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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: BuildingComparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Buildingof comparing three Building Energy Modeling Programs (BEMPs)

Zhu, Dandan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: BuildingComparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: HVACassumptions of three building energy modeling programs (

Zhou, Xin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

A detailed loads comparison of three building energy modeling programs:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

detailed loads comparison of three building energy modeling programs: detailed loads comparison of three building energy modeling programs: EnergyPlus, DeST and DOE-2.1E Title A detailed loads comparison of three building energy modeling programs: EnergyPlus, DeST and DOE-2.1E Publication Type Journal Year of Publication 2013 Authors Zhu, Dandan, Tianzhen Hong, Da Yan, and Chuang Wang Date Published 05/2013 Keywords building energy modeling program, building thermal loads, comparison, dest, DOE-2.1E, energyplus Abstract Building energy simulation is widely used to help design energy efficient building envelopes and HVAC systems, develop and demonstrate compliance of building energy codes, and implement building energy rating programs. However, large discrepancies exist between simulation results from different building energy modeling programs (BEMPs). This leads many users and stakeholders

4

Building energy modeling programs comparison Research on HVAC systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy modeling programs comparison Research on HVAC systems energy modeling programs comparison Research on HVAC systems simulation part Title Building energy modeling programs comparison Research on HVAC systems simulation part Publication Type Journal Year of Publication 2013 Authors Zhou, Xin, Da Yan, Tianzhen Hong, and Dandan Zhu Keywords Building energy modeling programs, comparison tests, HVAC system simulation, theory analysis Abstract Building energy simulation programs are effective tools for the evaluation of building energy saving and optimization of design. The fact that large discrepancies exist in simulated results when different BEMPs are used to model the same building has caused wide concern. Urgent research is needed to identify the main elements that contribute towards the simulation results. This technical report summarizes methodologies, processes, and the main assumptions of three building energy modeling programs (BEMPs) for HVAC calculations: EnergyPlus, DeST, and DOE-2.1E, and test cases are designed to analyze the calculation process in detail. This will help users to get a better understanding of BEMPs and the research methodology of building simulation. This will also help build a foundation for building energy code development and energy labeling programs.

5

A comparison of three programming models for adaptive applications on the Origin2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adaptive applications have computational workloads and communication patterns which change unpredictably at runtime, requiring dynamic load balancing to achieve scalable performance on parallel machines. Efficient parallel implementations of such adaptive applications is therefore a challenging task. In this paper, we compare the performance of and the programming effort required for two major classes of adaptive applications under three leading parallel programming models on an SGI Origin2000 system, a machine which supports all three models efficiently. Results indicate that the three models deliver comparable performance; however, the implementations differ significantly beyond merely using explicit messages versus implicit loads/stores even though the basic parallel algorithms are similar. Compared with the message-passing (using MPI) and SHMEM programming models, the cache-coherent shared address space (CC-SAS) model provides substantial ease of programming at both the conceptual and program orchestration levels, often accompanied by performance gains. However, CC-SAS currently has portability limitations and may suffer from poor spatial locality of physically distributed shared data on large numbers of processors.

Shan, Hongzhang; Singh, Jaswinder Pal; Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak

2001-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

6

Comparison of Home Retrofit Programs in Wisconsin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To explore ways to reduce customer barriers and increase home retrofit completions, several different existing home retrofit models have been implemented in the state of Wisconsin. This study compared these programs' performance in terms of savings per home and program cost per home to assess the relative cost-effectiveness of each program design. However, given the many variations in these different programs, it is difficult to establish a fair comparison based on only a small number of metrics. Therefore, the overall purpose of the study is to document these programs' performance in a case study approach to look at general patterns of these metrics and other variables within the context of each program. This information can be used by energy efficiency program administrators and implementers to inform home retrofit program design. Six different program designs offered in Wisconsin for single-family energy efficiency improvements were included in the study. For each program, the research team provided information about the programs' approach and goals, characteristics, achievements and performance. The program models were then compared with performance results -- program cost and energy savings -- to help understand the overall strengths and weaknesses or challenges of each model.

Cunningham, K.; Hannigan, E.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Model Comparison of Avalanche Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vertically resolved profiles of the mean downslope flow velocity of snow have been measured on the snow chute of the SLF at Weissfluhjoch during winter 2003/04. We used correlation of reflexivity measurements at the side walls and at the centerline of the chute. Several possible physical scenarios describing the snow flow lead to different models with different degrees of freedom. Bayesian model comparison has been used to answer the question which of the physical models is most likely in the light of the available data.

U. von Toussaint; M. Kern

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

EMTP transient modeling of a distance relay and a comparison with EMTP laboratory testing. [ElectroMagnetics Transient Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on a method to test the transient performance of a sampled-data relay. A model of one measuring unit of a digital relay was created on a personal computer. The simulations are compared with laboratory results obtained by applying digitally generated waveforms to the actual relay. Computer modelling of the digital relay is done within the Models version of the Transient Analysis of Control System (TACS) subsection of the ElectroMagnetics Transient Program (EMTP). The input filter, analog to digital converter, Fourier fundamental frequency detector, and the relay measuring principle of one digital microprocessor based relay are modeled. The modeling of these components within an EMTP environment represents new work. An actual 115 Kv 150 mile long transmission line was simulated using the EMTP. The faults simulated on the transmission line were applied both to the digital model of the relay and the actual relay. The physical testing used the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Relay Evaluation System (RES). Results from the digital relay simulation are compared with results from an actual relay. The educational value of observing relay waveforms at various stages within the simulation is discussed.

Wilson, R.E. (Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)); Nordstrom, J.M. (Bonneville Power Administration, Vancouver, WA (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Model-driven constraint programming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Constraint programming can definitely be seen as a model-driven paradigm. The users write programs for modeling problems. These programs are mapped to executable models to calculate the solutions. This paper focuses on efficient model management (definition ... Keywords: constraint modeling languages, constraint programming, metamodeling, model transformation

Raphaël Chenouard; Laurent Granvilliers; Ricardo Soto

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Comparison of Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs: Rebates and White  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Comparison of Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs: Rebates and White Comparison of Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs: Rebates and White Certificates **Subscription Required** Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Comparison of Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs: Rebates and White Certificates **Subscription Required** Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, - Utility Topics: Environmental Website: www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0957178709000460 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/comparison-energy-efficiency-incentiv Language: English Policies: "Financial Incentives,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Mandates/Targets This analysis utilizes New Jersey data to compare two incentive based

11

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Guide: Utility Program Administrator Market Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Utility Program Administrator Market Utility program administrator market...

12

National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Topics: GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.iea.org/papers/2009/Mitigation_potentials.pdf References: National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models[1] Summary "This paper focuses on mitigation potential to provide a comparative assessment across key economies. GHG mitigation potential is defined here to be the level of GHG emission reductions that could be realised, relative

13

Semantic comparison of structured visual dataflow programs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The diff utility is an important basic tool, providing a foundation for many of the fundamental practices of software development, such as source code management. While there are many file differencing tools for textual programming languages, including ... Keywords: code management, graph isomorphism, heuristic search, semantic difference, structured dataflow, visual programming language

Philip T. Cox; Anh Dang

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Guide: HVAC Contractor Business Model Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: HVAC Contractor Business Model HVAC contractor business model...

15

Comparison of Real World Energy Consumption to Models and DOE...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Comparison of Real World Energy Consumption to Models and DOE Test Procedures Comparison of Real World Energy Consumption to Models and DOE Test Procedures This study investigates...

16

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Model Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Business Model Business Model Resources to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Model Resources on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Model Resources on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Model Resources on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Model Resources on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Model Resources on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Model Resources on AddThis.com... Getting Started Assess the Market Establish Goals & Objectives Develop Plans of Action Business Model Resources Driving Demand Financing Workforce Development Business Model Resources Business Models Workshop and Materials

17

State Energy Program: Kentucky Implementation Model Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below are resources associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs Office State Energy Program Kentucky Implementation Model.

18

Program Transformations in Weak Memory Models   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyse the validity of common optimisations on multi-threaded programs in two memory models—the DRF guarantee and the Java Memory Model. Unlike in the single-threaded world, even simple program transformations, such ...

Sevcik, Jaroslav

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Extending algebraic modelling languages for Stochastic Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Stochastic Programming Integrated Environment) which facilitates modelling and .... management and pension funds management (Ziemba and Mulvey 1998)

Robert Fourer

2006-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

20

The ASC Sequoia Programming Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1980's and early 1990's, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was deeply engrossed in determining the next generation programming model for the Integrated Design Codes (IDC) beyond vectorization for the Cray 1s series of computers. The vector model, developed in mid 1970's first for the CDC 7600 and later extended from stack based vector operation to memory to memory operations for the Cray 1s, lasted approximately 20 years (See Slide 5). The Cray vector era was deemed an extremely long lived era as it allowed vector codes to be developed over time (the Cray 1s were faster in scalar mode than the CDC 7600) with vector unit utilization increasing incrementally over time. The other attributes of the Cray vector era at LLNL were that we developed, supported and maintained the Operating System (LTSS and later NLTSS), communications protocols (LINCS), Compilers (Civic Fortran77 and Model), operating system tools (e.g., batch system, job control scripting, loaders, debuggers, editors, graphics utilities, you name it) and math and highly machine optimized libraries (e.g., SLATEC, and STACKLIB). Although LTSS was adopted by Cray for early system generations, they later developed COS and UNICOS operating systems and environment on their own. In the late 1970s and early 1980s two trends appeared that made the Cray vector programming model (described above including both the hardware and system software aspects) seem potentially dated and slated for major revision. These trends were the appearance of low cost CMOS microprocessors and their attendant, departmental and mini-computers and later workstations and personal computers. With the wide spread adoption of Unix in the early 1980s, it appeared that LLNL (and the other DOE Labs) would be left out of the mainstream of computing without a rapid transition to these 'Killer Micros' and modern OS and tools environments. The other interesting advance in the period is that systems were being developed with multiple 'cores' in them and called Symmetric Multi-Processor or Shared Memory Processor (SMP) systems. The parallel revolution had begun. The Laboratory started a small 'parallel processing project' in 1983 to study the new technology and its application to scientific computing with four people: Tim Axelrod, Pete Eltgroth, Paul Dubois and Mark Seager. Two years later, Eugene Brooks joined the team. This team focused on Unix and 'killer micro' SMPs. Indeed, Eugene Brooks was credited with coming up with the 'Killer Micro' term. After several generations of SMP platforms (e.g., Sequent Balance 8000 with 8 33MHz MC32032s, Allian FX8 with 8 MC68020 and FPGA based Vector Units and finally the BB&N Butterfly with 128 cores), it became apparent to us that the killer micro revolution would indeed take over Crays and that we definitely needed a new programming and systems model. The model developed by Mark Seager and Dale Nielsen focused on both the system aspects (Slide 3) and the code development aspects (Slide 4). Although now succinctly captured in two attached slides, at the time there was tremendous ferment in the research community as to what parallel programming model would emerge, dominate and survive. In addition, we wanted a model that would provide portability between platforms of a single generation but also longevity over multiple--and hopefully--many generations. Only after we developed the 'Livermore Model' and worked it out in considerable detail did it become obvious that what we came up with was the right approach. In a nutshell, the applications programming model of the Livermore Model posited that SMP parallelism would ultimately not scale indefinitely and one would have to bite the bullet and implement MPI parallelism within the Integrated Design Code (IDC). We also had a major emphasis on doing everything in a completely standards based, portable methodology with POSIX/Unix as the target environment. We decided against specialized libraries like STACKLIB for performance, but kept as many general purpose, portable math libraries as were needed by the co

Seager, M

2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Analysing earthquake slip models with the spatial prediction comparison test  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......slip models with the spatial prediction comparison test Ling Zhang 1 P. Martin Mai 1 Kiran K.S. Thingbaijam...performance of the spatial prediction comparison test (SPCT), a statistical test developed to compare spatial (random) fields by......

Ling Zhang; P. Martin Mai; Kiran K.S. Thingbaijam; Hoby N.T. Razafindrakoto; Marc G. Genton

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Program Plan Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program Plan The NEAMS program plan includes information on the program vision, objective, scope, schedule and...

23

Comparison of Photovoltaic Models in the System Advisor Model: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The System Advisor Model (SAM) is free software developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for predicting the performance of renewable energy systems and analyzing the financial feasibility of residential, commercial, and utility-scale grid-connected projects. SAM offers several options for predicting the performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems. The model requires that the analyst choose from three PV system models, and depending on that choice, possibly choose from three module and two inverter component models. To obtain meaningful results from SAM, the analyst must be aware of the differences between the model options and their applicability to different modeling scenarios. This paper presents an overview the different PV model options and presents a comparison of results for a 200-kW system using different model options.

Blair, N. J.; Dobos, A. P.; Gilman, P.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Models comparison for JET polarimeter data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A complete comparison between the theory and the measurements in polarimetry was done by using the Far Infrared Polarimeter at JET. More than 300 shots were analyzed, including a wide spectrum of JET scenarios in all critical conditions for polarimetry: high density, high and very low fields, high temperatures.This work is aimed at the demonstration of the robustness of the theoretical models for the JET polarimeter measurements in the perspective of using these models for ITER like plasma scenarios . In this context, an assessment was performed on how the line-integrated plasma density along the central vertical chord of FIR polarimeter could be evaluated using the Cotton-Mouton effect and its possible concrete use to correct fringe jumps of the interferometer.The models considered are: i) the rigorous numerical solution of the Stokes propagation equations, using dielectric tensor evaluated from JET equilibrium and Thomson scattering [1,2]; ii) two types of approximated solutions [2,3] and iii) the Guenther empirical model [4] that considers the mutual effect between Cotton-Mouton and Faraday rotation angle. The model calculations have been compared with polarimeter measurements for the Cotton-Mouton phase shift.The agreement with theory is satisfactory within the limits of experimental errors [3].

Mazzotta, C.; Orsitto, F. P.; Giovannozzi, E. [Centro Ricerche Energia Frascati, Euratom-ENEA Association, Frascati (Italy); Boboc, A.; Tudisco, O.; Zabeo, L. [Association EURATOM-UKAEA Culham Science Centre Abingdon 0X14 3DB (UK) (United Kingdom); Brombin, M.; Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Association, Padova (Italy)

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

25

NETL: Predictive Modeling and Evaluation - TVA Model Comparison  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ozone/PM2.5 Formation & Transport Model Comparison Ozone/PM2.5 Formation & Transport Model Comparison Future regulatory actions for mitigating PM2.5 concentrations will rely, to some extent, on results from large-scale atmospheric models. The most efficient approach to evaluating regulatory actions is to use an integrated approach that examines multiple air quality impacts simultaneously. This is because of the strong linkage between PM2.5 levels, visibility degradation, ozone and acidic deposition. Thus, regional modeling of the impacts on PM2.5 levels from proposed emission reductions should be evaluated in terms of computed impacts not only on PM2.5 levels, but on ozone and acidic deposition as well. TVA is an active participant in the only ongoing assessment of this type, which is being done for the Southern Appalachian Mountains Initiative (SAMI) as part of its integrated assessment in the southeastern United States. SAMI, with its focus on protecting PSD Class I areas, is using a model called URM that can examine all the aforementioned phenomena at once. In addition, URM has the capability, which SAMI intends to use, of efficiently examining the sensitivity of model outputs to changes in emissions across the entire modeling domain. Finally, SAMI will use URM to test various emission management options (EMOs) for mitigating impacts in the southern Appalachians. These EMOs will include controls on various source sectors, including energy.

26

Gold Standard Program Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gold Standard Program Model Gold Standard Program Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Gold Standard Program Model Agency/Company /Organization: World Wildlife Fund Sector: Climate, Energy User Interface: Other Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.cdmgoldstandard.org/project-certification/rules-and-toolkit Cost: Paid Related Tools Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program (BenMAP) MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model ProForm ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS A bottom-up method of certifying Kyoto Protocol Clean Development Mechanism projects and voluntary programs that result in verifiable co-benefits. Approach It is a bottom up method of certifying Kyoto Protocol Clean Development Mechanism projects as well as voluntary programs that result in verifiable

27

PNNL Support of the DOE GTO Model Comparison Activity  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

PNNL Support of the DOE GTO Model Comparison Activity presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

28

Posters A Comparison of Model-Simulated Relative Humidity with...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Posters A Comparison of Model-Simulated Relative Humidity with Satellite-Derived Cloudiness R. J. Alliss and S. Raman Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences North...

29

Property:Data Comparison to Computational Models | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Comparison to Computational Models Comparison to Computational Models Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Data Comparison to Computational Models Property Type Text Pages using the property "Data Comparison to Computational Models" Showing 14 pages using this property. A Alden Large Flume + Designed as needed Alden Small Flume + Designed as needed Alden Tow Tank + Velocity, flow characteristics Alden Wave Basin + Wave height, period, length, velocity D Davidson Laboratory Tow Tank + Comparisons to validate and improve CFD models are made periodically. M MHL Free Surface Channel + Custom MHL Data Acquisition System includes graphical displays for the results of each sampling channel. MHL Tow Tank + Custom MHL Data Acquisition System includes graphical displays for the results of each sampling channel.

30

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

31

2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Program Peer Review  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability held a peer review of the Advanced Grid Modeling Program on June 17-18, 2014 in Alexandria, VA. This page lists the four sessions of the Peer Review.

32

Automatic programming of AGVS simulation models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

restricted its rule base and stack size. While expanded memory to 2M bytes is available for these machines, Turbo Prolog is not currently designed to utilize the Lotus/Intel/MicroSoft protocol necessary for supporting this environment. This problem might...). The modeling system is capable of guiding and assisting the engineer with a level of "expertise" comparable to a trained simulation specialist. The modeling support program is an automatic programming system, written in Turbo Prolog which generates...

Brazier, Mark Kevin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

33

2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Program Peer Review Presentations...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Grid Modeling Program Peer Review Presentations Now Available 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Program Peer Review Presentations Now Available July 10, 2014 - 6:01pm Addthis...

34

Model Policies | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Center Center Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center FAQs Publications Resource Guides eLearning Model Policies Glossary Related Links ACE Learning Series Utility Savings Estimators Model Policies States and local jurisdictions across the nation have demonstrated leadership in developing programs and policies that both encourage and require compliance with energy codes, stretch codes (e.g., above-minimum codes) and green building techniques, energy-efficiency practices, and environmentally-friendly procedures. The laws and regulations behind these programs and policies can help states and jurisdictions establish unique policies to address their particular needs. Model policies for residential and commercial building construction have

35

COMPARISON OF KERNELBASED MODELS FOR BINARY CLASSIFICATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL DATA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COMPARISON OF KERNEL­BASED MODELS FOR BINARY CLASSIFICATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL DATA V. Polishchuk ABSTRACT The task of real­world environmental data classification was approached with different models simulation -- which arise in environmental modeling, classification between two classes may be considered

36

Cooperative global security programs modeling & simulation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The national laboratories global security programs implement sustainable technical solutions for cooperative nonproliferation, arms control, and physical security systems worldwide. To help in the development and execution of these programs, a wide range of analytical tools are used to model, for example, synthetic tactical environments for assessing infrastructure protection initiatives and tactics, systematic approaches for prioritizing nuclear and biological threat reduction opportunities worldwide, and nuclear fuel cycle enrichment and spent fuel management for nuclear power countries. This presentation will describe how these models are used in analyses to support the Obama Administration's agenda and bilateral/multinational treaties, and ultimately, to reduce weapons of mass destruction and terrorism threats through international technical cooperation.

Briand, Daniel

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Comparison of the performance of different bioassessment methods: similar evaluations of biotic integrity from separate programs and procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

area and subsampling procedures on comparisons of taxaseparate programs and procedures David B. Herbst 1 Sierrasorting, and laboratory procedures used in stream benthic

Herbst, David B

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Model Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide Model Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Model Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.epa.gov/cleanenergy/documents/suca/evaluation_guide.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/model-energy-efficiency-program-impac Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This document provides guidance on model approaches for calculating energy, demand and emissions savings resulting from energy efficiency programs. It

39

A comparison of rule inheritance in model-to-model transformation languages  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although model transformations presumably play a major role in Model-Driven Engineering, reuse mechanisms such as inheritance have received little attention so far. In this paper, we propose a comparison framework for rule inheritance in declarative ... Keywords: comparison, model transformations, rule inheritance

Manuel Wimmer; Gerti Kappel; Angelika Kusel; Werner Retschitzegger; Johannes Schönböck; Wieland Schwinger; Dimitris Kolovos; Richard Paige; Marius Lauder; Andy Schürr; Dennis Wagelaar

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Shared memory optimizations for distributed memory programming models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the world of parallel programming, there are two major classes of programming models: shared memory and distributed memory. Shared memory models share all memory by default, and are most effective on multi-processor systems. Distributed memory models ...

Andrew Friedley / Andrew Lumsdaine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Comparison of ?Z-structure function models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ?Z-box is an important contribution to the proton's weak charge. The ?Z-box is calculated dispersively and depends on ?Z-structure functions, F{sub 1,2,3}{sup ?Z}(x,Q{sup 2}). At present there is no data for these structure functions and they must be modeled by modifying existing fits to electromagnetic data. Each group that has studied the ?Z-box used different modifications. The results of the PVDIS experiment at Jefferson Lab may provide a first test of the validity of each group's models. I present details of the different models and their predictions for the PVDIS result.

Rislow, Benjamin C. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

42

Modeling for surge control of centrifugal compresssors: comparison with experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

con- trol design, of a centrifugal compression system is vali- dated. Compressor surge is an unwanted to centrifugal compressors. Since compressors are vari- able speed machines, and surge is commonly encoun- teredModeling for surge control of centrifugal compresssors: comparison with experiment Jan Tommy

Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

43

RELIABILITY COMPARISON MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES (OWT)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RELIABILITY COMPARISON MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES (OWT) Yizhou Lu, T. M. Delorm, A. Christou of the reliability of these 5 Types Surrogate failure rate data Onshore wind turbines (OT) 1-1.5MW CONCLUSIONS., Faulstich, S. & van Bussel G. J. W. Reliability & availability of wind turbine electrical & electronic

Bernstein, Joseph B.

44

MicroShield/ISOCS gamma modeling comparison.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative radiological analysis attempts to determine the quantity of activity or concentration of specific radionuclide(s) in a sample. Based upon the certified standards that are used to calibrate gamma spectral detectors, geometric similarities between sample shape and the calibration standards determine if the analysis results developed are qualitative or quantitative. A sample analyzed that does not mimic a calibrated sample geometry must be reported as a non-standard geometry and thus the results are considered qualitative and not quantitative. MicroShieldR or ISOCSR calibration software can be used to model non-standard geometric sample shapes in an effort to obtain a quantitative analytical result. MicroShieldR and Canberra's ISOCSR software contain several geometry templates that can provide accurate quantitative modeling for a variety of sample configurations. Included in the software are computational algorithms that are used to develop and calculate energy efficiency values for the modeled sample geometry which can then be used with conventional analysis methodology to calculate the result. The response of the analytical method and the sensitivity of the mechanical and electronic equipment to the radionuclide of interest must be calibrated, or standardized, using a calibrated radiological source that contains a known and certified amount of activity.

Sansone, Kenneth R

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Agency/Company /Organization: Future Perfect Sector: Climate Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development, Greenhouse Gas Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Training materials Website: www.gpstrategiesltd.com/divisions/future-perfect/ Country: South Korea Eastern Asia Language: English References: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling[1] Logo: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Jointly sponsored by Greenhouse Gas Inventory & Research (GIR) Center of

46

genBRDF: Synthesizing Novel Analytic BRDFs with Genetic Programming Figure 1: Comparison of BRDFs modeling the tungsten carbide material from the MERL BRDF database. Each scene consists of a sphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of BRDFs modeling the tungsten carbide material from the MERL BRDF database. Each scene consists that remains between state-of-the-art analytic BRDFs and measured data in the case of tungsten carbide

Weimer, Westley

47

A Comparison of Single Column Model Simulations of Summertime Midlatitude Continental Convection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eleven different single-column models (SCMs) and one cloud ensemble model (CEM) are driven by boundary conditions observed at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program southern Great Plains site for a 17 day period during the summer of 1995. Comparison of the model simulations reveals common signatures identifiable as products of errors in the boundary conditions. Intermodel differences in the simulated temperature, humidity, cloud, precipitation, and radiative fluxes reflect differences in model resolution or physical parameterizations, although sensitive dependence on initial conditions can also contribute to intermodel differences. All models perform well at times but poorly at others. Although none of the SCM simulations stands out as superior to the others, the simulation by the CEM is in several respects in better agreement with the observations than the simulations by the SCMs. Nudging of the simulated temperature and humidity toward observations generally improves the simulated cloud and radiation fields as well as the simulated temperature and humidity but degrades the precipitation simulation for models with large temperature and humidity biases without nudging. Although some of the intermodel differences have not been explained, others have been identified as model problems that can be or have been corrected as a result of the comparison.

Ghan, Steven J.; Randall, David A.; Xu, Kuan-Man; Cederwall, Richard; Cripe, Douglas; Hack, James; Iacobellis, Sam; Klein, Stephen; Krueger, Steven; Lohmann, Ulrike; Pedretti, John; Robock, Alan; Rotstayn, Leon; Somerville, Richard; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Sud, Yogesh; Walker, Gregory; Xie, Shaocheng; Yio, John; Zhang, Minghua

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (C2M2) Program | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

(C2M2) Program The Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (C2M2) program is a public-private partnership effort that was established as a result of the Administration's...

49

LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) Jump to: navigation, search Name LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) Agency/Company /Organization Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Sector Energy, Land Topics Pathways analysis References LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI)[1] Abstract Established in 1989, the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) is an International focal point for understanding climate change and analyzing and diagnosing the performance of the world's climate models; the PCMDI is a DOE program located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The PCMDI mission is to develop improved methods and tools for the diagnosis ...

50

PySP: Modeling and Solving Stochastic Programs in Python  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sep 8, 2010 ... Abstract: Although stochastic programming is a powerful tool for modeling decision-making under uncertainty, various impediments have ...

Jean-Paul Watson

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

51

The dc modeling program (DCMP): Version 2. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project one of the main objectives was the refinement of tools for the study of HVDC systems. The original software was prepared in project RP1964-2 (EL-4365) as power flow and stability program models for HVDC systems. In this project new modeling capabilities were added to both the power flow and stability models. Additionally, the HVDC specific model capabilities were integrated into a new program, termed the Standalone program, for use in the development and testing of HVDC models. This manual provides technical background for programmers and those interested in understanding, augmenting or transporting the dc models.

Chapman, D.G. (Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, MB (Canada))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Attachment F: Summary Checklist of Model AIP Provisions and Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

F: Summary Checklist of Model AIP Provisions and Program F: Summary Checklist of Model AIP Provisions and Program Policies Attachment F: Summary Checklist of Model AIP Provisions and Program Policies Summary Checklist of Model AIP Provisions and Program Policies In response to concerns expressed by DOE and State AIP program representatives, the Office of Environmental Activities has developed a list of mandatory and non-mandatory model language provisions for new and renegotiated AIPs. The underlying concepts for the mandatory provisions are set forth in Attachment A. Other program policies are set forth in a question and answer format in Attachment B. The texts of the optional provisions and mandatory provisions that may be applicable are provided in Attachments C and D respectively. Suggested language related to emergency

53

Energy efficiency in nonprofit agencies: Creating effective program models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonprofit agencies are a critical component of the health and human services system in the US. It has been clearly demonstrated by programs that offer energy efficiency services to nonprofits that, with minimal investment, they can educe their energy consumption by ten to thirty percent. This energy conservation potential motivated the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to conceive a project to help states develop energy efficiency programs for nonprofits. The purpose of the project was two-fold: (1) to analyze existing programs to determine which design and delivery mechanisms are particularly effective, and (2) to create model programs for states to follow in tailoring their own plans for helping nonprofits with energy efficiency programs. Twelve existing programs were reviewed, and three model programs were devised and put into operation. The model programs provide various forms of financial assistance to nonprofits and serve as a source of information on energy efficiency as well. After examining the results from the model programs (which are still on-going) and from the existing programs, several replicability factors'' were developed for use in the implementation of programs by other states. These factors -- some concrete and practical, others more generalized -- serve as guidelines for states devising program based on their own particular needs and resources.

Brown, M.A.; Prindle, B.; Scherr, M.I.; White, D.L.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Using a CSP Based Programming Model for Reconfigurable Processor Arrays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The growing trend towards adoption of flexible and heterogeneous, parallel computing architectures has increased the challenges faced by the programming community. We propose a method to program an emerging class of reconfigurable processor arrays by ... Keywords: CSP, Programming Models, Coarse-grained Reconfigurable Architectures

Zain-ul-Abdin; Bertil Svensson

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2010 -- Washington D.C. lm001das2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus Technical Cost Modeling - Life...

56

The dc modeling program (DCMP): Version 2. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project one of the main objectives was the refinement of tools for the study of HVDC systems. The original software was prepared in project RP1964-2 (EL-4365) as power flow and stability program models for HVDC systems. In this project new modeling capabilities were added to both the power flow and stability models. Additionally, the HVDC specific model capabilities were integrated into a new program, termed the Standalone program, for use in the development and testing of HVDC models. This volume provides information on the application of the software in the form of a User's Manual.

Chapman, D.G. (Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, MB (Canada))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The dc modeling program (DCMP): Version 2. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project one of the main objectives was the refinement of tools for the study of HVDC systems. The original software was prepared in project RP1964-2 (EL-4365) as power flow and stability program models for HVDC systems. In this project new modeling capabilities were added to both the power flow and stability models. Additionally, the HVDC specific model capabilities were integrated into a new program, termed the Standalone program, for use in the development and testing of HVDC models.

Chapman, D.G. (Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, MB (Canada))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Orchestration in Orc: A Deterministic Distributed Programming Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Orchestration in Orc: A Deterministic Distributed Programming Model William R. Cook and Jayadev}@cs.utexas.edu Abstract. Orc is a new model of distributed programming which pro- vides a strong theoretical foundation for internet computing based on compositions of web-services. Orc combines some of the power and flex- ibility

Misra, Jayadev

59

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vary hourly (such as phase change materials). Thus, DOE-2 isand can handle phase change materials (PCM) or variablesimulate PCMs (phase change materials) or variable thermal

Zhu, Dandan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Four Pipe Fan Coil; Four Pipe Induction Unit; Heating andTwo Pipe Fan Coil; Two Pipe Induction Unit; Unit Heater;units (AHUs) – four CAV systems, four VAV systems, and one fan coil

Zhou, Xin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or FAU with no control), supply water temperature, pressureunder the same control The supply air temperature and supplyHVAC control strategies of supply air temperature, supply

Zhou, Xin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Waste glass corrosion modeling: Comparison with experimental results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A chemical model of glass corrosion will be used to predict the rates of release of radionuclides from borosilicate glass waste forms in high-level waste repositories. The model will be used both to calculate the rate of degradation of the glass, and also to predict the effects of chemical interactions between the glass and repository materials such as spent fuel, canister and container materials, backfill, cements, grouts, and others. Coupling between the degradation processes affecting all these materials is expected. Models for borosilicate glass dissolution must account for the processes of (1) kinetically-controlled network dissolution, (2) precipitation of secondary phases, (3) ion exchange, (4) rate-limiting diffusive transport of silica through a hydrous surface reaction layer, and (5) specific glass surface interactions with dissolved cations and anions. Current long-term corrosion models for borosilicate glass employ a rate equation consistent with transition state theory embodied in a geochemical reaction-path modeling program that calculates aqueous phase speciation and mineral precipitation/dissolution. These models are currently under development. Future experimental and modeling work to better quantify the rate-controlling processes and validate these models are necessary before the models can be used in repository performance assessment calculations.

