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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-6432E Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: HVAC Systems Xin Zhou1 , Tianzhen Hong2 programs (BEMPs) for HVAC calculations: EnergyPlus, DeST, and DOE-2.1E. This is a joint effort between purposes, BEMPs can be divided into load modules and HVAC system modules. This technical report

2

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Mehry Yazdanian. Comparisons of HVAC Simulations betweeninformation Comparison of HVAC System Simulations inCLT (kW) Comparison of HVAC System Simulations in Different

Zhou, Xin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

A comparison of three programming models for adaptive applications on the Origin2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adaptive applications have computational workloads and communication patterns which change unpredictably at runtime, requiring dynamic load balancing to achieve scalable performance on parallel machines. Efficient parallel implementations of such adaptive applications is therefore a challenging task. In this paper, we compare the performance of and the programming effort required for two major classes of adaptive applications under three leading parallel programming models on an SGI Origin2000 system, a machine which supports all three models efficiently. Results indicate that the three models deliver comparable performance; however, the implementations differ significantly beyond merely using explicit messages versus implicit loads/stores even though the basic parallel algorithms are similar. Compared with the message-passing (using MPI) and SHMEM programming models, the cache-coherent shared address space (CC-SAS) model provides substantial ease of programming at both the conceptual and program orchestration levels, often accompanied by performance gains. However, CC-SAS currently has portability limitations and may suffer from poor spatial locality of physically distributed shared data on large numbers of processors.

Shan, Hongzhang; Singh, Jaswinder Pal; Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak

2001-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

Programming models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A programming model is a set of software technologies that support the expression of algorithms and provide applications with an abstract representation of the capabilities of the underlying hardware architecture. The primary goals are productivity, portability and performance.

Daniel, David J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Pherson, Allen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thorp, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barrett, Richard [SNL; Clay, Robert [SNL; De Supinski, Bronis [LLNL; Dube, Evi [LLNL; Heroux, Mike [SNL; Janssen, Curtis [SNL; Langer, Steve [LLNL; Laros, Jim [SNL

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

5

Comparison of Home Retrofit Programs in Wisconsin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To explore ways to reduce customer barriers and increase home retrofit completions, several different existing home retrofit models have been implemented in the state of Wisconsin. This study compared these programs' performance in terms of savings per home and program cost per home to assess the relative cost-effectiveness of each program design. However, given the many variations in these different programs, it is difficult to establish a fair comparison based on only a small number of metrics. Therefore, the overall purpose of the study is to document these programs' performance in a case study approach to look at general patterns of these metrics and other variables within the context of each program. This information can be used by energy efficiency program administrators and implementers to inform home retrofit program design. Six different program designs offered in Wisconsin for single-family energy efficiency improvements were included in the study. For each program, the research team provided information about the programs' approach and goals, characteristics, achievements and performance. The program models were then compared with performance results -- program cost and energy savings -- to help understand the overall strengths and weaknesses or challenges of each model.

Cunningham, K.; Hannigan, E.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

OSHWPP model programs guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Descriptions of model occupational health and safety programs implemented at DOE facilities are presented.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Model Fire Protection Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To facilitate conformance with its fire safety directives and the implementation of a comprehensive fire protection program, DOE has developed a number of "model" program documents. These include a comprehensive model fire protection program, model fire hazards analyses and assessments, fire protection system inspection and testing procedures, and related material.

8

Comparison of Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs: Rebates and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Comparison of Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs: Rebates and White Certificates **Subscription Required** Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Comparison...

9

Multidimensional Model Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Multidimensional Model Programming SQL Server 2012 Books Online Summary: Analysis Services provides several APIs that you can use to program against an Analysis Services instance this information to choose the programming interface that best meets the requirements of a particular project

Hunt, Galen

10

Modeling EERE Deployment Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to compile information and conclusions gathered as part of three separate tasks undertaken as part of the overall project, “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs,” sponsored by the Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation office within the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address improvements to modeling in the near term, and note gaps in knowledge where future research is needed.

Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.

2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

11

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Guide: Utility Program Administrator Market Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Utility Program Administrator Market Utility program administrator market...

12

Comparison of two different rating programs for sustainable homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis compares two different rating programs for sustainable homes; The Code for Sustainable Homes in the United Kingdom, and LEED for Homes in the United States. The comparison is both in general and with respect ...

Bjarnadottir, Margret Halla

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Community Renewables: Model Program Rules  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) has worked closely with The Vote Solar Initiative to develop model program rules for community-scale renewables that consider many of the basic issues facing community renewables programs. IREC’s model program rules address such issues as renewable system size, interconnection, eligibility for participation, allocation of the benefits flowing from participation, net metering of system production, and other essential features of a community renewables program. The goal of this effort is to provide stakeholders with program rules they can tailor to the individual circumstances and policy preferences of their state without having to reinvent the wheel at each turn.

14

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Guide: HVAC Contractor Business Model Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: HVAC Contractor Business Model HVAC contractor business model...

15

Comparison of Real World Energy Consumption to Models and DOE...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Comparison of Real World Energy Consumption to Models and DOE Test Procedures Comparison of Real World Energy Consumption to Models and DOE Test Procedures This study investigates...

16

Bayesian Model comparison of Higgs couplings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the possibility of contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) to the Higgs couplings, in the light of the LHC data. The work is performed within an interim framework where the magnitude of the Higgs production and decay rates are rescaled though Higgs coupling scale factors. We perform Bayesian parameter inference on these scale factors, concluding that there is good compatibility with the SM. Furthermore, we carry out Bayesian model comparison on all models where any combination of scale factors can differ from their SM values and find that typically models with fewer free couplings are strongly favoured. We consider the evidence that each coupling individually equals the SM value, making the minimal assumptions on the other couplings. Finally, we make a comparison of the SM against a single "not-SM" model, and find that there is moderate to strong evidence for the SM.

Johannes Bergstrom; Stella Riad

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

17

Comparison of Frictional Heating Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to compare the predicted temperature rises using four well-known models for frictional heating under a few selected conditions in which similar variable inputs are provided to each model. Classic papers by Archard, Kuhlmann-Wilsdorf, Lim and Ashby, and Rabinowicz have been examined, and a spreadsheet (Excel ) was developed to facilitate the calculations. This report may be used in conjunction with that spreadsheet. It explains the background, assumptions, and rationale used for the calculations. Calculated flash temperatures for selected material combinations, under a range of applied loads and sliding speeds, are tabulated. The materials include AISI 52100 bearing steel, CDA 932 bronze, NBD 200 silicon nitride, Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and carbon-graphite material. Due to the assumptions made by the different models, and the direct way in which certain assumed quantities, like heat sink distances or asperity dimensions, enter into the calculations, frictional hearing results may differ significantly; however, they can be similar in certain cases in light of certain assumptions that are shared between the models.

Davies, Nicholas R [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

State Energy Program: Kentucky Implementation Model Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below are resources associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs Office State Energy Program Kentucky Implementation Model.

19

Comparison of open-source linear programming solvers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When developing linear programming models, issues such as budget limitations, customer requirements, or licensing may preclude the use of commercial linear programming solvers. In such cases, one option is to use an open-source linear programming solver. A survey of linear programming tools was conducted to identify potential open-source solvers. From this survey, four open-source solvers were tested using a collection of linear programming test problems and the results were compared to IBM ILOG CPLEX Optimizer (CPLEX) [1], an industry standard. The solvers considered were: COIN-OR Linear Programming (CLP) [2], [3], GNU Linear Programming Kit (GLPK) [4], lp_solve [5] and Modular In-core Nonlinear Optimization System (MINOS) [6]. As no open-source solver outperforms CPLEX, this study demonstrates the power of commercial linear programming software. CLP was found to be the top performing open-source solver considered in terms of capability and speed. GLPK also performed well but cannot match the speed of CLP or CPLEX. lp_solve and MINOS were considerably slower and encountered issues when solving several test problems.

Gearhart, Jared Lee; Adair, Kristin Lynn; Durfee, Justin D.; Jones, Katherine A.; Martin, Nathaniel; Detry, Richard Joseph

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Comparison between VNIIEF computer programs used to study NPP safety and similar western codes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report gives schematic comparison between VNIIEF computer programs used to study NPP safety and similar western codes. This comparison is schematic and in no way pretends to be complete.

Pevnitsky, A.V.; Tarasov, V.A.; Solovyev, V.P. [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Program Transformations in Weak Memory Models   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyse the validity of common optimisations on multi-threaded programs in two memory models—the DRF guarantee and the Java Memory Model. Unlike in the single-threaded world, even simple program transformations, such ...

Sevcik, Jaroslav

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Extending algebraic modelling languages for Stochastic Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Stochastic Programming Integrated Environment) which facilitates modelling and .... management and pension funds management (Ziemba and Mulvey 1998)

Robert Fourer

2006-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

23

Comparison of Photovoltaic Models in the System Advisor Model: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The System Advisor Model (SAM) is free software developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for predicting the performance of renewable energy systems and analyzing the financial feasibility of residential, commercial, and utility-scale grid-connected projects. SAM offers several options for predicting the performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems. The model requires that the analyst choose from three PV system models, and depending on that choice, possibly choose from three module and two inverter component models. To obtain meaningful results from SAM, the analyst must be aware of the differences between the model options and their applicability to different modeling scenarios. This paper presents an overview the different PV model options and presents a comparison of results for a 200-kW system using different model options.

Blair, N. J.; Dobos, A. P.; Gilman, P.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Models comparison for JET polarimeter data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A complete comparison between the theory and the measurements in polarimetry was done by using the Far Infrared Polarimeter at JET. More than 300 shots were analyzed, including a wide spectrum of JET scenarios in all critical conditions for polarimetry: high density, high and very low fields, high temperatures.This work is aimed at the demonstration of the robustness of the theoretical models for the JET polarimeter measurements in the perspective of using these models for ITER like plasma scenarios . In this context, an assessment was performed on how the line-integrated plasma density along the central vertical chord of FIR polarimeter could be evaluated using the Cotton-Mouton effect and its possible concrete use to correct fringe jumps of the interferometer.The models considered are: i) the rigorous numerical solution of the Stokes propagation equations, using dielectric tensor evaluated from JET equilibrium and Thomson scattering [1,2]; ii) two types of approximated solutions [2,3] and iii) the Guenther empirical model [4] that considers the mutual effect between Cotton-Mouton and Faraday rotation angle. The model calculations have been compared with polarimeter measurements for the Cotton-Mouton phase shift.The agreement with theory is satisfactory within the limits of experimental errors [3].

Mazzotta, C.; Orsitto, F. P.; Giovannozzi, E. [Centro Ricerche Energia Frascati, Euratom-ENEA Association, Frascati (Italy); Boboc, A.; Tudisco, O.; Zabeo, L. [Association EURATOM-UKAEA Culham Science Centre Abingdon 0X14 3DB (UK) (United Kingdom); Brombin, M.; Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Association, Padova (Italy)

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

25

The ASC Sequoia Programming Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1980's and early 1990's, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was deeply engrossed in determining the next generation programming model for the Integrated Design Codes (IDC) beyond vectorization for the Cray 1s series of computers. The vector model, developed in mid 1970's first for the CDC 7600 and later extended from stack based vector operation to memory to memory operations for the Cray 1s, lasted approximately 20 years (See Slide 5). The Cray vector era was deemed an extremely long lived era as it allowed vector codes to be developed over time (the Cray 1s were faster in scalar mode than the CDC 7600) with vector unit utilization increasing incrementally over time. The other attributes of the Cray vector era at LLNL were that we developed, supported and maintained the Operating System (LTSS and later NLTSS), communications protocols (LINCS), Compilers (Civic Fortran77 and Model), operating system tools (e.g., batch system, job control scripting, loaders, debuggers, editors, graphics utilities, you name it) and math and highly machine optimized libraries (e.g., SLATEC, and STACKLIB). Although LTSS was adopted by Cray for early system generations, they later developed COS and UNICOS operating systems and environment on their own. In the late 1970s and early 1980s two trends appeared that made the Cray vector programming model (described above including both the hardware and system software aspects) seem potentially dated and slated for major revision. These trends were the appearance of low cost CMOS microprocessors and their attendant, departmental and mini-computers and later workstations and personal computers. With the wide spread adoption of Unix in the early 1980s, it appeared that LLNL (and the other DOE Labs) would be left out of the mainstream of computing without a rapid transition to these 'Killer Micros' and modern OS and tools environments. The other interesting advance in the period is that systems were being developed with multiple 'cores' in them and called Symmetric Multi-Processor or Shared Memory Processor (SMP) systems. The parallel revolution had begun. The Laboratory started a small 'parallel processing project' in 1983 to study the new technology and its application to scientific computing with four people: Tim Axelrod, Pete Eltgroth, Paul Dubois and Mark Seager. Two years later, Eugene Brooks joined the team. This team focused on Unix and 'killer micro' SMPs. Indeed, Eugene Brooks was credited with coming up with the 'Killer Micro' term. After several generations of SMP platforms (e.g., Sequent Balance 8000 with 8 33MHz MC32032s, Allian FX8 with 8 MC68020 and FPGA based Vector Units and finally the BB&N Butterfly with 128 cores), it became apparent to us that the killer micro revolution would indeed take over Crays and that we definitely needed a new programming and systems model. The model developed by Mark Seager and Dale Nielsen focused on both the system aspects (Slide 3) and the code development aspects (Slide 4). Although now succinctly captured in two attached slides, at the time there was tremendous ferment in the research community as to what parallel programming model would emerge, dominate and survive. In addition, we wanted a model that would provide portability between platforms of a single generation but also longevity over multiple--and hopefully--many generations. Only after we developed the 'Livermore Model' and worked it out in considerable detail did it become obvious that what we came up with was the right approach. In a nutshell, the applications programming model of the Livermore Model posited that SMP parallelism would ultimately not scale indefinitely and one would have to bite the bullet and implement MPI parallelism within the Integrated Design Code (IDC). We also had a major emphasis on doing everything in a completely standards based, portable methodology with POSIX/Unix as the target environment. We decided against specialized libraries like STACKLIB for performance, but kept as many general purpose, portable math libraries as were needed by the co

Seager, M

2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

26

A Comparison of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic Modeling...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic Modeling Results over a Wide Rangeof Gasoline Range Surrogate Fuel Blends A Comparison of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic...

27

A Comparison of Software Packages for Verified Linear Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jun 11, 2008 ... ... is supported by the Mathematical Programming Society and by the Optimization Technology Center. Mathematical Programming Society.

Christian Keil

2008-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

28

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Guide Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide Uses lessons learned from Better Buildings grantees, existing data, and private sector insights to highlight...

29

Comparison of two conceptual models of flow using the TSA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the performance-assessment task for the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Sandia National Laboratories is developing a set of programs called the Total-System Analyzer (TSA). The TSA is one of the tools being used in the current effort to provide a systematic preliminary estimate the total-system performance of the Yucca Mountain site. The purposes of this paper are twofold: (1) to describe capabilities that have been added to the TSA in the last year; and (2) to present a comparison of two conceptual models of unsaturated-zone flow and transport, in terms of the performance measure specified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 40 CFR Part 191. The conceptual-model comparison is intended to demonstrate the new TSA capabilities and at the same time shed some light on the performance implications of fracture flow at Yucca Mountain. Unsaturated fracture flow is not yet well understood, and it is of great importance in determining the performance of Yucca Mountain.

Wilson, M.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Energy Conservation Program: Data Collection and Comparison with Forecasted Unit Sales for Five Lamp Types, Notice of Data Availability  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy Conservation Program: Data Collection and Comparison with Forecasted Unit Sales for Five Lamp Types, Notice of Data Availability

31

Robust model comparison disfavors power law cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Late-time power law expansion has been proposed as an alternative to the standard cosmological model and shown to be consistent with some low-redshift data. We test power law expansion against the standard flat $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology using goodness-of-fit and model comparison criteria. We consider Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) data from two current compilations (Union2.1 and JLA) along with a current set of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements that includes the high-redshift Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest measurements from BOSS quasars. We find that neither power law expansion nor $\\Lambda$CDM is strongly preferred over the other when the SN Ia and BAO data are analyzed separately but that power law expansion is strongly disfavored by the combination. We treat the $R_\\text{h} = ct$ cosmology (a constant rate of expansion) separately and find that it is conclusively disfavored by all combinations of data that include SN Ia observations and a poor overall fit when systematic errors in the SN Ia measurements are ig...

Shafer, Daniel L

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Comparison Between TRNSYS Software Simulation and PV F-Chart Program on Photovoltaic System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report covers the comparisons of Photovoltaic System by TRNSYS simulation and PV F-Chart program to test TRNSYS simulation accuracy. The report starts with the Photovoltaic (PV) (PV) System introduction in Section one which is followed...

Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

34

COMPARISON OF KERNELBASED MODELS FOR BINARY CLASSIFICATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL DATA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COMPARISON OF KERNEL­BASED MODELS FOR BINARY CLASSIFICATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL DATA V. Polishchuk ABSTRACT The task of real­world environmental data classification was approached with different models simulation -- which arise in environmental modeling, classification between two classes may be considered

35

2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Program Peer Review Presentations...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Grid Modeling Program Peer Review Presentations Now Available 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Program Peer Review Presentations Now Available July 10, 2014 - 6:01pm Addthis...

36

3M's Model Rewards and Recognition Program Engages Employees...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3M's Model Rewards and Recognition Program Engages Employees and Drives Energy Savings Efforts 3M's Model Rewards and Recognition Program Engages Employees and Drives Energy...

37

A comparison group analysis of DOE`s Energy-Related Inventions Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past decade, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has conducted four evaluations of the economic impacts of the US DOE`s Energy-Related Inventions Program (ERIP). None of these evaluations has involved the use of a comparison group. Instead, statistics on the innovation process have been compiled from a review of the literature. Unfortunately, the types of technologies and inventors documents by previous studies do not match those supported by the Energy-Related Inventions Program. ERIP-supported technologies are diverse in both application and technical complexity. ERIP-supported inventors are a particular subset of inventors: the Program targets inventors who are either independently employed or are employees of a small business. The purpose of this task is to identify and characterize a matched comparison group of inventors whose progress can be compared with the progress of ERIP inventors. With this comparison group, we will be able to assess more accurately the impact of the ERIP support and thereby strengthen the program`s impact evaluations. This report is divided into six sections. As background to understanding the comparison group design and the results provided in this report, section 1.3 provides an overview of the Energy-Related Inventions Program. Section 2 describes the research design used to define and characterize a suitable comparison group. Section 3 presents comparative statistics describing both the comparison group and the ERIP technologies. Section 4 is more qualitative in nature; it describes four technologies in the comparison group that were commercially successful, focusing on how they succeeded in the absence of DOE/ERIP support. The report ends with a summary of its findings (section 5) and a list of references (section 6).

Brown, M.A.; Curlee, T.R.; Elliott, S.R.; Franchuk, C.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

A comparison group analysis of DOE's Energy-Related Inventions Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past decade, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has conducted four evaluations of the economic impacts of the US DOE's Energy-Related Inventions Program (ERIP). None of these evaluations has involved the use of a comparison group. Instead, statistics on the innovation process have been compiled from a review of the literature. Unfortunately, the types of technologies and inventors documents by previous studies do not match those supported by the Energy-Related Inventions Program. ERIP-supported technologies are diverse in both application and technical complexity. ERIP-supported inventors are a particular subset of inventors: the Program targets inventors who are either independently employed or are employees of a small business. The purpose of this task is to identify and characterize a matched comparison group of inventors whose progress can be compared with the progress of ERIP inventors. With this comparison group, we will be able to assess more accurately the impact of the ERIP support and thereby strengthen the program's impact evaluations. This report is divided into six sections. As background to understanding the comparison group design and the results provided in this report, section 1.3 provides an overview of the Energy-Related Inventions Program. Section 2 describes the research design used to define and characterize a suitable comparison group. Section 3 presents comparative statistics describing both the comparison group and the ERIP technologies. Section 4 is more qualitative in nature; it describes four technologies in the comparison group that were commercially successful, focusing on how they succeeded in the absence of DOE/ERIP support. The report ends with a summary of its findings (section 5) and a list of references (section 6).

Brown, M.A.; Curlee, T.R.; Elliott, S.R.; Franchuk, C.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Comparison of the performance of different bioassessment methods: similar evaluations of biotic integrity from separate programs and procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

area and subsampling procedures on comparisons of taxaseparate programs and procedures David B. Herbst 1 Sierrasorting, and laboratory procedures used in stream benthic

Herbst, David B

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Climate Impact of Transportation A Model Comparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transportation contributes to a significant and rising share of global energy use and GHG emissions. Therefore modeling future travel demand, its fuel use, and resulting CO2 emission is highly relevant for climate change mitigation. In this study we compare the baseline projections for global service demand (passenger-kilometers, ton-kilometers), fuel use, and CO2 emissions of five different global transport models using harmonized input assumptions on income and population. For four models we also evaluate the impact of a carbon tax. All models project a steep increase in service demand over the century. Technology is important for limiting energy consumption and CO2 emissions, but quite radical changes in the technology mix are required to stabilize or reverse the trend. While all models project liquid fossil fuels dominating up to 2050, they differ regarding the use of alternative fuels (natural gas, hydrogen, biofuels, and electricity), because of different fuel price projections. The carbon tax of US$200/tCO2 in 2050 stabilizes or reverses global emission growth in all models. Besides common findings many differences in the model assumptions and projections indicate room for improvement in modeling and empirical description of the transport system.

Girod, Bastien; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Grahn, Maria; Kitous, Alban; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Status of state Brownfield programs -- A comparison of enabling legislation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Though a definitive count is impossible, the US General Accounting Office has estimated that there are between 130,000 and 400,000 Brownfield sites in the country. What accounts for this discrepancy is that many of these sites may not be contaminated at all, but merely perceived to require a prohibitively expensive cleanup before redeveloping. Many developers and lending institutions have been increasingly unwilling to take on the stringent municipal, state, and federal regulations required for remediation at these sites. As a result, development often times has taken place on greenfield sites which are located outside the confines of the inner city. This has frustrated the comprehensive plan goals of most communities which mandate urban infilling and use of existing public infrastructure. Over the past decade, however, there has been a movement in nearly half of the states away from stringent cleanup requirements. There are currently variations in what each state requires. Some states, which maintain strict State Superfund programs while some states provide a form of voluntary remediation actions by the property owner or developer. Other states are developing more flexible approaches for their Brownfield programs based on numeric or risk based standards. The degree of stringency may vary from state to state dependent on the degree of legislative emphasis placed on economic redevelopment of Brownfield properties. This paper will compare and contrast the major trends in enabling legislation of states which currently allow some form of brownfield program. A case study from Florida will highlight how one state is attempting to draft enabling legislation to initiate a comprehensive Brownfield program to respond to current state needs.

Rogoff, M.J. [HDR Engineering, Inc., Tampa, FL (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Comparison of ?Z-structure function models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ?Z-box is an important contribution to the proton's weak charge. The ?Z-box is calculated dispersively and depends on ?Z-structure functions, F{sub 1,2,3}{sup ?Z}(x,Q{sup 2}). At present there is no data for these structure functions and they must be modeled by modifying existing fits to electromagnetic data. Each group that has studied the ?Z-box used different modifications. The results of the PVDIS experiment at Jefferson Lab may provide a first test of the validity of each group's models. I present details of the different models and their predictions for the PVDIS result.

Rislow, Benjamin C. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

43

Phenotype Plasticity in Genetic Programming: A Comparison of Darwinian and Lamarckian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phenotype Plasticity in Genetic Programming: A Comparison of Darwinian and Lamarckian Inheritance of phenotype plasticity in Genetic Pro­ gramming (GP). This takes the form of a set of real­valued numerical that plastic GP has significant benefits including faster evolution and adaptation in changing environments

Fernandez, Thomas

44

RELIABILITY COMPARISON MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES (OWT)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RELIABILITY COMPARISON MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES (OWT) Yizhou Lu, T. M. Delorm, A. Christou of the reliability of these 5 Types Surrogate failure rate data Onshore wind turbines (OT) 1-1.5MW CONCLUSIONS., Faulstich, S. & van Bussel G. J. W. Reliability & availability of wind turbine electrical & electronic

Bernstein, Joseph B.

45

MicroShield/ISOCS gamma modeling comparison.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative radiological analysis attempts to determine the quantity of activity or concentration of specific radionuclide(s) in a sample. Based upon the certified standards that are used to calibrate gamma spectral detectors, geometric similarities between sample shape and the calibration standards determine if the analysis results developed are qualitative or quantitative. A sample analyzed that does not mimic a calibrated sample geometry must be reported as a non-standard geometry and thus the results are considered qualitative and not quantitative. MicroShieldR or ISOCSR calibration software can be used to model non-standard geometric sample shapes in an effort to obtain a quantitative analytical result. MicroShieldR and Canberra's ISOCSR software contain several geometry templates that can provide accurate quantitative modeling for a variety of sample configurations. Included in the software are computational algorithms that are used to develop and calculate energy efficiency values for the modeled sample geometry which can then be used with conventional analysis methodology to calculate the result. The response of the analytical method and the sensitivity of the mechanical and electronic equipment to the radionuclide of interest must be calibrated, or standardized, using a calibrated radiological source that contains a known and certified amount of activity.

Sansone, Kenneth R

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Comparison Between Synchronous and Asynchronous Implementation of Parallel Genetic Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the processing time by using a coarse-grained model for parallelization and an asyn- chronous migration. The problem chosen to examine the parallel GP is a mobile robot navigation problem. The experimental results environments that were different from the original one. As a result, the substantial pro- cessing time

Fernandez, Thomas

47

Simple SPICE model for comparison of CMOS output driver circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to monitor the ground nodes of output driver circuits for noise. Both relative performance and noise levels are generated through the simulations. A test device was built to confirm that the model was effective in speed and noise comparisons. Values were... on CMOS technologies. Journal model is IEEE 'I?ansactions on Automatic Control. A. Literature Survey Research has been done in the past concerning noise generated by digital logic de- vices. In particular, Advanced CMOS Logic (ACL) integrated circuits...

Hermann, John Karl

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Comparison of Hyperelastic Models for Granular Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three recently proposed hyperelastic models for granular materials are compared with experiment data. Though all three are formulated to give elastic moduli that are power law functions of the mean stress, they have rather different dependencies on individual stresses, and generally differ from well established experimental forms. Predicted static stress distributions are in qualitative agreement with experiments, but do not differ greatly from isotropic linear elasticity, and similarly fail to account for variability in experiment data that presumably occurs due to a preparation dependence of granular materials.

Paul W. Humrickhouse; J. Phil Sharpe; Michael L. Corradini

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Hot Water Distribution System Program Documentation and Comparison to Experimental Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2003, the California Energy Commission s (CEC s) Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program funded Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to create a computer program to analyze hot water distribution systems for single family residences, and to perform such analyses for a selection of houses. This effort and its results were documented in a report provided to CEC in March, 2004 [1]. The principal objective of effort was to compare the water and energy wasted between various possible hot water distribution systems for various different house designs. It was presumed that water being provided to a user would be considered suitably warm when it reached 105 F. Therefore, what was needed was a tool which could compute the time it takes for water reaching the draw point to reach 105 F, and the energy wasted during this wait. The computer program used to perform the analyses was a combination of a calculational core, produced by Dr. Keith A. Woodbury, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director, Alabama Industrial Assessment Center, University of Alabama, and a user interface based on LabVIEW, created by Dr. Roberto Lenarduzzi of ORNL. At that time, the computer program was in a relatively rough and undocumented form adequate to perform the contracted work but not in a condition where it could be readily used by those not involved in its generation. Subsequently, the CEC provided funding through Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to improve the program s documentation and user interface to facilitate use by others, and to compare the program s results to experimental data generated by Dr. Carl Hiller. This report describes the program and provides user guidance. It also summarizes the comparisons made to experimental data, along with options built into the program specifically to allow these comparisons. These options were necessitated by the fact that some of the experimental data required options and features not originally included in the program. A more detailed description of these program modifications along with detailed comparisons to the experimental data are provided in a report produced by Dr. Woodbury, which accompanies this report as Appendix H.

Baskin, Evelyn [GE Infrastructure Energy; Craddick, William G [ORNL; Lenarduzzi, Roberto [ORNL; Wendt, Robert L [ORNL; Woodbury, Professor Keith A. [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

genBRDF: Synthesizing Novel Analytic BRDFs with Genetic Programming Figure 1: Comparison of BRDFs modeling the tungsten carbide material from the MERL BRDF database. Each scene consists of a sphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of BRDFs modeling the tungsten carbide material from the MERL BRDF database. Each scene consists that remains between state-of-the-art analytic BRDFs and measured data in the case of tungsten carbide

Weimer, Westley

51

A comparison of land surface model soil hydraulic properties estimated by inverse modeling and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of water in the soil. This in turn plays an important role in the water and energy cycles at the land depths in the soil column controls the partitioning of two key energy fluxes of concern in climate modelsA comparison of land surface model soil hydraulic properties estimated by inverse modeling

Small, Eric

52

Melt coolability modeling and comparison to MACE test results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important question in the assessment of severe accidents in light water nuclear reactors is the ability of water to quench a molten corium-concrete interaction and thereby terminate the accident progression. As part of the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiment (MACE) Program, phenomenological models of the corium quenching process are under development. The modeling approach considers both bulk cooldown and crust-limited heat transfer regimes, as well as criteria for the pool thermal hydraulic conditions which separate the two regimes. The model is then compared with results of the MACE experiments.

Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Melt coolability modeling and comparison to MACE test results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important question in the assessment of severe accidents in light water nuclear reactors is the ability of water to quench a molten corium-concrete interaction and thereby terminate the accident progression. As part of the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiment (MACE) Program, phenomenological models of the corium quenching process are under development. The modeling approach considers both bulk cooldown and crust-limited heat transfer regimes, as well as criteria for the pool thermal hydraulic conditions which separate the two regimes. The model is then compared with results of the MACE experiments.

Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

COMPARISON OF RF CAVITY TRANSPORT MODELS FOR BBU SIMULATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transverse focusing effect in RF cavities plays a considerable role in beam dynamics for low-energy beamline sections and can contribute to beam breakup (BBU) instability. The purpose of this analysis is to examine RF cavity models in simulation codes which will be used for BBU experiments at Jefferson Lab and improve BBU simulation results. We review two RF cavity models in the simulation codes elegant and TDBBU (a BBU simulation code developed at Jefferson Lab). elegant can include the Rosenzweig-Serafini (R-S) model for the RF focusing effect. Whereas TDBBU uses a model from the code TRANSPORT which considers the adiabatic damping effect, but not the RF focusing effect. Quantitative comparisons are discussed for the CEBAF beamline. We also compare the R-S model with the results from numerical simulations for a CEBAF-type 5-cell superconducting cavity to validate the use of the R-S model as an improved low-energy RF cavity transport model in TDBBU. We have implemented the R-S model in TDBBU. It will improve BBU simulation results to be more matched with analytic calculations and experimental results.

Ilkyoung Shin,Byung Yunn,Todd Satogata,Shahid Ahmed

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

A comparison of water vapor quantities from model short-range forecasts and ARM observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Model evolution and improvement is complicated by the lack of high quality observational data. To address a major limitation of these measurements the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program was formed. For the second quarter ARM metric we will make use of new water vapor data that has become available, and called the 'Merged-sounding' value added product (referred to as OBS, within the text) at three sites: the North Slope of Alaska (NSA), Darwin Australia (DAR) and the Southern Great Plains (SGP) and compare these observations to model forecast data. Two time periods will be analyzed March 2000 for the SGP and October 2004 for both DAR and NSA. The merged-sounding data have been interpolated to 37 pressure levels (e.g., from 1000hPa to 100hPa at 25hPa increments) and time averaged to 3 hourly data for direct comparison to our model output.

Hnilo, J J

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

56

The Brasfield Hydroelectric Project: A model-prototype comparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations made during start-up and operation of the 3 MW Brasfield Hydroelectric Project provide an excellent means of comparing physical model results with the prototype installation. During start-up, the turbine generator unit was operated without the surface vortex suppression grid in place to allow engineers to observe vortex formation without, and later with, the grid. The model performance is reproduced in the prototype with regard to surface vortices. Field data has also been obtained at 0.7 in depth increments to provide dissolved oxygen (D.O.) concentrations profiles in the reservoir and in the nearfield zone surrounding the intake. Parallel D.O. measurements at the powerhouse outlet and 1.6 km downstream of the outlet provide a good means of determining the average depth of water column from which the water was removed. Measurements of model velocities, scaled to the prototype, multiplied times the field measurements of dissolved oxygen (D.O.) concentration and water temperature provide a model-predicted downstream D.O. concentration that also compares well to that measured in the prototype. This paper provides support for an unconventional design technique which may be applicable to many other sites facing similar environmental constraints. The model-prototype comparison also provides a strong verification of the combined use of both physical and mathematical models to solve such a design problem.

Gulliver, J.S.; Voigt, R.L. Jr.; Hibbs, D.E. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

The dc modeling program (DCMP): Version 2. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project one of the main objectives was the refinement of tools for the study of HVDC systems. The original software was prepared in project RP1964-2 (EL-4365) as power flow and stability program models for HVDC systems. In this project new modeling capabilities were added to both the power flow and stability models. Additionally, the HVDC specific model capabilities were integrated into a new program, termed the Standalone program, for use in the development and testing of HVDC models. This manual provides technical background for programmers and those interested in understanding, augmenting or transporting the dc models.

Chapman, D.G. (Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, MB (Canada))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy, the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center for Building Energy Efficiency, of the U National Laboratory, USA and Tsinghua University, China Under the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center the US-China Clean Energy Research Center on Building Energy Efficiency (CERC-BEE). Energy Foundation

59

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Four Pipe Fan Coil; Four Pipe Induction Unit; Heating andTwo Pipe Fan Coil; Two Pipe Induction Unit; Unit Heater;units (AHUs) – four CAV systems, four VAV systems, and one fan coil

Zhou, Xin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

The dc modeling program (DCMP): Version 2. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project one of the main objectives was the refinement of tools for the study of HVDC systems. The original software was prepared in project RP1964-2 (EL-4365) as power flow and stability program models for HVDC systems. In this project new modeling capabilities were added to both the power flow and stability models. Additionally, the HVDC specific model capabilities were integrated into a new program, termed the Standalone program, for use in the development and testing of HVDC models.

Chapman, D.G. (Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, MB (Canada))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The dc modeling program (DCMP): Version 2. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project one of the main objectives was the refinement of tools for the study of HVDC systems. The original software was prepared in project RP1964-2 (EL-4365) as power flow and stability program models for HVDC systems. In this project new modeling capabilities were added to both the power flow and stability models. Additionally, the HVDC specific model capabilities were integrated into a new program, termed the Standalone program, for use in the development and testing of HVDC models. This volume provides information on the application of the software in the form of a User's Manual.

Chapman, D.G. (Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, MB (Canada))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Web Cube: a Programming Model for Reliable Web Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Web Cube: a Programming Model for Reliable Web Applications I.S.W.B. Prasetya, T.E.J. Vos, S UU-CS-2005-002 www.cs.uu.nl #12;Web Cube: a Programming Model for Reliable Web Applications I@cs.uu.nl, tanja@iti.upv.es, doaitse@cs.uu.nl, bela@cs.ui.ac.id Abstract Web Cube is a server side programming

Utrecht, Universiteit

63

Orchestration in Orc: A Deterministic Distributed Programming Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Orchestration in Orc: A Deterministic Distributed Programming Model William R. Cook and Jayadev}@cs.utexas.edu Abstract. Orc is a new model of distributed programming which pro- vides a strong theoretical foundation for internet computing based on compositions of web-services. Orc combines some of the power and flex- ibility

Misra, Jayadev

64

A Class-Object Model for Program Transformations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

class-object model makes power- ful transformations not only of the compiler experts but alsoA Class-Object Model for Program Transformations Doctoral Program in Engineering University. The technology that enables the reuse of larger software components have become available with the emergence

Chiba, Shigeru

65

E-Print Network 3.0 - analytical model comparison Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Slope Summary: -Depleted SONFET is presented. The analytical model is validated by comparison to the Medici simulation results... Vertical Silicon-on-Nothing FET: Analytical...

66

A Comparison of Cosmological Models Using Strong Gravitational Lensing Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strongly gravitationally lensed quasar-galaxy systems allow us to compare competing cosmologies as long as one can be reasonably sure of the mass distribution within the intervening lens. In this paper, we assemble a catalog of 69 such systems, and carry out a one-on-one comparison between the standard model, LCDM, and the R_h=ct Universe. We find that both models account for the lens observations quite well, though the precision of these measurements does not appear to be good enough to favor one model over the other. Part of the reason is the so-called bulge-halo conspiracy that, on average, results in a baryonic velocity dispersion within a fraction of the optical effective radius virtually identical to that expected for the whole luminous-dark matter distribution. Given the limitations of doing precision cosmological testing using the current sample, we also carry out Monte Carlo simulations based on the current lens measurements to estimate how large the source catalog would have to be in order to rule o...

Melia, Fulvio; Wu, Xue-Feng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

A Comparison of Cosmological Models Using Time Delay Lenses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of time-delay gravitational lenses to examine the cosmological expansion introduces a new standard ruler with which to test theoretical models. The sample suitable for this kind of work now includes 12 lens systems, which have thus far been used solely for optimizing the parameters of $\\Lambda$CDM. In this paper, we broaden the base of support for this new, important cosmic probe by using these observations to carry out a one-on-one comparison between {\\it competing} models. The currently available sample indicates a likelihood of $\\sim 70-80%$ that the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ Universe is the correct cosmology versus $\\sim 20-30%$ for the standard model. This possibly interesting result reinforces the need to greatly expand the sample of time-delay lenses, e.g., with the successful implementation of the Dark Energy Survey, the VST ATLAS survey, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. In anticipation of a greatly expanded catalog of time-delay lenses identified with these surveys, we have produced synthetic sa...

