are identified for three main groups of actors. The paper concludes by calling for development aid agencies to reconceptualise EIA capacity building as an opportunity to transform developing countries' development planning processes.

  11. Automated Eukaryotic Gene Structure Annotation Using EVidenceModeler and the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, B J; Salzberg, S L; Zhu, W; Pertea, M; Allen, J E; Orvis, J; White, O; Buell, C R; Wortman, J R

    2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    EVidenceModeler (EVM) is presented as an automated eukaryotic gene structure annotation tool that reports eukaryotic gene structures as a weighted consensus of all available evidence. EVM, when combined with the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA), yields a comprehensive, configurable annotation system that predicts protein-coding genes and alternatively spliced isoforms. Our experiments on both rice and human genome sequences demonstrate that EVM produces automated gene structure annotation approaching the quality of manual curation.

  12. A hybrid programming model for compressible gas dynamics using openCL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergen, Benjamin Karl [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daniels, Marcus G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Weber, Paul M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current trend towards multicore/manycore and accelerated architectures presents challenges, both in portability, and also in the choices that developers must make on how to use the resources that these architectures provide. This paper explores some of the possibilities that are enabled by the Open Computing Language (OpenCL), and proposes a programming model that allows developers and scientists to more fully subscribe hybrid compute nodes, while, at the same time, reducing the impact of system failure.

  13. Comparison of the Accuracy and Speed of Transient Mobile A/C System Simulation Models: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiss, T.; Lustbader, J.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The operation of air conditioning (A/C) systems is a significant contributor to the total amount of fuel used by light- and heavy-duty vehicles. Therefore, continued improvement of the efficiency of these mobile A/C systems is important. Numerical simulation has been used to reduce the system development time and to improve the electronic controls, but numerical models that include highly detailed physics run slower than desired for carrying out vehicle-focused drive cycle-based system optimization. Therefore, faster models are needed even if some accuracy is sacrificed. In this study, a validated model with highly detailed physics, the 'Fully-Detailed' model, and two models with different levels of simplification, the 'Quasi-Transient' and the 'Mapped- Component' models, are compared. The Quasi-Transient model applies some simplifications compared to the Fully-Detailed model to allow faster model execution speeds. The Mapped-Component model is similar to the Quasi-Transient model except instead of detailed flow and heat transfer calculations in the heat exchangers, it uses lookup tables created with the Quasi-Transient model. All three models are set up to represent the same physical A/C system and the same electronic controls. Speed and results of the three model versions are compared for steady state and transient operation. Steady state simulated data are also compared to measured data. The results show that the Quasi-Transient and Mapped-Component models ran much faster than the Fully-Detailed model, on the order of 10- and 100-fold, respectively. They also adequately approach the results of the Fully-Detailed model for steady-state operation, and for drive cycle-based efficiency predictions

  14. A comparison of radiological risk assessment models: Risk assessment models used by the BEIR V Committee, UNSCEAR, ICRP, and EPA (for NESHAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, L.E.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiological risk assessments and resulting risk estimates have been developed by numerous national and international organizations, including the National Research Council`s fifth Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations (BEIR V), the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). A fourth organization, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), has also performed a risk assessment as a basis for the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP). This paper compares the EPA`s model of risk assessment with the models used by the BEIR V Committee, UNSCEAR, and ICRP. Comparison is made of the values chosen by each organization for several model parameters: populations used in studies and population transfer coefficients, dose-response curves and dose-rate effects, risk projection methods, and risk estimates. This comparison suggests that the EPA has based its risk assessment on outdated information and that the organization should consider adopting the method used by the BEIR V Committee, UNSCEAR, or ICRP.

  15. Comparison of Aermod and ISCST3 Models for Particulate Emissions from Ground Level Sources 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botlaguduru, Venkata Sai V.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Emission factors (EFs) and results from dispersion models are key components in the air pollution regulatory process. The EPA preferred regulatory model changed from ISCST3 to AERMOD in November, 2007. Emission factors are used in conjunction...

  16. Optimisation and comparison of integrated models of direct-drive linear machines for wave energy conversion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crozier, Richard Carson

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Combined electrical and structural models of five types of permanent magnet linear electrical machines suitable for direct-drive power take-off on wave energy applications are presented. Electromagnetic models were ...

  17. 2006 EUR 22241 EN report on model inter-comparison performed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    ............................................................................................................ 4 4 SF6 INTERCOMPARISON .......................................................................................... 19 4.1 SF6 MODELLING PROTOCOL ...................................................................................... 19 4.2 SF6 RESULTS

  18. Results and Comparison from the SAM Linear Fresnel Technology Performance Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, M. J.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the new Linear Fresnel technology performance model in NREL's System Advisor Model. The model predicts the financial and technical performance of direct-steam-generation Linear Fresnel power plants, and can be used to analyze a range of system configurations. This paper presents a brief discussion of the model formulation and motivation, and provides extensive discussion of the model performance and financial results. The Linear Fresnel technology is also compared to other concentrating solar power technologies in both qualitative and quantitative measures. The Linear Fresnel model - developed in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute - provides users with the ability to model a variety of solar field layouts, fossil backup configurations, thermal receiver designs, and steam generation conditions. This flexibility aims to encompass current market solutions for the DSG Linear Fresnel technology, which is seeing increasing exposure in fossil plant augmentation and stand-alone power generation applications.

  19. A comparison of measured and modeled tidal currents in the Gulf of Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Michael S

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Advisory Committee; Dr. David A. Brooks A modified version of the National Ocean Survey harmonic analysis computer program was used to extract the tidal signal from current meter records at five mooring stations (present stations) collected during four... summer periods in the Gulf of Maine. The results showed that the dominant tidal current constituent at all stations was the M2 constituent. The M2 tidal currents at each present station were vertically-averaged using a depth-weighting scheme...

  20. Waste package performance assessment: Deterministic system model, program scope and specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connell, W.J.; Drach, R.S.

    1986-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated assessments of the performance of nuclear waste package designs must be made in order to qualify waste package designs with respect to containment time and release-rate requirements. PANDORA is a computer-based model of the waste package and of the processes affecting it over the long terms, specific to conditions at the proposed Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site. The processes PANDORA models include: changes in inventories due to radioactive decay, gamma radiation dose rate in and near the package, heat transfer, mechanical behavior, groundwater contact, corrosion, waste form alteration, and radionuclide release. The model tracks the development and coupling of these processes over time. The process models are simplified ones that focus on major effects and on coupling. This report documents our conceptual model development and provides a specification for the computer program. The current model is the first in a series. Succeeding models will use guidance from results of preceding models in the PANDORA series and will incorporate results of recently completed experiments and calculations on processes affecting performance. 22 refs., 21 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. The Lifecycle of Bayesian Network Models Developed for Multi-Source Signature Assessment of Nuclear Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gastelum, Zoe N.; White, Amanda M.; Whitney, Paul D.; Gosink, Luke J.; Sego, Landon H.

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multi-Source Signatures for Nuclear Programs project, part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) Signature Discovery Initiative, seeks to computationally capture expert assessment of multi-type information such as text, sensor output, imagery, or audio/video files, to assess nuclear activities through a series of Bayesian network (BN) models. These models incorporate knowledge from a diverse range of information sources in order to help assess a country’s nuclear activities. The models span engineering topic areas, state-level indicators, and facility-specific characteristics. To illustrate the development, calibration, and use of BN models for multi-source assessment, we present a model that predicts a country’s likelihood to participate in the international nuclear nonproliferation regime. We validate this model by examining the extent to which the model assists non-experts arrive at conclusions similar to those provided by nuclear proliferation experts. We also describe the PNNL-developed software used throughout the lifecycle of the Bayesian network model development.

  2. Comparison between a spectral and PDF model for turbulent reacting flows.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaithianathan, T. (Thiranavakkarasu); Collins, L. R. (Lance R.); Ulitsky, M. S. (Mark S.)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study compares the performance of a probability density function (PDF) model and a spectral model (known as the eddy damped quasi-normal Markovian or EDQNM model) for the case of two initially unmixed reactants undergoing a finite-rate bimolecular reaction. The two models were chosen because they involve complimentary treatments of the nonlinearities and mixing terms. That is, nonlinearities are exactly treated in the PDF and mixing is modeled, whereas the opposite is true for EDQNM. The predictions of the two models are compared to direct numerical simulations. The results show that the PDF model is capable of describing the mixing of the major species reasonably well, but fails to describe the correlations between the reactants and the products even qualitatively. This suggests that the mixing model in the PDF is adequate for describing mixing between major species, but is incapable of describing mixing of the more spatially segregated product species. The EDQNM model does a slightly better job of describing the mixing of reactant species and a much better job of describing mixing of the product species. Presumably the improvement is associated with the more accurate description of the interscale dynamics that are especially important for the segregated products. The implication is that a model that combines the strengths of the EDQNM for describing mixing and the PDF for describing the nonlinearities would yield the best of both worlds.

  3. A Mixed-Integer Linear Programming Model for Optimizing the Scheduling and Assignment of Tank Farm Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 A Mixed-Integer Linear Programming Model for Optimizing the Scheduling and Assignment of Tank, Midland, MI 48674, USA Abstract This paper presents a novel mixed-integer linear programming (MILP multi-product processing lines and the assignment of dedicated storage tanks to finished products

  4. Comparisons of Statistical Multifragmentation and Evaporation Models for Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, M B; Charity, R; Durand, D; Friedman, W A; Gulminelli, F; Lefèvre, A; Raduta, A H; Raduta, A R; Souza, S; Trautmann, W; Wada, R; Raduta, Ad.R.; Raduta, Al. H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results from ten statistical multifragmentation models have been compared with each other using selected experimental observables. Even though details in any single observable may differ, the general trends among models are similar. Thus these models and similar ones are very good in providing important physics insights especially for general properties of the primary fragments and the multifragmentation process. Mean values and ratios of observables are also less sensitive to individual differences in the models. In addition to multifragmentation models, we have compared results from five commonly used evaporation codes. The fluctuations in isotope yield ratios are found to be a good indicator to evaluate the sequential decay implementation in the code. The systems and the observables studied here can be used as benchmarks for the development of statistical multifragmentation models and evaporation codes.

  5. Comparisons of Statistical Multifragmentation and Evaporation Models for Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Tsang; R. Bougault; R. Charity; D. Durand; W. A. Friedman; F. Gulminelli; A. Le Fevre; Al. H. Raduta; Ad. R. Raduta; S. Souza; W. Trautmann; R. Wada

    2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The results from ten statistical multifragmentation models have been compared with each other using selected experimental observables. Even though details in any single observable may differ, the general trends among models are similar. Thus these models and similar ones are very good in providing important physics insights especially for general properties of the primary fragments and the multifragmentation process. Mean values and ratios of observables are also less sensitive to individual differences in the models. In addition to multifragmentation models, we have compared results from five commonly used evaporation codes. The fluctuations in isotope yield ratios are found to be a good indicator to evaluate the sequential decay implementation in the code. The systems and the observables studied here can be used as benchmarks for the development of statistical multifragmentation models and evaporation codes.

  6. Comparison of Accelerated Testing with Modeling to Predict Lifetime of CPV Solder Layers (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silverman, T. J.; Bosco, N.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) cell assemblies can fail due to thermomechanical fatigue in the die-attach layer. In this presentation, we show the latest results from our computational model of thermomechanical fatigue. The model is used to estimate the relative lifetime of cell assemblies exposed to various temperature histories consistent with service and with accelerated testing. We also present early results from thermal cycling experiments designed to help validate the computational model.

  7. A comparison of turbulence models in airship steady-state CFD simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voloshin, Vitaly; Calay, Rajnish K

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accuracy and resource consumption of the four different turbulence models based on the eddy viscosity assumption, namely, $k-\\varepsilon$, two $k-\\omega$ and Spallart-Allmaram models, in modeling airships are investigated. The test airship shape is a conventional shape. Three different angles of attack are considered. The results are checked against the wind tunnel experimental data. The resource consumption study is based on the benchmark of 1500 iterations. Based on all data obtained it is evident that Spallart-Allmaras model is the most optimal one in the majority of cases.

  8. Determining Wind Turbine Gearbox Model Complexity Using Measurement Validation and Cost Comparison: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCava, W.; Xing, Y.; Guo, Y.; Moan, T.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) has conducted extensive field and dynamometer test campaigns on two heavily instrumented wind turbine gearboxes. In this paper, data from the planetary stage is used to evaluate the accuracy and computation time of numerical models of the gearbox. First, planet-bearing load and motion data is analyzed to characterize planetary stage behavior in different environments and to derive requirements for gearbox models and life calculations. Second, a set of models are constructed that represent different levels of fidelity. Simulations of the test conditions are compared to the test data and the computational cost of the models are compared. The test data suggests that the planet-bearing life calculations should be made separately for each bearing on a row due to unequal load distribution. It also shows that tilting of the gear axes is related to planet load share. The modeling study concluded that fully flexible models were needed to predict planet-bearing loading in some cases, although less complex models were able to achieve good correlation in the field-loading case. Significant differences in planet load share were found in simulation and were dependent on the scope of the model and the bearing stiffness model used.

  9. Exploiting Processor Groups to Extend Scalability of the GA Shared Memory Programming Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieplocha, Jarek; Krishnan, Manoj Kumar; Palmer, Bruce J.; Tipparaju, Vinod; Zhang, Yeliang

    2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploiting processor groups is becoming increasingly important for programming next-generation high-end systems composed of tens or hundreds of thousands of processors. This paper discusses the requirements, functionality and development of multilevel-parallelism based on processor groups in the context of the Global Array (GA) shared memory programming model. The main effort involves management of shared data, rather than interprocessor communication. Experimental results for the NAS NPB Conjugate Gradient benchmark and a molecular dynamics (MD) application are presented for a Linux cluster with Myrinet and illustrate the value of the proposed approach for improving scalability. While the original GA version of the CG benchmark lagged MPI, the processor-group version outperforms MPI in all cases, except for a few points on the smallest problem size. Similarly, the group version of the MD application improves execution time by 58% on 32 processors.

  10. Comparison of constitutive laws on the modeling of thermo-viscoplastic behaviour of an aluminum alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .guines@insa-rennes.fr, d email: shdgj@sdu.edu.cn Keywords: Hardening law; Aluminum alloy; Flow stress; Temperature; Strain, the innovative lightweight materials, such as aluminum alloys, have been widely adopted in the automotive published to model the thermo-viscoplastic behaviour of the aluminum alloys. A modified Bergström model

  11. Comparison of land use change models with focus on spatial and temporal frameworks and data issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Keith

    remote sensing data Adaptation of the land cover classification scheme for County or a small city.g. MEPLAN, Smart Places, INDEX, DRAM/EPAL § CUF 1,2, LUCAS, What If?, UPLAN, LTM, UrbanSim, Clarke Model § Other interesting models UGrow, Smart Growth Index - Research sources: § USFS Report: Data and Data

  12. The critical behavior of hadronic matter: Comparison of lattice and bootstrap model calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turko, L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Statistical bootstrap model and the related concept of the limiting temperature begun the discussion about phase transitions in the hadronic matter. This was also the origin of the quark-gluon plazma concept. We discuss here to which extend lattice studies of QCD critical behavior at non-zero chemical potential are compatible with the statistical bootstrap model calculations.

  13. The critical behavior of hadronic matter: Comparison of lattice and bootstrap model calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Turko

    2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Statistical bootstrap model and the related concept of the limiting temperature begun the discussion about phase transitions in the hadronic matter. This was also the origin of the quark-gluon plazma concept. We discuss here to which extend lattice studies of QCD critical behavior at non-zero chemical potential are compatible with the statistical bootstrap model calculations.

  14. A comparison of methods for calculating the matrix block source term in a double porosity model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Jean E.

    by the flow equation which is Darcy's law relating the fluid pressure with the Darcy velocity u u = -K p together with the law of conservation of mass div u = q. Here, in Darcy's equation, the effects of gravity- priate conditions, with a double porosity model. Such a model consists of a parabolic equation

  15. A comparison of polar cap ionospheric velocity determined from a digital ionosonde model and the DICM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    , and the IZMEM/DMSP model was constructed using ground-magnetometer measurements and calibrated against DMSP ion. These convection models must accommodate a raft of geo- physical conditions, particularly IMF orientation, solar and Maynard, 1987; Rich and Maynard, 1989) and sup- ported the two cell convection pattern predicted

  16. Model for incorporating fuel swelling and clad shrinkage effects in diffusion theory calculations (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schick, W.C. Jr.; Milani, S.; Duncombe, E.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model has been devised for incorporating into the thermal feedback procedure of the PDQ few-group diffusion theory computer program the explicit calculation of depletion and temperature dependent fuel-rod shrinkage and swelling at each mesh point. The model determines the effect on reactivity of the change in hydrogen concentration caused by the variation in coolant channel area as the rods contract and expand. The calculation of fuel temperature, and hence of Doppler-broadened cross sections, is improved by correcting the heat transfer coefficient of the fuel-clad gap for the effects of clad creep, fuel densification and swelling, and release of fission-product gases into the gap. An approximate calculation of clad stress is also included in the model.

  17. PNNL Support of the DOE GTO Model Comparison Activity | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartmentOutreachDepartment ofProgram49,PHEV1PIDepartment

  18. 407 herdsa2005 Approaches to learning in computer programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robins, Anthony

    emphasise presage factors. Biggs' 3P general model of student learning, by comparison, measures attitudinal measure, deep and surface approaches to learning (Biggs R-SPQ-2F questionnaire), to explain the success programming Introduction Biggs (1978) describes a three stage model of learning: presage, process and product

  19. A Comparative SWOT Analysis of the National Agricultural Extension Program Organization to Determine Best-Fit Program Model: A Case Study of the North West and South West Regions of Cameroon.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyambi, Gwendoline

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMPARATIVE SWOT ANALYSIS OF THE NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION PROGRAM ORGANIZATION TO DETERMINE BEST-FIT PROGRAM MODEL: A CASE STUDY OF THE NORTH WEST AND SOUTH WEST REGIONS OF CAMEROON A Dissertation by GWENDOLINE NA-AH NYAMBI... A Comparative SWOT Analysis of the National Agricultural Extension Program Organization to Determine Best-Fit Program Model: A Case Study of the North West and South West Regions of Cameroon Copyright 2012 Gwendoline Na-ah Nyambi A COMPARATIVE...

  20. A Comparison of Measured Crab and Vela Glitch Healing Parameters with Predictions of Neutron Star Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fronefield Crawford; Marek Demianski

    2003-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    There are currently two well-accepted models that explain how pulsars exhibit glitches, sudden changes in their regular rotational spin-down. According to the starquake model, the glitch healing parameter, Q, which is measurable in some cases from pulsar timing, should be equal to the ratio of the moment of inertia of the superfluid core of a neutron star (NS) to its total moment of inertia. Measured values of the healing parameter from pulsar glitches can therefore be used in combination with realistic NS structure models as one test of the feasibility of the starquake model as a glitch mechanism. We have constructed NS models using seven representative equations of state of superdense matter to test whether starquakes can account for glitches observed in the Crab and Vela pulsars, for which the most extensive and accurate glitch data are available. We also present a compilation of all measured values of Q for Crab and Vela glitches to date which have been separately published in the literature. We have computed the fractional core moment of inertia for stellar models covering a range of NS masses and find that for stable NSs in the realistic mass range 1.4 +/- 0.2 solar masses, the fraction is greater than 0.55 in all cases. This range is not consistent with the observational restriction Q 0.7) are consistent with the starquake model predictions and support previous conclusions that starquakes can be the cause of Crab glitches.

  1. Comparison of kinetic and equilibrium reaction models insimulating the behavior of porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalsky, Michael B.; Moridis, George J.

    2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study we compare the use of kinetic and equilibriumreaction models in the simulation of gas (methane) hydrate behavior inporous media. Our objective is to evaluate through numerical simulationthe importance of employing kinetic versus equilibrium reaction modelsfor predicting the response of hydrate-bearing systems to externalstimuli, such as changes in pressure and temperature. Specifically, we(1) analyze and compare the responses simulated using both reactionmodels for natural gas production from hydrates in various settings andfor the case of depressurization in a hydrate-bearing core duringextraction; and (2) examine the sensitivity to factors such as initialhydrate saturation, hydrate reaction surface area, and numericaldiscretization. We find that for large-scale systems undergoing thermalstimulation and depressurization, the calculated responses for bothreaction models are remarkably similar, though some differences areobserved at early times. However, for modeling short-term processes, suchas the rapid recovery of a hydrate-bearing core, kinetic limitations canbe important, and neglecting them may lead to significantunder-prediction of recoverable hydrate. Assuming validity of the mostaccurate kinetic reaction model that is currently available, the use ofthe equilibrium reaction model often appears to be justified andpreferred for simulating the behavior of gas hydrates, given that thecomputational demands for the kinetic reaction model far exceed those forthe equilibrium reaction model.

  2. ahmed code comparison: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    program. The first step of such a program is the comparison of different cosmology codes including gravitation interactions only. In this paper we extend a recently carried...

  3. aerosol code comparisons: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    program. The first step of such a program is the comparison of different cosmology codes including gravitation interactions only. In this paper we extend a recently carried...