Bourcier, W.L.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models July 31, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) today announced the release of the report "Climate Models: An Assessment of Strengths and Limitations," the 10th in a series of 21 Synthesis and Assessment Products (SAPs) managed by U.S. federal agencies. Developed under the leadership of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), this report, SAP 3.1, describes computer models of the Earth's climate and their ability to simulate current climate change. "Complex climate models are tools that provide insights and knowledge into how future climate may evolve. To assure that future climate projections

64

E-Print Network 3.0 - analytical model comparison Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Slope Summary: -Depleted SONFET is presented. The analytical model is validated by comparison to the Medici simulation results... Vertical Silicon-on-Nothing FET: Analytical...

65

On Programming Models for Service-Level High Availability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of existing programming models for service-level high availability and investigates their differences, similarities, advantages, and disadvantages. Its goal is to help to improve reuse of code and to allow adaptation to quality of service requirements by using a uniform programming model description. It further aims at encouraging a discussion about these programming models and their provided quality of service, such as availability, performance, serviceability, usability, and applicability. Within this context, the presented research focuses on providing high availability for services running on head and service nodes of high-performance computing systems.

Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL; Leangsuksun, Chokchai [ORNL; He, X. [Tennessee Technological University

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Strategies for Energy Efficient Resource Management of Hybrid Programming Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many scientific applications are programmed using hybrid programming models that use both message-passing and shared-memory, due to the increasing prevalence of large-scale systems with multicore, multisocket nodes. Previous work has shown that energy efficiency can be improved using software-controlled execution schemes that consider both the programming model and the power-aware execution capabilities of the system. However, such approaches have focused on identifying optimal resource utilization for one programming model, either shared-memory or message-passing, in isolation. The potential solution space, thus the challenge, increases substantially when optimizing hybrid models since the possible resource configurations increase exponentially. Nonetheless, with the accelerating adoption of hybrid programming models, we increasingly need improved energy efficiency in hybrid parallel applications on large-scale systems. In this work, we present new software-controlled execution schemes that consider the effects of dynamic concurrency throttling (DCT) and dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) in the context of hybrid programming models. Specifically, we present predictive models and novel algorithms based on statistical analysis that anticipate application power and time requirements under different concurrency and frequency configurations. We apply our models and methods to the NPB MZ benchmarks and selected applications from the ASC Sequoia codes. Overall, we achieve substantial energy savings (8.74% on average and up to 13.8%) with some performance gain (up to 7.5%) or negligible performance loss.

Li, Dong [ORNL; Supinski, Bronis de [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Schulz, Martin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios S [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Cameron, Kirk W. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

A Comparison of Cosmological Models Using Strong Gravitational Lensing Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strongly gravitationally lensed quasar-galaxy systems allow us to compare competing cosmologies as long as one can be reasonably sure of the mass distribution within the intervening lens. In this paper, we assemble a catalog of 69 such systems, and carry out a one-on-one comparison between the standard model, LCDM, and the R_h=ct Universe. We find that both models account for the lens observations quite well, though the precision of these measurements does not appear to be good enough to favor one model over the other. Part of the reason is the so-called bulge-halo conspiracy that, on average, results in a baryonic velocity dispersion within a fraction of the optical effective radius virtually identical to that expected for the whole luminous-dark matter distribution. Given the limitations of doing precision cosmological testing using the current sample, we also carry out Monte Carlo simulations based on the current lens measurements to estimate how large the source catalog would have to be in order to rule o...

Melia, Fulvio; Wu, Xue-Feng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

A Comparison of Cosmological Models Using Time Delay Lenses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of time-delay gravitational lenses to examine the cosmological expansion introduces a new standard ruler with which to test theoretical models. The sample suitable for this kind of work now includes 12 lens systems, which have thus far been used solely for optimizing the parameters of $\\Lambda$CDM. In this paper, we broaden the base of support for this new, important cosmic probe by using these observations to carry out a one-on-one comparison between {\\it competing} models. The currently available sample indicates a likelihood of $\\sim 70-80%$ that the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ Universe is the correct cosmology versus $\\sim 20-30%$ for the standard model. This possibly interesting result reinforces the need to greatly expand the sample of time-delay lenses, e.g., with the successful implementation of the Dark Energy Survey, the VST ATLAS survey, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. In anticipation of a greatly expanded catalog of time-delay lenses identified with these surveys, we have produced synthetic sa...

Wei, Jun-Jie; Melia, Fulvio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

MATLAB Programs Modeling and Simulation in Medicine and the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 1.1.11 Graph Transition Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 1.2 EpidemicsMATLAB Programs for Modeling and Simulation in Medicine and the Life Sciences and Population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 #12;Comments The MATLAB programs in this document were developed over several years, and so

Peskin, Charles S.

70

Generation of certifiably correct programs from formal models Alexei Iliasov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation of certifiably correct programs from formal models Alexei Iliasov Newcastle University techniques helps to deliver systems that are free from engineer- ing defects. A code generator quickly, consistently and reproducibly. Com- monly, a code generator is a program constructed informally

Southampton, University of

71

Comparison of low-level waste disposal programs of DOE and selected international countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to examine and compare the approaches and practices of selected countries for disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) with those of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The report addresses the programs for disposing of wastes into engineered LLW disposal facilities and is not intended to address in-situ options and practices associated with environmental restoration activities or the management of mill tailings and mixed LLW. The countries chosen for comparison are France, Sweden, Canada, and the United Kingdom. The countries were selected as typical examples of the LLW programs which have evolved under differing technical constraints, regulatory requirements, and political/social systems. France was the first country to demonstrate use of engineered structure-type disposal facilities. The UK has been actively disposing of LLW since 1959. Sweden has been disposing of LLW since 1983 in an intermediate-depth disposal facility rather than a near-surface disposal facility. To date, Canada has been storing its LLW but will soon begin operation of Canada`s first demonstration LLW disposal facility.

Meagher, B.G. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cole, L.T. [Cole and Associates (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

NEAMS: The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NEAMS: The Nuclear Energy Advanced NEAMS: The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Program The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program is developing a simulation tool kit using leading-edge computational methods that will accelerate the development and deployment of nuclear power technologies that employ enhanced safety and security features, produce power more cost-effectively, and utilize natural resources more efficiently. The NEAMS ToolKit

73

A Comparison of Cosmological Models Using Strong Gravitational Lensing Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strongly gravitationally lensed quasar-galaxy systems allow us to compare competing cosmologies as long as one can be reasonably sure of the mass distribution within the intervening lens. In this paper, we assemble a catalog of 69 such systems, and carry out a one-on-one comparison between the standard model, LCDM, and the R_h=ct Universe. We find that both models account for the lens observations quite well, though the precision of these measurements does not appear to be good enough to favor one model over the other. Part of the reason is the so-called bulge-halo conspiracy that, on average, results in a baryonic velocity dispersion within a fraction of the optical effective radius virtually identical to that expected for the whole luminous-dark matter distribution. Given the limitations of doing precision cosmological testing using the current sample, we also carry out Monte Carlo simulations based on the current lens measurements to estimate how large the source catalog would have to be in order to rule out either model at a ~99.7% confidence level. We find that if the real cosmology is LCDM, a sample of ~200 strong gravitational lenses would be sufficient to rule out R_h=ct at this level of accuracy, while ~300 strong gravitational lenses would be required to rule out LCDM if the real Universe were instead R_h=ct. The difference in required sample size reflects the greater number of free parameters available to fit the data with LCDM. We point out that, should the R_h=ct Universe eventually emerge as the correct cosmology, its lack of any free parameters for this kind of work will provide a remarkably powerful probe of the mass structure in lensing galaxies, and a means of better understanding the origin of the bulge-halo conspiracy.

Fulvio Melia; Jun-Jie Wei; Xue-Feng Wu

2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

74

Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the United States Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs modern web technologies, usability design, and national average defaults as an interface to annual simulations of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim in order to provide estimated annual energy and cost savings. In addition to cool reflective roofs, RSC simulates multiple roof and attic configurations including different roof slopes, above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers, low-emittance roof surfaces, duct location, duct leakage rates, multiple substrate types, and insulation levels. A base case and energy-efficient alternative can be compared side-by-side to estimate monthly energy. RSC was benchmarked against field data from demonstration homes in Ft. Irwin, California; while cooling savings were similar, heating penalty varied significantly across different simulation engines. RSC results reduce cool roofing cost-effectiveness thus mitigating expected economic incentives for this countermeasure to the urban heat island effect. This paper consolidates comparison of RSC s projected energy savings to other simulation engines including DOE-2.1E, AtticSim, Micropas, and EnergyPlus, and presents preliminary analyses. RSC s algorithms for capturing radiant heat transfer and duct interaction in the attic assembly are considered major contributing factors to increased cooling savings and heating penalties. Comparison to previous simulation-based studies, analysis on the force multiplier of RSC cooling savings and heating penalties, the role of radiative heat exchange in an attic assembly, and changes made for increased accuracy of the duct model are included.

New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Huang, Yu (Joe) [White Box Technologies; Levinson, Ronnen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

3rd International Conference on Countermeasures to Urban Heat Island Venice, October 13-15, 2014 Comparison of Software Models for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua Newa, William A. Millera, Yu (Joe their effects on the building's heating and cooling energy use · AtticSim is a detailed simulation program- based tool to estimate cool-roof energy savings 2 2014-08-20: The Roof Savings Calculator (RSC

Tennessee, University of

76

Photovoltaic subsystem marketing and distribution model: programming manual. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complete documentation of the marketing and distribution (M and D) computer model is provided. The purpose is to estimate the costs of selling and transporting photovoltaic solar energy products from the manufacturer to the final customer. The model adjusts for the inflation and regional differences in marketing and distribution costs. The model consists of three major components: the marketing submodel, the distribution submodel, and the financial submodel. The computer program is explained including the input requirements, output reports, subprograms and operating environment. The program specifications discuss maintaining the validity of the data and potential improvements. An example for a photovoltaic concentrator collector demonstrates the application of the model.

Not Available

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Uses lessons learned from Better Buildings grantees, existing data, and private sector insights to highlight business models that can help develop a sustainable residential energy efficiency market.

78

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide ...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

insights to highlight business models that can help develop a sustainable residential energy efficiency market. bbnpbusinessmodelsguide.pdf More Documents & Publications...

79

Experimental studies of irregular water wave component interactions with comparisons to the hybrid wave model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

computed by Wheeler Stretching and Linear Extrapolation modifications to Linear Random Wave Theory and the Hybrid Wave Model. Extreme wave acceleration fields arc compared with Hybrid Wave Model acceleration fields only. Comparisons between measurements...

Longridge, Jonathon Kent

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Causes of variation in soil carbon simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison with observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and benchmarks in Earth system models sitivity of the Amazonand benchmarks in Earth system models Thornton, P. E. ,simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Comparison of the ATP version of the EMTP and the NETOMAC program for simulation of HVdc systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the capabilities and limitations of the EMTP and NETOMAC program as applied to HVdc system simulation. The fundamental differences between the two programs and their effect on simulation results are described. Consistency of the results obtained from these programs is examined through simulation of a test HVdc network. As expected, a very high degree of agreement between the two sets of simulation results proved to be achievable, but only when particular care was taken to overcome internal program differences. Finally, the new advanced stability feature of NETOMAC is briefly discussed and then tested against the complex transient models established in the EMTP and in the NETOMAC transients program section.

Lehn, P.; Rittiger, J. [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany)] [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany); Kulicke, B. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany)] [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Analysis of Precipitation Using Satellite Observations and Comparisons with Global Climate Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is investigated by comparisons with satellite observa- iv tions. Speci cally, six-year long (2000-2005) simulations are performed using a high- resolution (36-km) Weather Research Forecast (WRF) model and the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) at T85 spatial... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 B. Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 1. Satellite data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 2. Weather research and forecast model simulations . . . 34 3. Community atmosphere model simulations...

Murthi, Aditya

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

83

Transforming PLC Programs into Formal Models for Verification Purposes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most of CERN’s industrial installations rely on PLC-based (Programmable Logic Controller) control systems developed using the UNICOS framework. This framework contains common, reusable program modules and their correctness is a high priority. Testing is already applied to find errors, but this method has limitations. In this work an approach is proposed to transform automatically PLC programs into formal models, with the goal of applying formal verification to ensure their correctness. We target model checking which is a precise, mathematical-based method to check formalized requirements automatically against the system.

Darvas, D; Blanco, E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

SciTech Connect: Comparison of the Dynamic Wake Meandering Model...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wake Meandering Model, Large-Eddy Simulation, and Field Data at the Egmond aan Zee Offshore Wind Plant: Preprint Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Comparison of the...

85

Comparisons of Transport and Dispersion Model Predictions of the URBAN 2000 Field Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The tracer releases of the “URBAN 2000” urban tracer and meteorological field experiment conducted in Salt Lake City, Utah, in October 2000 provided a wealth of data for comparison with the predictions of transport and dispersion models. ...

Steve Warner; Nathan Platt; James F. Heagy

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Programming languages as tools for describing and modeling anticipatory systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Algorithmizing the control of a complex system needs to know it in details, especially when the control steps are tested at a simulation model of the system. Computing technique enables performing control so that possible consequences to more or less ... Keywords: SIMULA, anticipatory systems, complex systems formalism, object-oriented programming, simulation, sophisticated control

Eugene Kindler

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

A comparison of approximate models for radiation in gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Approximate equations for radiative heat transfer equations coupled to an equation for the temperature are stated and a comparative numerical study of the different approximations is given. The approximation methods considered here range from moment methods to simplified PN-approximations. Numerical experiments and comparisons in different space dimensions and for various physical situations are presented.

M. Frank; M. Seaid; A. Klar; R. Pinnau; G. Thommes; J. Janicka

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Accepted Manuscript Kinetic Modelling of High Density PolyEthylene Pyrolysis: Part 1. Comparison of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted Manuscript Kinetic Modelling of High Density PolyEthylene Pyrolysis: Part 1. Comparison this article as: Gascoin N, Navarro-Rodriguez A, Gillard P, Mangeot A, Kinetic Modelling of High Density PolyEthylene.polymdegradstab.2012.05.008 #12;M ANUSCRIPT ACCEPTED ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT 1 Kinetic Modelling of High Density PolyEthylene

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

89

final report for Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of the work on parallel programming patterns that was part of the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing

Johnson, Ralph E

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

90

Advanced Modeling Grid Research Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development » Advanced Modeling Grid Development » Advanced Modeling Grid Research Program Advanced Modeling Grid Research Program The electric power industry has undergone extensive changes over the past several decades and become substantially more complex, dynamic, and uncertain, as new market rules, regulatory policies, and technologies have been adopted. The availability of more detailed data about system conditions from devices, such as phasor measurement units (PMUs) for wide area visibility and advanced meter infrastructure (AMI) for dynamic pricing and demand response, can be a great benefit for electric system reliability and flexibility. However, this large volume (and variety) of data poses its own challenges. Shifting operational data analytics from a traditionally off-line environment to real-time situational awareness (e.g., visibility) to

91

Computer program for comparison of nutrient media for biological cultures grown in vitro  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A computer program in BASIC computer language for use in storing and comparing the components of various biological culture media is described. The program contains 11 operations that deal with manipulation of...

Stanley L. Nickel; Mary C. Grant

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Final Report: Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing, Rice University collaborated with project partners in the design, development and deployment of language, compiler, and runtime support for parallel programming models to support application development for the “leadership-class” computer systems at DOE national laboratories. Work over the course of this project has focused on the design, implementation, and evaluation of a second-generation version of Coarray Fortran. Research and development efforts of the project have focused on the CAF 2.0 language, compiler, runtime system, and supporting infrastructure. This has involved working with the teams that provide infrastructure for CAF that we rely on, implementing new language and runtime features, producing an open source compiler that enabled us to evaluate our ideas, and evaluating our design and implementation through the use of benchmarks. The report details the research, development, findings, and conclusions from this work.

Mellor-Crummey, John [William Marsh Rice University] [William Marsh Rice University

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

93

A model for a national low level waste program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A national program for the management of low level waste is essential to the success of environmental clean-up, decontamination and decommissioning, current operations and future missions. The value of a national program is recognized through procedural consistency and a shared set of resources. A national program requires a clear waste definition and an understanding of waste characteristics matched against available and proposed disposal options. A national program requires the development and implementation of standards and procedures for implementing the waste hierarchy, with a specitic emphasis on waste avoidance, minimization and recycling. It requires a common set of objectives for waste characterization based on the disposal facility's waste acceptance criteria, regulatory and license requirements and performance assessments. Finally, a national waste certification program is required to ensure compliance. To facilitate and enhance the national program, a centralized generator services organization, tasked with providing technical services to the generators on behalf of the national program, is necessary. These subject matter experts are the interface between the generating sites and the disposal facility(s). They provide an invaluable service to the generating organizations through their involvement in waste planning prior to waste generation and through championing implementation of the waste hierarchy. Through their interface, national treatment and transportation services are optimized and new business opportunities are identified. This national model is based on extensive experience in the development and on-going management of a national transuranic waste program and management of the national repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The Low Level Program at the Savannah River Site also successfully developed and implemented the waste hierarchy, waste certification and waste generator services concepts presented below. The Savannah River Site services over forty generators and has historically managed over 12,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The results of the waste minimization program at the site resulted in over 900 initiatives, avoiding over 220,000 cubic meters of waste for a life cycle cost savings of $275 million. At the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the low level waste program services over 20 major generators and several hundred smaller generators that produce over 4,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The Los Alamos National Laboratory low level waste program utilizes both on-site and off-site disposal capabilities. Off-site disposal requires the implementation of certification requirements to utilize both federal and commercial options. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is the US Department of Energy's first deep geological repository for the permanent disposal of Transuanic waste. Transuranic waste was generated and retrievably stored at 39 sites across the US. Transuranic waste is defined as waste with a radionuclide concentration equal to or greater than 100 nCi/g consisting of radionuclides with half-lives greater than 20 years and with an atomic mass greater than uranium. Combining the lessons learned from the national transuranic waste program, the successful low level waste program at Savannah River Site and the experience of off-site disposal options at Los Alamos National Laboratory provides the framework and basis for developing a viable national strategy for managing low level waste.

Blankenhorn, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Statistics for the Evaluation and Comparison of Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Procedures that may be used to evaluate the operational performance of a wide spectrum of geophysical models are introduced. Primarily using a complementary set of difference measures, both model accuracy and precision ...

Willmott, Cort J.; Ackleson, Steven G.; Davis, Robert E.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Klink, Katherine M.; Legates, David R.; O'Donnell, James; Rowe, Clinton M.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Impact Assessment of Abiotic Resources in LCA: Quantitative Comparison of Selected Characterization Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Impact Assessment of Abiotic Resources in LCA: Quantitative Comparison of Selected Characterization Models ... Resources have received significant attention in recent years resulting in development of a wide range of resource depletion indicators within life cycle assessment (LCA). ... Finally, we classify the existing methods into three groups, according to method focus and modeling approach, to aid method selection within LCA. ...

Jakob T. Rørbech; Carl Vadenbo; Stefanie Hellweg; Thomas F. Astrup

2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

96

Modeling, Simulation and Comparison Study of Cirrus Clouds' Ice Jorge M. Villa*a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling, Simulation and Comparison Study of Cirrus Clouds' Ice Crystals Jorge M. Villa*a , Sandra of the bullets. This software allows us to create irregular models of particles using the Discrete Dipole of earth's energy dynamics, therefore affecting climate systems1 . In addition, they indirectly affect

Cruz-Pol, Sandra L.

97

Acoustic models comparison using HTK and the Spoltech corpus to Brazilian Portuguese  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper shows a comparison between Hidden Markov Models (HMM) trained with 12 mel-cepstral coefficients plus extra(s) parameter(s) and two different HMM initialization ways. Thus, it compares the models, in order to detect the more robust parameter ... Keywords: HMM, HTK, Spoltech, português brasileiro, reconhecimento de fala

Yuri T. Passos; Carlos A. F. Pimentel Filho; Uriel Marx C. Bispo; Leonardo Nogueira Matos

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Comparison of Rough-set and Interval-set Models for Uncertain Reasoning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Rough-set and Interval-set Models for Uncertain Reasoning Y.Y. Yao and Xining Li Department of Computer Science Lakehead University Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada P7B 5E1 Abstract In the rough-set of their extended set-theoretic operators. The operators in the rough-set model are not truth-functional, while

Yao, Yiyu

99

Artificial Neural Network Model for fMRI timeseries and a Framework for Comparison of Convolution Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Artificial Neural Network Model for fMRI timeseries and a Framework for Comparison of Convolution of the hemodynamic response was proposed in [5]. Here we propose an artificial neural network (ANN) model. Method The specific neural network we will use is a two­layer feed­forward type. Parameters are optimized

Nielsen, Finn Ã?rup

100

Evaluation of the Multi-scale Modeling Framework Using Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the goals of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is to provide long-term observations for evaluating and improving cloud and radiation treatment in global climate models. Unfortunately, the traditional parametric approach of diagnosing cloud and radiation properties for gridcells that are tens to hundreds kilometers across from large-scale model fields is not well suited for comparison with time series of ground based observations at selected locations. A recently emerging approach called a multi-scale modeling framework (MMF) has shown promise to bridge the scale gap. The MMF consists of a two-dimensional or small three-dimensional cloud resolving model (CRM) embedded into each grid column of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), thereby computing cloud properties at a scale that is more consistent with observations. We present a comparison of data from two ARM sites, one at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) in Oklahoma and one at Nauru Island in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region, with output from both the CAM and MMF. Two sets of one year long simulations are considered: one using climatological sea surface temperatures (SST) and another using 1999 SST. Each set includes a run with the MMF as well as the CAM run with traditional or standard cloud and radiation treatment. Time series of cloud fraction, precipitation intensity, and downwelling solar radiation flux at the surface are statistically analyzed. For the TWP site, nearly all parameters of frequency distributions of these variables from the MMF run are shown to be more consistent with observation than those from the CAM run. This change is attributed to the improved representation of convective clouds in the MMF compared to the conventional climate model. For the SGP, the MMF shows little to no improvement in predicting the same quantities. Possible causes of this lack of improvement are discussed.

Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Khairoutdinov, Marat

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Gas-Phase Diffusion in Porous Media: Comparison of Models Stephen W. Webb  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Gas-Phase Diffusion in Porous Media: Comparison of Models Gas-Phase Diffusion in Porous Media: Comparison of Models Stephen W. Webb Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87 185 ABSTRACT Two models are commonly used to analyze gas- phase diffusion in porous media in the presence of advection, the Advective-Dispersive Model (ADM) and the Dusty-gas Model (DGM). The ADM, which is used in TOUGH2, is based on a simple linear addition of advection calculated by Darcy's law and ordinary diffusion using Fick's law with a porosity- tortuosity-gas saturation multiplier to account for the porous medium. Another approach for gas-phase transport in porous media is the Dusty-Gas Model. This model applies the kinetic theory of gases to the gaseous components and the porous media (or "dust") to combine transport due to diffusion and

102

Advanced Grid Modeling Program Peer Review June 17-18, 2014 ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Grid Modeling Program Peer Review June 17-18, 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Program Peer Review June 17-18, 2014 May 28, 2014 - 4:36pm Addthis The Office of Electricity...

103

Comparison of Predictive Models for Photovoltaic Module Performance: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines three models used to estimate the performance of photovoltaic (PV) modules when the irradiances and PV cell temperatures are known. The results presented here were obtained by comparing modeled and measured maximum power (Pm) for PV modules that rely on different technologies.

Marion, B.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Advances in Mathematical Programming ModelsAdvances in Mathematical Programming Models for Enterprise-wide Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(EWO) EWO involves optimizing the operations of R&D, material supply, manufacturing, distribution of Crude Transfer of Crude Refinery Processing Refinery Processing Schedule Products Schedule ProductsModeling Systems OperationalOperational AnalysisAnalysis Materials RequirementMaterials Requirement Planning

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

105

Technical Cost Modeling- Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

106

Technical Cost Modeling- Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

107

Evaluation of the Multi-Scale Modeling Framework using Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the goals of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program was to provide long-term observations for evaluation of cloud and radiation treatment in global climate models. Unfortunately, traditional parametric approach of diagnosing cloud and radiation properties from large-scale model fields is not well suited for comparison with observed time series at selected locations. A recently emerging approach called the multi-scale modeling framework (MMF) has shown promise to bridge the gap. MMF consists of a two-dimensional cloud system resolving model (CSRM) embedded into each CAM grid column of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), thereby computing cloud properties at a scale that is more consistent with observations. Because the approach is computationally expensive only limited simulations have been carried out. In this presentation, we will present a comparison of data from two ARM sites, one at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) in Oklahoma and one at Nauru island in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region, with output from both CAM and MMF. Two sets of one year long simulations are considered: one using climatological sea surface temperatures (SST) and another using 1999 SST. Each set includes a run with MMF as well as CAM run with traditional or standard cloud and radiation treatment. Time series of cloud fraction, precipitation intensity, and downwelling solar radiation flux at the surface are statistically analyzed. For the TWP site, nearly all parameters of frequency distributions of these variables from MMF run are shown to be more consistent with observation than those from CAM run. For the SGP, the improvements are marginal.

Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Khairoutdinov, Marat

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Comparison Between TRNSYS Software Simulation and PV F-Chart Program on Photovoltaic System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Section two about the detailed simulation input and output for both TRNSYS and PVF-Chart. In Section three, the comparisons between two software are performed in terms of features and tables. Last but not least, the conclusion and references are given...

Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Comparison of analytical models for zonal flow generation in ion-temperature-gradient mode turbulence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past years the understanding of the multi scale interaction problems have increased significantly. However, at present there exists a flora of different analytical models for investigating multi scale interactions and hardly any specific comparisons have been performed among these models. In this work two different models for the generation of zonal flows from ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) background turbulence are discussed and compared. The methods used are the coherent mode coupling model and the wave kinetic equation model (WKE). It is shown that the two models give qualitatively the same results even though the assumption on the spectral difference is used in the (WKE) approach.

Anderson, J.; Miki, K.; Uzawa, K.; Li, J.; Kishimoto, Y. [Dept. Fundamental Energy Science, School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto, 611-0011 (Japan)

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

110

Appendix A: ACSL Simulation Model Program 182 AA.. AACCSSLL SSIIMMUULLAATTIIOONN MMOODDEELL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix A: ACSL Simulation Model Program 182 AA.. AACCSSLL SSIIMMUULLAATTIIOONN MMOODDEELL evaporator #12;Appendix A: ACSL Simulation Model Program 183 CONSTANT V3 = 18.85 ! Receiver CONSTANT VC = 4.5)] #12;Appendix A: ACSL Simulation Model Program 184 CONSTANT CV1 = 3.39814 ! Vapour valve CONSTANT CV2

Skogestad, Sigurd

111

A Comparison of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic Modeling...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Better chance to predict emissions CFD model - Most true to flow, mixing, and heat loss processes 5 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy ORNL HCCI engine...

112

HotStrength of Ferritic CreepResistant Steels Comparison of Neural Network and Genetic Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the development of materials. In our continuing research on steels for the energy production industries [3], we that methods such as neural networks, genetic programming and optimisation techniques have made a mark

Cambridge, University of

113

Garnering the Industrial Sector: A Comparison of Cutting Edge Industrial DSM Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The industrial sector has posed a daunting DSM challenge to utilities throughout North America, even to those with successful and creative residential and commercial DSM programs. Most utilities have had great difficulty in going beyond conventional...

Kyricopoulos, P. F.; Wikler, G. A.; Faruqui, A.; Wood, B. G.

114

Comparison between the SIMPLE and ENERGY mixing models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SIMPLE and ENERGY mixing models were compared in order to investigate the limitations of SIMPLE's analytically formulated mixing parameter, relative to the experimentally calibrated ENERGY mixing parameters. For interior subchannels, it was shown that when the SIMPLE and ENERGY parameters are reduced to a common form, there is good agreement between the two models for a typical fuel geometry. However, large discrepancies exist for typical blanket (lower P/D) geometries. Furthermore, the discrepancies between the mixing parameters result in significant differences in terms of the temperature profiles generated by the ENERGY code utilizing these mixing parameters as input. For edge subchannels, the assumptions made in the development of the SIMPLE model were extended to the rectangular edge subchannel geometry used in ENERGY. The resulting effective eddy diffusivities (used by the ENERGY code) associated with the SIMPLE model are again closest to those of the ENERGY model for the fuel assembly geometry. Finally, the SIMPLE model's neglect of a net swirl effect in the edge region is most limiting for assemblies exhibiting relatively large radial power skews.

Burns, K.J.; Todreas, N.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Comparison to the Revised ECMWF Shortwave Model  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Comparison to the Revised ECMWF Shortwave Model M. J. Iacono, J. S. Delamere, E. J. Mlawer, and S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Massachusetts J.-J. Morcrette European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Reading, United Kingdom Introduction An important step toward improving radiative transfer codes in general circulation models (GCMs) is their thorough evaluation by comparison to measurements directly, or to other data-validated radiation models. This work extends the clear-sky shortwave (SW) GCM evaluation presented by Iacono et al. (2001) to computations including clouds. The rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM) SW radiation model accurately reproduces clear-sky direct beam fluxes from the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer

116

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Comparison of DNA Damage Risk from  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comparison of DNA Damage Risk from Low-Dose Radiation and Folate Comparison of DNA Damage Risk from Low-Dose Radiation and Folate Deficiency. Authors: Chantal Courtemanche, Arnold C. Huang, Nicole Kerry, Bernice Ng, and Bruce N. Ames. Institutions: Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, California. Our overall goal is to understand and quantify the real effects of low-dose radiation by measuring direct and specific cellular changes. However, since the background dose of radiation to which most individuals are exposed is well below the levels where significant biological effects, such as mutation or tumor induction, are observed, our novel approach is to compare the consequences of radiation to those of specific nutritional deficiencies. By determining which of these two common stresses at physiologically relevant doses leads to a greater amount of DNA damage, we

117

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Comparisons of IR and ROS for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comparisons of IR and ROS for Induction of Damage to Cells Comparisons of IR and ROS for Induction of Damage to Cells Kathryn D. Held1, Yvonne L. McCarey1, Laurence Tartier1, Elena V. Rusyn1, Giuseppe Schettino2, Melvyn Folkard2, Kevin M. Prise2, and Barry D. Michael2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114; 2Gray Laboratory Cancer Research Trust, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, HA6 2JR, UK Accurate evaluation of the risks associated with exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR) is a major challenge for environmental sciences. Studies on the mechanisms of the actions of low doses of IR are needed to help understand possible risks. IR exerts its effects on cells through production of reactive oxidizing species (ROS) such as ·OH, H2O2 and

118

Comparison of light scattering models for diffuse optical tomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

different models for light propagation in tissues: (1) the radiative transport equation, (2) the delta of the radiative transport equation that take into account forward-peaked scattering analytically. Using simulated data from the numerical solution of radiative transport equation, we solve the inverse problem

Kim, Arnold D.