Wei, Jun-Jie; Melia, Fulvio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Development and Implementation of a Program Management Maturity Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2006, Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) announced an updatedvision statement for the organization. The vision is “To be the most admired team within the NNSA [National Nuclear Security Administration] for our relentless drive to convert ideas into the highest quality products and services for National Security by applying the right technology, outstanding program management and best commercial practices.” The challenge to provide outstanding program management was taken up by the Program Management division and the Program Integration Office (PIO) of the company. This article describes how Honeywell developed and deployed a program management maturity model to drive toward excellence.

Hartwig, Laura; Smith, Matt

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the United States Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs modern web technologies, usability design, and national average defaults as an interface to annual simulations of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim in order to provide estimated annual energy and cost savings. In addition to cool reflective roofs, RSC simulates multiple roof and attic configurations including different roof slopes, above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers, low-emittance roof surfaces, duct location, duct leakage rates, multiple substrate types, and insulation levels. A base case and energy-efficient alternative can be compared side-by-side to estimate monthly energy. RSC was benchmarked against field data from demonstration homes in Ft. Irwin, California; while cooling savings were similar, heating penalty varied significantly across different simulation engines. RSC results reduce cool roofing cost-effectiveness thus mitigating expected economic incentives for this countermeasure to the urban heat island effect. This paper consolidates comparison of RSC s projected energy savings to other simulation engines including DOE-2.1E, AtticSim, Micropas, and EnergyPlus, and presents preliminary analyses. RSC s algorithms for capturing radiant heat transfer and duct interaction in the attic assembly are considered major contributing factors to increased cooling savings and heating penalties. Comparison to previous simulation-based studies, analysis on the force multiplier of RSC cooling savings and heating penalties, the role of radiative heat exchange in an attic assembly, and changes made for increased accuracy of the duct model are included.

New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Huang, Yu (Joe) [White Box Technologies; Levinson, Ronnen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

A Comparison of Cosmological Models Using Strong Gravitational Lensing Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strongly gravitationally lensed quasar-galaxy systems allow us to compare competing cosmologies as long as one can be reasonably sure of the mass distribution within the intervening lens. In this paper, we assemble a catalog of 69 such systems, and carry out a one-on-one comparison between the standard model, LCDM, and the R_h=ct Universe. We find that both models account for the lens observations quite well, though the precision of these measurements does not appear to be good enough to favor one model over the other. Part of the reason is the so-called bulge-halo conspiracy that, on average, results in a baryonic velocity dispersion within a fraction of the optical effective radius virtually identical to that expected for the whole luminous-dark matter distribution. Given the limitations of doing precision cosmological testing using the current sample, we also carry out Monte Carlo simulations based on the current lens measurements to estimate how large the source catalog would have to be in order to rule out either model at a ~99.7% confidence level. We find that if the real cosmology is LCDM, a sample of ~200 strong gravitational lenses would be sufficient to rule out R_h=ct at this level of accuracy, while ~300 strong gravitational lenses would be required to rule out LCDM if the real Universe were instead R_h=ct. The difference in required sample size reflects the greater number of free parameters available to fit the data with LCDM. We point out that, should the R_h=ct Universe eventually emerge as the correct cosmology, its lack of any free parameters for this kind of work will provide a remarkably powerful probe of the mass structure in lensing galaxies, and a means of better understanding the origin of the bulge-halo conspiracy.

Fulvio Melia; Jun-Jie Wei; Xue-Feng Wu

2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

71

3rd International Conference on Countermeasures to Urban Heat Island Venice, October 13-15, 2014 Comparison of Software Models for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua Newa, William A. Millera, Yu (Joe their effects on the building's heating and cooling energy use · AtticSim is a detailed simulation program- based tool to estimate cool-roof energy savings 2 2014-08-20: The Roof Savings Calculator (RSC

Tennessee, University of

72

Hydraulic Habitat Model Comparison_12_03_09 Desiree Tullos and Beth Copeland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic Habitat Model Comparison_12_03_09 Desiree Tullos and Beth Copeland Review of Hydraulic;Hydraulic Habitat Model Comparison_12_03_09 Desiree Tullos and Beth Copeland Name PHABSIM Spatial scale and Observations on Flow Determination in New Zealand Regulated Streams: Advances in Ecology. Plenum Press, New

Tullos, Desiree

73

On Programming Models for Service-Level High Availability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of existing programming models for service-level high availability and investigates their differences, similarities, advantages, and disadvantages. Its goal is to help to improve reuse of code and to allow adaptation to quality of service requirements by using a uniform programming model description. It further aims at encouraging a discussion about these programming models and their provided quality of service, such as availability, performance, serviceability, usability, and applicability. Within this context, the presented research focuses on providing high availability for services running on head and service nodes of high-performance computing systems.

Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL; Leangsuksun, Chokchai [ORNL; He, X. [Tennessee Technological University

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Comparison of low-level waste disposal programs of DOE and selected international countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to examine and compare the approaches and practices of selected countries for disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) with those of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The report addresses the programs for disposing of wastes into engineered LLW disposal facilities and is not intended to address in-situ options and practices associated with environmental restoration activities or the management of mill tailings and mixed LLW. The countries chosen for comparison are France, Sweden, Canada, and the United Kingdom. The countries were selected as typical examples of the LLW programs which have evolved under differing technical constraints, regulatory requirements, and political/social systems. France was the first country to demonstrate use of engineered structure-type disposal facilities. The UK has been actively disposing of LLW since 1959. Sweden has been disposing of LLW since 1983 in an intermediate-depth disposal facility rather than a near-surface disposal facility. To date, Canada has been storing its LLW but will soon begin operation of Canada`s first demonstration LLW disposal facility.

Meagher, B.G. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cole, L.T. [Cole and Associates (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Experimental studies of irregular water wave component interactions with comparisons to the hybrid wave model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

computed by Wheeler Stretching and Linear Extrapolation modifications to Linear Random Wave Theory and the Hybrid Wave Model. Extreme wave acceleration fields arc compared with Hybrid Wave Model acceleration fields only. Comparisons between measurements...

Longridge, Jonathon Kent

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Causes of variation in soil carbon simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison with observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and benchmarks in Earth system models sitivity of the Amazonand benchmarks in Earth system models Thornton, P. E. ,simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Joint Program Report 164 Appendix B page 1 Appendix B: Comparison of U.S. Marginal Abatement Cost Curves from a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Joint Program Report 164 Appendix B ­ page 1 Appendix B: Comparison of U.S. Marginal Abatement Cost, John Reilly, Henry Jacoby This note provides a short comparison of Marginal Abatement Cost (MAC) curve Joint Program's approach to constructing MACs, which is a relationship between tons of emissions abated

78

MATLAB Programs Modeling and Simulation in Medicine and the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 1.1.11 Graph Transition Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 1.2 EpidemicsMATLAB Programs for Modeling and Simulation in Medicine and the Life Sciences and Population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 #12;Comments The MATLAB programs in this document were developed over several years, and so

Peskin, Charles S.

79

Generation of certifiably correct programs from formal models Alexei Iliasov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation of certifiably correct programs from formal models Alexei Iliasov Newcastle University techniques helps to deliver systems that are free from engineer- ing defects. A code generator quickly, consistently and reproducibly. Com- monly, a code generator is a program constructed informally

Southampton, University of

80

EPRI PEAC Corp.: Certification Model Program and Interconnection Agreement Tools  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summarizes the work of EPRI PEAC Corp., under contract to DOE's Distribution and Interconnection R&D, to develop a certification model program and interconnection agreement tools to support the interconnection of distributed energy resources.

Not Available

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Optimization Modeling and Programming in Xpress-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the business problem in the Mosel algebraic modeling language · Ex: Capital Budgeting · Set of projects resources · Select set of projects to maximize return #12;Developing an optimization model Building Block 1-user · protects intellectual property · platform independent · efficient #12;More Mosel Features · Modeling

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

82

Photovoltaic subsystem marketing and distribution model: programming manual. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complete documentation of the marketing and distribution (M and D) computer model is provided. The purpose is to estimate the costs of selling and transporting photovoltaic solar energy products from the manufacturer to the final customer. The model adjusts for the inflation and regional differences in marketing and distribution costs. The model consists of three major components: the marketing submodel, the distribution submodel, and the financial submodel. The computer program is explained including the input requirements, output reports, subprograms and operating environment. The program specifications discuss maintaining the validity of the data and potential improvements. An example for a photovoltaic concentrator collector demonstrates the application of the model.

Not Available

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Uses lessons learned from Better Buildings grantees, existing data, and private sector insights to highlight business models that can help develop a sustainable residential energy efficiency market.

84

Power Handling of the Bulk Tungsten Divertor Row at JET: First Measurements and Comparison to the GTM Thermal Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Handling of the Bulk Tungsten Divertor Row at JET: First Measurements and Comparison to the GTM Thermal Model

85

Transport Analysis of Trace Tritium Experiments on JET using TRANSP Code and Comparison with Theory-Based Transport Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transport Analysis of Trace Tritium Experiments on JET using TRANSP Code and Comparison with Theory-Based Transport Models

86

ENERGY INVESTMENTS UNDER CLIMATE POLICY: A COMPARISON OF GLOBAL MODELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The levels of investment needed to mobilize an energy system transformation and mitigate climate change are not known with certainty. This paper aims to inform the ongoing dialogue and in so doing to guide public policy and strategic corporate decision making. Within the framework of the LIMITS integrated assessment model comparison exercise, we analyze a multi-IAM ensemble of long-term energy and greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. Our study provides insight into several critical but uncertain areas related to the future investment environment, for example in terms of where capital expenditures may need to flow regionally, into which sectors they might be concentrated, and what policies could be helpful in spurring these financial resources. We find that stringent climate policies consistent with a 2°C climate change target would require a considerable upscaling of investments into low-carbon energy and energy efficiency, reaching approximately $45 trillion (range: $30–$75 trillion) cumulative between 2010 and 2050, or about $1.1 trillion annually. This represents an increase of some $30 trillion ($10–$55 trillion), or $0.8 trillion per year, beyond what investments might otherwise be in a reference scenario that assumes the continuation of present and planned emissions-reducing policies throughout the world. In other words, a substantial "clean-energy investment gap" of some $800 billion/yr exists — notably on the same order of magnitude as present-day subsidies for fossil energy and electricity worldwide ($523 billion). Unless the gap is filled rather quickly, the 2°C target could potentially become out of reach.

McCollum, David; Nagai, Yu; Riahi, Keywan; Marangoni, Giacomo; Calvin, Katherine V.; Pietzcker, Robert; Van Vliet, Jasper; van der Zwaan, Bob

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Solving seismological problems using sgraph program: II-waveform modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the seismological programs to manipulate seismic data is SGRAPH program. It consists of integrated tools to perform advanced seismological techniques. SGRAPH is considered a new system for maintaining and analyze seismic waveform data in a stand-alone Windows-based application that manipulate a wide range of data formats. SGRAPH was described in detail in the first part of this paper. In this part, I discuss the advanced techniques including in the program and its applications in seismology. Because of the numerous tools included in the program, only SGRAPH is sufficient to perform the basic waveform analysis and to solve advanced seismological problems. In the first part of this paper, the application of the source parameters estimation and hypocentral location was given. Here, I discuss SGRAPH waveform modeling tools. This paper exhibits examples of how to apply the SGRAPH tools to perform waveform modeling for estimating the focal mechanism and crustal structure of local earthquakes.

Abdelwahed, Mohamed F. [Geological Hazards Research Unit, King Abdulaziz University (Saudi Arabia) and National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics (NRIAG), Helwan (Egypt)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

88

Comparison of the ATP version of the EMTP and the NETOMAC program for simulation of HVdc systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the capabilities and limitations of the EMTP and NETOMAC program as applied to HVdc system simulation. The fundamental differences between the two programs and their effect on simulation results are described. Consistency of the results obtained from these programs is examined through simulation of a test HVdc network. As expected, a very high degree of agreement between the two sets of simulation results proved to be achievable, but only when particular care was taken to overcome internal program differences. Finally, the new advanced stability feature of NETOMAC is briefly discussed and then tested against the complex transient models established in the EMTP and in the NETOMAC transients program section.

Lehn, P.; Rittiger, J. [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany)] [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany); Kulicke, B. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany)] [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

SciTech Connect: Comparison of the Dynamic Wake Meandering Model...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wake Meandering Model, Large-Eddy Simulation, and Field Data at the Egmond aan Zee Offshore Wind Plant: Preprint Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Comparison of the...

90

Social comparison test using women's subjective and physiological reactivity to thin and average size models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The current study examined the subjective and physiological reactivity to body image stimuli among females engaging in a social comparison task. Study I was conducted to select images of thin and average size models and neutral objects for Study...

Tamez, Jeannine Paola

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Model Fire Protection Program | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't32 MasterAcquisitiTechnologyPotomacRidgeMobile VisitorsModel

92

A model technology transfer program for independent operators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In August 1992, the Energy Research Center (ERC) at the University of Kansas was awarded a contract by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a technology transfer regional model. This report describes the development and testing of the Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM) which is to be utilized as a regional model for the development of other technology transfer programs for independent operators throughout oil-producing regions in the US. It describes the linkage of the regional model with a proposed national technology transfer plan, an evaluation technique for improving and assessing the model, and the methodology which makes it adaptable on a regional basis. The report also describes management concepts helpful in managing a technology transfer program.

Schoeling, L.G.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Accepted Manuscript Kinetic Modelling of High Density PolyEthylene Pyrolysis: Part 1. Comparison of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted Manuscript Kinetic Modelling of High Density PolyEthylene Pyrolysis: Part 1. Comparison this article as: Gascoin N, Navarro-Rodriguez A, Gillard P, Mangeot A, Kinetic Modelling of High Density PolyEthylene.polymdegradstab.2012.05.008 #12;M ANUSCRIPT ACCEPTED ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT 1 Kinetic Modelling of High Density PolyEthylene

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

94

Transforming PLC Programs into Formal Models for Verification Purposes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most of CERN’s industrial installations rely on PLC-based (Programmable Logic Controller) control systems developed using the UNICOS framework. This framework contains common, reusable program modules and their correctness is a high priority. Testing is already applied to find errors, but this method has limitations. In this work an approach is proposed to transform automatically PLC programs into formal models, with the goal of applying formal verification to ensure their correctness. We target model checking which is a precise, mathematical-based method to check formalized requirements automatically against the system.

Darvas, D; Blanco, E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Energy systematics of heavy nuclei -- mean field models in comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compare the systematics of binding energies computed within the standard and extended versions of the relativistic mean-field (RMF) model and the Skyrme Hartree-Fock (SHF) model. The general trends for the binding energies for super-heavy nuclei are significantly different for these models. The SHF models tend to underbind the superheavy nuclei, while, RMF models show just the opposite trend. The extended RMF model seems to provide remarkable improvements over the results obtained for the standard RMF model.

P. -G. Reinhard; B. K. Agrawal

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

96

COMPARISON OF MOBILE5A, MOBILE6, VT-MICRO, AND CMEM MODELS FOR ESTIMATING HOT-STABILIZED LIGHT-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPARISON OF MOBILE5A, MOBILE6, VT-MICRO, AND CMEM MODELS FOR ESTIMATING HOT-STABILIZED LIGHT hot-stabilized, light-duty vehicle emissions. Specifically, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL comparisons. The comparisons demonstrate that the CMEM model exhibits some abnormal behaviors when compared

Rakha, Hesham A.

97

final report for Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of the work on parallel programming patterns that was part of the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing

Johnson, Ralph E

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

98

Electron-density comparisons between radar observations and 3-D ionospheric model calculations. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparison of electron densities calculated from the Utah State University First-Principals Ionospheric Model with simultaneous observations taken at Sondrestrom, Millstone, and Arecibo incoherent-scatter radars was undertaken to better understanding the response of the ionosphere at these longitudinally similar yet latitudinally separated locations. The comparison included over 50 days distributed over 3 1/2 years roughly symmetrical about the last solar-minimum in 1986. The overall trend of the comparison was that to first-order the model reproduces electron densities responding to diurnal, seasonal, geomagnetic, and solar-cycle variations for all three radars. However, some model-observation discrepancies were found. These include, failure of the model to correctly produce an evening peak at Millstone, fall-spring equinox differences at Sondrestrom, tidal structure at Arecibo, and daytime NmF2 values at Arecibo.

Johnson, M.W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Statistics for the Evaluation and Comparison of Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Procedures that may be used to evaluate the operational performance of a wide spectrum of geophysical models are introduced. Primarily using a complementary set of difference measures, both model accuracy and precision ...

Willmott, Cort J.; Ackleson, Steven G.; Davis, Robert E.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Klink, Katherine M.; Legates, David R.; O'Donnell, James; Rowe, Clinton M.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Modeling, Simulation and Comparison Study of Cirrus Clouds' Ice Jorge M. Villa*a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling, Simulation and Comparison Study of Cirrus Clouds' Ice Crystals Jorge M. Villa*a , Sandra of the bullets. This software allows us to create irregular models of particles using the Discrete Dipole of earth's energy dynamics, therefore affecting climate systems1 . In addition, they indirectly affect

Cruz-Pol, Sandra L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A Comparison of the AC and DC Power Flow Models for LMP Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Comparison of the AC and DC Power Flow Models for LMP Calculations Thomas J. Overbye, Xu Cheng power flow model for LMP-based market calculations. The paper first provides a general discussion of balanced, three phase, electric power transmission networks is through the solution of the power flow. From

102

Incident and in situ irradiance in Lakes Cadagno and Lucerne: A comparison of methods and models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incident and in situ irradiance in Lakes Cadagno and Lucerne: A comparison of methods and models Key words: Lake Lucerne, Lake Cadagno, PAR, UV-A, UV-B, irradiance regime, radiative transfer models) at the field stations Kastanienbaum at Lake Lucerne (434 m a.s.l.) and Piora at Lake Cadagno (1923 m a

Sommaruga, Ruben

103

A comparison of option prices under different pricing measures in a stochastic volatility model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comparison of option prices under different pricing measures in a stochastic volatility model with correlation Vicky Henderson Princeton University David Hobson § University of Bath Sam Howison ¶ University option prices in an incomplete stochastic volatility model with correlation. In a general setting, we

Howison, Sam

104

Numerical comparison between relaxation and nonlinear equilibrium models. Application to chemical engineering.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processes widely used in chemical engineering: distillation and chromatography. Distillation is a wellNumerical comparison between relaxation and nonlinear equilibrium models. Application to chemical engineering. F. James 1 M. Postel 2 M. Sep'ulveda 3 Abstract A model to take into account the finite exchange

d'Orléans, Université

105

A Comparison of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic Modeling...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic Modeling Results over a Wide Range of Gasoline Range Surrogate Fuel Blends Bruce G. Bunting and Scott Eaton, Oak Ridge National...

106

Comparison of Selected Model Evaluation Criteria for Maintenance Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Louisville, KY 40292, USA Model-based preventive maintenance relies on creating models that can either loss, and as a whole a sluggish system, the focus has shifted to preventive maintenance. Computerized maintenance systems aid in improving the efficiency of maintenance tasks [28]. The approach of preventive

Huang, Samuel H.

107

Comparison between third and second generation ocean wave models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this study is to assess the relative performance of a second generation (2G) model, WISWAVE (Hubertz 1992), and a third generation (3G) model, WAM (WAMDI 1988), in deep water. High-quality wind fields, with detailed spatial...

Bratos, Steven Martin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

108

Final Report: Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing, Rice University collaborated with project partners in the design, development and deployment of language, compiler, and runtime support for parallel programming models to support application development for the “leadership-class” computer systems at DOE national laboratories. Work over the course of this project has focused on the design, implementation, and evaluation of a second-generation version of Coarray Fortran. Research and development efforts of the project have focused on the CAF 2.0 language, compiler, runtime system, and supporting infrastructure. This has involved working with the teams that provide infrastructure for CAF that we rely on, implementing new language and runtime features, producing an open source compiler that enabled us to evaluate our ideas, and evaluating our design and implementation through the use of benchmarks. The report details the research, development, findings, and conclusions from this work.

Mellor-Crummey, John [William Marsh Rice University] [William Marsh Rice University

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

109

Comparison of analytical models for zonal flow generation in ion-temperature-gradient mode turbulence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past years the understanding of the multi scale interaction problems have increased significantly. However, at present there exists a flora of different analytical models for investigating multi scale interactions and hardly any specific comparisons have been performed among these models. In this work two different models for the generation of zonal flows from ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) background turbulence are discussed and compared. The methods used are the coherent mode coupling model and the wave kinetic equation model (WKE). It is shown that the two models give qualitatively the same results even though the assumption on the spectral difference is used in the (WKE) approach.

Anderson, J.; Miki, K.; Uzawa, K.; Li, J.; Kishimoto, Y. [Dept. Fundamental Energy Science, School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto, 611-0011 (Japan)

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

110

A model for a national low level waste program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A national program for the management of low level waste is essential to the success of environmental clean-up, decontamination and decommissioning, current operations and future missions. The value of a national program is recognized through procedural consistency and a shared set of resources. A national program requires a clear waste definition and an understanding of waste characteristics matched against available and proposed disposal options. A national program requires the development and implementation of standards and procedures for implementing the waste hierarchy, with a specitic emphasis on waste avoidance, minimization and recycling. It requires a common set of objectives for waste characterization based on the disposal facility's waste acceptance criteria, regulatory and license requirements and performance assessments. Finally, a national waste certification program is required to ensure compliance. To facilitate and enhance the national program, a centralized generator services organization, tasked with providing technical services to the generators on behalf of the national program, is necessary. These subject matter experts are the interface between the generating sites and the disposal facility(s). They provide an invaluable service to the generating organizations through their involvement in waste planning prior to waste generation and through championing implementation of the waste hierarchy. Through their interface, national treatment and transportation services are optimized and new business opportunities are identified. This national model is based on extensive experience in the development and on-going management of a national transuranic waste program and management of the national repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The Low Level Program at the Savannah River Site also successfully developed and implemented the waste hierarchy, waste certification and waste generator services concepts presented below. The Savannah River Site services over forty generators and has historically managed over 12,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The results of the waste minimization program at the site resulted in over 900 initiatives, avoiding over 220,000 cubic meters of waste for a life cycle cost savings of $275 million. At the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the low level waste program services over 20 major generators and several hundred smaller generators that produce over 4,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The Los Alamos National Laboratory low level waste program utilizes both on-site and off-site disposal capabilities. Off-site disposal requires the implementation of certification requirements to utilize both federal and commercial options. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is the US Department of Energy's first deep geological repository for the permanent disposal of Transuanic waste. Transuranic waste was generated and retrievably stored at 39 sites across the US. Transuranic waste is defined as waste with a radionuclide concentration equal to or greater than 100 nCi/g consisting of radionuclides with half-lives greater than 20 years and with an atomic mass greater than uranium. Combining the lessons learned from the national transuranic waste program, the successful low level waste program at Savannah River Site and the experience of off-site disposal options at Los Alamos National Laboratory provides the framework and basis for developing a viable national strategy for managing low level waste.

Blankenhorn, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Evaluation of the Multi-scale Modeling Framework Using Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the goals of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is to provide long-term observations for evaluating and improving cloud and radiation treatment in global climate models. Unfortunately, the traditional parametric approach of diagnosing cloud and radiation properties for gridcells that are tens to hundreds kilometers across from large-scale model fields is not well suited for comparison with time series of ground based observations at selected locations. A recently emerging approach called a multi-scale modeling framework (MMF) has shown promise to bridge the scale gap. The MMF consists of a two-dimensional or small three-dimensional cloud resolving model (CRM) embedded into each grid column of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), thereby computing cloud properties at a scale that is more consistent with observations. We present a comparison of data from two ARM sites, one at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) in Oklahoma and one at Nauru Island in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region, with output from both the CAM and MMF. Two sets of one year long simulations are considered: one using climatological sea surface temperatures (SST) and another using 1999 SST. Each set includes a run with the MMF as well as the CAM run with traditional or standard cloud and radiation treatment. Time series of cloud fraction, precipitation intensity, and downwelling solar radiation flux at the surface are statistically analyzed. For the TWP site, nearly all parameters of frequency distributions of these variables from the MMF run are shown to be more consistent with observation than those from the CAM run. This change is attributed to the improved representation of convective clouds in the MMF compared to the conventional climate model. For the SGP, the MMF shows little to no improvement in predicting the same quantities. Possible causes of this lack of improvement are discussed.

Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Khairoutdinov, Marat

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Comparison between the SIMPLE and ENERGY mixing models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SIMPLE and ENERGY mixing models were compared in order to investigate the limitations of SIMPLE's analytically formulated mixing parameter, relative to the experimentally calibrated ENERGY mixing parameters. For interior subchannels, it was shown that when the SIMPLE and ENERGY parameters are reduced to a common form, there is good agreement between the two models for a typical fuel geometry. However, large discrepancies exist for typical blanket (lower P/D) geometries. Furthermore, the discrepancies between the mixing parameters result in significant differences in terms of the temperature profiles generated by the ENERGY code utilizing these mixing parameters as input. For edge subchannels, the assumptions made in the development of the SIMPLE model were extended to the rectangular edge subchannel geometry used in ENERGY. The resulting effective eddy diffusivities (used by the ENERGY code) associated with the SIMPLE model are again closest to those of the ENERGY model for the fuel assembly geometry. Finally, the SIMPLE model's neglect of a net swirl effect in the edge region is most limiting for assemblies exhibiting relatively large radial power skews.

Burns, K.J.; Todreas, N.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

An Empirical Comparison of Field Defect Modeling Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management, Measurement, Reliability, Experimentation, Defect modeling, empirical research, COTS, maintenance of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh PA, 15213 *Center for Software Engineering IBM T.J. Watson Research Center Hawthorne, NY 10532 This research was supported by the National Science Foundation

114

Comparison of light scattering models for diffuse optical tomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

different models for light propagation in tissues: (1) the radiative transport equation, (2) the delta of the radiative transport equation that take into account forward-peaked scattering analytically. Using simulated data from the numerical solution of radiative transport equation, we solve the inverse problem

Kim, Arnold D.

115

Surrogate and reduced-order modeling: a comparison of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Second, sam- pling may be complicated by the large dimensionality of the input space--as when the inputs or accelerating evaluations of a stochastic model for the data, and thus are also applicable in a frequentist and multiscale approaches, and stochastic spectral approaches. Second, the dimension of the input space can

Peraire, Jaime

116

Modeling for surge control of centrifugal compresssors: comparison with experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

con- trol design, of a centrifugal compression system is vali- dated. Compressor surge is an unwanted pressure rise and e¢ciency, and it narrows the operating range of the compressor. Ac- tive surge control is validated. The background for this is the need for a energy based model including the rotational speed

Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

117

Evaluation of the Multi-Scale Modeling Framework using Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the goals of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program was to provide long-term observations for evaluation of cloud and radiation treatment in global climate models. Unfortunately, traditional parametric approach of diagnosing cloud and radiation properties from large-scale model fields is not well suited for comparison with observed time series at selected locations. A recently emerging approach called the multi-scale modeling framework (MMF) has shown promise to bridge the gap. MMF consists of a two-dimensional cloud system resolving model (CSRM) embedded into each CAM grid column of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), thereby computing cloud properties at a scale that is more consistent with observations. Because the approach is computationally expensive only limited simulations have been carried out. In this presentation, we will present a comparison of data from two ARM sites, one at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) in Oklahoma and one at Nauru island in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region, with output from both CAM and MMF. Two sets of one year long simulations are considered: one using climatological sea surface temperatures (SST) and another using 1999 SST. Each set includes a run with MMF as well as CAM run with traditional or standard cloud and radiation treatment. Time series of cloud fraction, precipitation intensity, and downwelling solar radiation flux at the surface are statistically analyzed. For the TWP site, nearly all parameters of frequency distributions of these variables from MMF run are shown to be more consistent with observation than those from CAM run. For the SGP, the improvements are marginal.

Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Khairoutdinov, Marat

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

HotStrength of Ferritic CreepResistant Steels Comparison of Neural Network and Genetic Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the development of materials. In our continuing research on steels for the energy production industries [3], we that methods such as neural networks, genetic programming and optimisation techniques have made a mark

Cambridge, University of

119

Garnering the Industrial Sector: A Comparison of Cutting Edge Industrial DSM Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The industrial sector has posed a daunting DSM challenge to utilities throughout North America, even to those with successful and creative residential and commercial DSM programs. Most utilities have had great difficulty in going beyond conventional...

Kyricopoulos, P. F.; Wikler, G. A.; Faruqui, A.; Wood, B. G.

120

A COMPARISON BETWEEN CODYRUN AND TRNSYS, SIMULATION MODELS FOR THERMAL BUILDINGS BEHAVIOUR.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A COMPARISON BETWEEN CODYRUN AND TRNSYS, SIMULATION MODELS FOR THERMAL BUILDINGS BEHAVIOUR. F of climate. This software #12;has already been used for the validation of prescriptions concerning low energy; E.Mail : lucas@iremia.univ-reunion.fr ABSTRACT: Simulation codes of thermal behaviour could

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Comparison of model predicted to observed winds in the coastal zone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Predictions of near-surface (10 to 100 m) wind velocities made by a mesoscale numerical model on a 10 km grid over and near the coastline are checked against observations. Two comparisons are made. The first is between observed and model-estimated mean annual wind power density at locations where surface observations exist in three coastal areas: the Chesapeake Bay, the Apalachee Bay and the South Texas coastal area. The second comparison is made between model predictions over the Delmarva Peninsula and adjacent ocean and observations made over a 120 x 30 km rectangle extending across the peninsula and out to sea. It is concluded that the unbiased error analysis skill ratings of 81% and 76% are attained for two days of prediction-observation comparisons. In the meantime, the skill of the model in duplicating individual coastal wind fields is taken as 78%. In addition, a qualitative comparison is made between the predicted fields of wind and the observed wind field. The predicted wind field unquestionably reproduces the observed field.

Garstang, M.; Pielke, R.A.; Snow, J.W.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

COMPARISON OF EXISTING EPS-BLOCK GEOFOAM CREEP MODELS WITH FIELD MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPARISON OF EXISTING EPS-BLOCK GEOFOAM CREEP MODELS WITH FIELD MEASUREMENTS By David Arellano, P-stark1@uiuc.edu Paper Submitted to EPS Geofoam 2001 3rd International Conference December 10-12, 2001 Salt Lake City, Utah October 15, 2001 #12;2 ABSTRACT An estimate of the long-term vertical creep of EPS

123

Comparison of Model Prediction With Measurements of Galactic Background Noise at L-Band  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with measurements made with several modern L-band remote sensing radiometers. The comparison validates the model and ocean salinity that are needed for understanding the hydrological cycle, ocean circu- lation, and energy surface salinity, which requires high radiometric accuracy (at L-band the sensitivity to salinity

Boyer, Edmond

124

LIDAR measurements of wind turbine wake dyn_amics and comparison with an engineering model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIDAR measurements of wind turbine wake dyn_amics and comparison with an engineering model 1 dynamics, lIre performed at four diameters behind a 95 kW wind turbine. The wake 111eaeasurement technique allows esti111ation of qUClsiinstantancou~ two dimensional wind fields in an area

125

Comparison of a microstructure evolution model with experiments on irradiated vanadium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of a microstructure evolution model with experiments on irradiated vanadium S. Sharafat vacancy ¯ux to grow matrix and precipitate-axed bubbles. The direct formation of vacancy and interstitial and its alloys are now considered as candidate structural materials in fu- sion reactors, because

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

126

A Comparison Between Model Reduction and Controller Reduction: Application to a PWR Nuclear Planty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Comparison Between Model Reduction and Controller Reduction: Application to a PWR Nuclear Planty@csam.ucl.ac.be, Gevers@csam.ucl.ac.be 2 Electricite de France, Direction des Etudes et Recherches, 6 Quai Watier, F-78041 of a controller for the secondary circuit of a nu- clear Pressurized Water Reactor, leading to the conclu- sions

Gevers, Michel

127

Final Map Draft Comparison Report WIND ENERGY RESOURCE MODELING AND MEASUREMENT PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

II Final Map Draft Comparison Report #12;WIND ENERGY RESOURCE MODELING AND MEASUREMENT PROJECT Tel: 978-749-9591 Fax: 978-749-9713 mbrower@awstruewind.com August 10, 2004 #12;2 WIND ENERGY RESOURCE issues. 1 Background In Task 2 of the project, five promising areas of the state for wind energy

128

COMPARISON OF SEISMIC RISK ESTIMATES USING DIFFERENT METHODS TO MODEL FRAGILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COMPARISON OF SEISMIC RISK ESTIMATES USING DIFFERENT METHODS TO MODEL FRAGILITY Pierre Gehl1 , Ariane Ducellier2 , Caterina Negulescu3 , Jaime Abad4 and John Douglas5 Seismic risk evaluations play of decades hundreds of such studies have been conducted. However, the assessment of seismic risk is always

129

Comparison of constitutive laws on the modeling of thermo-viscoplastic behaviour of an aluminum alloy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of constitutive laws on the modeling of thermo-viscoplastic behaviour of an aluminum.guines@insa-rennes.fr, d email: shdgj@sdu.edu.cn Keywords: Hardening law; Aluminum alloy; Flow stress; Temperature; Strain, the innovative lightweight materials, such as aluminum alloys, have been widely adopted in the automotive

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

130

A COMPARISON BETWEEN TWO SIMPLIFIED DYNAMICAL MODELS FOR THE HUMAN GAIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A COMPARISON BETWEEN TWO SIMPLIFIED DYNAMICAL MODELS FOR THE HUMAN GAIT A.Ortega 1 , F.Montoya 1 and J.Finat 2 , MoBiVA Group. 1 ETS Ing. Industrial, Paseo del Cauce, Univ. Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid to a passive approach to maintain the upright position and locomotion with a view to their applications

Llanos, Diego R.

131

Comparison of multivariate methods for inferential modeling of soil carbon using visible/near-infrared spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of multivariate methods for inferential modeling of soil carbon using visible/near-infrared Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy Visible/near-infrared spectroscopy Multivariate calibration Pre-processing transformations In order to reduce costs and time in the analysis of soil properties, visible/near-infrared

Grunwald, Sabine

132

Comparison of problem model change mechanisms issued from CSP and TRIZ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Comparison of problem model change mechanisms issued from CSP and TRIZ RRoollaanndd DDee GGuuiioo satisfaction problem (CSP), on the other hand. Keywords: over-constrained problems, dialectical methods issued from CSP and TRIZ 2 · a set of evaluation parameters, which represent the objective of the problem

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

133

Topology in CP(N-1) models: a critical comparison of different cooling techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Various cooling methods, including a recently introduced one which smoothes out only quantum fluctuations larger than a given threshold, are applied to the study of topology in 2d CP(N-1) models. A critical comparison of their properties is performed.

B. Alles; L. Cosmai; M. D'Elia; A. Papa

1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

134

Comparison of Wake Model Simulations with Offshore Wind Turbine Wake Profiles Measured by Sodar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a ship-mounted sodar at a small offshore wind farm. The experiments were conducted at varying distances Offshore wind farms have increased in size from the first phase of installation with up to 20 turbinesComparison of Wake Model Simulations with Offshore Wind Turbine Wake Profiles Measured by Sodar R

Pryor, Sara C.

135

A comparison of various models in predicting ignition delay in single-particle coal combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comparison of various models in predicting ignition delay in single-particle coal combustion November 2013 Accepted 7 January 2014 Available online xxxx Keywords: Coal Devolatilization Ignition delay a b s t r a c t In this paper, individual coal particle combustion under laminar conditions

136

Comparison of Blade-Strike Modeling Results with Empirical Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is the initial stage of further investigation into the dynamics of injury to fish during passage through a turbine runner. As part of the study, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) estimated the probability of blade strike, and associated injury, as a function of fish length and turbine operating geometry at two adjacent turbines in Powerhouse 1 of Bonneville Dam. Units 5 and 6 had identical intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, and draft tubes, but Unit 6 had a new runner and curved discharge ring to minimize gaps between the runner hub and blades and between the blade tips and discharge ring. We used a mathematical model to predict blade strike associated with two Kaplan turbines and compared results with empirical data from biological tests conducted in 1999 and 2000. Blade-strike models take into consideration the geometry of the turbine blades and discharges as well as fish length, orientation, and distribution along the runner.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

137

Dynamic Code Overlay of SDF-Modeled Programs on Low-end Embedded Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Code Overlay of SDF-Modeled Programs on Low-end Embedded Systems Hae-woo Park Kyoungjoo Oh of synchronous data-flow (SDF) ­modeled program for low-end embedded systems which lack MMU- support-program code, dynamic loader and linker script files from the given SDF- modeled blocks and schematic, so we

Ha, Soonhoi

138

Appendix A: ACSL Simulation Model Program 182 AA.. AACCSSLL SSIIMMUULLAATTIIOONN MMOODDEELL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix A: ACSL Simulation Model Program 182 AA.. AACCSSLL SSIIMMUULLAATTIIOONN MMOODDEELL evaporator #12;Appendix A: ACSL Simulation Model Program 183 CONSTANT V3 = 18.85 ! Receiver CONSTANT VC = 4.5)] #12;Appendix A: ACSL Simulation Model Program 184 CONSTANT CV1 = 3.39814 ! Vapour valve CONSTANT CV2

Skogestad, Sigurd

139

Comparison of Joint Modeling Approaches Including Eulerian Sliding Interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate representation of discontinuities such as joints and faults is a key ingredient for high fidelity modeling of shock propagation in geologic media. The following study was done to improve treatment of discontinuities (joints) in the Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN (Lomov and Liu 2005). Lagrangian methods with conforming meshes and explicit inclusion of joints in the geologic model are well suited for such an analysis. Unfortunately, current meshing tools are unable to automatically generate adequate hexahedral meshes for large numbers of irregular polyhedra. Another concern is that joint stiffness in such explicit computations requires significantly reduced time steps, with negative implications for both the efficiency and quality of the numerical solution. An alternative approach is to use non-conforming meshes and embed joint information into regular computational elements. However, once slip displacement on the joints become comparable to the zone size, Lagrangian (even non-conforming) meshes could suffer from tangling and decreased time step problems. The use of non-conforming meshes in an Eulerian solver may alleviate these difficulties and provide a viable numerical approach for modeling the effects of faults on the dynamic response of geologic materials. We studied shock propagation in jointed/faulted media using a Lagrangian and two Eulerian approaches. To investigate the accuracy of this joint treatment the GEODYN calculations have been compared with results from the Lagrangian code GEODYN-L which uses an explicit treatment of joints via common plane contact. We explore two approaches to joint treatment in the code, one for joints with finite thickness and the other for tight joints. In all cases the sliding interfaces are tracked explicitly without homogenization or blending the joint and block response into an average response. In general, rock joints will introduce an increase in normal compliance in addition to a reduction in shear strength. In the present work we consider the limiting case of stiff discontinuities that only affect the shear strength of the material.