  4. Validation and Comparison of Carbon Sequestration Project Cost Models with Project Cost Data Obtained from the Southwest Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Lee; Reid Grigg; Brian McPherson

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Obtaining formal quotes and engineering conceptual designs for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration sites and facilities is costly and time-consuming. Frequently, when looking at potential locations, managers, engineers and scientists are confronted with multiple options, but do not have the expertise or the information required to quickly obtain a general estimate of what the costs will be without employing an engineering firm. Several models for carbon compression, transport and/or injection have been published that are designed to aid in determining the cost of sequestration projects. A number of these models are used in this study, including models by J. Ogden, MIT's Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies Program Model, the Environmental Protection Agency and others. This report uses the information and data available from several projects either completed, in progress, or conceptualized by the Southwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) to determine the best approach to estimate a project's cost. The data presented highlights calculated versus actual costs. This data is compared to the results obtained by applying several models for each of the individual projects with actual cost. It also offers methods to systematically apply the models to future projects of a similar scale. Last, the cost risks associated with a project of this scope are discussed, along with ways that have been and could be used to mitigate these risks.

  5. A Comparison of Reduced-Form Permit Price Models and their Empirical Performances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taschini, Luca

    Equilibrium models have been proposed in literature with the aim of describing the evolution of the price of emission permits. This paper derives _rst estimation methods for the calibration of three competing equilibrium ...

  6. Dynamic soil-structure interaction-comparison of FEM model with experimental results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Palanivel Rajan

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to represent twenty different laboratory experiments. The results of these models are compared with results available from extensive experimental dynamic testing on a geotechnical centrifuge. Though the various results from the finite element analysis...

  7. The Importance of Model Selection on Housing Price Indexes: Comparisons of Temporal Aggregation and Sample Selectivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Englund, Peter; Quigley, John M.; Redfearn, Christian L.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DC, OFHEO, 1997. Quigley, John M. , “A Simple Hybrid Model419-438. Englund, Peter, John M. Quigley, and Christian L.University Sweden John M. Quigley University of California

  8. Improved Building Energy Performance Modelling through Comparison of Measured Data with Simulated Results 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bambrook, S.; Jacob, D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -ICE for the same building. The dataset collected at the demonstration building consists of total energy consumption, weather data, indoor conditions and HVAC system parameters, measured in at least hourly time steps. This paper presents the first steps in modelling...

  9. Improved Building Energy Performance Modelling through Comparison of Measured Data with Simulated Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bambrook, S.; Jacob, D.

    -ICE for the same building. The dataset collected at the demonstration building consists of total energy consumption, weather data, indoor conditions and HVAC system parameters, measured in at least hourly time steps. This paper presents the first steps in modelling...

  10. Comparison of Single, Double, and Triple Linear Flow Models for Shale Gas/Oil Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tivayanonda, Vartit

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    reservoirs effectively. Verification and derivation of asymptotic and associated equations from the Laplace space for dual porosity and triple porosity models are performed in order to generate analysis equations. Theories and practical applications...

  11. Comparison of reflection boundary conditions for langevin equation modeling of convective boundary layer dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasstrom, J.S.; Ermak, D.L.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lagrangian stochastic modeling based on the Langevin equation has been shown to be useful for simulating vertical dispersion of trace material in the convective boundary layer or CBL. This modeling approach can account for the effects of the long velocity correlation time scales, skewed vertical velocity distributions, and vertically inhomogeneous turbulent properties found in the CBL. It has been recognized that Langevin equation models assuming skewed but homogenous velocity statistics can capture the important aspects of diffusion from sources in the CBL, especially elevated sources. We compare three reflection boundary conditions using two different Langevin-equation-based numerical models for vertical dispersion in skewed, homogeneous turbulence. One model, described by Ermak and Nasstrom (1995) is based on a Langevin equation with a skewed random force and a linear deterministic force. The second model, used by Hurley and Physick (1993) is based on a Langevin equation with a Gaussian random force and a non-linear deterministic force. The reflection boundary conditions are all based on the approach described by Thompson and Montgomery (1994).

  12. A Review of Ground Coupled Heat Pump Models Used in Whole-Building Computer Simulation Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, S. L.; Haberl, J. S.

    system simulation module. The DOE-2.2 is the simulation engine of eQUEST. The eQUEST/DOE- 2.2 program uses an enhanced g-function algorithm, which was proposed by Eskilson (1987) at Lund University, Sweden, for fast calculation of the borehole wall... & Renewable Energy: http://apps1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/energyplus/ Eskilson, P. 1987. Thermal analysis of heat extraction boreholes. Lund, Sweden: Doctoral thesis, University of Lund, Dept. of Mathmatics. Fisher, D., & Rees, S. 2005. Modeling ground...

  13. MT3D: a 3 dimensional magnetotelluric modeling program (user's guide and documentation for Rev. 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutter, C.; Wannamaker, P.E.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MT3D.REV1 is a non-interactive computer program written in FORTRAN to do 3-dimensional magnetotelluric modeling. A 3-D volume integral equation has been adapted to simulate the MT response of a 3D body in the earth. An integro-difference scheme has been incorporated to increase the accuracy. This is a user's guide for MT3D.REV1 on the University of Utah Research Institute's (UURI) PRIME 400 computer operating under PRIMOS IV, Rev. 17.

  14. Nonlinear Modeling of the Dynamic Effects of Infused Insulin on Glucose: Comparison of Compartmental With Volterra Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markakis, Michail

    This paper presents the results of a computational study that compares simulated compartmental (differential equation) and Volterra models of the dynamic effects of insulin on blood glucose concentration in humans. In the ...

  15. The SMC (Short Model Coil) Nb3Sn Program: FE Analysis with 3D Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokkinos, C; Guinchard, M; Karppinen, M; Manil, P; Perez, J C; Regis, F

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SMC (Short Model Coil) project aims at testing superconducting coils in racetrack configuration, wound with Nb3Sn cable. The degradation of the magnetic properties of the cable is studied by applying different levels of pre-stress. It is an essential step in the validation of procedures for the construction of superconducting magnets with high performance conductor. Two SMC assemblies have been completed and cold tested in the frame of a European collaboration between CEA (FR), CERN and STFC (UK), with the technical support from LBNL (US). The second assembly showed remarkable good quench results, reaching a peak field of 12.5T. This paper details the new 3D modeling method of the SMC, implemented using the ANSYS® Workbench environment. Advanced computer-aided-design (CAD) tools are combined with multi-physics Finite Element Analyses (FEA), in the same integrated graphic interface, forming a fully parametric model that enables simulation driven development of the SMC project. The magnetic and structural ...

  16. Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (NUREG-0711)Revision 3: Update Methodology and Key Revisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.; Fleger, S.

    2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the human factors engineering (HFE) programs of applicants for nuclear power plant construction permits, operating licenses, standard design certifications, and combined operating licenses. The purpose of these safety reviews is to help ensure that personnel performance and reliability are appropriately supported. Detailed design review procedures and guidance for the evaluations is provided in three key documents: the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800), the HFE Program Review Model (NUREG-0711), and the Human-System Interface Design Review Guidelines (NUREG-0700). These documents were last revised in 2007, 2004 and 2002, respectively. The NRC is committed to the periodic update and improvement of the guidance to ensure that it remains a state-of-the-art design evaluation tool. To this end, the NRC is updating its guidance to stay current with recent research on human performance, advances in HFE methods and tools, and new technology being employed in plant and control room design. NUREG-0711 is the first document to be addressed. We present the methodology used to update NUREG-0711 and summarize the main changes made. Finally, we discuss the current status of the update program and the future plans.

  17. Comparison of bifurcation dynamics of turbulent transport models for the L-H transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weymiens, W., E-mail: w.weymiens@differ.nl; Blank, H. J. de; Hogeweij, G. M. D. [FOM Institute DIFFER—Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, PO Box 1207, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)] [FOM Institute DIFFER—Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, PO Box 1207, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Paquay, S. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 503, Eindhoven (Netherlands)] [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 503, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In more than three decades, a large amount of models and mechanisms have been proposed to describe a very beneficial feature of magnetically confined fusion plasmas: the L-H transition. Bifurcation theory can be used to compare these different models based on their dynamical transition structure. In this paper, we employ bifurcation theory to distinguish two fundamentally different descriptions of the interaction between turbulence levels and sheared flows. The analytic bifurcation analysis characterises the parameter space structure of the transition dynamics. Herewith, in these models three dynamically different types of transitions are characterised, sharp transitions, oscillatory transitions, and smooth transitions. One of the two models has a very robust transition structure and is therefore likely to be more accurate for such a robust phenomenon as the L-H transition. The other model needs more fine-tuning to get non-oscillatory transitions. These conclusions from the analytic bifurcation analysis are confirmed by dedicated numerical simulations, with the newly developed code Bifurcator.

  18. Comparison of kinetic and equilibrium reaction models insimulating gas hydrate behavior in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalsky, Michael B.; Moridis, George J.

    2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study we compare the use of kinetic and equilibriumreaction models in the simulation of gas (methane) hydrate behavior inporous media. Our objective is to evaluate through numerical simulationthe importance of employing kinetic versus equilibrium reaction modelsfor predicting the response of hydrate-bearing systems to externalstimuli, such as changes in pressure and temperature. Specifically, we(1) analyze and compare the responses simulated using both reactionmodels for natural gas production from hydrates in various settings andfor the case of depressurization in a hydrate-bearing core duringextraction; and (2) examine the sensitivity to factors such as initialhydrate saturation, hydrate reaction surface area, and numericaldiscretization. We find that for large-scale systems undergoing thermalstimulation and depressurization, the calculated responses for bothreaction models are remarkably similar, though some differences areobserved at early times. However, for modeling short-term processes, suchas the rapid recovery of a hydrate-bearing core, kinetic limitations canbe important, and neglecting them may lead to significantunder-prediction of recoverable hydrate. The use of the equilibriumreaction model often appears to be justified and preferred for simulatingthe behavior of gas hydrates, given that the computational demands forthe kinetic reaction model far exceed those for the equilibrium reactionmodel.

  19. Preliminary validation of rock mass models by comparison to laboratory frictional sliding experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobolik, S.R.; Miller, J.D.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) is studying Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada as a potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Site characterization will be facilitated by the construction of an Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). The ESF and potential repository will be excavated from both nonwelded and welded ashflow tuff with varying rock quality (degree of welding, rock mass strength, etc.) and fault and fracture characteristics. Design concerns for the construction of these facilities include the integrity of the structure during underground testing operations and, if it occurs, the emplacement and storage of high-level nuclear waste which could increase the local temperatures in the underground rock mass to as high as 300{degrees}C. Because of the associated issues regarding personnel and long-term environmental safety, sophisticated jointed rock mass models will be required to provide a high degree of confidence for decisions regarding the design, site characterization, and licensing of such facilities. The objective of the work documented in this report is to perform code validation calculations for three rock-mass computer models. The three rock-mass computer models used for this report are the discrete element code UDEC, Version 1.82; and the finite element continuum joint models JAC2D Version 5.10 and JAS3D Version 1.1. The rock mass behavior predicted by the models are compared to the results of laboratory experiments on layered polycarbonate (Lexan) and granite plate experiments. These experiments examine the rock mass behavior of well-defined jointed rock structures or models of jointed structures under uniaxial and biaxial loading. The laboratory environment allows control over the boundary conditions, material properties, and quality and quantity of the data obtained.

  20. Comparisons of Shewanella strains based on genome annotations, modeling and experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, Wai Kit; Vu, Trang; Lovendahl, Klaus N.; Llull, Jenna; Serres, Margaret; Romine, Margaret F.; Reed, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shewanella is a genus of facultatively anaerobic, Gram-negative bacteria that have highly adaptable metabolism which allows them to thrive in diverse environments. This quality makes them attractive target bacteria for research in bioremediation and microbial fuel cell applications. Constraint-based modeling is a useful tool for helping researchers gain insights into the metabolic capabilities of these bacteria. However, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is the only strain with a genome-scale metabolic model constructed out of the 22 sequenced Shewanella strains.

  1. A comparison of observed and modeled surface waves in southern Lake Michigan and the implications for models of sediment resuspension.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawley, N.; Lesht, B. M.; Schwab, D. J.; Environmental Research; Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab

    2004-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface pressure sensors were used to make measurements of surface waves during 18 deployments in southern Lake Michigan between 1998 and 2000. Most of the observations were made during the unstratified period (November--May) in water depths between 10 and 55 m. The observations (as well as those obtained from the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) buoy 45007, which is located in the middle of the southern basin of the lake) were compared to the results obtained from the Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL)-Donelan wave model implemented on a 2-km grid. The results show that the wave model does a good job of calculating the wave heights, but consistently underestimates the wave periods. In over 80% of the cases the bottom stresses calculated from both the observations and the wave model results agree as to whether or not resuspension occurs, but over 70% of this agreement is for cases when resuspension does not occur; both stresses predict resuspension about 6% of the time. Since the bottom stresses calculated from the model results are usually lower than those calculated from the observations, resuspension estimates based on the wave model parameters are also lower than those calculated from the observed waves.

  2. COMPARISON OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION Bernhard Lange(1), Jrgen Hjstrup(2), Sren Larsen(2), Rebecca Barthelmie(2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Large offshore wind farms are being built in several countries in Europe. The economic viabilityCOMPARISON OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION Bernhard Lange(1 of such projects depends on the favourable wind conditions of offshore sites, since the higher energy yield has

  3. Composites Science and Technology, Vol. 64, no. 7-8, pp. 1011-1020 (2004) Comparison of Two Models of SWCN Polymer Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odegard, Gregory M.

    developed to predict the macroscopic behavior of composite materials reinforced with typical carbon fibers composite materials has attracted significant attention since their discovery more than a decade ago [1, 2Composites Science and Technology, Vol. 64, no. 7-8, pp. 1011-1020 (2004) Comparison of Two Models

  4. 3rd International Conference on Countermeasures to Urban Heat Island Venice, October 13-15, 2014 Comparison of Software Models for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua Newa, William A. Millera, Yu (Joe- based tool to estimate cool-roof energy savings 2 2014-08-20: The Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) is undergoing revision and validation. Results from the current version of RSC (beta release 0.92) may

  5. Modelling of environmental impacts of solid waste landfilling within the life-cycle analysis program EASEWASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkeby, Janus T.; Birgisdottir, Harpa [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Bhander, Gurbakash Singh; Hauschild, Michael [Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management, Technical University of Denmark, Building 424, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)], E-mail: thc@er.dtu.dk

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new computer-based life-cycle assessment model (EASEWASTE) has been developed to evaluate resource and environmental consequences of solid waste management systems. This paper describes the landfilling sub-model used in the life-cycle assessment program EASEWASTE, and examines some of the implications of this sub-model. All quantities and concentrations of leachate and landfill gas can be modified by the user in order to bring them in agreement with the actual landfill that is assessed by the model. All emissions, except the generation of landfill gas, are process specific. The landfill gas generation is calculated on the basis of organic matter in the landfilled waste. A landfill assessment example is provided. For this example, the normalised environmental effects of landfill gas on global warming and photochemical smog are much greater than the environmental effects for landfill leachate or for landfill construction. A sensitivity analysis for this example indicates that the overall environmental impact is sensitive to the gas collection efficiency and the use of the gas, but not to the amount of leachate generated, or the amount of soil or liner material used in construction. The landfill model can be used for evaluating different technologies with different liners, gas and leachate collection efficiencies, and to compare the environmental consequences of landfilling with alternative waste treatment options such as incineration or anaerobic digestion.

  6. Titan's ionosphere: Model comparisons with Cassini Ta data T. E. Cravens,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    and measured electron densities along the spacecraft track. Ionization both by solar radiation and by incoming technique [Bird et al., 1997]. Many models of Titan's ionosphere have been constructed over the past decade below the exobase [Waite et al., 2005]. The solar zenith angle (SZA) and latitude at CA were 91

  7. A Comparison of High-Level Full-System Power Models Suzanne Rivoire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivoire, Suzanne

    proposed in the context of enabling specific energy-efficiency optimizations on specific machines compare these models over a wide variation of workloads and machines, from a laptop to a server, two classes of systems that are increasingly prevalent. 1 Introduction In order to maximize energy

  8. A Comparison of Shell Model Results for Some properties of the Even-Even Ge Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. J. Q. Robinson; L. Zamick; Y. Y. Sharon

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we examine two recent effective shell model interactions, JUN45 and JJ4B, that have been proposed for use in the $f_{5/2},p_{3/2}, p_{1/2}, g_{9/2}$ model space for both protons and neutrons. We calculate a number of quantities that did not enter into the fits undertaken to fix the parameters of both interactions. In particular we consider static quadrupole moments (Q's) of excited states of the even-even $^{70-76}$Ge isotopes, as well as the B(E2) values in these nuclei. (We have previously studied $^{70}$Zn isotopes using JJ4B.) Some striking disagreements between the JUN45 prediction and the experimental results had already been noted for the quadrupole moments of the $2_1^+$ states of these nuclei. We investigate whether these discrepancies also occur for the JJ4B interaction. Subsequently, we also apply both interactions to calculate the Q's of some more highly excited states and compare the two sets of predictions regarding the nature of the nuclear states under consideration. In order to gain insight into these more complex large-scale shell-model calculations, we examine the corresponding and much simpler single-j shell model calculations in the $g_{9/2}$ neutron shell.

  9. Comparison of Implementations of a Flexible Joint Multibody Dynamics System Model for an Industrial Robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stryk, Oskar von

    In this paper, different implementations of elastic joint models of industrial robots are described and com Industrial robots are widely used in various fields of applica- tion. However, when it comes to tasks where than industrial robots. Industrial robots, on the other hand, have a high work space and are very

  10. Sequential Monte Carlo in Model Comparison: Example in Cellular Dynamics in Systems Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    : American Statistical Association (2009): 1274-1287. Abstract Sequential Monte Carlo analysis of time series. Mukherjee L. You M. West -- Published in: JSM Proceedings/Bayesian Statistical Science. Alexandria, VA statistical model assessment is really just beginning in this new field. Single cell time series data

  11. 14 STEP DETACHMENT MODELING DIAGNOSTICS USING EXPERIMENTAL DATA TO CONSTRAIN THE PLASMA SOLUTION COMPARISON WITH DTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stangeby, P. C.

    density entering each flux tube is calculated from the standard 2 Point Model relation, q = 2 T /7L, where recombination neglected. 12. Momentum loss term, S , also rectangular in shape, extends from S to the target. Target temperature was assigned by a search process: with the foregoing prescription, and assuming some

  12. Analysing protein energy data by a stochastic model for cooperative interactions: comparison and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roma Tor Vergata, Università di

    of the peptidic chain are involved in many processes of great biological relevance, like protein folding, ligand­ actions favours the formation of additional bonds. In the protein folding process, this behaviour results simplified models of protein folding have been proposed, but they all mantain # Corresponding author

  13. A Statistical Model and Computer program for Preliminary Calculations Related to the Scaling of Sensor Arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Max Morris

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in sensor technology and engineering have made it possible to assemble many related sensors in a common array, often of small physical size. Sensor arrays may report an entire vector of measured values in each data collection cycle, typically one value per sensor per sampling time. The larger quantities of data provided by larger arrays certainly contain more information, however in some cases experience suggests that dramatic increases in array size do not always lead to corresponding improvements in the practical value of the data. The work leading to this report was motivated by the need to develop computational planning tools to approximate the relative effectiveness of arrays of different size (or scale) in a wide variety of contexts. The basis of the work is a statistical model of a generic sensor array. It includes features representing measurement error, both common to all sensors and independent from sensor to sensor, and the stochastic relationships between the quantities to be measured by the sensors. The model can be used to assess the effectiveness of hypothetical arrays in classifying objects or events from two classes. A computer program is presented for evaluating the misclassification rates which can be expected when arrays are calibrated using a given number of training samples, or the number of training samples required to attain a given level of classification accuracy. The program is also available via email from the first author for a limited time.

  14. Use of a Lidar Forward Model for Global Comparisons of Cloud Fraction between the ICESat Lidar and the ECMWF Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    to underestimate cloud cover in the extra-tropical oceans, the trade wind cumulus, the stratocumulus sheets off-to-backscatter ratio and effective radius affect the forward modeled mean cloud fraction by no more than 10%. 1. Introduction Clouds play a major role in the Earth's radiation bud- get and predictions of future climate

  15. The response of strati?ed swirling ?ames to acoustic forcing: experiments and comparison to model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Zhiyi; Hochgreb, Simone

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    systems from a positive coupling between pressure perturbations and the heat release rate oscillation [1], and have posed significant challenges to the development of advanced gas turbine engines [1–3]. The drive towards lean operation leaves combustion... . Lieuwen, V. Yang, Combustion instabilities in gas turbine en- gines: operational experience, fundamental mechanisms and modeling, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2005. [2] Y. Huang, V. Yang, Progress in Energy and Combustion Science 35...

  16. Comparison of Jupiter Interior Models Derived from First-Principles Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Militzer; W. B. Hubbard

    2008-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently two groups used first-principles computer simulations to model Jupiter's interior. While both studies relied on the same simulation technique, density functional molecular dynamics, the groups derived very different conclusions. In particular estimates for the size of Jupiter's core and the metallicity of its hydrogen-helium mantle differed substantially. In this paper, we discuss the differences of the approaches and give an explanation for the differing conclusions.

  17. A Comparison of Storage Ring Modeling with COSY INFINITY, ZGOUBI, and MAD8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hipple, Robert

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently there is significant interest in the use of storage rings to search for an electric dipole moment (EDM) in hadrons. This requires utilizing the storage ring as a precision measuring device. Part of understanding the detailed behavior of storage rings comes from careful analysis of fringe fields, but the various tracking codes available differ in their ability to model such behavior. It is the purpose of this paper to investigate these differences.