119

Modeling National Impacts for the Building America Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we present a model to estimate the nationalenergy and economic impacts of the Department of Energy Building Americaprogram. The program goal is to improve energy performance in newresidential construction, by working with builders to design andconstruct energy-efficient homes at minimal cost. The model is anadaptation of the method used to calculate the national energy savingsfor appliance energy efficiency standards. The main difference is thatthe key decision here is not the consumer decision to buy anefficienthouse, but rather the builder decision to offer such a house inthe market. The builder decision is treated by developing a number ofscenarios in which the relative importance of first costs vs. energysavings is varied.

Coughlin, Katie M.; McNeil, Michael A.

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Comparison of problem model change mechanisms issued from CSP and TRIZ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Comparison of problem model change mechanisms issued from CSP and TRIZ RRoollaanndd DDee GGuuiioo satisfaction problem (CSP), on the other hand. Keywords: over-constrained problems, dialectical methods issued from CSP and TRIZ 2 · a set of evaluation parameters, which represent the objective of the problem

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Review and comparison of methods to study the contribution of variables in artificial neural network models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Greece Abstract Convinced by the predictive quality of artificial neural network (ANN) models in ecology. # 2002 Published by Elsevier Science B.V. Keywords: Artificial neural networks; Backpropagation; NonReview and comparison of methods to study the contribution of variables in artificial neural

Lek, Sovan

122

Modeling DNA in Confinement: A Comparison between the Brownian Dynamics and Lattice Boltzmann Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling DNA in Confinement: A Comparison between the Brownian Dynamics and Lattice Boltzmann from both the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and the Brownian dynamics simulations with fluctuating. We find that the lattice Boltzmann method is well-suited for long polymer chains as well

123

LIDAR measurements of wind turbine wake dyn_amics and comparison with an engineering model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIDAR measurements of wind turbine wake dyn_amics and comparison with an engineering model 1 dynamics, lIre performed at four diameters behind a 95 kW wind turbine. The wake 111eaeasurement technique allows esti111ation of qUClsiinstantancou~ two dimensional wind fields in an area

124

A COMPARISON BETWEEN CODYRUN AND TRNSYS, SIMULATION MODELS FOR THERMAL BUILDINGS BEHAVIOUR.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A COMPARISON BETWEEN CODYRUN AND TRNSYS, SIMULATION MODELS FOR THERMAL BUILDINGS BEHAVIOUR. F of climate. This software #12;has already been used for the validation of prescriptions concerning low energy; E.Mail : lucas@iremia.univ-reunion.fr ABSTRACT: Simulation codes of thermal behaviour could

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

125

Comparison of model predicted to observed winds in the coastal zone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Predictions of near-surface (10 to 100 m) wind velocities made by a mesoscale numerical model on a 10 km grid over and near the coastline are checked against observations. Two comparisons are made. The first is between observed and model-estimated mean annual wind power density at locations where surface observations exist in three coastal areas: the Chesapeake Bay, the Apalachee Bay and the South Texas coastal area. The second comparison is made between model predictions over the Delmarva Peninsula and adjacent ocean and observations made over a 120 x 30 km rectangle extending across the peninsula and out to sea. It is concluded that the unbiased error analysis skill ratings of 81% and 76% are attained for two days of prediction-observation comparisons. In the meantime, the skill of the model in duplicating individual coastal wind fields is taken as 78%. In addition, a qualitative comparison is made between the predicted fields of wind and the observed wind field. The predicted wind field unquestionably reproduces the observed field.

Garstang, M.; Pielke, R.A.; Snow, J.W.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

COMPARISON OF EXISTING EPS-BLOCK GEOFOAM CREEP MODELS WITH FIELD MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPARISON OF EXISTING EPS-BLOCK GEOFOAM CREEP MODELS WITH FIELD MEASUREMENTS By David Arellano, P-stark1@uiuc.edu Paper Submitted to EPS Geofoam 2001 3rd International Conference December 10-12, 2001 Salt Lake City, Utah October 15, 2001 #12;2 ABSTRACT An estimate of the long-term vertical creep of EPS

127

Comparison of a microstructure evolution model with experiments on irradiated vanadium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of a microstructure evolution model with experiments on irradiated vanadium S. Sharafat vacancy ¯ux to grow matrix and precipitate-axed bubbles. The direct formation of vacancy and interstitial and its alloys are now considered as candidate structural materials in fu- sion reactors, because

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

128

A Comparison Between Model Reduction and Controller Reduction: Application to a PWR Nuclear Planty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Comparison Between Model Reduction and Controller Reduction: Application to a PWR Nuclear Planty@csam.ucl.ac.be, Gevers@csam.ucl.ac.be 2 Electricite de France, Direction des Etudes et Recherches, 6 Quai Watier, F-78041 of a controller for the secondary circuit of a nu- clear Pressurized Water Reactor, leading to the conclu- sions

Gevers, Michel

129

A comparison of various models in predicting ignition delay in single-particle coal combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comparison of various models in predicting ignition delay in single-particle coal combustion November 2013 Accepted 7 January 2014 Available online xxxx Keywords: Coal Devolatilization Ignition delay a b s t r a c t In this paper, individual coal particle combustion under laminar conditions

130

Final Map Draft Comparison Report WIND ENERGY RESOURCE MODELING AND MEASUREMENT PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

II Final Map Draft Comparison Report #12;WIND ENERGY RESOURCE MODELING AND MEASUREMENT PROJECT Tel: 978-749-9591 Fax: 978-749-9713 mbrower@awstruewind.com August 10, 2004 #12;2 WIND ENERGY RESOURCE issues. 1 Background In Task 2 of the project, five promising areas of the state for wind energy

131

Comparison of constitutive laws on the modeling of thermo-viscoplastic behaviour of an aluminum alloy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of constitutive laws on the modeling of thermo-viscoplastic behaviour of an aluminum.guines@insa-rennes.fr, d email: shdgj@sdu.edu.cn Keywords: Hardening law; Aluminum alloy; Flow stress; Temperature; Strain, the innovative lightweight materials, such as aluminum alloys, have been widely adopted in the automotive

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

132

A COMPARISON BETWEEN GLOBAL SOLAR MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC AND POTENTIAL FIELD SOURCE SURFACE MODEL RESULTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT The large-scale, steady-state magnetic field configuration of the solar corona is typicallyA COMPARISON BETWEEN GLOBAL SOLAR MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC AND POTENTIAL FIELD SOURCE SURFACE MODEL computer resources, and can resolve structure on scales beyond those that can be handled by current MHD

California at Berkeley, University of

133

Comparison of multivariate methods for inferential modeling of soil carbon using visible/near-infrared spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of multivariate methods for inferential modeling of soil carbon using visible/near-infrared Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy Visible/near-infrared spectroscopy Multivariate calibration Pre-processing transformations In order to reduce costs and time in the analysis of soil properties, visible/near-infrared

Grunwald, Sabine

134

Modeling relay operational characteristics using electromagnetic transients program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are many commercially available software packages nowadays for power system analysis. These range from load flow, stability, contingency and reliability analysis. The Electro-Magnetic Transients Program is a widely used program for simulation and analysis of power system transients. The Transient Control Analysis Systems, the so-called (TACS) of the EMTP, functions like an analogue computer. This allows signals to be passed between TACS and the electric network simulated by EMTP. In fact, with TACS facilities, it is possible to simulate control circuitry associated with rotating machinery, hvdc converters and static var controllers. It is also possible to extend the application of EMTP to relay testing. If relay models are simulated within the EMTP environment, then it becomes a close-loop simulation as the operation of a particular relay, and thus the associated circuit breaker, would change the system conditions. Subsequent relay operations can then be further investigated. In this manner, dynamic operation of relays can be studies solely on a personal computer with no external hardware arrangement necessary. This paper describes the basic techniques used for simulation of distance relays, such as a self and cross-polarized distance relay commonly used for the protection of transmission circuits. This paper highlights some techniques employed to model dynamic operational characteristics of distance relays using EMTP. Simulation results of a self- and a cross-polarized Mho relay are presented.

Chan, T.W.; Chua, K.M.; Lim, K.T. [Nanyang Technological Univ., Singapore (Singapore)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Comparison Between TRNSYS Software Simulation and F-Chart Program on Pool Heating System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this report is to test the accuracy of TRNSYS simulation of Solar Pool Heating System by comparing with F-Chart program which is an authoritative tool to analyze solar system and was developed in 1970s. This report is organized...

Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

UW-MADISON GEOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT: COMPARISON OF PROGRAM OFFERINGS IN GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS (GIS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(GIS) MS CARTOGRAPHY/GIS CERTIFICATE IN GIS PROGRAM GOALS Conduct research in GIS (Studying GIS to develop new techniques in the field of GIS). Emphasis is on the development of new GIS tools or Application of GIS in academic settings. Apply GIS to geographic problems in a non- academic setting. Emphasis

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

137

Comparison of Joint Modeling Approaches Including Eulerian Sliding Interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate representation of discontinuities such as joints and faults is a key ingredient for high fidelity modeling of shock propagation in geologic media. The following study was done to improve treatment of discontinuities (joints) in the Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN (Lomov and Liu 2005). Lagrangian methods with conforming meshes and explicit inclusion of joints in the geologic model are well suited for such an analysis. Unfortunately, current meshing tools are unable to automatically generate adequate hexahedral meshes for large numbers of irregular polyhedra. Another concern is that joint stiffness in such explicit computations requires significantly reduced time steps, with negative implications for both the efficiency and quality of the numerical solution. An alternative approach is to use non-conforming meshes and embed joint information into regular computational elements. However, once slip displacement on the joints become comparable to the zone size, Lagrangian (even non-conforming) meshes could suffer from tangling and decreased time step problems. The use of non-conforming meshes in an Eulerian solver may alleviate these difficulties and provide a viable numerical approach for modeling the effects of faults on the dynamic response of geologic materials. We studied shock propagation in jointed/faulted media using a Lagrangian and two Eulerian approaches. To investigate the accuracy of this joint treatment the GEODYN calculations have been compared with results from the Lagrangian code GEODYN-L which uses an explicit treatment of joints via common plane contact. We explore two approaches to joint treatment in the code, one for joints with finite thickness and the other for tight joints. In all cases the sliding interfaces are tracked explicitly without homogenization or blending the joint and block response into an average response. In general, rock joints will introduce an increase in normal compliance in addition to a reduction in shear strength. In the present work we consider the limiting case of stiff discontinuities that only affect the shear strength of the material.

Lomov, I; Antoun, T; Vorobiev, O

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

138

Modeling National Impacts for the Building America Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Renewable Energy (EERE) is supporting the development ofgoals. For the most part EERE program impacts are estimatedcase, which removes any EERE program activities that are

Coughlin, Katie M.; McNeil, Michael A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Discussion of comparison study of hydraulic fracturing models -- Test case: GRI Staged Field Experiment No. 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides comments to a companion journal paper on predictive modeling of hydraulic fracturing patterns (N.R. Warpinski et. al., 1994). The former paper was designed to compare various modeling methods to demonstrate the most accurate methods under various geologic constraints. The comments of this paper are centered around potential deficiencies in the former authors paper which include: limited actual comparisons offered between models, the issues of matching predictive data with that from related field operations was lacking or undocumented, and the relevance/impact of accurate modeling on the overall hydraulic fracturing cost and production.

Cleary, M.P.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Comparison of the predictions of two models with dose measurements in a  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comparison of the predictions of two models with dose measurements in a Comparison of the predictions of two models with dose measurements in a case of children exposed to the emissions of a lead smelter Title Comparison of the predictions of two models with dose measurements in a case of children exposed to the emissions of a lead smelter Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-2397E Year of Publication 2009 Authors Bonnard, Roseline, and Thomas E. McKone Journal Journal of Human and Environmental Risk Assessment Volume 15 Issue 6 Pagination 1203-1226 ISSN 1080-7039 Keywords environmental chemistry, exposure & risk group, exposure and health effects, exposure assessment, ieubk, indoor environment department, lead, multimedia models, probabilistic risk assessment Abstract The predictions of two source-to-dose models are systematically evaluated with observed data collected in a village polluted by a currently operating secondary lead smelter. Both models were built up from several sub-models linked together and run using Monte-Carlo simulation, to calculate the distribution children's blood lead levels attributable to the emissions from the facility. The first model system is composed of the CalTOX model linked to a recoded version of the IEUBK model. This system provides the distribution of the media-specific lead concentrations (air, soil, fruit, vegetables and blood) in the whole area investigated. The second model consists of a statistical model to estimate the lead deposition on the ground, a modified version of the model HHRAP and the same recoded version of the IEUBK model. This system provides an estimate of the concentration of exposure of specific individuals living in the study area. The predictions of the first model system were improvedin terms of accuracy and precision by performing a sensitivity analysis and using field data to correct the default value provided for the leaf wet density. However, in this case study, the first model system tends to overestimate the exposure due to exposed vegetables. The second model was tested for nine children with contrasting exposure conditions. It managed to capture the blood levels for eight of them. In the last case, the exposure of the child by pathways not considered in the model may explain the failure of the model. The interest of this integrated model is to provide outputs with lower variance than the first model system, but at the moment further tests are necessary to conclude about its accuracy.

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Comparison of Arabinoxylan Structure in Bioenergy and Model Grasses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arabinoxylan Arabinoxylan Structure in Bioenergy and Model Grasses Ameya R. Kulkarni, 1 Sivakumar Pattathil, 1 Michael G. Hahn, 1,2 William S. York, 1,3 and Malcolm A. O'Neill 1 1 Complex Carbohydrate Research Center and US Department of Energy BioEnergy Science Center, 2 Department of Plant Biology, and 3 Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA Abstract Heteroxylans were solubilized from the alcohol-insoluble residue of switchgrass, rice, Brachypodium, Miscanthus, foxtail millet, and poplar with 1 M KOH. A combination of enzymatic, chemical, nu- clear magnetic resonance (NMR), mass spectroscopic, and immu- nological techniques indicated that grass arabinoxylans have comparable structures and contain no discernible amount of the reducing end sequence present in dicot glucuronoxylan. Our data suggest that rice, Brachypodium, and foxtail

142

Scenario generation for stochastic programming and simulation: a modelling perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......applications (excluding energy) is also mentioned in...the context of the `car distribution problem...formulation of the empty car distribution problem...Stochastic programming in energy. Stochastic Programming...stochastic measures and (c) alternative risk measures. These......

Nico Di Domenica; Cormac Lucas; Gautam Mitra; Patrick Valente

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation lm001das2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Technical Cost...

144

Modeling genome evolution with a DSEL for probabilistic programming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many scientific applications benefit from simulation. However, programming languages used in simulation, such as C++ or Matlab, approach problems from a deterministic procedural view, which seems to differ, in general, from many scientists’ mental ... Keywords: Haskell, functional programming, genome evolution, probabilistic programming

Martin Erwig; Steve Kollmansberger

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

A Comparison of Clustering Methods for Developing Models of User Interest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Frank M. Shipman Committee Members, Richard Furuta Takashi Yamauchi Head of Department, Valerie Taylor May 2011 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT A Comparison... of Clustering Methods for Developing Models of User Interest. (May 2011) Prasanth Ganta, B.Tech., Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati Chair of Advisory Committee: Prof. Frank Shipman For open-ended information tasks, users must sift through many...

Ganta, Prasanth

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

146

Comparison of value-added models for school ranking and classification: a Monte Carlo study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPARISON OF VALUE-ADDED MODELS FOR SCHOOL RANKING AND CLASSIFICATION: A MONTE CARLO STUDY A Dissertation by ZHONGMIAO WANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... AND CLASSIFICATION: A MONTE CARLO STUDY A Dissertation by ZHONGMIAO WANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Co...

Wang, Zhongmiao

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Earth System Modeling (ESM) Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

148

Further Program Development for the Cost Minimizing Global Energy System Model GET-RC.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The linear programming Global Energy Transition (GET) model covers the global energy system and is designed to meet exogenously given energy demand levels, subject to… (more)

Andersson, Magnus

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua New, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua New, Oak Ridge National consolidates comparison of RSC's projected energy savings to other simulation engines including DOE-2.1E, Attic of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Technologies Office (BTO). The simulation engine used in the RSC

Tennessee, University of

150

The Program for climate Model diagnosis and Intercomparison: 20-th anniversary Symposium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twenty years ago, W. Lawrence (Larry) Gates approached the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Research (now the Office of Science) with a plan to coordinate the comparison and documentation of climate model differences. This effort would help improve our understanding of climate change through a systematic approach to model intercomparison. Early attempts at comparing results showed a surprisingly large range in control climate from such parameters as cloud cover, precipitation, and even atmospheric temperature. The DOE agreed to fund the effort at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in part because of the existing computing environment and because of a preexisting atmospheric science group that contained a wide variety of expertise. The project was named the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI), and it has changed the international landscape of climate modeling over the past 20 years. In spring 2009 the DOE hosted a 1-day symposium to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of PCMDI and to honor its founder, Larry Gates. Through their personal experiences, the morning presenters painted an image of climate science in the 1970s and 1980s, that generated early support from the international community for model intercomparison, thereby bringing PCMDI into existence. Four talks covered Gates���¢��������s early contributions to climate research at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), the RAND Corporation, and Oregon State University through the founding of PCMDI to coordinate the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP). The speakers were, in order of presentation, Warren Washington [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)], Kelly Redmond (Western Regional Climate Center), George Boer (Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis), and Lennart Bengtsson [University of Reading, former director of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF)]. The afternoon session emphasized the scientific ideas that are the basis of PCMDI���¢��������s success, summarizing their evolution and impact. Four speakers followed the various PCMDI-supported climate model intercomparison projects, beginning with early work on cloud representations in models, presented by Robert D. Cess (Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Stony Brook University), and then the latest Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Projects (CFMIPs) led by Sandrine Bony (Laboratoire de M�������©t�������©orologie Dynamique). Benjamin Santer (LLNL) presented a review of the climate change detection and attribution (D & A) work pioneered at PCMDI, and Gerald A. Meehl (NCAR) ended the day with a look toward the future of climate change research.

Potter, Gerald L; Bader, David C; Riches, Michael; Bamzai, Anjuli; Joseph, Renu

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

151

A precise model for contextual roles: The programming language ObjectTeams/Java  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A number of proposals exist concerning how to support the concept of roles at the level of programming languages. While some of these proposals indeed exhibit very promising properties, the concept of roles has not found its way into mainstream programming ... Keywords: Roles, collaboration, context, method dispatch, modeling, programming language

Stephan Herrmann

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Full-scale rocket motor acoustic tests and comparisons with empirical source models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development of the next-generation space flight vehicles has prompted a renewed focus on rocket sound source characterization and near-field propagation modeling. Improved measurements of the noise near the rocket plume are critical for direct determination of the noise environment. They are also crucial in providing inputs to empirical models and in validating computational aeroacoustics models. NASA's SP-8072 acoustic load prediction model (1971) is a widely used method for predicting liftoff acoustics. The method implements two Distributed Source Methods (DSM-1 and DSM-2) which predict the loading as the sum of the radiated field from each source distributed along the plume. In this paper measurements of a static horizontal firing of an Alliant Techsystem (ATK) Orion 50S XLG are analyzed with respect to the historical data that drive the SP-8072 prediction models. Comparisons include total sound power and sound power spectrum and the distribution of the sound power and sound power spectrum along the length of the plume. Scalar pressure measurements yield reasonable agreement between the Orion-50S XLG data and both methods for undeflected plumes in the original SP-8072. However development of these comparisons has prompted significant questions regarding the underlying physics of the two methods.

Michael M. James; Kent L. Gee; Tracianne B. Neilsen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

A COMPARISON OF CLOUD MICROPHYSICAL QUANTITIES WITH FORECASTS FROM CLOUD PREDICTION MODELS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program, Bethesda, MD March 15-19, 2010 Environmental Sciences Department/Atmospheric Plains (SGP) site. Cloud forecasts generated by the models are compared with cloud microphysical and radiosonde) are used to derive the cloud microphysical quantities: ice water content, liquid water content

154

Kruskal-Wallis test: BASIC computer program to perform nonparametric one-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons on ranks of several independent samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Multiple t tests at a fixed p level are frequently used to analyse biomedical data where analysis of variance followed by multiple comparisons or the adjustment of the p values according to Bonferroni would be more appropriate. The Kruskal-Wallis test is a nonparametric ‘analysis of variance’ which may be used to compare several independent samples. The present program is written in an elementary subset of BASIC and will perform Kruskal-Wallis test followed by multiple comparisons between the groups on practically any computer programmable in BASIC.

Elvar Theodorsson-Norheim

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A Quantitative Comparison of Parallel Computation Models Ben H,H. Juurlink Harry A.G. Wijshoff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Quantitative Comparison of Parallel Computation Models Ben H,H. Juurlink Harry A.G. Wijshoff High, requires specific permission sad/or fee. SPM96, Padua, Italy Q 199(j ACM ().89791+@-&96j~ ..$3

Moreno Maza, Marc

156

Connecticut Fuel Cell Activities: Markets, Programs, and Models  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presented by the Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology, Inc. at the bi-monthly informational call for the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program on December 16, 2009

157

Technical Cost Modeling- Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

158

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

supported by Materials Technology Program to meet national objectives for improved fuel economy * Identify specific technology improvements that affect major cost drivers *...

159

A synchronous model of the PLC programming language ST Fernando Jimenez-Fraustro  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A synchronous model of the PLC programming language ST Fernando Jimenez-Fraustro IRISA / INRIA F of a synchronous model of the PLC programming lan- guage ST. This work is part of the integration of the IEC 1131 Logic Controllers (PLC) architec- tures. Their design relies on standards like the IEC 1131 norm

Boyer, Edmond

160

Evaluation and comparison of models and modelling tools simulating nitrogen processes in treatment wetlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, two ecological models of nitrogen processes in treatment wetlands have been evaluated and compared. These models were implemented, simulated, and visualized using the Modelica modelling and simulation language [P. Fritzson, Principles of Object-Oriented Modelling and Simulation with Modelica 2.1 (Wiley-IEEE Press, USA, 2004).] and an associated tool. The differences and similarities between the MathModelica Model Editor and three other ecological modelling tools have also been evaluated. The results show that the models can well be modelled and simulated in the MathModelica Model Editor, and that nitrogen decrease in a constructed treatment wetland should be described and simulated using the Nitrification/Denitrification model as this model has the highest overall quality score and provides a more variable environment.

Stina Edelfeldt; Peter Fritzson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Comparisons of complex network based models and direct current power flow model to analyze power grid vulnerability under intentional attacks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Many scholars have applied complex network based models to investigate power grid vulnerability, but how effective are these models to capture the real performance is an interesting topic. This paper selects two typical complex network based models, including a purely topological model (PTM) and a betweenness based model (BBM), as well as a direct current power flow model (DCPFM), to simulate the topology-based and flow-based vulnerability of power grid under degree, betweenness, maximum traffic and importance based intentional attacks. The relationships of vulnerability results from different models are analyzed and discussed for model comparisons. Taking IEEE 300 power grid with line capacity set proportional to tolerant parameter tp as example, the results show that there exists a critical node attack intensity A I = 0.147 , above which the three models produce almost identical topology-based vulnerability results under each attack strategy at any t p ? 1 , while producing identical flow-based vulnerability results from PTM and DCPFM occurs at A I > 0.147 , and A I > 0.73 for BBM and DCPFM, which indicates that the PTM can better approach the DCPFM for flow-based vulnerability analysis under intentional attacks. Similar results are also found for intentional edge attacks and other power grids.

Min Ouyang; Lijing Zhao; Zhezhe Pan; Liu Hong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Geothermal helical heat exchangers: Comparison and use of two-dimensional axisymmetric models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study concerns near-surface geothermic heat pumps applied to the heating or the cooling of buildings, and more especially the modeling of new helical heat exchangers buried in the subsoil between 1 and 4 m depth. Two 2D axisymmetric models are considered for the exchangers: a horizontal rings model and an annular cylindrical conduit model. The models are described, and successfully compared with literature results applied to ground thermal energy storage. The 2 models give comparable results. The simulations run significantly faster when modeling the exchanger as an annular cylindrical conduit. The ability of the thermal model of the subsoil to simulate the earth freezing is validated by comparison to experimental results. The influence of the liquid fraction included into the ground on the thermal response of the geothermic heat pumps is analyzed. It has a significant impact on the return temperature from the geothermal heat exchangers because of the phase change phenomena and the increase of the conductivity due to the soil freezing.

Xavier Moch; Marc Palomares; Fabrice Claudon; Bernard Souyri; Benoît Stutz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Going Beyond a RESNET Certification for Code-Compliant Simulations: A Comparison of Detailed Results of Three RESNET-Certified, Code-Compliant Residential Simulation Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the cooling and heating energy use from this adjustment was not resolved. Therefore, a more detailed understanding of the Software-2 simulation programs is needed to accomplish the comparison with IC3 or Software-1 on the standard reference house. ESL... compared to IC3 and Software-2. Standard Reference House in Houston: Large differences were found in the standard reference house simulation results from the three performance calculators. The IC3 calculated total annual energy use was 77.7 MMBtu...

Liu, Z.; Kim, H.; Malhotra, M.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Baltazar, J. C.; Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Montgomery, C.

164

Modelling and Formal Verification of Timing Aspects in Large PLC Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the main obstacle that prevents model checking from being widely used in industrial control systems is the complexity of building formal models out of PLC programs, especially when timing aspects need to be integrated. This paper brings an answer to this obstacle by proposing a methodology to model and verify timing aspects of PLC programs. Two approaches are proposed to allow the users to balance the trade-off between the complexity of the model, i.e. its number of states, and the set of specifications possible to be verified. A tool supporting the methodology which allows to produce models for different model checkers directly from PLC programs has been developed. Verification of timing aspects for real-life PLC programs are presented in this paper using NuSMV.

Fernandez Adiego, B; Blanco Vinuela, E; Tournier, J-C; Gonzalez Suarez, V M; Blech, J O

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Mathematical Programming Models and Their Relaxations for The ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note that the database graph on the right has a subgraph, which is structurally identical ..... We next introduce the matrix variable Y = yyT , where y is the vector .... which is a MATLAB interface for the semidefinite programming algorithm ...

Birbil

2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

166

Accelerating Energy Savings Performance Contracting Through Model Statewide Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Provides suggestions on how to accelerateEnergy Savings Performance Contracting programs and information about the types of assistance provided under the 'Accelerated Energy Savings Performance Contracting' initiative. Author: Energy Services Coalition

167

3M's Model Rewards and Recognition Program Engages Employees...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Now LEADER. Companies that choose to participate in this program pledge to reduce their energy intensity by 25% or more in 10 years. Nearly 50 different companies have committed...

168

Comparison of the unavailability using FT model and Markov model of SDS1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Candu nuclear power plants, the unavailability of the shutdown system number 1 (SDS1) is not only a function of the component failure rate, but also the test interval, the test duration, and the channel configuration. In classical fault tree methods, the effect of the configuration change and the test duration is usually ignored. To analyze their effects on the unavailability, a dynamic fault tree model and a Markov process model of the shutdown system number 1 have been developed and quantified using the high neutron power trip channel data in this paper. It is shown that the Markov process model of the SDS1 trip channel provides the most conservative results, while the dynamic fault tree model offers the least conservative one. The unavailability decreases as the test frequency and the test duration increases in both models. (authors)

Cho, S.; Jiang, J. [Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ont. N6A 5B9 (Canada)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Developing a model lifeline protection program for DOE facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A National Lifeline Standard Development Program is currently being conducted by FEMA and NIST. The Department of Energy is following these developments and supplementing them to meet Life-Safety and mission requirements for all DOE facilities as part of the Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation Plan. The task will be overseen by a DOE management team with technical guidance provided by a Steering Group of management and operating contractor representatives. The DOE will participate in the federal program by conducting a workshop on lifeline protection issues, developing an overall plan, organizing a Steering Group, and conducting a pilot study at a DOE facility.

Lowing, A.N.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Programming  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

provided on the Cray systems at NERSC. The Programming Environment is managed by a meta-module named similar to "PrgEnv-gnu4.6". The "gnu" indicates that it is providing the GNU...

171

Comparison between hybrid and fully kinetic models of asymmetric magnetic reconnection: Coplanar and guide field configurations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic reconnection occurring in collisionless environments is a multi-scale process involving both ion and electron kinetic processes. Because of their small mass, the electron scales are difficult to resolve in numerical and satellite data, it is therefore critical to know whether the overall evolution of the reconnection process is influenced by the kinetic nature of the electrons, or is unchanged when assuming a simpler, fluid, electron model. This paper investigates this issue in the general context of an asymmetric current sheet, where both the magnetic field amplitude and the density vary through the discontinuity. A comparison is made between fully kinetic and hybrid kinetic simulations of magnetic reconnection in coplanar and guide field systems. The models share the initial condition but differ in their electron modeling. It is found that the overall evolution of the system, including the reconnection rate, is very similar between both models. The best agreement is found in the guide field system, which confines particle better than the coplanar one, where the locality of the moments is violated by the electron bounce motion. It is also shown that, contrary to the common understanding, reconnection is much faster in the guide field system than in the coplanar one. Both models show this tendency, indicating that the phenomenon is driven by ion kinetic effects and not electron ones.

Aunai, Nicolas; Hesse, Michael; Kuznetsova, Maria; Black, Carrie; Evans, Rebekah [Space Weather Laboratory, Code 674, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Zenitani, Seiji [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Smets, Roch [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Ecole polytechnique, route de Palaiseau, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP): A Model-Data Comparison System for Evaluation of Coupled Biosphere-Atmosphere Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need to capture important climate feebacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in new efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, now often referred to as Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results, suggesting that a more rigorous set of offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are warranted. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) provides a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). C-LAMP provides feedback to the modeling community regarding model improvements and to the measurement community by suggesting new observational campaigns. C-LAMP Experiment 1 consists of a set of uncoupled simulations of terrestrial carbon models specifically designed to examine the ability of the models to reproduce surface carbon and energy fluxes at multiple sites and to exhibit the influence of climate variability, prescribed atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), nitrogen (N) deposition, and land cover change on projections of terrestrial carbon fluxes during the 20th century. Experiment 2 consists of partially coupled simulations of the terrestrial carbon model with an active atmosphere model exchanging energy and moisture fluxes. In all experiments, atmospheric CO{sub 2} follows the prescribed historical trajectory from C{sup 4}MIP. In Experiment 2, the atmosphere model is forced with prescribed sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and corresponding sea ice concentrations from the Hadley Centre; prescribed CO{sub 2} is radiatively active; and land, fossil fuel, and ocean CO{sub 2} fluxes are advected by the model. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3) in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): The CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon-nitrogen (CN) model of Thornton. Comparisons against Ameriflus site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) site measurements, and other datasets have been performed and are described in Randerson et al. (2009). The C-LAMP diagnostics package was used to validate improvements to CASA and CN for use in the next generation model, CLM4. It is hoped that this effort will serve as a prototype for an international carbon-cycle model benchmarking activity for models being used for the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report. More information about C-LAMP, the experimental protocol, performance metrics, output standards, and model-data comparisons from the CLM3-CASA and CLM3-CN models are available at http://www.climatemodeling.org/c-lamp.

Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Randerson, Jim [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Mahowald, Natalie [Cornell University; Bonan, Gordon [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Running, Steven [University of Montana, Missoula; Fung, Inez [University of California, Berkeley

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Program Peer Review Presentations Now Available  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

17 projects were presented at the 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Peer Review. Presentations are now available for download.

174

Introduction Imaging Models Results 1 Results 2 Model study and comparison for the cardiac electrical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dV dt + Iion(V , w) = 0 d w dt = g(V , w) · V = i - e : V trans-membrane potential. · w RN TNNP Bidomain model : statement · Heart electrical activity : in H, C V t + Iion(V , w) = -div (Ge e) w

Pierre, Charles

175

Land-use change trajectories up to 2050: insights from a global agro-economic model comparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changes in agricultural land use have important implications for environmental services. Previous studies of agricultural land-use futures have been published indicating large uncertainty due to different model assumptions and methodologies. In this article we present a first comprehensive comparison of global agro-economic models that have harmonized drivers of population, GDP, and biophysical yields. The comparison allows us to ask two research questions: (1) How much cropland will be used under different socioeconomic and climate change scenarios? (2) How can differences in model results be explained? The comparison includes four partial and six general equilibrium models that differ in how they model land supply and amount of potentially available land. We analyze results of two different socioeconomic scenarios and three climate scenarios (one with constant climate). Most models (7 out of 10) project an increase of cropland of 10–25% by 2050 compared to 2005 (under constant climate), but one model projects a decrease. Pasture land expands in some models, which increase the treat on natural vegetation further. Across all models most of the cropland expansion takes place in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. In general, the strongest differences in model results are related to differences in the costs of land expansion, the endogenous productivity responses, and the assumptions about potential cropland.

Schmitz, Christoph; van Meijl, Hans; Kyle, G. Page; Nelson, Gerald C.; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Gurgel, Angelo; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Popp, Alexander; Sands, Ronald; Tabeau, Andrzej; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; von Lampe, Martin; Wise, Marshall A.; Blanc, Elodie; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Kavallari, Aikaterini; Valin, Hugo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Introduction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Uses lessons learned from Better Buildings grantees, existing data, and private sector insights to highlight business models that can help develop a sustainable residential energy efficiency market.

177

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Executive Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Uses lessons learned from Better Buildings grantees, existing data, and private sector insights to highlight business models that can help develop a sustainable residential energy efficiency market.

178

Short term performance comparisons between a solar thermosyphon water heater and two numerical models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study of a solar thermosyphon domestic water heater was conducted in the indoor solar simulator facility at Colorado State University (Bickford, 1994). The system consisted of a closed-loop collector circuit filled with propylene glycol and water solution and a horizontal storage tank with an annular tank-in-tank heat exchanger. Short-term irradiated tests with and without timed draws were performed to assess overall performance and monitor collector flow rate, storage tank stratification, and heat exchanger temperature distribution. The measured performance was compared with the ``standard`` thermosyphon model in TRNSYS 13.1 (transient system simulation program). A revised TRNSYS model was developed by Graham Morrison at the University of New South Wales, Australia. The revised model specifically addressed the horizontal tank, closed-loop configuration. The standard TRNSYS version predicted solar gain within 17% of the measured values and differed dramatically from experimental collector temperatures, closed-loop flow rate, and tank stratification. This is not surprising since this model does not include the tank and tank heat exchanger. The revised TRNSYS model agreed more closely with experimental results. It predicted closed-loop flow at 8% lower than observed flow and collector temperature rise that was higher than the observed flow by approximately the same amount, resulting in extremely accurate prediction of collector output energy. Losses from the storage tank and piping were significantly underpredicted in both models, however.

Bickford, C.; Hittle, D.C. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Solar Energy Applications Lab.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Scenario generation for stochastic programming and simulation: a modelling perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......models Artificial Neural gas Neural networks Supply...Paper 01-04. Nicosia, Cyprus: HERMES Center of Excellence...Management, University of Cyprus. JORDAN, W. & TURNQUIST...1991) A "neural-gas" network learns topologies...A decision model for natural oil buying policy under......

Nico Di Domenica; Cormac Lucas; Gautam Mitra; Patrick Valente

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Comparison of high pressure transient PVT measurements and model predictions. Part I.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of experiments consisting of vessel-to-vessel transfers of pressurized gas using Transient PVT methodology have been conducted to provide a data set for optimizing heat transfer correlations in high pressure flow systems. In rapid expansions such as these, the heat transfer conditions are neither adiabatic nor isothermal. Compressible flow tools exist, such as NETFLOW that can accurately calculate the pressure and other dynamical mechanical properties of such a system as a function of time. However to properly evaluate the mass that has transferred as a function of time these computational tools rely on heat transfer correlations that must be confirmed experimentally. In this work new data sets using helium gas are used to evaluate the accuracy of these correlations for receiver vessel sizes ranging from 0.090 L to 13 L and initial supply pressures ranging from 2 MPa to 40 MPa. The comparisons show that the correlations developed in the 1980s from sparse data sets perform well for the supply vessels but are not accurate for the receivers, particularly at early time during the transfers. This report focuses on the experiments used to obtain high quality data sets that can be used to validate computational models. Part II of this report discusses how these data were used to gain insight into the physics of gas transfer and to improve vessel heat transfer correlations. Network flow modeling and CFD modeling is also discussed.

Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.; Winters, William Stanley, Jr.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Energy saving by integrated control of natural ventilation and HVAC systems using model guide for comparison  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Integrated control by controlling both natural ventilation and HVAC systems based on human thermal comfort requirement can result in significant energy savings. The concept of this paper differs from conventional methods of energy saving in HVAC systems by integrating the control of both these HVAC systems and the available natural ventilation that is based on the temperature difference between the indoor and the outdoor air. This difference affects the rate of change of indoor air enthalpy or indoor air potential energy storage. However, this is not efficient enough as there are other factors affecting the rate of change of indoor air enthalpy that should be considered to achieve maximum energy saving. One way of improvement can be through the use of model guide for comparison (MGFC) that uses physical-empirical hybrid modelling to predict the rate of change of indoor air potential energy storage considering building fabric and its fixture. Three methods (normal, conventional and proposed) are tested on an identical residential building model using predicted mean vote (PMV) sensor as a criterion test for thermal comfort standard. The results indicate that the proposed method achieved significant energy savings compared with the other methods while still achieving thermal comfort.

Raad Z. Homod; Khairul Salleh Mohamed Sahari; Haider A.F. Almurib

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

The booster to AGS transfer line: comparison between model and measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Booster to AGS (BtA) transfer line was to match both ions and protons into the AGS lattice. For proton beam operation the only constraint on the optics is to define a match to the AGS lattice. For ion operation there are additional constraints introduced by a stripping foil in the upstream part of the transfer line. For polarized proton operation there is the complication that the AGS lattice is distorted by the presence of two partial snake magnets. In the 2008 polarized proton run it was observed that there was a significant optical injection mismatch. Beam experiments were conducted that showed disagreement with the model of the BtA line. In addition, these studies revealed some minor problems with the instrumentation in the line. A new model and more reliable measurements of the transfer line magnet currents have been implemented. Another series of experiments was conducted to test these modifications and to collect a more complete set of data to allow better understanding of the beam dynamics during the transfer and better understanding of the instrumentation. In this paper we will present the results of these experiments and the comparison to the new model of the BtA.

Brown,K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bonati, R.; Gassner, D.; Glenn, W.; Huang, H.; Morris, J.; Nida, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Schoefer, V.; Zeno, K.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

183

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Use of Computational Modeling to  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Use of Computational Modeling to Evaluate Hypotheses about the Use of Computational Modeling to Evaluate Hypotheses about the Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Bystander Effects Authors: Yuchao “Maggie” Zhao and Rory Conolly Institutions: CIIT Centers for Health Research, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina A detailed understanding of the biological mechanisms of radiation-induced damage at the molecular and cellular levels is needed for accurate assessment of the shape of the dose-response curve for radiationinduced health effects in the intact organism. Computational models can contribute to the improved understanding of mechanisms through integration of data and quantitative evaluation of hypotheses. We propose to develop a novel computational model of bystander effects elicited by oxidative stress and a

184

Commercial Prototype Building Models | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Prototype Building Models Prototype Building Models The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of commercial building energy codes and standards by participating in review processes and providing analyses that are available for public review and use. To calculate the impact of ASHRAE Standard 90.1, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) created a suite of 16 prototype buildings covering 80% of the commercial building floor area in the United States for new construction, including both commercial buildings and mid- to high-rise buildings. These prototype buildings-derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models-cover all the reference building types except supermarkets, and also add a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings. As ASHRAE Standard 90.1

185

Comparison of the PHISICS/RELAP5-3D Ring and Block Model Results for Phase I of the OECD MHTGR-350 Benchmark  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INL PHISICS code system consists of three modules providing improved core simulation capability: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. Coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been finalized, and as part of the code verification and validation program the exercises defined for Phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR 350 MW Benchmark were completed. This paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark, and presents selected results of the three steady state exercises 1-3 defined for Phase I. For Exercise 1, a stand-alone steady-state neutronics solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) was calculated with INSTANT, using the provided geometry, material descriptions, and detailed cross-section libraries. Exercise 2 required the modeling of a stand-alone thermal fluids solution. The RELAP5-3D results of four sub-cases are discussed, consisting of various combinations of coolant bypass flows and material thermophysical properties. Exercise 3 combined the first two exercises in a coupled neutronics and thermal fluids solution, and the coupled code suite PHISICS/RELAP5-3D was used to calculate the results of two sub-cases. The main focus of the paper is a comparison of the traditional RELAP5-3D “ring” model approach vs. a much more detailed model that include kinetics feedback on individual block level and thermal feedbacks on a triangular sub-mesh. The higher fidelity of the block model is illustrated with comparison results on the temperature, power density and flux distributions, and the typical under-predictions produced by the ring model approach are highlighted.

Gerhard Strydom

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

A nested grid model of the Oregon Coastal Transition Zone: Simulations and comparisons with observations during the 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A nested grid model of the Oregon Coastal Transition Zone: Simulations and comparisons several hundred kilometers offshore where shelf flows interact with the northern California Current is realistic representation of coastal jet separation and eddy formation offshore of Cape Blanco. Three

Kurapov, Alexander

187

Comparison between Model Simulations and Measurements of Hyperspectral Far- infrared Radiation from FIRST during the RHUBC-II Campaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for its dry, cold, and dominantly clear atmosphere, which is optimal for studying the effects, that water vapor and cirrus clouds have on the far-IR. Comparisons with Line-By-Line Discrete Ordinants Radiative Transfer model, LBLDIS, show that FIRST...

Baugher, Elizabeth

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

188

Energy efficiency and the cost of GHG abatement: A comparison of bottom-up and hybrid models for the US  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy efficiency and the cost of GHG abatement: A comparison of bottom-up and hybrid models of energy efficiency potential and green- house gas (GHG) abatement potential that have been highly, and that profitable energy efficiency improvements are the reason. For the US, McKinsey estimates that GHG emissions

189

Performance Modeling of Shared Memory Programsof SharedMemory Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nus edu sg/~teoymURL: www.comp.nus.edu.sg/ teoym 7th Workshop on High Performance Computing UPM Analysis l i l d l­ Analytical Model · Summary 1 November 2011 47th Workshop on High Performance Computing November 2011 57th Workshop on High Performance Computing (invited talk) #12;R l t d W kRelated Work

Teo, Yong-Meng

190

Analysis of a solarimetric database for Mexico and comparison with the CSR model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An analysis of the solar radiation database from the network of meteorological stations of the Mexican National Weather Service was carried out. The database includes global irradiance measurements from the oldest 136 stations distributed in the Mexican territory. The consistency of data acquisition from the launch of the stations until 2010 was checked, and visual inspection of graphs of daily irradiance data was carried out, for the first three years operation, to ensure quality and reliability of the data. The results indicate that less than half of the stations have an adequate regularity for data records. With a limited number of selected stations that passed the applied quality criteria, evaluation of hourly and daily global irradiations was carried out. These results were compared to satellite derived data for Mexico, based on NREL's CSR model. The results of the comparison show a good agreement between measured and modeled daily global solar irradiation with an average RMSE of 6.6%. Based on the selected stations, a daily irradiation mean of 5.5 kWh/m²/day is estimated for the country.

D. Riveros-Rosas; C.A. Arancibia-Bulnes; R. Bonifaz; M.A. Medina; R. Peón; M. Valdes

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Computational Modeling of Biochemical  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computational Modeling of Biochemical Pathways Linking Ionizing Computational Modeling of Biochemical Pathways Linking Ionizing Radiation to Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis, and Tumor Incidence Authors: Yuchao Maggie Zhao and Rory Conolly Institutions: Center for Computational Systems Biology CIIT Centers for Health Research Long-Range Goal: To develop an integrated, computational framework for the prediction of low-dose-response to ionizing radiation (IR) in people. Methodology: To provide a flexible framework to evaluate mechanisms of cellular adaptive responses after exposure to IR, three progressively more complicated descriptions of biochemical pathways linking DNA damage with cell-cycle checkpoint control and apoptosis were developed. These descriptions focus on p53-dependent checkpoint arrest and apoptosis, p73-dependent apoptosis, and Chk2-dependent checkpoint arrest,

192

Federal Energy Management Program: Model Acquisition Language for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Model Acquisition Language for Energy-Efficient Product Contracts Model Acquisition Language for Energy-Efficient Product Contracts Training Available Graphic of the eTraining logo Energy-Efficient Federal Purchasing: This intermediate FEMP eTraining course offers hands-on learning on finding, specifying, and selecting energy-efficient products. Energy-Efficient Product Procurement: This introductory FEMP First Thursday Seminar details executive order and Federal Acquisition Regulation requirements for purchasing FEMP-designated and ENERGY STAR products. Federal agencies must insert specific contract language for Energy Efficiency in Energy-Consuming Products as defined in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Section 52.223-15 in solicitations and contracts when ENERGY STAR®-qualified or FEMP-designated energy-consuming products are:

193

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Modeling Intercellular Interactions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modeling Intercellular Interactions During Radiation Carcinogenesis Modeling Intercellular Interactions During Radiation Carcinogenesis Authors: Rainer K Sachs,1 Michael Chan,2 Lynn Hlatky,3 Philip Hahnfeldt3 Institutions: 1Departments of Mathematics and Physics, University of California Berkeley California; 2School of Medicine, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla California; 3Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston Massachusetts Abstract By modulating the microenvironment of malignant or pre-malignant epithelial cells, inhibitory or stimulatory signals from nearby cells, including those in stromal and vascular tissues, can play a key role in carcinogenesis; cancer is ultimately a disease of a whole-cell community, not just of a single cell, clone, or cell lineage. However, current commonly used

194

Translation techniques for distributed-shared memory programming models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high performance computing community has experienced an explosive improvement in distributed-shared memory hardware. Driven by increasing real-world problem complexity, this explosion has ushered in vast numbers of new systems. Each new system presents new challenges to programmers and application developers. Part of the challenge is adapting to new architectures with new performance characteristics. Different vendors release systems with widely varying architectures that perform differently in different situations. Furthermore, since vendors need only provide a single performance number (total MFLOPS, typically for a single benchmark), they only have strong incentive initially to optimize the API of their choice. Consequently, only a fraction of the available APIs are well optimized on most systems. This causes issues porting and writing maintainable software, let alone issues for programmers burdened with mastering each new API as it is released. Also, programmers wishing to use a certain machine must choose their API based on the underlying hardware instead of the application. This thesis argues that a flexible, extensible translator for distributed-shared memory APIs can help address some of these issues. For example, a translator might take as input code in one API and output an equivalent program in another. Such a translator could provide instant porting for applications to new systems that do not support the application's library or language natively. While open-source APIs are abundant, they do not perform optimally everywhere. A translator would also allow performance testing using a single base code translated to a number of different APIs. Most significantly, this type of translator frees programmers to select the most appropriate API for a given application based on the application (and developer) itself instead of the underlying hardware.

Fuller, Douglas James

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Business Models for Code Compliance | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Compliance Compliance Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Basics Compliance Evaluation Software & Web Tools Regulations Resource Center Business Models for Code Compliance The U.S. Department of Energy is coordinating strategies and activities with companies, individuals, and government entities to demonstrate, quantify, and monetize energy code compliance and coordinate deployment at the local, state, and regional levels. Consumer Assurance through Code Compliance Energy efficiency measures in the buildings sector, if properly realized and captured, provide a tremendous opportunity to reduce energy consumption and expenditures. Yet currently there is a lack of assurance that buildings as designed realize the levels of energy efficiency established in the

196

Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Extremophiles 2004 Extremophiles 2004 5th International Conference on Extremophiles SEPTEMBER 19 -23, 2004 CAMBRIDGE, MARYLAND Extremophiles 2004 5th International Conference on Extremophiles © 2004, American Society for Microbiology 1752 N Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20036-2904 Phone: 202-737-3600 World Wide Web: www.asm.org All Rights Reserved Printed in the United States of America ISBN: 1-55581 324-0 TABLE OF CONTENTS General Information Scientific Program Abstracts for Oral Sessions Abstracts for Poster Sessions Index 4 10 18 42 144 4 ASM Conferences EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Frank Robb, Chair University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute Michael W. Adams University of Georgia Koki Horikoshi Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology Robert M. Kelly North Carolina State University Jennifer Littlechild

197

Comparisons of purely topological model, betweenness based model and direct current power flow model to analyze power grid vulnerability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper selects three frequently used power grid models including a purely topological model (PTM) a betweennness based model (BBM) and a direct current power flow model (DCPFM) to describe three different dynamical processes on a power grid under both single and multiple component failures. Each of the dynamical processes is then characterized by both a topology-based and a flow-based vulnerability metrics to compare the three models with each other from the vulnerability perspective. Taking as an example the IEEE 300 power grid with line capacity set proportional to a tolerance parameter tp the results show non-linear phenomenon: under single node failures there exists a critical value of tp?=?1.36 above which the three models all produce identical topology-based vulnerability results and more than 85% nodes have identical flow-based vulnerability from any two models; under multiple node failures that each node fails with an identical failure probability fp there exists a critical fp?=?0.56 above which the three models produce almost identical topology-based vulnerability results at any tp???1 but producing identical flow-based vulnerability results only occurs at fp?=?1. In addition the topology-based vulnerability results can provide a good approximation for the flow-based vulnerability under large fp and the priority of PTM and BBM to better approach the DCPFM for vulnerability analysis mainly depends on the value of fp. Similar results are also found for other failure types other system operation parameters and other power grids.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Pharmacokinetic calculator program for generation of initial parameter estimates from a three-compartment infusion model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A polyexponential curve-stripping program, kin, is described for use on the HP-41CV programmable calculator. The program may be used in the analysis of plasma-concentration-time curves for a three-compartment intravenous bolus or infusion model with linear elimination processes. The coefficients and hybrid rate constants of the exponential function are then used to compute pharmacokinetic parameters (volume of the central compartment, intercompartmental rate transfer constants), which may be used as initial estimates of model parameters in non-linear regression curve-fitting procedures.

James D. Henderson; Richard D. Olson; William R. Ravis

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Stack and cell modelling with SOFC3D: a computer program for the 3D simulations of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stack and cell modelling with SOFC3D: a computer program for the 3D simulations of solid oxide fuel, France 1 Introduction SOFC3D is a computer program, which simulates the behaviour of a solid oxide fuel model A detailed cell model was obtained [9] by writing the conservation laws in the solid parts

Herbin, Raphaèle

200

Early Site Permit Demonstration Program, plant parameters envelopes: Comparison with ranges of values for four hypothetical sites. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this volume is to report the results of the comparison of the ALWR plan parameters envelope with values of site characteristics developed for our hypothetical sites that generally represent conditions encountered within the United States. This effort is not intended to identify or address the suitability of any existing site, site area, or region in the United States. Also included in this volume is Appendix F, SERCH Summaries Regarding Siting.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

On the Inner Structure and Topology of Clusters in Two-Component Lipid Bilayers. Comparison of Monomer and Dimer Ising Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comparison of Monomer and Dimer Ising Models ... Clusters of two-component phospholipid bilayers have been simulated by two Ising-type lattice models: the monomer and the dimer model. ... The first theoretical model of a collective system, the model of ferromagnets, was developed by Ernst Ising(17) in 1925. ...

István P. Sugár

2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

202

Automation of invariom and of experimental charge density modelling of organic molecules with the preprocessor program InvariomTool  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The XD preprocessor program InvariomTool presented here allows the automation of the process of invariom and experimental charge density modelling of organic molecules.

Hübschle, C.B.

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Bringing Automated Model Checking to PLC Program Development - A CERN Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Verification of critical software is a high priority but a challenging task for industrial control systems. Model checking appears to be an appropriate approach for this purpose. However, this technique is not widely used in industry yet, due to some obstacles. The main obstacles encountered when trying to apply formal verification techniques at industrial installations are the difficulty of creating models out of PLC programs and defining formally the specification requirements. In addition, models produced out of real-life programs have a huge state space, thus preventing the verification due to performance issues. Our work at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) focuses on developing efficient automatic verification methods for industrial critical installations based on PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) control systems. In this paper, we present a tool generating automatically formal models out of PLC code. The tool implements a general methodology which can support several input languages, ...

Fernandez Adiego, B; Tournier, J-C; Blanco Vinuela, E; Gonzalez Suarez, V M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

1 MWt bench model solar receiver test program J. Gintz, D. Bartlett and R. Zentner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a scale model of a Brayton cycle solar electric plant receiver. The program span from initiation of design and transients; and demonstrations of solar load following. Design thermal efficiency predictions were achieved in high temperature, gas cooled, solar central receiver concepts under direction of the Electric Power

Boyer, Edmond

205

An exploration of the stages of change model in a group treatment program for male batterers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to investigate the adequacy of the Stages of Change model in a group therapy treatment program for male batterers. The sample consisted of three groups with a total sample size of 22 participants. Data for this study...

Wells, Robert Davis

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

206

Modelling of offshore wind turbine wakes with the wind farm program FLaP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling of offshore wind turbine wakes with the wind farm program FLaP Bernhard Lange(1) , Hans been extended to improve the description of wake development in offshore conditions, especially the low from the Danish offshore wind farm Vindeby. Vertical wake profiles and mean turbulence intensities

Heinemann, Detlev

207

Comparison and validation of HEU and LEU modeling results to HEU experimental benchmark data for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology MITR reactor.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like the MITR-II reactor. Towards this goal, comparisons of MCNP5 Monte Carlo neutronic modeling results for HEU and LEU cores have been performed. Validation of the model has been based upon comparison to HEU experimental benchmark data for the MITR-II. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a model which could represent the experimental HEU data, and therefore could provide a basis to demonstrate LEU core performance. This report presents an overview of MITR-II model geometry and material definitions which have been verified, and updated as required during the course of validation to represent the specifications of the MITR-II reactor. Results of calculations are presented for comparisons to historical HEU start-up data from 1975-1976, and to other experimental benchmark data available for the MITR-II Reactor through 2009. This report also presents results of steady state neutronic analysis of an all-fresh LEU fueled core. Where possible, HEU and LEU calculations were performed for conditions equivalent to HEU experiments, which serves as a starting point for safety analyses for conversion of MITR-II from the use of HEU fuel to the use of UMo LEU fuel.

Newton, T. H.; Wilson, E. H; Bergeron, A.; Horelik, N.; Stevens, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (MIT Nuclear Reactor Lab.)

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

208

Comparison of Optimal Thermodynamic Models of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle from Heterotrophs, Cyanobacteria, and Green Sulfur Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comparison of Optimal Thermodynamic Models of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle from Heterotrophs, Cyanobacteria, and Green Sulfur Bacteria ... The ability to evaluate the thermodynamics of metabolic pathways allows one to understand the relationship between coupling of energy and material gradients in the environment and the self-organization of stable biological systems, and it is shown that each cycle operates in the direction expected due to its environmental niche. ...

Dennis G. Thomas; Sebastian Jaramillo-Riveri; Douglas J. Baxter; William R. Cannon

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

209

WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) influences the market for plumbing fixtures and fittings by encouraging consumers to purchase products that carry the WaterSense label, which certifies those products as performing at low flow rates compared to unlabeled fixtures and fittings. As consumers decide to purchase water-efficient products, water consumption will decline nationwide. Decreased water consumption should prolong the operating life of water and wastewater treatment facilities.This report describes the method used to calculate national water savings attributable to EPA?s WaterSense program. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet model, the National Water Savings (NWS) analysis model, accompanies this methodology report. Version 1.0 of the NWS model evaluates indoor residential water consumption. Two additional documents, a Users? Guide to the spreadsheet model and an Impacts Report, accompany the NWS model and this methodology document. Altogether, these four documents represent Phase One of this project. The Users? Guide leads policy makers through the spreadsheet options available for projecting the water savings that result from various policy scenarios. The Impacts Report shows national water savings that will result from differing degrees of market saturation of high-efficiency water-using products.This detailed methodology report describes the NWS analysis model, which examines the effects of WaterSense by tracking the shipments of products that WaterSense has designated as water-efficient. The model estimates market penetration of products that carry the WaterSense label. Market penetration is calculated for both existing and new construction. The NWS model estimates savings based on an accounting analysis of water-using products and of building stock. Estimates of future national water savings will help policy makers further direct the focus of WaterSense and calculate stakeholder impacts from the program.Calculating the total gallons of water the WaterSense program saves nationwide involves integrating two components, or modules, of the NWS model. Module 1 calculates the baseline national water consumption of typical fixtures, fittings, and appliances prior to the program (as described in Section 2.0 of this report). Module 2 develops trends in efficiency for water-using products both in the business-as-usual case and as a result of the program (Section 3.0). The NWS model combines the two modules to calculate total gallons saved by the WaterSense program (Section 4.0). Figure 1 illustrates the modules and the process involved in modeling for the NWS model analysis.The output of the NWS model provides the base case for each end use, as well as a prediction of total residential indoor water consumption during the next two decades. Based on the calculations described in Section 4.0, we can project a timeline of water savings attributable to the WaterSense program. The savings increase each year as the program results in the installation of greater numbers of efficient products, which come to compose more and more of the product stock in households throughout the United States.

Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; McNeil, Michael; Dunham_Whitehead, Camilla; Letschert, Virginie; della_Cava, Mirka

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

210

Comparison of MAGIC and Diatom paleolimnological model hindcasts of lakewater acidification in the Adirondack region of New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thirty-three lakes that had been statistically selected as part of the US Environmental Protection Agency's Eastern Lake Survey and Direct Delayed Response Project (DDRP) were used to compare the MAGIC (watershed) and Diatom (paleolimnological) models. The study lakes represented a well-defined group of Adirondack lakes, each larger than 4 ha in area and having acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) <400 {mu}eq L{sup {minus}1}. The study first compared current and pre-industrial (before 1850) pH and ANC estimates from Diatom and MAGIC as they were calibrated in the preceding Paleocological Investigation of Recent Lake Acidification (PIRLA) and DDRP studies, respectively. Initially, the comparison of hindcasts of pre-industrial chemistry was confounded by seasonal and methodological differences in lake chemistry data used in calibration of the model. Although certain differences proved to be of little significance for comparison, MAGIC did predict significantly higher pre-industrial ANC and pH values than did Diatom, using calibrations in the preceding studies. Both models suggest acidification of low ANC Adirondack region lakes since preindustrial times, but differ primarily in that MAGIC inferred greater acidification and that acidification has occurred in all lakes in the comparison, whereas Diatom inferred that acidification has been restricted to low ANC lakes (

Sullivan, T.J.; Bernert, J.A.; Eliers, J.M. (E and S Environmental Chemistry, Corvallis, OR (USA)); Jenne, E.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Cosby, B.J. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA). School of Forestry and Environmental Studies); Charles, D.F.; Selle, A.R. (Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (USA). Environmental Research Lab.)

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

MODEL EER 2013-2014 for Bachelor's degree programs based on competency-centered learning, version of May 2, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODEL EER 2013-2014 for Bachelor's degree programs based on competency-centered learning, version Regulations, which enter into force on September 1, 2013, read as follows: #12;MODEL EER 2013

Franssen, Michael

212

Si deposition rates in a two-dimensional CVD (chemical vapor deposition) reactor and comparisons with model calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deposition rates are presented for silicon from silane in a helium carrier gas using a tubular CVD reactor with a two-dimensional flow geometry. Measured surface-temperature profiles, inlet gas velocities, total pressures, and silane/helium concentrations are reported, providing exact boundary conditions that can be used in a two-dimensional numerical CVD model. Comparisons are made between this data and two variations of a model by Coltrin, Kee, and Miller in which different empirical expressions for the silane and disilane reactive sticking coefficient are used.

Breiland, W.G.; Coltrin, M.E.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

The North Atlantic Subpolar Gyre in Four High-Resolution Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors present the first quantitative comparison between new velocity datasets and high-resolution models in the North Atlantic subpolar gyre [1/10° Parallel Ocean Program model (POPNA10), Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model (MICOM), ?° ...

A. M. Treguier; S. Theetten; E. P. Chassignet; T. Penduff; R. Smith; L. Talley; J. O. Beismann; C. Böning

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Contractor/Retailer Business Models  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Business models information focused on remodelers, HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) contractors, home performance contractors, or retailers.

215

Comparison of observed lung retention and urinary excretion of thorium workers and members of the public in India with the values predicted by the icrp biokinetic model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......certifiedreported values indicating the reliability of the analysis. Table 1. A comparison...Contamination, Radioactive analysis Guidelines as Topic Humans...Models, Biological Nuclear Reactors Occupational Exposure analysis Organ Specificity Radioactive......

D. D. Jaiswal; I. S. Singh; Suma Nair; H. S. Dang; S. P. Garg; A. S. Pradhan

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Sporting Good Manufacturing Company: Optimal Manufacturing and Shipping Cost Through Linear Programming Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 15: Example Transshipment Model.............................................................................. 18 vi List of Principal Symbols and Nomenclature SGMC Sporting Good Manufacturing Company LP Linear Programming CEO Chief... Executive Officer COO Chief Operation Officer PKR Pakistani Rupees EMGT Engineering Management O.F. Objective Function A i No. of bats manufactured in factory i; where i = k, l BB i No. of Stumps manufactured in factory i; where i = k, l C i No...

Malik, Ejaz

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Automated Eukaryotic Gene Structure Annotation Using EVidenceModeler and the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EVidenceModeler (EVM) is presented as an automated eukaryotic gene structure annotation tool that reports eukaryotic gene structures as a weighted consensus of all available evidence. EVM, when combined with the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA), yields a comprehensive, configurable annotation system that predicts protein-coding genes and alternatively spliced isoforms. Our experiments on both rice and human genome sequences demonstrate that EVM produces automated gene structure annotation approaching the quality of manual curation.