Lomov, I; Antoun, T; Vorobiev, O

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

140

Comparison of Statistically Modeled Contaminated Soil Volume Estimates and Actual Excavation Volumes at the Maywood FUSRAP Site - 13555  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the ongoing remediation process at the Maywood Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) properties, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) assisted the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) New York District by providing contaminated soil volume estimates for the main site area, much of which is fully or partially remediated. As part of the volume estimation process, an initial conceptual site model (ICSM) was prepared for the entire site that captured existing information (with the exception of soil sampling results) pertinent to the possible location of surface and subsurface contamination above cleanup requirements. This ICSM was based on historical anecdotal information, aerial photographs, and the logs from several hundred soil cores that identified the depth of fill material and the depth to bedrock under the site. Specialized geostatistical software developed by Argonne was used to update the ICSM with historical sampling results and down-hole gamma survey information for hundreds of soil core locations. The updating process yielded both a best guess estimate of contamination volumes and a conservative upper bound on the volume estimate that reflected the estimate's uncertainty. Comparison of model results to actual removed soil volumes was conducted on a parcel-by-parcel basis. Where sampling data density was adequate, the actual volume matched the model's average or best guess results. Where contamination was un-characterized and unknown to the model, the actual volume exceeded the model's conservative estimate. Factors affecting volume estimation were identified to assist in planning further excavations. (authors)

Moore, James [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - New York District 26 Federal Plaza, New York, New York 10278 (United States)] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - New York District 26 Federal Plaza, New York, New York 10278 (United States); Hays, David [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Kansas City District 601 E. 12th Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64106 (United States)] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Kansas City District 601 E. 12th Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64106 (United States); Quinn, John; Johnson, Robert; Durham, Lisa [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Susceptibilities in the PNJL model with 8q interactions and comparison with lQCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present some results pertaining quantities which are regarded as good indicators of the pseudo-critical temperatures for the deconfinement and partial chiral restoration transitions using a polynomial form for the Polyakov potential part and an extended version of the NJL model which includes 6 and 8 quark interaction terms. Some comparisons with results from the lattice formulation of QCD (lQCD) are performed and results for the location of the critical endoint in the phase diagram are also presented. It is shown that the comparison with lQCD results favors a moderately strong OZI-violating 8 quark interaction term.

João Moreira; Brigitte Hiller; Alexander Osipov; Alex Blin

2013-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

142

Discussion of comparison study of hydraulic fracturing models -- Test case: GRI Staged Field Experiment No. 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides comments to a companion journal paper on predictive modeling of hydraulic fracturing patterns (N.R. Warpinski et. al., 1994). The former paper was designed to compare various modeling methods to demonstrate the most accurate methods under various geologic constraints. The comments of this paper are centered around potential deficiencies in the former authors paper which include: limited actual comparisons offered between models, the issues of matching predictive data with that from related field operations was lacking or undocumented, and the relevance/impact of accurate modeling on the overall hydraulic fracturing cost and production.

Cleary, M.P.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Improvements in Hanford TRU Program Utilizing Systems Modeling and Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford's Transuranic (TRU) Program is responsible for certifying contact-handled (CH) TRU waste and shipping the certified waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Hanford's CH TRU waste includes material that is in retrievable storage as well as above ground storage, and newly generated waste. Certifying a typical container entails retrieving and then characterizing it (Non-Destructive Examination [NDE], Non-Destructive Assay [NDA], and Head Space Gas Sampling [HSG]), validating records (data review and reconciliation), and designating the container for a payload. The certified payload is then shipped to WIPP. Systems modeling and analysis techniques were applied to Hanford's TRU Program to help streamline the certification process and increase shipping rates. The modeling and analysis yields several benefits: - Maintains visibility on system performance and predicts downstream consequences of production issues. - Predicts future system performance with higher confidence, based on tracking past performance. - Applies speculation analyses to determine the impact of proposed changes (e.g., apparent shortage of feed should not be used as basis to reassign personnel if more feed is coming in the queue). - Positively identifies the appropriate queue for all containers (e.g., discovered several containers that were not actively being worked because they were in the wrong 'physical' location - method used previously for queuing up containers). - Identifies anomalies with the various data systems used to track inventory (e.g., dimensional differences for Standard Waste Boxes). A model of the TRU Program certification process was created using custom queries of the multiple databases for managing waste containers. The model was developed using a simplified process chart based on the expected path for a typical container. The process chart was augmented with the remediation path for containers that do not meet acceptance criteria for WIPP. Containers are sorted into queues based on their current status in the process. A container can be in only one queue at any given time. Existing data systems are queried to establish the quantity of containers in each queue on any given day. This sets the amount of feed available that is then modeled to be processed according to the daily production plans. The daily production plans were created by identifying the equipment necessary and the staff that performs each process step, and determining the expected production rate for each step. Production performance is monitored on a weekly basis with Project senior staff to establish a total operating efficiency (TOE) for each step (comparing actual performance to production capacity). The unit operations were modeled to be constrained by each day's feed queue plus the performance of the preceding step. The TOE for each unit operation was applied to an integrated model to determine bottlenecks and identify areas for improvement. All of the steps were linked to predict future system performance based on available feed and integrated system-level TOE. It has been determined that at times sub-optimization of a particular unit operation is necessary to ensure the system remains balanced (e.g., having excess capacity in assay does no good if there is no feed available because the real-time radiography [RTR] is working at half capacity). Several recommendations have been provided to the Project management team resulting in improvements in the performance of TRU certification activities by Hanford's TRU Program. (authors)

Baynes, P.A.; Bailey, K.B.; McKenney, D.E. [Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Uytioco, E. [Fluor Government Group, Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Comparison of value-added models for school ranking and classification: a Monte Carlo study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPARISON OF VALUE-ADDED MODELS FOR SCHOOL RANKING AND CLASSIFICATION: A MONTE CARLO STUDY A Dissertation by ZHONGMIAO WANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... AND CLASSIFICATION: A MONTE CARLO STUDY A Dissertation by ZHONGMIAO WANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Co...

Wang, Zhongmiao

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua New, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua New, Oak Ridge National consolidates comparison of RSC's projected energy savings to other simulation engines including DOE-2.1E, Attic of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Technologies Office (BTO). The simulation engine used in the RSC

Tennessee, University of

146

Comparison of Chiller Models for Use in Model-Based Fault Detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and computational requirements. The objective of this study was to evaluate different modeling approaches for their applicability to model based FDD of vapor compression chillers. Three different models were studied: the Gordon and Ng Universal Chiller model (2nd...

Sreedhara, P.; Haves, P.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Model Test Setup and Program for Experimental Estimation of Surface Loads of the SSG Kvitsy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model Test Setup and Program for Experimental Estimation of Surface Loads of the SSG Kvitsøy Pilot Engineering No. 32 ISSN: 1603-9874 Model Test Setup and Program for Experimental Estimation of Surface Loads University October, 2005 #12;#12;Preface This report presents the preparations done prior to model tests

148

Human intake fraction of toxic pollutants: a model comparison between caltox and uses-lca  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Life Cycle Assessment and Comparative Risk Assessment potential human exposure to toxic pollutants can be expressed as the human intake fraction (iF), representing the fraction of the quantity emitted that enters the human population. To assess model uncertainty in the human intake fraction, ingestion and inhalation iFs of 367 substances emitted to air and freshwater were calculated with two commonly applied multi-media fate and exposure models, CalTOX and USES-LCA. Comparison of the model outcomes reveal that uncertainty in the ingestion iFs was up to a factor of 70. The uncertainty in the inhalation iFs was up to a factor of 865,000. The comparison showed that relatively few model differences account for the uncertainties found. An optimal model structure in the calculation of human intake fractions can be achieved by including (1) rain and no-rain scenarios, (2) a continental sea water compartment, (3) drinking water purification, (4) pH-correction of chemical properties, and (5) aerosol-associated deposition on plants. Finally, vertical stratification of the soil compartment combined with a chemical-dependent soil depth may be considered in future intake fraction calculations.

Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; Geelen, Loes M.J.; Hertwich, Edgar G.; McKone, Thomas E.; van de Meent, Dik

2004-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

149

Comparison of QM-Only and QM/MM Models for the Mechanism of Tungsten-Dependent Acetylene Hydratase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of QM-Only and QM/MM Models for the Mechanism of Tungsten-Dependent Acetylene Hydratase study on the formation of vinyl alcohol in the catalytic cycle of tungsten-dependent acetylene hydratase

Liao, Rongzhen

150

A Quantitative Comparison of Parallel Computation Models Ben H,H. Juurlink Harry A.G. Wijshoff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Quantitative Comparison of Parallel Computation Models Ben H,H. Juurlink Harry A.G. Wijshoff High, requires specific permission sad/or fee. SPM96, Padua, Italy Q 199(j ACM ().89791+@-&96j~ ..$3

Moreno Maza, Marc

151

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation lm001das2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Technical Cost...

152

Spatial distributions in static heavy-light mesons: a comparison of quark models with lattice QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lattice measurements of spatial distributions of the light quark bilinear densities in static mesons allow to test directly and in detail the wave functions of quark models. These distributions are gauge invariant quantities directly related to the spatial distribution of wave functions. We make a detailed comparison of the recent lattice QCD results with our own quark models, formulated previously for quite different purposes. We find a striking agreement not only between our two quark models, but also with the lattice QCD data for the ground state in an important range of distances up to about 4/GeV. Moreover the agreement extends to the L=1 states [j^P=(1/2)^+]. An explanation of several particular features completely at odds with the non-relativistic approximation is provided. A rather direct, somewhat unexpected and of course approximate relation between wave functions of certain quark models and QCD has been established.

Damir Becirevic; Emmanuel Chang; Alain Le Yaouanc Luis Oliver; Jean-Claude Raynal

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

153

Comparisons of empirical viscous-fingering models and their calibration for heterogeneous problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the formulation and parameters for three principal empirical viscous-fingering models: the Kovl, Todd and Longstaff, and Fayers methods. All three methods give similar levels of accuracy when compared with linear homogeneous experiments, but they differ in performance in 2D applications. This arises from differences in the formulation of the total mobility terms. The superiority of the Todd and Longstaff and Fayers methods is demonstrated for 2D and gravity-influenced flows by comparison with experiments and high-resolution simulation. The use of high-resolution simulation to calibrate empirical models in a systematic manner is described. Results from detailed simulation demonstrate the sensitivity of empirical model parameters to viscous/gravity ratio, recovery process (secondary, tertiary, or water-alternating-gas (WAG)), and geological heterogeneity. For large amplitude heterogeneities with short correlation lengths, the accuracy of the empirical models is shown to be less satisfactory, but improved by the addition of a diffusive term.

Fayers, F.J.; Blunt, M.J.; Christie, M.A. (BP Research Center (GB))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

The Program for climate Model diagnosis and Intercomparison: 20-th anniversary Symposium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twenty years ago, W. Lawrence (Larry) Gates approached the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Research (now the Office of Science) with a plan to coordinate the comparison and documentation of climate model differences. This effort would help improve our understanding of climate change through a systematic approach to model intercomparison. Early attempts at comparing results showed a surprisingly large range in control climate from such parameters as cloud cover, precipitation, and even atmospheric temperature. The DOE agreed to fund the effort at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in part because of the existing computing environment and because of a preexisting atmospheric science group that contained a wide variety of expertise. The project was named the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI), and it has changed the international landscape of climate modeling over the past 20 years. In spring 2009 the DOE hosted a 1-day symposium to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of PCMDI and to honor its founder, Larry Gates. Through their personal experiences, the morning presenters painted an image of climate science in the 1970s and 1980s, that generated early support from the international community for model intercomparison, thereby bringing PCMDI into existence. Four talks covered Gates���¢��������s early contributions to climate research at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), the RAND Corporation, and Oregon State University through the founding of PCMDI to coordinate the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP). The speakers were, in order of presentation, Warren Washington [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)], Kelly Redmond (Western Regional Climate Center), George Boer (Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis), and Lennart Bengtsson [University of Reading, former director of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF)]. The afternoon session emphasized the scientific ideas that are the basis of PCMDI���¢��������s success, summarizing their evolution and impact. Four speakers followed the various PCMDI-supported climate model intercomparison projects, beginning with early work on cloud representations in models, presented by Robert D. Cess (Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Stony Brook University), and then the latest Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Projects (CFMIPs) led by Sandrine Bony (Laboratoire de M�������©t�������©orologie Dynamique). Benjamin Santer (LLNL) presented a review of the climate change detection and attribution (D & A) work pioneered at PCMDI, and Gerald A. Meehl (NCAR) ended the day with a look toward the future of climate change research.

Potter, Gerald L; Bader, David C; Riches, Michael; Bamzai, Anjuli; Joseph, Renu

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

155

Computational Modeling and the Experimental Plasma Research Program A White Paper Submitted to the FESAC Subcommittee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational Modeling and the Experimental Plasma Research Program A White Paper Submitted of the fusion energy program. The experimental plasma research (EPR) program is well positioned to make major in fusion development and promote scientific discovery. Experimental plasma research projects explore

156

Non-Linear Stochastic Fractional Programming Model of Financial ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2. Charles, V. and Dutta, D., A method for solving linear stochastic fractional programming problem with mixed constraints, Acta Ciencia Indica, Vol. XXX M,. No.

2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

157

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

supported by Materials Technology Program to meet national objectives for improved fuel economy * Identify specific technology improvements that affect major cost drivers *...

158

A synchronous model of the PLC programming language ST Fernando Jimenez-Fraustro  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A synchronous model of the PLC programming language ST Fernando Jimenez-Fraustro IRISA / INRIA F of a synchronous model of the PLC programming lan- guage ST. This work is part of the integration of the IEC 1131 Logic Controllers (PLC) architec- tures. Their design relies on standards like the IEC 1131 norm

Boyer, Edmond

159

Going Beyond a RESNET Certification for Code-Compliant Simulations: A Comparison of Detailed Results of Three RESNET-Certified, Code-Compliant Residential Simulation Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the cooling and heating energy use from this adjustment was not resolved. Therefore, a more detailed understanding of the Software-2 simulation programs is needed to accomplish the comparison with IC3 or Software-1 on the standard reference house. ESL... compared to IC3 and Software-2. Standard Reference House in Houston: Large differences were found in the standard reference house simulation results from the three performance calculators. The IC3 calculated total annual energy use was 77.7 MMBtu...

Liu, Z.; Kim, H.; Malhotra, M.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Baltazar, J. C.; Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Montgomery, C.

160

Preliminary Model Comparison Results From the Sim-SEQ Project Using TOUGH2, STOMP, Eclipse, and VESA Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sim-SEQ is an international initiative on model comparison for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS), with an objective to understand and, if possible, quantify model uncertainties. Model comparison efforts in Sim-SEQ are initially limited to one specific field test site, hereafter referred to as the Sim-SEQ Study site (or S-3 site). Within Sim-SEQ, different modeling teams are developing conceptual models of CO2 injection at the S-3 site. One of the conceptual models, developed by the LBNL team, is based on TOUGH2/EOS7C. In this paper, we present some preliminary model predictions of the S-3 site using the TOUGH2/EOS7C simulator. We also compare the predictions of the TOUGH2 simulator with three other conceptual models, developed by three different organizations, of the S-3 site.

Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Doughty, Christine A.; Bacon, Diana H.; Bacci, Giacomo; Govindan, Rajesh; Shi, Ji-Quan; Gasda, Sarah E.; Ramanathan, Ramya; Nicot, Jean-Philippe; Hosseini, Seyyed; Birkholzer, Jens

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Modeling Activities in the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Sciences Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Science Program (ASP) conducts research pertinent to radiative forcing of climate change by atmospheric aerosols. The program consists of approximately 40 highly interactive peer-reviewed research projects that examine aerosol properties and processes and the evolution of aerosols in the atmosphere. Principal components of the program are instrument development, laboratory experiments, field studies, theoretical investigations, and modeling. The objectives of the Program are to 1) improve the understanding of aerosol processes associated with light scattering and absorption properties and interactions with clouds that affect Earth's radiative balance and to 2) develop model-based representations of these processes that enable the effects of aerosols on Earth's climate system to be properly represented in global-scale numerical climate models. Although only a few of the research projects within ASP are explicitly identified as primarily modeling activities, modeling actually comprises a substantial component of a large fraction of ASP research projects. This document describes the modeling activities within the Program as a whole, the objectives and intended outcomes of these activities, and the linkages among the several modeling components and with global-scale modeling activities conducted under the support of the Department of Energy's Climate Sciences Program and other aerosol and climate research programs.

Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Schwartz, Stephen E.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

A model-dye comparison experiment in the tidal mixing front zone on the southern flank of Georges Bank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model-dye comparison experiment in the tidal mixing front zone on the southern flank of Georges; revised 8 June 2007; accepted 30 October 2007; published 9 February 2008. [1] A process-oriented model-dye the observed movement of dye across the tidal mixing front on the southern flank of Georges Bank during 22

Chen, Changsheng

163

Comparison of particle-tracking and lumped-parameter age-distribution models for evaluating vulnerability of production wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Groundwaterage . Contamination . Numerical modeling . Water supply . USA Introduction Drinking-water productionComparison of particle-tracking and lumped-parameter age-distribution models for evaluating-source contaminant inputs at the water table, some representation of the distribution of groundwater ages in the well

164

A model technology transfer program for independent operators: Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development and testing of the Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM) which is to be utilized as a regional model for the development of other technology transfer programs for independent operators throughout oil-producing regions in the US. It describes the linkage of the regional model with a proposed national technology transfer plan, an evaluation technique for improving and assessing the model, and the methodology which makes it adaptable on a regional basis. The report also describes management concepts helpful in managing a technology transfer program. The original Tertiary Oil Recovery Project (TORP) activities, upon which the KTTM is based, were developed and tested for Kansas and have proved to be effective in assisting independent operators in utilizing technology. Through joint activities of TORP and the Kansas Geological Survey (KGS), the KTTM was developed and documented for application in other oil-producing regions. During the course of developing this model, twelve documents describing the implementation of the KTTM were developed as deliverables to DOE. These include: (1) a problem identification (PI) manual describing the format and results of six PI workshops conducted in different areas of Kansas, (2) three technology workshop participant manuals on advanced waterflooding, reservoir description, and personal computer applications, (3) three technology workshop instructor manuals which provides instructor material for all three workshops, (4) three technologies were documented as demonstration projects which included reservoir management, permeability modification, and utilization of a liquid-level acoustic measuring device, (5) a bibliography of all literature utilized in the documents, and (6) a document which describes the KTTM.

Schoeling, L.G.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Modelling and Formal Verification of Timing Aspects in Large PLC Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the main obstacle that prevents model checking from being widely used in industrial control systems is the complexity of building formal models out of PLC programs, especially when timing aspects need to be integrated. This paper brings an answer to this obstacle by proposing a methodology to model and verify timing aspects of PLC programs. Two approaches are proposed to allow the users to balance the trade-off between the complexity of the model, i.e. its number of states, and the set of specifications possible to be verified. A tool supporting the methodology which allows to produce models for different model checkers directly from PLC programs has been developed. Verification of timing aspects for real-life PLC programs are presented in this paper using NuSMV.

Fernandez Adiego, B; Blanco Vinuela, E; Tournier, J-C; Gonzalez Suarez, V M; Blech, J O

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Ur/Web: A Simple Model for Programming the Web  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The World Wide Web has evolved gradually from a document delivery platform to an architecture for distributed programming. This largely unplanned evolution is apparent in the set of interconnected languages and protocols ...

Chlipala, Adam

167

Accelerating Energy Savings Performance Contracting Through Model Statewide Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Provides suggestions on how to accelerateEnergy Savings Performance Contracting programs and information about the types of assistance provided under the 'Accelerated Energy Savings Performance Contracting' initiative. Author: Energy Services Coalition

168

Mathematical Programming Models and Their Relaxations for The ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note that the database graph on the right has a subgraph, which is structurally identical ..... We next introduce the matrix variable Y = yyT , where y is the vector .... which is a MATLAB interface for the semidefinite programming algorithm ...

Birbil

2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

169

3M's Model Rewards and Recognition Program Engages Employees...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Now LEADER. Companies that choose to participate in this program pledge to reduce their energy intensity by 25% or more in 10 years. Nearly 50 different companies have committed...

170

The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP): A Model-Data Comparison System for Evaluation of Coupled Biosphere-Atmosphere Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need to capture important climate feebacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in new efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, now often referred to as Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results, suggesting that a more rigorous set of offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are warranted. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) provides a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). C-LAMP provides feedback to the modeling community regarding model improvements and to the measurement community by suggesting new observational campaigns. C-LAMP Experiment 1 consists of a set of uncoupled simulations of terrestrial carbon models specifically designed to examine the ability of the models to reproduce surface carbon and energy fluxes at multiple sites and to exhibit the influence of climate variability, prescribed atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), nitrogen (N) deposition, and land cover change on projections of terrestrial carbon fluxes during the 20th century. Experiment 2 consists of partially coupled simulations of the terrestrial carbon model with an active atmosphere model exchanging energy and moisture fluxes. In all experiments, atmospheric CO{sub 2} follows the prescribed historical trajectory from C{sup 4}MIP. In Experiment 2, the atmosphere model is forced with prescribed sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and corresponding sea ice concentrations from the Hadley Centre; prescribed CO{sub 2} is radiatively active; and land, fossil fuel, and ocean CO{sub 2} fluxes are advected by the model. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3) in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): The CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon-nitrogen (CN) model of Thornton. Comparisons against Ameriflus site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) site measurements, and other datasets have been performed and are described in Randerson et al. (2009). The C-LAMP diagnostics package was used to validate improvements to CASA and CN for use in the next generation model, CLM4. It is hoped that this effort will serve as a prototype for an international carbon-cycle model benchmarking activity for models being used for the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report. More information about C-LAMP, the experimental protocol, performance metrics, output standards, and model-data comparisons from the CLM3-CASA and CLM3-CN models are available at http://www.climatemodeling.org/c-lamp.

Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Randerson, Jim [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Mahowald, Natalie [Cornell University; Bonan, Gordon [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Running, Steven [University of Montana, Missoula; Fung, Inez [University of California, Berkeley

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

User's guide to the MESOI diffusion model and to the utility programs UPDATE and LOGRVU  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MESOI is an interactive, Lagrangian puff trajectory diffusion model. The model is documented separately (Ramsdell and Athey, 1981); this report is intended to provide MESOI users with the information needed to successfully conduct model simulations. The user is also provided with guidance in the use of the data file maintenance and review programs; UPDATE and LOGRVU. Complete examples are given for the operaton of all three programs and an appendix documents UPDATE and LOGRVU.

Athey, G.F.; Allwine, K.J.; Ramsdell, J.V.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP) Modeling System Programming Manual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WRAP interface program was developed as a Fortran QuickWin application. SIM simulates the river/reservoir water allocation/management/use system for input sequences of monthly naturalized flows and net evaporation rates. (Chapter 2) SIMD (D for daily... management, and other utility functions. Many different Fortran compiler/IDE packages are sold by various companies. The WRAP programs are in standard Fortran that can be compiled with the various compilers. The compiler, linker, and development...

Wurbs, R.; Hoffpauir, R.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Applicability of daylighting computer modeling in real case studies: Comparison between measured and simulated daylight availability and lighting consumption. Building and Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this paper is published in / Une version de ce document se trouve dans : IEA (International Energy Agency) Task 21 / Annex 29: Daylight in Buildings, November 1998, 68 pp. www.nrc.ca/irc/ircpubs NRCC-42862 Subtask C: Daylighting Design Tools T21/C1-21/CAN/98-11 Applicability of Daylighting Computer Modeling in Real Case Studies: Comparison between Measured and Simulated Daylight Availability and Lighting Consumption A report of IEA SHC Task 21 / IEA ECBCS Annex 29 Daylight in Buildings Subtask C: Daylighting Design Tools Report T21/C1-21/CAN/98-11 Applicability of Daylighting Computer Modeling in Real Case Studies: Comparison between Measured and Simulated Daylight Availability and Lighting Consumption by Anca D. Galasiu * Morad R. Atif * A report of IEA SHC Task 21 / IEA ECBCS Annex 29 * National Research Council Canada, Institute for Research in Construction, Indoor Environment Research Program Subtask C: Daylighting Design Tools Report T21/C1-21/CAN/98-11 IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Programme (IEA SHC) The International Energy Agency (IEA) was established in 1974 as an autonomous agency within the framework of the Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to carry out a comprehensive program of energy cooperation among its 24 member countries and the Commission of the European Communities. An important part of the Agency's program involves collaboration in the research, development and demonstration of new energy technologies to reduce excessive reliance on imported oil, increase long-term energy security and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The IEA's R&D activities are headed by the Committee on Energy Research and Technology (CERT) and supported by a small Secretariat staff, headquartered in Paris. In addition, three Working Parties are charged with monitorin...

A. D. Atif

174

Land-use change trajectories up to 2050: insights from a global agro-economic model comparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changes in agricultural land use have important implications for environmental services. Previous studies of agricultural land-use futures have been published indicating large uncertainty due to different model assumptions and methodologies. In this article we present a first comprehensive comparison of global agro-economic models that have harmonized drivers of population, GDP, and biophysical yields. The comparison allows us to ask two research questions: (1) How much cropland will be used under different socioeconomic and climate change scenarios? (2) How can differences in model results be explained? The comparison includes four partial and six general equilibrium models that differ in how they model land supply and amount of potentially available land. We analyze results of two different socioeconomic scenarios and three climate scenarios (one with constant climate). Most models (7 out of 10) project an increase of cropland of 10–25% by 2050 compared to 2005 (under constant climate), but one model projects a decrease. Pasture land expands in some models, which increase the treat on natural vegetation further. Across all models most of the cropland expansion takes place in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. In general, the strongest differences in model results are related to differences in the costs of land expansion, the endogenous productivity responses, and the assumptions about potential cropland.

Schmitz, Christoph; van Meijl, Hans; Kyle, G. Page; Nelson, Gerald C.; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Gurgel, Angelo; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Popp, Alexander; Sands, Ronald; Tabeau, Andrzej; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; von Lampe, Martin; Wise, Marshall A.; Blanc, Elodie; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Kavallari, Aikaterini; Valin, Hugo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Fractured rock modeling in the National Waste Terminal Storage Program: a review of requirements and status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Generalized computer codes capable of forming the basis for numerical models of fractured rock masses are being used within the NWTS program. Little additional development of these codes is considered justifiable, except in the area of representation of discrete fractures. On the other hand, model preparation requires definition of medium-specific constitutive descriptions and site characteristics and is therefore legitimately conducted by each of the media-oriented projects within the National Waste Terminal Storage program. However, it is essential that a uniform approach to the role of numerical modeling be adopted, including agreement upon the contribution of modeling to the design and licensing process and the need for, and means of, model qualification for particular purposes. This report discusses the role of numerical modeling, reviews the capabilities of several computer codes that are being used to support design or performance assessment, and proposes a framework for future numerical modeling activities within the NWTS program.

St. John, C.; Krug, A.; Key, S.; Monsees, J.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Accident Sequence Precursor Program Large Early Release Frequency Model Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives for the ASP large early release frequency (LERF) model development work is to build a Level 2 containment response model that would capture all of the events necessary to define LERF as outlined in Regulatory Guide 1.174, can be directly interfaced with the existing Level 1 models, is technically correct, can be readily modified to incorporate new information or to represent another plant, and can be executed in SAPHIRE. The ASP LERF models being developed will meet these objectives while providing the NRC with the capability to independently assess the risk impact of plant-specific changes proposed by the utilities that change the nuclear power plants' licensing basis. Together with the ASP Level 1 models, the ASP LERF models provide the NRC with the capability of performing equipment and event assessments to determine their impact on a plant's LERF for internal events during power operation. In addition, the ASP LERF models are capable of being updated to reflect changes in information regarding the system operations and phenomenological events, and of being updated to assess the potential for early fatalities for each LERF sequence. As the ASP Level 1 models evolve to include more analysis capabilities, the LERF models will also be refined to reflect the appropriate level of detail needed to demonstrate the new capabilities. An approach was formulated for the development of detailed LERF models using the NUREG-1150 APET models as a guide. The modifications to the SAPHIRE computer code have allowed the development of these detailed models and the ability to analyze these models in a reasonable time. Ten reference LERF plant models, including six PWR models and four BWR models, which cover a wide variety of containment and nuclear steam supply systems designs, will be complete in 1999. These reference models will be used as the starting point for developing the LERF models for the remaining nuclear power plants.

Brown, T.D.; Brownson, D.A.; Duran, F.A.; Gregory, J.J.; Rodrick, E.G.

1999-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

177

Comparison of high pressure transient PVT measurements and model predictions. Part I.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of experiments consisting of vessel-to-vessel transfers of pressurized gas using Transient PVT methodology have been conducted to provide a data set for optimizing heat transfer correlations in high pressure flow systems. In rapid expansions such as these, the heat transfer conditions are neither adiabatic nor isothermal. Compressible flow tools exist, such as NETFLOW that can accurately calculate the pressure and other dynamical mechanical properties of such a system as a function of time. However to properly evaluate the mass that has transferred as a function of time these computational tools rely on heat transfer correlations that must be confirmed experimentally. In this work new data sets using helium gas are used to evaluate the accuracy of these correlations for receiver vessel sizes ranging from 0.090 L to 13 L and initial supply pressures ranging from 2 MPa to 40 MPa. The comparisons show that the correlations developed in the 1980s from sparse data sets perform well for the supply vessels but are not accurate for the receivers, particularly at early time during the transfers. This report focuses on the experiments used to obtain high quality data sets that can be used to validate computational models. Part II of this report discusses how these data were used to gain insight into the physics of gas transfer and to improve vessel heat transfer correlations. Network flow modeling and CFD modeling is also discussed.

Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.; Winters, William Stanley, Jr.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

A Comparison of Forecast Error Generators for Modeling Wind and Load Uncertainty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents four algorithms to generate random forecast error time series. The performance of four algorithms is compared. The error time series are used to create real-time (RT), hour-ahead (HA), and day-ahead (DA) wind and load forecast time series that statistically match historically observed forecasting data sets used in power grid operation to study the net load balancing need in variable generation integration studies. The four algorithms are truncated-normal distribution models, state-space based Markov models, seasonal autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models, and a stochastic-optimization based approach. The comparison is made using historical DA load forecast and actual load values to generate new sets of DA forecasts with similar stoical forecast error characteristics (i.e., mean, standard deviation, autocorrelation, and cross-correlation). The results show that all methods generate satisfactory results. One method may preserve one or two required statistical characteristics better the other methods, but may not preserve other statistical characteristics as well compared with the other methods. Because the wind and load forecast error generators are used in wind integration studies to produce wind and load forecasts time series for stochastic planning processes, it is sometimes critical to use multiple methods to generate the error time series to obtain a statistically robust result. Therefore, this paper discusses and compares the capabilities of each algorithm to preserve the characteristics of the historical forecast data sets.

Lu, Ning; Diao, Ruisheng; Hafen, Ryan P.; Samaan, Nader A.; Makarov, Yuri V.

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

179

A FAST MODEL-BUILDING METHOD FOR TIME SERIES USING GENETIC PROGRAMMING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A FAST MODEL-BUILDING METHOD FOR TIME SERIES USING GENETIC PROGRAMMING I. Yoshihara Faculty) financial problems e.g. stock price indices and gold prices. The experiments lead us to the conclusion

Fernandez, Thomas

180

Mode Estimation of Model-based Programs: Monitoring Systems with Complex Behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- active programming constructs with probabilistic, constraint-based modeling, and that offers a sim- ple controllers, have simple behaviors. However, the above trajectory spends most of its time wend- ing its way

Williams, Brian C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Mode Estimation of Model-based Programs: Monitoring Systems with Complex Behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that combines reactive programming constructs with probabilistic, constraint-based modeling, and that offers wending its way through software functions. DS-1 is an instance of modern embedded systems whose

Williams, Brian C.

182

Testing Concurrent Programs on Relaxed Memory Models Jacob Burnim Koushik Sen Christos Stergiou  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Testing Concurrent Programs on Relaxed Memory Models Jacob Burnim Koushik Sen Christos Stergiou that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice

Sen, Koushik

183

Comparison of surface meteorological data representativeness for the Weldon Spring transport and dispersion modeling analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is conducting the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project under the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). The major goals of the SFMP are to eliminate potential hazards to the public and the environment that associated with contamination at SFMP sites and to make surplus property available for other uses to the extent possible. This report presents the results of analysis of available meteorological data from stations near the Weldon Spring site. Data that are most representative of site conditions are needed to accurately model the transport and dispersion of air pollutants associated with remedial activities. Such modeling will assist the development of mitigative measures. 17 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

Lazaro, M.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Comparison of Model Forecast Skill of Sea-Level Pressure Along the East and West Coasts of the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Comparison of Model Forecast Skill of Sea-Level Pressure Along the East and West Coasts, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington Submitted to: Weather and Forecasting May 2008 Revised recent advances in numerical weather prediction, major errors in short-range forecasts still occur

Mass, Clifford F.

185

A nested grid model of the Oregon Coastal Transition Zone: Simulations and comparisons with observations during the 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A nested grid model of the Oregon Coastal Transition Zone: Simulations and comparisons several hundred kilometers offshore where shelf flows interact with the northern California Current is realistic representation of coastal jet separation and eddy formation offshore of Cape Blanco. Three

Kurapov, Alexander

186

Comparison between Model Simulations and Measurements of Hyperspectral Far- infrared Radiation from FIRST during the RHUBC-II Campaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for its dry, cold, and dominantly clear atmosphere, which is optimal for studying the effects, that water vapor and cirrus clouds have on the far-IR. Comparisons with Line-By-Line Discrete Ordinants Radiative Transfer model, LBLDIS, show that FIRST...

Baugher, Elizabeth

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

187

Energy efficiency and the cost of GHG abatement: A comparison of bottom-up and hybrid models for the US  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy efficiency and the cost of GHG abatement: A comparison of bottom-up and hybrid models marginal cost, as well as a smaller contribution from energy efficiency relative to other abatement of energy efficiency potential and green- house gas (GHG) abatement potential that have been highly

188

Modeling Information Scent: A Comparison of LSA, PMI and GLSA Similarity Measures on Common Tests and Corpora  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Information Scent: A Comparison of LSA, PMI and GLSA Similarity Measures on Common Tests, & Royer, 2005). We compare all these techniques on a unique corpus (TASA) and, for PMI and GLSA, we also that for large corpora PMI works best on word sim- ilarity tests, and GLSA on synonymy tests. For the smaller

189

PySP: Modeling and Solving Stochastic Programs in Python  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sep 6, 2010 ... report, University of Oklahoma, School of Industrial Engineering, Norman, OK, 2005. S. Karabuk. Extending algebraic modeling languages to ...

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

190

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Executive Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Uses lessons learned from Better Buildings grantees, existing data, and private sector insights to highlight business models that can help develop a sustainable residential energy efficiency market.

191

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Introduction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Uses lessons learned from Better Buildings grantees, existing data, and private sector insights to highlight business models that can help develop a sustainable residential energy efficiency market.

192

Comparison of the PHISICS/RELAP5-3D Ring and Block Model Results for Phase I of the OECD MHTGR-350 Benchmark  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INL PHISICS code system consists of three modules providing improved core simulation capability: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. Coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been finalized, and as part of the code verification and validation program the exercises defined for Phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR 350 MW Benchmark were completed. This paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark, and presents selected results of the three steady state exercises 1-3 defined for Phase I. For Exercise 1, a stand-alone steady-state neutronics solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) was calculated with INSTANT, using the provided geometry, material descriptions, and detailed cross-section libraries. Exercise 2 required the modeling of a stand-alone thermal fluids solution. The RELAP5-3D results of four sub-cases are discussed, consisting of various combinations of coolant bypass flows and material thermophysical properties. Exercise 3 combined the first two exercises in a coupled neutronics and thermal fluids solution, and the coupled code suite PHISICS/RELAP5-3D was used to calculate the results of two sub-cases. The main focus of the paper is a comparison of the traditional RELAP5-3D “ring” model approach vs. a much more detailed model that include kinetics feedback on individual block level and thermal feedbacks on a triangular sub-mesh. The higher fidelity of the block model is illustrated with comparison results on the temperature, power density and flux distributions, and the typical under-predictions produced by the ring model approach are highlighted.