  18. Comparison of Fourier and model-based estimators in single mode multiaxial interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Tatulli; J. -B. LeBouquin

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There are several solutions to code the signal arising from optical long baseline multi-aperture interferometers. In this paper,we focus on the {\\bf non homothetic spatial coding scheme} (multiaxial) with the fringe pattern coded along one dimension on one detector(all-in-one). After describing the physical principles governing single mode interferometers using that sort of recombination scheme, we analyze two different existing methods that measure the source visibility. The first technique, so-called Fourier estimator, consists in integrating the high frequency peak of the power spectral density of the interferogram. The second method, so-called model-based estimator, has been specifically developed for the AMBER instrument of the VLTI and deals with directly modelling the interferogram recorded on the detector. Performances of both estimators are computed in terms of Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of the visibility, assuming that the interferograms are perturbed by photon and detector noises. Theoretical expressions of the visibility SNR are provided, validated through numerical computations and then compared. We show that the model-based estimator offers up to 5 times better performances than the Fourier one.

  19. Comparison between RHD simulation of supercritical accretion flows and steady model with outflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Cheng-Liang; Takeuchi, Shun; Ohsuga, Ken

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply our two-dimensional (2D), radially self-similar steady-state accretion flow model to the analysis of hydrodynamic simulation results of supercritical accretion flows. Self-similarity is checked and the input parameters for the model calculation, such as advective factor and heat capacity ratio, are obtained from time-averaged simulation data. Solutions of the model are then calculated and compared with the simulation results. We find that in the converged region of the simulation, excluding the part too close to the black hole, the radial distribution of azimuthal velocity $v_\\phi$, density $\\rho$ and pressure $p$ basically follows the self-similar assumptions, i.e. they are roughly proportional to $r^{-0.5}$, $r^{-n}$, and $r^{-(n+1)}$, respectively, where $n\\sim0.85$ for the mass injection rate of $1000L_\\mathrm{E}/c^2$, and $n\\sim0.74$ for $3000L_\\mathrm{E}/c^2$. The distribution of $v_r$ and $v_\\theta$ agrees less with self-similarity, possibly due to convective motions in the $r\\theta$ plane. Th...

  20. Comparison of Two Gas Selection Methodologies: An Application of Bayesian Model Averaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renholds, Andrea S.; Thompson, Sandra E.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Chilton, Lawrence K.

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One goal of hyperspectral imagery analysis is the detection and characterization of plumes. Characterization includes identifying the gases in the plumes, which is a model selection problem. Two gas selection methods compared in this report are Bayesian model averaging (BMA) and minimum Akaike information criterion (AIC) stepwise regression (SR). Simulated spectral data from a three-layer radiance transfer model were used to compare the two methods. Test gases were chosen to span the types of spectra observed, which exhibit peaks ranging from broad to sharp. The size and complexity of the search libraries were varied. Background materials were chosen to either replicate a remote area of eastern Washington or feature many common background materials. For many cases, BMA and SR performed the detection task comparably in terms of the receiver operating characteristic curves. For some gases, BMA performed better than SR when the size and complexity of the search library increased. This is encouraging because we expect improved BMA performance upon incorporation of prior information on background materials and gases.

  1. Gasoline surrogate modeling of gasoline ignition in a rapid compression machine and comparison to experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehl, M; Kukkadapu, G; Kumar, K; Sarathy, S M; Pitz, W J; Sung, S J

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of gasoline in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines (HCCI) and in duel fuel diesel - gasoline engines, has increased the need to understand its compression ignition processes under engine-like conditions. These processes need to be studied under well-controlled conditions in order to quantify low temperature heat release and to provide fundamental validation data for chemical kinetic models. With this in mind, an experimental campaign has been undertaken in a rapid compression machine (RCM) to measure the ignition of gasoline mixtures over a wide range of compression temperatures and for different compression pressures. By measuring the pressure history during ignition, information on the first stage ignition (when observed) and second stage ignition are captured along with information on the phasing of the heat release. Heat release processes during ignition are important because gasoline is known to exhibit low temperature heat release, intermediate temperature heat release and high temperature heat release. In an HCCI engine, the occurrence of low-temperature and intermediate-temperature heat release can be exploited to obtain higher load operation and has become a topic of much interest for engine researchers. Consequently, it is important to understand these processes under well-controlled conditions. A four-component gasoline surrogate model (including n-heptane, iso-octane, toluene, and 2-pentene) has been developed to simulate real gasolines. An appropriate surrogate mixture of the four components has been developed to simulate the specific gasoline used in the RCM experiments. This chemical kinetic surrogate model was then used to simulate the RCM experimental results for real gasoline. The experimental and modeling results covered ultra-lean to stoichiometric mixtures, compressed temperatures of 640-950 K, and compression pressures of 20 and 40 bar. The agreement between the experiments and model is encouraging in terms of first-stage (when observed) and second-stage ignition delay times and of heat release rate. The experimental and computational results are used to gain insight into low and intermediate temperature processes during gasoline ignition.

  2. Tidally averaged circulation in Puget Sound sub-basins: Comparison of historical data, analytical model, and numerical model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Yang, Zhaoqing; Kim, Tae Yun; Roberts, Mindy

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Through extensive field data collection and analysis efforts conducted since the 1950s, researchers have established an understanding of the characteristic features of circulation in Puget Sound. The pattern ranges from the classic fjordal behavior in some basins, with shallow brackish outflow and compensating inflow immediately below, to the typical two-layer flow observed in many partially mixed estuaries with saline inflow at depth. An attempt at reproducing this behavior by fitting an analytical formulation to past data is presented, followed by the application of a three-dimensional circulation and transport numerical model. The analytical treatment helped identify key physical processes and parameters, but quickly reconfirmed that response is complex and would require site-specific parameterization to include effects of sills and interconnected basins. The numerical model of Puget Sound, developed using unstructured-grid finite volume method, allowed resolution of the sub-basin geometric features, including presence of major islands, and site-specific strong advective vertical mixing created by bathymetry and multiple sills. The model was calibrated using available recent short-term oceanographic time series data sets from different parts of the Puget Sound basin. The results are compared against (1) recent velocity and salinity data collected in Puget Sound from 2006 and (2) a composite data set from previously analyzed historical records, mostly from the 1970s. The results highlight the ability of the model to reproduce velocity and salinity profile characteristics, their variations among Puget Sound subbasins, and tidally averaged circulation. Sensitivity of residual circulation to variations in freshwater inflow and resulting salinity gradient in fjordal sub-basins of Puget Sound is examined.

  3. World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3): Multi-Model Dataset Archive at PCMDI (Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    In response to a proposed activity of the WCRP's Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM),PCMDI volunteered to collect model output contributed by leading modeling centers around the world. Climate model output from simulations of the past, present and future climate was collected by PCMDI mostly during the years 2005 and 2006, and this archived data constitutes phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3). In part, the WGCM organized this activity to enable those outside the major modeling centers to perform research of relevance to climate scientists preparing the Fourth Asssessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The IPCC was established by the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environmental Program to assess scientific information on climate change. The IPCC publishes reports that summarize the state of the science. This unprecedented collection of recent model output is officially known as the WCRP CMIP3 multi-model dataset. It is meant to serve IPCC's Working Group 1, which focuses on the physical climate system - atmosphere, land surface, ocean and sea ice - and the choice of variables archived at the PCMDI reflects this focus. A more comprehensive set of output for a given model may be available from the modeling center that produced it. As of November 2007, over 35 terabytes of data were in the archive and over 303 terabytes of data had been downloaded among the more than 1200 registered users. Over 250 journal articles, based at least in part on the dataset, have been published or have been accepted for peer-reviewed publication. Countries from which models have been gathered include Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany and Korea, Italy, Japan, Norway, Russia, Great Britain and the United States. Models, variables, and documentation are collected and stored. Check http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/data_status_tables.htm to see at a glance the output that is available. (Description taken from http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/about_ipcc.php)

  4. Comparison of model and observations of the wake of a MOD-OA wind turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doran, J.C.; Packard, K.R.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of wind velocity measurements upwind and downwind of the MOD-OA wind turbine at Clayton, New Mexico, was used to determine some of the characteristics of wakes within approximately two blade diameters of the machine. The magnitudes and shapes of the velocity profiles downwind of the turbine were compared with results obtained from a model. Generally good agreement was obtained at speeds well below the rated speed of the MOD-OA, but the results were not as satisfactory for higher values.

  5. A comparison of two lung clearance models based on the dissolution rates of oxidized depleted uranium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crist, Kevin Craig

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by Cuddihy. Predictions fr'om bai. h models based on the dissolution rates of the amount of oxidized depleted uranium that wau'ld be cleared to blood irom the pu lraana ry region i'o'i)owing an i nba !at i cn exposure were compared . It was f:urd ti... to oxidized depleted uranium (DU) aerosol. The ob, ject. ive of th. is i:hesis was three fold: (1) to determine the dissolution rates for two respirable DU samples, (2) to determine the specific pulmonary clearance characteristics of oxidized DU, (3) Co...

  6. Essential and model programs for teaching and learning centers as reported by directors in selected research extensive universities: a Delphi study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pchenitchnaia, Larissa V.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    research extensive universities? (2) What are model faculty development programs for teaching and learning centers as reported by directors in selected research extensive universities? (3) What programs will be essential for faculty development...

  7. Sensitivity of climate models: Comparison of simulated and observed patterns for past climates. Progress report, February 1, 1992--January 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prell, W.L.; Webb, T. III

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting the potential climatic effects of increased concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide requires the continuing development of climate models. Confidence in the predictions will be much enhanced once the models are thoroughly tested in terms of their ability to simulate climates that differ significantly from today`s climate. As one index of the magnitude of past climate change, the global mean temperature increase during the past 18,000 years is similar to that predicted for carbon dioxide--doubling. Simulating the climatic changes of the past 18,000 years, as well as the warmer-than-present climate of 6000 years ago and the climate of the last interglacial, around 126,000 years ago, provides an excellent opportunity to test the models that are being used in global climate change research. During the past several years, we have used paleoclimatic data to test the accuracy of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Community Climate Model, Version 0, after changing its boundary conditions to those appropriate for past climates. We have assembled regional and near-global paleoclimatic data sets of pollen, lake level, and marine plankton data and calibrated many of the data in terms of climatic variables. We have also developed methods that permit direct quantitative comparisons between the data and model results. Our research has shown that comparing the model results with the data is an evolutionary process, because the models, the data, and the methods for comparison are continually being improved. During 1992, we have completed new modeling experiments, further analyzed previous model experiments, compiled new paleodata, made new comparisons between data and model results, and participated in workshops on paleoclimatic modeling.

  8. Simulation and Comparison of Particle Injection in an Indoor Environment Using the Species Transport and Discrete Phase Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Zhongquan C.; Wei, Zhenglun A.; Bennett, James S.; Yang, Xiaofan

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In simulating fluid/solid-particle multiphase -flows, various methods are available. One approach is the combined Euler-Lagrange method, which simulates the fluid phase flow in the Eulerian framework and the discrete phase (particle) motion in the Lagrangian framework simultaneously. The Lagrangian approach, where particle motion is determined by the current state of the fluid phase flow, is also called the discrete phase model (DPM), in the context of numerical flow simulation. In this method, the influence of the particle motions on the fluid flow can be included (two-way interactions) but are more commonly excluded (one-way interactions, when the discrete phase concentration is dilute. The other approach is to treat the particle number concentration as a continuous species, a necessarily passive quantity determined by the fluid flow, with no influences from the particles on the fluid flow (one-way interactions only), except to the extent the discrete phase “continuum” alters the overall fluid properties, such as density. In this paper, we compare these two methods with experimental data for an indoor environmental chamber. The effects of injection particle numbers and the related boundary conditions are investigated. In the Euler-Lagrange interaction or DPM model for incompressible flow, the Eulerian continuous phase is governed by the Reynolds-averaged N-S (RANS) equations. The motions of particles are governed by Newton’s second law. The effects of particle motions are communicated to the continuous phase through a force term in the RANS equations. The second formulation is a pure Eulerian type, where only the particle-number concentration is addressed, rather than the motion of each individual particle. The fluid flow is governed by the same RANS equations without the particle force term. The particle-number concentration is simulated by a species transport equation. Comparisons among the models and with experimental and literature data are presented. Particularly, results with different numbers of released particles in the DPM will be investigated.

  9. Modeling sequence-specific polymers using anisotropic coarse-grained sites allows quantitative comparison with experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Haxton; Ranjan V. Mannige; Ronald N. Zuckermann; Stephen Whitelam

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Certain sequences of peptoid polymers (synthetic analogs of peptides) assemble into bilayer nanosheets via a nonequilibrium assembly pathway of adsorption, compression, and collapse at an air-water interface. As with other large-scale dynamic processes in biology and materials science, understanding the details of this supramolecular assembly process requires a modeling approach that captures behavior on a wide range of length and time scales, from those on which individual sidechains fluctuate to those on which assemblies of polymers evolve. Here we demonstrate that a new coarse-grained modeling approach is accurate and computationally efficient enough to do so. Our approach uses only a minimal number of coarse-grained sites, but retains independently fluctuating orientational degrees of freedom for each site. These orientational degrees of freedom allow us to accurately parameterize both bonded and nonbonded interactions, and to generate all-atom configurations with sufficient accuracy to perform atomic scattering calculations and to interface with all-atom simulations. We have used this approach to reproduce all available experimental X-ray scattering spectra (for stacked nanosheets, and for peptoids adsorbed at air-water interfaces and in solution), in order to resolve the microscopic, real-space structures responsible for these Fourier-space features. By interfacing with all-atom simulations, we have also laid the foundations for future multiscale simulations of sequence-specific polymers that communicate in both directions across scales.

  10. Cosmic Reionization and the 21-cm signal: Comparison between an analytical model and a simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario G. Santos; Alexandre Amblard; Jonathan Pritchard; Hy Trac; Renyue Cen; Asantha Cooray

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure several properties of the reionization process and the corresponding low-frequency 21-cm signal associated with the neutral hydrogen distribution, using a large volume, high resolution simulation of cosmic reionization. The brightness temperature of the 21-cm signal is derived by post-processing this numerical simulation with a semi-analytical prescription. Our study extends to high redshifts (z ~ 25) where, in addition to collisional coupling, our post-processed simulations take into account the inhomogeneities in the heating of the neutral gas by X-rays and the effect of an inhomogeneous Lya radiation field. Unlike the well-studied case where spin temperature is assumed to be significantly greater than the temperature of the cosmic microwave background due to uniform heating of the gas by X-rays, spatial fluctuations in both the Lya radiation field and X-ray intensity impact predictions related to the brightness temperature at z > 10, during the early stages of reionization and gas heating. The statistics of the 21-cm signal from our simulation are then compared to existing analytical models in the literature and we find that these analytical models provide a reasonably accurate description of the 21-cm power spectrum at z 10 and, with upcoming interferometric data, these differences in return can provide a way to better understand the astrophysical processes during reionization.

  11. Calculation of heat flux through a wall containing a cavity: comparison of several models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.E.; Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Tunstall, J.N.; Childs, K.W.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the calculation of the heat transfer through the standard stud wall structure of a residential building. The wall cavity contains no insulation. Results from five test cases are presented. The first four represent progressively more complicated approximations to the heat transfer through and within a hollow wall structure. The fifth adds the model components necessary to severely inhibit the radiative energy transport across the empty cavity. Flow within the wall cavity is calculated from the Navier-Stokes equations and the energy conservation equation for an ideal gas using an improvement to the Implicit-Compressible Eulerian (ICE) algorithm of Harlow and Amsden. An algorithm is described to efficiently couple the fluid flow calculations to the radiation-conduction model for the solid portions of the system. Results indicate that conduction through still plates contributes less than 2% of the total heat transferred through a composite wall. All of the other elements (conduction through wall board, sheathing, and siding; convection from siding and wallboard to ambients; and radiation across the wall cavity) are required to accurately predict the heat transfer through a wall. Addition of a foil liner on one inner surface of the wall cavity reduces the total heat transferred by almost 50%.

  12. Clustering of radioactive tank waste data and comparison to historical models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, B.C.

    1998-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated remediation for stored high-level radioactive wastes. At the DOE Hanford site in southeastern Washington, 149 large underground tanks contain such wastes, generated by various chemical processes during the manufacture of plutonium for nuclear weapons. One of the key steps in this remediation effort is to characterize the waste stored in these tanks so that it can be treated properly and safely. A number of samples have been extracted from a subset of the tanks and analyzed for various chemical and radiological constituents. The analytical results were used to cluster tanks into groups with similar waste compositions. The tank groups determined by clustering of the analytical data are compared to tank groups determined using process-based historical models. Agreement between the two grouping strategies may reduce the number of samples required to characterize the waste in a tank, and perhaps support the use of the historical models to characterize tanks that have not been sampled. A successful implementation of this approach with one tank group is described here. This particular case yielded DOE significant savings of characterization resources.

  13. A direct comparison of X-ray spectral models for tori in active galactic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yuan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several X-ray spectral models for tori in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are available to constrain the properties of tori; however, the accuracy of these models has not been verified. We recently construct a code for the torus using Geant4, which can easily handle different geometries (Liu & Li 2014). Thus, we adopt the same assumptions as Murphy & Yaqoob (2009, hereafter MY09) and Brightman & Nandra (2011, hereafter BN11) and try to reproduce their spectra. As a result, we can reproduce well the reflection spectra and the strength of the Fe K$\\alpha$ line of MY09, for both $\\NH=10^{24}$ and $10^{25}$ cm$^{-2}$. However, we cannot produce the strong reflection component of BN11 in the low-energy band. The origin of this component is the reflection from the visible inner wall of the torus, and it should be very weak in the edge-on directions under the geometry of BN11. Therefore, the behaviour of the reflection spectra in BN11 is not consistent with their geometry. The strength of the Fe K$\\alpha$ ...

  14. COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTS TO CFD MODELS FOR MIXING USING DUAL OPPOSING JETS IN TANKS WITH AND WITHOUT INTERNAL OBSTRUCTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Fowley, M.

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper documents testing methods, statistical data analysis, and a comparison of experimental results to CFD models for blending of fluids, which were blended using a single pump designed with dual opposing nozzles in an eight foot diameter tank. Overall, this research presents new findings in the field of mixing research. Specifically, blending processes were clearly shown to have random, chaotic effects, where possible causal factors such as turbulence, pump fluctuations, and eddies required future evaluation. CFD models were shown to provide reasonable estimates for the average blending times, but large variations -- or scatter -- occurred for blending times during similar tests. Using this experimental blending time data, the chaotic nature of blending was demonstrated and the variability of blending times with respect to average blending times were shown to increase with system complexity. Prior to this research, the variation in blending times caused discrepancies between CFD models and experiments. This research addressed this discrepancy, and determined statistical correction factors that can be applied to CFD models, and thereby quantified techniques to permit the application of CFD models to complex systems, such as blending. These blending time correction factors for CFD models are comparable to safety factors used in structural design, and compensate variability that cannot be theoretically calculated. To determine these correction factors, research was performed to investigate blending, using a pump with dual opposing jets which re-circulate fluids in the tank to promote blending when fluids are added to the tank. In all, eighty-five tests were performed both in a tank without internal obstructions and a tank with vertical obstructions similar to a tube bank in a heat exchanger. These obstructions provided scale models of vertical cooling coils below the liquid surface for a full scale, liquid radioactive waste storage tank. Also, different jet diameters and different horizontal orientations of the jets were investigated with respect to blending. Two types of blending tests were performed. The first set of eighty-one tests blended small quantities of tracer fluids into solution. Data from these tests were statistically evaluated to determine blending times for the addition of tracer solution to tanks, and blending times were successfully compared to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models. The second set of four tests blended bulk quantities of solutions of different density and viscosity. For example, in one test a quarter tank of water was added to a three quarters of a tank of a more viscous salt solution. In this case, the blending process was noted to significantly change due to stratification of fluids, and blending times increased substantially. However, CFD models for stratification and the variability of blending times for different density fluids was not pursued, and further research is recommended in the area of blending bulk quantities of fluids. All in all, testing showed that CFD models can be effectively applied if statistically validated through experimental testing, but in the absence of experimental validation CFD model scan be extremely misleading as a basis for design and operation decisions.