Haas, B J; Salzberg, S L; Zhu, W; Pertea, M; Allen, J E; Orvis, J; White, O; Buell, C R; Wortman, J R

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

218

Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Task 23: Phase IV Results Regarding Floating Wind Turbine Modeling; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, which operates under Subtask 2 of the International Energy Agency Wind Task 23. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating spar buoy in 320 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants' codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

Jonkman, J.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Nygaard, T.; Maus, K.; Karimirad, M.; Gao, Z.; Moan, T.; Fylling, I.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Two-stage fuzzy-stochastic robust programming: a hybrid model for regional air quality management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, a hybrid two-stage fuzzy-stochastic robust programming (TFSRP) model is developed and applied to the planning of an air-quality management system. As an extension of existing fuzzy-robust programming and two stage stochastic programming methods, the TFSRP can explicitly address complexities and uncertainties of the study system without unrealistic simplifications. Uncertain parameters can be expressed as probability density and/or fuzzy membership functions, such that robustness of the optimization efforts can be enhanced. Moreover, economic penalties as corrective measures against any infeasibilities arising from the uncertainties are taken into account. This method can, thus, provide a linkage to predefined policies determined by authorities that have to be respected when a modeling effort is undertaken. In its solution algorithm, the fuzzy decision space can be delimited through specification of the uncertainties using dimensional enlargement of the original fuzzy constraints. The developed model is applied to a case study of regional air quality management at two coal-fired power plants considered as major sulfur dioxide emission sources. The results indicate that reasonable solutions have been obtained. The solutions can be used for further generating pollution-mitigation alternatives with minimized system costs and for providing a more solid support for sound environmental decisions. 61 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Yongping Li; Guo H. Huang; Amornvadee Veawab; Xianghui Nie; Lei Liu [University of Regina, Regina, SK (Canada). Environmental Systems Engineering Program

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

90.1 Prototype Building Models Large Hotel | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hotel Hotel The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

90.1 Prototype Building Models Large Office | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Office Office The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

222

90.1 Prototype Building Models Small Office | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Office Office The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

223

90.1 Prototype Building Models Strip Mall | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Strip Mall Strip Mall The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

224

90.1 Prototype Building Models Small Hotel | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hotel Hotel The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

225

90.1 Prototype Building Models Hospital | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hospital Hospital The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

226

A model for including Arduino microcontroller programming in the introductory physics lab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper describes a curricular framework for introducing microcontroller programming in the University Physics lab. The approach makes use of Modeling Instruction, an effective approach for teaching science at the secondary level in which student learn the standard material by developing and deploying models of the physical world. In our approach, students engage with a context-rich problem that can be solved with one or more sensors and a microcontroller. The solution path we describe then consists of developing a mathematical model for how the sensors' data can be mapped to a meaningful measurement, and further, developing an algorithmic model that will be implemented in the microcontroller. Once the system is developed and implemented, students are given an array of similar problems in which they can deploy their data collection system. Results from the implementation of this idea, in two University Physics sections, using Arduino microcontrollers, are also described.

Haugen, Andrew J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Incorporating daily flood control objectives into a monthly stochastic dynamic programming model for a hydroelectric complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A monthly stochastic dynamic programing model was recently developed and implemented at British Columbia (B.C.) Hydro to provide decision support for short-term energy exports and, if necessary, for flood control on the Peace River in northern British Columbia. The model established the marginal cost of supplying energy from the B.C. Hydro system, as well as a monthly operating policy for the G.M. Shrum and Peace Canyon hydroelectric plants and the Williston Lake storage reservoir. A simulation model capable of following the operating policy then determines the probability of refilling Williston Lake and possible spill rates and volumes. Reservoir inflows are input to both models in daily and monthly formats. The results indicate that flood control can be accommodated without sacrificing significant export revenue.

Druce, D.J. (British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Introduction Comparison With Matlab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Comparison With Matlab Advantages Extensions with Pyrex Communication Numerical Computing in Python A Guide for Matlab Users B. Blais Department of Science and Technology Bryant University Comparison With Matlab Advantages Extensions with Pyrex Communication Abstract Matlab is a commercial program

Blais, Brian

229

E-Print Network 3.0 - analyze model programs Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering 3 2010 ARRA SUMMER RESEARCH EXPERIENCE Joann Gruber Summary: in MATLAB. Overall, I adapted four programs in SAS and five programs in MATLAB. The programs in...

230

Atmospheric Environment 38 (2004) 44274436 Statistical comparison of observed and CMAQ modeled daily  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2004 Abstract New statistical procedures to evaluate the Models-3/Community Multiscale Air Quality reserved. Keywords: Air quality model; Model evaluation; Space­time process; Separable covariance function 1. Introduction The Models-3/Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system has been

Jun, Mikyoung

231

The MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model : revisions, sensitivities, and comparisons of results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model is a component of the MIT Integrated Earth Systems Model (IGSM). Here, we provide an overview of the model accessible to a broad audience and present the detailed ...

Babiker, Mustafa H.M.; Reilly, John M.; Mayer, Monika.; Eckaus, Richard S.; Sue Wing, Ian.; Hyman, Robert C.

232

A Comparison of Data Assimilation Methods Using a Planetary Geostrophic Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assimilating hydrographic observations into a planetary geostrophic model is posed as a problem in control theory. The cost functional is the sum of weighted model and data residuals. Model errors are assumed to be spatially correlated, and ...

Edward D. Zaron

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Cross-comparison of spacecraft-environment interaction model predictions applied to Solar Probe Plus near perihelion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five spacecraft-plasma models are used to simulate the interaction of a simplified geometry Solar Probe Plus (SPP) satellite with the space environment under representative solar wind conditions near perihelion. By considering similarities and differences between results obtained with different numerical approaches under well defined conditions, the consistency and validity of our models can be assessed. The impact on model predictions of physical effects of importance in the SPP mission is also considered by comparing results obtained with and without these effects. Simulation results are presented and compared with increasing levels of complexity in the physics of interaction between solar environment and the SPP spacecraft. The comparisons focus particularly on spacecraft floating potentials, contributions to the currents collected and emitted by the spacecraft, and on the potential and density spatial profiles near the satellite. The physical effects considered include spacecraft charging, photoelectron and secondary electron emission, and the presence of a background magnetic field. Model predictions obtained with our different computational approaches are found to be in agreement within 2% when the same physical processes are taken into account and treated similarly. The comparisons thus indicate that, with the correct description of important physical effects, our simulation models should have the required skill to predict details of satellite-plasma interaction physics under relevant conditions, with a good level of confidence. Our models concur in predicting a negative floating potential V{sub fl}??10V for SPP at perihelion. They also predict a “saturated emission regime” whereby most emitted photo- and secondary electron will be reflected by a potential barrier near the surface, back to the spacecraft where they will be recollected.

Marchand, R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada); Miyake, Y.; Usui, H. [Graduate School of System Informatics, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Deca, J.; Lapenta, G. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Mathematics Department, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Matéo-Vélez, J. C. [Department of Space Environment, Onera—The French Aerospace Lab, Toulouse (France); Ergun, R. E.; Sturner, A. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Génot, V. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie, Université de Toulouse, France and CNRS, IRAP, 9 Av. colonel Roche, BP 44346, 31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Hilgers, A. [ESA, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, PO Box 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Markidis, S. [High Performance Computing and Visualization Department, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Evaluation and Comparison of Ecological Models Simulating Nitrogen Processes in Treatment Wetlands,Implemented in Modelica.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Two ecological models of nitrogen processes in treatment wetlands have been evaluated and compared. These models have been implemented, simulated, and visualized in the… (more)

Edelfeldt, Stina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

A comparison between a hydro-wind plant and wind speed forecasting using ARIMA models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we will present a comparison between two options for harnessing wind power. We will first analyze the behaviour of a wind farm that goes to the electricity market having previously made a forecast of wind speed while accepting the deviation penalties that these may incur. Second we will study the possibility of the wind farm not going to the market individually but as part of a hydro-wind plant.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Programming and Scheduling Model for Supporting Heterogeneous Accelerators in Tobias Beisel and Tobias Wiersema and Christian Plessl and Andr Brinkmann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Programming and Scheduling Model for Supporting Heterogeneous Accelerators in Linux Tobias Beisel of such heterogeneous systems is still a subject of research. While many efforts address the programming of accelerators, scheduling heterogeneous systems, i. e., mapping parts of an application to accelerators at runtime, is still

Hellebrand, Sybille

237

A nonlinear binary programming model for electric distribution systems reliability optimization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a new nonlinear binary programming model aiming to minimize the SAIDI and SAIFI reliability indices of a distribution feeder. Graph theory and a contingency simulation-based technique are used in the explicit formulation of the objective functions to accurately model the protection system response to faults and system reconfiguration practices. To ensure the solution’s feasibility both technical and economic constraints are considered. An alternative economic constraint is proposed, taking into account the current locations of the protective devices and sectionalizing switches, which directly affect the utility costs for reliability improvement. To solve the proposed model, an optimization technique based on the branch-and-bound algorithm is used in this paper. Hence, this technique enables deterministic optimization of distribution feeder reliability by identifying types and locations of protection devices and sectionalizing switches, so that SAIDI and SAIFI reliability indices are minimized. Test cases are presented to illustrate the reliability optimization of a test feeder considering the use of different protection schemes and cost constraints. A value-based reliability optimization formulation is derived from the proposed model and its application to the test feeder is also illustrated. Additionally, the solutions obtained from the proposed model are compared with the solutions obtained from two other state-of-the-art models found in the literature. A comparative study is also carried out to evaluate the efficiency of the genetic algorithm in solving the proposed models.

G.D. Ferreira; A.S. Bretas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

An experimental comparison of current viscoplastic constitutive models at elevated temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the model has been used to predict the response of Hastelloy X at room temperature [891. A method for the determination of the material constants for the anisotropic form has been reported [90]. Material constants for several other mater1als have also... method for evaluating the constants and has modelled Hastelloy X at several temperatures [72]. Transient temperature modelling has been attempted with Hastelloy X [72]. Miller's Model. Miller first proposed his microphenomenologically based model...

James, George Henry

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Second Level Cluster Dependencies: A Comparison of Modeling Software and Missing Data Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@ 1 C A = 0 B @ G 0 0 R 1 C A . (1.9) 1. The Independence Model In the scenario where all the teachers? measurements are independent of each other and across the years, and thus there is no second level dependency (SLD....12). 2. The Correlated Cluster Model Moving from the independence model assumption to the correlated cluster model, in which the teacher?s measurements may be dependent across the years, requires the SLD to be modeled in some way. A common modeling...

Larsen, Ross Allen Andrew

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

240

Comparison of the Accuracy and Speed of Transient Mobile A/C System Simulation Models: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operation of air conditioning (A/C) systems is a significant contributor to the total amount of fuel used by light- and heavy-duty vehicles. Therefore, continued improvement of the efficiency of these mobile A/C systems is important. Numerical simulation has been used to reduce the system development time and to improve the electronic controls, but numerical models that include highly detailed physics run slower than desired for carrying out vehicle-focused drive cycle-based system optimization. Therefore, faster models are needed even if some accuracy is sacrificed. In this study, a validated model with highly detailed physics, the 'Fully-Detailed' model, and two models with different levels of simplification, the 'Quasi-Transient' and the 'Mapped- Component' models, are compared. The Quasi-Transient model applies some simplifications compared to the Fully-Detailed model to allow faster model execution speeds. The Mapped-Component model is similar to the Quasi-Transient model except instead of detailed flow and heat transfer calculations in the heat exchangers, it uses lookup tables created with the Quasi-Transient model. All three models are set up to represent the same physical A/C system and the same electronic controls. Speed and results of the three model versions are compared for steady state and transient operation. Steady state simulated data are also compared to measured data. The results show that the Quasi-Transient and Mapped-Component models ran much faster than the Fully-Detailed model, on the order of 10- and 100-fold, respectively. They also adequately approach the results of the Fully-Detailed model for steady-state operation, and for drive cycle-based efficiency predictions

Kiss, T.; Lustbader, J.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM`s highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM`s experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

Patrinos, A.A. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ellingson, R.G. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM's highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM's experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

Patrinos, A.A. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)); Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Ellingson, R.G. (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Optimisation and comparison of integrated models of direct-drive linear machines for wave energy conversion   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined electrical and structural models of five types of permanent magnet linear electrical machines suitable for direct-drive power take-off on wave energy applications are presented. Electromagnetic models were ...

Crozier, Richard Carson

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

244

A comparison of Bayesian versus deterministic formulation for dynamic data integration into reservoir models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Into Reservoir Models. (Decmnber 200 I) Danny LL Rojas Paico, B. S. , Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Peru Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Akhil Datta-Gupta The integration of dynamic data into reservoir models is known as automatic history matching...

Rojas Paico, Danny H.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

MT3D: a 3 dimensional magnetotelluric modeling program (user's guide and documentation for Rev. 1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MT3D.REV1 is a non-interactive computer program written in FORTRAN to do 3-dimensional magnetotelluric modeling. A 3-D volume integral equation has been adapted to simulate the MT response of a 3D body in the earth. An integro-difference scheme has been incorporated to increase the accuracy. This is a user's guide for MT3D.REV1 on the University of Utah Research Institute's (UURI) PRIME 400 computer operating under PRIMOS IV, Rev. 17.

Nutter, C.; Wannamaker, P.E.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Thermal conditions in buildings-advances of acausal OO modelling in comparison with traditional approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper deals with some important aspects of continuous systems modelling approaches. Namely the traditional approach is based on block oriented schemes in which causal relations play an important role. However this causality is artificially generated ... Keywords: acausal modelling, intelligent building, object oriented modelling, simulation, thermal flows

Borut Zupan?i?; Anton Sodja

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Comparison of NO and OH planar fluorescence temperature measurements in scramjet model flowfields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of nitric oxide (NO) and the hydroxyl radical (OH) as temperature tracers, in a two-line planar laser-induced fluorescence technique, is examined in the context of a supersonic mixing and combustion flowfield. The temperature measurements were based on the sequential excitation of two transitions, either in the A implied by X (0,0) band of NO near 226 nm or the A implied by X (1,0) band of OH near 283 nm. The measurements were obtained for each species through the use of two lasers and two cameras, with each camera integrating signal induced from only one of the lasers. Both temporally resolved and frame-averaged temperature measurements of each species are presented. Additional results include simultaneous NO and OH visualizations, in which seeded NO marks the fuel jet fluid and nascent OH marks the reaction zones and convected combustion gases. A detailed temperature comparison shows good agreement in the common measurement regions and indicates that shot noise is the largest source of uncertainty. The comparison also illustrates the importance of a careful interpretation of the measurements, since, depending on the origin of the tracer and the degree of mixing, the measurements may be biased toward the fuel, freestream, or reaction zone temperatures. 33 refs.

Mcmillin, B.K.; Seitzman, J.M.; Hanson, R.K. [Natl. Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (NUREG-0711)Revision 3: Update Methodology and Key Revisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the human factors engineering (HFE) programs of applicants for nuclear power plant construction permits, operating licenses, standard design certifications, and combined operating licenses. The purpose of these safety reviews is to help ensure that personnel performance and reliability are appropriately supported. Detailed design review procedures and guidance for the evaluations is provided in three key documents: the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800), the HFE Program Review Model (NUREG-0711), and the Human-System Interface Design Review Guidelines (NUREG-0700). These documents were last revised in 2007, 2004 and 2002, respectively. The NRC is committed to the periodic update and improvement of the guidance to ensure that it remains a state-of-the-art design evaluation tool. To this end, the NRC is updating its guidance to stay current with recent research on human performance, advances in HFE methods and tools, and new technology being employed in plant and control room design. NUREG-0711 is the first document to be addressed. We present the methodology used to update NUREG-0711 and summarize the main changes made. Finally, we discuss the current status of the update program and the future plans.

OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.; Fleger, S.

2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

249

Results and Comparison from the SAM Linear Fresnel Technology Performance Model: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the new Linear Fresnel technology performance model in NREL's System Advisor Model. The model predicts the financial and technical performance of direct-steam-generation Linear Fresnel power plants, and can be used to analyze a range of system configurations. This paper presents a brief discussion of the model formulation and motivation, and provides extensive discussion of the model performance and financial results. The Linear Fresnel technology is also compared to other concentrating solar power technologies in both qualitative and quantitative measures. The Linear Fresnel model - developed in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute - provides users with the ability to model a variety of solar field layouts, fossil backup configurations, thermal receiver designs, and steam generation conditions. This flexibility aims to encompass current market solutions for the DSG Linear Fresnel technology, which is seeing increasing exposure in fossil plant augmentation and stand-alone power generation applications.

Wagner, M. J.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Comparisons of model simulations of climate variability with data, Task 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant progress has been made in our investigations aimed at diagnosing low frequency variations of climate in General Circulation Models. We have analyzed three versions of the Oregon State University General Circulation Model (OSU GCM). These are: (1) the Slab Model in which the ocean is treated as a static heat reservoir of fixed depth, (2) the coupled upper ocean-atmosphere model in which the ocean dynamics are calculated in two layers of variable depths representing the mixed layers and the thermocline; this model is referred to OSU2 in the following discussion, and (3) the coupled full ocean-atmosphere model in which the ocean is represented by six layers of variable depth; this model is referred to as OSU6 GCM in the discussion.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Comparisons of model simulations of climate variability with data, Task 2. [Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant progress has been made in our investigations aimed at diagnosing low frequency variations of climate in General Circulation Models. We have analyzed three versions of the Oregon State University General Circulation Model (OSU GCM). These are: (1) the Slab Model in which the ocean is treated as a static heat reservoir of fixed depth, (2) the coupled upper ocean-atmosphere model in which the ocean dynamics are calculated in two layers of variable depths representing the mixed layers and the thermocline; this model is referred to OSU2 in the following discussion, and (3) the coupled full ocean-atmosphere model in which the ocean is represented by six layers of variable depth; this model is referred to as OSU6 GCM in the discussion.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

A Comparison of Simulated Cloud Radar Output from the Multiscale Modeling Framework Global Climate Model with CloudSat Cloud Radar Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last few years a new type of global climate model (GCM) has emerged in which a cloud-resolving model is embedded into each grid cell of a GCM. This new approach is frequently called a multiscale modeling framework (MMF) or superparameterization. In this article we present a comparison of MMF output with radar observations from the NASA CloudSat mission, which uses a near-nadir-pointing millimeter-wavelength radar to probe the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. We account for radar detection limits by simulating the 94 GHz radar reflectivity that CloudSat would observe from the high-resolution cloud-resolving model output produced by the MMF. Overall, the MMF does a good job of reproducing the broad pattern of tropical convergence zones, subtropical belts, and midlatitude storm tracks, as well as their changes in position with the annual solar cycle. Nonetheless, the comparison also reveals a number of model shortfalls including (1) excessive hydrometeor coverage at all altitudes over many convectively active regions, (2) a lack of low-level hydrometeors over all subtropical oceanic basins, (3) excessive low-level hydrometeor coverage (principally precipitating hydrometeors) in the midlatitude storm tracks of both hemispheres during the summer season (in each hemisphere), and (4) a thin band of low-level hydrometeors in the Southern Hemisphere of the central (and at times eastern and western) Pacific in the MMF, which is not observed by CloudSat. This band resembles a second much weaker ITCZ but is restricted to low levels.

Marchand, Roger T.; Haynes, J. M.; Mace, Gerald G.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Stephens, Graeme L.

2009-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

253

Comparison of Accelerated Testing with Modeling to Predict Lifetime of CPV Solder Layers (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) cell assemblies can fail due to thermomechanical fatigue in the die-attach layer. In this presentation, we show the latest results from our computational model of thermomechanical fatigue. The model is used to estimate the relative lifetime of cell assemblies exposed to various temperature histories consistent with service and with accelerated testing. We also present early results from thermal cycling experiments designed to help validate the computational model.

Silverman, T. J.; Bosco, N.; Kurtz, S.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Comparison of two-equation turbulence models for boundary layers with pressure gradient  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper compares the performance of eight low Reynolds number k-epsilon and k-omega models for high Reynolds number, incompressible turbulent boundary layers with favorable, zero, and adverse pressure gradients. Results obtained underscore the k-epsilon model's unsuitability for such flows. Even more seriously, the k-epsilon model is demonstrated to be inconsistent with the well-established physical structure of the turbulent boundary layer, and low Reynolds number corrections cannot remove the inconsistency. By contrast, the k-omega model, with and without low Reynolds number modifications, proves to be very accurate for all of the tests conducted. 16 refs.

Wilcox, D.C. (DCW Industries, Inc., La Canada, CA (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Comparison of predictions of the Hybrid Plume Dispersion Model with observations at the Kincaid power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Hybrid Plume Dispersion Model (HPDM) has been evaluated with observations from a field experiment at the Kincaid power plant. HPDM is a dispersion model for buoyant plumes that employs parameterisations of boundary-layer wind, temperature, and turbulence profiles and Lagrangian time-scales. The model accounts for the bimodal distribution of turbulent velocities in the convective boundary layer and contains an algorithm for calculating the lofting of a buoyant plume against a capping inversion. The model predictions of maximum plume centreline concentrations show a mean bias of less than l0%, a typical error that is about 50% of the mean, and a correlation of about 0.5.

S.R. Hanna; J.C. Chang

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Comparison of Idealized and Real-World City Station Citing Models for Hydrogen Distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

focus is on modeling of hydrogen production and distributionconvenience of hydrogen production, delivery and refuelinga hydrogen depot (i.e. hydrogen production facility or city-

Yang, Christopher; Nicholas, Michael A; Ogden, Joan M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Comparison of Real World Energy Consumption to Models and DOE Test Procedures  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This study investigates the real-world energy performance of appliances and equipment as it compares with models and test procedures.

258

Determining Wind Turbine Gearbox Model Complexity Using Measurement Validation and Cost Comparison: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) has conducted extensive field and dynamometer test campaigns on two heavily instrumented wind turbine gearboxes. In this paper, data from the planetary stage is used to evaluate the accuracy and computation time of numerical models of the gearbox. First, planet-bearing load and motion data is analyzed to characterize planetary stage behavior in different environments and to derive requirements for gearbox models and life calculations. Second, a set of models are constructed that represent different levels of fidelity. Simulations of the test conditions are compared to the test data and the computational cost of the models are compared. The test data suggests that the planet-bearing life calculations should be made separately for each bearing on a row due to unequal load distribution. It also shows that tilting of the gear axes is related to planet load share. The modeling study concluded that fully flexible models were needed to predict planet-bearing loading in some cases, although less complex models were able to achieve good correlation in the field-loading case. Significant differences in planet load share were found in simulation and were dependent on the scope of the model and the bearing stiffness model used.

LaCava, W.; Xing, Y.; Guo, Y.; Moan, T.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A comparison of the ingredients of stellar population models on the inference of the slope of the initial mass function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform a direct comparison between two new single stellar population (SSP) models constructed specifically for the purpose of studying old, metal-rich stellar populations. We examine the effect of the underlying model assumptions and ingredients, such as stellar libraries or isochrones, on the inference of the Initial Mass Function (IMF) slope down to 0.1 solar masses in massive early-type galaxies (ETGs). For both models, we study equivalent widths of stellar features with varying ages, metallicity and elemental abundances, as a function of the IMF slope. We show that the use of optical indices, mainly from TiO and CaH molecular absorption lines, permits us to eliminate the uncertainty caused by the different stellar libraries used in the synthesis process. Neither of the two SSP models are able to simultaneously reproduce all the optical stellar features in SDSS ETGs with \\sigma > 250km/s if we restrict the analysis to solar abundance patterns and to line-index measurements.We also find that predictions...

Spiniello, Chiara; Koopmans, Léon V E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Comparison of Aermod and ISCST3 Models for Particulate Emissions from Ground Level Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the dispersion models ISCST3 and AERMOD, to determine the emission fluxes from cotton harvesting. The goal of this research was to document differences in emission factors as a consequence of the models used. The PM10 EFs developed for two-row and six-row pickers...

Botlaguduru, Venkata Sai V.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A comparison of observed and modeled surface waves in southern Lake Michigan and the implications for models of sediment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for models of sediment resuspension Nathan Hawley Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Ann Arbor calculated from both the observations and the wave model results agree as to whether or not resuspension occurs, but over 70% of this agreement is for cases when resuspension does not occur; both stresses

NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Episodic Events

262

Comparison of different capillary bridge models for application in the discrete element method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weakly wetted granular material is the subject of many studies. Several formulations were proposed to calculate the capillary forces between wet particles. In this paper some of such models have been implemented in a DEM-framework, and simulation results were compared to experimental measurements. Also, the influence of capillary model type on macro parameters like local shear viscosity and cohesive parameters of sheared material have been investigated through the simulation of spherical beads using a DEM-model of a split-bottom shear-cell. It was concluded that the water content, simulated with the help of capillary bridge models, changes the macro-properties of the simulated granular material. Different capillary bridge models do not influence the macroscopic results visibly.

Anton Gladkyy; Ruediger Schwarze

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

Comparison of one-, two-, and three-dimensional models for mass transport of radionuclides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical memorandum compares one-, two-, and three-dimensional models for studying regional mass transport of radionuclides in groundwater associated with deep repository disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. In addition, this report outlines the general conditions for which a one- or two-dimensional model could be used as an alternate to a three-dimensional model analysis. The investigation includes a review of analytical and numerical models in addition to consideration of such conditions as rock and fluid heterogeneity, anisotropy, boundary and initial conditions, and various geometric shapes of repository sources and sinks. Based upon current hydrologic practice, each review is taken separately and discussed to the extent that the researcher can match his problem conditions with the minimum number of model dimensions necessary for an accurate solution.

Prickett, T.A.; Voorhees, M.L.; Herzog, B.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Comparison of Test Procedures and Energy Efficiency Criteria in Selected International Standards & Labeling Programs for Copy Machines, External Power Supplies, LED Displays, Residential Gas Cooktops and Televisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012. “Overview and Test Procedures – AS/NZ 4665 ExternalComparison of Test Procedures and Energy Efficiency CriteriaProcedures

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

A comparison of different approaches to modelling the PEMFC catalyst layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper compares three different approaches for describing the cathode catalyst layer of a PEMFC, using a three-dimensional CFD model. The three catalyst treatments include: a thin-film model, a discrete-catalyst volume model and an agglomerate model. It is shown that, within a single-phase approach using physically meaningful parameters, the commonly employed thin-film or discrete-volume descriptions of the catalyst layer do not show the significant mass transport limitations which occur at higher current densities; while this region is observed using a catalyst agglomerate approach. Further, an in-depth analysis of the current density distributions indicates that for a given electrode overpotential the thin-film model significantly over-predicts the current density, compared to the discrete and agglomerate approaches. The thin-film model also greatly exaggerates the variation in current density both along and across the channel. Finally, the agglomerate model predicts noticeable mass transport losses even at very low current densities despite the use of high stoichiometric ratios and thin-electrolyte films.

D. Harvey; J.G. Pharoah; K. Karan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Comparison of a semi-analytic and a CFD model uranium combustion to experimental data.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two numerical models were developed and compared for the analysis of uranium combustion and ignition in a furnace. Both a semi-analytical solution and a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical solution were obtained. Prediction of uranium oxidation rates is important for fuel storage applications, fuel processing, and the development of spent fuel metal waste forms. The semi-analytical model was based on heat transfer correlations, a semi-analytical model of flow over a flat surface, and simple radiative heat transfer from the material surface. The CFD model numerically determined the flowfield over the object of interest, calculated the heat and mass transfer to the material of interest, and calculated the radiative heat exchange of the material with the furnace. The semi-analytical model is much less detailed than the CFD model, but yields reasonable results and assists in understanding the physical process. Short computation times allowed the analyst to study numerous scenarios. The CFD model had significantly longer run times, was found to have some physical limitations that were not easily modified, but was better able to yield details of the heat and mass transfer and flow field once code limitations were overcome.

Clarksean, R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3): Multi-Model Dataset Archive at PCMDI (Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

In response to a proposed activity of the WCRP's Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM),PCMDI volunteered to collect model output contributed by leading modeling centers around the world. Climate model output from simulations of the past, present and future climate was collected by PCMDI mostly during the years 2005 and 2006, and this archived data constitutes phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3). In part, the WGCM organized this activity to enable those outside the major modeling centers to perform research of relevance to climate scientists preparing the Fourth Asssessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The IPCC was established by the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environmental Program to assess scientific information on climate change. The IPCC publishes reports that summarize the state of the science. This unprecedented collection of recent model output is officially known as the WCRP CMIP3 multi-model dataset. It is meant to serve IPCC's Working Group 1, which focuses on the physical climate system - atmosphere, land surface, ocean and sea ice - and the choice of variables archived at the PCMDI reflects this focus. A more comprehensive set of output for a given model may be available from the modeling center that produced it. As of November 2007, over 35 terabytes of data were in the archive and over 303 terabytes of data had been downloaded among the more than 1200 registered users. Over 250 journal articles, based at least in part on the dataset, have been published or have been accepted for peer-reviewed publication. Countries from which models have been gathered include Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany and Korea, Italy, Japan, Norway, Russia, Great Britain and the United States. Models, variables, and documentation are collected and stored. Check http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/data_status_tables.htm to see at a glance the output that is available. (Description taken from http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/about_ipcc.php)

268

Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4E 4E Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building J.H. Dudley, D. Black, M. Apte, M.A. Piette Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory P. Berkeley University of California, Berkeley May 2010 Presented at the 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Pacific Grove, CA, August 15-20, 2010, and published in the Proceedings DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

269

Inter-ELM Power Decay Length for JET and ASDEX Upgrade: Measurement and Comparison with Heuristic Drift-Based Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental measurements of the SOL power decay length (?q) estimated from analysis of fully attached divertor heat load profiles from two tokamaks, JET and ASDEX Upgrade, are presented. Data was measured by means of infrared thermography. An empirical scaling reveals parametric dependency ?q in mm=0.73BT-0.78qcyl1.2PSOL0.1Rgeo0, where BT(T) describes the toroidal magnetic field, qcyl the cylindrical safety factor, PSOL(MW) the power crossing the separatrix and Rgeo(m) the major radius of the device. A comparison of these measurements to a heuristic particle drift-based model shows satisfactory agreement in both absolute magnitude and scaling. Extrapolation to ITER gives ?q?1??mm.

T. Eich; B. Sieglin; A. Scarabosio; W. Fundamenski; R. J. Goldston; A. Herrmann (ASDEX Upgrade Team)

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

270

Modeling of the Aging Viscoelastic Properties of Cement Paste Using Computational Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results from the Dissolution-Formation Viscoelastic Program, the NISTIR ELAS3D Program and the Abaqus Program ............................................................................................................ 38 Figure 14 Comparison... with an existent aging viscoelastic model which has some limitations in predicting the behavior of cement paste. Overview of the three dimensional linear elastic model ELAS3D is also included in this chapter. Chapter 3 develops the dissolution...

Li, Xiaodan

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

271

Uncertainty in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) deployment projections: a cross-model comparison exercise  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) can be a...2...mitigation option, but what role CCS will play in the future is uncertain. In this paper we analyze the results of different integrated assessment models (IAMs) tak...