Gerhard Strydom

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Non-Utility  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: ScopeDepartment ofEnergyBeowawe7:forOFFICE 0Program

194

EnergyPlusDeST DOE-2.1E Building energy modeling programs comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4 EnergyPlus DeST 4 #12; 4 4.1 CAVVAV ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 EnergyPlus DeST #12; 1 IEA BESTest ASHRAE Standard 140[1] [2] 1 EnergyPlus, DeST, DOE-2, ESP, BLAST TRNSYS 1 ASHRAE RP865[1] 2ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140 [4] 3 IEA SHC BESTest / [5] EnergyPlus [6] [7

195

Automated verification of model-based programs under uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highly robust embedded systems have been enabled through software executives that have the ability to reason about their environment. Those that employ the model-based autonomy paradigm automatically diagnose and plan ...

Mahtab, Tazeen, 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Modeling a bender element test using Abaqus Finite Element Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finite Element Methods hold promise for modeling the behavior of an unsaturated soil specimen subjected to bender element agitation. The immediate objective of this research project is to reproduce a bender element test ...

Johnson, Sean (Sean Michael)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Modelling and solving the stable marriage problem using constraint programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manlove,D.F. O'Malley,G. Proceedings of the Fifth Workshop on Modelling and Solving Problems with Constraints, held at the 19th International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI 2005) pp 10-17

Manlove, D.F.

198

Non-Linear Factor Model for Asset Selection using Multi Objective Genetic Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and sensi- tivity to market movement. In [8], the interest rates, money growth, oil prices, and growth framework of the model. It was shown that the market exhibits evidence for nonlinear behaviour with effectsNon-Linear Factor Model for Asset Selection using Multi Objective Genetic Programming Ghada Hassan

Fernandez, Thomas

199

Microgrid Reliability Modeling and Battery Scheduling Using Stochastic Linear Programming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the introduction of stochastic linear programming into Operations DER-CAM, a tool used to obtain optimal operating schedules for a given microgrid under local economic and environmental conditions. This application follows previous work on optimal scheduling of a lithium-iron-phosphate battery given the output uncertainty of a 1 MW molten carbonate fuel cell. Both are in the Santa Rita Jail microgrid, located in Dublin, California. This fuel cell has proven unreliable, partially justifying the consideration of storage options. Several stochastic DER-CAM runs are executed to compare different scenarios to values obtained by a deterministic approach. Results indicate that using a stochastic approach provides a conservative yet more lucrative battery schedule. Lower expected energy bills result, given fuel cell outages, in potential savings exceeding 6percent.

Cardoso, Goncalo; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; DeForest, Nicholas; Barbosa-Povoa, Ana; Ferrao, Paulo

2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

200

Comparison between cylindrical model and experimental observation on the study of resistive wall mode in reversed field pinch plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cylindrical magnetohydrodynamic model including plasma pressure and longitudinal flow has been employed for the study of resistive wall mode (RWM) in reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas. In order to validate the model, a careful comparison with the experimental measurements in RFX-mod [P. Sonato et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 66-68, 161 (2003)] on the mode growth rates has been made by well matching the equilibrium parameters F, THETA, and beta{sub p}. The RWM instability spectrum, which varies with the equilibrium parameters, is also calculated for comparison. The sensitivity of the mode growth rate to the equilibrium parameters is studied in details. It is concluded that the model can provide consistent accuracy in studies of RWM in RFP plasmas. The analysis based on the balance of the potential energy components has been carried out in order to obtain the physical understanding on the mode behavior.

Wang, Z. R.; Guo, S. C.; Bolzonella, T.; Baruzzo, M. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione Euratom ENEA sulla Fusione, Corso Stati Uniti 4, Padova 35127 (Italy); Shi, L.; Wang, X. G. [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Final Report - From Measurements to Models: Cross-Comparison of Measured and Simulated Behavioral States of the Atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ARM sites and the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) were constructed to make measurements of the atmosphere and radiation system in order to quantify deficiencies in the simulation of clouds within models and to make improvements in those models. While the measurement infrastructure of ARM is well-developed and a model parameterization testbed capability has been established, additional effort is needed to develop statistical techniques which permit the comparison of simulation output from atmospheric models with actual measurements. Our project establishes a new methodology for objectively comparing ARM measurements to the outputs of leading global climate models and reanalysis data. The quantitative basis for this comparison is provided by a statistical procedure which establishes an exhaustive set of mutually-exclusive, recurring states of the atmosphere from sets of multivariate atmospheric and cloud conditions, and then classifies multivariate measurements or simulation outputs into those states. Whether measurements and models classify the atmosphere into the same states at specific locations through time provides an unequivocal comparison result. Times and locations in both geographic and state space of model-measurement agreement and disagreement will suggest directions for the collection of additional measurements at existing sites, provide insight into the global representativeness of the current ARM sites (suggesting locations and times for use of the AMF), and provide a basis for improvement of models. Two different analyses were conducted: One, using the Parallel Climate Model, focused on an IPCC climate change scenario and clusters that characterize long-term changes in the hydrologic cycle. The other, using the GISS Model E GCM and the ARM Active Remotely Sensed Cloud Layers product, explored current climate cloud regimes in the Tropical West Pacific.

Del Genio, Anthony D; Hoffman, Forrest M; Hargrove, Jr, William W

2007-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

202

Aspect-oriented Programming as Model Driven Evolution Mattia Monga  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] by Xerox PARC. As- pectJ aims at managing tangled concerns at the level of Java code. AspectJ allows concern considered orthogonal to the others. The augmentation is applied automatically to a code base the power of abstracting from the code base the model they pre- fer. Then, the augmentations described

Monga, Mattia

203

Performance Modeling of Shared Memory Programsof SharedMemory Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nus edu sg/~teoymURL: www.comp.nus.edu.sg/ teoym 7th Workshop on High Performance Computing UPM Analysis l i l d l­ Analytical Model · Summary 1 November 2011 47th Workshop on High Performance Computing November 2011 57th Workshop on High Performance Computing (invited talk) #12;R l t d W kRelated Work

Teo, Yong-Meng

204

Early Site Permit Demonstration Program, plant parameters envelopes: Comparison with ranges of values for four hypothetical sites. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this volume is to report the results of the comparison of the ALWR plan parameters envelope with values of site characteristics developed for our hypothetical sites that generally represent conditions encountered within the United States. This effort is not intended to identify or address the suitability of any existing site, site area, or region in the United States. Also included in this volume is Appendix F, SERCH Summaries Regarding Siting.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

2014 WIND POWER PROGRAM PEER REVIEW-ANALYSIS & MODELING  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment(October-December 2013 issue ofOfficeEnergyAnalysis and Modeling

206

Comparison and validation of HEU and LEU modeling results to HEU experimental benchmark data for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology MITR reactor.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like the MITR-II reactor. Towards this goal, comparisons of MCNP5 Monte Carlo neutronic modeling results for HEU and LEU cores have been performed. Validation of the model has been based upon comparison to HEU experimental benchmark data for the MITR-II. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a model which could represent the experimental HEU data, and therefore could provide a basis to demonstrate LEU core performance. This report presents an overview of MITR-II model geometry and material definitions which have been verified, and updated as required during the course of validation to represent the specifications of the MITR-II reactor. Results of calculations are presented for comparisons to historical HEU start-up data from 1975-1976, and to other experimental benchmark data available for the MITR-II Reactor through 2009. This report also presents results of steady state neutronic analysis of an all-fresh LEU fueled core. Where possible, HEU and LEU calculations were performed for conditions equivalent to HEU experiments, which serves as a starting point for safety analyses for conversion of MITR-II from the use of HEU fuel to the use of UMo LEU fuel.

Newton, T. H.; Wilson, E. H; Bergeron, A.; Horelik, N.; Stevens, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (MIT Nuclear Reactor Lab.)

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

207

Towards an Abstraction-Friendly Programming Model for High Productivity and High Performance Computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

General purpose languages, such as C++, permit the construction of various high level abstractions to hide redundant, low level details and accelerate programming productivity. Example abstractions include functions, data structures, classes, templates and so on. However, the use of abstractions significantly impedes static code analyses and optimizations, including parallelization, applied to the abstractions complex implementations. As a result, there is a common perception that performance is inversely proportional to the level of abstraction. On the other hand, programming large scale, possibly heterogeneous high-performance computing systems is notoriously difficult and programmers are less likely to abandon the help from high level abstractions when solving real-world, complex problems. Therefore, the need for programming models balancing both programming productivity and execution performance has reached a new level of criticality. We are exploring a novel abstraction-friendly programming model in order to support high productivity and high performance computing. We believe that standard or domain-specific semantics associated with high level abstractions can be exploited to aid compiler analyses and optimizations, thus helping achieving high performance without losing high productivity. We encode representative abstractions and their useful semantics into an abstraction specification file. In the meantime, an accessible, source-to-source compiler infrastructure (the ROSE compiler) is used to facilitate recognizing high level abstractions and utilizing their semantics for more optimization opportunities. Our initial work has shown that recognizing abstractions and knowing their semantics within a compiler can dramatically extend the applicability of existing optimizations, including automatic parallelization. Moreover, a new set of optimizations have become possible within an abstraction-friendly and semantics-aware programming model. In the future, we will apply our programming model to more large scale applications. In particular, we plan to classify and formalize more high level abstractions and semantics which are relevant to high performance computing. We will also investigate better ways to allow language designers, library developers and programmers to communicate abstraction and semantics information with each other.

Liao, C; Quinlan, D; Panas, T

2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

208

Comparison of MAGIC and Diatom paleolimnological model hindcasts of lakewater acidification in the Adirondack region of New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thirty-three lakes that had been statistically selected as part of the US Environmental Protection Agency's Eastern Lake Survey and Direct Delayed Response Project (DDRP) were used to compare the MAGIC (watershed) and Diatom (paleolimnological) models. The study lakes represented a well-defined group of Adirondack lakes, each larger than 4 ha in area and having acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) <400 {mu}eq L{sup {minus}1}. The study first compared current and pre-industrial (before 1850) pH and ANC estimates from Diatom and MAGIC as they were calibrated in the preceding Paleocological Investigation of Recent Lake Acidification (PIRLA) and DDRP studies, respectively. Initially, the comparison of hindcasts of pre-industrial chemistry was confounded by seasonal and methodological differences in lake chemistry data used in calibration of the model. Although certain differences proved to be of little significance for comparison, MAGIC did predict significantly higher pre-industrial ANC and pH values than did Diatom, using calibrations in the preceding studies. Both models suggest acidification of low ANC Adirondack region lakes since preindustrial times, but differ primarily in that MAGIC inferred greater acidification and that acidification has occurred in all lakes in the comparison, whereas Diatom inferred that acidification has been restricted to low ANC lakes (

Sullivan, T.J.; Bernert, J.A.; Eliers, J.M. (E and S Environmental Chemistry, Corvallis, OR (USA)); Jenne, E.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Cosby, B.J. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA). School of Forestry and Environmental Studies); Charles, D.F.; Selle, A.R. (Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (USA). Environmental Research Lab.)

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Bringing Automated Model Checking to PLC Program Development - A CERN Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Verification of critical software is a high priority but a challenging task for industrial control systems. Model checking appears to be an appropriate approach for this purpose. However, this technique is not widely used in industry yet, due to some obstacles. The main obstacles encountered when trying to apply formal verification techniques at industrial installations are the difficulty of creating models out of PLC programs and defining formally the specification requirements. In addition, models produced out of real-life programs have a huge state space, thus preventing the verification due to performance issues. Our work at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) focuses on developing efficient automatic verification methods for industrial critical installations based on PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) control systems. In this paper, we present a tool generating automatically formal models out of PLC code. The tool implements a general methodology which can support several input languages, ...

Fernandez Adiego, B; Tournier, J-C; Blanco Vinuela, E; Gonzalez Suarez, V M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Automatic Calibration of a Building Energy Simulation Model Using a Global Optimization Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AUTOMATIC CALIBRATION OF A BUILDING ENERGY SIMULATION MODEL USING A GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION PROGRAM Seung Uk Lee Research Associate Texas A&M University Energy Systems Laboratory College Station, TX David E. Claridge, Ph.D., P....E. Professor Texas A&M University Energy Systems Laboratory College Station, TX ABSTRACT A simulation model used to analyze the energy performance of an existing building should be calibrated to measured consumption data from...

Lee, S. U.; Claridge, D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

An exploration of the stages of change model in a group treatment program for male batterers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to investigate the adequacy of the Stages of Change model in a group therapy treatment program for male batterers. The sample consisted of three groups with a total sample size of 22 participants. Data for this study...

Wells, Robert Davis

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

212

Modelling of offshore wind turbine wakes with the wind farm program FLaP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling of offshore wind turbine wakes with the wind farm program FLaP Bernhard Lange(1) , Hans been extended to improve the description of wake development in offshore conditions, especially the low from the Danish offshore wind farm Vindeby. Vertical wake profiles and mean turbulence intensities

Heinemann, Detlev

213

1 MWt bench model solar receiver test program J. Gintz, D. Bartlett and R. Zentner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a scale model of a Brayton cycle solar electric plant receiver. The program span from initiation of design and transients; and demonstrations of solar load following. Design thermal efficiency predictions were achieved in high temperature, gas cooled, solar central receiver concepts under direction of the Electric Power

Boyer, Edmond

214

Studying the Causes of Recent Climate Change Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Studying the Causes of Recent Climate Change Ben Santer Program for Climate Model Diagnosis of evidence suggests a discernible human influence on global climate" "There is new and stronger evidence that most of the warming observed over the last 50 years is attributable to human activities" "Most

Kammen, Daniel M.

215

WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) influences the market for plumbing fixtures and fittings by encouraging consumers to purchase products that carry the WaterSense label, which certifies those products as performing at low flow rates compared to unlabeled fixtures and fittings. As consumers decide to purchase water-efficient products, water consumption will decline nationwide. Decreased water consumption should prolong the operating life of water and wastewater treatment facilities.This report describes the method used to calculate national water savings attributable to EPA?s WaterSense program. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet model, the National Water Savings (NWS) analysis model, accompanies this methodology report. Version 1.0 of the NWS model evaluates indoor residential water consumption. Two additional documents, a Users? Guide to the spreadsheet model and an Impacts Report, accompany the NWS model and this methodology document. Altogether, these four documents represent Phase One of this project. The Users? Guide leads policy makers through the spreadsheet options available for projecting the water savings that result from various policy scenarios. The Impacts Report shows national water savings that will result from differing degrees of market saturation of high-efficiency water-using products.This detailed methodology report describes the NWS analysis model, which examines the effects of WaterSense by tracking the shipments of products that WaterSense has designated as water-efficient. The model estimates market penetration of products that carry the WaterSense label. Market penetration is calculated for both existing and new construction. The NWS model estimates savings based on an accounting analysis of water-using products and of building stock. Estimates of future national water savings will help policy makers further direct the focus of WaterSense and calculate stakeholder impacts from the program.Calculating the total gallons of water the WaterSense program saves nationwide involves integrating two components, or modules, of the NWS model. Module 1 calculates the baseline national water consumption of typical fixtures, fittings, and appliances prior to the program (as described in Section 2.0 of this report). Module 2 develops trends in efficiency for water-using products both in the business-as-usual case and as a result of the program (Section 3.0). The NWS model combines the two modules to calculate total gallons saved by the WaterSense program (Section 4.0). Figure 1 illustrates the modules and the process involved in modeling for the NWS model analysis.The output of the NWS model provides the base case for each end use, as well as a prediction of total residential indoor water consumption during the next two decades. Based on the calculations described in Section 4.0, we can project a timeline of water savings attributable to the WaterSense program. The savings increase each year as the program results in the installation of greater numbers of efficient products, which come to compose more and more of the product stock in households throughout the United States.

Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; McNeil, Michael; Dunham_Whitehead, Camilla; Letschert, Virginie; della_Cava, Mirka

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

216

Expand the Modeling Capabilities of DOE's EnergyPlus Building Energy Simulation Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EnergyPlus{trademark} is a new generation computer software analysis tool that has been developed, tested, and commercialized to support DOE's Building Technologies (BT) Program in terms of whole-building, component, and systems R&D (http://www.energyplus.gov). It is also being used to support evaluation and decision making of zero energy building (ZEB) energy efficiency and supply technologies during new building design and existing building retrofits. Version 1.0 of EnergyPlus was released in April 2001, followed by semiannual updated versions over the ensuing seven-year period. This report summarizes work performed by the University of Central Florida's Florida Solar Energy Center (UCF/FSEC) to expand the modeling capabilities of EnergyPlus. The project tasks involved implementing, testing, and documenting the following new features or enhancement of existing features: (1) A model for packaged terminal heat pumps; (2) A model for gas engine-driven heat pumps with waste heat recovery; (3) Proper modeling of window screens; (4) Integrating and streamlining EnergyPlus air flow modeling capabilities; (5) Comfort-based controls for cooling and heating systems; and (6) An improved model for microturbine power generation with heat recovery. UCF/FSEC located existing mathematical models or generated new model for these features and incorporated them into EnergyPlus. The existing or new models were (re)written using Fortran 90/95 programming language and were integrated within EnergyPlus in accordance with the EnergyPlus Programming Standard and Module Developer's Guide. Each model/feature was thoroughly tested and identified errors were repaired. Upon completion of each model implementation, the existing EnergyPlus documentation (e.g., Input Output Reference and Engineering Document) was updated with information describing the new or enhanced feature. Reference data sets were generated for several of the features to aid program users in selecting proper model inputs. An example input data file, suitable for distribution to EnergyPlus users, was created for each new or improved feature to illustrate the input requirements for the model.

Don Shirey

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

217

Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Task 23: Phase IV Results Regarding Floating Wind Turbine Modeling; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, which operates under Subtask 2 of the International Energy Agency Wind Task 23. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating spar buoy in 320 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants' codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

Jonkman, J.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Nygaard, T.; Maus, K.; Karimirad, M.; Gao, Z.; Moan, T.; Fylling, I.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Introduction Comparison With Matlab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Comparison With Matlab Advantages Extensions with Pyrex Communication Numerical Computing in Python A Guide for Matlab Users B. Blais Department of Science and Technology Bryant University Comparison With Matlab Advantages Extensions with Pyrex Communication Abstract Matlab is a commercial program

Blais, Brian

219

Modeling geologic storage of carbon dioxide: Comparison of non-hysteretic chracteristic curves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the emissions of a 1,000 MW coal fired power plant for 30Emissions Research and Technology) and GEO-SEQ programs, through the Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Office of Coal and Power

Doughty, Christine

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Modeling geologic storage of carbon dioxide: Comparison of non-hysteretic and hysteretic characteristic curves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the emissions of a 1,000 MW coal fired power plant for 30Emissions Research and Technology) and GEO-SEQ programs, through the Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Office of Coal and Power

Doughty, Christine

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Contractor/Retailer Business Models  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Business models information focused on remodelers, HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) contractors, home performance contractors, or retailers.

222

Cross-comparison of spacecraft-environment interaction model predictions applied to Solar Probe Plus near perihelion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five spacecraft-plasma models are used to simulate the interaction of a simplified geometry Solar Probe Plus (SPP) satellite with the space environment under representative solar wind conditions near perihelion. By considering similarities and differences between results obtained with different numerical approaches under well defined conditions, the consistency and validity of our models can be assessed. The impact on model predictions of physical effects of importance in the SPP mission is also considered by comparing results obtained with and without these effects. Simulation results are presented and compared with increasing levels of complexity in the physics of interaction between solar environment and the SPP spacecraft. The comparisons focus particularly on spacecraft floating potentials, contributions to the currents collected and emitted by the spacecraft, and on the potential and density spatial profiles near the satellite. The physical effects considered include spacecraft charging, photoelectron and secondary electron emission, and the presence of a background magnetic field. Model predictions obtained with our different computational approaches are found to be in agreement within 2% when the same physical processes are taken into account and treated similarly. The comparisons thus indicate that, with the correct description of important physical effects, our simulation models should have the required skill to predict details of satellite-plasma interaction physics under relevant conditions, with a good level of confidence. Our models concur in predicting a negative floating potential V{sub fl}??10V for SPP at perihelion. They also predict a “saturated emission regime” whereby most emitted photo- and secondary electron will be reflected by a potential barrier near the surface, back to the spacecraft where they will be recollected.

Marchand, R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada); Miyake, Y.; Usui, H. [Graduate School of System Informatics, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Deca, J.; Lapenta, G. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Mathematics Department, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Matéo-Vélez, J. C. [Department of Space Environment, Onera—The French Aerospace Lab, Toulouse (France); Ergun, R. E.; Sturner, A. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Génot, V. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie, Université de Toulouse, France and CNRS, IRAP, 9 Av. colonel Roche, BP 44346, 31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Hilgers, A. [ESA, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, PO Box 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Markidis, S. [High Performance Computing and Visualization Department, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Comparison of Strong Gravitational Lens Model Software II. HydraLens: Computer-Assisted Strong Gravitational Lens Model Generation and Translation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The behavior of strong gravitational lens model software in the analysis of lens models is not necessarily consistent among the various software available, suggesting that the use of several models may enhance the understanding of the system being studied. Among the publicly available codes, the model input files are heterogeneous, making the creation of multiple models tedious. An enhanced method of creating model files and a method to easily create multiple models, may increase the number of comparison studies. HydraLens simplifies the creation of model files for four strong gravitational lens model software packages, including Lenstool, Gravlens/Lensmodel, glafic and PixeLens, using a custom designed GUI for each of the four codes that simplifies the entry of the model for each of these codes, obviating the need for user manuals to set the values of the many flags and in each data field. HydraLens is designed in a modular fashion, which simplifies the addition of other strong gravitational lens codes in th...

Lefor, Alsn T

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Evaluation and Comparison of Ecological Models Simulating Nitrogen Processes in Treatment Wetlands,Implemented in Modelica.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Two ecological models of nitrogen processes in treatment wetlands have been evaluated and compared. These models have been implemented, simulated, and visualized in the… (more)

Edelfeldt, Stina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Sporting Good Manufacturing Company: Optimal Manufacturing and Shipping Cost Through Linear Programming Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 15: Example Transshipment Model.............................................................................. 18 vi List of Principal Symbols and Nomenclature SGMC Sporting Good Manufacturing Company LP Linear Programming CEO Chief... Executive Officer COO Chief Operation Officer PKR Pakistani Rupees EMGT Engineering Management O.F. Objective Function A i No. of bats manufactured in factory i; where i = k, l BB i No. of Stumps manufactured in factory i; where i = k, l C i No...

Malik, Ejaz

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

An experimental comparison of current viscoplastic constitutive models at elevated temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the model has been used to predict the response of Hastelloy X at room temperature [891. A method for the determination of the material constants for the anisotropic form has been reported [90]. Material constants for several other mater1als have also... method for evaluating the constants and has modelled Hastelloy X at several temperatures [72]. Transient temperature modelling has been attempted with Hastelloy X [72]. Miller's Model. Miller first proposed his microphenomenologically based model...

James, George Henry

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Comparison of Simulation Methods for Evaluating Improved Fenestration Using the DOE-2.1E Building Energy Simulation Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- performance glazing technology pushed researchers at LBNL to develop new and more sophisticated algorithms for fenestration simulation software (Arasteh et al. 1998). Research by Rubin (1982a, 1982b) and later Arasteh et al. (1989) played a key role... performance of fenestration systems under realistic conditions and compared the results with those obtained from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories (LBNL) simulation models (Klems 1989; Klems et al. 1995). DOE-2.1e gives several options...

Mukhopadhyay, J.; Haberl, J. S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

A model for including Arduino microcontroller programming in the introductory physics lab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper describes a curricular framework for introducing microcontroller programming in the University Physics lab. The approach makes use of Modeling Instruction, an effective approach for teaching science at the secondary level in which student learn the standard material by developing and deploying models of the physical world. In our approach, students engage with a context-rich problem that can be solved with one or more sensors and a microcontroller. The solution path we describe then consists of developing a mathematical model for how the sensors' data can be mapped to a meaningful measurement, and further, developing an algorithmic model that will be implemented in the microcontroller. Once the system is developed and implemented, students are given an array of similar problems in which they can deploy their data collection system. Results from the implementation of this idea, in two University Physics sections, using Arduino microcontrollers, are also described.

Haugen, Andrew J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Incorporating daily flood control objectives into a monthly stochastic dynamic programming model for a hydroelectric complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A monthly stochastic dynamic programing model was recently developed and implemented at British Columbia (B.C.) Hydro to provide decision support for short-term energy exports and, if necessary, for flood control on the Peace River in northern British Columbia. The model established the marginal cost of supplying energy from the B.C. Hydro system, as well as a monthly operating policy for the G.M. Shrum and Peace Canyon hydroelectric plants and the Williston Lake storage reservoir. A simulation model capable of following the operating policy then determines the probability of refilling Williston Lake and possible spill rates and volumes. Reservoir inflows are input to both models in daily and monthly formats. The results indicate that flood control can be accommodated without sacrificing significant export revenue.

Druce, D.J. (British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Second Level Cluster Dependencies: A Comparison of Modeling Software and Missing Data Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@ 1 C A = 0 B @ G 0 0 R 1 C A . (1.9) 1. The Independence Model In the scenario where all the teachers? measurements are independent of each other and across the years, and thus there is no second level dependency (SLD....12). 2. The Correlated Cluster Model Moving from the independence model assumption to the correlated cluster model, in which the teacher?s measurements may be dependent across the years, requires the SLD to be modeled in some way. A common modeling...

Larsen, Ross Allen Andrew

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

231

Comparison of Real World Energy Consumption to Models and DOE Test Procedures  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codestheat TwoDepartment ofComparison of

232

E-Print Network 3.0 - analyze model programs Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering 3 2010 ARRA SUMMER RESEARCH EXPERIENCE Joann Gruber Summary: in MATLAB. Overall, I adapted four programs in SAS and five programs in MATLAB. The programs in...

233

Comparison of the Accuracy and Speed of Transient Mobile A/C System Simulation Models: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operation of air conditioning (A/C) systems is a significant contributor to the total amount of fuel used by light- and heavy-duty vehicles. Therefore, continued improvement of the efficiency of these mobile A/C systems is important. Numerical simulation has been used to reduce the system development time and to improve the electronic controls, but numerical models that include highly detailed physics run slower than desired for carrying out vehicle-focused drive cycle-based system optimization. Therefore, faster models are needed even if some accuracy is sacrificed. In this study, a validated model with highly detailed physics, the 'Fully-Detailed' model, and two models with different levels of simplification, the 'Quasi-Transient' and the 'Mapped- Component' models, are compared. The Quasi-Transient model applies some simplifications compared to the Fully-Detailed model to allow faster model execution speeds. The Mapped-Component model is similar to the Quasi-Transient model except instead of detailed flow and heat transfer calculations in the heat exchangers, it uses lookup tables created with the Quasi-Transient model. All three models are set up to represent the same physical A/C system and the same electronic controls. Speed and results of the three model versions are compared for steady state and transient operation. Steady state simulated data are also compared to measured data. The results show that the Quasi-Transient and Mapped-Component models ran much faster than the Fully-Detailed model, on the order of 10- and 100-fold, respectively. They also adequately approach the results of the Fully-Detailed model for steady-state operation, and for drive cycle-based efficiency predictions

Kiss, T.; Lustbader, J.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Optimisation and comparison of integrated models of direct-drive linear machines for wave energy conversion   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined electrical and structural models of five types of permanent magnet linear electrical machines suitable for direct-drive power take-off on wave energy applications are presented. Electromagnetic models were ...

Crozier, Richard Carson

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

235

A comparison of Bayesian versus deterministic formulation for dynamic data integration into reservoir models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Into Reservoir Models. (Decmnber 200 I) Danny LL Rojas Paico, B. S. , Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Peru Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Akhil Datta-Gupta The integration of dynamic data into reservoir models is known as automatic history matching...

Rojas Paico, Danny H.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Waste package performance assessment: Deterministic system model, program scope and specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated assessments of the performance of nuclear waste package designs must be made in order to qualify waste package designs with respect to containment time and release-rate requirements. PANDORA is a computer-based model of the waste package and of the processes affecting it over the long terms, specific to conditions at the proposed Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site. The processes PANDORA models include: changes in inventories due to radioactive decay, gamma radiation dose rate in and near the package, heat transfer, mechanical behavior, groundwater contact, corrosion, waste form alteration, and radionuclide release. The model tracks the development and coupling of these processes over time. The process models are simplified ones that focus on major effects and on coupling. This report documents our conceptual model development and provides a specification for the computer program. The current model is the first in a series. Succeeding models will use guidance from results of preceding models in the PANDORA series and will incorporate results of recently completed experiments and calculations on processes affecting performance. 22 refs., 21 figs., 9 tabs.

O`Connell, W.J.; Drach, R.S.

1986-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

237

A comparison of radiological risk assessment models: Risk assessment models used by the BEIR V Committee, UNSCEAR, ICRP, and EPA (for NESHAP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiological risk assessments and resulting risk estimates have been developed by numerous national and international organizations, including the National Research Council`s fifth Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations (BEIR V), the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). A fourth organization, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), has also performed a risk assessment as a basis for the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP). This paper compares the EPA`s model of risk assessment with the models used by the BEIR V Committee, UNSCEAR, and ICRP. Comparison is made of the values chosen by each organization for several model parameters: populations used in studies and population transfer coefficients, dose-response curves and dose-rate effects, risk projection methods, and risk estimates. This comparison suggests that the EPA has based its risk assessment on outdated information and that the organization should consider adopting the method used by the BEIR V Committee, UNSCEAR, or ICRP.

Wahl, L.E.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Comparison of NO and OH planar fluorescence temperature measurements in scramjet model flowfields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of nitric oxide (NO) and the hydroxyl radical (OH) as temperature tracers, in a two-line planar laser-induced fluorescence technique, is examined in the context of a supersonic mixing and combustion flowfield. The temperature measurements were based on the sequential excitation of two transitions, either in the A implied by X (0,0) band of NO near 226 nm or the A implied by X (1,0) band of OH near 283 nm. The measurements were obtained for each species through the use of two lasers and two cameras, with each camera integrating signal induced from only one of the lasers. Both temporally resolved and frame-averaged temperature measurements of each species are presented. Additional results include simultaneous NO and OH visualizations, in which seeded NO marks the fuel jet fluid and nascent OH marks the reaction zones and convected combustion gases. A detailed temperature comparison shows good agreement in the common measurement regions and indicates that shot noise is the largest source of uncertainty. The comparison also illustrates the importance of a careful interpretation of the measurements, since, depending on the origin of the tracer and the degree of mixing, the measurements may be biased toward the fuel, freestream, or reaction zone temperatures. 33 refs.

Mcmillin, B.K.; Seitzman, J.M.; Hanson, R.K. [Natl. Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Results and Comparison from the SAM Linear Fresnel Technology Performance Model: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the new Linear Fresnel technology performance model in NREL's System Advisor Model. The model predicts the financial and technical performance of direct-steam-generation Linear Fresnel power plants, and can be used to analyze a range of system configurations. This paper presents a brief discussion of the model formulation and motivation, and provides extensive discussion of the model performance and financial results. The Linear Fresnel technology is also compared to other concentrating solar power technologies in both qualitative and quantitative measures. The Linear Fresnel model - developed in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute - provides users with the ability to model a variety of solar field layouts, fossil backup configurations, thermal receiver designs, and steam generation conditions. This flexibility aims to encompass current market solutions for the DSG Linear Fresnel technology, which is seeing increasing exposure in fossil plant augmentation and stand-alone power generation applications.

Wagner, M. J.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Programming and Scheduling Model for Supporting Heterogeneous Accelerators in Tobias Beisel and Tobias Wiersema and Christian Plessl and Andr Brinkmann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Programming and Scheduling Model for Supporting Heterogeneous Accelerators in Linux Tobias Beisel of such heterogeneous systems is still a subject of research. While many efforts address the programming of accelerators, scheduling heterogeneous systems, i. e., mapping parts of an application to accelerators at runtime, is still

Hellebrand, Sybille

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Comparison between a spectral and PDF model for turbulent reacting flows.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study compares the performance of a probability density function (PDF) model and a spectral model (known as the eddy damped quasi-normal Markovian or EDQNM model) for the case of two initially unmixed reactants undergoing a finite-rate bimolecular reaction. The two models were chosen because they involve complimentary treatments of the nonlinearities and mixing terms. That is, nonlinearities are exactly treated in the PDF and mixing is modeled, whereas the opposite is true for EDQNM. The predictions of the two models are compared to direct numerical simulations. The results show that the PDF model is capable of describing the mixing of the major species reasonably well, but fails to describe the correlations between the reactants and the products even qualitatively. This suggests that the mixing model in the PDF is adequate for describing mixing between major species, but is incapable of describing mixing of the more spatially segregated product species. The EDQNM model does a slightly better job of describing the mixing of reactant species and a much better job of describing mixing of the product species. Presumably the improvement is associated with the more accurate description of the interscale dynamics that are especially important for the segregated products. The implication is that a model that combines the strengths of the EDQNM for describing mixing and the PDF for describing the nonlinearities would yield the best of both worlds.

Vaithianathan, T. (Thiranavakkarasu); Collins, L. R. (Lance R.); Ulitsky, M. S. (Mark S.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Using Linear Genetic Programming to Develop a C/C++ Simulation Model of a Waste Incinerator. Larry M Deschaine PE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Linear Genetic Programming to Develop a C/C++ Simulation Model of a Waste Incinerator. Larry incinerator accurately. Human expert written simulation models are used worldwide in a variety of industrial waste incinerator. This process is a difficult problem to model. Previously, in a well-conducted study

Fernandez, Thomas

243

Exploiting Processor Groups to Extend Scalability of the GA Shared Memory Programming Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exploiting processor groups is becoming increasingly important for programming next-generation high-end systems composed of tens or hundreds of thousands of processors. This paper discusses the requirements, functionality and development of multilevel-parallelism based on processor groups in the context of the Global Array (GA) shared memory programming model. The main effort involves management of shared data, rather than interprocessor communication. Experimental results for the NAS NPB Conjugate Gradient benchmark and a molecular dynamics (MD) application are presented for a Linux cluster with Myrinet and illustrate the value of the proposed approach for improving scalability. While the original GA version of the CG benchmark lagged MPI, the processor-group version outperforms MPI in all cases, except for a few points on the smallest problem size. Similarly, the group version of the MD application improves execution time by 58% on 32 processors.

Nieplocha, Jarek; Krishnan, Manoj Kumar; Palmer, Bruce J.; Tipparaju, Vinod; Zhang, Yeliang

2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

244

Model for incorporating fuel swelling and clad shrinkage effects in diffusion theory calculations (LWBR Development Program)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model has been devised for incorporating into the thermal feedback procedure of the PDQ few-group diffusion theory computer program the explicit calculation of depletion and temperature dependent fuel-rod shrinkage and swelling at each mesh point. The model determines the effect on reactivity of the change in hydrogen concentration caused by the variation in coolant channel area as the rods contract and expand. The calculation of fuel temperature, and hence of Doppler-broadened cross sections, is improved by correcting the heat transfer coefficient of the fuel-clad gap for the effects of clad creep, fuel densification and swelling, and release of fission-product gases into the gap. An approximate calculation of clad stress is also included in the model.

Schick, W.C. Jr.; Milani, S.; Duncombe, E.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

A Comparison of Simulated Cloud Radar Output from the Multiscale Modeling Framework Global Climate Model with CloudSat Cloud Radar Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last few years a new type of global climate model (GCM) has emerged in which a cloud-resolving model is embedded into each grid cell of a GCM. This new approach is frequently called a multiscale modeling framework (MMF) or superparameterization. In this article we present a comparison of MMF output with radar observations from the NASA CloudSat mission, which uses a near-nadir-pointing millimeter-wavelength radar to probe the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. We account for radar detection limits by simulating the 94 GHz radar reflectivity that CloudSat would observe from the high-resolution cloud-resolving model output produced by the MMF. Overall, the MMF does a good job of reproducing the broad pattern of tropical convergence zones, subtropical belts, and midlatitude storm tracks, as well as their changes in position with the annual solar cycle. Nonetheless, the comparison also reveals a number of model shortfalls including (1) excessive hydrometeor coverage at all altitudes over many convectively active regions, (2) a lack of low-level hydrometeors over all subtropical oceanic basins, (3) excessive low-level hydrometeor coverage (principally precipitating hydrometeors) in the midlatitude storm tracks of both hemispheres during the summer season (in each hemisphere), and (4) a thin band of low-level hydrometeors in the Southern Hemisphere of the central (and at times eastern and western) Pacific in the MMF, which is not observed by CloudSat. This band resembles a second much weaker ITCZ but is restricted to low levels.

Marchand, Roger T.; Haynes, J. M.; Mace, Gerald G.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Stephens, Graeme L.

2009-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

246

Comparisons of Statistical Multifragmentation and Evaporation Models for Heavy Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The results from ten statistical multifragmentation models have been compared with each other using selected experimental observables. Even though details in any single observable may differ, the general trends among models are similar. Thus these models and similar ones are very good in providing important physics insights especially for general properties of the primary fragments and the multifragmentation process. Mean values and ratios of observables are also less sensitive to individual differences in the models. In addition to multifragmentation models, we have compared results from five commonly used evaporation codes. The fluctuations in isotope yield ratios are found to be a good indicator to evaluate the sequential decay implementation in the code. The systems and the observables studied here can be used as benchmarks for the development of statistical multifragmentation models and evaporation codes.