  15. Plasma depletion layer model for low Alfven Mach number: Comparison with ISEE observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrugia, C.J. [Department of Mathematics, Science and Technical Education, University of Malta, Msida (Malta)] [Department of Mathematics, Science and Technical Education, University of Malta, Msida (Malta); [Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham; Erkaev, N.V. [Computer Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk (Russia)] [Computer Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk (Russia); Biernat, H.K. [Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz (Austria)] [Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz (Austria); Lawrence, G.R. [Space Science Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton (England)] [Space Science Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton (England); Elphic, R.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States)

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Together with the magnetic shear across the magnetopause, the solar wind Alfven Mach number, M{sub A{infinity}} plays a central role in determining the structure of the magnetosheath. Recent theoretical modeling has shown, in particular, that as M{sub A{infinity}} decreases, the region adjacent to the sunward side of the magnetopause where the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) exerts a strong influence on the flow (i.e., the so-called plasma depletion layer), is no longer confined to a thin layer {approximately}0.3 Earth radii (R{sub E}) thick but occupies an increasingly larger fraction of the magnetosheath. Furthermore, the model predicts the possibility of a plasma depletion layer for low M{sub A{infinity}}, irrespective of the size of the magnetic shear at the magnetopause. In this paper we study three examples of low latitude ISEE 2 passes through the dayside magnetosheath near noon: December 3, 1979; October 5, 1979; and November 11, 1979. In all three examples, M{sub A{infinity}} was lower than normal. During the December 3 pass (which we treat qualitatively), we find evidence of a plasma depletion layer when the IMF was pointing south. On the other two passes (which we study quantitatively), the interplanetary magnetic field was strongly northward pointing, leading to low magnetic shear at the respective magnetopause crossings. The October 5 pass was under steady interplanetary conditions and we find good agreement between theory and data. Temporal variations of the interplanetary medium during the November 11 pass necessitated an extension of the steady state theory to encompass piecewise steady (on average) interplanetary conditions. Better agreement with the data results when the theory is extended further to correct the total pressure at the sunward side of the magnetopause by integrating the magnetic tension term across the layer. For wide plasma depletion layers, this correction can be substantial.{copyright} 1997 American Geophysical Union

  16. North American Carbon Program (NACP) Regional Interim Synthesis: Terrestrial Biospheric Model Intercomparision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntzinger, Deborah [University of Michigan; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Michalak, Anna [University of Michigan; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Jacobson, Andrew [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Baker, Ian [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Chen, Jing M. [University of Toronto; Davis, Kenneth [Pennsylvania State University; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Jain, Atul [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Liu, Shuguang [United States Geological Survey, Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (USGS EROS); Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Neilson, Ronald [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Poulter, Ben [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Tian, Hanqin [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Tomelleri, Enrico [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Viovy, Nicolas [National Center for Scientific Research, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Xiao, Jingfeng [Purdue University; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding of carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere can be improved through direct observations and experiments, as well as through modeling activities. Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding to much larger terrestrial regions. Although models vary in their specific goals and approaches, their central role within carbon cycle science is to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms currently controlling carbon exchange. Recently, the North American Carbon Program (NACP) organized several interim-synthesis activities to evaluate and inter-compare models and observations at local to continental scales for the years 2000-2005. Here, we compare the results from the TBMs collected as part of the regional and continental interim-synthesis (RCIS) activities. The primary objective of this work is to synthesize and compare the 19 participating TBMs to assess current understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle in North America. Thus, the RCIS focuses on model simulations available from analyses that have been completed by ongoing NACP projects and other recently published studies. The TBM flux estimates are compared and evaluated over different spatial (1{sup o} x 1{sup o} and spatially aggregated to different regions) and temporal (monthly and annually) scales. The range in model estimates of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) for North America is much narrower than estimates of productivity or respiration, with estimates of NEP varying between -0.7 and 2.2 PgC yr{sup -1}, while gross primary productivity and heterotrophic respiration vary between 12.2 and 32.9 PgC yr{sup -1} and 5.6 and 13.2 PgC yr{sup -1}, respectively. The range in estimates from the models appears to be driven by a combination of factors, including the representation of photosynthesis, the source and of environmental driver data and the temporal variability of those data, as well as whether nutrient limitation is considered in soil carbon decomposition. The disagreement in current estimates of carbon flux across North America, including whether North America is a net biospheric carbon source or sink, highlights the need for further analysis through the use of model runs following a common simulation protocol, in order to isolate the influences of model formulation, structure, and assumptions on flux estimates.

  17. Computational tool for comparison of kinematic mechanisms and commonly used kinematic models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollerbach, K.; Hollister, A.M.; Van Vorhis, R.L.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate, reliable, and reproducible methods to measure the movements of human joints have been elusive. Currently, three-dimensional recording methods are used to track the motion of one segment relative to another as the joint moves. Six parameters describe the moving segment`s location and orientation relative to the reference segment: three translations (x, y, and z) and three rotations (yaw, pitch and roll) in the reference frame. The raw data can be difficult to interpret. For this reason, several methods have been developed to measure the motion of human joints and to describe the resulting data. For example, instant helical axes or screw deviation axes (Kinzell et al., 1972), the Joint Coordinate System of Grood and Suntay (1983), and the Euler angle method have been used to describe the movements of bones relative to each other. None of these methods takes into account the physical kinematic mechanism producing the joint motion. More recently, Lupichuk (1995) has developed an algorithm to find, for an arbitrary revolute, the axis` position and orientation in three- dimensional space. Each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages in analyzing joint kinematics. The authors have developed software to provide a means of comparing these methods for arbitrary, single degree of freedom, kinematic mechanisms. Our objective is to demonstrate the software and to show how it can be used to compare the results from the different kinematic models as they are applied to specific kinematic mechanisms.

  18. Comparison of Two Foreign Body Retrieval Devices with Adjustable Loops in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konya, Andras [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Section of Interventional Radiology, Division of Diagnostic Imaging (United States)], E-mail: akonya@mdanderson.org

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study was to compare two similar foreign body retrieval devices, the Texan{sup TM} (TX) and the Texan LONGhorn{sup TM} (TX-LG), in a swine model. Both devices feature a {<=}30-mm adjustable loop. Capture times and total procedure times for retrieving foreign bodies from the infrarenal aorta, inferior vena cava, and stomach were compared. All attempts with both devices (TX, n = 15; TX-LG, n = 14) were successful. Foreign bodies in the vasculature were captured quickly using both devices (mean {+-} SD, 88 {+-} 106 sec for TX vs 67 {+-} 42 sec for TX-LG) with no significant difference between them. The TX-LG, however, allowed significantly better capture times than the TX in the stomach (p = 0.022), Overall, capture times for the TX-LG were significantly better than for the TX (p = 0.029). There was no significant difference between the total procedure times in any anatomic region. TX-LG performed significantly better than the TX in the stomach and therefore overall. The better torque control and maneuverability of TX-LG resulted in better performance in large anatomic spaces.

  19. Evaluation of methane emissions from Palermo municipal landfill: Comparison between field measurements and models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Bella, Gaetano, E-mail: dibella@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Di Trapani, Daniele, E-mail: ditrapani@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Viviani, Gaspare, E-mail: gviv@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane (CH{sub 4}) diffuse emissions from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills represent one of the most important anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gas. CH{sub 4} is produced by anaerobic biodegradation of organic matter in landfilled MSW and constitutes a major component of landfill gas (LFG). Gas recovery is a suitable method to effectively control CH{sub 4} emissions from landfill sites and the quantification of CH{sub 4} emissions represents a good tool to evaluate the effectiveness of a gas recovery system in reducing LFG emissions. In particular, LFG emissions can indirectly be evaluated from mass balance equations between LFG production, recovery and oxidation in the landfill, as well as by a direct approach based on LFG emission measurements from the landfill surface. However, up to now few direct measurements of landfill CH{sub 4} diffuse emissions have been reported in the technical literature. In the present study, both modeling and direct emission measuring methodologies have been applied to the case study of Bellolampo landfill located in Palermo, Italy. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate CH{sub 4} diffuse emissions, based on direct measurements carried out with the flux accumulation chamber (static, non-stationary) method, as well as to obtain the CH{sub 4} contoured flux map of the landfill. Such emissions were compared with the estimate achieved by means of CH{sub 4} mass balance equations. The results showed that the emissions obtained by applying the flux chamber method are in good agreement with the ones derived by the application of the mass balance equation, and that the evaluated contoured flux maps represent a reliable tool to locate areas with abnormal emissions in order to optimize the gas recovery system efficiency.

  20. M.Sc. Thesis Project at Ericsson AB for two students Comparison of model-based testing tools based on modelling of LTE functionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrow, Joachim

    , Object Oriented programming using Java, Constraint programming, Test methodology, and Software than January 22, to Olga Grinchtein olga.grinchtein@ericsson.com #12;

  1. Comparison of Test Procedures and Energy Efficiency Criteria in Selected International Standards and Labeling Programs for Clothes Washers, Water Dispensers, Vending Machines and CFLs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Energy Star, Australia, Brazil and EU programs butBesides Energy Star, all China, Australia, Brazil and EUBrazil, South Korea and Australia also have mandatory energy

  2. Process Modeling Phase I Summary Report for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Boyalakuntla, Dhanunjay S [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of preliminary work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to demonstrate application of computational fluid dynamics modeling to the scale-up of a Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition (FBCVD) process for nuclear fuels coating. Specifically, this work, referred to as Modeling Scale-Up Phase I, was conducted between January 1, 2006 and March 31, 2006 in support of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Program. The objective was to develop, demonstrate and "freeze" a version of ORNL's computational model of the TRI ISOtropic (TRISO) fuel-particle coating process that can be specifically used to assist coater scale-up activities as part of the production of AGR-2 fuel. The results in this report are intended to serve as input for making decisions about initiating additional FBCVD modeling work (referred to as Modeling Scale-Up Phase II) in support of AGR-2. The main computational tool used to implement the model is the general-purpose multiphase fluid-dynamics computer code known as MFIX (Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges), which is documented in detail on the DOE-sponsored website http://www.mfix.org. Additional computational tools are also being developed by ORNL for post-processing MFIX output to efficiently summarize the important information generated by the coater simulations. The summarized information includes quantitative spatial and temporal measures (referred to as discriminating characteristics, or DCs) by which different coater designs and operating conditions can be compared and correlated with trends in product quality. The ORNL FBCVD modeling work is being conducted in conjunction with experimental coater studies at ORNL with natural uranium CO (NUCO) and surrogate fuel kernels. Data are also being obtained from ambient-temperature, spouted-bed characterization experiments at the University of Tennessee and theoretical studies of carbon and silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition kinetics at Iowa State University. Prior to the current scale-up activity, considerable effort has gone in to adapting the MFIX code to incorporate the unique features of fuel coating reactors and also in validating the resulting simulation features with experimental observations. Much of this work is documented in previous AGR reports and publications (Pannala et al., 2004, Pannala et al., 2005, Boyalakuntla et al., 2005a, Boyalakuntla et al., 2005b and Finney et al., 2005). As a result of the previous work described above, the ORNL coater model now has the capability for simulating full spatio-temporal details of the gas-particle hydrodynamics and gas-particle heat and mass transfer in the TRISO coater. This capability provides a great deal of information about many of the processes believed to control quality, but the model is not yet sufficiently developed to fully predict coating quality for any given coater design and/or set of operating conditions because the detailed chemical reaction kinetics needed to make the model fully predictive are not yet available. Nevertheless, the model at its current stage of development already provides the most comprehensive and detailed quantitative information available about gas flows, solid flows, temperatures, and species inside the coater during operation. This level of information ought to be highly useful in expediting the scale-up process (e.g., in correlating observations and minimizing the number of pilot-scale tests required). However, previous work had not yet demonstrated that the typical design and/or operating changes known to affect product quality at the lab scale could be clearly discriminated by the existing model. The Modeling Scale-Up Phase I work was initiated to produce such a demonstration, and two detailed examples are discussed in this report.

  3. Comparison of Test Procedures and Energy Efficiency Criteria in Selected International Standards and Labeling Programs for Clothes Washers, Water Dispensers, Vending Machines and CFLs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the late 1970s, energy labeling programs and mandatory energy performance standards have been used in many different countries to improve the efficiency levels of major residential and commercial equipment. As more countries and regions launch programs covering a greater range of products that are traded worldwide, greater attention has been given to harmonizing the specific efficiency criteria in these programs and the test methods for measurements. For example, an international compact fluorescent light (CFL) harmonization initiative was launched in 2006 to focus on collaboration between Australia, China, Europe and North America. Given the long history of standards and labeling programs, most major energy-consuming residential appliances and commercial equipment are already covered under minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) and/or energy labels. For these products, such as clothes washers and CFLs, harmonization may still be possible when national MEPS or labeling thresholds are revised. Greater opportunity for harmonization exists in newer energy-consuming products that are not commonly regulated but are under consideration for new standards and labeling programs. This may include commercial products such as water dispensers and vending machines, which are only covered by MEPS or energy labels in a few countries or regions. As China continues to expand its appliance standards and labeling programs and revise existing standards and labels, it is important to learn from recent international experiences with efficiency criteria and test procedures for the same products. Specifically, various types of standards and labeling programs already exist in North America, Europe and throughout Asia for products in China's 2010 standards and labeling programs, namely clothes washers, water dispensers, vending machines and CFLs. This report thus examines similarities and critical differences in energy efficiency values, test procedure specifications and other technical performance requirements in existing international programs in order to shed light on where Chinese programs currently stands and considerations for their 2010 programs.

  4. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Models Guide, October 27, 2011.

  5. ANNUAL HEATING AND COOLING REQUIREMENTS AND DESIGN DAY PERFORMANCE FOR A RESIDENTIAL MODEL IN SIX CLIMATES: A COMPARISON OF NBSLD, BLAST 2, AND DOE-2.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, William L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPARISON - HOURLY INTERNAL LOAD PROFILES LightingA Comparison of NBSLD, BLAST 2. and DOE-2.1 (b) Lighting:

  6. 2048 IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery, Vol. 10, No. 4,October 1995 COMPARISON OF THEATP VERSION OF THE EMTP AND THE NETOMAC PROGRAM FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehn, Peter W.

    VERSION OF THE EMTP AND THE NETOMAC PROGRAM FOR SIMULATION OF HVDC SYSTEMS P. Lehn J. Rittiger Member the results obtained from these programs isexamined through simulation of a test HVdc network. As expected- tablished in the EMTP and in the NETOMAC transients pro- gram section. Keywords: HVdc simulation, ATP, EMTP

  7. Low-level fluoride trapping studies experimental work for computer modeling program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, R.G.

    1988-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The material presented in this report involved experimental work performed to assist in determining the constants for a computer modeling program being developed by Production Engineering for use in trap design. Included in this study is bed distribution studies to define uranium loading on alumina (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) and sodium fluoride (NaF) with respect to bed zones. A limited amount of work was done on uranium penetration into NaF pellets. Only the experimental work is reported here; Production Engineering will use this data to develop constants for the computer model. Some of the significant conclusions are: NaF has more capacity to load UF/sub 6/, but Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ distributes the load more equally; velocity, system pressure, and operating temperature influence uranium loading; and in comparative tests NaF had a loading of 25%, while Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was 13%. 2 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. INTERLINE 5. 0 -- An expanded railroad routing model: Program description, methodology, and revised user's manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Clarke, D.B.; Jacobi, J.M. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Transportation Center)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rail routine model, INTERLINE, has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate potential routes for transporting radioactive materials. In Version 5.0, the INTERLINE routing algorithms have been enhanced to include the ability to predict alternative routes, barge routes, and population statistics for any route. The INTERLINE railroad network is essentially a computerized rail atlas describing the US railroad system. All rail lines, with the exception of industrial spurs, are included in the network. Inland waterways and deep water routes along with their interchange points with the US railroadsystem are also included. The network contains over 15,000 rail and barge segments (links) and over 13,000 stations, interchange points, ports, and other locations (nodes). The INTERLINE model has been converted to operate on an IBM-compatible personal computer. At least a 286 computer with a hard disk containing approximately 6 MB of free space is recommended. Enhanced program performance will be obtained by using arandom-access memory drive on a 386 or 486 computer.

  9. A Cost Analysis for a Higher-Order Parallel Programming Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangaswami, Roopa

    Programming parallel computers remains a difficult task. An ideal programming environment should enablethe user to concentrate on the problem solving activity at a convenient level of abstraction, while managing the intricate low-level details...

  10. The photovoltaic market analysis program : background, model development, applications and extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lilien, Gary L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to describe and motivate the market analysis program for photovoltaics that has developed over the last several years. The main objective of the program is to develop tools and procedures to ...

  11. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Annex XXIII: Phase III Results Regarding Tripod Support Structure Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, J.; Camp, T.; Jonkman, J.; Butterfield, S.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Azcona, J.; Martinez, A.; Munduate, X.; Vorpahl, F.; Kleinhansl, S.; Kohlmeier, M.; Kossel, T.; Boker, C.; Kaufer, D.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes. This paper describes the findings of code-to-code verification activities of the IEA Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration.

  12. Modeling of AAR affected structures using the GROW3D FEA program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, D.D. [Acres International Limited, Niagara Falls, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to present a rational and practical methodology for finite element stress analysis of AAR affected structures. The methodology is presented using case history studies which illustrate the practical application of the GROW3D program. GROW3D uses an anisotropic expansion strain function and concrete properties which simulates the following key characteristics of AAR affected concrete (1) concrete growth expansion rates dependent on the stress vectors at each point; (2) concrete growth rate variation due to changes in moisture content and temperature; and (3) time-dependent, enhanced creep behavior. GROW3D has been applied to several hydropower structures and case histories from the Mactaquac Generating Station are presented herein. Mactaquac is selected because extensive instrumentation data before and after remedial measures have been used to calibrate and test the model. The results of analyses of three different structures are given, i.e., the intake, diversion sluiceway and powerhouse. The analysis results are used to identify potential structural problems and the need and timing of remedial measures. The output from GROW3D includes displacement rates, total displacements, global stresses and local factors of safety. The local factors of safety (or strength to stress ratios) are computed for several modes of failure including crushing, cracking, shear and sliding on horizontal construction joints. The analysis results are compared with field measurements which are taken before and after slot cutting. The effects of including the above-mentioned characteristics and other modeling assumptions on the computed results is discussed herein. Finally, a brief discussion on the recent enhancements to the model is given. These enhancements include the implementation of a more rigorous treatment of concrete creep effects.

  13. Dosimetric accuracy of a deterministic radiation transport based {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy treatment planning system. Part III. Comparison to Monte Carlo simulation in voxelized anatomical computational models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zourari, K.; Pantelis, E.; Moutsatsos, A.; Sakelliou, L.; Georgiou, E.; Karaiskos, P.; Papagiannis, P. [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athens (Greece); Department of Physics, Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, University of Athens, Ilisia, 157 71 Athens (Greece); Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athens (Greece)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare TG43-based and Acuros deterministic radiation transport-based calculations of the BrachyVision treatment planning system (TPS) with corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results in heterogeneous patient geometries, in order to validate Acuros and quantify the accuracy improvement it marks relative to TG43. Methods: Dosimetric comparisons in the form of isodose lines, percentage dose difference maps, and dose volume histogram results were performed for two voxelized mathematical models resembling an esophageal and a breast brachytherapy patient, as well as an actual breast brachytherapy patient model. The mathematical models were converted to digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) image series for input to the TPS. The MCNP5 v.1.40 general-purpose simulation code input files for each model were prepared using information derived from the corresponding DICOM RT exports from the TPS. Results: Comparisons of MC and TG43 results in all models showed significant differences, as reported previously in the literature and expected from the inability of the TG43 based algorithm to account for heterogeneities and model specific scatter conditions. A close agreement was observed between MC and Acuros results in all models except for a limited number of points that lay in the penumbra of perfectly shaped structures in the esophageal model, or at distances very close to the catheters in all models. Conclusions: Acuros marks a significant dosimetry improvement relative to TG43. The assessment of the clinical significance of this accuracy improvement requires further work. Mathematical patient equivalent models and models prepared from actual patient CT series are useful complementary tools in the methodology outlined in this series of works for the benchmarking of any advanced dose calculation algorithm beyond TG43.

  14. A complete desktop phase-equilibria software package using object-oriented programming and the component object model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Jairo Medina

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using a number of programming languages. OOP and COM are used in this research to create a library that implements a thermodynamics model and a set of phase-equilibria algorithms based on an equation of state (EOS). Without a major trade...

  15. A O(n^8) X O(n^7) Linear Programming Model of the Quadratic Assignment Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaby, Moustapha

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we propose a linear programming (LP) formulation of the Quadratic Assignment Problem (QAP) with O(n^8) variables and O(n^7) constraints, where n is the number of assignments. A small experimentation that was undertaken in order to gain some rough indications about the computational performance of the model is discussed.

  16. Abstract--A stochastic dynamic programming hydrothermal dispatch model to simulate a bid-based market is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    on dynamic programming that optimizes and validates the bid prices strategies for each power plant in a hydro several plants. Emphasis is given to hydro reservoir modeling and to the assessment of their market power market power is detected, focalized on main reservoir plants and implicating important increases

  17. Relative risk-relative ranking in Defense and Energy Department cleanup programs: Comparison of methods, results, and role in priority setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turkeltaub, R. [Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense, Washington, DC (United States); Treichel, L.C. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States). Office of Environmental Restoration; Rowe, W.D. Jr.; Strohl, A.R. [Booz Allen and Hamilton, McLean, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper demonstrates how the Department of Energy (DOE) enhanced their Environmental Restoration Program by modifying the Department of Defense (DoD) Cleanup Program`s Relative Risk Site Evaluation Primer in order to create their own framework, the Relative Ranking Evaluation Framework for EM-40 Release Sites, Facilities and Buildings. In addition, this paper discusses and compares the two frameworks and presents the results of relative risk/relative ranking site evaluations for both agencies through July 1996. The status of agency efforts to implement their respective frameworks also is discussed along with plans for strengthening these initiatives in the coming year.