Barbara Sophia Koelbl; Machteld A. van den Broek; André P. C. Faaij…

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Dynamic soil-structure interaction-comparison of FEM model with experimental results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to represent twenty different laboratory experiments. The results of these models are compared with results available from extensive experimental dynamic testing on a geotechnical centrifuge. Though the various results from the finite element analysis...

Srinivasan, Palanivel Rajan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

273

Tropospheric Aerosol Optical Thickness from the GOCART Model and Comparisons with Satellite and Sun Photometer Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Georgia Institute of Technology–Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model is used to simulate the aerosol optical thickness ? for major types of tropospheric aerosols including sulfate, dust, organic carbon ...

Mian Chin; Paul Ginoux; Stefan Kinne; Omar Torres; Brent N. Holben; Bryan N. Duncan; Randall V. Martin; Jennifer A. Logan; Akiko Higurashi; Teruyuki Nakajima

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A comparison of two approaches for generating spatial models of growing season variables for Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study produced annual spatial models (or grids) of 27 growing season variables for Canada that span two centuries (1901-2100). Temporal gaps in the availability of daily climate data – the typical and preferred source for calculating growing ...

John H. Pedlar; Daniel W. McKenney; Kevin Lawrence; Pia Papadopol; Michael F. Hutchinson; David Price

275

Modeling of Asymmetry between Gasoline and Crude Oil Prices: A Monte Carlo Comparison  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An Engle–Granger two-step procedure is commonly used to estimate cointegrating vectors and consequently asymmetric error-correction models. This study uses Monte Carlo methods and demonstrates that the Engle–G...

Afshin Honarvar

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A Comparison of the Dynamic Wake Meandering Model, Large-Eddy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wake Meandering Model, Large-Eddy Simulation, and Field Data at the Egmond aan Zee Offshore Wind Plant Preprint M.J. Churchfield and P.J. Moriarty National Renewable Energy...

277

Measurement of Surface Energy Fluxes from Two Rangeland Sites and Comparison with a Multilayer Canopy Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rangelands are often characterized by a patchy mosaic of vegetation types, making measurement and modeling of surface energy fluxes particularly challenging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate surface energy fluxes measured using three eddy ...

Gerald N. Flerchinger; Michele L. Reba; Danny Marks

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Comparison of dark energy models: A perspective from the latest observational data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We compare some popular dark energy models under the assumption of a flat ... acoustic oscillation measurement from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the cosmic microwave background measurement given by...H ...

Miao Li; XiaoDong Li; Xin Zhang

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Comparison of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous CFD Fuel Models for Phase I of the IAEA CRP on HTR Uncertainties Benchmark  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) evaluation of homogeneous and heterogeneous fuel models was performed as part of the Phase I calculations of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinate Research Program (CRP) on High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Uncertainties in Modeling (UAM). This study was focused on the nominal localized stand-alone fuel thermal response, as defined in Ex. I-3 and I-4 of the HTR UAM. The aim of the stand-alone thermal unit-cell simulation is to isolate the effect of material and boundary input uncertainties on a very simplified problem, before propagation of these uncertainties are performed in subsequent coupled neutronics/thermal fluids phases on the benchmark. In many of the previous studies for high temperature gas cooled reactors, the volume-averaged homogeneous mixture model of a single fuel compact has been applied. In the homogeneous model, the Tristructural Isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles in the fuel compact were not modeled directly and an effective thermal conductivity was employed for the thermo-physical properties of the fuel compact. On the contrary, in the heterogeneous model, the uranium carbide (UCO), inner and outer pyrolytic carbon (IPyC/OPyC) and silicon carbide (SiC) layers of the TRISO fuel particles are explicitly modeled. The fuel compact is modeled as a heterogeneous mixture of TRISO fuel kernels embedded in H-451 matrix graphite. In this study, a steady-state and transient CFD simulations were performed with both homogeneous and heterogeneous models to compare the thermal characteristics. The nominal values of the input parameters are used for this CFD analysis. In a future study, the effects of input uncertainties in the material properties and boundary parameters will be investigated and reported.

Gerhard Strydom; Su-Jong Yoon

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Computational fluid dynamics combustion modelling--A comparison of secondary air system designs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A newly developed computer simulation of the combustion process in a kraft recovery furnace uses computational fluid dynamics to model the processes of mass, momentum, and energy transport. This paper describes two models and a presentation of the flow fields obtained. The results predict a dramatic improvement in combustion behavior using a refined secondary air system with reduction in particulate carryover, enhanced operating temperatures, more uniform gas flow, and less carbon monoxide at the furnace exit.

Jones, A.K. (ABB Combustion Engineering Systems, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)); Chapman, P.J. (ABB Combustion Engineering Systems, Windsor, CT (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A comparison of two heat transfer models for estimating thermal drawdown in Hot Dry Rock reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimates of thermal drawdown in Hot Dry Rock geothermal systems have been made with two different models of heat transfer from hydraulically fractured reservoir rock blocks to water circulated through the fracture permeability. One model is based on deconvolution of experimental tracer response curves into a network of flowpaths connected in parallel with heat transfer calculated individually in each flowpath. The second model is based on one-dimensional flow through the rock with a block size distribution described as a group of equivalent-radius spheres for which the heat transfer equations can be solved analytically. The two models were applied to the planned Phase II long-term thermal drawdown experiment at Fenton Hill, NM. The results show good agreement between the two models, with estimates of temperature cooldown from 240ºC to 150ºC in a few years depending on selected operation parameters, but with somewhat differing cooldown curve characteristic shapes. Data from the long-term experiment will be helpful in improving the two models.

Robinson, Bruce A.; Kruger, Paul

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Frequency domain and finite difference modeling of ventilated concrete slabs and comparison with field measurements: Part 1, modeling methodology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper is the first of two papers that focus on the thermal modeling of building-integrated thermal energy storage (BITES) systems using frequency response (FR) and lumped-parameter finite difference (LPFD) techniques. Structural/non-structural building fabric components, such as ventilated concrete slabs (VCS) can actively store and release thermal energy effectively by passing air through their embedded air channels. These building components can be described as ventilated BITES systems. To assist the thermal analysis and control of BITES systems, modeling techniques and guidelines for FR and LPFD models of VCS are presented in this two-part paper. In this first part, modeling techniques for FR and LPFD approaches based on network theory are presented. A method for calculating the heat transfer between flowing air and ventilated components is developed for these two approaches. Discretization criteria for explicit LPFD models are discussed. For the FR approach, discrete Fourier series in complex frequency form are used to represent the boundary excitations. In the treatment of heat injection from the flowing air as internal source in the VCS, network techniques such as Thévenin theorem, heat flow division, and Y-diakoptic transform are employed. The techniques presented in this paper are applicable to other BITES with hydronic or electric charging/discharging systems. With the FR techniques, model-based control strategies based on transfer functions can be readily developed.

Yuxiang Chen; Andreas K. Athienitis; Khaled E. Galal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Resuspension of carbon dust collected in Tore Supra and exposed to turbulent airflow: Controlled experiments and comparison with model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work presents the results of experiments conducted with carbon microparticles collected in the tokamak Tore Supra in order to characterize their resuspension behaviour from a stainless-steel substrate when exposed to turbulent airflow. Experiments were conducted in a wind tunnel with controlled velocity profiles and monitored environmental conditions. A consequent amount of dust has been collected in the vessel of the tokamak and a bimodal particle size distribution of samples is first demonstrated. Comparison with resuspension of alumina powders with equivalent particle size distributions under turbulent airflow is also discussed. Results for both carbon and alumina microparticles are then compared to a theoretical resuspension model. Data reveal that exposing multilayer deposits with bimodal particle size distributions to low-speed flows (i.e. 3–10 m/s) induces a significant reduction of the mobilized fractions compared to what was predicted by the model. In addition, results helped to highlight some limitations in the model to physically describe changes in the adhesive strength that can occur with a polydisperse deposit.

S. Peillon; A. Roynette; C. Grisolia; F. Gensdarmes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

A Comparison of Model-Scale Experimental Measurements and Computational Predictions for a Large Transom-Stern Wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The flow field generated by a transom stern hull form is a complex, broad-banded, three-dimensional system marked by a large breaking wave. This unsteady multiphase turbulent flow feature is difficult to study experimentally and simulate numerically. Recent model-scale experimental measurements and numerical predictions of the wave-elevation topology behind a transom-sterned hull form, Model 5673, are compared and assessed in this paper. The mean height, surface roughness (RMS), and spectra of the breaking stern-waves were measured by Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) and Quantitative Visualization (QViz) sensors over a range of model speeds covering both wet- and dry-transom operating conditions. Numerical predictions for this data set from two Office of Naval Research (ONR) supported naval-design codes, Numerical Flow Analysis (NFA) and CFDship-Iowa-V.4, have been performed. Comparisons of experimental data, including LiDAR and QViz measurements, to the numerical predictions for wet-transom and dry transo...

Drazen, David A; Fu, Thomas C; Beale, Kristine L C; O'Shea, Thomas T; Brucker, Kyle A; Dommermuth, Douglas G; Wyatt, Donald C; Bhushan, Shanti; Carrica, Pablo M; Stern, Fred

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

An evaluation of WIPP structural modeling capabilities based on comparisons with South Drift data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The creep response of rock salt around a long uniform excavation of rectangular cross-section has been computed with the structural finite element code SANCHO, and the results are compared with field data. The excavation, known as the South Drift, is part of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility. The geomechanical model used in the calculations is quite complex and includes constitutive models based on standard laboratory creep tests. Because closure and closure rate measurements are at least three times larger than computed values, a thorough investigation of the many parameters in the geomechanical model is presented. This investigation indicates that variations to parameters not related to the constitutive model for halite cannot produce the type of changes in the closure histories needed to produce good agreement with data. Thus, the reason for the discrepancy is attributed to the parameters in the constitutive model for halite. However, none of the halite parameters investigated could produce the measured behavior. Several areas for future study have been identified.

Morgan, H.S.; Stone, C.M.; Krieg, R.D.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

A comparison of observed and modeled surface waves in southern Lake Michigan and the implications for models of sediment resuspension.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subsurface pressure sensors were used to make measurements of surface waves during 18 deployments in southern Lake Michigan between 1998 and 2000. Most of the observations were made during the unstratified period (November--May) in water depths between 10 and 55 m. The observations (as well as those obtained from the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) buoy 45007, which is located in the middle of the southern basin of the lake) were compared to the results obtained from the Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL)-Donelan wave model implemented on a 2-km grid. The results show that the wave model does a good job of calculating the wave heights, but consistently underestimates the wave periods. In over 80% of the cases the bottom stresses calculated from both the observations and the wave model results agree as to whether or not resuspension occurs, but over 70% of this agreement is for cases when resuspension does not occur; both stresses predict resuspension about 6% of the time. Since the bottom stresses calculated from the model results are usually lower than those calculated from the observations, resuspension estimates based on the wave model parameters are also lower than those calculated from the observed waves.

Hawley, N.; Lesht, B. M.; Schwab, D. J.; Environmental Research; Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab

2004-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

287

Status of the INL high-temperature electrolysis research program –experimental and modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides a status update on the high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) research and development program at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), with an overview of recent large-scale system modeling results and the status of the experimental program. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an advanced nuclear reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of reactor coolant outlet temperatures. In terms of experimental research, the INL has recently completed an Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) HTE test at the 15 kW level. The initial hydrogen production rate for the ILS test was in excess of 5000 liters per hour. Details of the ILS design and operation will be presented. Current small-scale experimental research is focused on improving the degradation characteristics of the electrolysis cells and stacks. Small-scale testing ranges from single cells to multiple-cell stacks. The INL is currently in the process of testing several state-of-the-art anode-supported cells and is working to broaden its relationship with industry in order to improve the long-term performance of the cells.

J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; K. G. Condie; G. K. Housley; J. S. Herring; J. J. Hartvigsen

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Fine resolution atmospheric sulfate model driven by operational meteorological data: Comparison with observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hypothesis that anthropogenic sulfur aerosol influences clear-sky and cloud albedo and can thus influence climate has been advanced by several investigators; current global-average climate forcing is estimated to be of comparable magnitude, but opposite sign, to longwave forcing by anthropogenic greenhouse gases. The high space and time variability of sulfate concentrations and column aerosol burdens have been established by observational data; however, geographic and time coverage provided by data from surface monitoring networks is very limited. Consistent regional and global estimates of sulfate aerosol loading, and the contributions to this loading from different sources can be obtained only by modeling studies. Here we describe a sub-hemispheric to global-scale Eulerian transport and transformation model for atmospheric sulfate and its precursors, driven by operational meteorological data, and report results of calculations for October, 1986 for the North Atlantic and adjacent continental regions. The model, which is based on the Global Chemistry Model uses meteorological data from the 6-hour forecast model of the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast to calculate transport and transformation of sulfur emissions. Time- and location-dependent dry deposition velocities were estimated using the methodology of Wesely and colleagues. Chemical reactions includes gaseous oxidation of SO{sub 2} and DMS by OH, and aqueous oxidation of SO{sub 2} by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and O{sub 3}. Anthropogenic emissions were from the NAPAP and EMEP 1985 inventories and biogenic emissions based on Bates et al. Calculated sulfate concentrations and column burdens exhibit high variability on spatial scale of hundreds of km and temporal scale of days. Calculated daily average sulfate concentrations closely reproduce observed concentrations at locations widespread over the model domain.

Benkovitz, C.M.; Schwartz, S.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Berkowitz, C.M.; Easter, R.C. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

A comparison of current models for nonlinear rate-dependent material behavior of crystalline solids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a ss 69 83 Fig. 16 Experimental constant strain rate tensile test response. 89 Fig. 17 Experimental creep test response. . . 91 Fig. 18 Graph of in(c ) v. in~a-a) for Krieg's i l model 93 Fig. 19 Graph of Y v. a for Bodner 's model. ~ . 97... as second order tensor s, they may be tensors of' other rank as well C13]. The method of Coleman and Noll L1 0] may be used to obtain the spatial and time distribution of the body force f. and the heat supply r from the conservation of linear 1...

Beek, Joachim Michael

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Photoelectrochemical Materials: Theory and Modeling - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Muhammad N. Huda (Primary Contact), Yanfa Yan*, Todd Deutsch*, Mowafak M. Al-Jassim* and A. John A. Turner* Department of Physics University of Texas at Arlington Arlington, TX 76019 Phone: (817) 272-1097 Email: huda@uta.edu *National Renewable Energy Laboratory DOE Manager HQ: Eric L. Miller Phone: (202) 287-5892 Email: Eric.Miller@ee.doe.gov Subcontractor: University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX Project Start Date: September 2009 Project End Date: August 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives For FY 2012, the main goal of this project was to improve materials efficiency by understanding and hence tuning the following by theoretical/computational modeling

291

Validation of the SEPHIS Program for the Modeling of the HM Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SEPHIS computer program is currently being used to evaluate the effect of all process variables on the criticality safety of the HM 1st Uranium Cycle process in H Canyon. The objective of its use has three main purposes. (1) To provide a better technical basis for those process variables that do not have any realistic effect on the criticality safety of the process. (2) To qualitatively study those conditions that have been previously recognized to affect the nuclear safety of the process or additional conditions that modeling has indicated may pose a criticality safety issue. (3) To judge the adequacy of existing or future neutron monitors locations in the detection of the initial stages of reflux for specific scenarios.Although SEPHIS generally over-predicts the distribution of uranium to the organic phase, it is a capable simulation tool as long as the user recognizes its biases and takes special care when using the program for scenarios where the prediction bias is non-conservative. The temperature coefficient used by SEPHIS is poor at predicting effect of temperature on uranium extraction for the 7.5 percent TBP used in the HM process. Therefore, SEPHIS should not be used to study temperature related scenarios. However, within normal operating temperatures when other process variables are being studied, it may be used. Care must be is given to understanding the prediction bias and its effect on any conclusion for the particular scenario that is under consideration. Uranium extraction with aluminum nitrate is over-predicted worse than for nitric acid systems. However, the extraction section of the 1A bank has sufficient excess capability that these errors, while relatively large, still allow SEPHIS to be used to develop reasonable qualitative assessments for reflux scenarios. However, high losses to the 1AW stream cannot be modeled by SEPHIS.

Kyser, E.A.

1998-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

292

How warm was the last interglacial? New model–data comparisons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Division, National Center for Atmospheric...those of the pre-industrial (PI) Holocene...the start of the industrial age, atmospheric...simulations allow an assessment of how well models...at the National Center for Atmospheric...CCSM3 for pre-industrial (PI) conditions...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Comparison Between Two Models for Interactions Between Electric and Magnetic Fields and Proteins in Cell Membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Melbourne, Australia. Departments of 2 Medical Radiation Physics and 3 Neurosurgery, Lund University, Lund Lines; Interaction Models; Biological Effects Introduction Static magnetic and electric fields occur naturally; time-varying fields, however, do not. These man-made fields have health consequences remains

Halgamuge, Malka N.

294

On the differential benchmarking of promotional efficiency with machine learning modeling (I): Principles and statistical comparison  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sales promotions have become in recent years a paramount issue in the marketing strategies of many companies, and they have even more relevance in the present economic situation. Currently, the empirical models, aimed at assessing consumers behavior ... Keywords: Bootstrap, Machine learning, Marketing, Price indices, Promotion, Signal processing

Cristina Soguero-Ruiz; Francisco-Javier Gimeno-Blanes; Inmaculada Mora-JiméNez; MaríA Pilar MartíNez-Ruiz; José-Luis Rojo-ÁLvarez

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Predicting fault damage zones by modeling dynamic rupture propagation and comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

faults observed in the SSC reservoir. The modeling of ruptures propagating as self-sustaining pulses, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA, 2 Now at Upstream Technology, BP America, Houston, Texas University, Houston, California, USA, 4 ConocoPhillips Technology and Projects, Houston, Texas, USA Abstract

Dunham, Eric M.

296

Comparison of Wake Model Simulations with Offshore Wind Turbine Wake Profiles Measured by Sodar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper gives an evaluation of most of the commonly used models for predicting wind speed decrease (wake) downstream of a wind turbine. The evaluation is based on six experiments where free-stream and wake wind speed profiles were measured ...

R. J. Barthelmie; G. C. Larsen; S. T. Frandsen; L. Folkerts; K. Rados; S. C. Pryor; B. Lange; G. Schepers

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

EMPIRICAL MODELS FOR DARK MATTER HALOS. I. NONPARAMETRIC CONSTRUCTION OF DENSITY PROFILES AND COMPARISON WITH PARAMETRIC MODELS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

random ve- locity, the end state of such systems departed from a simple power law, resembling instead. 1988). Dubinski & Carlberg (1991) adopted Hernquist's (1990) double- power-law model (itself Terzic´ Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115 Received 2006 May 11

Terzi, BalÂ?a

298

Comparison of blood flow models and acquisitions for quantitative myocardial perfusion estimation from dynamic CT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Myocardial blood flow (MBF) can be estimated from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) cardiac CT acquisitions, leading to quantitative assessment of regional perfusion. The need for low radiation dose and the lack of consensus on MBF estimation methods motivates this study to refine the selection of acquisition protocols and models for CT-derived MBF. DCE cardiac CT acquisitions were simulated for a range of flow states (MBF = 0.5, 1, 2, 3 ml (min g)?1, cardiac output = 3, 5, 8 L min?1). Patient kinetics were generated by a mathematical model of iodine exchange incorporating numerous physiological features including heterogenenous microvascular flow, permeability and capillary contrast gradients. CT acquisitions were simulated for multiple realizations of realistic x-ray flux levels. CT acquisitions that reduce radiation exposure were implemented by varying both temporal sampling (1, 2, and 3 s sampling intervals) and tube currents (140, 70, and 25 mAs). For all acquisitions, we compared three quantitative MBF estimation methods (two-compartment model, an axially-distributed model, and the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneous model) and a qualitative slope-based method. In total, over 11 000 time attenuation curves were used to evaluate MBF estimation in multiple patient and imaging scenarios. After iodine-based beam hardening correction, the slope method consistently underestimated flow by on average 47.5% and the quantitative models provided estimates with less than 6.5% average bias and increasing variance with increasing dose reductions. The three quantitative models performed equally well, offering estimates with essentially identical root mean squared error (RMSE) for matched acquisitions. MBF estimates using the qualitative slope method were inferior in terms of bias and RMSE compared to the quantitative methods. MBF estimate error was equal at matched dose reductions for all quantitative methods and range of techniques evaluated. This suggests that there is no particular advantage between quantitative estimation methods nor to performing dose reduction via tube current reduction compared to temporal sampling reduction. These data are important for optimizing implementation of cardiac dynamic CT in clinical practice and in prospective CT MBF trials.

Michael Bindschadler; Dimple Modgil; Kelley R Branch; Patrick J La Riviere; Adam M Alessio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Comparison of the EXAFS Spectra of Heteronuclear MnCa/Sr Model Complexes to the Oxygen-Evolving Mn(4)Ca Complex of Photosystem II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heterometallic Mn-Ca and Mn-Sr complexes have been prepared and employed as model complexes for Ca and Sr EXAFS spectral comparisons with the Oxygen-Evolving Complex (OEC) of Photosystem II (PS II); these have revealed similarities that support the presence of at least one O atom bridge between the Mn and Ca/Sr in the OEC.

Mishra, A.; Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Abboud, K.A.; Yachandra, V.K.; Christou, G.

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

300

Comparison of four models simulating phosphorus dynamics in LakeVnern,Sweden Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 11531163 (2004) EGU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of four models simulating phosphorus dynamics in LakeVänern,Sweden 1153 Hydrology dynamics in Lake Vänern, Sweden Magnus Dahl1 and B. Charlotta Pers2 1 Department of Chemical Engineering, Karlstad University, SE651 88 Karlstad, Sweden 2 Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, SE601

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Modeling sequence-specific polymers using anisotropic coarse-grained sites allows quantitative comparison with experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Certain sequences of peptoid polymers (synthetic analogs of peptides) assemble into bilayer nanosheets via a nonequilibrium assembly pathway of adsorption, compression, and collapse at an air-water interface. As with other large-scale dynamic processes in biology and materials science, understanding the details of this supramolecular assembly process requires a modeling approach that captures behavior on a wide range of length and time scales, from those on which individual sidechains fluctuate to those on which assemblies of polymers evolve. Here we demonstrate that a new coarse-grained modeling approach is accurate and computationally efficient enough to do so. Our approach uses only a minimal number of coarse-grained sites, but retains independently fluctuating orientational degrees of freedom for each site. These orientational degrees of freedom allow us to accurately parameterize both bonded and nonbonded interactions, and to generate all-atom configurations with sufficient accuracy to perform atomic sca...

Haxton, Thomas K; Zuckermann, Ronald N; Whitelam, Stephen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Time dependence of the paramagnetic Meissner effect: Comparison between model calculations and experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental results of the temperature, field, and time dependence of the magnetization in high-temperature superconductors displaying the paramagnetic Meissner effect are compared with numerical results from model calculations. In experiments the relaxation rate of the zero-field-cooled magnetization exhibits novel field-dependent properties and the field-cooled magnetization is found to increase with time. A model based on an ensemble of superconducting loops, each loop containing an ordinary Josephson junction or a ? junction, is shown to be able to account for most of the experimental results. The time-dependent magnetization is explained by thermally activated flipping of spontaneous orbital magnetic moments, a dynamical process which is fundamentally different from the flux-creep phenomenon usually observed in type-II superconductors.

J. Magnusson; J.-O. Andersson; M. Björnander; P. Nordblad; P. Svedlindh

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

A Comparison of Time-Space Schemes for Graphical Models Robert Mateescu and Rina Dechter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

models that can accom- modate trade-offs between time and space: 1) AND/OR Adaptive Caching (AOC(i)); 2 show that AOC(i) is better than the vanilla ver- sions of both VEC(i) and TDC(i), and use the guid- ing principles of AOC(i) to improve the other two schemes. Finally, we show that the improved ver- sions of VEC

Dechter, Rina

304

Storm surge analysis using numerical and statistical techniques and comparison with NWS model SLOSH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Most of the coastal basins that make up the estuaries along the Texas Gulf coast are very shallow, with depths that are often no more than a meter. In addition to the shallow bay depths, the topography of coastal lands is that of flat coastal plains... stress for a well-developed hurricane moving towards Texas coast ........................................................................................ 28 Fig. 3-1 SLOSH model basins for the East and Gulf coastlines of the U...

Aggarwal, Manish

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Comparison of Two Gas Selection Methodologies: An Application of Bayesian Model Averaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One goal of hyperspectral imagery analysis is the detection and characterization of plumes. Characterization includes identifying the gases in the plumes, which is a model selection problem. Two gas selection methods compared in this report are Bayesian model averaging (BMA) and minimum Akaike information criterion (AIC) stepwise regression (SR). Simulated spectral data from a three-layer radiance transfer model were used to compare the two methods. Test gases were chosen to span the types of spectra observed, which exhibit peaks ranging from broad to sharp. The size and complexity of the search libraries were varied. Background materials were chosen to either replicate a remote area of eastern Washington or feature many common background materials. For many cases, BMA and SR performed the detection task comparably in terms of the receiver operating characteristic curves. For some gases, BMA performed better than SR when the size and complexity of the search library increased. This is encouraging because we expect improved BMA performance upon incorporation of prior information on background materials and gases.

Renholds, Andrea S.; Thompson, Sandra E.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Chilton, Lawrence K.

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Microsoft Word - Transport-program.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TRANSPORT PROGRAM TRANSPORT PROGRAM C-MOD 5 YEAR REVIEW MAY, 2003 PRESENTED BY MARTIN GREENWALD MIT - PLASMA SCIENCE & FUSION CENTER Alcator C-Mod C-MOD - OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES * Prediction and control are the ultimate goals of transport studies - Experiments and theory have progressed to the point where meaningful, quantitative tests are being made. - Theory/experiment comparisons drive the experimental program * C-Mod operates in unique regime in several important respects - crucial for validation of physics models * Facility Upgrades - important tools for transport research: shaping, heating, current drive (LHCD), particle control (cryopump). * Diagnostics - the tokamak is a scientific instrument - Investment in high resolution diagnostics enabled edge studies.

307

The RERTR Program: Past, present and future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The past, present and future of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program are discussed with an emphasis on some of the reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics codes and modelling required to accommodate research and test reactor analysis, and some of the development work still in progress is described. Some comparisons with physical measurements and Monte Carlo are provided. The efforts in fuels development and the experimental support are summarized. The accomplishments in joint study programs and the transfer of technology are high lighted. The joint study with the Russian reduced enrichment program presents many new challenges.

Woodruff, W.L.; Travelli, A.; Matos, J.E.; Snelgrove, J.L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

USE OF BESTEST PROCEDURE TO IMPROVE A BUILDING THERMAL SIMULATION PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. KEYWORDS Building energy simulation; validation; BESTEST; inter program comparison DESCRIPTION BESTEST Validation of building energy simulation programs is of major interest to both users and modellers simulation software called CODYRUN (Boyer et al., 1998). Indeed, one of the most interesting aspects

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

309

The photovoltaic market analysis program : background, model development, applications and extensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this report is to describe and motivate the market analysis program for photovoltaics that has developed over the last several years. The main objective of the program is to develop tools and procedures to ...

Lilien, Gary L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Modeling sequence-specific polymers using anisotropic coarse-grained sites allows quantitative comparison with experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Certain sequences of peptoid polymers (synthetic analogs of peptides) assemble into bilayer nanosheets via a nonequilibrium assembly pathway of adsorption, compression, and collapse at an air-water interface. As with other large-scale dynamic processes in biology and materials science, understanding the details of this supramolecular assembly process requires a modeling approach that captures behavior on a wide range of length and time scales, from those on which individual sidechains fluctuate to those on which assemblies of polymers evolve. Here we demonstrate that a new coarse-grained modeling approach is accurate and computationally efficient enough to do so. Our approach uses only a minimal number of coarse-grained sites, but retains independently fluctuating orientational degrees of freedom for each site. These orientational degrees of freedom allow us to accurately parameterize both bonded and nonbonded interactions, and to generate all-atom configurations with sufficient accuracy to perform atomic scattering calculations and to interface with all-atom simulations. We have used this approach to reproduce all available experimental X-ray scattering spectra (for stacked nanosheets, and for peptoids adsorbed at air-water interfaces and in solution), in order to resolve the microscopic, real-space structures responsible for these Fourier-space features. By interfacing with all-atom simulations, we have also laid the foundations for future multiscale simulations of sequence-specific polymers that communicate in both directions across scales.

Thomas K. Haxton; Ranjan V. Mannige; Ronald N. Zuckermann; Stephen Whitelam

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

Modeling geologic storage of carbon dioxide: Comparison ofnon-hysteretic chracteristic curves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TOUGH2 models of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in brine-bearing formations use characteristic curves to represent the interactions of non-wetting-phase CO2 and wetting-phase brine. When a problem includes both injection of CO2 (a drainage process) and its subsequent post-injection evolution (a combination of drainage and wetting), hysteretic characteristic curves are required to correctly capture the behavior of the CO2 plume. In the hysteretic formulation, capillary pressure and relative permeability depend not only on the current grid-block saturation, but also on the history of the saturation in the grid block. For a problem that involves only drainage or only wetting, a nonhysteretic formulation, in which capillary pressure and relative permeability depend only on the current value of the grid-block saturation, is adequate. For the hysteretic formulation to be robust computationally, care must be taken to ensure the differentiability of the characteristic curves both within and beyond the turning-point saturations where transitions between branches of the curves occur. Two example problems involving geologic CO2 storage are simulated using non-hysteretic and hysteretic models, to illustrate the applicability and limitations of non-hysteretic methods: the first considers leakage of CO2 from the storage formation to the ground surface, while the second examines the role of heterogeneity within the storage formation.

Doughty, Christine

2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

312

A direct comparison of X-ray spectral models for tori in active galactic nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several X-ray spectral models for tori in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are available to constrain the properties of tori; however, the accuracy of these models has not been verified. We recently construct a code for the torus using Geant4, which can easily handle different geometries (Liu & Li 2014). Thus, we adopt the same assumptions as Murphy & Yaqoob (2009, hereafter MY09) and Brightman & Nandra (2011, hereafter BN11) and try to reproduce their spectra. As a result, we can reproduce well the reflection spectra and the strength of the Fe K$\\alpha$ line of MY09, for both $\\NH=10^{24}$ and $10^{25}$ cm$^{-2}$. However, we cannot produce the strong reflection component of BN11 in the low-energy band. The origin of this component is the reflection from the visible inner wall of the torus, and it should be very weak in the edge-on directions under the geometry of BN11. Therefore, the behaviour of the reflection spectra in BN11 is not consistent with their geometry. The strength of the Fe K$\\alpha$ ...