Tsang, M B; Charity, R; Durand, D; Friedman, W A; Gulminelli, F; Lefèvre, A; Raduta, A H; Raduta, A R; Souza, S; Trautmann, W; Wada, R; Raduta, Ad.R.; Raduta, Al. H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Comparison of Accelerated Testing with Modeling to Predict Lifetime of CPV Solder Layers (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) cell assemblies can fail due to thermomechanical fatigue in the die-attach layer. In this presentation, we show the latest results from our computational model of thermomechanical fatigue. The model is used to estimate the relative lifetime of cell assemblies exposed to various temperature histories consistent with service and with accelerated testing. We also present early results from thermal cycling experiments designed to help validate the computational model.

Silverman, T. J.; Bosco, N.; Kurtz, S.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Determining Wind Turbine Gearbox Model Complexity Using Measurement Validation and Cost Comparison: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) has conducted extensive field and dynamometer test campaigns on two heavily instrumented wind turbine gearboxes. In this paper, data from the planetary stage is used to evaluate the accuracy and computation time of numerical models of the gearbox. First, planet-bearing load and motion data is analyzed to characterize planetary stage behavior in different environments and to derive requirements for gearbox models and life calculations. Second, a set of models are constructed that represent different levels of fidelity. Simulations of the test conditions are compared to the test data and the computational cost of the models are compared. The test data suggests that the planet-bearing life calculations should be made separately for each bearing on a row due to unequal load distribution. It also shows that tilting of the gear axes is related to planet load share. The modeling study concluded that fully flexible models were needed to predict planet-bearing loading in some cases, although less complex models were able to achieve good correlation in the field-loading case. Significant differences in planet load share were found in simulation and were dependent on the scope of the model and the bearing stiffness model used.

LaCava, W.; Xing, Y.; Guo, Y.; Moan, T.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Comparison of Idealized and Real-World City Station Citing Models for Hydrogen Distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

focus is on modeling of hydrogen production and distributionconvenience of hydrogen production, delivery and refuelinga hydrogen depot (i.e. hydrogen production facility or city-

Yang, Christopher; Nicholas, Michael A; Ogden, Joan M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal model comparison Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

as animation... test for this model. Mayer and Moreno (2002) describe seven animation design principles that support... Article Molecular and Cellular Biology Animations:...

251

Development of preference models for regular dissemination of informational and educational programming through cable television systems of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT OF PREFERENCE MODELS FOR REGULAR DISSEMINATION OF INFORMATIONAL AND EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING THROUGH CABLE TELEVISION SYSTEMS OF TEXAS A Thesis by LARRY ARNOLD QUINN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August l973 Major Subject: Educational Administration (Public Relations) DEVELOPMENT OF PREFERENCE MODELS FOR REGULAR DISSEMINATION OF INFORMATIONAL AND EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING...

Quinn, Larry Arnold

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Comparison of Aermod and ISCST3 Models for Particulate Emissions from Ground Level Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

......................................................................................................................... 95 x LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 1. Schematic of the Flocchini box model.............................................................. 7 Figure 2. Layout of test plots... in Table 1. EFs developed using the two modeling methods were found not to be statistically different for all the four species at the 95% confidence level. No difference was observed even in the standard deviation values of the EFs developed using...

Botlaguduru, Venkata Sai V.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

253

Comparison of one-, two-, and three-dimensional models for mass transport of radionuclides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical memorandum compares one-, two-, and three-dimensional models for studying regional mass transport of radionuclides in groundwater associated with deep repository disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. In addition, this report outlines the general conditions for which a one- or two-dimensional model could be used as an alternate to a three-dimensional model analysis. The investigation includes a review of analytical and numerical models in addition to consideration of such conditions as rock and fluid heterogeneity, anisotropy, boundary and initial conditions, and various geometric shapes of repository sources and sinks. Based upon current hydrologic practice, each review is taken separately and discussed to the extent that the researcher can match his problem conditions with the minimum number of model dimensions necessary for an accurate solution.

Prickett, T.A.; Voorhees, M.L.; Herzog, B.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

A Comparative SWOT Analysis of the National Agricultural Extension Program Organization to Determine Best-Fit Program Model: A Case Study of the North West and South West Regions of Cameroon.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A COMPARATIVE SWOT ANALYSIS OF THE NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION PROGRAM ORGANIZATION TO DETERMINE BEST-FIT PROGRAM MODEL: A CASE STUDY OF THE NORTH WEST AND SOUTH WEST REGIONS OF CAMEROON A Dissertation by GWENDOLINE NA-AH NYAMBI... A Comparative SWOT Analysis of the National Agricultural Extension Program Organization to Determine Best-Fit Program Model: A Case Study of the North West and South West Regions of Cameroon Copyright 2012 Gwendoline Na-ah Nyambi A COMPARATIVE...

Nyambi, Gwendoline

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

255

MT3D: a 3 dimensional magnetotelluric modeling program (user's guide and documentation for Rev. 1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MT3D.REV1 is a non-interactive computer program written in FORTRAN to do 3-dimensional magnetotelluric modeling. A 3-D volume integral equation has been adapted to simulate the MT response of a 3D body in the earth. An integro-difference scheme has been incorporated to increase the accuracy. This is a user's guide for MT3D.REV1 on the University of Utah Research Institute's (UURI) PRIME 400 computer operating under PRIMOS IV, Rev. 17.

Nutter, C.; Wannamaker, P.E.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

A Review of Ground Coupled Heat Pump Models Used in Whole-Building Computer Simulation Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system simulation module. The DOE-2.2 is the simulation engine of eQUEST. The eQUEST/DOE- 2.2 program uses an enhanced g-function algorithm, which was proposed by Eskilson (1987) at Lund University, Sweden, for fast calculation of the borehole wall... & Renewable Energy: http://apps1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/energyplus/ Eskilson, P. 1987. Thermal analysis of heat extraction boreholes. Lund, Sweden: Doctoral thesis, University of Lund, Dept. of Mathmatics. Fisher, D., & Rees, S. 2005. Modeling ground...

Do, S. L.; Haberl, J. S.

257

Comparison of a semi-analytic and a CFD model uranium combustion to experimental data.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two numerical models were developed and compared for the analysis of uranium combustion and ignition in a furnace. Both a semi-analytical solution and a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical solution were obtained. Prediction of uranium oxidation rates is important for fuel storage applications, fuel processing, and the development of spent fuel metal waste forms. The semi-analytical model was based on heat transfer correlations, a semi-analytical model of flow over a flat surface, and simple radiative heat transfer from the material surface. The CFD model numerically determined the flowfield over the object of interest, calculated the heat and mass transfer to the material of interest, and calculated the radiative heat exchange of the material with the furnace. The semi-analytical model is much less detailed than the CFD model, but yields reasonable results and assists in understanding the physical process. Short computation times allowed the analyst to study numerous scenarios. The CFD model had significantly longer run times, was found to have some physical limitations that were not easily modified, but was better able to yield details of the heat and mass transfer and flow field once code limitations were overcome.

Clarksean, R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A comparison of current work-hardening models used in the analysis of plastic deformations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stress-strain curve, 6061-T6 aluminum. 91 15 Uniaxial reversed loading of 6061-T6 aluminum, isotropic hardening 92 16 Uniaxial reversed loading of 6061-T6 aluminum, kinematic hardening 93 17 Uniaxial reversed loading of 6061-T6 aluminum, mechanical... sublayer model (4 sublayers) 94 viii LIST OF FIGURES (Continued) FIGURE PAGE 18 Uniaxial reversed loading of 6061-T6 aluminum, mechanical sublayer model (2 sublayers) 95 19 Uniaxial reversed loading of 6061-T6 aluminum, Mroz model (4 work hardening...

Vaughn, David Kenneth

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Validation and Comparison of Carbon Sequestration Project Cost Models with Project Cost Data Obtained from the Southwest Partnership  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Obtaining formal quotes and engineering conceptual designs for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration sites and facilities is costly and time-consuming. Frequently, when looking at potential locations, managers, engineers and scientists are confronted with multiple options, but do not have the expertise or the information required to quickly obtain a general estimate of what the costs will be without employing an engineering firm. Several models for carbon compression, transport and/or injection have been published that are designed to aid in determining the cost of sequestration projects. A number of these models are used in this study, including models by J. Ogden, MIT's Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies Program Model, the Environmental Protection Agency and others. This report uses the information and data available from several projects either completed, in progress, or conceptualized by the Southwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) to determine the best approach to estimate a project's cost. The data presented highlights calculated versus actual costs. This data is compared to the results obtained by applying several models for each of the individual projects with actual cost. It also offers methods to systematically apply the models to future projects of a similar scale. Last, the cost risks associated with a project of this scope are discussed, along with ways that have been and could be used to mitigate these risks.

Robert Lee; Reid Grigg; Brian McPherson

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

A Comparison of the Dynamic Wake Meandering Model, Large-Eddy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wake Meandering Model, Large-Eddy Simulation, and Field Data at the Egmond aan Zee Offshore Wind Plant Preprint M.J. Churchfield and P.J. Moriarty National Renewable Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A Comparison of Reduced-Form Permit Price Models and their Empirical Performances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Equilibrium models have been proposed in literature with the aim of describing the evolution of the price of emission permits. This paper derives _rst estimation methods for the calibration of three competing equilibrium ...

Taschini, Luca

262

The Importance of Model Selection on Housing Price Indexes: Comparisons of Temporal Aggregation and Sample Selectivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DC, OFHEO, 1997. Quigley, John M. , “A Simple Hybrid Model419-438. Englund, Peter, John M. Quigley, and Christian L.University Sweden John M. Quigley University of California

Englund, Peter; Quigley, John M.; Redfearn, Christian L.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Comparison of Single, Double, and Triple Linear Flow Models for Shale Gas/Oil Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reservoirs effectively. Verification and derivation of asymptotic and associated equations from the Laplace space for dual porosity and triple porosity models are performed in order to generate analysis equations. Theories and practical applications...

Tivayanonda, Vartit

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

264

Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (NUREG-0711)Revision 3: Update Methodology and Key Revisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the human factors engineering (HFE) programs of applicants for nuclear power plant construction permits, operating licenses, standard design certifications, and combined operating licenses. The purpose of these safety reviews is to help ensure that personnel performance and reliability are appropriately supported. Detailed design review procedures and guidance for the evaluations is provided in three key documents: the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800), the HFE Program Review Model (NUREG-0711), and the Human-System Interface Design Review Guidelines (NUREG-0700). These documents were last revised in 2007, 2004 and 2002, respectively. The NRC is committed to the periodic update and improvement of the guidance to ensure that it remains a state-of-the-art design evaluation tool. To this end, the NRC is updating its guidance to stay current with recent research on human performance, advances in HFE methods and tools, and new technology being employed in plant and control room design. NUREG-0711 is the first document to be addressed. We present the methodology used to update NUREG-0711 and summarize the main changes made. Finally, we discuss the current status of the update program and the future plans.

OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.; Fleger, S.

2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

265

Nonlinear Modeling of the Dynamic Effects of Infused Insulin on Glucose: Comparison of Compartmental With Volterra Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents the results of a computational study that compares simulated compartmental (differential equation) and Volterra models of the dynamic effects of insulin on blood glucose concentration in humans. In the ...

Markakis, Michail

266

A comparison of two heat transfer models for estimating thermal drawdown in Hot Dry Rock reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimates of thermal drawdown in Hot Dry Rock geothermal systems have been made with two different models of heat transfer from hydraulically fractured reservoir rock blocks to water circulated through the fracture permeability. One model is based on deconvolution of experimental tracer response curves into a network of flowpaths connected in parallel with heat transfer calculated individually in each flowpath. The second model is based on one-dimensional flow through the rock with a block size distribution described as a group of equivalent-radius spheres for which the heat transfer equations can be solved analytically. The two models were applied to the planned Phase II long-term thermal drawdown experiment at Fenton Hill, NM. The results show good agreement between the two models, with estimates of temperature cooldown from 240ºC to 150ºC in a few years depending on selected operation parameters, but with somewhat differing cooldown curve characteristic shapes. Data from the long-term experiment will be helpful in improving the two models.

Robinson, Bruce A.; Kruger, Paul

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Comparison of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous CFD Fuel Models for Phase I of the IAEA CRP on HTR Uncertainties Benchmark  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) evaluation of homogeneous and heterogeneous fuel models was performed as part of the Phase I calculations of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinate Research Program (CRP) on High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Uncertainties in Modeling (UAM). This study was focused on the nominal localized stand-alone fuel thermal response, as defined in Ex. I-3 and I-4 of the HTR UAM. The aim of the stand-alone thermal unit-cell simulation is to isolate the effect of material and boundary input uncertainties on a very simplified problem, before propagation of these uncertainties are performed in subsequent coupled neutronics/thermal fluids phases on the benchmark. In many of the previous studies for high temperature gas cooled reactors, the volume-averaged homogeneous mixture model of a single fuel compact has been applied. In the homogeneous model, the Tristructural Isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles in the fuel compact were not modeled directly and an effective thermal conductivity was employed for the thermo-physical properties of the fuel compact. On the contrary, in the heterogeneous model, the uranium carbide (UCO), inner and outer pyrolytic carbon (IPyC/OPyC) and silicon carbide (SiC) layers of the TRISO fuel particles are explicitly modeled. The fuel compact is modeled as a heterogeneous mixture of TRISO fuel kernels embedded in H-451 matrix graphite. In this study, a steady-state and transient CFD simulations were performed with both homogeneous and heterogeneous models to compare the thermal characteristics. The nominal values of the input parameters are used for this CFD analysis. In a future study, the effects of input uncertainties in the material properties and boundary parameters will be investigated and reported.

Gerhard Strydom; Su-Jong Yoon

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Comparison of Test Procedures and Energy Efficiency Criteria in Selected International Standards & Labeling Programs for Copy Machines, External Power Supplies, LED Displays, Residential Gas Cooktops and Televisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012. “Overview and Test Procedures – AS/NZ 4665 ExternalComparison of Test Procedures and Energy Efficiency CriteriaProcedures

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

407 herdsa2005 Approaches to learning in computer programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emphasise presage factors. Biggs' 3P general model of student learning, by comparison, measures attitudinal measure, deep and surface approaches to learning (Biggs R-SPQ-2F questionnaire), to explain the success programming Introduction Biggs (1978) describes a three stage model of learning: presage, process and product

Robins, Anthony

270

A Statistical Model and Computer program for Preliminary Calculations Related to the Scaling of Sensor Arrays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advances in sensor technology and engineering have made it possible to assemble many related sensors in a common array, often of small physical size. Sensor arrays may report an entire vector of measured values in each data collection cycle, typically one value per sensor per sampling time. The larger quantities of data provided by larger arrays certainly contain more information, however in some cases experience suggests that dramatic increases in array size do not always lead to corresponding improvements in the practical value of the data. The work leading to this report was motivated by the need to develop computational planning tools to approximate the relative effectiveness of arrays of different size (or scale) in a wide variety of contexts. The basis of the work is a statistical model of a generic sensor array. It includes features representing measurement error, both common to all sensors and independent from sensor to sensor, and the stochastic relationships between the quantities to be measured by the sensors. The model can be used to assess the effectiveness of hypothetical arrays in classifying objects or events from two classes. A computer program is presented for evaluating the misclassification rates which can be expected when arrays are calibrated using a given number of training samples, or the number of training samples required to attain a given level of classification accuracy. The program is also available via email from the first author for a limited time.

Max Morris

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

A comparison of current models for nonlinear rate-dependent material behavior of crystalline solids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a ss 69 83 Fig. 16 Experimental constant strain rate tensile test response. 89 Fig. 17 Experimental creep test response. . . 91 Fig. 18 Graph of in(c ) v. in~a-a) for Krieg's i l model 93 Fig. 19 Graph of Y v. a for Bodner 's model. ~ . 97... as second order tensor s, they may be tensors of' other rank as well C13]. The method of Coleman and Noll L1 0] may be used to obtain the spatial and time distribution of the body force f. and the heat supply r from the conservation of linear 1...

Beek, Joachim Michael

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A Comparison of High-Level Full-System Power Models Suzanne Rivoire  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proposed in the context of enabling specific energy-efficiency optimizations on specific machines compare these models over a wide variation of workloads and machines, from a laptop to a server, two classes of systems that are increasingly prevalent. 1 Introduction In order to maximize energy

Rivoire, Suzanne

273

Predicting fault damage zones by modeling dynamic rupture propagation and comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

faults observed in the SSC reservoir. The modeling of ruptures propagating as self-sustaining pulses, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA, 2 Now at Upstream Technology, BP America, Houston, Texas University, Houston, California, USA, 4 ConocoPhillips Technology and Projects, Houston, Texas, USA Abstract

Dunham, Eric M.

274

Comparison of Implementations of a Flexible Joint Multibody Dynamics System Model for an Industrial Robot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, different implementations of elastic joint models of industrial robots are described and com Industrial robots are widely used in various fields of applica- tion. However, when it comes to tasks where than industrial robots. Industrial robots, on the other hand, have a high work space and are very

Stryk, Oskar von

275

14 STEP DETACHMENT MODELING DIAGNOSTICS USING EXPERIMENTAL DATA TO CONSTRAIN THE PLASMA SOLUTION COMPARISON WITH DTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

density entering each flux tube is calculated from the standard 2 Point Model relation, q = 2 T /7L, where recombination neglected. 12. Momentum loss term, S , also rectangular in shape, extends from S to the target. Target temperature was assigned by a search process: with the foregoing prescription, and assuming some

Stangeby, P. C.

276

Titan's ionosphere: Model comparisons with Cassini Ta data T. E. Cravens,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and measured electron densities along the spacecraft track. Ionization both by solar radiation and by incoming technique [Bird et al., 1997]. Many models of Titan's ionosphere have been constructed over the past decade below the exobase [Waite et al., 2005]. The solar zenith angle (SZA) and latitude at CA were 91

California at Berkeley, University of

277

EMPIRICAL MODELS FOR DARK MATTER HALOS. I. NONPARAMETRIC CONSTRUCTION OF DENSITY PROFILES AND COMPARISON WITH PARAMETRIC MODELS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

random ve- locity, the end state of such systems departed from a simple power law, resembling instead. 1988). Dubinski & Carlberg (1991) adopted Hernquist's (1990) double- power-law model (itself Terzic´ Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115 Received 2006 May 11

Terzi, BalÂ?a

278

World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3): Multi-Model Dataset Archive at PCMDI (Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

In response to a proposed activity of the WCRP's Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM),PCMDI volunteered to collect model output contributed by leading modeling centers around the world. Climate model output from simulations of the past, present and future climate was collected by PCMDI mostly during the years 2005 and 2006, and this archived data constitutes phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3). In part, the WGCM organized this activity to enable those outside the major modeling centers to perform research of relevance to climate scientists preparing the Fourth Asssessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The IPCC was established by the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environmental Program to assess scientific information on climate change. The IPCC publishes reports that summarize the state of the science. This unprecedented collection of recent model output is officially known as the WCRP CMIP3 multi-model dataset. It is meant to serve IPCC's Working Group 1, which focuses on the physical climate system - atmosphere, land surface, ocean and sea ice - and the choice of variables archived at the PCMDI reflects this focus. A more comprehensive set of output for a given model may be available from the modeling center that produced it. As of November 2007, over 35 terabytes of data were in the archive and over 303 terabytes of data had been downloaded among the more than 1200 registered users. Over 250 journal articles, based at least in part on the dataset, have been published or have been accepted for peer-reviewed publication. Countries from which models have been gathered include Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany and Korea, Italy, Japan, Norway, Russia, Great Britain and the United States. Models, variables, and documentation are collected and stored. Check http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/data_status_tables.htm to see at a glance the output that is available. (Description taken from http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/about_ipcc.php)

279

aerosol code comparisons: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

program. The first step of such a program is the comparison of different cosmology codes including gravitation interactions only. In this paper we extend a recently carried...

280

Composites Science and Technology, Vol. 64, no. 7-8, pp. 1011-1020 (2004) Comparison of Two Models of SWCN Polymer Composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

developed to predict the macroscopic behavior of composite materials reinforced with typical carbon fibers composite materials has attracted significant attention since their discovery more than a decade ago [1, 2Composites Science and Technology, Vol. 64, no. 7-8, pp. 1011-1020 (2004) Comparison of Two Models

Odegard, Gregory M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Comparison of the EXAFS Spectra of Heteronuclear MnCa/Sr Model Complexes to the Oxygen-Evolving Mn(4)Ca Complex of Photosystem II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heterometallic Mn-Ca and Mn-Sr complexes have been prepared and employed as model complexes for Ca and Sr EXAFS spectral comparisons with the Oxygen-Evolving Complex (OEC) of Photosystem II (PS II); these have revealed similarities that support the presence of at least one O atom bridge between the Mn and Ca/Sr in the OEC.

Mishra, A.; Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Abboud, K.A.; Yachandra, V.K.; Christou, G.

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

282

Comparison of four models simulating phosphorus dynamics in LakeVnern,Sweden Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 11531163 (2004) EGU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of four models simulating phosphorus dynamics in LakeVänern,Sweden 1153 Hydrology dynamics in Lake Vänern, Sweden Magnus Dahl1 and B. Charlotta Pers2 1 Department of Chemical Engineering, Karlstad University, SE651 88 Karlstad, Sweden 2 Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, SE601

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

283

COMPARISON OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION Bernhard Lange(1), Jrgen Hjstrup(2), Sren Larsen(2), Rebecca Barthelmie(2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large offshore wind farms are being built in several countries in Europe. The economic viabilityCOMPARISON OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION Bernhard Lange(1 of such projects depends on the favourable wind conditions of offshore sites, since the higher energy yield has

Heinemann, Detlev

284

Comparison of Jupiter Interior Models Derived from First-Principles Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently two groups used first-principles computer simulations to model Jupiter's interior. While both studies relied on the same simulation technique, density functional molecular dynamics, the groups derived very different conclusions. In particular estimates for the size of Jupiter's core and the metallicity of its hydrogen-helium mantle differed substantially. In this paper, we discuss the differences of the approaches and give an explanation for the differing conclusions.

B. Militzer; W. B. Hubbard

2008-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

285

The response of strati?ed swirling ?ames to acoustic forcing: experiments and comparison to model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems from a positive coupling between pressure perturbations and the heat release rate oscillation [1], and have posed significant challenges to the development of advanced gas turbine engines [1–3]. The drive towards lean operation leaves combustion... . Lieuwen, V. Yang, Combustion instabilities in gas turbine en- gines: operational experience, fundamental mechanisms and modeling, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2005. [2] Y. Huang, V. Yang, Progress in Energy and Combustion Science 35...

Han, Zhiyi; Hochgreb, Simone

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

286

Dynamic soil-structure interaction-comparison of FEM model with experimental results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of Results. . . . . . . Consistency of Results. 38 53 V FREQUENCY ANALYSIS. 54 Frequency Content of Base Excitation and Response. . . Eigen-Analysis of the FEM Results. Results From Using a Kgher Stiffness. , . . . 54 . 66 . 68 VI.... . . 29 3. 2 Table of Models and their Properties. . . 4. 1 Recommended Values of Young's Modulus (E) in N/m2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. 1 Dominant and Average Frequencies in Hertz for Each of the Parts of Each 45 of the Time...

Srinivasan, Palanivel Rajan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Comparison of Two Gas Selection Methodologies: An Application of Bayesian Model Averaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One goal of hyperspectral imagery analysis is the detection and characterization of plumes. Characterization includes identifying the gases in the plumes, which is a model selection problem. Two gas selection methods compared in this report are Bayesian model averaging (BMA) and minimum Akaike information criterion (AIC) stepwise regression (SR). Simulated spectral data from a three-layer radiance transfer model were used to compare the two methods. Test gases were chosen to span the types of spectra observed, which exhibit peaks ranging from broad to sharp. The size and complexity of the search libraries were varied. Background materials were chosen to either replicate a remote area of eastern Washington or feature many common background materials. For many cases, BMA and SR performed the detection task comparably in terms of the receiver operating characteristic curves. For some gases, BMA performed better than SR when the size and complexity of the search library increased. This is encouraging because we expect improved BMA performance upon incorporation of prior information on background materials and gases.

Renholds, Andrea S.; Thompson, Sandra E.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Chilton, Lawrence K.

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Gasoline surrogate modeling of gasoline ignition in a rapid compression machine and comparison to experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of gasoline in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines (HCCI) and in duel fuel diesel - gasoline engines, has increased the need to understand its compression ignition processes under engine-like conditions. These processes need to be studied under well-controlled conditions in order to quantify low temperature heat release and to provide fundamental validation data for chemical kinetic models. With this in mind, an experimental campaign has been undertaken in a rapid compression machine (RCM) to measure the ignition of gasoline mixtures over a wide range of compression temperatures and for different compression pressures. By measuring the pressure history during ignition, information on the first stage ignition (when observed) and second stage ignition are captured along with information on the phasing of the heat release. Heat release processes during ignition are important because gasoline is known to exhibit low temperature heat release, intermediate temperature heat release and high temperature heat release. In an HCCI engine, the occurrence of low-temperature and intermediate-temperature heat release can be exploited to obtain higher load operation and has become a topic of much interest for engine researchers. Consequently, it is important to understand these processes under well-controlled conditions. A four-component gasoline surrogate model (including n-heptane, iso-octane, toluene, and 2-pentene) has been developed to simulate real gasolines. An appropriate surrogate mixture of the four components has been developed to simulate the specific gasoline used in the RCM experiments. This chemical kinetic surrogate model was then used to simulate the RCM experimental results for real gasoline. The experimental and modeling results covered ultra-lean to stoichiometric mixtures, compressed temperatures of 640-950 K, and compression pressures of 20 and 40 bar. The agreement between the experiments and model is encouraging in terms of first-stage (when observed) and second-stage ignition delay times and of heat release rate. The experimental and computational results are used to gain insight into low and intermediate temperature processes during gasoline ignition.

Mehl, M; Kukkadapu, G; Kumar, K; Sarathy, S M; Pitz, W J; Sung, S J

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Essential and model programs for teaching and learning centers as reported by directors in selected research extensive universities: a Delphi study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research extensive universities? (2) What are model faculty development programs for teaching and learning centers as reported by directors in selected research extensive universities? (3) What programs will be essential for faculty development...

Pchenitchnaia, Larissa V.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

A comparison of two lung clearance models based on the dissolution rates of oxidized depleted uranium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Cuddihy. Predictions fr'om bai. h models based on the dissolution rates of the amount of oxidized depleted uranium that wau'ld be cleared to blood irom the pu lraana ry region i'o'i)owing an i nba !at i cn exposure were compared . It was f:urd ti... to oxidized depleted uranium (DU) aerosol. The ob, ject. ive of th. is i:hesis was three fold: (1) to determine the dissolution rates for two respirable DU samples, (2) to determine the specific pulmonary clearance characteristics of oxidized DU, (3) Co...

Crist, Kevin Craig

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

A direct comparison of X-ray spectral models for tori in active galactic nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several X-ray spectral models for tori in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are available to constrain the properties of tori; however, the accuracy of these models has not been verified. We recently construct a code for the torus using Geant4, which can easily handle different geometries (Liu & Li 2014). Thus, we adopt the same assumptions as Murphy & Yaqoob (2009, hereafter MY09) and Brightman & Nandra (2011, hereafter BN11) and try to reproduce their spectra. As a result, we can reproduce well the reflection spectra and the strength of the Fe K$\\alpha$ line of MY09, for both $\\NH=10^{24}$ and $10^{25}$ cm$^{-2}$. However, we cannot produce the strong reflection component of BN11 in the low-energy band. The origin of this component is the reflection from the visible inner wall of the torus, and it should be very weak in the edge-on directions under the geometry of BN11. Therefore, the behaviour of the reflection spectra in BN11 is not consistent with their geometry. The strength of the Fe K$\\alpha$ ...

Liu, Yuan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Modeling geologic storage of carbon dioxide: Comparison ofnon-hysteretic chracteristic curves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TOUGH2 models of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in brine-bearing formations use characteristic curves to represent the interactions of non-wetting-phase CO2 and wetting-phase brine. When a problem includes both injection of CO2 (a drainage process) and its subsequent post-injection evolution (a combination of drainage and wetting), hysteretic characteristic curves are required to correctly capture the behavior of the CO2 plume. In the hysteretic formulation, capillary pressure and relative permeability depend not only on the current grid-block saturation, but also on the history of the saturation in the grid block. For a problem that involves only drainage or only wetting, a nonhysteretic formulation, in which capillary pressure and relative permeability depend only on the current value of the grid-block saturation, is adequate. For the hysteretic formulation to be robust computationally, care must be taken to ensure the differentiability of the characteristic curves both within and beyond the turning-point saturations where transitions between branches of the curves occur. Two example problems involving geologic CO2 storage are simulated using non-hysteretic and hysteretic models, to illustrate the applicability and limitations of non-hysteretic methods: the first considers leakage of CO2 from the storage formation to the ground surface, while the second examines the role of heterogeneity within the storage formation.

Doughty, Christine

2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

293

Cosmic Reionization and the 21-cm signal: Comparison between an analytical model and a simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measure several properties of the reionization process and the corresponding low-frequency 21-cm signal associated with the neutral hydrogen distribution, using a large volume, high resolution simulation of cosmic reionization. The brightness temperature of the 21-cm signal is derived by post-processing this numerical simulation with a semi-analytical prescription. Our study extends to high redshifts (z ~ 25) where, in addition to collisional coupling, our post-processed simulations take into account the inhomogeneities in the heating of the neutral gas by X-rays and the effect of an inhomogeneous Lya radiation field. Unlike the well-studied case where spin temperature is assumed to be significantly greater than the temperature of the cosmic microwave background due to uniform heating of the gas by X-rays, spatial fluctuations in both the Lya radiation field and X-ray intensity impact predictions related to the brightness temperature at z > 10, during the early stages of reionization and gas heating. The statistics of the 21-cm signal from our simulation are then compared to existing analytical models in the literature and we find that these analytical models provide a reasonably accurate description of the 21-cm power spectrum at z 10 and, with upcoming interferometric data, these differences in return can provide a way to better understand the astrophysical processes during reionization.

Mario G. Santos; Alexandre Amblard; Jonathan Pritchard; Hy Trac; Renyue Cen; Asantha Cooray

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

294

Status of the INL high-temperature electrolysis research program –experimental and modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides a status update on the high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) research and development program at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), with an overview of recent large-scale system modeling results and the status of the experimental program. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an advanced nuclear reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of reactor coolant outlet temperatures. In terms of experimental research, the INL has recently completed an Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) HTE test at the 15 kW level. The initial hydrogen production rate for the ILS test was in excess of 5000 liters per hour. Details of the ILS design and operation will be presented. Current small-scale experimental research is focused on improving the degradation characteristics of the electrolysis cells and stacks. Small-scale testing ranges from single cells to multiple-cell stacks. The INL is currently in the process of testing several state-of-the-art anode-supported cells and is working to broaden its relationship with industry in order to improve the long-term performance of the cells.

J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; K. G. Condie; G. K. Housley; J. S. Herring; J. J. Hartvigsen

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Tritium transport in the NuMI decay pipe region - modeling and comparison with experimental data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NuMI (Neutrinos at Main Injector) beam facility at Fermilab is designed to produce an intense beam of muon neutrinos to be sent to the MINOS underground experiment in Soudan, Minnesota. Neutrinos are created by the decay of heavier particles. In the case of NuMI, the decaying particles are created by interaction of high-energy protons in a target, creating mostly positive pions. These particles can also interact with their environment, resulting in production of a variety of short-lived radionuclides and tritium. In the NuMI beam, neutrinos are produced by 120 GeV protons from the Fermilab Main Injector accelerator which are injected into the NuMI beam line using single turn extraction. The beam line has been designed for 400 kW beam power, roughly a factor of 2 above the initial (2005-06) running conditions. Extracted protons are bent downwards at a 57mr angle towards the Soudan Laboratory. The meson production target is a 94 cm segmented graphite rod, cooled by water in stainless tubes on the top and bottom of the target. The target is followed by two magnetic horns which are pulsed to 200 kA in synchronization with the passage of the beam, producing focusing of the secondary hadron beam and its daughter neutrinos. Downstream of the second horn the meson beam is transported for 675 m in an evacuated 2 m diameter beam (''decay'') pipe. Subsequently, the residual mesons and protons are absorbed in a water cooled aluminum/steel absorber immediately downstream of the decay pipe. Some 200 m of rock further downstream ranges out all of the residual muons. During beam operations, after installation of the chiller condensate system in December 2005, the concentration of tritiated water in the MINOS sump flow of 177 gpm was around 12 pCi/ml, for a total of 0.010 pCi/day. A simple model of tritium transport and deposition via humidity has been constructed to aid in understanding how tritium reaches the sump water. The model deals with tritium transported as HTO, water in which one hydrogen atom has been replaced with tritium. Based on concepts supported by the modeling, a dehumidification system was installed during May 2006 that reduced the tritium level in the sump by a factor of two. This note is primarily concerned with tritium that was produced in the NuMI target pile, carried by air flow into the target hall and down the decay pipe passageway (where most of it was deposited). The air is exhausted through the existing air vent shaft EAV2 (Figure 1).

Hylen, J.; Plunkett, R.; /Fermilab

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Sensitivity of climate models: Comparison of simulated and observed patterns for past climates. Progress report, February 1, 1992--January 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Predicting the potential climatic effects of increased concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide requires the continuing development of climate models. Confidence in the predictions will be much enhanced once the models are thoroughly tested in terms of their ability to simulate climates that differ significantly from today`s climate. As one index of the magnitude of past climate change, the global mean temperature increase during the past 18,000 years is similar to that predicted for carbon dioxide--doubling. Simulating the climatic changes of the past 18,000 years, as well as the warmer-than-present climate of 6000 years ago and the climate of the last interglacial, around 126,000 years ago, provides an excellent opportunity to test the models that are being used in global climate change research. During the past several years, we have used paleoclimatic data to test the accuracy of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Community Climate Model, Version 0, after changing its boundary conditions to those appropriate for past climates. We have assembled regional and near-global paleoclimatic data sets of pollen, lake level, and marine plankton data and calibrated many of the data in terms of climatic variables. We have also developed methods that permit direct quantitative comparisons between the data and model results. Our research has shown that comparing the model results with the data is an evolutionary process, because the models, the data, and the methods for comparison are continually being improved. During 1992, we have completed new modeling experiments, further analyzed previous model experiments, compiled new paleodata, made new comparisons between data and model results, and participated in workshops on paleoclimatic modeling.

Prell, W.L.; Webb, T. III

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTS TO CFD MODELS FOR MIXING USING DUAL OPPOSING JETS IN TANKS WITH AND WITHOUT INTERNAL OBSTRUCTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper documents testing methods, statistical data analysis, and a comparison of experimental results to CFD models for blending of fluids, which were blended using a single pump designed with dual opposing nozzles in an eight foot diameter tank. Overall, this research presents new findings in the field of mixing research. Specifically, blending processes were clearly shown to have random, chaotic effects, where possible causal factors such as turbulence, pump fluctuations, and eddies required future evaluation. CFD models were shown to provide reasonable estimates for the average blending times, but large variations -- or scatter -- occurred for blending times during similar tests. Using this experimental blending time data, the chaotic nature of blending was demonstrated and the variability of blending times with respect to average blending times were shown to increase with system complexity. Prior to this research, the variation in blending times caused discrepancies between CFD models and experiments. This research addressed this discrepancy, and determined statistical correction factors that can be applied to CFD models, and thereby quantified techniques to permit the application of CFD models to complex systems, such as blending. These blending time correction factors for CFD models are comparable to safety factors used in structural design, and compensate variability that cannot be theoretically calculated. To determine these correction factors, research was performed to investigate blending, using a pump with dual opposing jets which re-circulate fluids in the tank to promote blending when fluids are added to the tank. In all, eighty-five tests were performed both in a tank without internal obstructions and a tank with vertical obstructions similar to a tube bank in a heat exchanger. These obstructions provided scale models of vertical cooling coils below the liquid surface for a full scale, liquid radioactive waste storage tank. Also, different jet diameters and different horizontal orientations of the jets were investigated with respect to blending. Two types of blending tests were performed. The first set of eighty-one tests blended small quantities of tracer fluids into solution. Data from these tests were statistically evaluated to determine blending times for the addition of tracer solution to tanks, and blending times were successfully compared to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models. The second set of four tests blended bulk quantities of solutions of different density and viscosity. For example, in one test a quarter tank of water was added to a three quarters of a tank of a more viscous salt solution. In this case, the blending process was noted to significantly change due to stratification of fluids, and blending times increased substantially. However, CFD models for stratification and the variability of blending times for different density fluids was not pursued, and further research is recommended in the area of blending bulk quantities of fluids. All in all, testing showed that CFD models can be effectively applied if statistically validated through experimental testing, but in the absence of experimental validation CFD model scan be extremely misleading as a basis for design and operation decisions.

Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Fowley, M.

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

298

Validation of the SEPHIS Program for the Modeling of the HM Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SEPHIS computer program is currently being used to evaluate the effect of all process variables on the criticality safety of the HM 1st Uranium Cycle process in H Canyon. The objective of its use has three main purposes. (1) To provide a better technical basis for those process variables that do not have any realistic effect on the criticality safety of the process. (2) To qualitatively study those conditions that have been previously recognized to affect the nuclear safety of the process or additional conditions that modeling has indicated may pose a criticality safety issue. (3) To judge the adequacy of existing or future neutron monitors locations in the detection of the initial stages of reflux for specific scenarios.Although SEPHIS generally over-predicts the distribution of uranium to the organic phase, it is a capable simulation tool as long as the user recognizes its biases and takes special care when using the program for scenarios where the prediction bias is non-conservative. The temperature coefficient used by SEPHIS is poor at predicting effect of temperature on uranium extraction for the 7.5 percent TBP used in the HM process. Therefore, SEPHIS should not be used to study temperature related scenarios. However, within normal operating temperatures when other process variables are being studied, it may be used. Care must be is given to understanding the prediction bias and its effect on any conclusion for the particular scenario that is under consideration. Uranium extraction with aluminum nitrate is over-predicted worse than for nitric acid systems. However, the extraction section of the 1A bank has sufficient excess capability that these errors, while relatively large, still allow SEPHIS to be used to develop reasonable qualitative assessments for reflux scenarios. However, high losses to the 1AW stream cannot be modeled by SEPHIS.