  18. Land-use transition for bioenergy and climate stabilization: model comparison of drivers, impacts and interactions with other land use based mitigation options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popp, Alexander; Rose, Steven K.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Dietrich, Jan P.; Wise, Marshall A.; Stehfest, Eike; Humpenoder, Florian; Kyle, G. Page; Van Vliet, Jasper; Bauer, Nico; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Klein, David; Kriegler, Elmar

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is a model comparison assessing the drivers and impacts of bioenergy production on the global land system and the interaction with other land use based mitigation options in the context of the EMF 27 project. We compare and evaluate results from three integrated assessment models (GCAM, IMAGE, and ReMIND/MAgPIE). All three models project that dedicated bioenergy crops and biomass residues are a potentially important and cost-effective component of the energy system. But bioenergy deployment levels and feedstock composition vary notably across models as do the implications for land-use and greenhouse gas emissions and the interaction with other land use based mitigation measures. Despite numerous model differences, we identify a few that are likely contributing to differences in land-use and emissions attributable to energy crop deployment.

  19. From chi-squared to Bayesian model comparison and Levy expansions of Bose-Einstein correlations in e+e- reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michiel B. De Kock; Hans C. Eggers; Tamás Csörg?

    2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The usual chi-squared method of fit quality assessment is a special case of the more general method of Bayesian model comparison which involves integrals of the likelihood and prior over all possible values of all parameters. We introduce new parametrisations based on systematic expansions around the stretched exponential or Fourier-transformed L\\'evy source distribution, and utilise the increased discriminating power of the Bayesian approach to evaluate the relative probability of these models to be true representations of a recently measured Bose-Einstein correlation data in e+e- annihilations at LEP.

  20. SSI sensitivity studies and model improvements for the US NRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.J.; Maslenikov, O.R.; Benda, B.J.

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is a US NRC-funded program conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Its goal is to develop a complete fully coupled analysis procedure for estimating the risk of an earthquake-induced radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. In Phase II of the SSMRP, the methodology was applied to the Zion nuclear power plant. Three topics in the SSI analysis of Zion were investigated and reported here - flexible foundation modeling, structure-to-structure interaction, and basemat uplift. The results of these investigations were incorporated in the SSMRP seismic risk analysis. 14 references, 51 figures, 13 tables.

  1. Compiler Comparisons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compiler Comparisons Using a set of benchmarks described below, different optimization options for the different compilers on Edison are compared. The compilers are also...

  2. Chesapeake Bay ecosystem modeling program. Technical synthesis report 1993-94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, S.B.; Boynton, W.R.; Kemp, W.M.; Wetzel, R.; Bartleson, R.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ;Contents: Ecosystem models for management; Ecosystem regession models; Patuxent River Sav-Littoral Ecosystem Process Model; Lower Chesapeake Bay Polyhaline Sav Model; Emergent Intertidal Marsh Process Model; Plankton-Benthos Ecosystem Process Model; Fish Bioenergetics Models; Linking Water Quality with Fish Habitat; Data Visualization; Publications and Scientific Presentations Resulting From This Research.

  3. ICPIG, July 15-20, 2007, Prague, Czech Republi Negative streamer fronts: comparison of particle and fluid models and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebert, Ute

    that propagates into non-ionized matter. Streamers are used in industrial applications such as ozone generation28th ICPIG, July 15-20, 2007, Prague, Czech Republi Negative streamer fronts: comparison be generated during early stages of the lighting event. Both questions require a fully kinetic description

  4. COMPARISON OF WIND AND WIND SHEAR CLIMATOLOGIES DERIVED FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION RADIOSONDES AND THE ECMWF MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    COMPARISON OF WIND AND WIND SHEAR CLIMATOLOGIES DERIVED FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION RADIOSONDES wind and its vertical gradient, i.e. wind-shear, is characterized as a function of climate region. For a better representation of the average atmospheric wind and shear and their variabilities, high

  5. Continental Scale Comparisons of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks Estimated from Satellite Data and Ecosystem Modeling 1982-1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    ecosystem (tundra and boreal) sinks for atmospheric CO2. Key Words: carbon dioxide, ecosystems, remote "missing sink" for carbon dioxide emissions. Measured atmospheric CO2, 13 C, and O2/N2 distributionsContinental Scale Comparisons of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks Estimated from Satellite Data

  6. Financial comparison of time-of-use pricing with technical DSM programs and generating plants as electric-utility resource options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, L.J.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changing electricity prices to more closely reflect production costs has a significant impact on the consumption of electricity. It is known, for example, that most of the efficiency gains in the electric power sectors of the industrialized world since the first international oil price shock in 1973 are attributable to the rising trend of electricity prices. This was due to the rising average price of electricity. Because of the unique characteristics of producing electricity, its marginal cost is higher than its average cost during many hours of the day. This study shows that, for utilities not reflecting these cost differences in their rates, there is ample room to satisfy a portion of their resource needs by exploiting the load-shaping properties of time-of-use (TOU) rates. Satisfying a portion of resource requirements by implementing a TOU-pricing program, however, is not costless. Metering and administering TOU pricing requires a financial commitment by an electric utility. And the commitment has an opportunity cost. That is, the funds could be used to construct generating plants or run DSM programs (other than a TOU-pricing program) and satisfy the same resource needs that TOU pricing does. The question addressed in this study is whether a utility is better-served financially by (i) implementing TOU pricing or (ii) running technical DSM programs and building power plants. The answer is that TOU pricing compares favorably on a financial basis with other resources under a wide set of conditions that real-world utilities confront.

  7. User manual for geothermal energy assisted dairy complex computer programs: PREBLD, MODEL0, MODEL1, MODEL2, FRMAT2, PREPI2, NET2, DAIRY and DAIRY1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The operation of the programs on a computer is described. The programs are divided into two parts: the simulation of the buildings and the simulation of the pipe network. (MHR)

  8. Training course No. 2: the implementation of FEMWASTE (ORNL-5601) computer program. Final report. [Finite Element Model of WASTE transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, G.T.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a training course conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the implementation of a Finite Element Model of WASTE transport through saturated-unsaturated porous media (FEMWASTE) - ORNL-5601. In addition to presenting basic program operations (Appendices A-V through A-VII), the course also covers the following topics: (1) Heuristic derivation of governing equations based on physical and chemical principles, (2) finite element derivation of FEMWASTE, (3) various numerical schemes provided by FEMWASTE, (4) FEMWASTE program structure, and (5) running of three samples problems to demonstrate various options the FEMWASTE can handle. The purpose of the training seminar is to enable NRC staff to use the model (and to be able to modify the code, if necessary) for checking information provided by a licensee, for evaluating alternative sites and designs for burial, and for comparing their results from other methods of solution.

  9. GRADUATE PROGRAM UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SELF STUDY GRADUATE PROGRAM UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE COLLEGE OF LIBERALARTS TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY March 2007 #12;SELF STUDY GRADUATE PROGRAM UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT........................................................................................ 4 Brief History of Degree Programs and the Department

  10. Application of a dynamic linear programming model for optimum use of range resources over time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, Wayne Winston

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ . ~ ~ ~ ~ ? ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Scope and Importance of Range Resource Use . . . . . . . . e. . . ? " . . Present Status of the Problem, Objectives of the Study 1 2 4 6 11 II. DESCRIPTION OF THE STUDY AREA, Size and Location of the Area, Major Soils and Types of Enterprises... ~ Cattle Transfer Equations , ee ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 46 46 48 52 54 55 58 6'I 62 66 66 68 7'1 75 75 76 76 77 77 The Function to be Maximized The Role of Management. Program I Program II Program III 80 80 82 82 83 V. RESULTS. Optimal...

  11. Model Development and Loads Analysis of an Offshore Wind Turbine on a Tension Leg Platform with a Comparison to Other Floating Turbine Concepts: April 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matha, D.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results of the analysis of a 5-MW wind turbine located on a floating offshore tension leg platform (TLP) that was conducted using the fully coupled time-domain aero-hydro-servo-elastic design code FAST with AeroDyn and HydroDyn. The report also provides a description of the development process of the TLP model. The model has been verified via comparisons to frequency-domain calculations. Important differences have been identified between the frequency-domain and time-domain simulations, and have generated implications for the conceptual design process. An extensive loads and stability analysis for ultimate and fatigue loads according to the procedure of the IEC 61400-3 offshore wind turbine design standard was performed with the verified TLP model. This report compares the loads for the wind turbine on the TLP to those of an equivalent land-based turbine. Major instabilities for the TLP are identified and described.

  12. Comparison of Average Transport and Dispersion Among a Gaussian Model, a Two-Dimensional Model and a Three-Dimensional Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, J A; Molenkamp, C R; Bixler, N E; Morrow, C W; Ramsdell, Jr., J V

    2004-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission uses MACCS2 (MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2) for regulatory purposes such as planning for emergencies and cost-benefit analyses. MACCS2 uses a straight-line Gaussian model for atmospheric transport and dispersion. This model has been criticized as being overly simplistic, although only expected values of metrics of interest are used in the regulatory arena. To test the assumption that averaging numerous weather results adequately compensates for the loss of structure in the meteorology that occurs away from the point of release, average MACCS2 results have been compared with average results from a state-of-the-art, 3-dimensional LODI (Lagrangian Operational Dispersion Integrator)/ADAPT (Atmospheric Data Assimilation and Parameterization Technique) and a Lagrangian trajectory, Gaussian puff transport and dispersion model from RASCAL (Radiological Assessment System for consequence Analysis). The weather sample included 610 weather trials representing conditions for a hypothetical release at the Central Facility of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site. The values compared were average ground concentrations and average surface-level air concentrations at several distances out to 100 miles (160.9 km) from the assumed release site.

  13. Development of preference models for regular dissemination of informational and educational programming through cable television systems of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Larry Arnold

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of formats on the market today. Different manufacturers' equipment is not compatible, and often even equipment manufactured by the same company is not always compatible (9: I). Results of this study will reveal to the Texas cable industry the kinds...DEVELOPMENT OF PREFERENCE MODELS FOR REGULAR DISSEMINATION OF INFORMATIONAL AND EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING THROUGH CABLE TELEVISION SYSTEMS OF TEXAS A Thesis by LARRY ARNOLD QUINN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University...

  14. COMPARISON OF MOBILE5A, MOBILE6, VT-MICRO, AND CMEM MODELS FOR ESTIMATING HOT-STABILIZED LIGHT-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rakha, Hesham A.

    , MOBILE6, Fuel Consumption Models, Emission Models. #12;3 INTRODUCTION Numerous energy and emission models) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) laboratory fuel consumption and emission databases are utilized for model are consistent in trends with laboratory measurements. Furthermore, the VT-Micro and MOBILE6 models accurately

  15. Program listing for heat-pump seasonal-performance model (SPM). [CNHSPM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The computer program CNHSPM is listed which predicts heat pump seasonal energy consumption (including defrost, cyclic degradation, and supplementary heat) using steady state rating point performance and binned weather data. (LEW)

  16. Comparison of the Dynamic Wake Meandering Model, Large-Eddy Simulation, and Field Data at the Egmond aan Zee Offshore Wind Plant: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churchfield, M. J.; Moriarty, P. J.; Hao, Y.; Lackner, M. A.; Barthelmie, R.; Lundquist, J.; Oxley, G. S.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this work is the comparison of the dynamic wake meandering model and large-eddy simulation with field data from the Egmond aan Zee offshore wind plant composed of 36 3-MW turbines. The field data includes meteorological mast measurements, SCADA information from all turbines, and strain-gauge data from two turbines. The dynamic wake meandering model and large-eddy simulation are means of computing unsteady wind plant aerodynamics, including the important unsteady meandering of wakes as they convect downstream and interact with other turbines and wakes. Both of these models are coupled to a turbine model such that power and mechanical loads of each turbine in the wind plant are computed. We are interested in how accurately different types of waking (e.g., direct versus partial waking), can be modeled, and how background turbulence level affects these loads. We show that both the dynamic wake meandering model and large-eddy simulation appear to underpredict power and overpredict fatigue loads because of wake effects, but it is unclear that they are really in error. This discrepancy may be caused by wind-direction uncertainty in the field data, which tends to make wake effects appear less pronounced.

  17. AURORA: A FORTRAN program for modeling well stirred plasma and thermal reactors with gas and surface reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meeks, E.; Grcar, J.F.; Kee, R.J. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Thermal and Plasma Processes Dept.] [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Thermal and Plasma Processes Dept.; Moffat, H.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Surface Processing Sciences Dept.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Surface Processing Sciences Dept.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The AURORA Software is a FORTRAN computer program that predicts the steady-state or time-averaged properties of a well mixed or perfectly stirred reactor for plasma or thermal chemistry systems. The software was based on the previously released software, SURFACE PSR which was written for application to thermal CVD reactor systems. AURORA allows modeling of non-thermal, plasma reactors with the determination of ion and electron concentrations and the electron temperature, in addition to the neutral radical species concentrations. Well stirred reactors are characterized by a reactor volume, residence time or mass flow rate, heat loss or gas temperature, surface area, surface temperature, the incoming temperature and mixture composition, as well as the power deposited into the plasma for non-thermal systems. The model described here accounts for finite-rate elementary chemical reactions both in the gas phase and on the surface. The governing equations are a system of nonlinear algebraic relations. The program solves these equations using a hybrid Newton/time-integration method embodied by the software package TWOPNT. The program runs in conjunction with the new CHEMKIN-III and SURFACE CHEMKIN-III packages, which handle the chemical reaction mechanisms for thermal and non-thermal systems. CHEMKIN-III allows for specification of electron-impact reactions, excitation losses, and elastic-collision losses for electrons.

  18. Mechanism to support generic collective communication across a variety of programming models

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Almasi, Gheorghe (Ardsley, NY); Dozsa, Gabor (Ardsley, NY); Kumar, Sameer (White Plains, NY)

    2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for supporting collective communications on a plurality of processors that use different parallel programming paradigms, in one aspect, may comprise a schedule defining one or more tasks in a collective operation, an executor that executes the task, a multisend module to perform one or more data transfer functions associated with the tasks, and a connection manager that controls one or more connections and identifies an available connection. The multisend module uses the available connection in performing the one or more data transfer functions. A plurality of processors that use different parallel programming paradigms can use a common implementation of the schedule module, the executor module, the connection manager and the multisend module via a language adaptor specific to a parallel programming paradigm implemented on a processor.

  19. Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M-PACE through ModelObservation Comparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Amy

    Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M the microphysical properties of Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus. Intensive measurements taken during the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M

  20. EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison against 6th Power Plan (Update cyclically Data Clearinghouse BPA/RTF NEEA/Regional Programs Group Update Regional EE Technology Roadmap Lighting

  1. Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudley, Junqiao Han

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied a low energy building on a campus of theEnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building Junqiao HanEnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building Junqiao Han

  2. 1 MWt bench model solar receiver test program J. Gintz, D. Bartlett and R. Zentner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and solar testing of a cavity receiver using metal gas-in-tube heat exchangers. The design represents performed to derive the required high quality in heat exchanger panels. Subcontractors skilled in steel and groups of heliostats. First solar heating was accomplished on October 27, 1978. The test program

  3. Modeling, Simulation and Analysis of Complex Networked Systems: A Program Plan for DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D L

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many complex systems of importance to the U.S. Department of Energy consist of networks of discrete components. Examples are cyber networks, such as the internet and local area networks over which nearly all DOE scientific, technical and administrative data must travel, the electric power grid, social networks whose behavior can drive energy demand, and biological networks such as genetic regulatory networks and metabolic networks. In spite of the importance of these complex networked systems to all aspects of DOE's operations, the scientific basis for understanding these systems lags seriously behind the strong foundations that exist for the 'physically-based' systems usually associated with DOE research programs that focus on such areas as climate modeling, fusion energy, high-energy and nuclear physics, nano-science, combustion, and astrophysics. DOE has a clear opportunity to develop a similarly strong scientific basis for understanding the structure and dynamics of networked systems by supporting a strong basic research program in this area. Such knowledge will provide a broad basis for, e.g., understanding and quantifying the efficacy of new security approaches for computer networks, improving the design of computer or communication networks to be more robust against failures or attacks, detecting potential catastrophic failure on the power grid and preventing or mitigating its effects, understanding how populations will respond to the availability of new energy sources or changes in energy policy, and detecting subtle vulnerabilities in large software systems to intentional attack. This white paper outlines plans for an aggressive new research program designed to accelerate the advancement of the scientific basis for complex networked systems of importance to the DOE. It will focus principally on four research areas: (1) understanding network structure, (2) understanding network dynamics, (3) predictive modeling and simulation for complex networked systems, and (4) design, situational awareness and control of complex networks. The program elements consist of a group of Complex Networked Systems Research Institutes (CNSRI), tightly coupled to an associated individual-investigator-based Complex Networked Systems Basic Research (CNSBR) program. The CNSRI's will be principally located at the DOE National Laboratories and are responsible for identifying research priorities, developing and maintaining a networked systems modeling and simulation software infrastructure, operating summer schools, workshops and conferences and coordinating with the CNSBR individual investigators. The CNSBR individual investigator projects will focus on specific challenges for networked systems. Relevancy of CNSBR research to DOE needs will be assured through the strong coupling provided between the CNSBR grants and the CNSRI's.

  4. Comparison of current state residential energy codes with the 1992 model energy code for one- and two-family dwellings; 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klevgard, L.A.; Taylor, Z.T.; Lucas, R.G.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one in a series of documents describing research activities in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) leads the program for DOE. The goal of the program is to develop and support the adopting, implementation, and enforcement of Federal, State, and Local energy codes for new buildings. The program approach to meeting the goal is to initiate and manage individual research and standards and guidelines development efforts that are planned and conducted in cooperation with representatives from throughout the buildings community. Projects under way involve practicing architects and engineers, professional societies and code organizations, industry representatives, and researchers from the private sector and national laboratories. Research results and technical justifications for standards criteria are provided to standards development and model code organizations and to Federal, State, and local jurisdictions as a basis to update their codes and standards. This effort helps to ensure that building standards incorporate the latest research results to achieve maximum energy savings in new buildings, yet remain responsive to the needs of the affected professions, organizations, and jurisdictions. Also supported are the implementation, deployment, and use of energy-efficient codes and standards. This report documents findings from an analysis conducted by PNL of the State`s building codes to determine if the codes meet or exceed the 1992 MEC energy efficiency requirements (CABO 1992a).

  5. Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) RAPID Engineering Program, Project 7: Development of Field Exposure Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bracken, T.D.; Rankin, R.F.; Wiley, J.A.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to develop a conceptual model for estimating magnetic field (EMF) personal exposure (PE) of individuals or groups and construct a working model using existing data.

  6. Comparative evaluation of network flow programming and conventional reservoir system simulation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yerramreddy, Anilkumar

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ANALYSIS MODELS Operating river/reservoir systems in an optimal manner is an important and com- plex area of water resources planning and management. Reservoir system operation involves: allocating storage capacity and water resources between multiple... broad array of analysis capabilities, have been developed over the past several decades to support planning studies and management decisions. Reservoir system analysis models can be categorized as (I) simulation models, (2) optimization models...

  7. Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing:A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues,recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, anddescriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

  8. Transformer procurement and relocation at a large electric utility: A mixed 0-1 linear programming model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, L.C. [Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong, Shatin (Hong Kong). Decision Science and Managerial Economics] [Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong, Shatin (Hong Kong). Decision Science and Managerial Economics; Khator, S.K. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Industrial and Management Systems Engineering] [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Industrial and Management Systems Engineering

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Power Delivery Substation Division at Florida Power and Light (FPL) must plan and provide logistical support for about 2,000 transformers located at roughly 400 substations. Each year, to meet new transformer requirements, the Division must make the decision of procuring and/or relocating transformers. Due to the large number of transformers and substations involved, there is a strong need for a systematic approach to determine optimally the decisions for transformer procurement and relocation, as well as their schedules. In this paper, a mixed 0-1 linear programming model is developed for that purpose.

  9. Repository Integration Program: RIP performance assessment and strategy evaluation model theory manual and user`s guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the theory and capabilities of RIP (Repository Integration Program). RIP is a powerful and flexible computational tool for carrying out probabilistic integrated total system performance assessments for geologic repositories. The primary purpose of RIP is to provide a management tool for guiding system design and site characterization. In addition, the performance assessment model (and the process of eliciting model input) can act as a mechanism for integrating the large amount of available information into a meaningful whole (in a sense, allowing one to keep the ``big picture`` and the ultimate aims of the project clearly in focus). Such an integration is useful both for project managers and project scientists. RIP is based on a `` top down`` approach to performance assessment that concentrates on the integration of the entire system, and utilizes relatively high-level descriptive models and parameters. The key point in the application of such a ``top down`` approach is that the simplified models and associated high-level parameters must incorporate an accurate representation of their uncertainty. RIP is designed in a very flexible manner such that details can be readily added to various components of the model without modifying the computer code. Uncertainty is also handled in a very flexible manner, and both parameter and model (process) uncertainty can be explicitly considered. Uncertainty is propagated through the integrated PA model using an enhanced Monte Carlo method. RIP must rely heavily on subjective assessment (expert opinion) for much of its input. The process of eliciting the high-level input parameters required for RIP is critical to its successful application. As a result, in order for any project to successfully apply a tool such as RIP, an enormous amount of communication and cooperation must exist between the data collectors, the process modelers, and the performance. assessment modelers.