Liu, Yuan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Simulation and Comparison of Particle Injection in an Indoor Environment Using the Species Transport and Discrete Phase Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In simulating fluid/solid-particle multiphase -flows, various methods are available. One approach is the combined Euler-Lagrange method, which simulates the fluid phase flow in the Eulerian framework and the discrete phase (particle) motion in the Lagrangian framework simultaneously. The Lagrangian approach, where particle motion is determined by the current state of the fluid phase flow, is also called the discrete phase model (DPM), in the context of numerical flow simulation. In this method, the influence of the particle motions on the fluid flow can be included (two-way interactions) but are more commonly excluded (one-way interactions, when the discrete phase concentration is dilute. The other approach is to treat the particle number concentration as a continuous species, a necessarily passive quantity determined by the fluid flow, with no influences from the particles on the fluid flow (one-way interactions only), except to the extent the discrete phase “continuum” alters the overall fluid properties, such as density. In this paper, we compare these two methods with experimental data for an indoor environmental chamber. The effects of injection particle numbers and the related boundary conditions are investigated. In the Euler-Lagrange interaction or DPM model for incompressible flow, the Eulerian continuous phase is governed by the Reynolds-averaged N-S (RANS) equations. The motions of particles are governed by Newton’s second law. The effects of particle motions are communicated to the continuous phase through a force term in the RANS equations. The second formulation is a pure Eulerian type, where only the particle-number concentration is addressed, rather than the motion of each individual particle. The fluid flow is governed by the same RANS equations without the particle force term. The particle-number concentration is simulated by a species transport equation. Comparisons among the models and with experimental and literature data are presented. Particularly, results with different numbers of released particles in the DPM will be investigated.

Zheng, Zhongquan C.; Wei, Zhenglun A.; Bennett, James S.; Yang, Xiaofan

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

314

Tritium transport in the NuMI decay pipe region - modeling and comparison with experimental data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NuMI (Neutrinos at Main Injector) beam facility at Fermilab is designed to produce an intense beam of muon neutrinos to be sent to the MINOS underground experiment in Soudan, Minnesota. Neutrinos are created by the decay of heavier particles. In the case of NuMI, the decaying particles are created by interaction of high-energy protons in a target, creating mostly positive pions. These particles can also interact with their environment, resulting in production of a variety of short-lived radionuclides and tritium. In the NuMI beam, neutrinos are produced by 120 GeV protons from the Fermilab Main Injector accelerator which are injected into the NuMI beam line using single turn extraction. The beam line has been designed for 400 kW beam power, roughly a factor of 2 above the initial (2005-06) running conditions. Extracted protons are bent downwards at a 57mr angle towards the Soudan Laboratory. The meson production target is a 94 cm segmented graphite rod, cooled by water in stainless tubes on the top and bottom of the target. The target is followed by two magnetic horns which are pulsed to 200 kA in synchronization with the passage of the beam, producing focusing of the secondary hadron beam and its daughter neutrinos. Downstream of the second horn the meson beam is transported for 675 m in an evacuated 2 m diameter beam (''decay'') pipe. Subsequently, the residual mesons and protons are absorbed in a water cooled aluminum/steel absorber immediately downstream of the decay pipe. Some 200 m of rock further downstream ranges out all of the residual muons. During beam operations, after installation of the chiller condensate system in December 2005, the concentration of tritiated water in the MINOS sump flow of 177 gpm was around 12 pCi/ml, for a total of 0.010 pCi/day. A simple model of tritium transport and deposition via humidity has been constructed to aid in understanding how tritium reaches the sump water. The model deals with tritium transported as HTO, water in which one hydrogen atom has been replaced with tritium. Based on concepts supported by the modeling, a dehumidification system was installed during May 2006 that reduced the tritium level in the sump by a factor of two. This note is primarily concerned with tritium that was produced in the NuMI target pile, carried by air flow into the target hall and down the decay pipe passageway (where most of it was deposited). The air is exhausted through the existing air vent shaft EAV2 (Figure 1).

Hylen, J.; Plunkett, R.; /Fermilab

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Designing Energy Efficient Communication Runtime Systems for Data Centric Programming Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The insatiable demand of high performance computing is being driven by the most computationally intensive applications such as computational chemistry, climate modeling, nuclear physics, etc. The last couple of decades have observed a tremendous rise in supercomputers with architectures ranging from traditional clusters to system-on-a-chip in order to achieve the petaflop computing barrier. However, with advent of petaflop-plus computing, we have ushered in an era where power efficient system software stack is imperative for execution on exascale systems and beyond. At the same time, computationally intensive applications are exploring programming models beyond traditional message passing, as a combination of Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) languages and libraries, providing one-sided communication paradigm with put, get and accumulate primitives. To support the PGAS models, it is critical to design power efficient and high performance one-sided communication runtime system. In this paper, we design and implement PASCoL, a high performance power aware one-sided communication library using Aggregate Remote Memory Copy Interface (ARMCI), the communication runtime system of Global Arrays. For various communication primitives provided by ARMCI, we study the impact of Dynamic Voltage/Frequency Scaling (DVFS) and a combination of interrupt (blocking)/polling based mechanisms provided by most modern interconnects. We implement our design and evaluate it with synthetic benchmarks using an InfiniBand cluster. Our results indicate that PASCoL can achieve significant reduction in energy consumed per byte transfer without additional penalty for various one-sided communication primitives and various message sizes and data transfer patterns.

Vishnu, Abhinav; Song, Shuaiwen; Marquez, Andres; Barker, Kevin J.; Kerbyson, Darren J.; Cameron, Kirk; Balaji, Pavan

2010-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

316

Comparison of Nonlinear Model Results Using Modified Recorded and Synthetic Ground Motions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study has been performed that compares results of nonlinear model runs using two sets of earthquake ground motion time histories that have been modified to fit the same design response spectra. The time histories include applicable modified recorded earthquake ground motion time histories and synthetic ground motion time histories. The modified recorded earthquake ground motion time histories are modified from time history records that are selected based on consistent magnitude and distance. The synthetic ground motion time histories are generated using appropriate Fourier amplitude spectrums, Arias intensity, and drift correction. All of the time history modification is performed using the same algorithm to fit the design response spectra. The study provides data to demonstrate that properly managed synthetic ground motion time histories are reasonable for use in nonlinear seismic analysis.

Robert E. Spears; J. Kevin Wilkins

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Jet penetration into a riser operated in dense suspension upflow: experimental and model comparisons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solids tracers were used to characterize the penetration of a gas-solids jet directed toward the center of the 0.3-m diameter, circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser. The penetration was measured by tracking phosphorescent particles illuminated immediately prior to injection into the riser. Photosensors and piezoelectric detectors were traversed across the radius of the riser at various axial positions to detect the phosphorescent jet material and particles traveling in the radial direction. Local particle velocities were measured at various radial positions, riser heights, and azimuthal angles using an optical fiber probe. Four (4) variables were tested including the jet velocity, solids feed rate into the jet, the riser velocity, and overall CFB circulation rate over 8 distinct test cases with the central, or base case, repeated each time the test series was conducted. In addition to the experimental measurements made, the entire riser with a side feed jet of solids was simulated using the Eulerian-Eulerian computer model MFIX.

Shadle, L.J.; Ludlow, C.J.; Spenik, J.L.; Seachman, S.M.; Guenther, C.P.

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

318

Acoustic characterization of a partially-premixed gas turbine model combustor: Syngas and hydrocarbon fuel comparisons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, the acoustic behavior of a combustion instability in a gas turbine model combustor was investigated as fuel properties, air flow rates, and burner geometry were varied. The dual-swirl burner, developed at DLR Stuttgart by Meier, was operated using syngas (H2/CO), ethylene, propane, and methane. The frequency of the instability was found to vary significantly from 250 to 480 Hz. When the plenum volume and the exhaust pipe length and diameter were changed, the frequencies followed trends similar to a Helmholtz resonator. The variation of fuel type, flame speed, and air flow rate greatly altered the instability frequency and amplitude. These effects are not predicted by Helmholtz or organ tone acoustic theory. Higher frequencies were correlated with larger laminar burning velocities and higher air flow rates. The burner is a forced resonator, in which the flame oscillations couple with the flowfield to create convectively altered Helmholtz resonances. This suggests the need for an improved model of a forced Helmholtz resonator that includes flame properties. Alkane fuels displayed similar acoustic trends, but ethylene varied greatly from methane and propane. Syngas displayed different behavior than hydrocarbon fuels, even when the laminar flame speeds of the fuels were matched between ethylene and a syngas mixture. Flame characteristics such as anchoring, liftoff height, and shape appear to play a major role in the determination of instability strength and presence. With increasing hydrogen-content in the syngas-mixture, the flame transitions from a lifted to a fully anchored flame, resulting in a drastic decrease in the acoustic amplitude associated with non-resonating flames. Rayleigh indices show that flat flames create strong regions of thermo-acoustic coupling compared to axially extended V-shape flames. It is concluded that, in the current burner configuration, integrated-acoustics occur that involve a combination of Helmholtz and convective-mechanisms.

Patton M. Allison; James F. Driscoll; Matthias Ihme

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTS TO CFD MODELS FOR MIXING USING DUAL OPPOSING JETS IN TANKS WITH AND WITHOUT INTERNAL OBSTRUCTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper documents testing methods, statistical data analysis, and a comparison of experimental results to CFD models for blending of fluids, which were blended using a single pump designed with dual opposing nozzles in an eight foot diameter tank. Overall, this research presents new findings in the field of mixing research. Specifically, blending processes were clearly shown to have random, chaotic effects, where possible causal factors such as turbulence, pump fluctuations, and eddies required future evaluation. CFD models were shown to provide reasonable estimates for the average blending times, but large variations -- or scatter -- occurred for blending times during similar tests. Using this experimental blending time data, the chaotic nature of blending was demonstrated and the variability of blending times with respect to average blending times were shown to increase with system complexity. Prior to this research, the variation in blending times caused discrepancies between CFD models and experiments. This research addressed this discrepancy, and determined statistical correction factors that can be applied to CFD models, and thereby quantified techniques to permit the application of CFD models to complex systems, such as blending. These blending time correction factors for CFD models are comparable to safety factors used in structural design, and compensate variability that cannot be theoretically calculated. To determine these correction factors, research was performed to investigate blending, using a pump with dual opposing jets which re-circulate fluids in the tank to promote blending when fluids are added to the tank. In all, eighty-five tests were performed both in a tank without internal obstructions and a tank with vertical obstructions similar to a tube bank in a heat exchanger. These obstructions provided scale models of vertical cooling coils below the liquid surface for a full scale, liquid radioactive waste storage tank. Also, different jet diameters and different horizontal orientations of the jets were investigated with respect to blending. Two types of blending tests were performed. The first set of eighty-one tests blended small quantities of tracer fluids into solution. Data from these tests were statistically evaluated to determine blending times for the addition of tracer solution to tanks, and blending times were successfully compared to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models. The second set of four tests blended bulk quantities of solutions of different density and viscosity. For example, in one test a quarter tank of water was added to a three quarters of a tank of a more viscous salt solution. In this case, the blending process was noted to significantly change due to stratification of fluids, and blending times increased substantially. However, CFD models for stratification and the variability of blending times for different density fluids was not pursued, and further research is recommended in the area of blending bulk quantities of fluids. All in all, testing showed that CFD models can be effectively applied if statistically validated through experimental testing, but in the absence of experimental validation CFD model scan be extremely misleading as a basis for design and operation decisions.

Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Fowley, M.

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

320

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Models Guide, October 27, 2011.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Lineal energy and radiation quality in radiation therapy: model calculations and comparison with experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microdosimetry is a recommended method for characterizing radiation quality in situations when the biological effectiveness under test is not well known. In such situations, the radiation beams are described by their lineal energy probability distributions. Results from radiobiological investigations in the beams are then used to establish response functions that relate the lineal energy to the relative biological effectiveness (RBE). In this paper we present the influence of the size of the simulated volume on the relation to the clinical RBE values (or weighting factors). A single event probability distribution of the lineal energy is approximated by its dose average lineal energy () which can be measured or calculated for volumes from a few micrometres down to a few nanometres. The clinical RBE values were approximated as the ratio of the ?-values derived from the LQ-relation. Model calculations are presented and discussed for the SOBP of a 12C ion (290 MeV u?1) and the reference 60Co ? therapy beam. Results were compared with those for a conventional x-ray therapy beam, a 290 MeV proton beam and a neutron therapy beam. It is concluded that for a simulated volume of about 10 nm, the ?-ratio increases approximately linearly with the -ratio for all the investigated beams. The correlation between y and ? provides the evidence to characterize a radiation therapy beam by the lineal energy when, for instance, weighting factors are to be estimated.

L Lindborg; M Hultqvist; Å Carlsson Tedgren; H Nikjoo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Comparison of the Legacy and Gold SnIa Dataset Constraints on Dark Energy Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have performed a comparative analysis of three recent and reliable SnIa datasets available in the literature: the Full Gold (FG) dataset (157 data points $0dataset (140 data points $0dataset (115 data points $0datasets are consistent with each other at the 95% confidence level, the latest (SNLS) dataset shows distinct trends which are not shared by the Gold datasets. We find that the best fit dynamical $w(z)$ obtained from the SNLS dataset does not cross the PDL $w=-1$ and remains above and close to the $w=-1$ line for the whole redshift range $0datasets (FG and TG) clearly crosses the PDL and departs significantly from the PDL $w=-1$ line while the LCDM parameter values are about $2\\sigma$ away from the best fit $w(z)$. In addition, the $(\\Omega_{0m},\\Omega_\\Lambda)$ parameters in a LCDM parametrization without a flat prior, fit by the SNLS dataset, favor the minimal flat LCDM concordance model. The corresponding fit with the Gold datasets mildly favors a closed universe and the flat LCDM parameter values are $1\\sigma - 2\\sigma$ away from the best fit $(\\Omega_{0m},\\Omega_\\Lambda)$.

S. Nesseris; L. Perivolaropoulos

2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

323

Abstract--A stochastic dynamic programming hydrothermal dispatch model to simulate a bid-based market is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on dynamic programming that optimizes and validates the bid prices strategies for each power plant in a hydro-thermal several plants. Emphasis is given to hydro reservoir modeling and to the assessment of their market power market power is detected, focalized on main reservoir plants and implicating important increases

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

324

A Mixed-Integer Linear Programming Model for Optimizing the Scheduling and Assignment of Tank Farm Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Mixed-Integer Linear Programming Model for Optimizing the Scheduling and Assignment of Tank) formulation for the Tank Farm Operation Problem (TFOP), which involves simultaneous scheduling of continuous multi-product processing lines and the assignment of dedicated storage tanks to finished products

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

325

In Vitro Comparison in a Manikin Model: Increasing Apical Enlargement with K3 and K3XF Rotary Instruments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractIntroduction The aim of the study was to compare the K3 and K3XF systems (SybronEndo, Glendora, CA) after 1 and 2 uses by evaluating apical transportation, working length loss, and working time in a manikin model. Methods Mesial canals of 40 extracted first mandibular molars were instrumented. Radiographs taken after instrumentation with #25, #30, #35, and #40 files were superimposed on the preoperative image in both mesiodistal and buccolingual angulations. AutoCAD (Autodesk Inc, San Rafael, CA) was used to measure working length loss and apical transportation at 0, 0.5, and 1 mm from the working length (WL). The working time was measured. Group comparison was analyzed using post hoc Tukey honestly significant difference tests (P < .05). Results No significant differences were found in apical transportation, working length loss between K3 and K3XF systems, or between the number of uses. Significant differences were found when canal enlargement was performed to a #35–40 (P < .05). K3 instrumentation performed significantly faster (29.6 ± 15.4) than with the K3XF system (40.2 ± 17.7) (P < .05). No differences were observed in working time when comparing the number of uses. Conclusions K3 and R-phase K3XF rotary systems shaped curved root canals safely with minimal apical transportation, even up to a 40/04 file.

Juan Gonzalo Olivieri; Eva Stöber; Marc García Font; Jose Antonio González; Pablo Bragado; Miguel Roig; Fernando Duran-Sindreu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Comparison of trichostatin A and valproic acid treatment regimens in a mouse model of kidney fibrosis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are promising new compounds for the therapy of fibrotic diseases. In this study we compared the effect of two HDAC inhibitors, trichostatin A and valproic acid, in an experimental model of kidney fibrosis. In mice, doxorubicin (adriamycin) can cause nephropathy characterized by chronic proteinuria, glomerular damage and interstitial inflammation and fibrosis, as seen in human focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Two treatment regimens were applied, treatment was either started prior to the doxorubicin insult or delayed until a significant degree of proteinuria and fibrosis was present. Pre-treatment of trichostatin A significantly hampered glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis, as did the pre-treatment with valproic acid. In contrast, the development of proteinuria was only completely inhibited in the pre-treated valproic acid group, and not in the pre-treated trichostatin A animals. In the postponed treatment with valproic acid, a complete resolution of established doxorubicin-induced proteinuria was achieved within three days, whereas trichostatin A could not correct proteinuria in such a treatment regimen. However, both postponed regimens have comparable efficacy in maintaining the kidney fibrosis to the level reached at the start of the treatments. Moreover, not only the process of fibrosis, but also renal inflammation was attenuated by both HDAC inhibitors. Our data confirm a role for HDACs in renal fibrogenesis and point towards a therapeutic potential for HDAC inhibitors. The effect on renal disease progression and manifestation can however be different for individual HDAC inhibitors. - Highlights: • Valproic acid is a potent antiproteinuric drug, whereas trichostatin A is not. • Trichostatin A and valproic acid reduce kidney fibrosis in doxorubicin nephropathy. • Both valproic acid and trichostatin A attenuate renal inflammation.

Van Beneden, Katrien, E-mail: kvbenede@vub.ac.be [Department of Human Anatomy, Liver Cell Biology Lab, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Geers, Caroline [Department of Pathology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Pauwels, Marina [Department of Human Anatomy, Liver Cell Biology Lab, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Mannaerts, Inge [Department of Cell Biology, Liver Cell Biology Lab, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Wissing, Karl M. [Department of Nephrology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Van den Branden, Christiane [Department of Human Anatomy, Liver Cell Biology Lab, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Grunsven, Leo A. van, E-mail: lvgrunsv@vub.ac.be [Department of Cell Biology, Liver Cell Biology Lab, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Comparison of Atmospheric Water Vapor in Observational and Model Data Sets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The global water vapor distribution for five observational based data sets and three GCM integrations are compared. The variables considered are the mean and standard deviation values of the precipitable water for the entire atmospheric column and the 500 to 300 hPa layer for January and July. The observationally based sets are the radiosonde data of Ross and Elliott, the ERA and NCEP reanalyses, and the NVAP blend of sonde and satellite data. The three GCM simulations all use the NCAR CCM3 as the atmospheric model. They include: a AMIP type simulation using observed SSTs for the period 1979 to 1993, the NCAR CSM 300 year coupled ocean--atmosphere integration, and a CSM integration with a 1% CO2 increase per year. The observational data exhibit some serious inconsistencies. There are geographical patterns of differences related to interannual variations and national instrument biases. It is clear that the proper characterization of water vapor is somewhat uncertain. Some conclusions about these data appear to be robust even given the discrepancies. The ERA data are too dry especially in the upper levels. The observational data evince much better agreement in the data rich Northern Hemisphere compared to the Southern. Distinct biases are quite pronounced over the Southern Ocean. The mean values and particularly the standard deviations of the three reanalyses are very dependent upon the GCM used as the assimilation vehicle for the analyses. This is made clear by the much enhanced tropical variability in the NCEP/DOE/ AMIP reanalyses compared the initial NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis. The NCAR CCM3 shows consistent evidence of a dry bias. The 1% CO2 experiment shows a very similar pattern of disagreement with the sonde data as the other integrations, once account is taken of the warming trend. No new modes of difference are evident in the 1% CO2 experiment. All the CCM3 runs indicated too much Tropical variability especially in the western Tropical Pacific and Southeast Asia. A EOF analysis of the interannual variations of the zonally averaged precipitable water and the 500 to 300 hPa layer reveals fundamental differences in the structure of the variations. The impact of ENSO and variations of the ITCZ have only a low level of correspondence between the observed data, much less the simulations. It is apparent that an adequate characterization of the climatology of the global water vapor distribution is not yet at hand.

Boyle, J.S.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Soya: a Programming Model and Runtime Environment for Component Composition using SSDL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SOAP Service Description Language (SSDL) is a SOAPcentric language for describing Web Service contracts. SSDL focuses on message abstraction as the building block for creating service-oriented applications and provides an extensible range of protocol frameworks that can be used to describe and formally model component composition based on Web Service interactions. Given its novel approach, implementing support for SSDL contracts presents interesting challenges to middleware developers. At one end of the spectrum, programming abstractions that support message-oriented designs need to be created. At the other end, new functionality and semantics must be added to existing SOAP engines. In this paper we explain how component developers can create message-oriented Web Service interfaces with contemporary tool support (specifically the Windows Communication Foundation) using SSDL. We show how SSDL can be used as an alternative and powerful metadata language natively alongside existing tooling without imposing additional burdens on application developers. Moreover, we describe the design and architecture of the Soya middleware which supports

Fornasier, Patrick; Webber, James; Gorton, Ian

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

329

Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Refiners Switch to Reformulated Refiners Switch to Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model Contents * Summary * Introduction o Table 1. Comparison of Simple Model and Complex Model RFG Per Gallon Requirements * Statutory, Individual Refinery, and Compliance Baselines o Table 2. Statutory Baseline Fuel Compositions * Simple Model * Complex Model o Table 3. Complex Model Variables * Endnotes Related EIA Short-Term Forecast Analysis Products * RFG Simple and Complex Model Spreadsheets * Areas Particpating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program * Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations * Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model * Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules * Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline, 1995 , (Adobe

330

DOE/DHS INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEM CYBER SECURITY PROGRAMS: A MODEL FOR USE IN NUCLEAR FACILITY SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many critical infrastructure sectors have been investigating cyber security issues for several years especially with the help of two primary government programs. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National SCADA Test Bed and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program have both implemented activities aimed at securing the industrial control systems that operate the North American electric grid along with several other critical infrastructure sectors (ICS). These programs have spent the last seven years working with industry including asset owners, educational institutions, standards and regulating bodies, and control system vendors. The programs common mission is to provide outreach, identification of cyber vulnerabilities to ICS and mitigation strategies to enhance security postures. The success of these programs indicates that a similar approach can be successfully translated into other sectors including nuclear operations, safeguards, and security. The industry regulating bodies have included cyber security requirements and in some cases, have incorporated sets of standards with penalties for non-compliance such as the North American Electric Reliability Corporation Critical Infrastructure Protection standards. These DOE and DHS programs that address security improvements by both suppliers and end users provide an excellent model for nuclear facility personnel concerned with safeguards and security cyber vulnerabilities and countermeasures. It is not a stretch to imagine complete surreptitious collapse of protection against the removal of nuclear material or even initiation of a criticality event as witnessed at Three Mile Island or Chernobyl in a nuclear ICS inadequately protected against the cyber threat.

Robert S. Anderson; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Paul Moskowitz

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

2048 IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery, Vol. 10, No. 4,October 1995 COMPARISON OF THEATP VERSION OF THE EMTP AND THE NETOMAC PROGRAM FOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VERSION OF THE EMTP AND THE NETOMAC PROGRAM FOR SIMULATION OF HVDC SYSTEMS P. Lehn J. Rittiger Member the results obtained from these programs isexamined through simulation of a test HVdc network. As expected- tablished in the EMTP and in the NETOMAC transients pro- gram section. Keywords: HVdc simulation, ATP, EMTP

Lehn, Peter W.

332

Application of a dynamic linear programming model for optimum use of range resources over time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Native Rangeland by Sites? 69 8 Program I-A: Optimum Solution for 2, 250 Acre Ranch With No Cropland, All Livestock Activities Considered and Income Discounted at 16 Peroent? 85 9 Program I-B: Optimum Solution for 2, 250 Acre Ranch With 15 Percent... Cropland, All Livestock Activities Considered and. Income Discounted at 16 Percent 89 10 Chaining and Spraying Compared for Programs I-A and I-B -~ ? - 93 11 Program II-A: Optimum Solution for 2, 250 Acre Ranch with No Cropland, Stocker Activities...

Sharp, Wayne Winston

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

333

Tideflow| A dataflow-inspired execution model for high performance computing programs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Traditional programming, execution and optimization techniques have been shown to be inadequate to exploit the features of computer processors with many cores. In particular,… (more)

Orozco, Daniel A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

PTIDES: A Programming Model for Distributed Real-Time Embedded Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program, and the following companies: Agilent, Bosch, HSBC, Lockheed-Martin, National Instruments, and the following companies: Agilent, Bosch, HSBC, Lockheed-Martin, National Instruments, and Toyota. expressed

335

Modeling without categorical variables : a mixed-integer nonlinear program for the optimization of thermal insulation systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optimal design applications are often modeled by using categorical variables to express discrete design decisions, such as material types. A disadvantage of using categorical variables is the lack of continuous relaxations, which precludes the use of modern integer programming techniques. We show how to express categorical variables with standard integer modeling techniques, and we illustrate this approach on a load-bearing thermal insulation system. The system consists of a number of insulators of different materials and intercepts that minimize the heat flow from a hot surface to a cold surface. Our new model allows us to employ black-box modeling languages and solvers and illustrates the interplay between integer and nonlinear modeling techniques. We present numerical experience that illustrates the advantage of the standard integer model.

Abhishek, K.; Leyffer, S.; Linderoth, J. T.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Lehigh Univ.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Ecological-economic assessment of farms using multi-input multi-output models: life cycle assessment with multiple paired comparisons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A multi-input multi-output model is developed by extending the life cycle assessment framework for analysing the relationship between agricultural production and environmental impacts. The inputs include farmland and materials such as fertilisers, pesticides and animals. The outputs are of two types: one is agro-economic production, such as crop yields, and the other is environmental impacts, including greenhouse gas emissions. Additive and ratio models are defined for analysing the relationship between management intensity, land productivity and environmental impacts based on the farm model. After the framework of multiple paired comparisons is illustrated, the multi-input multi-output model is applied to rice farming in Japan. The results indicate that the additive and ratio models can be used for detecting the directions of changes. These models can be extended for analysing the land-use competition between food and energy production.

Kiyotada Hayashi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Experience with the SOL14 computer program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SOL14 computer program was developed to provide performance estimates on new solar heated building designs. The program is based on a one-month first law model that is amplified in the paper. Insolation on collectors at any orientation is computed according to modified ASHRAE equations. The effect of thermal capacitance is analyzed using the concept of overheat, excess solar gain that must be rejected rather than used. Internal temperature swings are analyzed with a time-lag model. The program was tested on nineteen buildings and a comparison of actual and estimated performance is presented. The nineteen buildings include direct gain, Solaris, Trombe, superinsulated and retrofit greenhouses. The program estimated auxiliary heat within about 12% of actual experience in all cases except extremely low energy users (less than 10 MMBtu); here the noise of an open window or a week's vacation became the major energy consideration.

Hyman, H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Annex XXIII: Phase III Results Regarding Tripod Support Structure Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes. This paper describes the findings of code-to-code verification activities of the IEA Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration.

Nichols, J.; Camp, T.; Jonkman, J.; Butterfield, S.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Azcona, J.; Martinez, A.; Munduate, X.; Vorpahl, F.; Kleinhansl, S.; Kohlmeier, M.; Kossel, T.; Boker, C.; Kaufer, D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Joint Program Report 164 Appendix B page 1 Appendix B: Comparison of U.S. Marginal Abatement Cost Curves from a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

60 Energyuse(EJ) Coal Petrol. Prod. Gas Nuclear Hydro Renewables Biomass liquids Reduced Use -60 -50 Program Report 164 Appendix B ­ page 3 energy. Similarly, some uses of coal are reduced at low costs

340

Land-use transition for bioenergy and climate stabilization: model comparison of drivers, impacts and interactions with other land use based mitigation options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is a model comparison assessing the drivers and impacts of bioenergy production on the global land system and the interaction with other land use based mitigation options in the context of the EMF 27 project. We compare and evaluate results from three integrated assessment models (GCAM, IMAGE, and ReMIND/MAgPIE). All three models project that dedicated bioenergy crops and biomass residues are a potentially important and cost-effective component of the energy system. But bioenergy deployment levels and feedstock composition vary notably across models as do the implications for land-use and greenhouse gas emissions and the interaction with other land use based mitigation measures. Despite numerous model differences, we identify a few that are likely contributing to differences in land-use and emissions attributable to energy crop deployment.

Popp, Alexander; Rose, Steven K.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Dietrich, Jan P.; Wise, Marshall A.; Stehfest, Eike; Humpenoder, Florian; Kyle, G. Page; Van Vliet, Jasper; Bauer, Nico; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Klein, David; Kriegler, Elmar

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Numerical modeling of buoyancy-driven flows in a rotating cylindrical cavity: Comparison of a finite element model with a spectral model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A finite element model is developed for the prediction of the motion of rotating Boussinesq fluid driven by buoyancy. The computations are performed for the axisymmetric regime in an annular cavity for Reynolds number varying from 0 to 2,500. The results are compared with those of an earlier study of this problem using a spectral Tau-Chebyshev method. The good agreement found assesses the finite element model. Finally, a complementary convergence analysis gives the sensitivity of the model to mesh refinement.

Jaeger, M.; Medale, M.; Randriamanpianina, A. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Marseille (France)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Computer-assisted Modelling and Analysis of Linear Programming Problems: Towards a Unified Framework  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Institute, ULCA. Also to appear in Management Science. [8] GEOFFRION, A. M...Working Paper No. 338, Western Management Science Institute, UCLA. [9] GREENBERG...programming problems: A unified approach towards automatic reformulation......

HARVEY J. GREENBERG; CORMAC LUCAS; GAUTAM MITRA

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Meeting the challenge of responding to stakeholder information needs: A program model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a dynamic, changing environment, effective decision-making is reached at the lower levels of an organization. With this concept in mind, Westinghouse Hanford Company designed a comprehensive information release program to manage information as close as possible to the original source. This paper will describe that program and the issues associated with implementing its objectives: improve the release process to respond to stakeholder requirements and liability for noncompliance.

Birkland, V.L. (Boeing Computer Services Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Automatic Calibration of a Building Energy Simulation Model Using a Global Optimization Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

optimization process minimizing the error between measured and simulated energy consumption. The ?measured? data used in this case was generated by the simulation program and will be referred to as synthetic measured data. The accuracy of calibration...). It is used to prove the possibility of automatic calibration through an optimization process. Synthetic ?data? was generated by the simulation program. This synthetic measured heating and cooling energy consumption data for the prototype building...