Kyser, E.A.

1998-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

299

Comparison of the Legacy and Gold SnIa Dataset Constraints on Dark Energy Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have performed a comparative analysis of three recent and reliable SnIa datasets available in the literature: the Full Gold (FG) dataset (157 data points $0dataset (140 data points $0dataset (115 data points $0datasets are consistent with each other at the 95% confidence level, the latest (SNLS) dataset shows distinct trends which are not shared by the Gold datasets. We find that the best fit dynamical $w(z)$ obtained from the SNLS dataset does not cross the PDL $w=-1$ and remains above and close to the $w=-1$ line for the whole redshift range $0datasets (FG and TG) clearly crosses the PDL and departs significantly from the PDL $w=-1$ line while the LCDM parameter values are about $2\\sigma$ away from the best fit $w(z)$. In addition, the $(\\Omega_{0m},\\Omega_\\Lambda)$ parameters in a LCDM parametrization without a flat prior, fit by the SNLS dataset, favor the minimal flat LCDM concordance model. The corresponding fit with the Gold datasets mildly favors a closed universe and the flat LCDM parameter values are $1\\sigma - 2\\sigma$ away from the best fit $(\\Omega_{0m},\\Omega_\\Lambda)$.

S. Nesseris; L. Perivolaropoulos

2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

300

Comparison of Two Foreign Body Retrieval Devices with Adjustable Loops in a Swine Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the study was to compare two similar foreign body retrieval devices, the Texan{sup TM} (TX) and the Texan LONGhorn{sup TM} (TX-LG), in a swine model. Both devices feature a {<=}30-mm adjustable loop. Capture times and total procedure times for retrieving foreign bodies from the infrarenal aorta, inferior vena cava, and stomach were compared. All attempts with both devices (TX, n = 15; TX-LG, n = 14) were successful. Foreign bodies in the vasculature were captured quickly using both devices (mean {+-} SD, 88 {+-} 106 sec for TX vs 67 {+-} 42 sec for TX-LG) with no significant difference between them. The TX-LG, however, allowed significantly better capture times than the TX in the stomach (p = 0.022), Overall, capture times for the TX-LG were significantly better than for the TX (p = 0.029). There was no significant difference between the total procedure times in any anatomic region. TX-LG performed significantly better than the TX in the stomach and therefore overall. The better torque control and maneuverability of TX-LG resulted in better performance in large anatomic spaces.

Konya, Andras [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Section of Interventional Radiology, Division of Diagnostic Imaging (United States)], E-mail: akonya@mdanderson.org

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

Computational tool for comparison of kinematic mechanisms and commonly used kinematic models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate, reliable, and reproducible methods to measure the movements of human joints have been elusive. Currently, three-dimensional recording methods are used to track the motion of one segment relative to another as the joint moves. Six parameters describe the moving segment`s location and orientation relative to the reference segment: three translations (x, y, and z) and three rotations (yaw, pitch and roll) in the reference frame. The raw data can be difficult to interpret. For this reason, several methods have been developed to measure the motion of human joints and to describe the resulting data. For example, instant helical axes or screw deviation axes (Kinzell et al., 1972), the Joint Coordinate System of Grood and Suntay (1983), and the Euler angle method have been used to describe the movements of bones relative to each other. None of these methods takes into account the physical kinematic mechanism producing the joint motion. More recently, Lupichuk (1995) has developed an algorithm to find, for an arbitrary revolute, the axis` position and orientation in three- dimensional space. Each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages in analyzing joint kinematics. The authors have developed software to provide a means of comparing these methods for arbitrary, single degree of freedom, kinematic mechanisms. Our objective is to demonstrate the software and to show how it can be used to compare the results from the different kinematic models as they are applied to specific kinematic mechanisms.

Hollerbach, K.; Hollister, A.M.; Van Vorhis, R.L.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Process Modeling Phase I Summary Report for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of preliminary work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to demonstrate application of computational fluid dynamics modeling to the scale-up of a Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition (FBCVD) process for nuclear fuels coating. Specifically, this work, referred to as Modeling Scale-Up Phase I, was conducted between January 1, 2006 and March 31, 2006 in support of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Program. The objective was to develop, demonstrate and "freeze" a version of ORNL's computational model of the TRI ISOtropic (TRISO) fuel-particle coating process that can be specifically used to assist coater scale-up activities as part of the production of AGR-2 fuel. The results in this report are intended to serve as input for making decisions about initiating additional FBCVD modeling work (referred to as Modeling Scale-Up Phase II) in support of AGR-2. The main computational tool used to implement the model is the general-purpose multiphase fluid-dynamics computer code known as MFIX (Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges), which is documented in detail on the DOE-sponsored website http://www.mfix.org. Additional computational tools are also being developed by ORNL for post-processing MFIX output to efficiently summarize the important information generated by the coater simulations. The summarized information includes quantitative spatial and temporal measures (referred to as discriminating characteristics, or DCs) by which different coater designs and operating conditions can be compared and correlated with trends in product quality. The ORNL FBCVD modeling work is being conducted in conjunction with experimental coater studies at ORNL with natural uranium CO (NUCO) and surrogate fuel kernels. Data are also being obtained from ambient-temperature, spouted-bed characterization experiments at the University of Tennessee and theoretical studies of carbon and silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition kinetics at Iowa State University. Prior to the current scale-up activity, considerable effort has gone in to adapting the MFIX code to incorporate the unique features of fuel coating reactors and also in validating the resulting simulation features with experimental observations. Much of this work is documented in previous AGR reports and publications (Pannala et al., 2004, Pannala et al., 2005, Boyalakuntla et al., 2005a, Boyalakuntla et al., 2005b and Finney et al., 2005). As a result of the previous work described above, the ORNL coater model now has the capability for simulating full spatio-temporal details of the gas-particle hydrodynamics and gas-particle heat and mass transfer in the TRISO coater. This capability provides a great deal of information about many of the processes believed to control quality, but the model is not yet sufficiently developed to fully predict coating quality for any given coater design and/or set of operating conditions because the detailed chemical reaction kinetics needed to make the model fully predictive are not yet available. Nevertheless, the model at its current stage of development already provides the most comprehensive and detailed quantitative information available about gas flows, solid flows, temperatures, and species inside the coater during operation. This level of information ought to be highly useful in expediting the scale-up process (e.g., in correlating observations and minimizing the number of pilot-scale tests required). However, previous work had not yet demonstrated that the typical design and/or operating changes known to affect product quality at the lab scale could be clearly discriminated by the existing model. The Modeling Scale-Up Phase I work was initiated to produce such a demonstration, and two detailed examples are discussed in this report.

Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Boyalakuntla, Dhanunjay S [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

The RERTR Program: Past, present and future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The past, present and future of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program are discussed with an emphasis on some of the reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics codes and modelling required to accommodate research and test reactor analysis, and some of the development work still in progress is described. Some comparisons with physical measurements and Monte Carlo are provided. The efforts in fuels development and the experimental support are summarized. The accomplishments in joint study programs and the transfer of technology are high lighted. The joint study with the Russian reduced enrichment program presents many new challenges.

Woodruff, W.L.; Travelli, A.; Matos, J.E.; Snelgrove, J.L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Analysis of tropical radiative heating profiles: A comparison...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

tropical radiative heating profiles: A comparison of models and observations . Analysis of tropical radiative heating profiles: A comparison of models and observations . Abstract:...

305

USE OF BESTEST PROCEDURE TO IMPROVE A BUILDING THERMAL SIMULATION PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. KEYWORDS Building energy simulation; validation; BESTEST; inter program comparison DESCRIPTION BESTEST Validation of building energy simulation programs is of major interest to both users and modellers simulation software called CODYRUN (Boyer et al., 1998). Indeed, one of the most interesting aspects

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

306

Comparison of trichostatin A and valproic acid treatment regimens in a mouse model of kidney fibrosis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are promising new compounds for the therapy of fibrotic diseases. In this study we compared the effect of two HDAC inhibitors, trichostatin A and valproic acid, in an experimental model of kidney fibrosis. In mice, doxorubicin (adriamycin) can cause nephropathy characterized by chronic proteinuria, glomerular damage and interstitial inflammation and fibrosis, as seen in human focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Two treatment regimens were applied, treatment was either started prior to the doxorubicin insult or delayed until a significant degree of proteinuria and fibrosis was present. Pre-treatment of trichostatin A significantly hampered glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis, as did the pre-treatment with valproic acid. In contrast, the development of proteinuria was only completely inhibited in the pre-treated valproic acid group, and not in the pre-treated trichostatin A animals. In the postponed treatment with valproic acid, a complete resolution of established doxorubicin-induced proteinuria was achieved within three days, whereas trichostatin A could not correct proteinuria in such a treatment regimen. However, both postponed regimens have comparable efficacy in maintaining the kidney fibrosis to the level reached at the start of the treatments. Moreover, not only the process of fibrosis, but also renal inflammation was attenuated by both HDAC inhibitors. Our data confirm a role for HDACs in renal fibrogenesis and point towards a therapeutic potential for HDAC inhibitors. The effect on renal disease progression and manifestation can however be different for individual HDAC inhibitors. - Highlights: • Valproic acid is a potent antiproteinuric drug, whereas trichostatin A is not. • Trichostatin A and valproic acid reduce kidney fibrosis in doxorubicin nephropathy. • Both valproic acid and trichostatin A attenuate renal inflammation.

Van Beneden, Katrien, E-mail: kvbenede@vub.ac.be [Department of Human Anatomy, Liver Cell Biology Lab, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Geers, Caroline [Department of Pathology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Pauwels, Marina [Department of Human Anatomy, Liver Cell Biology Lab, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Mannaerts, Inge [Department of Cell Biology, Liver Cell Biology Lab, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Wissing, Karl M. [Department of Nephrology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Van den Branden, Christiane [Department of Human Anatomy, Liver Cell Biology Lab, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Grunsven, Leo A. van, E-mail: lvgrunsv@vub.ac.be [Department of Cell Biology, Liver Cell Biology Lab, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

M.Sc. Thesis Project at Ericsson AB for two students Comparison of model-based testing tools based on modelling of LTE functionality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Object Oriented programming using Java, Constraint programming, Test methodology, and Software than January 22, to Olga Grinchtein olga.grinchtein@ericsson.com #12;

Parrow, Joachim

308

Comparison of Atmospheric Water Vapor in Observational and Model Data Sets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The global water vapor distribution for five observational based data sets and three GCM integrations are compared. The variables considered are the mean and standard deviation values of the precipitable water for the entire atmospheric column and the 500 to 300 hPa layer for January and July. The observationally based sets are the radiosonde data of Ross and Elliott, the ERA and NCEP reanalyses, and the NVAP blend of sonde and satellite data. The three GCM simulations all use the NCAR CCM3 as the atmospheric model. They include: a AMIP type simulation using observed SSTs for the period 1979 to 1993, the NCAR CSM 300 year coupled ocean--atmosphere integration, and a CSM integration with a 1% CO2 increase per year. The observational data exhibit some serious inconsistencies. There are geographical patterns of differences related to interannual variations and national instrument biases. It is clear that the proper characterization of water vapor is somewhat uncertain. Some conclusions about these data appear to be robust even given the discrepancies. The ERA data are too dry especially in the upper levels. The observational data evince much better agreement in the data rich Northern Hemisphere compared to the Southern. Distinct biases are quite pronounced over the Southern Ocean. The mean values and particularly the standard deviations of the three reanalyses are very dependent upon the GCM used as the assimilation vehicle for the analyses. This is made clear by the much enhanced tropical variability in the NCEP/DOE/ AMIP reanalyses compared the initial NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis. The NCAR CCM3 shows consistent evidence of a dry bias. The 1% CO2 experiment shows a very similar pattern of disagreement with the sonde data as the other integrations, once account is taken of the warming trend. No new modes of difference are evident in the 1% CO2 experiment. All the CCM3 runs indicated too much Tropical variability especially in the western Tropical Pacific and Southeast Asia. A EOF analysis of the interannual variations of the zonally averaged precipitable water and the 500 to 300 hPa layer reveals fundamental differences in the structure of the variations. The impact of ENSO and variations of the ITCZ have only a low level of correspondence between the observed data, much less the simulations. It is apparent that an adequate characterization of the climatology of the global water vapor distribution is not yet at hand.

Boyle, J.S.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Low-level fluoride trapping studies experimental work for computer modeling program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The material presented in this report involved experimental work performed to assist in determining the constants for a computer modeling program being developed by Production Engineering for use in trap design. Included in this study is bed distribution studies to define uranium loading on alumina (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) and sodium fluoride (NaF) with respect to bed zones. A limited amount of work was done on uranium penetration into NaF pellets. Only the experimental work is reported here; Production Engineering will use this data to develop constants for the computer model. Some of the significant conclusions are: NaF has more capacity to load UF/sub 6/, but Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ distributes the load more equally; velocity, system pressure, and operating temperature influence uranium loading; and in comparative tests NaF had a loading of 25%, while Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was 13%. 2 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

Russell, R.G.

1988-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

310

A Cost Analysis for a Higher-Order Parallel Programming Model   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Programming parallel computers remains a difficult task. An ideal programming environment should enablethe user to concentrate on the problem solving activity at a convenient level of abstraction, while managing the intricate low-level details...

Rangaswami, Roopa

311

The photovoltaic market analysis program : background, model development, applications and extensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this report is to describe and motivate the market analysis program for photovoltaics that has developed over the last several years. The main objective of the program is to develop tools and procedures to ...

Lilien, Gary L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Modeling of AAR affected structures using the GROW3D FEA program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to present a rational and practical methodology for finite element stress analysis of AAR affected structures. The methodology is presented using case history studies which illustrate the practical application of the GROW3D program. GROW3D uses an anisotropic expansion strain function and concrete properties which simulates the following key characteristics of AAR affected concrete (1) concrete growth expansion rates dependent on the stress vectors at each point; (2) concrete growth rate variation due to changes in moisture content and temperature; and (3) time-dependent, enhanced creep behavior. GROW3D has been applied to several hydropower structures and case histories from the Mactaquac Generating Station are presented herein. Mactaquac is selected because extensive instrumentation data before and after remedial measures have been used to calibrate and test the model. The results of analyses of three different structures are given, i.e., the intake, diversion sluiceway and powerhouse. The analysis results are used to identify potential structural problems and the need and timing of remedial measures. The output from GROW3D includes displacement rates, total displacements, global stresses and local factors of safety. The local factors of safety (or strength to stress ratios) are computed for several modes of failure including crushing, cracking, shear and sliding on horizontal construction joints. The analysis results are compared with field measurements which are taken before and after slot cutting. The effects of including the above-mentioned characteristics and other modeling assumptions on the computed results is discussed herein. Finally, a brief discussion on the recent enhancements to the model is given. These enhancements include the implementation of a more rigorous treatment of concrete creep effects.

Curtis, D.D. [Acres International Limited, Niagara Falls, Ontario (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Models Guide, October 27, 2011.

314

Abstract--A stochastic dynamic programming hydrothermal dispatch model to simulate a bid-based market is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on dynamic programming that optimizes and validates the bid prices strategies for each power plant in a hydro-thermal several plants. Emphasis is given to hydro reservoir modeling and to the assessment of their market power market power is detected, focalized on main reservoir plants and implicating important increases

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

315

A Mixed-Integer Linear Programming Model for Optimizing the Scheduling and Assignment of Tank Farm Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Mixed-Integer Linear Programming Model for Optimizing the Scheduling and Assignment of Tank) formulation for the Tank Farm Operation Problem (TFOP), which involves simultaneous scheduling of continuous multi-product processing lines and the assignment of dedicated storage tanks to finished products

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

316

2048 IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery, Vol. 10, No. 4,October 1995 COMPARISON OF THEATP VERSION OF THE EMTP AND THE NETOMAC PROGRAM FOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VERSION OF THE EMTP AND THE NETOMAC PROGRAM FOR SIMULATION OF HVDC SYSTEMS P. Lehn J. Rittiger Member the results obtained from these programs isexamined through simulation of a test HVdc network. As expected- tablished in the EMTP and in the NETOMAC transients pro- gram section. Keywords: HVdc simulation, ATP, EMTP

Lehn, Peter W.

317

Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Annex XXIII: Phase III Results Regarding Tripod Support Structure Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes. This paper describes the findings of code-to-code verification activities of the IEA Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration.

Nichols, J.; Camp, T.; Jonkman, J.; Butterfield, S.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Azcona, J.; Martinez, A.; Munduate, X.; Vorpahl, F.; Kleinhansl, S.; Kohlmeier, M.; Kossel, T.; Boker, C.; Kaufer, D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

ANNUAL HEATING AND COOLING REQUIREMENTS AND DESIGN DAY PERFORMANCE FOR A RESIDENTIAL MODEL IN SIX CLIMATES: A COMPARISON OF NBSLD, BLAST 2, AND DOE-2.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPARISON - HOURLY INTERNAL LOAD PROFILES LightingA Comparison of NBSLD, BLAST 2. and DOE-2.1 (b) Lighting:

Carroll, William L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Soya: a Programming Model and Runtime Environment for Component Composition using SSDL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SOAP Service Description Language (SSDL) is a SOAPcentric language for describing Web Service contracts. SSDL focuses on message abstraction as the building block for creating service-oriented applications and provides an extensible range of protocol frameworks that can be used to describe and formally model component composition based on Web Service interactions. Given its novel approach, implementing support for SSDL contracts presents interesting challenges to middleware developers. At one end of the spectrum, programming abstractions that support message-oriented designs need to be created. At the other end, new functionality and semantics must be added to existing SOAP engines. In this paper we explain how component developers can create message-oriented Web Service interfaces with contemporary tool support (specifically the Windows Communication Foundation) using SSDL. We show how SSDL can be used as an alternative and powerful metadata language natively alongside existing tooling without imposing additional burdens on application developers. Moreover, we describe the design and architecture of the Soya middleware which supports

Fornasier, Patrick; Webber, James; Gorton, Ian

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

320

DOE/DHS INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEM CYBER SECURITY PROGRAMS: A MODEL FOR USE IN NUCLEAR FACILITY SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many critical infrastructure sectors have been investigating cyber security issues for several years especially with the help of two primary government programs. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National SCADA Test Bed and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program have both implemented activities aimed at securing the industrial control systems that operate the North American electric grid along with several other critical infrastructure sectors (ICS). These programs have spent the last seven years working with industry including asset owners, educational institutions, standards and regulating bodies, and control system vendors. The programs common mission is to provide outreach, identification of cyber vulnerabilities to ICS and mitigation strategies to enhance security postures. The success of these programs indicates that a similar approach can be successfully translated into other sectors including nuclear operations, safeguards, and security. The industry regulating bodies have included cyber security requirements and in some cases, have incorporated sets of standards with penalties for non-compliance such as the North American Electric Reliability Corporation Critical Infrastructure Protection standards. These DOE and DHS programs that address security improvements by both suppliers and end users provide an excellent model for nuclear facility personnel concerned with safeguards and security cyber vulnerabilities and countermeasures. It is not a stretch to imagine complete surreptitious collapse of protection against the removal of nuclear material or even initiation of a criticality event as witnessed at Three Mile Island or Chernobyl in a nuclear ICS inadequately protected against the cyber threat.

Robert S. Anderson; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Paul Moskowitz

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Land-use transition for bioenergy and climate stabilization: model comparison of drivers, impacts and interactions with other land use based mitigation options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is a model comparison assessing the drivers and impacts of bioenergy production on the global land system and the interaction with other land use based mitigation options in the context of the EMF 27 project. We compare and evaluate results from three integrated assessment models (GCAM, IMAGE, and ReMIND/MAgPIE). All three models project that dedicated bioenergy crops and biomass residues are a potentially important and cost-effective component of the energy system. But bioenergy deployment levels and feedstock composition vary notably across models as do the implications for land-use and greenhouse gas emissions and the interaction with other land use based mitigation measures. Despite numerous model differences, we identify a few that are likely contributing to differences in land-use and emissions attributable to energy crop deployment.

Popp, Alexander; Rose, Steven K.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Dietrich, Jan P.; Wise, Marshall A.; Stehfest, Eike; Humpenoder, Florian; Kyle, G. Page; Van Vliet, Jasper; Bauer, Nico; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Klein, David; Kriegler, Elmar

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Relative risk-relative ranking in Defense and Energy Department cleanup programs: Comparison of methods, results, and role in priority setting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper demonstrates how the Department of Energy (DOE) enhanced their Environmental Restoration Program by modifying the Department of Defense (DoD) Cleanup Program`s Relative Risk Site Evaluation Primer in order to create their own framework, the Relative Ranking Evaluation Framework for EM-40 Release Sites, Facilities and Buildings. In addition, this paper discusses and compares the two frameworks and presents the results of relative risk/relative ranking site evaluations for both agencies through July 1996. The status of agency efforts to implement their respective frameworks also is discussed along with plans for strengthening these initiatives in the coming year.

Turkeltaub, R. [Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense, Washington, DC (United States); Treichel, L.C. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States). Office of Environmental Restoration; Rowe, W.D. Jr.; Strohl, A.R. [Booz Allen and Hamilton, McLean, VA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Tideflow| A dataflow-inspired execution model for high performance computing programs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Traditional programming, execution and optimization techniques have been shown to be inadequate to exploit the features of computer processors with many cores. In particular,… (more)

Orozco, Daniel A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

PTIDES: A Programming Model for Distributed Real-Time Embedded Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program, and the following companies: Agilent, Bosch, HSBC, Lockheed-Martin, National Instruments, and the following companies: Agilent, Bosch, HSBC, Lockheed-Martin, National Instruments, and Toyota. expressed

325

SSI sensitivity studies and model improvements for the US NRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. Rev. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is a US NRC-funded program conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Its goal is to develop a complete fully coupled analysis procedure for estimating the risk of an earthquake-induced radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. In Phase II of the SSMRP, the methodology was applied to the Zion nuclear power plant. Three topics in the SSI analysis of Zion were investigated and reported here - flexible foundation modeling, structure-to-structure interaction, and basemat uplift. The results of these investigations were incorporated in the SSMRP seismic risk analysis. 14 references, 51 figures, 13 tables.

Johnson, J.J.; Maslenikov, O.R.; Benda, B.J.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

COMPARISON OF WIND AND WIND SHEAR CLIMATOLOGIES DERIVED FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION RADIOSONDES AND THE ECMWF MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPARISON OF WIND AND WIND SHEAR CLIMATOLOGIES DERIVED FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION RADIOSONDES wind and its vertical gradient, i.e. wind-shear, is characterized as a function of climate region. For a better representation of the average atmospheric wind and shear and their variabilities, high

Stoffelen, Ad

327

ICPIG, July 15-20, 2007, Prague, Czech Republi Negative streamer fronts: comparison of particle and fluid models and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that propagates into non-ionized matter. Streamers are used in industrial applications such as ozone generation28th ICPIG, July 15-20, 2007, Prague, Czech Republi Negative streamer fronts: comparison be generated during early stages of the lighting event. Both questions require a fully kinetic description

Ebert, Ute

328

Compiler Comparisons  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Compiler Comparisons Using a set of benchmarks described below, different optimization options for the different compilers on Edison are compared. The compilers are also...

329

A cost/benefit model for insertion of technological innovation into a total quality management program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study provides economic justification for insertion of technological innovation into a total quality management (TQM) program in a remanufacturing environment. One of the core principles of TQM is continuous improvement. A preferred metric...

Ratliff, William L

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Program listing for heat-pump seasonal-performance model (SPM). [CNHSPM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The computer program CNHSPM is listed which predicts heat pump seasonal energy consumption (including defrost, cyclic degradation, and supplementary heat) using steady state rating point performance and binned weather data. (LEW)

Not Available

1982-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

331

The North American Carbon Program Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project Part 1: Overview and experimental design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding of land-atmosphere carbon exchange to larger regions. The North American Carbon Program (NACP) Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP) is a formal model intercomparison and evaluation effort focused on improving the diagnosis and attribution of carbon exchange at regional and global scales. MsTMIP builds upon current and past synthesis activities, and has a unique framework designed to isolate, interpret, and inform understanding of how model structural differences impact estimates of carbon uptake and release. Here we provide an overview of the MsTMIP effort and describe how the MsTMIP experimental design enables the assessment and quantification of TBM structural uncertainty. Model structure refers to the types of processes considered (e.g. nutrient cycling, disturbance, lateral transport of carbon), and how these processes are represented (e.g. photosynthetic formulation, temperature sensitivity, respiration) in the models. By prescribing a common experimental protocol with standard spin-up procedures and driver data sets, we isolate any biases and variability in TBM estimates of regional and global carbon budgets resulting from differences in the models themselves (i.e. model structure) and model-specific parameter values. An initial intercomparison of model structural differences is represented using hierarchical cluster diagrams (a.k.a. dendrograms), which highlight similarities and differences in how models account for carbon cycle, vegetation, energy, and nitrogen cycle dynamics. We show that, despite the standardized protocol used to derive initial conditions, models show a high degree of variation for GPP, total living biomass, and total soil carbon, underscoring the influence of differences in model structure and parameterization on model estimates.

Huntzinger, D.N. [Northern Arizona University] [Northern Arizona University; Schwalm, C. [Northern Arizona University] [Northern Arizona University; Michalak, A.M [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford] [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford; Schaefer, K. [National Snow and Ice Data Center] [National Snow and Ice Data Center; King, A.W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Wei, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jacobson, A. [National Snow and Ice Data Center] [National Snow and Ice Data Center; Liu, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Cook, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Post, W.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Berthier, G. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE)] [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE); Hayes, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Huang, M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Ito, A. [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan] [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan; Lei, H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Lu, C. [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.] [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.; Mao, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Peng, C.H. [University of Quebec at Montreal, Institute of Environment Sciences] [University of Quebec at Montreal, Institute of Environment Sciences; Peng, S. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE)] [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE); Poulter, B. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE)] [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE); Riccuito, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Shi, X. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Tian, H. [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.] [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.; Wang, W. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Ames Research Center, Moffett Field] [National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Ames Research Center, Moffett Field; Zeng, N. [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland; Zhao, F. [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland; Zhu, Q. [Laboratory for Ecological Forecasting and Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University] [Laboratory for Ecological Forecasting and Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

GRADUATE PROGRAM UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SELF STUDY GRADUATE PROGRAM UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE COLLEGE OF LIBERALARTS TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY March 2007 #12;SELF STUDY GRADUATE PROGRAM UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT........................................................................................ 4 Brief History of Degree Programs and the Department

333

Model Development and Loads Analysis of an Offshore Wind Turbine on a Tension Leg Platform with a Comparison to Other Floating Turbine Concepts: April 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results of the analysis of a 5-MW wind turbine located on a floating offshore tension leg platform (TLP) that was conducted using the fully coupled time-domain aero-hydro-servo-elastic design code FAST with AeroDyn and HydroDyn. The report also provides a description of the development process of the TLP model. The model has been verified via comparisons to frequency-domain calculations. Important differences have been identified between the frequency-domain and time-domain simulations, and have generated implications for the conceptual design process. An extensive loads and stability analysis for ultimate and fatigue loads according to the procedure of the IEC 61400-3 offshore wind turbine design standard was performed with the verified TLP model. This report compares the loads for the wind turbine on the TLP to those of an equivalent land-based turbine. Major instabilities for the TLP are identified and described.

Matha, D.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Model program for the control and eradication of pullorum-typhoid infection from breeding/multiplier flocks in selected areas in Brazil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

surveillance sysiem based on data produced at various levels, the regu', ations pertaining to the control of Pullorum ? iyphoid infection and a public information service designed to bring in the cooperation of all paris -involved in the program also... the respiratory diseases and pullorum- gallinarum infection from commercial flocks. The model program developed and described herein is intended to be part of that nation- 'wide program. REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE ~Go h Brazil is a federal republic which...

Saraiva, Victor Emmanoel Vieira

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Methods and Models of the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, PNNL-MA-860  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (HIDP) provides internal dosimetry support services for operations at the Hanford Site. The HIDP is staffed and managed by the Radiation and Health Technology group, within the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Operations supported by the HIDP include research and development, the decontamination and decommissioning of facilities formerly used to produce and purify plutonium, and waste management activities. Radioelements of particular interest are plutonium, uranium, americium, tritium, and the fission and activation product radionuclides 137Cs, 90Sr, and 60Co. This manual describes the technical basis for the design of the routine bioassay monitoring program and for assessment of internal dose. The purposes of the manual are as follows: • Provide assurance that the HIDP derives from a sound technical base. • Promote the consistency and continuity of routine program activities. • Provide a historical record. • Serve as a technical reference for radiation protection personnel. • Aid in identifying and planning for future needs.

Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Bihl, Donald E.; Maclellan, Jay A.; Antonio, Cheryl L.; Hill, Robin L.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

Mechanism to support generic collective communication across a variety of programming models  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for supporting collective communications on a plurality of processors that use different parallel programming paradigms, in one aspect, may comprise a schedule defining one or more tasks in a collective operation, an executor that executes the task, a multisend module to perform one or more data transfer functions associated with the tasks, and a connection manager that controls one or more connections and identifies an available connection. The multisend module uses the available connection in performing the one or more data transfer functions. A plurality of processors that use different parallel programming paradigms can use a common implementation of the schedule module, the executor module, the connection manager and the multisend module via a language adaptor specific to a parallel programming paradigm implemented on a processor.

Almasi, Gheorghe (Ardsley, NY); Dozsa, Gabor (Ardsley, NY); Kumar, Sameer (White Plains, NY)

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

337

AURORA: A FORTRAN program for modeling well stirred plasma and thermal reactors with gas and surface reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The AURORA Software is a FORTRAN computer program that predicts the steady-state or time-averaged properties of a well mixed or perfectly stirred reactor for plasma or thermal chemistry systems. The software was based on the previously released software, SURFACE PSR which was written for application to thermal CVD reactor systems. AURORA allows modeling of non-thermal, plasma reactors with the determination of ion and electron concentrations and the electron temperature, in addition to the neutral radical species concentrations. Well stirred reactors are characterized by a reactor volume, residence time or mass flow rate, heat loss or gas temperature, surface area, surface temperature, the incoming temperature and mixture composition, as well as the power deposited into the plasma for non-thermal systems. The model described here accounts for finite-rate elementary chemical reactions both in the gas phase and on the surface. The governing equations are a system of nonlinear algebraic relations. The program solves these equations using a hybrid Newton/time-integration method embodied by the software package TWOPNT. The program runs in conjunction with the new CHEMKIN-III and SURFACE CHEMKIN-III packages, which handle the chemical reaction mechanisms for thermal and non-thermal systems. CHEMKIN-III allows for specification of electron-impact reactions, excitation losses, and elastic-collision losses for electrons.

Meeks, E.; Grcar, J.F.; Kee, R.J. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Thermal and Plasma Processes Dept.] [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Thermal and Plasma Processes Dept.; Moffat, H.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Surface Processing Sciences Dept.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Surface Processing Sciences Dept.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

On-the-Fly Model Checking of Program Runs for Automated Debugging M. Frey B.-H. Schlingloff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

debugging of parallel programs. Dur- ing the monitoring of a program run, a state action net is constructed

Schlingloff, Holger

339

OntheFly Model Checking of Program Runs for Automated Debugging M. Frey B.H. Schlingloff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

debugging of parallel programs. Dur­ ing the monitoring of a program run, a state action net is constructed

Schlingloff, Holger

340

Comparative evaluation of network flow programming and conventional reservoir system simulation models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS MODELS Operating river/reservoir systems in an optimal manner is an important and com- plex area of water resources planning and management. Reservoir system operation involves: allocating storage capacity and water resources between multiple... broad array of analysis capabilities, have been developed over the past several decades to support planning studies and management decisions. Reservoir system analysis models can be categorized as (I) simulation models, (2) optimization models...

Yerramreddy, Anilkumar

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M-PACE through ModelObservation Comparisons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M the microphysical properties of Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus. Intensive measurements taken during the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M

Solomon, Amy

342

Comparison of energy efficiency between variable refrigerant flow systems and ground source heat pump systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulation with credible software programs is a proven feasible way to get quantitative comparison of the energy

Hong, Tainzhen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied a low energy building on a campus of theEnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building Junqiao HanEnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building Junqiao Han

Dudley, Junqiao Han

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing:A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues,recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, anddescriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Repository Integration Program: RIP performance assessment and strategy evaluation model theory manual and user`s guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the theory and capabilities of RIP (Repository Integration Program). RIP is a powerful and flexible computational tool for carrying out probabilistic integrated total system performance assessments for geologic repositories. The primary purpose of RIP is to provide a management tool for guiding system design and site characterization. In addition, the performance assessment model (and the process of eliciting model input) can act as a mechanism for integrating the large amount of available information into a meaningful whole (in a sense, allowing one to keep the ``big picture`` and the ultimate aims of the project clearly in focus). Such an integration is useful both for project managers and project scientists. RIP is based on a `` top down`` approach to performance assessment that concentrates on the integration of the entire system, and utilizes relatively high-level descriptive models and parameters. The key point in the application of such a ``top down`` approach is that the simplified models and associated high-level parameters must incorporate an accurate representation of their uncertainty. RIP is designed in a very flexible manner such that details can be readily added to various components of the model without modifying the computer code. Uncertainty is also handled in a very flexible manner, and both parameter and model (process) uncertainty can be explicitly considered. Uncertainty is propagated through the integrated PA model using an enhanced Monte Carlo method. RIP must rely heavily on subjective assessment (expert opinion) for much of its input. The process of eliciting the high-level input parameters required for RIP is critical to its successful application. As a result, in order for any project to successfully apply a tool such as RIP, an enormous amount of communication and cooperation must exist between the data collectors, the process modelers, and the performance. assessment modelers.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Discussion on a Code Comparison Effort for the Geothermal Technologies...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Effort for the Geothermal Technologies Program Code comparison presentation by Mark White of PNNL at the 2012 Peer Review meeting on May 10. gtp2012peerreviewpnnlwhite.pdf...

347

Comparison of current state residential energy codes with the 1992 model energy code for one- and two-family dwellings; 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one in a series of documents describing research activities in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) leads the program for DOE. The goal of the program is to develop and support the adopting, implementation, and enforcement of Federal, State, and Local energy codes for new buildings. The program approach to meeting the goal is to initiate and manage individual research and standards and guidelines development efforts that are planned and conducted in cooperation with representatives from throughout the buildings community. Projects under way involve practicing architects and engineers, professional societies and code organizations, industry representatives, and researchers from the private sector and national laboratories. Research results and technical justifications for standards criteria are provided to standards development and model code organizations and to Federal, State, and local jurisdictions as a basis to update their codes and standards. This effort helps to ensure that building standards incorporate the latest research results to achieve maximum energy savings in new buildings, yet remain responsive to the needs of the affected professions, organizations, and jurisdictions. Also supported are the implementation, deployment, and use of energy-efficient codes and standards. This report documents findings from an analysis conducted by PNL of the State`s building codes to determine if the codes meet or exceed the 1992 MEC energy efficiency requirements (CABO 1992a).

Klevgard, L.A.; Taylor, Z.T.; Lucas, R.G.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Roofline: An Insightful Visual Performance Model for Floating-Point Programs and Multicore Architectures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose an easy-to-understand, visual performance model that offers insights to programmers and architects on improving parallel software and hardware for floating point computations.

Williams, Samuel; Waterman, Andrew; Patterson, David

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

A general purpose Fortran 90 electronic structure program for conjugated systems using Pariser-Parr-Pople model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pariser-Parr-Pople (P-P-P) model Hamiltonian has been used extensively over the years to perform calculations of electronic structure and optical properties of $\\pi$-conjugated systems successfully. In spite of tremendous successes of \\emph{ab initio} theory of electronic structure of large systems, the P-P-P model continues to be a popular one because of a recent resurgence in interest in the physics of $\\pi$-conjugated polymers, fullerenes and other carbon based materials. In this paper, we describe a Fortran 90 computer program developed by us, which uses P-P-P model Hamiltonian to not only solve Hartree-Fock (HF) equation for closed- and open-shell systems, but also for performing correlation calculations at the level of single configuration interactions (SCI) for molecular systems. Moreover, the code is capable of computing linear optical absorption spectrum at various levels, such as, tight binding (TB) Hueckel model, HF, SCI, and also of calculating the band structure using the Hueckel model. The code ...

Sony, Priya

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Bounding A Protein's Free Energy In Lattice Models Via Linear Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in understanding protein structure prediction. In these models, a protein folds to maximize H-H contacts (minimize [4], abstracts the dominant force in protein folding: the hydrophobic interaction. The hydrophobicity of protein folding in the Hydro- phobic-Hydrophilic (HP) model. We formulate several di#11;erent integer

Newman, Alantha

351

A comparison of geospatially modeled fire behavior and potential application to fire and fuels management for the Savannah River Site.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates modeled fire behavior for the Savannah River Site in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern U.S. using three data sources: FCCS, LANDFIRE, and SWRA. The Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS) was used to build fuelbeds from intensive field sampling of 629 plots. Custom fire behavior fuel models were derived from these fuelbeds. LANDFIRE developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy attributes for the U.S. using satellite imagery informed by field data. The Southern Wildfire Risk Assessment (SWRA) developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy cover for the southeastern U.S. using satellite imagery.