  10. A comparison of echocardiography to invasive measurement in the evaluation of pulmonary arterial hypertension in a rat model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    model. Keywords Pulmonary hypertension Á Echocardiography Áassessment of pulmonary hypertension. Am J Respir Crit Carerebreathing in pulmonary hypertension. Am J Respir Crit Care

  11. A comparison of geospatially modeled fire behavior and potential application to fire and fuels management for the Savannah River Site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurth, Laurie; Hollingsworth, LaWen; Shea, Dan

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates modeled fire behavior for the Savannah River Site in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern U.S. using three data sources: FCCS, LANDFIRE, and SWRA. The Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS) was used to build fuelbeds from intensive field sampling of 629 plots. Custom fire behavior fuel models were derived from these fuelbeds. LANDFIRE developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy attributes for the U.S. using satellite imagery informed by field data. The Southern Wildfire Risk Assessment (SWRA) developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy cover for the southeastern U.S. using satellite imagery.

  12. ANNUAL HEATING AND COOLING REQUIREMENTS AND DESIGN DAY PERFORMANCE FOR A RESIDENTIAL MODEL IN SIX CLIMATES: A COMPARISON OF NBSLD, BLAST 2, AND DOE-2.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, William L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comparison of NBSLD, BLAST 2. and Effect of Selected Changessignificant effect on annual heating loads, BLAST 2 predictsComparison of NBSLD, BLAST 2, and DOE~2.1 Effect of Climate

  13. Roofline: An Insightful Visual Performance Model for Floating-Point Programs and Multicore Architectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Samuel; Waterman, Andrew; Patterson, David

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose an easy-to-understand, visual performance model that offers insights to programmers and architects on improving parallel software and hardware for floating point computations.

  14. A comparison of three total variation based texture extraction models q Wotao Yin a,*, Donald Goldfarb b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Wotao

    Goldfarb b , Stanley Osher c a Rice University, Department of Computational and Applied Mathematics, 6100/image texture extraction based on total variation min- imization: the Meyer [27], Vese­Osher (VO) [35], and TV with these models on 1D oscillating signals and 2D images reveal their differences: the Meyer model tends to extract

  15. A general purpose Fortran 90 electronic structure program for conjugated systems using Pariser-Parr-Pople model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sony, Priya

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pariser-Parr-Pople (P-P-P) model Hamiltonian has been used extensively over the years to perform calculations of electronic structure and optical properties of $\\pi$-conjugated systems successfully. In spite of tremendous successes of \\emph{ab initio} theory of electronic structure of large systems, the P-P-P model continues to be a popular one because of a recent resurgence in interest in the physics of $\\pi$-conjugated polymers, fullerenes and other carbon based materials. In this paper, we describe a Fortran 90 computer program developed by us, which uses P-P-P model Hamiltonian to not only solve Hartree-Fock (HF) equation for closed- and open-shell systems, but also for performing correlation calculations at the level of single configuration interactions (SCI) for molecular systems. Moreover, the code is capable of computing linear optical absorption spectrum at various levels, such as, tight binding (TB) Hueckel model, HF, SCI, and also of calculating the band structure using the Hueckel model. The code ...

  16. SU-E-T-86: Comparison of Two Commercially Available Programs for the Evaluation of Delivered Daily Dose Using Cone Beam CT (CBCT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuohy, R; Bosse, C; Mavroidis, P; Shi, Z; Crownover, R; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S [University of Texas Health Science Center, UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In this study, two commercially available programs were compared for the evaluation of delivered daily dose using cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods: Thirty (n=30) patients previously treated in our clinic (10 prostate, 10 SBRT lung and 10 abdomen) were used in this study. The patients' plans were optimized and calculated using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. The daily CBCT scans were imported into Velocity and RayStation along with the corresponding planning CTs, structure sets and 3D dose distributions for each patient. The organs at risk (OAR) were contoured on each CBCT by the prescribing physician and were included in the evaluation of the daily delivered dose. Each CBCT was registered to the planning CT, once with rigid registration and then again, separately, with deformable registration. After registering each CBCT, the dose distribution from the planning CT was overlaid and the dose volume histograms (DVH) for the OAR and the planning target volumes (PTV) were calculated. Results: For prostate patients, we observed daily volume changes for the OARs. The DVH analysis for those patients showed variation in the sparing of the OARs while PTV coverage remained virtually unchanged using both Velocity and RayStation systems. Similar results were observed for abdominal patients. In contrast, for SBRT lung patients, the DVH for the OARs and target were comparable to those from the initial treatment plan. Differences in organ volume and organ doses were also observed when comparing the daily fractions using deformable and rigid registrations. Conclusion: By using daily CBCT dose reconstruction, we proved PTV coverage for prostate and abdominal targets is adequate. However, there is significant dosimetric change for the OARs. For lung SBRT patients, the delivered daily dose for both PTV and OAR is comparable to the planned dose with no significant differences.

  17. Bounding A Protein's Free Energy In Lattice Models Via Linear Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Alantha

    in understanding protein structure prediction. In these models, a protein folds to maximize H-H contacts (minimize [4], abstracts the dominant force in protein folding: the hydrophobic interaction. The hydrophobicity of protein folding in the Hydro- phobic-Hydrophilic (HP) model. We formulate several di#11;erent integer

  18. Recursive Programming Model for Crop Production on the Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reneau, D. R.; Lacewell, R. D.; Ellis, J. R.

    , the model will loop through up to 20 iterations, rebuilding the LP matrix for each iteration and writing a report for each period. The feedback section of the recursive model is used to update the groundwater situation after solution of each iteration...

  19. A comparison of dose and dose-rate conversion factors from the Soviet Union, United Kingdom, US Department of Energy, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Fusion Safety Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rood, A.S.; Abbott, M.L.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several independent data sets of radiological dose and dose-rate conversion factors (DCF/DRCF) have been tabulated or developed by the international community both for fission and fusion safety purposes. This report compares sets from the US Department of Energy, the Soviet Union, and the United Kingdom with those calculated by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Fusion Safety Program. The objectives were to identify trends and potential outlying values for specific radionuclides and contribute to a future benchmark evaluation of the CARR computer code. Fifty-year committed effective dose equivalent factors were compared for the inhalation and ingestion pathways. External effective dose equivalent rates were compared for the air immersion and ground surface exposure pathways. Comparisons were made by dividing dose factors in the different data bases by the values in the FSP data base. Differences in DCF/DRCF values less than a factor of 2 were considered to be in good agreement and are likely due to the use of slightly different decay data, variations in the number of organs considered for calculating CEDE, and rounding errors. DCF/DRCF values that differed by greater than a factor of 10 were considered to be significant. These differences are attributed primarily to the use of different radionuclide decay data, selection and nomenclature for different isomeric states, treatment of progeny radionuclides, differences in calculational methodology, and assumptions on a radionuclide's chemical form.

  20. A comparison of dose and dose-rate conversion factors from the Soviet Union, United Kingdom, US Department of Energy, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Fusion Safety Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rood, A.S.; Abbott, M.L.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several independent data sets of radiological dose and dose-rate conversion factors (DCF/DRCF) have been tabulated or developed by the international community both for fission and fusion safety purposes. This report compares sets from the US Department of Energy, the Soviet Union, and the United Kingdom with those calculated by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Fusion Safety Program. The objectives were to identify trends and potential outlying values for specific radionuclides and contribute to a future benchmark evaluation of the CARR computer code. Fifty-year committed effective dose equivalent factors were compared for the inhalation and ingestion pathways. External effective dose equivalent rates were compared for the air immersion and ground surface exposure pathways. Comparisons were made by dividing dose factors in the different data bases by the values in the FSP data base. Differences in DCF/DRCF values less than a factor of 2 were considered to be in good agreement and are likely due to the use of slightly different decay data, variations in the number of organs considered for calculating CEDE, and rounding errors. DCF/DRCF values that differed by greater than a factor of 10 were considered to be significant. These differences are attributed primarily to the use of different radionuclide decay data, selection and nomenclature for different isomeric states, treatment of progeny radionuclides, differences in calculational methodology, and assumptions on a radionuclide`s chemical form.

  1. Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing - Towards Enhancing OpenMP for Manycore and Heterogeneous Nodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbara Chapman

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OpenMP was not well recognized at the beginning of the project, around year 2003, because of its limited use in DoE production applications and the inmature hardware support for an efficient implementation. Yet in the recent years, it has been graduately adopted both in HPC applications, mostly in the form of MPI+OpenMP hybrid code, and in mid-scale desktop applications for scientific and experimental studies. We have observed this trend and worked deligiently to improve our OpenMP compiler and runtimes, as well as to work with the OpenMP standard organization to make sure OpenMP are evolved in the direction close to DoE missions. In the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing project, the HPCTools team at the University of Houston (UH), directed by Dr. Barbara Chapman, has been working with project partners, external collaborators and hardware vendors to increase the scalability and applicability of OpenMP for multi-core (and future manycore) platforms and for distributed memory systems by exploring different programming models, language extensions, compiler optimizations, as well as runtime library support.

  2. Comparison of water boiling models against recent experimental data, with special emphasis on the bubble ebullition cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virgen, Matthew Miguel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using recently collected data which was measured with state-of-the-art techniques, models for nucleation site density, bubble departure diameter, and nucleation frequency were compared against the acquired data. The ...

  3. Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudley, Junqiao Han

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    which combines the two cooling supply fans to just one asquantitatively the two cooling supply fans in the EnergyPlussupply fan has a capacity of 25,000 cfm. Model uses district heating and cooling

  4. A Comparison Study of Collaborative Strategies for Distributed Defense against Internet Worms based on Small-World Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yu

    based on Small-World Modeling Hao Chen, Yu Chen* Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engineering, SUNY threats to the network infrastructure. Distributed defense collaborating with single- point.0 vulnerability, mobile malware, industrial espionage, and attacks from organized crime. Malicious activities

  5. Comparison of Molecular-Wires for Enhancing Charge Transport of Enzymatic Electrode Assemblies: A Glycerol Bioanode Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahadevan, Aishwarya

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    challenge. A novel iron (II) sulfide (FeS) based molecular wiring system was developed for immobilizing glycerol dehydrogenase on a gold electrode surface. Amperometric and potentiometric analyses with glycerol dehydrogenase-based model electrodes confirmed...

  6. Comparison of Average Transport and Dispersion Among a Gaussian, a Two-Dimensional, and a Three-Dimensional Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) code for predicting off-siteconsequences, MACCS2 (Chanin, et al. 1998) (MELCOR Accident Consequence CodeSystem, Version 2), uses a simplified model for...

  7. Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudley, Junqiao Han

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Automated Demand Response in a Large Office Building”, inBuilding Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response.Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building

  8. Improved control strategy for parallel logic programming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, I.J.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this dissertation is to formulate an improved control strategy for parallel logic programming and to verify that the complexity of the parallel logic programs with this control strategy would be much less than the complexity of the other logic programs. The proposed control strategy is a combination of committed choice nondeterminism, and the data-flow model. The commit operator would be used for committed choice nondeterminism, and the primitives based on the dataflow model would be used to control AND-parallelism and OR-parallelism. With this proposed control strategy, the maximum useful parallelism can be explained with optimal granularity by controlling useless parallelism and limiting the branching factor. For justification of the proposed control strategy, it is suggested that the complexity of the computations of alternating Turing machines, which include a generalization of nondeterminism, can be used for the abstract cost function of logic programs. As justification of the proposed idea, the author bases a comparison of parallel logic programs on a model utilizing alternating Turing machines. The author shows that a natural reduction of the alternating Turing machine for the proposed control strategy yields a deterministic Turing machine whose complexity is linearly- related to that of the alternating Turing machine. However such a reduction for the conventional committed choice nondeterminism has complexity that is quadratically related to that of the alternating Turing machine.

  9. Retirement ................................................................................................... 1 Comparison Chart................................................................................... 2 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dasgupta, Dipankar

    . The University of Memphis offers two retirement programs, the Tennessee Consolidated Retirement System (TCRS paid on an hourly or bi-weekly basis will be enrolled in the Tennessee Consolidated Retirement System for a comparison of Optional Retirement Program and the Tennessee Consolidated Retirement System. · TN Consolidated

  10. Automatic Calibration of a Building Energy Simulation Model Using a Global Optimization Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, S. U.; Claridge, D.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulation model used to analyze the energy performance of an existing building should be calibrated to measured consumption data from the building so the simulation output closely follows the measured time series energy consumption data and shows...

  11. A cost/benefit model for insertion of technological innovation into a total quality management program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratliff, William L

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    justify quality improvement. The results of this study provide process-level engineers with a cost/benefit model template, which can be used to cost justify technological improvement based upon total quality costs....

  12. Variable-Speed Wind Turbine Controller Systematic Design Methodology: A Comparison of Non-Linear and Linear Model-Based Designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    1999-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Variable-speed, horizontal axis wind turbines use blade-pitch control to meet specified objectives for three regions of operation. This paper focuses on controller design for the constant power production regime. A simple, rigid, non-linear turbine model was used to systematically perform trade-off studies between two performance metrics. Minimization of both the deviation of the rotor speed from the desired speed and the motion of the actuator is desired. The robust nature of the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is illustrated, and optimal operating conditions are determined. Because numerous simulation runs may be completed in a short time, the relationship of the two opposing metrics is easily visualized. Traditional controller design generally consists of linearizing a model about an operating point. This step was taken for two different operating points, and the systematic design approach was used. A comparison of the optimal regions selected using the n on-linear model and the two linear models shows similarities. The linearization point selection does, however, affect the turbine performance slightly. Exploitation of the simplicity of the model allows surfaces consisting of operation under a wide range of gain values to be created. This methodology provides a means of visually observing turbine performance based upon the two metrics chosen for this study. Design of a PID controller is simplified, and it is possible to ascertain the best possible combination of controller parameters. The wide, flat surfaces indicate that a PID controller is very robust in this variable-speed wind turbine application.

  13. 2-D Modeling of Energy-z Beam Dynamics Using the LiTrack Matlab Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cauley, S.K.; /Unlisted; Woods, M.; /SLAC

    2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Short bunches and the bunch length distribution have important consequences for both the LCLS project at SLAC and the proposed ILC project. For both these projects, it is important to simulate what bunch length distributions are expected and then to perform actual measurements. The goal of the research is to determine the sensitivity of the bunch length distribution to accelerator phase and voltage. This then indicates the level of control and stability that is needed. In this project I simulated beamlines to find the rms bunch length in three different beam lines at SLAC, which are the test beam to End Station A (ILC-ESA) for the ILC studies, Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and LCLS-ESA. To simulate the beamlines, I used the LiTrack program, which does a 2-dimensional tracking of an electron bunch's longitudinal (z) and the energy spread beam (E) parameters. In order to reduce the time of processing the information, I developed a small program to loop over adjustable machine parameters. LiTrack is a Matlab script and Matlab is also used for plotting and saving and loading files. The results show that the LCLS in Linac-A is the most sensitive when looking at the ratio of change in phase degree to rate of change. The results also show a noticeable difference between the LCLS and LCLS-ESA, which suggest that further testing should go into looking the Beam Switch Yard and End Station A to determine why the result of the LCLS and LCLS-ESA vary.

  14. LUCIAE 3.0: A new version of a computer program for Firecracker Model and rescattering in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tai An; Sa Ben-Hao

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LUCIAE is a Monte Carlo program that, connected to FRITIOF, implements both the Firecracker Model (FCM), a possible mechanism for collective multi-gluon emission from the colour fields of interacting strings, and the reinteraction of the final state hadrons in relativistic heavy ion collisions. This paper includes a brief presentation of the dynamics of LUCIAE with an emphasis on the new features in this version, as well as a description of the program.

  15. Explosion Models for Type Ia Supernovae: A Comparison with Observed Light Curves, distances, H_o and q_o

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Hoeflich; A. Khokkhlov

    1996-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical monochromatic light curves and photospheric expansion velocities are compared with observations of 27 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). A set of 37 models has been considered which encompasses all currently discussed explosion scenarios for Type Ia supernovae including deflagrations, detonations, delayed detonations, pulsating delayed detonations and tamped detonations of Chandra- mass, and Helium detonations of low mass white dwarfs. The explosions are calculated using one-dimensional Lagrangian hydro and radiation-hydro codes with incorporated nuclear networks. Subsequently, light curves are constructed using our LC scheme which includes an implicit radiation transport, expansion opacities, a Monte-Carlo $\\gamma $-ray transport, and molecular and dust formation. For some supernovae, results of detailed non-LTE calculations have been considered. Observational properties of our series of models are discussed, the relation between the absolute brightness, post-maximum decline rates, the colors at several moments of time, etc. All models with a Ni production larger than 0.4 solar masses produce light curves of similar brightness. The influence of the cosmological red shift on the light curves and on the correction for interstellar reddening is discussed. Based on data rectification of the standard deviation, a quantitative procedure to fit the observations has been used to the determine the free parameters, i.e. the correct model, the distance, the reddening, and the time of the explosion. The results are discussed in detail and applied to determine Ho and qo.

  16. Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudley, Junqiao Han; Black, Doug; Apte, Mike; Piette, Mary Ann; Berkeley, Pam

    2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied a low energy building on a campus of the University of California. It has efficient heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, consisting of a dual-fan/dual-duct variable air volume (VAV) system. As a major building on the campus, it was included in two demand response (DR) events in the summers of 2008 and 2009. With chilled water supplied by thermal energy storage in the central plant, cooling fans played a critical role during DR events. In this paper, an EnergyPlus model of the building was developed and calibrated. We compared both whole-building and HVAC fan energy consumption with model predictions to understand why demand savings in 2009 were much lower than in 2008. We also used model simulations of the study building to assess pre-cooling, a strategy that has been shown to improve demand saving and thermal comfort in many types of building. This study indicates a properly calibrated EnergyPlus model can reasonably predict demand savings from DR events and can be useful for designing or optimizing DR strategies.

  17. Hanbury-Brown-Twiss Interferometry with Identical Bosons in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions: Comparisons with Hadronic Scattering Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas J. Humanic

    2005-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Identical boson Hanbury-Brown-Twiss interferometry as applied to relativistic heavy-ion collisions is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the use of hadronic scattering models to interpret the physical significance of experimental results. Interferometric studies with center-of-mass energies from < 1 GeV/nucleon up to 5500 GeV/nucleon are considered.

  18. Frequency dependent elastic properties and attenuation in heavy-oil sands: comparison between mea-sured and modeled data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) properties of heavy-oil sands over a range of frequencies (2 - 2000Hz) covering the seismic bandwidth. The results show reason- ably good agreement between the measured data and modeled response especially at non larger than that of conventional light oil. Current methods of produc- tion from heavy-oil reservoirs

  19. ERS SAR characterization of coastal polynyas in the Arctic and comparison with SSM/I and numerical model investigations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winsor, Peter

    ), and a numerical polynya model (NPM) forced by National Center for Environmental Predictions (NCEP) wind fields increases to .83. The NPM computes offshore coastal polynya widths, heat exchange, and ice production is that SAR images processed through the SAR polynya algorithm in combination with the NPM is a powerful tool

  20. Reduced model simulations of the scrape-off-layer heat-flux width and comparison with experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Myra, J. R. [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States); Russell, D. A. [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States); D'Ippolito, D. A. [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States); Ahn, J- W [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Maingi, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Maqueda, R. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Lundberg, D. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Stotler, D. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Zweben, S. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Boedo, J. [Univ. of California at San Diego, CA (United States); Umansky, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduced model simulations of turbulence in the edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) region of a spherical torus or tokamak plasma are employed to address the physics of the scrape-off-layer heat flux width. The simulation model is an electrostatic two-dimensional fluid turbulence model, applied in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field at the outboard midplane of the torus. The model contains curvature-driven-interchange modes, sheath losses, and both perpendicular turbulent diffusive and convective (blob) transport. These transport processes compete with classical parallel transport to set the SOL width. Midplane SOL profiles of density, temperature and parallel heat flux are obtained from the simulation and compared with experimental results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [S. M. Kaye, et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 1977 (2001)] to study the scaling of the heat flux width with power and plasma current. It is concluded that midplane turbulence is the main contributor to the SOL heat flux width for the low power H-mode discharges studied, while additional physics is required to explain the plasma current scaling of the SOL heat flux width observed experimentally in higher power discharges. Intermittent separatrix spanning convective cells are found to be the main mechanism that sets the near-SOL width in the simulations. The roles of sheared flows and blob trapping vs. emission are discussed.

  1. Comparison between backscattered TerraSAR signals and simulations from the radar backscattering models IEM, Oh, and Dubois

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for a use of IEM in the inversion of TerraSAR data. A semi-empirical calibration of IEM was done in X-band. Good agreement was found between the TerraSAR data and the simulations using the calibrated version propose an extension of the calibration of IEM model to SAR data in X-band. II. EXPERIMENTAL DATA A. Study

  2. Reduced model simulations of the scrape-off-layer heat-flux width and comparison with experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Myra, J. R.; Russell, D. A.; D’Ippolito, D. A.; Ahn, J.-W.; Maingi, R.; Maqueda, R. J.; Lundberg, D. P.; Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J.; Boedo, J.; et al

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduced model simulations of turbulence in the edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) region of a spherical torus or tokamak plasma are employed to address the physics of the scrape-off-layer heat flux width. The simulation model is an electrostatic two-dimensional fluid turbulence model, applied in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field at the outboard midplane of the torus. The model contains curvature-driven-interchange modes, sheath losses, and both perpendicular turbulent diffusive and convective (blob) transport. These transport processes compete with classical parallel transport to set the SOL width. Midplane SOL profiles of density, temperature and parallel heat flux are obtained from themore »simulation and compared with experimental results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to study the scaling of the heat flux width with power and plasma current. It is concluded that midplane turbulence is the main contributor to the SOL heat flux width for the low power H-mode discharges studied, while additional physics is required to explain the plasma current scaling of the SOL heat flux width observed experimentally in higher power discharges. Intermittent separatrix spanning convective cells are found to be the main mechanism that sets the near-SOL width in the simulations. The roles of sheared flows and blob trapping vs. emission are discussed.« less

  3. Comparison of mid-Pliocene climate predictions produced by the HadAM3 and GCMAM3 General Circulation Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Circulation Models Alan M. Haywood a, , Mark A. Chandler b , Paul J. Valdes c , Ulrich Salzmann d , Daniel J set of Piacenzian Stage land cover [Salzmann, U., Haywood, A.M., Lunt, D.J., Valdes, P.J., Hill, D intervals in Earth History (e.g. Kutzbach and Otto-Bliesner, 1982; Barron and Washington, 1982; Valdes

  4. Using CORE Model-Based Systems Engineering Software to Support Program Management in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Project: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, C.; Sandor, D.; Simpkins, P.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes how a model-based systems engineering software, CORE, is helping the U. S. Department of Energy's Office of Biomass Program assist with bringing biomass-derived biofuels to the market. This software tool provides information to guide informed decision-making as biomass-to-biofuels systems are advanced from concept to commercial adoption. It facilitates management and communication of program status by automatically generating custom reports, Gantt charts, and tables using the widely available programs of Microsoft Word, Project and Excel.