Kurth, Laurie; Hollingsworth, LaWen; Shea, Dan

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

352

A comparison of echocardiography to invasive measurement in the evaluation of pulmonary arterial hypertension in a rat model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model. Keywords Pulmonary hypertension Á Echocardiography Áassessment of pulmonary hypertension. Am J Respir Crit Carerebreathing in pulmonary hypertension. Am J Respir Crit Care

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison against 6th Power Plan (Update cyclically Data Clearinghouse BPA/RTF NEEA/Regional Programs Group Update Regional EE Technology Roadmap Lighting

354

Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing - Towards Enhancing OpenMP for Manycore and Heterogeneous Nodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OpenMP was not well recognized at the beginning of the project, around year 2003, because of its limited use in DoE production applications and the inmature hardware support for an efficient implementation. Yet in the recent years, it has been graduately adopted both in HPC applications, mostly in the form of MPI+OpenMP hybrid code, and in mid-scale desktop applications for scientific and experimental studies. We have observed this trend and worked deligiently to improve our OpenMP compiler and runtimes, as well as to work with the OpenMP standard organization to make sure OpenMP are evolved in the direction close to DoE missions. In the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing project, the HPCTools team at the University of Houston (UH), directed by Dr. Barbara Chapman, has been working with project partners, external collaborators and hardware vendors to increase the scalability and applicability of OpenMP for multi-core (and future manycore) platforms and for distributed memory systems by exploring different programming models, language extensions, compiler optimizations, as well as runtime library support.

Barbara Chapman

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

PostScript file created: April 17, 2005 Comparison of short-term and long-term earthquake forecast models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forecast models for southern California Agn`es Helmstetter1,3 , Yan Y. Kagan2 and David D. Jackson2 1, Columbia University, New York Abstract We consider the problem of forecasting earthquakes on two different time scales: years, and days. We evaluate some published forecast models on these time scales

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

356

Non Linear Programming (NLP) Formulation for Quantitative Modeling of Protein Signal Transduction Pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling of signal transduction pathways plays a major role in understanding cells' function and predicting cellular response. Mathematical formalisms based on a logic formalism are relatively simple but can describe how ...

Mitsos, Alexander

357

ANNUAL HEATING AND COOLING REQUIREMENTS AND DESIGN DAY PERFORMANCE FOR A RESIDENTIAL MODEL IN SIX CLIMATES: A COMPARISON OF NBSLD, BLAST 2, AND DOE-2.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of NBSLD, BLAST 2. and Effect of Selected Changessignificant effect on annual heating loads, BLAST 2 predictsComparison of NBSLD, BLAST 2, and DOE~2.1 Effect of Climate

Carroll, William L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Comparison of optical model results from a microscopic Schrödinger approach to nucleon-nucleus elastic scattering with those from a global Dirac phenomenology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparisons are made between results of calculations for intermediate energy nucleon-nucleus scattering for 12C, 16O, 40Ca, 90Zr, and 208Pb, using optical potentials obtained from global Dirac phenomenology and from a microscopic Schr\\"odinger model. Differential cross sections and spin observables for scattering from the set of five nuclei at 65 MeV and 200 MeV have been studied to assess the relative merits of each approach. Total reaction cross sections from proton-nucleus and total cross sections from neutron-nucleus scattering have been evaluated and compared with data for those five targets in the energy range 20 MeV to 800 MeV. The methods of analyses give results that compare well with experimental data in those energy regimes for which the procedures are suited.

P. K. Deb; B. C. Clark; S. Hama; K. Amos; S. Karataglidis; E. D. Cooper

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

359

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2013-2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2013-2014 Program Structure and Responsibilities Dr. Anas Chalah #12;SEAS Safety Program SEAS Safety Program Structure We have developed a great model of collaboration among · EHSEM · SEAS Safety Program · SEAS Facilities which accounts for the regulatory component

360

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2012-2103  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2012-2103 Program Structure and Responsibilities Dr. Anas Chalah #12;SEAS Safety Program SEAS Safety Program Structure We have developed a great model of collaboration among · EHSEM · SEAS Safety Program · SEAS Facilities which accounts for the regulatory component

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Comparison of Average Transport and Dispersion Among a Gaussian, a Two-Dimensional, and a Three-Dimensional Model  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) code for predicting off-siteconsequences, MACCS2 (Chanin, et al. 1998) (MELCOR Accident Consequence CodeSystem, Version 2), uses a simplified model for...

362

Comparison of water boiling models against recent experimental data, with special emphasis on the bubble ebullition cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using recently collected data which was measured with state-of-the-art techniques, models for nucleation site density, bubble departure diameter, and nucleation frequency were compared against the acquired data. The ...

Virgen, Matthew Miguel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Comparison of mean retention time (MRT) of markers in the reticulorumen (RR) estimated by modelling their faecal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-EDTA) were injected via the rumen cannula through the reticulo-omasal orifice prior to duodenal sampling (9 by modelling and algebraic methods were close. Markers (digesta phases) had an effect on accuracy of MRTRR

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

364

Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

which combines the two cooling supply fans to just one asquantitatively the two cooling supply fans in the EnergyPlussupply fan has a capacity of 25,000 cfm. Model uses district heating and cooling

Dudley, Junqiao Han

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Automated Demand Response in a Large Office Building”, inBuilding Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response.Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building

Dudley, Junqiao Han

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

2-D Modeling of Energy-z Beam Dynamics Using the LiTrack Matlab Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Short bunches and the bunch length distribution have important consequences for both the LCLS project at SLAC and the proposed ILC project. For both these projects, it is important to simulate what bunch length distributions are expected and then to perform actual measurements. The goal of the research is to determine the sensitivity of the bunch length distribution to accelerator phase and voltage. This then indicates the level of control and stability that is needed. In this project I simulated beamlines to find the rms bunch length in three different beam lines at SLAC, which are the test beam to End Station A (ILC-ESA) for the ILC studies, Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and LCLS-ESA. To simulate the beamlines, I used the LiTrack program, which does a 2-dimensional tracking of an electron bunch's longitudinal (z) and the energy spread beam (E) parameters. In order to reduce the time of processing the information, I developed a small program to loop over adjustable machine parameters. LiTrack is a Matlab script and Matlab is also used for plotting and saving and loading files. The results show that the LCLS in Linac-A is the most sensitive when looking at the ratio of change in phase degree to rate of change. The results also show a noticeable difference between the LCLS and LCLS-ESA, which suggest that further testing should go into looking the Beam Switch Yard and End Station A to determine why the result of the LCLS and LCLS-ESA vary.

Cauley, S.K.; /Unlisted; Woods, M.; /SLAC

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Earth System Modeling -- Director`s initiative. LDRD Program final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Earth System Modeling Director`s Initiative is to develop and test a framework for interactively coupling subsystem models that represent the physical, chemical, and biological processes which determine the state of the atmosphere, ocean, land surface and vegetation. Most studies of the potential for human perturbations of the climate system made previously have treated only limited components of the Earth system. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the capability of coupling all relevant components in a flexible framework that will permit a wide variety of tests to be conducted to assure realistic interactions. A representation of the Earth system is shown and its important interactions.

MacCracken, M.; Penner, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Atmospheric Science Div.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Model program for the recruitment and preparation of high ability elementary mathematics/science teachers: A collaborative project among scientists, teacher educators and classroom teachers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This teacher education program will provide a model for recruiting, educating and retaining high ability students to become mathematics and science lead teachers in elementary schools. The quality experiences and support provided these students will help them develop the knowledge and attitudes necessary to provide leadership for elementary mathematics and science programs. Students will have research experiences at the Ames Laboratory, high quality field experiences with nationally recognized mathematics and science teachers in local schools and opportunities to meaningfully connect these two experiences. This program, collaboratively designed and implemented by scientists, teacher educators and classroom teachers, should provide a replicatable model for other teacher education institutions. In addition, materials developed for the project should help other laboratories interface more effectively with K-8 schools and help other teacher education programs incorporate real science and mathematics experience into their curriculum.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL LBNL and SNL for the UFD Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes laboratory and field observations and numerical modeling related to coupled processes involving brine and vapor migration in geologic salt, focusing on recent developments and studies conducted at Sandia, Los Alamos, and Berkeley National Laboratories. Interest into the disposal of heat-generating waste in salt has led to interest into water distribution and migration in both run-of-mine crushed and intact geologic salt. Ideally a fully coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical simulation is performed using numerical models with validated constitutive models and parameters. When mechanical coupling is not available, mechanical effects are prescribed in hydraulic models as source, boundary, or initial conditions. This report presents material associated with developing appropriate initial conditions for a non-mechanical hydrologic simulation of brine migration in salt. Due to the strong coupling between the mechanical and hydrologic problems, the initial saturation will be low for the excavation disturbed zone surrounding the excavation. Although most of the material in this report is not new, the author hopes it is presented in a format making it useful to other salt researchers.

Kuhlman, Kristopher L.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

A Mathematical Programming Model for Optimal Layout Considering Quantitative Risk Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Celaya, Gto 38010 México 2 Carnegie Mellon University, Chemical Engineering). #12;The Center for Chemical Process Safety (CCPS) has published guidelines for facility siting model for safe process layout considering three possible hazardous incidents in an ethylene oxide plant

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

371

Modeling Conjunctive Use Operations and Farm Decisions with Two-Stage Stochastic Quadratic Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effects of intensive agricultural devel- opment based on groundwater in the Texas High Plains and point conjunctive use management to alleviate drought for irrigated agriculture with a spatially dis- tributed WR.1943-5452.0000045 CE Database subject headings: Water resources; Stochastic models; Agriculture

Pasternack, Gregory B.

372

Variable-Speed Wind Turbine Controller Systematic Design Methodology: A Comparison of Non-Linear and Linear Model-Based Designs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variable-speed, horizontal axis wind turbines use blade-pitch control to meet specified objectives for three regions of operation. This paper focuses on controller design for the constant power production regime. A simple, rigid, non-linear turbine model was used to systematically perform trade-off studies between two performance metrics. Minimization of both the deviation of the rotor speed from the desired speed and the motion of the actuator is desired. The robust nature of the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is illustrated, and optimal operating conditions are determined. Because numerous simulation runs may be completed in a short time, the relationship of the two opposing metrics is easily visualized. Traditional controller design generally consists of linearizing a model about an operating point. This step was taken for two different operating points, and the systematic design approach was used. A comparison of the optimal regions selected using the n on-linear model and the two linear models shows similarities. The linearization point selection does, however, affect the turbine performance slightly. Exploitation of the simplicity of the model allows surfaces consisting of operation under a wide range of gain values to be created. This methodology provides a means of visually observing turbine performance based upon the two metrics chosen for this study. Design of a PID controller is simplified, and it is possible to ascertain the best possible combination of controller parameters. The wide, flat surfaces indicate that a PID controller is very robust in this variable-speed wind turbine application.

Hand, M. M.

1999-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

373

Internal Audit of a Comprehensive IMRT Program for Prostate Cancer: A Model for Centers in Developing Countries?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: With improving regional prosperity, significant capital investments have been made to rapidly expand radiotherapy capacity across Southeast Asia. Yet little has been reported on the implementation of adequate quality assurance (QA) in patient management. The objective of this study is to perform an in-depth QA assessment of our definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) program for prostate cancer since its inception. Methods and Materials: The department's prostate IMRT program was modeled after that of University of California San Francisco. A departmental protocol consisting of radiotherapy volume/dose and hormone sequencing/duration and a set of 18 dose objectives to the target and critical organs were developed, and all plans were presented at the weekly departmental QA rounds. All patients treated with definitive IMRT for nonmetastatic prostate cancer were retrospectively reviewed. Protocol adherence, dosimetry data, toxicities, and outcomes were evaluated. Results: Since 2005, 76 patients received IMRT: 54 with whole-pelvis and 22 with prostate-only treatment. Of the 1,140 recorded dosimetric end points, 39 (3.3%) did not meet the protocol criteria. At QA rounds, no plans required a revision. Only one major protocol violation was observed. Two and two cases of Grade 3-4 acute and late toxicities, respectively, were observed. Five (8.8%) patients developed proctitis, but only one required argon laser therapy. Conclusions: Our comprehensive, practice-adapted QA measures appeared to ensure that we were able to consistently generate conforming IMRT plans with acceptable toxicities. These measures can be easily integrated into other clinics contemplating on developing such a program.

Koh, Wee Yao; Ren Wei; Mukherjee, Rahul K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore); Chung, Hans T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore)], E-mail: hanstchung@gmail.com

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Sorghum Program BIOENERGY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sorghum Program BIOENERGY PROGRAM Sorghums are important nongrain lignocellulosic feedstocks Biomass Switch Grass Forage Sorghum Bioenergy Sorghum Biomass per acre per year that can be converted (DT

375

Using CORE Model-Based Systems Engineering Software to Support Program Management in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Project: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes how a model-based systems engineering software, CORE, is helping the U. S. Department of Energy's Office of Biomass Program assist with bringing biomass-derived biofuels to the market. This software tool provides information to guide informed decision-making as biomass-to-biofuels systems are advanced from concept to commercial adoption. It facilitates management and communication of program status by automatically generating custom reports, Gantt charts, and tables using the widely available programs of Microsoft Word, Project and Excel.

Riley, C.; Sandor, D.; Simpkins, P.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Improved control strategy for parallel logic programming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this dissertation is to formulate an improved control strategy for parallel logic programming and to verify that the complexity of the parallel logic programs with this control strategy would be much less than the complexity of the other logic programs. The proposed control strategy is a combination of committed choice nondeterminism, and the data-flow model. The commit operator would be used for committed choice nondeterminism, and the primitives based on the dataflow model would be used to control AND-parallelism and OR-parallelism. With this proposed control strategy, the maximum useful parallelism can be explained with optimal granularity by controlling useless parallelism and limiting the branching factor. For justification of the proposed control strategy, it is suggested that the complexity of the computations of alternating Turing machines, which include a generalization of nondeterminism, can be used for the abstract cost function of logic programs. As justification of the proposed idea, the author bases a comparison of parallel logic programs on a model utilizing alternating Turing machines. The author shows that a natural reduction of the alternating Turing machine for the proposed control strategy yields a deterministic Turing machine whose complexity is linearly- related to that of the alternating Turing machine. However such a reduction for the conventional committed choice nondeterminism has complexity that is quadratically related to that of the alternating Turing machine.

Chung, I.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

UV-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and temperature programmed desorption studies of model and bulk heterogeneous catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) have been used to investigate the surface structure of model heterogeneous catalysts in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). UV-Raman spectroscopy has been used to probe the structure of bulk model catalysts in ambient and reaction conditions. The structural information obtained through UV-Raman spectroscopy has been correlated with both the UHV surface analysis and reaction results. The present day propylene and ethylene polymerization catalysts (Ziegler-Natta catalysts) are prepared by deposition of TiCl{sub 4} and a Al(Et){sub 3} co-catalyst on a microporous Mg-ethoxide support that is prepared from MgCl{sub 2} and ethanol. A model thin film catalyst is prepared by depositing metallic Mg on a Au foil in a UHV chamber in a background of TiCl{sub 4} in the gas phase. XPS results indicate that the Mg is completely oxidized to MgCl{sub 2} by TiCl{sub 4} resulting in a thin film of MgCl{sub 2}/TiCl{sub x}, where x = 2, 3, and 4. To prepare an active catalyst, the thin film of MgCl{sub 2}/TiCl{sub x} on Au foil is enclosed in a high pressure cell contained within the UHV chamber and exposed to {approx}1 Torr of Al(Et){sub 3}.

Tewell, Craig R.

2002-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

378

CRC fuel rating program: road octane performance of oxygenates in 1982 model cars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of the widespread interest in the use of alcohols and ethers as gasoline blending components, this program was conducted to evaluate the effects of several oxygenates on gasoline octane performance and to evaluate the effects of car design features such as engine and transmission type. Five oxygenates were evaluated at two nominal concentrations, 5 and 10 volume%, at both regular- and premium-grade octane levels: methanol (MeOH), ethanol (ETOH), isopropanol (IPA), tertiary butanol (TBA), and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE). A blend of 5% MeOH and 5 percent TBA was also tested at both octane levels. Twenty-eight unleaded fuels, including four hydrocarbon fuels, two hydrocarbon fuels plus toluene, and twenty-two oxygenated fuels, were rated in duplicate in thirty-eight cars using the Modified Uniontown Technique (CRC Designation F-28-75 described in Appendix C), plus some additional instructions. All testing was done on chassis dynamometers. Ratings were obtained at full throttle with all thirty-eight cars, and at the most critical part-throttle condition (occurring with manifold vacuum of 4 in. Hg (13.5 kPa) or greater above the full-throttle vacuum) with nine cars.

Not Available

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Physical Modeling of the Motions of a Container Ship Moored to a Dock with Comparison to Numerical Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ship moored to a dock, a 1:50 scale model is moored to two types of dock, solid wall dock and pile supported dock. Irregular waves of TMA spectrum with various periods, heights, and directions are generated in the wave basin to induce the motions...

Zhi, Yuanzhe

2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

380

Modeling the barotropic response of the global ocean to atmospheric wind and pressure forcing -comparisons with observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-G. Model outputs are compared to in situ observations with tide gauge data (TG) and bottom pressure gauge data (BPR), and also with T/P altimetric cross over points (noted CO). Intercomparisons were performed/P and Jason altimeters deliver very accurate data sets (within 2 centimeter global error for T/P). How- ever

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

ERS SAR characterization of coastal polynyas in the Arctic and comparison with SSM/I and numerical model investigations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), and a numerical polynya model (NPM) forced by National Center for Environmental Predictions (NCEP) wind fields increases to .83. The NPM computes offshore coastal polynya widths, heat exchange, and ice production is that SAR images processed through the SAR polynya algorithm in combination with the NPM is a powerful tool

Winsor, Peter

382

Reduced model simulations of the scrape-off-layer heat-flux width and comparison with experiment  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Reduced model simulations of turbulence in the edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) region of a spherical torus or tokamak plasma are employed to address the physics of the scrape-off-layer heat flux width. The simulation model is an electrostatic two-dimensional fluid turbulence model, applied in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field at the outboard midplane of the torus. The model contains curvature-driven-interchange modes, sheath losses, and both perpendicular turbulent diffusive and convective (blob) transport. These transport processes compete with classical parallel transport to set the SOL width. Midplane SOL profiles of density, temperature and parallel heat flux are obtained from the simulation and compared with experimental results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [S. M. Kaye, et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 1977 (2001)] to study the scaling of the heat flux width with power and plasma current. It is concluded that midplane turbulence is the main contributor to the SOL heat flux width for the low power H-mode discharges studied, while additional physics is required to explain the plasma current scaling of the SOL heat flux width observed experimentally in higher power discharges. Intermittent separatrix spanning convective cells are found to be the main mechanism that sets the near-SOL width in the simulations. The roles of sheared flows and blob trapping vs. emission are discussed.

Myra, J. R. [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States); Russell, D. A. [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States); D'Ippolito, D. A. [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States); Ahn, J- W [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Maingi, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Maqueda, R. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Lundberg, D. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Stotler, D. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Zweben, S. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Boedo, J. [Univ. of California at San Diego, CA (United States); Umansky, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

383

Comparison between backscattered TerraSAR signals and simulations from the radar backscattering models IEM, Oh, and Dubois  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for a use of IEM in the inversion of TerraSAR data. A semi-empirical calibration of IEM was done in X-band. Good agreement was found between the TerraSAR data and the simulations using the calibrated version propose an extension of the calibration of IEM model to SAR data in X-band. II. EXPERIMENTAL DATA A. Study

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

384

Explosion Models for Type Ia Supernovae: A Comparison with Observed Light Curves, distances, H_o and q_o  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretical monochromatic light curves and photospheric expansion velocities are compared with observations of 27 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). A set of 37 models has been considered which encompasses all currently discussed explosion scenarios for Type Ia supernovae including deflagrations, detonations, delayed detonations, pulsating delayed detonations and tamped detonations of Chandra- mass, and Helium detonations of low mass white dwarfs. The explosions are calculated using one-dimensional Lagrangian hydro and radiation-hydro codes with incorporated nuclear networks. Subsequently, light curves are constructed using our LC scheme which includes an implicit radiation transport, expansion opacities, a Monte-Carlo $\\gamma $-ray transport, and molecular and dust formation. For some supernovae, results of detailed non-LTE calculations have been considered. Observational properties of our series of models are discussed, the relation between the absolute brightness, post-maximum decline rates, the colors at several moments of time, etc. All models with a Ni production larger than 0.4 solar masses produce light curves of similar brightness. The influence of the cosmological red shift on the light curves and on the correction for interstellar reddening is discussed. Based on data rectification of the standard deviation, a quantitative procedure to fit the observations has been used to the determine the free parameters, i.e. the correct model, the distance, the reddening, and the time of the explosion. The results are discussed in detail and applied to determine Ho and qo.

P. Hoeflich; A. Khokkhlov

1996-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

385

Comparison of mid-Pliocene climate predictions produced by the HadAM3 and GCMAM3 General Circulation Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Circulation Models Alan M. Haywood a, , Mark A. Chandler b , Paul J. Valdes c , Ulrich Salzmann d , Daniel J set of Piacenzian Stage land cover [Salzmann, U., Haywood, A.M., Lunt, D.J., Valdes, P.J., Hill, D intervals in Earth History (e.g. Kutzbach and Otto-Bliesner, 1982; Barron and Washington, 1982; Valdes

386

Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadore Perlman,Bios High EnergyEliane S LessnerDrTimEarth System Modeling

387

The Effects of Parceling on Testing Group Differences in Second-Order CFA Models: A Comparison between Multi-Group CFA and MIMIC Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using multi-group confirmatory factor analysis (MCFA) and multiple-indicator-multiple-cause (MIMIC) to investigate group difference in the context of the second-order factor model with either the unparceled or parceled data had never been thoroughly...

Zou, Yuanyuan

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

388

Comparison of signal to noise ratios from spatial and frequency domain formulations of nonprewhitening model observers in digital mammography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Image quality indices based upon model observers are promising alternatives to laborious human readings of contrast-detail images. This is especially appealing in digital mammography as limiting values for contrast thresholds determine, according to some international protocols, the acceptability of these systems in the radiological practice. The objective of the present study was to compare the signal to noise ratios (SNR) obtained with two nonprewhitening matched filter model observer approaches, one in the spatial domain and the other in the frequency domain, and with both of them worked out for disks as present in the CDMAM phantom. Methods: The analysis was performed using images acquired with the Siemens Novation and Inspiration digital mammography systems. The spatial domain formulation uses a series of high dose CDMAM images as the signal and a routine exposure of two flood images to calculate the covariance matrix. The frequency domain approach uses the mathematical description of a disk and modulation transfer function (MTF) and noise power spectrum (NPS) calculated from images. Results: For both systems most of the SNR values calculated in the frequency domain were in very good agreement with the SNR values calculated in the spatial domain. Both the formulations in the frequency domain and in the spatial domain show a linear relationship between SNR and the diameter of the CDMAM discs. Conclusions: The results suggest that both formulations of the model observer lead to very similar figures of merit. This is a step forward in the adoption of figures of merit based on NPS and MTF for the acceptance testing of mammography systems.

Sisini, Francesco; Zanca, Federica; Marshall, Nicholas W.; Taibi, Angelo; Cardarelli, Paolo; Bosmans, Hilde [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara, Italy and (Italy); Department of Radiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Radiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Department of Radiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Comparison of Measurement And Modeling Of Current Profile Changes Due To Neutral Bean Ion Redistribution During TAE Avalanches in NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brief "avalanches" of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs) are observed in NSTX plasmas with several different n numbers simultaneously present. These affect the neutral beam ion distribution as evidenced by a concurrent drop in the neutron rate and, sometimes, beam ion loss. Guiding center orbit modeling has shown that the modes can transiently render portions of the beam ion phase space stochastic. The resulting redistribution of beam ions can also create a broader beam-driven current profile and produce other changes in the beam ion distribution function

Darrow, Douglas

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

390

Topology in 2D CP**(N-1) models on the lattice: a critical comparison of different cooling techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two-dimensional CP**(N-1) models are used to compare the behavior of different cooling techniques on the lattice. Cooling is one of the most frequently used tools to study on the lattice the topological properties of the vacuum of a field theory. We show that different cooling methods behave in an equivalent way. To see this we apply the cooling methods on classical instantonic configurations and on configurations of the thermal equilibrium ensemble. We also calculate the topological susceptibility by using the cooling technique.

B. Alles; L. Cosmai; M. D'Elia; A. Papa

2000-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

391

A Cross-model Comparison of Global Long-term Technology Diffusion under a 2?C Climate Change Control Target  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the long-term global energy technology diffusion patterns required to reach a stringent climate change target with a maximum average atmospheric temperature increase of 2°C. If the anthropogenic temperature increase is to be limited to 2°C, total CO2 emissions have to be reduced massively, so as to reach substantial negative values during the second half of the century. Particularly power sector CO2 emissions should become negative from around 2050 onwards according to most models used for this analysis in order to compensate for GHG emissions in other sectors where abatement is more costly. The annual additional capacity deployment intensity (expressed in GW/yr) for solar and wind energy until 2030 needs to be around that recently observed for coal-based power plants, and will have to be several times higher in the period 2030–2050. Relatively high agreement exists across models in terms of the aggregated low-carbon energy system cost requirements on the supply side until 2050, which amount to about 50 trillion US$.

van der Zwaan, Bob; Rosler, Hilke; Kober, Tom; Aboumahboub, Tino; Calvin, Katherine V.; Gernaat, David; Marangoni, Giacomo; McCollum, David

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Comparison of Very Smooth Cell-Model Trajectories Using Four Symplectic and Two Runge-Kutta Integrators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Symplectic methods, which are precisely compatible with Liouville's phase-volume-conservation theorem, are often recommended for computational simulations of Hamiltonian mechanics. Lack of energy drift is an advantage of symplectic methods. But all numerical methods are susceptible to chaos, Lyapunov instability, which severely limits the maximum time for which solutions can be "accurate". The "advantages" of higher-order methods are lost for typical chaotic Hamiltonians. We illustrate these difficulties for a useful reproducible test case, the two-dimensional one-particle cell model. The motion is chaotic and occurs on a three-dimensional constant energy shell. We benchmark the problem with quadruple-precision trajectories using a fifth-order Runge-Kutta and the fourth-order Candy-Rozmus integrator. We compare these benchmark results for accurate particle trajectories to those from six double-precision algorithms, four symplectic and two Runge-Kutta.

William Graham Hoover; Carol Griswold Hoover

2015-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

393

Modelling and comparison of trapped fields in (RE)BCO bulk superconductors for activation using pulsed field magnetization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1 Cn Heat capacity of liquid nitrogen at 77 K 1040 JK -1kg-1 kab Thermal conductivity of bulk along ab-plane 20 Wm -1K-1 kc Thermal conductivity of bulk along c-axis 4 Wm -1K-1 kn Thermal conductivity of liquid nitrogen 0.026 Wm -1K-1 E0... ) and Jnorm = ?(Jx 2 + Jy 2 + Jz 2). Table 1. Thermal model parameters PARAMETER DESCRIPTION VALUE Tc Transition temperature 92 K 𝜌𝑏 HTS bulk density 5.9 x 10 3 kgm-3 𝜌𝑛 Nitrogen density 808.4 kgm -3 Cb Heat capacity of bulk 1.32 x 10 2 Jkg-1K...

Ainslie, M. D.; Fujishiro, H.; Ujiie, T.; Zou, J.; Dennis, A. R.; Shi, Y.-H.; Cardwell, D. A.

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

394

Using precision gravity data in geothermal reservoir engineering modeling studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Precision gravity measurements taken at various times over a geothermal field can be used to derive information about influx into the reservoir. Output from a reservoir simulation program can be used to compute surface gravity fields and time histories. Comparison of such computer results with field-measured gravity data can add confidence to simulation models, and provide insight into reservoir processes. Such a comparison is made for the Bulalo field in the Philippines.

Atkinson, Paul G.; Pederseen, Jens R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Extraction of the second-order nonlinear response from model test data in random seas and comparison of the Gaussian and non-Gaussian models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study presents the results of an extraction of the 2nd-order nonlinear responses from model test data. Emphasis is given on the effects of assumptions made for the Gaussian and non-Gaussian input on the estimation of the 2nd-order response...

Kim, Nungsoo

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

396

Compiler Comparisons  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group and UserofProteinNewsatCompiler Comparisons Compiler

397

DIRECT N-BODY MODELING OF THE OLD OPEN CLUSTER NGC 188: A DETAILED COMPARISON OF THEORETICAL AND OBSERVED BINARY STAR AND BLUE STRAGGLER POPULATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following on from a recently completed radial-velocity survey of the old (7 Gyr) open cluster NGC 188 in which we studied in detail the solar-type hard binaries and blue stragglers of the cluster, here we investigate the dynamical evolution of NGC 188 through a sophisticated N-body model. Importantly, we employ the observed binary properties of the young (180 Myr) open cluster M35, where possible, to guide our choices for parameters of the initial binary population. We apply pre-main-sequence tidal circularization and a substantial increase to the main-sequence tidal circularization rate, both of which are necessary to match the observed tidal circularization periods in the literature, including that of NGC 188. At 7 Gyr the main-sequence solar-type hard-binary population in the model matches that of NGC 188 in both binary frequency and distributions of orbital parameters. This agreement between the model and observations is in a large part due to the similarities between the NGC 188 and M35 solar-type binaries. Indeed, among the 7 Gyr main-sequence binaries in the model, only those with P {approx}> 1000 days begin to show potentially observable evidence for modifications by dynamical encounters, even after 7 Gyr of evolution within the star cluster. This emphasizes the importance of defining accurate initial conditions for star cluster models, which we propose is best accomplished through comparisons with observations of young open clusters like M35. Furthermore, this finding suggests that observations of the present-day binaries in even old open clusters can provide valuable information on their primordial binary populations. However, despite the model's success at matching the observed solar-type main-sequence population, the model underproduces blue stragglers and produces an overabundance of long-period circular main-sequence-white-dwarf binaries as compared with the true cluster. We explore several potential solutions to the paucity of blue stragglers and conclude that the model dramatically underproduces blue stragglers through mass-transfer processes. We suggest that common-envelope evolution may have been incorrectly imposed on the progenitors of the spurious long-period circular main-sequence-white-dwarf binaries, which perhaps instead should have gone through stable mass transfer to create blue stragglers, thereby bringing both the number and binary frequency of the blue straggler population in the model into agreement with the true blue stragglers in NGC 188. Thus, improvements in the physics of mass transfer and common-envelope evolution employed in the model may in fact solve both discrepancies with the observations. This project highlights the unique accessibility of open clusters to both comprehensive observational surveys and full-scale N-body simulations, both of which have only recently matured sufficiently to enable such a project, and underscores the importance of open clusters to the study of star cluster dynamics.

Geller, Aaron M. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Hurley, Jarrod R. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Mathieu, Robert D., E-mail: a-geller@northwestern.edu, E-mail: mathieu@astro.wisc.edu, E-mail: jhurley@astro.swin.edu.au [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

LANL/LANS 2015 BCBSNM-Administered Medical Programs: ACTIVE EMPLOYEES...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

At-A-Glance: Comparing the 2015 PPO & HDHP Medical Programs Medical Program Benefit Comparison PPO Benefits & Cost Sharing HDHP + HSA Benefits & Cost-Sharing Preferred...

399

A physically-based heat pump model was connected to an optimization program to form a computer code for use in the design of high-efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;ABSTRACT A physically-based heat pump model was connected to an optimization program to form a computer code for use in the design of high-efficiency heat pumps. The method used allows efficiency of conventional heat pumps, ten variables were optimized while heating capacity was fixed

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

400

TOWARDS A POWER EFFICIENT PROGRAMMING MODEL FOR AD HOC In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a distributed operating system for ad hoc net-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 TOWARDS A POWER EFFICIENT PROGRAMMING MODEL FOR AD HOC NETWORKS Abstract In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a distributed operating system for ad hoc net- works. The goal of our system is to extend total system lifetime for ad hoc networking applications through power

Sirer, Emin Gun

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401

Automatic Thread Distribution For Nested Parallelism In OpenMP OpenMP is becoming the standard programming model for sharedmemory parallel architectures. One of its most inter-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automatic Thread Distribution For Nested Parallelism In OpenMP Abstract OpenMP is becoming in the language is the support for nested parallelism. Previous research and parallelization experiences have shown the benefits of using nested parallelism as an alternative to combining several programming models

Corbalan, Julita

402

Community Innovations Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Community Innovations Grants Program provides funding for communities to increase voluntary support for clean energy and to build model sustainable communities.

403

Report for the ASC CSSE L2 Milestone (4873) - Demonstration of Local Failure Local Recovery Resilient Programming Model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recovery from process loss during the execution of a distributed memory parallel application is presently achieved by restarting the program, typically from a checkpoint file. Future computer system trends indicate that the size of data to checkpoint, the lack of improvement in parallel file system performance and the increase in process failure rates will lead to situations where checkpoint restart becomes infeasible. In this report we describe and prototype the use of a new application level resilient computing model that manages persistent storage of local state for each process such that, if a process fails, recovery can be performed locally without requiring access to a global checkpoint file. LFLR provides application developers with an ability to recover locally and continue application execution when a process is lost. This report discusses what features are required from the hardware, OS and runtime layers, and what approaches application developers might use in the design of future codes, including a demonstration of LFLR-enabled MiniFE code from the Matenvo mini-application suite.

Heroux, Michael A.; Teranishi, Keita [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Computer programs for developing source terms for a UF{sub 6} dispersion model to simulate postulated UF{sub 6} releases from buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculational methods and computer programs for the analysis of source terms for postulated releases of UF{sub 6} are presented. Required thermophysical properties of UF{sub 6}, HF, and H{sub 2}O are described in detail. UF{sub 6} reacts with moisture in the ambient environment to form HF and H{sub 2}O. The coexistence of HF and H{sub 2}O significantly alters their pure component properties, and HF vapor polymerizes. Transient compartment models for simulating UF{sub 6} releases inside gaseous diffusion plant feed and withdrawl buildings and cascade buildings are also described. The basic compartment model mass and energy balances are supported by simple heat transfer, ventilation system, and deposition models. A model that can simulate either a closed compartment or a steady-state ventilation system is also discussed. The transient compartment models provide input to an atmospheric dispersion model as output.

Williams, W.R.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Guide to Benchmarking Residential Program Progress - CALL FOR...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

program performance across time and in comparison to others; and report about your performance in effective ways. Guide Overview The Guide also provides: Recommendations...

407

Comparison of ASHRAE Standard 90.1, 189.1 and IECC Codes for Large Office Building in Texas), Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

herein is necessarily error-free. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the Energy.... The comparison is carried out using the simulation model for a large office building initially developed by Ahmad et al. (2005) and Kim et al. (2009) using DOE-2.1e simulation program. The model has been updated and modified as per the requirements...

Mukhopadhyay, J.; Baltazar, J.C.; Kim,H.; Haberl, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Euclid Programming  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Programming Programming Compiling and linking programs on Euclid. Compiling Codes How to compile and link MPI codes on Euclid. Read More Using the ACML Math Library How to...

409

A model-data intercomparison of CO2 exchange across North America: Results from the North American Carbon Program Site Synthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our current understanding of terrestrial carbon processes is represented in various models used to integrate and scale measurements of CO{sub 2} exchange from remote sensing and other spatiotemporal data. Yet assessments are rarely conducted to determine how well models simulate carbon processes across vegetation types and environmental conditions. Using standardized data from the North American Carbon Program we compare observed and simulated monthly CO{sub 2} exchange from 44 eddy covariance flux towers in North America and 22 terrestrial biosphere models. The analysis period spans {approx}220 site-years, 10 biomes, and includes two large-scale drought events, providing a natural experiment to evaluate model skill as a function of drought and seasonality. We evaluate models' ability to simulate the seasonal cycle of CO{sub 2} exchange using multiple model skill metrics and analyze links between model characteristics, site history, and model skill. Overall model performance was poor; the difference between observations and simulations was {approx}10 times observational uncertainty, with forested ecosystems better predicted than nonforested. Model-data agreement was highest in summer and in temperate evergreen forests. In contrast, model performance declined in spring and fall, especially in ecosystems with large deciduous components, and in dry periods during the growing season. Models used across multiple biomes and sites, the mean model ensemble, and a model using assimilated parameter values showed high consistency with observations. Models with the highest skill across all biomes all used prescribed canopy phenology, calculated NEE as the difference between GPP and ecosystem respiration, and did not use a daily time step.

Schwalm, C.R.; Williams, C.A.; Schaefer, K.; Anderson, R.; Arain, M.A.; Baker, I.; Black, T.A.; Chen, G.; Ciais, P.; Davis, K. J.; Desai, A. R.; Dietze, M.; Dragoni, D.; Fischer, M.L.; Flanagan, L.B.; Grant, R.F.; Gu, L.; Hollinger, D.; Izaurralde, R.C.; Kucharik, C.; Lafleur, P.M.; Law, B.E.; Li, L.; Li, Z.; Liu, S.; Lokupitiya, E.; Luo, Y.; Ma, S.; Margolis, H.; Matamala, R.; McCaughey, H.; Monson, R. K.; Oechel, W. C.; Peng, C.; Poulter, B.; Price, D.T.; Riciutto, D.M.; Riley, W.J.; Sahoo, A.K.; Sprintsin, M.; Sun, J.; Tian, H.; Tonitto, C.; Verbeeck, H.; Verma, S.B.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

A Fortran 90 Hartree-Fock program for one-dimensional periodic $\\pi$-conjugated systems using Pariser-Parr-Pople model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pariser-Parr-Pople (P-P-P) model Hamiltonian is employed frequently to study the electronic structure and optical properties of $\\pi$-conjugated systems. In this paper we describe a Fortran 90 computer program which uses the P-P-P model Hamiltonian to solve the Hartree-Fock (HF) equation for infinitely long, one-dimensional, periodic, $\\pi$-electron systems. The code is capable of computing the band structure, as also the linear optical absorption spectrum, by using the tight-binding (TB) and the HF methods. Furthermore, using our program the user can solve the HF equation in the presence of a finite external electric field, thereby, allowing the simulation of gated systems. We apply our code to compute various properties of polymers such as $trans$-polyacetylene ($t$-PA), poly-\\emph{para}-phenylene (PPP), and armchair and zigzag graphene nanoribbons, in the infinite length limit.

Gundra, Kondayya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Stochastic Dynamic Programming and Stochastic Fluid-Flow Models in the Design and Analysis of Web-Server Farms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Web-server farm is a specialized facility designed specifically for housing Web servers catering to one or more Internet facing Web sites. In this dissertation, stochastic dynamic programming technique is used to obtain the optimal admission...

Goel, Piyush

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

412

Wind Energy Program: Top 10 Program Accomplishments  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Brochure on the top accomplishments of the Wind Energy Program, including the development of large wind machines, small machines for the residential market, wind tunnel testing, computer codes for modeling wind systems, high definition wind maps, and successful collaborations.

413

Student Internship Programs Program Description  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Student Internship Programs Program Description The objective of the Laboratory's student internship programs is to provide students with opportunities for meaningful hands- on...

414

Comparison between Gaussian-type orbitals and plane wave ab initio density functional theory modeling of layer silicates: Talc [Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 4}O{sub 10}(OH){sub 2}] as model system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quantum chemical characterization of solid state systems is conducted with many different approaches, among which the adoption of periodic boundary conditions to deal with three-dimensional infinite condensed systems. This method, coupled to the Density Functional Theory (DFT), has been proved successful in simulating a huge variety of solids. Only in relatively recent years this ab initio quantum-mechanic approach has been used for the investigation of layer silicate structures and minerals. In the present work, a systematic comparison of different DFT functionals (GGA-PBEsol and hybrid B3LYP) and basis sets (plane waves and all-electron Gaussian-type orbitals) on the geometry, energy, and phonon properties of a model layer silicate, talc [Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 4}O{sub 10}(OH){sub 2}], is presented. Long range dispersion is taken into account by DFT+D method. Results are in agreement with experimental data reported in literature, with minimal deviation given by the GTO/B3LYP-D* method regarding both axial lattice parameters and interaction energy and by PW/PBE-D for the unit-cell volume and angular values. All the considered methods adequately describe the experimental talc infrared spectrum.

Ulian, Gianfranco; Valdrè, Giovanni, E-mail: giovanni.valdre@unibo.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Biologiche e Geologico-Ambientali, Centro di Ricerca Interdisciplinare di Biomineralogia, Cristallografia e Biomateriali, Università di Bologna “Alma Mater Studiorum” Piazza di Porta San Donato 1, 40126 Bologna (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Scienze Biologiche e Geologico-Ambientali, Centro di Ricerca Interdisciplinare di Biomineralogia, Cristallografia e Biomateriali, Università di Bologna “Alma Mater Studiorum” Piazza di Porta San Donato 1, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Tosoni, Sergio [Departament de Química Física and Institut de Química Teòrica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)] [Departament de Química Física and Institut de Química Teòrica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

415

affirmative action program: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

programming Air pollution modeling: proportional rollback, Gaussian transport, emissions trading Location of waste disposal facilities, integer linear programming Dissolved...

416

Comparison of Production Costs and Resource Use for Organic and Conventional Production Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Comparison of Production Costs and Resource Use for Organic and Conventional Production Systems Karen Klonsky1 The USDA established the National Organic Program (NOP) to develop national standards for organically produced agricultural products and establish an organic certification program

Ferrara, Katherine W.

417

Oncor Energy Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oncor Energy Efficiency Programs November 19, 2014 For Oncor Internal Use Only ESL-KT-14-11-04 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Oncor Energy Efficiency Programs A Comparison of Trends For Oncor... Internal Use Only 2 ESL-KT-14-11-04 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 2012 – 2015 Energy Efficiency Goals Year Demand Goal MW Energy Goal MWh Basis 2012 53.1 93,031 25% of Average Load Growth 2013 54.6 95...

Betts, C.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Program School/ Career: Descripton ISIS Program Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program School/ Career: Descripton ISIS Program Codes Program Career: Descripton College School;Program School/ Career: Descripton ISIS Program Codes Program Career: Descripton College School/ College 1

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

419

Sandia National Laboratories: Inverter Reliability Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Generator Modeling Radar Friendly Blades Special Programs Techno-Economic Modeling, Analysis, and Support Analysis, Modeling, Cost of Energy, and Policy Impact: Wind Vision 2014...

420

Sandia National Laboratories: Utility Operations and Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Generator Modeling Radar Friendly Blades Special Programs Techno-Economic Modeling, Analysis, and Support Analysis, Modeling, Cost of Energy, and Policy Impact: Wind Vision 2014...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Protein and Peptide Letters 6, 429-436 (2001) AN EFFICIENT, FLEXIBLE-MODEL PROGRAM FOR THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the liquid phase of water, the temperature value for the y intercept (heat capacity) of all functions a constant Cp(T), linear heat capacity functions, and so on. We have developed a WindowsTM based program solutes in aqueous solution, the heat capacity contribution of protein molecules is small compared

Blaber, Michael

422

Integration of a sludge deposition model into the ATHOS3 computer program and application to a sample U-tube steam generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study pursues a approach to sludge deposition prediction, similar to that published by Keefer, et al.. Starting with the same basic model as Beal and Chen, Keefer, et al. made several simplifying assumptions so that a closed form solution to the equations describing deposition and reentrainment could be obtained. Using a similar approach, this study shows how the physics of the sludge model can be integrated directly into a steady-state thermal-hydraulic analysis computer program such as ATHOS3 to provide an estimate of the relative amounts of sludge expected to accumulate in various regions of a steam generator. This allows sludge deposition and reentrainment rates (i.e. rate coefficients) to be calculated at every node used to model the steam generator (which can be many thousands), so that sludge deposition patterns can readily be examined along with thermal-hydraulic parameters.

Keeton, L.W.; Keefer, R.H.; Clark, P.R.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Use of Federated Object Modeling to Develop a Macro-System Model for the U.S. Department of Energy's Hydrogen Program; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE is working on changing transportation fuel to hydrogen. To assist in that effort, we are developing a macro-system model that will link existing or developmental component models together.

Ruth, M. F.; Vanderveen, K. B.; Sa, T. J.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Accelerating Energy Savings Performance Contracting Through Model...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Accelerating Energy Savings Performance Contracting Through Model Statewide Programs Accelerating Energy Savings Performance Contracting Through Model Statewide Programs Provides...

425

Sponsored Program Resources SPONSORED PROGRAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sponsored Program Resources - 1 - SPONSORED PROGRAMS Sponsored programs are research, instruction for sponsored programs is provided through an agreement between the sponsor and Syracuse University are being achieved and funds properly used Sponsored programs are managed by the Office of Sponsored

Mather, Patrick T.

426

Program Manager  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will participate in a wide spectrum of program and project management activities involving systems engineering and integration support for Defense Programs...

427

Program Administration  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This volume describes program administration that establishes and maintains effective organizational management and control of the emergency management program. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.

1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

428

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. This report, Volume 2, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program SMECC (Substation Maximum Earth Current Computation Program). This program analyzes the electric current distribution among grounded structures inside and outside a substation for different fault conditions. The fault conditions are automatically selected by the program, or they may be specified by the user, or both. The fault condition resulting in maximum substation earth current is identified and reported. Data requirements for this program are: ground impedance, transformer data, transmission line data, transmission line grounding impedances, etc. The program provides four types of standard outputs: (1) a report of voltages and current flow in the unfaulted system, (2) a brief report of the maximum ground potential rise (worst fault condition), (3) a summary report of all fault conditions which have been analyzed by the program, and (4) a detailed report of voltages and current flow for a selected set of fault conditions.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. This report, Volume 3, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program SGSYS (Substation Grounding SYStem Analysis Program). This program analyzes the substation ground field given the total electric current injected into the ground field and the design of the grounding system. Standard outputs of the program are (1) total ground resistance, (2) step voltage, (3) touch voltage, (4) voltages on a grid of points, (5) voltage profile along straight lines, (6) transfer voltages, (7) ground potential rise, (8) body currents, (9) step voltage profile along straight lines, and (10) touch voltage profile along straight lines. This program can be utilized in an interactive or batch mode. In the interactive mode, the user defines the grounding system geometry, soil parameters, and output requests interactively, with the use of a user friendly conversational program. The users manual describes data requirements and data preparation procedures. An appendix provides forms which facilitate data collection procedures. The installation and validation manual describes the computer files which make up the program SGSYS and provides a test case for validation purposes.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Business Model Resources | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Run a Program Getting Started Business Model Resources Business Model Resources Business Models Guide Business Model Planning Resources - Working with Partners Sample Program...

431

TuCCompi: A Multi-Layer Programing Model for Heterogeneous Systems with Auto-Tuning Capabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

kernel. 4.5 Advanced TuCCompi Model Features TuCCompi model has additional functionalities and features for the functions, mas- ter (top) and slave (bottom), of the distribution plug-in. tational power, the master that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice

Llanos, Diego R.

432

A two-stage stochastic mixed-integer program modelling and hybrid solution approach to portfolio selection problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was developed by Harry Markowitz firstly in the 1950's. In his work, the PSP was formulated as the mean, in the classic MV model and other models of PSP (Chang, Meade et al. 2000, Kellerer, Mansini et al. 2000, Crama

Qu, Rong

433

Environmental Programs Environmental Programs Committee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

162 Environmental Programs Environmental Programs Committee Walter Whitfield Isle, Chair (English) Katherine Bennett Ensor (Statistics) Mark R. Wiesner (Civil and Environmental Engineering) Donald Ostdiek (Architecture) The Environmental Programs Committee coordinates courses and curricula on environmental topics

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

434

Comparison of the Vertical Velocity Used to Calculate the Cloud Droplet Number Concentration in a Cloud Resolving and a Global Climate Model  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity Involvement andMISR, and MODISPd/CeO/Ta/SiComparison

435

Comparison of the ANP model with the data for neutrino induced single pion production from the MiniBooNE and MINER$?$A experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present theoretical predictions in the framework of the ANP model for single pion production ($\\pi^+, \\pi^0$) in $\

J. -Y. Yu; E. A. Paschos; I. Schienbein

2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

436

Radioisotope-powered cardiac pacemaker program. Clinical studies of the nuclear pacemaker model NU-5. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beginning in February, 1970, the Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corporation (NUMEC) undertook a program to design, develop and manufacture a radioisotope powered cardiac pacemaker system. The scope of technical work was specified to be: establish system, component, and process cost reduction goals using the prototype Radioisotope Powered Cardiac Pacemaker (RCP) design and develop production techniques to achieve these cost reduction objectives; fabricate radioisotope powered fueled prototype cardiac pacemakers (RCP's) on a pilot production basis; conduct liaison with a Government-designated fueling facility for purposes of defining fueling requirements, fabrication and encapsulation procedures, safety design criteria and quality control and inspection requirements; develop and implement Quality Assurance and Reliability Programs; conduct performance, acceptance, lifetime and reliability tests of fueled RCP's in the laboratory; conduct liaison with the National Institutes of Health and with Government specified medical research institutions selected for the purpose of undertaking clinical evaluation of the RCP in humans; monitor and evaluate, on a continuing basis, all test data; and perform necessary safety analyses and tests. Pacemaker designs were developed and quality assurance and manufacturing procedures established. Prototype pacemakers were fabricated. A total of 126 radioisotope powered units were implanted and have been followed clinically for approximately seven years. Four (4) of these units have failed. Eighty-three (83) units remain implanted and satisfactorily operational. An overall failure rate of less than the target 0.15% per month has been achieved.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Construction of Energy Functions for Lattice Heteropolymer Models: A Case Study in Constraint Satisfaction Programming and Adiabatic Quantum Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization problems associated with the interaction of linked particles are at the heart of polymer science, protein folding and other important problems in the physical sciences. In this review we explain how to recast these problems as constraint satisfaction problems such as linear programming, maximum satisfiability, and pseudo-boolean optimization. By encoding problems this way, one can leverage substantial insight and powerful solvers from the computer science community which studies constraint programming for diverse applications such as logistics, scheduling, artificial intelligence, and circuit design. We demonstrate how to constrain and embed lattice heteropolymer problems using several strategies. Each strikes a unique balance between number of constraints, complexity of constraints, and number of variables. Finally, we show how to reduce the locality of couplings in these energy functions so they can be realized as Hamiltonians on existing quantum annealing machines. We intend that this review be used as a case study for encoding related combinatorial optimization problems in a form suitable for adiabatic quantum optimization.

Ryan Babbush; Alejandro Perdomo-Ortiz; Bryan O'Gorman; William Macready; Alán Aspuru-Guzik

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

438

A comparison of predicted wind turbine blade loads to test measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The accurate prediction of wind turbine blade loads and response is important in predicting the fatigue life of wind machines. At the SERI Wind Energy Research Center, a rotor code called FLAP (Force and Loads Analysis Program) is currently being validated by comparing predicted results to machine measurements. The FLAP code has been modified to allow the teetering degrees of freedom. This paper describes these modifications and comparisons of predicted blade bending moments to test measurements. Wind tunnel data for a 1/20th scale model will be used to compare FLAP predictions for the cyclic flap-bending moments at the 33% spanwise station for three different wind speeds. The comparisons will be made for both rigid and teetering hubs. Currently, the FLAP code accounts for deterministic excitations such as wind shear, tower shadow, gravity, and prescribed yawing motions. Conclusions will be made regarding the code's accuracy in predicting the cyclic bending moments.

Wright, A.D.; Thresher, R.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. It can be used to compute transient ground potential rise due to lightning or switching, and the ground impedance (i.e. resistance and reactance) at specified frequencies. This report, Volume 4, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program TGRND (Transient GRouNDing System Analysis Program). This program computes transient ground potential rise resulting from lightning, switching, or other transient electric currents injected to a grounding system. The program also computes the impedance (i.e. resistance and reactance) of a grounding system as a function of frequency. This program can be utilized in an interactive or batch mode. The users manual describes data requirements and data preparation procedures. The installation and validation manual describes the computer files which make up the program TGRND and provides a test case for validation purposes.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Wheat Improvement Programs WHEAT PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Royalty revenues, which assist funding of programs and attracting/retaining top scientists, have increased

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459 heat sweep model for estimating energy recovery from fractured geothermal reservoirs based on earlySTANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary

Stanford University

442

Comparison of a One-Dimensional Model of a High-Temperature Solid-Oxide Electrolysis Stack with CFD and Experimental Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A one-dimensional model has been developed to predict the thermal and electrochemical behavior of a high-temperature steam electrolysis stack. This electrolyzer model allows for the determination of the average Nernst potential, cell operating voltage, gas outlet temperatures, and electrolyzer efficiency for any specified inlet gas flow rates, current density, cell active area, and external heat loss or gain. The model includes a temperature-dependent area-specific resistance (ASR) that accounts for the significant increase in electrolyte ionic conductivity that occurs with increasing temperature. Model predictions are shown to compare favorably with results obtained from a fully 3-D computational fluid dynamics model. The one-dimensional model was also employed to demonstrate the expected trends in electrolyzer performance over a range of operating conditions including isothermal, adiabatic, constant steam utilization, constant flow rate, and the effects of operating temperature.

J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; G. L. Hawkes

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Comparison of Hydrodynamic Load Predictions Between Engineering Models and Computational Fluid Dynamics for the OC4-DeepCwind Semi-Submersible: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrodynamic loads on the platforms of floating offshore wind turbines are often predicted with computer-aided engineering tools that employ Morison's equation and/or potential-flow theory. This work compares results from one such tool, FAST, NREL's wind turbine computer-aided engineering tool, and the computational fluid dynamics package, OpenFOAM, for the OC4-DeepCwind semi-submersible analyzed in the International Energy Agency Wind Task 30 project. Load predictions from HydroDyn, the offshore hydrodynamics module of FAST, are compared with high-fidelity results from OpenFOAM. HydroDyn uses a combination of Morison's equations and potential flow to predict the hydrodynamic forces on the structure. The implications of the assumptions in HydroDyn are evaluated based on this code-to-code comparison.

Benitz, M. A.; Schmidt, D. P.; Lackner, M. A.; Stewart, G. M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

An indoorâ??outdoor building energy simulator to study urban modification effects on building energy use â?? Model description and validation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T.   Williamson, Urban surface energy balance modelsmodel of the international urban energy balance model comparison, The International Urban Energy Balance Models  Comparison 

Yaghoobian, Neda; Kleissl, Jan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

arXiv:nlin.CD/0607029v114Jul2006 APS/123-QED Modeling Time Series of Real Systems using Genetic Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Programming Dilip P. Ahalpara Institute for Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Gandhinagar-382428, India

Fernandez, Thomas

446

Comparison of isotropic elasto-plastic models for the plastic metric tensor $C_p=F_p^T\\, F_p$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss in detail existing isotropic elasto-plastic models based on 6-dimensional flow rules for the positive definite plastic metric tensor $C_p=F_p^T\\, F_p$ and highlight their properties and interconnections. We show that seemingly different models are equivalent in the isotropic case.

Patrizio Neff; Ionel-Dumitrel Ghiba

2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

447

Inter-comparison of the g-, f- and p-modes calculated using different oscillation codes for a given stellar model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to make astroseismology a powerful tool to explore stellar interiors, different numerical codes should give the same oscillation frequencies for the same input physics. This work is devoted to test, compare and, if needed, optimize the seismic codes used to calculate the eigenfrequencies to be finally compared with observations. The oscillation codes of nine research groups in the field have been used in this study. The same physics has been imposed for all the codes in order to isolate the non-physical dependence of any possible difference. Two equilibrium models with different grids, 2172 and 4042 mesh points, have been used, and the latter model includes an explicit modelling of semiconvection just outside the convective core. Comparing the results for these two models illustrates the effect of the number of mesh points and their distribution in particularly critical parts of the model, such as the steep composition gradient outside the convective core. A comprehensive study of the frequency diffe...

Moya, A; Charpinet, S; Lebreton, Y; Miglio, A; Montalban, J; Monteiro, M J P F G; Provost, J; Roxburgh, I W; Scuflaire, R; Suárez, J C; Suran, M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Millimeter-Wavelength Forward-Model Comparisons Based on Ground-Based Radiometric Data Taken During the 1999 NSA/AO Radiometric Experiment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,

449

programs in climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) project develops and maintains advanced numerical models of the ocean, sea ice, and ice sheets for use in global climate change

450

Academic Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Department of Mathematics offers a comprehensive educational program in applied and computational mathematics, and promotes both fundamental ...

451

Comparison of the National Green Building Standard (ICC 700-2008) and LEED for Homes to the Residential Provisions of the 2009 IECC for the Delaware Green for Green Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adhering to Delaware’s Green for Green program specifications results in homes being built to more energy-efficient levels than the 2009 IECC levels. Specifically: • Certifying at the Silver Performance Level for the ICC 700 standard using either the Prescriptive or Performance Paths will result in a residential building that is more efficient than if the building only complied with the 2009 IECC. • Certifying at the Silver level under LEED for Homes standard, including mandatory compliance with ENERGY STAR 2006 and earning two additional energy points will result in a residential building that is more efficient than if the building only complied with the 2009 IECC.

Britt, Michelle L.; Makela, Eric J.

2011-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

452

Local structure and thermodynamic properties of model fluids containing rod-like polymers: a comparison of theory and Monte Carlo simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rigid rod polymers are an interesting and commercially important class of materials. To manipulate these materials on the macroscopic scale, one must understand their behavior on the molecular level. This research investigated model fluids...

Dane, D. Merrill

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

TransCom N[subscript 2]O model inter-comparison – Part 2: Atmospheric inversion estimates of N[subscript 2]O emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study examines N[subscript 2]O emission estimates from five different atmospheric inversion frameworks based on chemistry transport models (CTMs). The five frameworks differ in the choice of CTM, meteorological data, ...

Thompson, R. L.

454

Implementing multi-step chemical kinetics models in opposed-flow flame spread over cellulose and a comparison to single-step chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multi-step, gas-phase chemical kinetics are introduced into flame spread modeling efforts. An unsteady multi-step, gas-phase kinetics model both with and without steady-state species assumptions, and including nonunit Lewis number, is compared with a model including a single, finite-rate gas-phase reaction, which has been the usual approach in flame spread modeling. Laminar diffusion flames over a thin fuel in an opposing O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} flow are considered with the solution in two-dimensional space of momentum, energy, and 12 gas-phase species. Results for the multi-step models show detailed flame structure in terms of species and heat release distributions throughout the flame and the role of chemical kinetics as a controlling mechanism in flame spread. Of particular interest is the potential of multi-step chemical kinetics in solutions at near-extinction limit conditions. While the incorporation of nonunit Le alone affords more detailed species transport, in high opposing flows it was found to give only minor structural differences form the single-step unit Le model. The multi-step chemistry allows for the gas kinetics to be self-adjusting to environmental conditions. As a result, the distribution of endothermicity and exothermicity throughout the flame and for particular reversible reactions is found to be a function of the flow environment, which overcomes a major drawback of single-step models, namely a fixed heat of combustion independent of environmental conditions, or one that must be determined separately from the model itself.

Wolverton, M.K.; Altenkirch, R.A.; Tang, L. [Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States)] [Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States)

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

COLD GASS, an IRAM Legacy Survey of Molecular Gas in Massive Galaxies: III. Comparison with semi-analytic models of galaxy formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compare the semi-analytic models of galaxy formation of Fu et al. (2010), which track the evolution of the radial profiles of atomic and molecular gas in galaxies, with gas fraction scaling relations derived from the COLD GASS survey (Saintonge et al 2011). The models provide a good description of how condensed baryons in galaxies with gas are partitioned into stars, atomic and molecular gas as a function of galaxy stellar mass and surface density. The models do not reproduce the tight observed relation between stellar surface density and bulge-to-disk ratio for this population. We then turn to an analysis of the"quenched" population of galaxies without detectable cold gas. The current implementation of radio-mode feedback in the models disagrees strongly with the data. In the models, gas cooling shuts down in nearly all galaxies in dark matter halos above a mass of 10**12 M_sun. As a result, stellar mass is the observable that best predicts whether a galaxy has little or no neutral gas. In contrast, our d...

Kauffmann, Guinevere; Fu, Jian; Saintonge, Amelie; Catinella, Barbara; Tacconi, Linda J; Kramer, Carsten; Genzel, Reinhard; Moran, Sean; Schiminovich, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

2008 Academic Program Review Graduate Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008 Academic Program Review of Graduate Programs November 2008 Texas A&M University College ........................................................................................................12 III. Graduate Program.....................................................................................................14 B. Educational Programs

457

Programs of Study Programs of Study.......................................... .42  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Programs ............................... .45 Minnesota Transfer Curriculum and Liberal Education41 Programs of Study Programs of Study.......................................... .42 UMC Degrees.................................................................................43 Certificates .......................................................................43 Program

Amin, S. Massoud

458

Technical reference book for the Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program is sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the purpose of developing current technical and cost information for nuclear and comparison electric power generating stations. The EEDB contains a variety of nuclear and coal-fired power plant technical data models. Each of these data models is a complete and detailed conceptual design for a single unit, commercial, steam electric, power generating station located on a standard hypothetical Middletown site. A major effort for the Sixth Update (1983) has been the updating of the system design descriptions and selected engineering drawings for the technical data models. This update took the form of revising and expanding the system design descriptions and engineering drawings contained in the Base Data Studies, to include the technical information developed and recorded in the first five EEDB updates. The results of the update effort are contained in this EEDB Program Technical Reference Book.

Allen, R.E.; Benedict, R.G.; Hodson, J.S.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Reactor Safety Research Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipeto- pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

Edler, S. K.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

What causes the large extensions of red-supergiant atmospheres? Comparisons of interferometric observations with 1-D hydrostatic, 3-D convection, and 1-D pulsating model atmospheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the atmospheric structure and the fundamental parameters of three red supergiants, increasing the sample of RSGs observed by near-infrared spectro-interferometry. Additionally, we test possible mechanisms that may explain the large observed atmospheric extensions of RSGs. We carried out spectro-interferometric observations of 3 RSGs in the near-infrared K-band with the VLTI/AMBER instrument at medium spectral resolution. To comprehend the extended atmospheres, we compared our observational results to predictions by available hydrostatic PHOENIX, available 3-D convection, and new 1-D self-excited pulsation models of RSGs. Our near-infrared flux spectra are well reproduced by the PHOENIX model atmospheres. The continuum visibility values are consistent with a limb-darkened disk as predicted by the PHOENIX models, allowing us to determine the angular diameter and the fundamental parameters of our sources. Nonetheless, in the case of V602 Car and HD 95686, the PHOENIX model visibilities do not predict ...

Arroyo-Torres, B; Chiavassa, A; Scholz, M; Freytag, B; Marcaide, J M; Hauschildt, P H; Wood, P R; Abellan, F J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Program Generation Considered Easy Invited Talk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program Generation Considered Easy Invited Talk Sam Kamin* Computer Science Department University program generators using the simple model of programs as text. The essence of this approach is its lack, in finding a willing audience for program generation among working programmers. Jumbo is a system

Kamin, Sam

462

Integrating Photovoltaic Systems into Low-Income Housing Developments: A Case Study on the Creation of a New Residential Financing Model and Low-Income Resident Job Training Program, September 2011 (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This case study covers the process of successfully integrating photovoltaic (PV) systems into a low-income housing development in northeast Denver, Colorado, focusing specifically on a new financing model and job training. The Northeast Denver Housing Center (NDHC), working in cooperation with Del Norte Neighborhood Development Corporation, Groundwork Denver, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was able to finance the PV system installations by blending private equity funding with utility rebates, federal tax credits, and public sector funding. A grant provided by the Governor's Energy Office allowed for the creation of the new financing model. In addition, the program incorporated an innovative low-income job training program and an energy conservation incentive program.

Dean, J.; Smith-Dreier, C.; Mekonnen, G.; Hawthorne, W.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Comparison of Nucleon Form Factors from Lattice QCD Against the Light Front Cloudy Bag Model and Extrapolation to the Physical Mass Regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the possibility of extrapolating state of the art lattice QCD calculations of nucleon form factors to the physical regime. We find that the lattice results can be reproduced using the Light Front Cloudy Bag Model by letting its parameters be analytic functions of the quark mass. We then use the model to extend the lattice calculations to large values of Q^{2} of interest to current and planned experiments. These functions are also used to define extrapolations to the physical value of the pion mass, thereby allowing us to study how the predicted zero in G_{E}(Q^{2})/G_{M}(Q^{2}) varies as a function of quark mass.

Hrayr H. Matevosyan; Gerald A. Miller; Anthony W. Thomas

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

464

Hydrologic Modeling Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Management Programs has both experience and technical knowledge to use and develop Earth systems models. Hydrological Modeling Models are simplified representations of...

465

Counterintelligence Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish the policies, procedures, and specific responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Counterintelligence (CI) Program. This directive does not cancel any other directive.

1992-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

466

Programming Stage  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter addresses plans for the acquisition and installation of operating environment hardware and software and design of a training program.

1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

467

Education Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

growth of the laboratory, and deployment of mission priorities. University Partnerships & Educational Outreach (UP&EO) programs provide students, teachers, and professors'...

468

LWRS Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What's New Archive Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Accomplishments Report: 2013 An accomplishments report highlighting progress in the development of the scientific...

469

LWRS Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

utilities across the industry (representing 70% of the existing LWR fleet) and Electric Power Research Institute advises the program. The Utility Working Group developed a...

470

Tool to Compare Solar Energy Program Financing Options | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Information Resources Tool to Compare Solar Energy Program Financing Options Tool to Compare Solar Energy Program Financing Options This model is intended to be used for...

471

Property-Assessed Clean Energy Programs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Financing Financing Structures Property-Assessed Clean Energy Programs Property-Assessed Clean Energy Programs The property-assessed clean energy (PACE) model is an...

472

Bad semidefinite programs: they all look the same 1 Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conic linear programs provide a natural framework to study duality in convex programs, and model a wide variety of practical optimization problems.

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

473

Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Tomography, Satellite Altimetry, and Modeling The ATOC to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore in the advective heat flux. Changes in oceanic heat storage are a major expected element of future climate shifts

Frandsen, Jannette B.

474

Sandia National Laboratories: SWiFT Research Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Generator Modeling Radar Friendly Blades Special Programs Techno-Economic Modeling, Analysis, and Support Analysis, Modeling, Cost of Energy, and Policy Impact: Wind Vision 2014...

475

Termination of Nondeterministic Quantum Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We define a language-independent model of nondeterministic quantum programs in which a quantum program consists of a finite set of quantum processes. These processes are represented by quantum Markov chains over the common state space. An execution of a nondeterministic quantum program is modeled by a sequence of actions of individual processes. These actions are described by super-operators on the state Hilbert space. At each step of an execution, a process is chosen nondeterministically to perform the next action. A characterization of reachable space and a characterization of diverging states of a nondeterministic quantum program are presented. We establish a zero-one law for termination probability of the states in the reachable space of a nondeterministic quantum program. A combination of these results leads to a necessary and sufficient condition for termination of nondeterministic quantum programs. Based on this condition, an algorithm is found for checking termination of nondeterministic quantum programs within a fixed finite-dimensional state space. A striking difference between nondeterministic classical and quantum programs is shown by example: it is possible that each of several quantum programs simulates the same classical program which terminates with probability 1, but the nondeterministic program consisting of them terminates with probability 0 due to the interference carried in the execution of them.

Yangjia Li; Nengkun Yu; Mingsheng Ying

2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

476

Comparisons of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry based on physical input-output life-cycle assessment model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using crop straws and wood wastes for paper production should be promoted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bagasse and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Imports of scrap paper should be encouraged. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sensitivity analysis, uncertainties and policy implications are discussed. - Abstract: Waste recycling for paper production is an important component of waste management. This study constructs a physical input-output life-cycle assessment (PIO-LCA) model. The PIO-LCA model is used to investigate environmental impacts of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry: crop straws, bagasse, textile wastes and scrap paper. Crop straw recycling and wood utilization for paper production have small total intensity of environmental impacts. Moreover, environmental impacts reduction of crop straw recycling and wood utilization benefits the most from technology development. Thus, using crop straws and wood (including wood wastes) for paper production should be promoted. Technology development has small effects on environmental impacts reduction of bagasse recycling, textile waste recycling and scrap paper recycling. In addition, bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling have big total intensity of environmental impacts. Thus, the development of bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Other pathways for reusing bagasse and textile wastes should be explored and evaluated. Moreover, imports of scrap paper should be encouraged to reduce large indirect impacts of scrap paper recycling on domestic environment.

Liang Sai [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Tianzhu, E-mail: zhangtz@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Xu Yijian [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); China Academy of Urban Planning and Design, Beijing 100037 (China)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The five volume report comprises the user manual, installation, and validation manual and an applications guide for the SGA (Substation Grounding Analysis) software package. SGA consists of four computer programs: (1) SOMIP, (2) SMECC, (3) SGSYS, and (4) TGRND. The first three programs provide a comprehensive analysis tool for the design of substation grounding systems to meet safety standards. The fourth program, TGRND, provides a state of the art analysis tool for computing transient ground potential rise and ground system impedance. This part of the report, Volume 1, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program SOMIP (SOil Measurement Interpretation Program). This program computes the best estimate of the parameters of a two layer soil model from usual soil resistivity measurements. Four pin or three pin soil measurements can be accommodated. In addition, it provides error bounds on the soil parameters for a given confidence level. The users manual describes data requirements and data preparation procedures. The installation and validation manual describes the computer files which make up the program SOMIP and provides two test cases for validation purposes. 4 refs.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Electrical Engineering)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Analysis, comparison, and modeling of radar interferometry, date of surface deformation signals associated with underground explosions, mine collapses and earthquakes. Phase I: underground explosions, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have previously presented simple elastic deformation modeling results for three classes of seismic events of concern in monitoring the CTBT--underground explosions, mine collapses and earthquakes. Those results explored the theoretical detectability of each event type using synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) based on commercially available satellite data. In those studies we identified and compared the characteristics of synthetic interferograms that distinguish each event type, as well the ability of the interferograms to constrain source parameters. These idealized modeling results, together with preliminary analysis of InSAR data for the 1995 mb 5.2 Solvay mine collapse in southwestern Wyoming, suggested that InSAR data used in conjunction with regional seismic monitoring holds great potential for CTBT discrimination and seismic source analysis, as well as providing accurate ground truth parameters for regional calibration events. In this paper we further examine the detectability and ''discriminating'' power of InSAR by presenting results from InSAR data processing, analysis and modeling of the surface deformation signals associated with underground explosions. Specifically, we present results of a detailed study of coseismic and postseismic surface deformation signals associated with underground nuclear and chemical explosion tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Several interferograms were formed from raw ERS-1/2 radar data covering different time spans and epochs beginning just prior to the last U.S. nuclear tests in 1992 and ending in 1996. These interferograms have yielded information about the nature and duration of the source processes that produced the surface deformations associated with these events. A critical result of this study is that significant post-event surface deformation associated with underground nuclear explosions detonated at depths in excess of 600 meters can be detected using differential radar interferometry. An immediate implication of this finding is that underground nuclear explosions may not need to be captured coseismically by radar images acquired before and after an event in order to be detectable. This has obvious advantages in CTBT monitoring since suspect seismic events--which usually can be located within a 100 km by 100 km area of an ERS-1/2 satellite frame by established seismic methods-can be imaged after the event has been identified and located by existing regional seismic networks. Key Words: InSAR, SLC images, interferogram, synthetic interferogram, ERS-1/2 frame, phase unwrapping, DEM, coseismic, postseismic, source parameters.

Foxall, W; Vincent, P; Walter, W

1999-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

479

The Weatherization Training program at Pennsylvania College  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A look into some of the remarkable work being done in the Weatherization Training program at Pennsylvania College. Penn College's program has served as the model for six other training centers in Pennsylvania alone.

Meville, Jeff; Wilson, Jack; Manz, John; Gannett, Kirk; Smith, Franzennia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

The Weatherization Training program at Pennsylvania College  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A look into some of the remarkable work being done in the Weatherization Training program at Pennsylvania College. Penn College's program has served as the model for six other training centers in Pennsylvania alone.

Meville, Jeff; Wilson, Jack; Manz, John; Gannett, Kirk; Smith, Franzennia;

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Hanford internal dosimetry program manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry program. Program Services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessments of internal exposure and dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating internal radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. 13 refs., 16 figs., 42 tabs.

Carbaugh, E.H.; Sula, M.J.; Bihl, D.E.; Aldridge, T.L.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Fluctuations and Correlations of net baryon number, electric charge, and strangeness: A comparison of lattice QCD results with the hadron resonance gas model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the quadratic fluctuations of net baryon number, electric charge and strangeness as well as correlations among these conserved charges in (2+1)-flavor lattice QCD at zero chemical potential. Results are obtained using calculations with tree level improved gauge and the highly improved staggered quark (HISQ) actions with almost physical light and strange quark masses at three different values of the lattice cut-off. Our choice of parameters corresponds to a value of 160 MeV for the lightest pseudo scalar Goldstone mass and a physical value of the kaon mass. The three diagonal charge susceptibilities and the correlations among conserved charges have been extrapolated to the continuum limit in the temperature interval 150 MeV net baryon number fluctuations in QCD agree with HRG model calculations while, the net electric charge fluctuations in QCD are about 10% smaller and net strangeness fluctuations are about 20% larger. These findings are relevant to the discussion of freeze-out conditions in relativistic heavy ion collisions.

A. Bazavov; Tanmoy Bhattacharya; C. E. DeTar; H. -T. Ding; Steven Gottlieb; Rajan Gupta; P. Hegde; Urs Heller; F. Karsch; E. Laermann; L. Levkova; Swagato Mukherjee; P. Petreczky; Christian Schmidt; R. A. Soltz; W. Soeldner; R. Sugar; Pavlos M. Vranas

2012-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

483

From square-well to Janus: Improved algorithm for integral equation theory and comparison with thermodynamic perturbation theory within the Kern-Frenkel model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building upon past work on the phase diagram of Janus fluids [F. Sciortino, A. Giacometti, and G. Pastore, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 237801 (2009)], we perform a detailed study of integral equation theory of the Kern-Frenkel potential with coverage that is tuned from the isotropic square-well fluid to the Janus limit. An improved algorithm for the reference hypernetted-chain (RHNC) equation for this problem is implemented that significantly extends the range of applicability of RHNC. Results for both structure and thermodynamics are presented and compared with numerical simulations. Unlike previous attempts, this algorithm is shown to be stable down to the Janus limit, thus paving the way for analyzing the frustration mechanism characteristic of the gas-liquid transition in the Janus system. The results are also compared with Barker-Henderson thermodynamic perturbation theory on the same model. We then discuss the pros and cons of both approaches within a unified treatment. On balance, RHNC integral equation theory, even with an isotropic hard-sphere reference system, is found to be a good compromise between accuracy of the results, computational effort, and uniform quality to tackle self-assem