  5. Automatic Calibration of a Building Energy Simulation Model Using a Global Optimization Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, S. U.; Claridge, D.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    buildings, Proceedings of the ACEEE 1992 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 1, 137-147. Kaplan, M.B., Jones, B., Jansen, J., 1990. DOE- 2.1C Model calibration with monitored end-use data, Proceedings of the ACEEE 1990 Summer Study on Energy....E. Professor Texas A&M University Energy Systems Laboratory College Station, TX ABSTRACT A simulation model used to analyze the energy performance of an existing building should be calibrated to measured consumption data from...

  6. Earth System Modeling -- Director`s initiative. LDRD Program final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacCracken, M.; Penner, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Atmospheric Science Div.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Earth System Modeling Director`s Initiative is to develop and test a framework for interactively coupling subsystem models that represent the physical, chemical, and biological processes which determine the state of the atmosphere, ocean, land surface and vegetation. Most studies of the potential for human perturbations of the climate system made previously have treated only limited components of the Earth system. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the capability of coupling all relevant components in a flexible framework that will permit a wide variety of tests to be conducted to assure realistic interactions. A representation of the Earth system is shown and its important interactions.

  7. Modeling Sparse Engine Test Data Using Genetic Programming Chevron Information Technology Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    , average camshaft plus lifter wear, maximum camshaft plus lifter wear, average engine sludge, oil ring land-world meaning. We hope the results of this study would benefit other engine oil modeling applications. 1 INTRODUCTION Laboratory engine tests are among the tools used to measure engine oil performance. These tests

  8. Generalized Disjunctive Programming as a Systematic Modeling Framework to Derive Scheduling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    variables and constraints, but it may compromise computational performance. On the other hand, the convex hull reformulation is tighter, which generally helps to speed up the search procedure. GDP formulations. The best performer is, however, a multiple time grid model which can be derived from the convex hull

  9. Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL LBNL and SNL for the UFD Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes laboratory and field observations and numerical modeling related to coupled processes involving brine and vapor migration in geologic salt, focusing on recent developments and studies conducted at Sandia, Los Alamos, and Berkeley National Laboratories. Interest into the disposal of heat-generating waste in salt has led to interest into water distribution and migration in both run-of-mine crushed and intact geologic salt. Ideally a fully coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical simulation is performed using numerical models with validated constitutive models and parameters. When mechanical coupling is not available, mechanical effects are prescribed in hydraulic models as source, boundary, or initial conditions. This report presents material associated with developing appropriate initial conditions for a non-mechanical hydrologic simulation of brine migration in salt. Due to the strong coupling between the mechanical and hydrologic problems, the initial saturation will be low for the excavation disturbed zone surrounding the excavation. Although most of the material in this report is not new, the author hopes it is presented in a format making it useful to other salt researchers.

  10. Conformance Checking with Constraint Logic Programming: The Case of Feature Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egyed, Alexander

    . On the semantic level, a PLM is defined as the collection of all the product models that can be derived from it. Therefore checking the conformance of the PLM is equivalent to checking the conformance of all the product of a PLM. Despite the importance of PLM conformance checking, very few research works have been published

  11. COMPARISON OF ELM PULSE PROPAGATION IN THE DIII-D SOL AND DIVERTORS WITH AN ION CONVECTION MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FENSTERMACHER,ME; PORTER,GD; LEONARD,AW; BROOKS,NH; BOEDO,JA; COLCHIN,RJ; GRAY,DS; GROEBNER,RJ; GROTH,M; HOGAN,JT; HOLLMANN,EM; LASNIER,CJ; OSBORNE,TH; PETRIE,TW; RUDAKOV,DL; SNYDER,PB; TAKAHASHI,H; WATKINS,JG; ZENG,L; DIII-D TEAM

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 Results from dedicated ELM experiments, performed in DIII-D with fast diagnostics to measure the evolution of Type-I ELM effects in the SOL and divertor, are compared with a simple ion convection model and with initial time-dependent UEDGE simulations. Delays between ELM effects observed in the inner versus the outer divertor regions in the experiments scale, as a function of density, with the difference in ion convection time along field lines from the outer midplane to the divertor targets. The ELM perturbation was modeled as an instantaneous radially uniform increase of diffusion coefficients from the top of the pedestal to the outer SOL. The perturbation was confined to a low field side poloidal zone {+-} 40{sup o} from the outer midplane. The delays in the simulations are similar to those observed in the experiments.

  12. Comparison of "warm and wet" and "cold and icy" scenarios for early Mars in a 3D climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wordsworth, Robin D; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T; Forget, Francois; Head, James W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a 3D general circulation model to compare the primitive Martian hydrological cycle in "warm and wet" and "cold and icy" scenarios. In the warm and wet scenario, an anomalously high solar flux or intense greenhouse warming artificially added to the climate model are required to maintain warm conditions and an ice-free northern ocean. Precipitation shows strong surface variations, with high rates around Hellas basin and west of Tharsis but low rates around Margaritifer Sinus (where the observed valley network drainage density is nonetheless high). In the cold and icy scenario, snow migration is a function of both obliquity and surface pressure, and limited episodic melting is possible through combinations of seasonal, volcanic and impact forcing. At surface pressures above those required to avoid atmospheric collapse (~0.5 bar) and moderate to high obliquity, snow is transported to the equatorial highland regions where the concentration of valley networks is highest. Snow accumulation in the Aeolis quadr...

  13. Computer model for gas turbine blade cooling; including a comparison of steam to air as a cooling medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortman, Daniel William

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THROUGH A DUCT OR PIN-FIN DUCT . FLOW THROUGH THE LEADING EDGE CALCULATION OF BLADE SURFACE TEMPERATURE CAPABILITIES OF THE MODEL RESULTS AND CONCLUSION FUTURE WORK OPTIMIZATION OF COOLANT FLOW PARAMETERS . INCLUSION OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONDUCTION... pressure Downstream coolant fluid static pressure Coolant fluid coefficient of friction Hydraulic diameter of coolant duct Length of coolant duct (element) Density of fluid coolant (corrected for pressure and temperature) Velocity of the coolant...

  14. The Effects of Parceling on Testing Group Differences in Second-Order CFA Models: A Comparison between Multi-Group CFA and MIMIC Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Yuanyuan

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Using multi-group confirmatory factor analysis (MCFA) and multiple-indicator-multiple-cause (MIMIC) to investigate group difference in the context of the second-order factor model with either the unparceled or parceled data had never been thoroughly...

  15. Comparison of signal to noise ratios from spatial and frequency domain formulations of nonprewhitening model observers in digital mammography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisini, Francesco; Zanca, Federica; Marshall, Nicholas W.; Taibi, Angelo; Cardarelli, Paolo; Bosmans, Hilde [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara, Italy and (Italy); Department of Radiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Radiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Department of Radiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Image quality indices based upon model observers are promising alternatives to laborious human readings of contrast-detail images. This is especially appealing in digital mammography as limiting values for contrast thresholds determine, according to some international protocols, the acceptability of these systems in the radiological practice. The objective of the present study was to compare the signal to noise ratios (SNR) obtained with two nonprewhitening matched filter model observer approaches, one in the spatial domain and the other in the frequency domain, and with both of them worked out for disks as present in the CDMAM phantom. Methods: The analysis was performed using images acquired with the Siemens Novation and Inspiration digital mammography systems. The spatial domain formulation uses a series of high dose CDMAM images as the signal and a routine exposure of two flood images to calculate the covariance matrix. The frequency domain approach uses the mathematical description of a disk and modulation transfer function (MTF) and noise power spectrum (NPS) calculated from images. Results: For both systems most of the SNR values calculated in the frequency domain were in very good agreement with the SNR values calculated in the spatial domain. Both the formulations in the frequency domain and in the spatial domain show a linear relationship between SNR and the diameter of the CDMAM discs. Conclusions: The results suggest that both formulations of the model observer lead to very similar figures of merit. This is a step forward in the adoption of figures of merit based on NPS and MTF for the acceptance testing of mammography systems.

  16. Topology in 2D CP**(N-1) models on the lattice: a critical comparison of different cooling techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Alles; L. Cosmai; M. D'Elia; A. Papa

    2000-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-dimensional CP**(N-1) models are used to compare the behavior of different cooling techniques on the lattice. Cooling is one of the most frequently used tools to study on the lattice the topological properties of the vacuum of a field theory. We show that different cooling methods behave in an equivalent way. To see this we apply the cooling methods on classical instantonic configurations and on configurations of the thermal equilibrium ensemble. We also calculate the topological susceptibility by using the cooling technique.

  17. Comparison of Measurement And Modeling Of Current Profile Changes Due To Neutral Bean Ion Redistribution During TAE Avalanches in NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darrow, Douglas

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Brief "avalanches" of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs) are observed in NSTX plasmas with several different n numbers simultaneously present. These affect the neutral beam ion distribution as evidenced by a concurrent drop in the neutron rate and, sometimes, beam ion loss. Guiding center orbit modeling has shown that the modes can transiently render portions of the beam ion phase space stochastic. The resulting redistribution of beam ions can also create a broader beam-driven current profile and produce other changes in the beam ion distribution function

  18. A Cross-model Comparison of Global Long-term Technology Diffusion under a 2?C Climate Change Control Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Zwaan, Bob; Rosler, Hilke; Kober, Tom; Aboumahboub, Tino; Calvin, Katherine V.; Gernaat, David; Marangoni, Giacomo; McCollum, David

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the long-term global energy technology diffusion patterns required to reach a stringent climate change target with a maximum average atmospheric temperature increase of 2°C. If the anthropogenic temperature increase is to be limited to 2°C, total CO2 emissions have to be reduced massively, so as to reach substantial negative values during the second half of the century. Particularly power sector CO2 emissions should become negative from around 2050 onwards according to most models used for this analysis in order to compensate for GHG emissions in other sectors where abatement is more costly. The annual additional capacity deployment intensity (expressed in GW/yr) for solar and wind energy until 2030 needs to be around that recently observed for coal-based power plants, and will have to be several times higher in the period 2030–2050. Relatively high agreement exists across models in terms of the aggregated low-carbon energy system cost requirements on the supply side until 2050, which amount to about 50 trillion US$.

  19. A model for determining body composition of steers fed in a variety of nutritional management programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regmund, John William

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to a period of time instead of a given point in time. A steer's mean weight was calculated by adding the starting and ending EBW and dividing by two. The growing phase OPG model was as follows: DPG (kg)= . 7414 ? . 1157(lnMWT) + . 0766(lnDEBG) + 2... across levels of the second factor. Figure 2 is a representation of the effects of OPG interacting with IC across rates of OEBG. Byers (1980c) and Lemieux et al. (1984) demonstrated that anabolic implants repartition energy from fat storage to lean...

  20. U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model Program RM2: Experimental Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Zandofpoint motional%^6 AnnualReference Model

  1. Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven National LaboratoryJeffrey L KrauseEarth System Modeling (ESM)

  2. Comparison of Very Smooth Cell-Model Trajectories Using Four Symplectic and Two Runge-Kutta Integrators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William Graham Hoover; Carol Griswold Hoover

    2015-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Symplectic methods, which are precisely compatible with Liouville's phase-volume-conservation theorem, are often recommended for computational simulations of Hamiltonian mechanics. Lack of energy drift is an advantage of symplectic methods. But all numerical methods are susceptible to chaos, Lyapunov instability, which severely limits the maximum time for which solutions can be "accurate". The "advantages" of higher-order methods are lost for typical chaotic Hamiltonians. We illustrate these difficulties for a useful reproducible test case, the two-dimensional one-particle cell model. The motion is chaotic and occurs on a three-dimensional constant energy shell. We benchmark the problem with quadruple-precision trajectories using a fifth-order Runge-Kutta and the fourth-order Candy-Rozmus integrator. We compare these benchmark results for accurate particle trajectories to those from six double-precision algorithms, four symplectic and two Runge-Kutta.

  3. Modelling and comparison of trapped fields in (RE)BCO bulk superconductors for activation using pulsed field magnetization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ainslie, M. D.; Fujishiro, H.; Ujiie, T.; Zou, J.; Dennis, A. R.; Shi, Y.-H.; Cardwell, D. A.

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    -1 Cn Heat capacity of liquid nitrogen at 77 K 1040 JK -1kg-1 kab Thermal conductivity of bulk along ab-plane 20 Wm -1K-1 kc Thermal conductivity of bulk along c-axis 4 Wm -1K-1 kn Thermal conductivity of liquid nitrogen 0.026 Wm -1K-1 E0... ) and Jnorm = ?(Jx 2 + Jy 2 + Jz 2). Table 1. Thermal model parameters PARAMETER DESCRIPTION VALUE Tc Transition temperature 92 K 𝜌𝑏 HTS bulk density 5.9 x 10 3 kgm-3 𝜌𝑛 Nitrogen density 808.4 kgm -3 Cb Heat capacity of bulk 1.32 x 10 2 Jkg-1K...

  4. A comparison of methods used in mapping of Pleistocene-bedrock unconformity: Conventional manual versus surface modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weibel, C.P.; Abert, C.C.; Kempton, J.P. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface modeling software packages allow geologists to model and map topographic and stratigraphic horizons. These map products, however, often differ from maps prepared without computerized mapping. The authors mapping of the Pleistocene-bedrock unconformity in east-central Illinois (1:100,000-scale), which includes the Mahomet paleovalley, illustrates this situation and demonstrates how both mapping methods, manual and computer, contribute to a better understanding of the paleovalley. A conventional hand-drawn map was constructed over a number of years by manually plotting and contouring bedrock elevations, primarily from water well logs, onto various county and local topographic bases. A computer-generated map of the same area was completed as part of a recent project to map the bedrock geology. It was prepared by carefully selecting data, which included geographic coordinates, unique well identification numbers, and bedrock elevations. Primary data sources were hydrocarbon exploration and storage wells. Digitizing the hand-drawn map allowed the two maps to be overlaid and compared. Several significant geomorphic features appeared on one map and not the other because of the use of different databases and inconsistent selection of data used for the hand-drawn map. The hand-drawn map appears more realistic, i.e., like a modern surface, because the mappers used their knowledge of geomorphic concepts in drawing the contours. Most of the data selection for the computer-generated map was completed prior to plotting of the map and therefore is less susceptible to bias interpretations. The computer-generated map, however, is less topographically realistic in areas where data are sparse because the extrapolation methods used to define the surface do not recognize geologic processes or bedrock lithology.

  5. INTERLINE 5.0 -- An expanded railroad routing model: Program description, methodology, and revised user`s manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Clarke, D.B.; Jacobi, J.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Transportation Center

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rail routine model, INTERLINE, has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate potential routes for transporting radioactive materials. In Version 5.0, the INTERLINE routing algorithms have been enhanced to include the ability to predict alternative routes, barge routes, and population statistics for any route. The INTERLINE railroad network is essentially a computerized rail atlas describing the US railroad system. All rail lines, with the exception of industrial spurs, are included in the network. Inland waterways and deep water routes along with their interchange points with the US railroadsystem are also included. The network contains over 15,000 rail and barge segments (links) and over 13,000 stations, interchange points, ports, and other locations (nodes). The INTERLINE model has been converted to operate on an IBM-compatible personal computer. At least a 286 computer with a hard disk containing approximately 6 MB of free space is recommended. Enhanced program performance will be obtained by using arandom-access memory drive on a 386 or 486 computer.

  6. DIRECT N-BODY MODELING OF THE OLD OPEN CLUSTER NGC 188: A DETAILED COMPARISON OF THEORETICAL AND OBSERVED BINARY STAR AND BLUE STRAGGLER POPULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geller, Aaron M. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Hurley, Jarrod R. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Mathieu, Robert D., E-mail: a-geller@northwestern.edu, E-mail: mathieu@astro.wisc.edu, E-mail: jhurley@astro.swin.edu.au [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following on from a recently completed radial-velocity survey of the old (7 Gyr) open cluster NGC 188 in which we studied in detail the solar-type hard binaries and blue stragglers of the cluster, here we investigate the dynamical evolution of NGC 188 through a sophisticated N-body model. Importantly, we employ the observed binary properties of the young (180 Myr) open cluster M35, where possible, to guide our choices for parameters of the initial binary population. We apply pre-main-sequence tidal circularization and a substantial increase to the main-sequence tidal circularization rate, both of which are necessary to match the observed tidal circularization periods in the literature, including that of NGC 188. At 7 Gyr the main-sequence solar-type hard-binary population in the model matches that of NGC 188 in both binary frequency and distributions of orbital parameters. This agreement between the model and observations is in a large part due to the similarities between the NGC 188 and M35 solar-type binaries. Indeed, among the 7 Gyr main-sequence binaries in the model, only those with P {approx}> 1000 days begin to show potentially observable evidence for modifications by dynamical encounters, even after 7 Gyr of evolution within the star cluster. This emphasizes the importance of defining accurate initial conditions for star cluster models, which we propose is best accomplished through comparisons with observations of young open clusters like M35. Furthermore, this finding suggests that observations of the present-day binaries in even old open clusters can provide valuable information on their primordial binary populations. However, despite the model's success at matching the observed solar-type main-sequence population, the model underproduces blue stragglers and produces an overabundance of long-period circular main-sequence-white-dwarf binaries as compared with the true cluster. We explore several potential solutions to the paucity of blue stragglers and conclude that the model dramatically underproduces blue stragglers through mass-transfer processes. We suggest that common-envelope evolution may have been incorrectly imposed on the progenitors of the spurious long-period circular main-sequence-white-dwarf binaries, which perhaps instead should have gone through stable mass transfer to create blue stragglers, thereby bringing both the number and binary frequency of the blue straggler population in the model into agreement with the true blue stragglers in NGC 188. Thus, improvements in the physics of mass transfer and common-envelope evolution employed in the model may in fact solve both discrepancies with the observations. This project highlights the unique accessibility of open clusters to both comprehensive observational surveys and full-scale N-body simulations, both of which have only recently matured sufficiently to enable such a project, and underscores the importance of open clusters to the study of star cluster dynamics.

  7. Translating Answer-Set Programs into Bit-Vector Logic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Mai; Niemelä, Ilkka

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Answer set programming (ASP) is a paradigm for declarative problem solving where problems are first formalized as rule sets, i.e., answer-set programs, in a uniform way and then solved by computing answer sets for programs. The satisfiability modulo theories (SMT) framework follows a similar modelling philosophy but the syntax is based on extensions of propositional logic rather than rules. Quite recently, a translation from answer-set programs into difference logic was provided---enabling the use of particular SMT solvers for the computation of answer sets. In this paper, the translation is revised for another SMT fragment, namely that based on fixed-width bit-vector theories. Thus, even further SMT solvers can be harnessed for the task of computing answer sets. The results of a preliminary experimental comparison are also reported. They suggest a level of performance which is similar to that achieved via difference logic.

  8. Extraction of the second-order nonlinear response from model test data in random seas and comparison of the Gaussian and non-Gaussian models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Nungsoo

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents the results of an extraction of the 2nd-order nonlinear responses from model test data. Emphasis is given on the effects of assumptions made for the Gaussian and non-Gaussian input on the estimation of the 2nd-order response...

  9. Comparison of Optimal Thermodynamic Models of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle from Heterotrophs, Cyanobacteria, and Green Sulfur Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Dennis G.; Jaramillo Riveri, Sebastian I.; Baxter, Douglas J.; Cannon, William R.

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have applied a new stochastic simulation approach to predict the metabolite levels, energy flow, and material flux in the different oxidative TCA cycles found in E. coli and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, and in the reductive TCA cycle typical of chemolithoautotrophs and phototrophic green sulfur bacteria such as Chlorobaculum tepidum. The simulation approach is based on equations of state and employs an assumption similar to that used in transition state theory. The ability to evaluate the thermodynamics of metabolic pathways allows one to understand the relationship between coupling of energy and material gradients in the environment and the selforganization of stable biological systems, and it is shown that each cycle operates in the direction expected due to its environmental niche. The simulations predict changes in metabolite levels and flux in response to changes in cofactor concentrations that would be hard to predict without an elaborate model based on the law of mass action. In fact, we show that a thermodynamically unfavorable reaction can still have flux in the forward direction when it is part of a reaction network. The ability to predict metabolite levels, energy flow and material flux should be significant for understanding the dynamics of natural systems and for understanding principles for engineering organisms for production of specialty chemicals, such as biofuels.

  10. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS --Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the installation of a fenced stream crossing over the Pahsimeroi River to enhance a livestock riparian enclosure. This structure would include up to four wood fence posts and two deadman anchors buried in the ground. The goal of this project is to enhance salmon and steelhead rearing and migration habitat by preventing livestock from entering the riparian area via the river. The NEPA compliance checklist for this project was completed by Carl Rudeen with the Custer Soil and Water Conservation District (August 4, 2004) and meets the standards and guidelines for the Watershed Management Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The Endangered Species Act (ESA) listed species that may occur in the general vicinity of the project area are gray wolf, Canada lynx, bald eagle, Ute ladies'Tresses, Snake River chinook salmon, Snake River steelhead trout, and Columbia River Basin bull trout. It was determined that the proposed fence crossing construction project would have no effect on these species. Bald eagle, gray wolf and Canada lynx are not known to occur in the immediate project vicinity. Since the site is used primarily as livestock pasture it does not lend itself to the presence of Ute ladies'Tresses. ESA listed fish may be present in the project vicinity but will not be affected because the project does not involve instream work. Soil disturbance will be limited to the livestock pasture and to two holes that will be used to bury anchors for the suspended portion of the fence. Required river crossings will be made on foot. Requirements associated with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act were handled by the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), in cooperation with staff from the U.S. Forest Service (Boise National Forest), under their existing Programmatic Agreement with the Idaho State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO). A description of the Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing project and site information was reviewed by a qualified archaeologist and it was determined that an archaeological survey was needed. Bruce Blackmere with NRCS conducted an intensive-complete survey of the project site and cultural resources were not identified (July 30, 2004). Based on these findings, it was recommended that the project proceed as planned. All survey findings were provided to the Idaho SHPO. In the unlikely event that archaeological material is discovered during project implementation, an archaeologist should be notified immediately and work halted in the vicinity of the finds until they can be inspected and assessed. Standard water quality protection procedures and Best Management Practices should be followed during the implementation of the Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing project. No construction is authorized to begin until the proponent has obtained all applicable local, state, and federal permits and approvals. Public involvement has occurred as part of the Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing project. This project was coordinated through the Upper Salmon Basin Technical Team and Advisory Committee composed of representatives from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, NOAA Fisheries, Shoshone Bannock Tribe, and Idaho Department of Fish and Game. In addition, the Custer Soil and Water Conservation District holds monthly meetings that are open to the public in which this project was discussed.

  11. The development of a laser safety program for a large academic research institution using Texas A&M University as a model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Douglas Allen

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a model for developing a laser safety program for a large academic research institution. It is based on the standards and requirements of the 1993 American National Standards Institute document Z136.1, The Safe Use of Lasers...

  12. A physically-based heat pump model was connected to an optimization program to form a computer code for use in the design of high-efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    #12;ABSTRACT A physically-based heat pump model was connected to an optimization program to form a computer code for use in the design of high-efficiency heat pumps. The method used allows efficiency of conventional heat pumps, ten variables were optimized while heating capacity was fixed

  13. The development of a laser safety program for a large academic research institution using Texas A&M University as a model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Douglas Allen

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a model for developing a laser safety program for a large academic research institution. It is based on the standards and requirements of the 1993 American National Standards Institute document Z136.1, The Safe Use of Lasers...

  14. Evaluation of TVA`s model site and individual technology pollution prevention demonstration programs and their impact on the agrichemical industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, G.S.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high volume of fertilizer and pesticides funneled through a relatively small number of distribution outlets has made these agribusiness sites potential sources of surface/groundwater contamination in watersheds surrounding the agrichemical facilities. The agrichemical industry came under increased pressures in the mid-1980s to implement environmentally sound management practices and to install containment structures around fertilizer and chemical storage/handling areas to prevent future contamination of existing sites or the movement of contaminants offsite. TVA`s long and successful history of technology transfer to the retail fertilizer industry, as well as the technical expertise of the Agency`s staff, made TVA ideally suited to handle the new environmental challenge. It was during this time period that TVA`s Model Site Demonstration Program (MSD) and Individual Technology Demonstration Program (ITD) were conceived. Since inception, the pollution prevention program and the technologies advanced by it have made a very positive impact on the US agrichemical industry, as well as on other TVA programs. This paper is an attempt to document these impacts, with primary focus being placed on the program`s impact on the agribusiness dealer who implements the pollution prevention technologies/practices recommended by TVA.

  15. Report for the ASC CSSE L2 Milestone (4873) - Demonstration of Local Failure Local Recovery Resilient Programming Model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heroux, Michael A.; Teranishi, Keita [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recovery from process loss during the execution of a distributed memory parallel application is presently achieved by restarting the program, typically from a checkpoint file. Future computer system trends indicate that the size of data to checkpoint, the lack of improvement in parallel file system performance and the increase in process failure rates will lead to situations where checkpoint restart becomes infeasible. In this report we describe and prototype the use of a new application level resilient computing model that manages persistent storage of local state for each process such that, if a process fails, recovery can be performed locally without requiring access to a global checkpoint file. LFLR provides application developers with an ability to recover locally and continue application execution when a process is lost. This report discusses what features are required from the hardware, OS and runtime layers, and what approaches application developers might use in the design of future codes, including a demonstration of LFLR-enabled MiniFE code from the Matenvo mini-application suite.

  16. The Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) Software Development: Applications, Infrastructure, and Middleware/Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of and future plans for the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) hinge on software that PCMDI is either currently distributing or plans to distribute to the climate community in the near future. These software products include standard conventions, national and international federated infrastructures, and community analysis and visualization tools. This report also mentions other secondary software not necessarily led by or developed at PCMDI to provide a complete picture of the overarching applications, infrastructures, and middleware/networks. Much of the software described anticipates the use of future technologies envisioned over the span of next year to 10 years. These technologies, together with the software, will be the catalyst required to address extreme-scale data warehousing, scalability issues, and service-level requirements for a diverse set of well-known projects essential for predicting climate change. These tools, unlike the previous static analysis tools of the past, will support the co-existence of many users in a productive, shared virtual environment. This advanced technological world driven by extreme-scale computing and the data it generates will increase scientists’ productivity, exploit national and international relationships, and push research to new levels of understanding.

  17. Comparison of ASHRAE Standard 90.1, 189.1 and IECC Codes for Large Office Building in Texas), Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, J.; Baltazar, J.C.; Kim,H.; Haberl, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    herein is necessarily error-free. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the Energy.... The comparison is carried out using the simulation model for a large office building initially developed by Ahmad et al. (2005) and Kim et al. (2009) using DOE-2.1e simulation program. The model has been updated and modified as per the requirements...

  18. Guide to Benchmarking Residential Program Progress - CALL FOR...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    program performance across time and in comparison to others; and report about your performance in effective ways. Guide Overview The Guide also provides: Recommendations...

  19. Computer programs for developing source terms for a UF{sub 6} dispersion model to simulate postulated UF{sub 6} releases from buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, W.R.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculational methods and computer programs for the analysis of source terms for postulated releases of UF{sub 6} are presented. Required thermophysical properties of UF{sub 6}, HF, and H{sub 2}O are described in detail. UF{sub 6} reacts with moisture in the ambient environment to form HF and H{sub 2}O. The coexistence of HF and H{sub 2}O significantly alters their pure component properties, and HF vapor polymerizes. Transient compartment models for simulating UF{sub 6} releases inside gaseous diffusion plant feed and withdrawl buildings and cascade buildings are also described. The basic compartment model mass and energy balances are supported by simple heat transfer, ventilation system, and deposition models. A model that can simulate either a closed compartment or a steady-state ventilation system is also discussed. The transient compartment models provide input to an atmospheric dispersion model as output.

  20. Matrixed business support comparison study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, Josh D.

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Matrixed Business Support Comparison Study reviewed the current matrixed Chief Financial Officer (CFO) division staff models at Sandia National Laboratories. There were two primary drivers of this analysis: (1) the increasing number of financial staff matrixed to mission customers and (2) the desire to further understand the matrix process and the opportunities and challenges it creates.

  1. Euclid Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Programming Programming Compiling and linking programs on Euclid. Compiling Codes How to compile and link MPI codes on Euclid. Read More Using the ACML Math Library How to...

  2. Wind Energy Program: Top 10 Program Accomplishments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Brochure on the top accomplishments of the Wind Energy Program, including the development of large wind machines, small machines for the residential market, wind tunnel testing, computer codes for modeling wind systems, high definition wind maps, and successful collaborations.

  3. A Fortran 90 Hartree-Fock program for one-dimensional periodic $\\pi$-conjugated systems using Pariser-Parr-Pople model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gundra, Kondayya

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pariser-Parr-Pople (P-P-P) model Hamiltonian is employed frequently to study the electronic structure and optical properties of $\\pi$-conjugated systems. In this paper we describe a Fortran 90 computer program which uses the P-P-P model Hamiltonian to solve the Hartree-Fock (HF) equation for infinitely long, one-dimensional, periodic, $\\pi$-electron systems. The code is capable of computing the band structure, as also the linear optical absorption spectrum, by using the tight-binding (TB) and the HF methods. Furthermore, using our program the user can solve the HF equation in the presence of a finite external electric field, thereby, allowing the simulation of gated systems. We apply our code to compute various properties of polymers such as $trans$-polyacetylene ($t$-PA), poly-\\emph{para}-phenylene (PPP), and armchair and zigzag graphene nanoribbons, in the infinite length limit.

  4. A model-data intercomparison of CO2 exchange across North America: Results from the North American Carbon Program Site Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwalm, C.R.; Williams, C.A.; Schaefer, K.; Anderson, R.; Arain, M.A.; Baker, I.; Black, T.A.; Chen, G.; Ciais, P.; Davis, K. J.; Desai, A. R.; Dietze, M.; Dragoni, D.; Fischer, M.L.; Flanagan, L.B.; Grant, R.F.; Gu, L.; Hollinger, D.; Izaurralde, R.C.; Kucharik, C.; Lafleur, P.M.; Law, B.E.; Li, L.; Li, Z.; Liu, S.; Lokupitiya, E.; Luo, Y.; Ma, S.; Margolis, H.; Matamala, R.; McCaughey, H.; Monson, R. K.; Oechel, W. C.; Peng, C.; Poulter, B.; Price, D.T.; Riciutto, D.M.; Riley, W.J.; Sahoo, A.K.; Sprintsin, M.; Sun, J.; Tian, H.; Tonitto, C.; Verbeeck, H.; Verma, S.B.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our current understanding of terrestrial carbon processes is represented in various models used to integrate and scale measurements of CO{sub 2} exchange from remote sensing and other spatiotemporal data. Yet assessments are rarely conducted to determine how well models simulate carbon processes across vegetation types and environmental conditions. Using standardized data from the North American Carbon Program we compare observed and simulated monthly CO{sub 2} exchange from 44 eddy covariance flux towers in North America and 22 terrestrial biosphere models. The analysis period spans {approx}220 site-years, 10 biomes, and includes two large-scale drought events, providing a natural experiment to evaluate model skill as a function of drought and seasonality. We evaluate models' ability to simulate the seasonal cycle of CO{sub 2} exchange using multiple model skill metrics and analyze links between model characteristics, site history, and model skill. Overall model performance was poor; the difference between observations and simulations was {approx}10 times observational uncertainty, with forested ecosystems better predicted than nonforested. Model-data agreement was highest in summer and in temperate evergreen forests. In contrast, model performance declined in spring and fall, especially in ecosystems with large deciduous components, and in dry periods during the growing season. Models used across multiple biomes and sites, the mean model ensemble, and a model using assimilated parameter values showed high consistency with observations. Models with the highest skill across all biomes all used prescribed canopy phenology, calculated NEE as the difference between GPP and ecosystem respiration, and did not use a daily time step.

  5. Student Internship Programs Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Student Internship Programs Program Description The objective of the Laboratory's student internship programs is to provide students with opportunities for meaningful hands- on...

  6. affirmative action program: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    programming Air pollution modeling: proportional rollback, Gaussian transport, emissions trading Location of waste disposal facilities, integer linear programming Dissolved...

  7. Effects of Pre-Existing Ice Crystals on Cirrus Clouds and Comparison between Different Ice Nucleation Parameterizations with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Xiangjun; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to improve the treatment of ice nucleation in a more realistic manner in the Community Atmospheric Model version 5.3 (CAM5.3), the effects of preexisting ice crystals on ice nucleation in cirrus clouds are considered. In addition, by considering the in-cloud variability in ice saturation ratio, homogeneous nucleation takes place spatially only in a portion of cirrus cloud rather than in the whole area of cirrus cloud. With these improvements, the two unphysical limiters used in the representation of ice nucleation are removed. Compared to observations, the ice number concentrations and the probability distributions of ice number concentration are both improved with the updated treatment. The preexisting ice crystals significantly reduce ice number concentrations in cirrus clouds, especially at mid- to high latitudes in the upper troposphere (by a factor of ~10). Furthermore, the contribution of heterogeneous ice nucleation to cirrus ice crystal number increases considerably.Besides the default ice nucleation parameterization of Liu and Penner (2005, hereafter LP) in CAM5.3, two other ice nucleation parameterizations of Barahona and Nenes (2009, hereafter BN) and Kärcher et al. (2006, hereafter KL) are implemented in CAM5.3 for the comparison. In-cloud ice crystal number concentration, percentage contribution from heterogeneous ice nucleation to total ice crystal number, and preexisting ice effects simulated by the three ice nucleation parameterizations have similar patterns in the simulations with present-day aerosol emissions. However, the change (present-day minus pre-industrial times) in global annual mean column ice number concentration from the KL parameterization (3.24×106 m-2) is obviously less than that from the LP (8.46×106 m-2) and BN (5.62×106 m-2) parameterizations. As a result, experiment using the KL parameterization predicts a much smaller anthropogenic aerosol longwave indirect forcing (0.24 W m-2) than that using the LP (0.46 W m-2) and BN (0.39 W m-2) parameterizations.

  8. Organ-Specific Alterations in Fatty Acid De Novo Synthesis and Desaturation in a Rat Model of Programmed Obesity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yee, Jennifer K; Lee, Wai-Nang P; Han, Guang; Ross, Michael G; Desai, Mina

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prevalence and Trends in Obesity Among US Adults, 1999-2008.C, Barker DJ, Bleker OP: Obesity at the age of 50 y in menDevelopmental programming of obesity in mammals. Exp Physiol

  9. Comparison between Gaussian-type orbitals and plane wave ab initio density functional theory modeling of layer silicates: Talc [Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 4}O{sub 10}(OH){sub 2}] as model system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulian, Gianfranco; Valdrè, Giovanni, E-mail: giovanni.valdre@unibo.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Biologiche e Geologico-Ambientali, Centro di Ricerca Interdisciplinare di Biomineralogia, Cristallografia e Biomateriali, Università di Bologna “Alma Mater Studiorum” Piazza di Porta San Donato 1, 40126 Bologna (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Scienze Biologiche e Geologico-Ambientali, Centro di Ricerca Interdisciplinare di Biomineralogia, Cristallografia e Biomateriali, Università di Bologna “Alma Mater Studiorum” Piazza di Porta San Donato 1, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Tosoni, Sergio [Departament de Química Física and Institut de Química Teòrica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)] [Departament de Química Física and Institut de Química Teòrica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum chemical characterization of solid state systems is conducted with many different approaches, among which the adoption of periodic boundary conditions to deal with three-dimensional infinite condensed systems. This method, coupled to the Density Functional Theory (DFT), has been proved successful in simulating a huge variety of solids. Only in relatively recent years this ab initio quantum-mechanic approach has been used for the investigation of layer silicate structures and minerals. In the present work, a systematic comparison of different DFT functionals (GGA-PBEsol and hybrid B3LYP) and basis sets (plane waves and all-electron Gaussian-type orbitals) on the geometry, energy, and phonon properties of a model layer silicate, talc [Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 4}O{sub 10}(OH){sub 2}], is presented. Long range dispersion is taken into account by DFT+D method. Results are in agreement with experimental data reported in literature, with minimal deviation given by the GTO/B3LYP-D* method regarding both axial lattice parameters and interaction energy and by PW/PBE-D for the unit-cell volume and angular values. All the considered methods adequately describe the experimental talc infrared spectrum.

  10. MERCHOP (Merchandising Optimizer): A dynamic programming model for estimating the harvest value of unthinned loblolly and slash pine plantations. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busby, R.L.; Ward, K.B.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model was devised to estimate the harvest value of unthinned loblolly and slash pine (pinus taeda L. and P. elliottii var. elliottii Englm.) plantations in the west gulf region. The model, MERCHOP, can be used to forecast product volumes and values; the output provided is partitioned into 1-inch tree d.b.h. classes. Using a dynamic programming algorithm, MERCHOP can be used to convert stand tables predicted by USLYCOWG's three-parameter Weibull function into a listing of seven products that maximizes the selling value of the stand, assuming the assumptions used in the analysis are correct.

  11. Comparison of Different Forms of Herpes Simplex Replication-Defective Mutant Viruses as Vaccines in a Mouse Model of HSV-2 Genital Infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knipe, David M.

    Comparison of Different Forms of Herpes Simplex Replication-Defective Mutant Viruses as Vaccines for revision June 6, 2001; accepted July 11, 2001 Some subunit vaccines composed of herpes simplex virus (HSV against HSV-2. © 2001 Academic Press INTRODUCTION Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) is the principal etio

  12. Modeling, Optimization and Power Efficiency Comparison of High-speed Inter-chip Electrical and Optical Interconnect Architectures in Nanometer CMOS Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palaniappan, Arun

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    for the power optimization and comparison of high-speed electrical and optical links at a given data rate and channel type in 90 nm and 45 nm CMOS technologies. The electrical I/O design framework combines statistical link analysis techniques, which are used...

  13. Program School/ Career: Descripton ISIS Program Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Program School/ Career: Descripton ISIS Program Codes Program Career: Descripton College School;Program School/ Career: Descripton ISIS Program Codes Program Career: Descripton College School/ College 1

  14. JPlag: Finding plagiarisms among a set of programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prechelt, Lutz

    : The "k-means" program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 4.3.4 j5 presents the design of JPlag, in particular the comparison algorithm, and carefully evaluates JPlag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3 The JPlag comparison algorithm 10 3.1 Converting the programs into token strings

  15. CoRoT/ESTA-TASK 1 and TASK 3 comparison of the internal structure and seismic properties of representative stellar models: Comparisons between the ASTEC, CESAM, CLES, GARSTEC and STAROX codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yveline Lebreton; Josefina Montalban; Joergen Christensen-Dalsgaard; Ian W. Roxburgh; Achim Weiss

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare stellar models produced by different stellar evolution codes for the CoRoT/ESTA project, comparing their global quantities, their physical structure, and their oscillation properties. We discuss the differences between models and identify the underlying reasons for these differences. The stellar models are representative of potential CoRoT targets. Overall we find very good agreement between the five different codes, but with some significant deviations. We find noticeable discrepancies (though still at the per cent level) that result from the handling of the equation of state, of the opacities and of the convective boundaries. The results of our work will be helpful in interpreting future asteroseismology results from CoRoT.

  16. Protein and Peptide Letters 6, 429-436 (2001) AN EFFICIENT, FLEXIBLE-MODEL PROGRAM FOR THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blaber, Michael

    to the liquid phase of water, the temperature value for the y intercept (heat capacity) of all functions a constant Cp(T), linear heat capacity functions, and so on. We have developed a WindowsTM based program solutes in aqueous solution, the heat capacity contribution of protein molecules is small compared

  17. Survey and discussion of models applicable to the transport and fate thrust area of the Department of Energy Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The availability and easy production of toxic chemical and biological agents by domestic and international terrorists pose a serious threat to US national security, especially to civilian populations in and around urban areas. To address this threat, the Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (CBNP) with the goal of focusing the DOE`s technical resources and expertise on capabilities to deny, deter, mitigate and respond to clandestine releases of chemical and biological agents. With the intent to build on DOE core competencies, the DOE has established six technology thrust areas within the CBNP Program: Biological Information Resources; Point Sensor Systems; Stand-off Detection; Transport and Fate; Decontamination; and Systems Analysis and Integration. The purpose of the Transport and Fate Thrust is to accurately predict the dispersion, concentration and ultimate fate of chemical and biological agents released into the urban and suburban environments and has two major goals: (1) to develop an integrated and validated state-of-the-art atmospheric transport and fate modeling capability for chemical and biological agent releases within the complex urban environment from the regional scale down to building and subway interiors, and (2) to apply this modeling capability in a broad range of simulation case studies of chemical and biological agent release scenarios in suburban, urban and confined (buildings and subways) environments and provide analysis for the incident response user community. Sections of this report discuss subway transport and fate models; buildings interior transport and fate modeling; models for flow and transport around buildings; and local-regional meteorology and dispersion models.

  18. Sponsored Program Resources SPONSORED PROGRAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Sponsored Program Resources - 1 - SPONSORED PROGRAMS Sponsored programs are research, instruction for sponsored programs is provided through an agreement between the sponsor and Syracuse University are being achieved and funds properly used Sponsored programs are managed by the Office of Sponsored

  19. Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experience, is a unique educational program designed to introduce students in geophysics and related fields to "hands on" geophysical exploration and research. The program...

  20. Program Administration

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume describes program administration that establishes and maintains effective organizational management and control of the emergency management program. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.