Lee, S. U.; Claridge, D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

The solubility and kinetics of minerals under CO2-EGS geothermal conditions: Comparison of experimental and modeling results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2000. A Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy concept utilizing2006. The Future of Geothermal Energy Impact of EnhancedU.S. Department of Energy, Geothermal Technologies Program,

Xu, T.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

The North American Carbon Program Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project Part 1: Overview and experimental design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding of land-atmosphere carbon exchange to larger regions. The North American Carbon Program (NACP) Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP) is a formal model intercomparison and evaluation effort focused on improving the diagnosis and attribution of carbon exchange at regional and global scales. MsTMIP builds upon current and past synthesis activities, and has a unique framework designed to isolate, interpret, and inform understanding of how model structural differences impact estimates of carbon uptake and release. Here we provide an overview of the MsTMIP effort and describe how the MsTMIP experimental design enables the assessment and quantification of TBM structural uncertainty. Model structure refers to the types of processes considered (e.g. nutrient cycling, disturbance, lateral transport of carbon), and how these processes are represented (e.g. photosynthetic formulation, temperature sensitivity, respiration) in the models. By prescribing a common experimental protocol with standard spin-up procedures and driver data sets, we isolate any biases and variability in TBM estimates of regional and global carbon budgets resulting from differences in the models themselves (i.e. model structure) and model-specific parameter values. An initial intercomparison of model structural differences is represented using hierarchical cluster diagrams (a.k.a. dendrograms), which highlight similarities and differences in how models account for carbon cycle, vegetation, energy, and nitrogen cycle dynamics. We show that, despite the standardized protocol used to derive initial conditions, models show a high degree of variation for GPP, total living biomass, and total soil carbon, underscoring the influence of differences in model structure and parameterization on model estimates.

Huntzinger, D.N. [Northern Arizona University] [Northern Arizona University; Schwalm, C. [Northern Arizona University] [Northern Arizona University; Michalak, A.M [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford] [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford; Schaefer, K. [National Snow and Ice Data Center] [National Snow and Ice Data Center; King, A.W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Wei, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jacobson, A. [National Snow and Ice Data Center] [National Snow and Ice Data Center; Liu, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Cook, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Post, W.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Berthier, G. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE)] [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE); Hayes, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Huang, M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Ito, A. [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan] [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan; Lei, H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Lu, C. [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.] [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.; Mao, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Peng, C.H. [University of Quebec at Montreal, Institute of Environment Sciences] [University of Quebec at Montreal, Institute of Environment Sciences; Peng, S. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE)] [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE); Poulter, B. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE)] [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE); Riccuito, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Shi, X. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Tian, H. [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.] [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.; Wang, W. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Ames Research Center, Moffett Field] [National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Ames Research Center, Moffett Field; Zeng, N. [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland; Zhao, F. [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland; Zhu, Q. [Laboratory for Ecological Forecasting and Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University] [Laboratory for Ecological Forecasting and Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Comparison of the Vertical Velocity Used to Calculate the Cloud Droplet Number Concentration in a Cloud Resolving and a Global Climate Model  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comparison of the Vertical Velocity Comparison of the Vertical Velocity used to Calculate the Cloud Droplet Number Concentration in a Cloud-Resolving and a Global Climate Model H. Guo, J. E. Penner, M. Herzog, and X. Liu Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan Introduction Anthropogenic aerosols are effective cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The availability of CCN affects the initial cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and droplet size; therefore, cloud optical properties (the so-called first aerosol indirect effect). However, the estimate of CDNC from a mechanistic treatment shows significant differences from the empirical schemes mainly due to the large bias of the large-scale vertical velocity (w) (Ghan et al. 1993, 1995; Boucher and Lohmann 1995;

348

Integrated modeling and experimental programs to predict brine and gas flow at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluation of the performance of the WIPP repository involves modeling of brine and gas flow in the host rocks of the Salado Formation, which consist of halite and anhydrite interbeds. Numerous physical, chemical, and structural processes, must be understood to perform this modeling. Gas generation within the repository is strongly coupled to the amount of brine inflow to the repository because brine aids in the corrosion of metals and associated generation of hydrogen gas. Increasing gas pressure in the repository decreases the rate of brine inflow. Ultimately, the gas pressure may exceed the brine pressure and gas may flow out of the repository. Relative-permeability curves and a correlation between threshold pressure and permeability taken from studies reported in the literature were used in PA models prior to being experimentally verified as appropriate for WIPP. In addition, interbed permeabilities were treated as constant and independent of effective stress in early models. Subsequently, the process of interbed fracturing (or fracture dilation) was recognized to limit gas pressures in the repository to values below lithostatic, and assumed (and unverified) relationships between porosity, permeability, and pore pressure were employed. Parameter-sensitivity studies performed using the simplified models identified important parameters for which site-specific data were needed. Unrealistic modeling results, such as room pressures substantially above lithostatic, showed the need to include additional processes in the models. Field and laboratory experimental programs have been initiated in conjunction with continued model development to provide information on important processes and parameters.

Beauheim, R.L.; Howarth, S.M.; Vaughn, P.; Webb, S.W.; Larson, K.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Mechanism to support generic collective communication across a variety of programming models  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for supporting collective communications on a plurality of processors that use different parallel programming paradigms, in one aspect, may comprise a schedule defining one or more tasks in a collective operation, an executor that executes the task, a multisend module to perform one or more data transfer functions associated with the tasks, and a connection manager that controls one or more connections and identifies an available connection. The multisend module uses the available connection in performing the one or more data transfer functions. A plurality of processors that use different parallel programming paradigms can use a common implementation of the schedule module, the executor module, the connection manager and the multisend module via a language adaptor specific to a parallel programming paradigm implemented on a processor.

Almasi, Gheorghe (Ardsley, NY); Dozsa, Gabor (Ardsley, NY); Kumar, Sameer (White Plains, NY)

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

350

Frequency dependent elastic properties and attenuation in heavy-oil sands: comparison between mea-sured and modeled data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Frequency dependent elastic properties and attenuation in heavy-oil sands: comparison between mea) properties of heavy-oil sands over a range of frequencies (2 - 2000Hz) covering the seismic bandwidth and at ultrasonic frequencies (0.8MHz). The measurements were carried on heavy-oil sand sample from Asphalt Ridge

351

COMPARISON OF WIND AND WIND SHEAR CLIMATOLOGIES DERIVED FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION RADIOSONDES AND THE ECMWF MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPARISON OF WIND AND WIND SHEAR CLIMATOLOGIES DERIVED FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION RADIOSONDES wind and its vertical gradient, i.e. wind-shear, is characterized as a function of climate region. For a better representation of the average atmospheric wind and shear and their variabilities, high

Stoffelen, Ad

352

On-the-Fly Model Checking of Program Runs for Automated Debugging M. Frey B.-H. Schlingloff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

debugging of parallel programs. Dur- ing the monitoring of a program run, a state action net is constructed

Schlingloff, Holger

353

OntheFly Model Checking of Program Runs for Automated Debugging M. Frey B.H. Schlingloff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

debugging of parallel programs. Dur­ ing the monitoring of a program run, a state action net is constructed

Schlingloff, Holger

354

THE TRUE COST OF PAIR PROGRAMMING: DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPREHENSIVE MODEL AND TEST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

teams at Symantec produced cleaner test classes and better coverage tests through the pair- programming process (Morales, 2002). Jensen, a consultant for the Software Technology Support Center, Hill Air Force Base, reported an error rate of 0.001 in a...

Sun, Wenying

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

355

Compiler Comparisons  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Compiler Comparisons Using a set of benchmarks described below, different optimization options for the different compilers on Edison are compared. The compilers are also...

356

Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) RAPID Engineering Program, Project 7: Development of Field Exposure Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to develop a conceptual model for estimating magnetic field (EMF) personal exposure (PE) of individuals or groups and construct a working model using existing data.

Bracken, T.D.; Rankin, R.F.; Wiley, J.A.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Model Development and Loads Analysis of an Offshore Wind Turbine on a Tension Leg Platform with a Comparison to Other Floating Turbine Concepts: April 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results of the analysis of a 5-MW wind turbine located on a floating offshore tension leg platform (TLP) that was conducted using the fully coupled time-domain aero-hydro-servo-elastic design code FAST with AeroDyn and HydroDyn. The report also provides a description of the development process of the TLP model. The model has been verified via comparisons to frequency-domain calculations. Important differences have been identified between the frequency-domain and time-domain simulations, and have generated implications for the conceptual design process. An extensive loads and stability analysis for ultimate and fatigue loads according to the procedure of the IEC 61400-3 offshore wind turbine design standard was performed with the verified TLP model. This report compares the loads for the wind turbine on the TLP to those of an equivalent land-based turbine. Major instabilities for the TLP are identified and described.

Matha, D.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

To cite this document: Hugues, Jrme A programming language view to model-driven engineering. (2013) In: Sminaire DTIM -ONERA, 03 June 2013 -03 June 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

laws, yet empirics »(Programming) language: human-defined .. Large variety > Model-Based: babel tower in the large Outline page 7 #12;> International standard promoted by SAE International, AS-2C committee

Mailhes, Corinne

359

Deep Placement Gel Bank as an Improved Oil Recovery Process: Modeling, Economic Analysis and Comparison to Polymer Flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have conducted relevant literature review about the development, design, modeling and economics of the enhanced oil recovery methods. Schlumberger's Eclipse simulator software has been used for modeling purposes. Modeling runs have demonstrated...

Seyidov, Murad

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

360

Repository Integration Program: RIP performance assessment and strategy evaluation model theory manual and user`s guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the theory and capabilities of RIP (Repository Integration Program). RIP is a powerful and flexible computational tool for carrying out probabilistic integrated total system performance assessments for geologic repositories. The primary purpose of RIP is to provide a management tool for guiding system design and site characterization. In addition, the performance assessment model (and the process of eliciting model input) can act as a mechanism for integrating the large amount of available information into a meaningful whole (in a sense, allowing one to keep the ``big picture`` and the ultimate aims of the project clearly in focus). Such an integration is useful both for project managers and project scientists. RIP is based on a `` top down`` approach to performance assessment that concentrates on the integration of the entire system, and utilizes relatively high-level descriptive models and parameters. The key point in the application of such a ``top down`` approach is that the simplified models and associated high-level parameters must incorporate an accurate representation of their uncertainty. RIP is designed in a very flexible manner such that details can be readily added to various components of the model without modifying the computer code. Uncertainty is also handled in a very flexible manner, and both parameter and model (process) uncertainty can be explicitly considered. Uncertainty is propagated through the integrated PA model using an enhanced Monte Carlo method. RIP must rely heavily on subjective assessment (expert opinion) for much of its input. The process of eliciting the high-level input parameters required for RIP is critical to its successful application. As a result, in order for any project to successfully apply a tool such as RIP, an enormous amount of communication and cooperation must exist between the data collectors, the process modelers, and the performance. assessment modelers.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Representing technology in CGE models: a comparison of SGM and AMIGA for electricity sector CO2 mitigation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The goal of this effort is to compare two climate economic models – the Second Generation Model (SGM) and All Modular Industry Growth Assessment Model (AMIGA) – and highlight the consequences of different modelling approaches and structures on the estimation of climate change policy results. We show that different assumptions about how technology choices are made in the US electricity sector in response to a carbon charge can lead to differences in estimates of environmental, fuel market, and economy-wide impacts. If the differences among models can be better understood, improvements in the models may be made and policy makers will be better informed by the insights provided by the models.

Michael G. Shelby; Allen A. Fawcett; O. Eric Smith; Donald A. Hanson; Ronald D. Sands

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Bounding A Protein's Free Energy In Lattice Models Via Linear Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in understanding protein structure prediction. In these models, a protein folds to maximize H-H contacts (minimize [4], abstracts the dominant force in protein folding: the hydrophobic interaction. The hydrophobicity of protein folding in the Hydro- phobic-Hydrophilic (HP) model. We formulate several di#11;erent integer

Newman, Alantha

363

Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing - Towards Enhancing OpenMP for Manycore and Heterogeneous Nodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OpenMP was not well recognized at the beginning of the project, around year 2003, because of its limited use in DoE production applications and the inmature hardware support for an efficient implementation. Yet in the recent years, it has been graduately adopted both in HPC applications, mostly in the form of MPI+OpenMP hybrid code, and in mid-scale desktop applications for scientific and experimental studies. We have observed this trend and worked deligiently to improve our OpenMP compiler and runtimes, as well as to work with the OpenMP standard organization to make sure OpenMP are evolved in the direction close to DoE missions. In the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing project, the HPCTools team at the University of Houston (UH), directed by Dr. Barbara Chapman, has been working with project partners, external collaborators and hardware vendors to increase the scalability and applicability of OpenMP for multi-core (and future manycore) platforms and for distributed memory systems by exploring different programming models, language extensions, compiler optimizations, as well as runtime library support.

Barbara Chapman

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Comparison of energy efficiency between variable refrigerant flow systems and ground source heat pump systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulation with credible software programs is a proven feasible way to get quantitative comparison of the energy

Hong, Tainzhen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Application of a Mathematic Programming Model for Integrated Planning and Scheduling of Petroleum Supply Networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because the detailed scheduling constraints are often ignored in the planning model, there is no guarantee that an operable schedule can be obtained with this hierarchical approach. ... 2,3,4 A petroleum supply chain can be roughly divided into four segments:? (1) exploration, (2) transportation, (3) refining, and (4) distribution. ... A number of LP-based commercial software packages are available for generating production plans in the refineries, for example, RPMS9 (refinery and petrochemical modeling system) and PIMS10 (process industry modeling system). ...

Tung-Hsiung Kuo; Chuei-Tin Chang

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

366

A Comparison of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic Modeling Results over a Wide Rangeof Gasoline Range Surrogate Fuel Blends  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Kinetic models of fuels are needed to allow the simulation of engine performance for research, design, or verification purposes.

367

Model-Driven Engineering of RNA Devices to Quantitatively Program Gene Expression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cotranscriptional folding simulations, and show that...coarse-grained biochemical modeling with biophysical kinetic RNA folding simulations...Voigt C. A. , Automated design of...Dizzy: Stochastic simulation of large-scale...may deal with the rapid folding...

James M. Carothers; Jonathan A. Goler; Darmawi Juminaga; Jay D. Keasling

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

368

Non Linear Programming (NLP) Formulation for Quantitative Modeling of Protein Signal Transduction Pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling of signal transduction pathways plays a major role in understanding cells' function and predicting cellular response. Mathematical formalisms based on a logic formalism are relatively simple but can describe how ...

Mitsos, Alexander

369

CUDA programs for GPU computing of Swendsen-Wang multi-cluster spin flip algorithm: 2D and 3D Ising, Potts, and XY models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present sample CUDA programs for the GPU computing of the Swendsen-Wang multi-cluster spin flip algorithm. We deal with the classical spin models; the Ising model, the $q$-state Potts model, and the classical XY model. As for the lattice, both the 2D (square) lattice and the 3D (simple cubic) lattice are treated. We already reported the idea of the GPU implementation for 2D models [Comput. Phys. Commun. 183 (2012) 1155-1161]. We here explain the details of sample programs, and discuss the performance of the present GPU implementation for the 3D Ising and XY models. We also show the calculated results of the moment ratio for these models, and discuss phase transitions.

Komura, Yukihiro

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2013-2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2013-2014 Program Structure and Responsibilities Dr. Anas Chalah #12;SEAS Safety Program SEAS Safety Program Structure We have developed a great model of collaboration among · EHSEM · SEAS Safety Program · SEAS Facilities which accounts for the regulatory component

371

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2012-2103  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2012-2103 Program Structure and Responsibilities Dr. Anas Chalah #12;SEAS Safety Program SEAS Safety Program Structure We have developed a great model of collaboration among · EHSEM · SEAS Safety Program · SEAS Facilities which accounts for the regulatory component

372

Discussion on a Code Comparison Effort for the Geothermal Technologies...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Effort for the Geothermal Technologies Program Code comparison presentation by Mark White of PNNL at the 2012 Peer Review meeting on May 10. gtp2012peerreviewpnnlwhite.pdf...

373

Comparison of Fuel Cell Technologies: Fact Sheet | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Office. Comparison of Fuel Cell Technologies More Documents & Publications Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Fuel Cells Fact Sheet Fuel Cells Fact Sheet MCFC and PAFC...

374

2-D Modeling of Energy-z Beam Dynamics Using the LiTrack Matlab Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Short bunches and the bunch length distribution have important consequences for both the LCLS project at SLAC and the proposed ILC project. For both these projects, it is important to simulate what bunch length distributions are expected and then to perform actual measurements. The goal of the research is to determine the sensitivity of the bunch length distribution to accelerator phase and voltage. This then indicates the level of control and stability that is needed. In this project I simulated beamlines to find the rms bunch length in three different beam lines at SLAC, which are the test beam to End Station A (ILC-ESA) for the ILC studies, Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and LCLS-ESA. To simulate the beamlines, I used the LiTrack program, which does a 2-dimensional tracking of an electron bunch's longitudinal (z) and the energy spread beam (E) parameters. In order to reduce the time of processing the information, I developed a small program to loop over adjustable machine parameters. LiTrack is a Matlab script and Matlab is also used for plotting and saving and loading files. The results show that the LCLS in Linac-A is the most sensitive when looking at the ratio of change in phase degree to rate of change. The results also show a noticeable difference between the LCLS and LCLS-ESA, which suggest that further testing should go into looking the Beam Switch Yard and End Station A to determine why the result of the LCLS and LCLS-ESA vary.

Cauley, S.K.; /Unlisted; Woods, M.; /SLAC

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Sorghum Program BIOENERGY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sorghum Program BIOENERGY PROGRAM Sorghums are important nongrain lignocellulosic feedstocks Biomass Switch Grass Forage Sorghum Bioenergy Sorghum Biomass per acre per year that can be converted (DT

376

Earth System Modeling -- Director`s initiative. LDRD Program final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Earth System Modeling Director`s Initiative is to develop and test a framework for interactively coupling subsystem models that represent the physical, chemical, and biological processes which determine the state of the atmosphere, ocean, land surface and vegetation. Most studies of the potential for human perturbations of the climate system made previously have treated only limited components of the Earth system. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the capability of coupling all relevant components in a flexible framework that will permit a wide variety of tests to be conducted to assure realistic interactions. A representation of the Earth system is shown and its important interactions.

MacCracken, M.; Penner, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Atmospheric Science Div.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL LBNL and SNL for the UFD Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes laboratory and field observations and numerical modeling related to coupled processes involving brine and vapor migration in geologic salt, focusing on recent developments and studies conducted at Sandia, Los Alamos, and Berkeley National Laboratories. Interest into the disposal of heat-generating waste in salt has led to interest into water distribution and migration in both run-of-mine crushed and intact geologic salt. Ideally a fully coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical simulation is performed using numerical models with validated constitutive models and parameters. When mechanical coupling is not available, mechanical effects are prescribed in hydraulic models as source, boundary, or initial conditions. This report presents material associated with developing appropriate initial conditions for a non-mechanical hydrologic simulation of brine migration in salt. Due to the strong coupling between the mechanical and hydrologic problems, the initial saturation will be low for the excavation disturbed zone surrounding the excavation. Although most of the material in this report is not new, the author hopes it is presented in a format making it useful to other salt researchers.

Kuhlman, Kristopher L.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

A Mathematical Programming Model for Optimal Layout Considering Quantitative Risk Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Celaya, Gto 38010 México 2 Carnegie Mellon University, Chemical Engineering). #12;The Center for Chemical Process Safety (CCPS) has published guidelines for facility siting model for safe process layout considering three possible hazardous incidents in an ethylene oxide plant

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

379

Air Quality Modeling in the South Coast Air Basin of California: What Do the Numbers Really Mean?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Quality Modeling in the South Coast Air Basin of California: What Do the Numbers Really Mean and Energy Program, University of California, Irvine, CA ABSTRACT This study evaluates air quality model. Comparison among CIT, California Photochemical Grid Model (CALGRID), and Urban Airshed Model air quality

Dabdub, Donald

380

Model program for the recruitment and preparation of high ability elementary mathematics/science teachers: A collaborative project among scientists, teacher educators and classroom teachers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This teacher education program will provide a model for recruiting, educating and retaining high ability students to become mathematics and science lead teachers in elementary schools. The quality experiences and support provided these students will help them develop the knowledge and attitudes necessary to provide leadership for elementary mathematics and science programs. Students will have research experiences at the Ames Laboratory, high quality field experiences with nationally recognized mathematics and science teachers in local schools and opportunities to meaningfully connect these two experiences. This program, collaboratively designed and implemented by scientists, teacher educators and classroom teachers, should provide a replicatable model for other teacher education institutions. In addition, materials developed for the project should help other laboratories interface more effectively with K-8 schools and help other teacher education programs incorporate real science and mathematics experience into their curriculum.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Internal Audit of a Comprehensive IMRT Program for Prostate Cancer: A Model for Centers in Developing Countries?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: With improving regional prosperity, significant capital investments have been made to rapidly expand radiotherapy capacity across Southeast Asia. Yet little has been reported on the implementation of adequate quality assurance (QA) in patient management. The objective of this study is to perform an in-depth QA assessment of our definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) program for prostate cancer since its inception. Methods and Materials: The department's prostate IMRT program was modeled after that of University of California San Francisco. A departmental protocol consisting of radiotherapy volume/dose and hormone sequencing/duration and a set of 18 dose objectives to the target and critical organs were developed, and all plans were presented at the weekly departmental QA rounds. All patients treated with definitive IMRT for nonmetastatic prostate cancer were retrospectively reviewed. Protocol adherence, dosimetry data, toxicities, and outcomes were evaluated. Results: Since 2005, 76 patients received IMRT: 54 with whole-pelvis and 22 with prostate-only treatment. Of the 1,140 recorded dosimetric end points, 39 (3.3%) did not meet the protocol criteria. At QA rounds, no plans required a revision. Only one major protocol violation was observed. Two and two cases of Grade 3-4 acute and late toxicities, respectively, were observed. Five (8.8%) patients developed proctitis, but only one required argon laser therapy. Conclusions: Our comprehensive, practice-adapted QA measures appeared to ensure that we were able to consistently generate conforming IMRT plans with acceptable toxicities. These measures can be easily integrated into other clinics contemplating on developing such a program.

Koh, Wee Yao; Ren Wei; Mukherjee, Rahul K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore); Chung, Hans T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore)], E-mail: hanstchung@gmail.com

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Energy consumption comparison analysis of high energy efficiency office buildings in typical climate zones of China and U.S. based on correction model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Actual operation energy consumption of the high energy efficiency buildings built and operated in China and U.S. has been quite different than expected. This paper compares actual energy consumption to expect high energy efficiency office buildings in U.S. and China. Considering the different indoor design temperature, climate conditions and operated period between the compared cases in the two countries impact on the building energy consumption, correction model was built to eliminate the influence of the three factors on the comparison result and put the comparison analysis of high energy efficiency office buildings in the two countries into the same level. Regard to building general information and climate condition, four pairs of buildings in typical climate zones of China and U.S. were selected to compare the building energy conservation technology and building energy consumption based on a large scale of investigation and testing. After corrected, the energy consumption data are analyzed, including total energy consumption, and sub-metering energy consumption such as heating, cooling, lighting, office equipment, etc.. The energy saving technologies applied in these four pairs of buildings was also compared to explain energy consumption differences.

Long Liu; Jing Zhao; Xin Liu; Zhaoxia Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Brief Friction induced hunting limit cycles: A comparison between the LuGre and switch friction model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, friction induced limit cycles are predicted for a simple motion system consisting of a motor-driven inertia subjected to friction and a PID-controlled regulator task. The two friction models used, i.e., (i) the dynamic LuGre friction model ... Keywords: Friction, Limit cycles, PID control, Stability analysis

R. H. A. Hensen; M. J. G. Van De Molengraft; M. Steinbuch

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Capturing frontier research in grant proposals and initial analysis of the comparison between model vs. peer review1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vs. peer review1 Dirk Holste* , Thomas Scherngell* , Ivana Roche**, Marianne Hörlesberger-statistical model for inferring attributes of ,,frontier research in peer-reviewed research proposals submitted of a proposal to be accepted and compares outcomes between the model and peer-review decision, with the goal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

385

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Comparison of ECMWF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comparison of ECMWF Model and ARSCL Cloudiness at the ARM SGP site Comparison of ECMWF Model and ARSCL Cloudiness at the ARM SGP site Kollias, Pavlos RSMAS/University of Miami Albrecht, Bruce University of Miami The Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program operates a comprehensive suite of active remote sensors at Southern Great Plains (SGP) in Oklahoma since 1996 to detect all hydrometeors in the atmospheric column above. Due to its location, the ARM SGP site cloud and precipitation climatology it is believed to be representative of mid-latitudes. Long-term (6.5 years) observations from this ARM site are used to provide a cloud and precipitation climatology. A cloud classification scheme based on cloud base height, fractional coverage, cloud thickness, cloud reflectivity and precipitation detection at the

386

CRC fuel rating program: road octane performance of oxygenates in 1982 model cars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of the widespread interest in the use of alcohols and ethers as gasoline blending components, this program was conducted to evaluate the effects of several oxygenates on gasoline octane performance and to evaluate the effects of car design features such as engine and transmission type. Five oxygenates were evaluated at two nominal concentrations, 5 and 10 volume%, at both regular- and premium-grade octane levels: methanol (MeOH), ethanol (ETOH), isopropanol (IPA), tertiary butanol (TBA), and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE). A blend of 5% MeOH and 5 percent TBA was also tested at both octane levels. Twenty-eight unleaded fuels, including four hydrocarbon fuels, two hydrocarbon fuels plus toluene, and twenty-two oxygenated fuels, were rated in duplicate in thirty-eight cars using the Modified Uniontown Technique (CRC Designation F-28-75 described in Appendix C), plus some additional instructions. All testing was done on chassis dynamometers. Ratings were obtained at full throttle with all thirty-eight cars, and at the most critical part-throttle condition (occurring with manifold vacuum of 4 in. Hg (13.5 kPa) or greater above the full-throttle vacuum) with nine cars.

Not Available

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Using CORE Model-Based Systems Engineering Software to Support Program Management in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Project: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes how a model-based systems engineering software, CORE, is helping the U. S. Department of Energy's Office of Biomass Program assist with bringing biomass-derived biofuels to the market. This software tool provides information to guide informed decision-making as biomass-to-biofuels systems are advanced from concept to commercial adoption. It facilitates management and communication of program status by automatically generating custom reports, Gantt charts, and tables using the widely available programs of Microsoft Word, Project and Excel.

Riley, C.; Sandor, D.; Simpkins, P.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

UV-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and temperature programmed desorption studies of model and bulk heterogeneous catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) have been used to investigate the surface structure of model heterogeneous catalysts in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). UV-Raman spectroscopy has been used to probe the structure of bulk model catalysts in ambient and reaction conditions. The structural information obtained through UV-Raman spectroscopy has been correlated with both the UHV surface analysis and reaction results. The present day propylene and ethylene polymerization catalysts (Ziegler-Natta catalysts) are prepared by deposition of TiCl{sub 4} and a Al(Et){sub 3} co-catalyst on a microporous Mg-ethoxide support that is prepared from MgCl{sub 2} and ethanol. A model thin film catalyst is prepared by depositing metallic Mg on a Au foil in a UHV chamber in a background of TiCl{sub 4} in the gas phase. XPS results indicate that the Mg is completely oxidized to MgCl{sub 2} by TiCl{sub 4} resulting in a thin film of MgCl{sub 2}/TiCl{sub x}, where x = 2, 3, and 4. To prepare an active catalyst, the thin film of MgCl{sub 2}/TiCl{sub x} on Au foil is enclosed in a high pressure cell contained within the UHV chamber and exposed to {approx}1 Torr of Al(Et){sub 3}.

Tewell, Craig R.

2002-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

389

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster Formation in a Cellular Environment Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster Formation in a Cellular Environment Larry Toburen East Carolina University Why This Project Modern tools of radiobiology are leading to many new discoveries regarding how cells and tissues respond to radiation exposure. We can now irradiate single cells and observe responses in adjacent cells. We can also measure clusters of radiation damage produced in DNA. The primary tools available to describe the initial spatial pattern of damage formed by the absorption of ionizing radiation are based on (MC) Monte Carlo simulations of the structure of charged particle tracks. Although many MC codes exist and considerable progress is being made in the incorporation of detailed macromolecular target structures into these codes, much of the interaction

390

Frequency domain and finite difference modeling of ventilated concrete slabs and comparison with field measurements: Part 2. Application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper is the second of two papers that present techniques and guidelines for frequency response (FR) and lumped-parameter finite difference (LPFD) approaches for the thermal modeling of building-integrated thermal energy storage (BITES) systems. To assist the thermal analysis and control of active BITES systems, development of FR and LPFD models are presented in this two-part paper. Modeling methodology and techniques are presented in paper Part 1 using ventilated concrete slabs (VCS) for demonstration. In this part, the methodology is applied to two types of VCS. The modeling results from different FR and explicit LPFD models with different time steps and discretization schemes are presented. The results are compared to each other, and with field-measured data from a solar demonstration house with a VCS. Simulation results show that time step of half an hour for FR models results in less than 3% error in thermal performance. For LPFD models, discretization with Biot number smaller than 0.5 can reduce error to about 5%.

Yuxiang Chen; Andreas K. Athienitis; Khaled E. Galal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

A comparison of rotordynamic-coefficient predictions for annular honeycomb gas seals using different friction-factor models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are not considered in the present study. 2.4 Childs and Fayolle model (1999) In the discussion of the paper of liquid seals with a hole-patterned roughened stator, the authors set out to develop a friction-factor model that would improve or reasonably predict... the rotordynamic coefficients. Estimates of the stator (roughened surface) friction- factor were obtained from AP/ leakage-rate data. A least-square curve fit was used to calculate Blasius type coefficients for each clearance. The friction-factor model...

D'Sousa, Rohan Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

392

Comparison of optical model results from a microscopic Schrödinger approach to nucleon-nucleus elastic scattering with those from a global Dirac phenomenology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparisons are made between results of calculations for intermediate energy nucleon-nucleus scattering for 12C, 16O, 40Ca, 90Zr, and 208Pb, using optical potentials obtained from global Dirac phenomenology and from a microscopic Schr\\"odinger model. Differential cross sections and spin observables for scattering from the set of five nuclei at 65 MeV and 200 MeV have been studied to assess the relative merits of each approach. Total reaction cross sections from proton-nucleus and total cross sections from neutron-nucleus scattering have been evaluated and compared with data for those five targets in the energy range 20 MeV to 800 MeV. The methods of analyses give results that compare well with experimental data in those energy regimes for which the procedures are suited.

P. K. Deb; B. C. Clark; S. Hama; K. Amos; S. Karataglidis; E. D. Cooper

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

393

SCIENCE Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SCIENCE Program SCIENCE Program early science program Early at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility CONTACT  Argonne Leadership Computing Facility | www.alcf.anl.gov | (877) 737-8615 Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model PI: Venkatramani Balaji Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Award: 150 Million Hours Materials Design and Discovery: Catalysis and Energy Storage PI: Larry Curtiss Argonne National Laboratory Award: 50 Million Hours Direct Numerical Simulation of Autoignition in a Jet in a Cross-Flow PI: Christos Frouzakis Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Award: 150 Million Hours High-Accuracy Predictions of the Bulk Properties of Water PI: Mark Gordon Iowa State University Award: 150 Million Hours Cosmic Structure Probes

394

Development of the Symbolic Manipulator Laboratory modeling package for the kinematic design and optimization of the Future Armor Rearm System robot. Ammunition Logistics Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new program package, Symbolic Manipulator Laboratory (SML), for the automatic generation of both kinematic and static manipulator models in symbolic form is presented. Critical design parameters may be identified and optimized using symbolic models as shown in the sample application presented for the Future Armor Rearm System (FARS) arm. The computer-aided development of the symbolic models yields equations with reduced numerical complexity. Important considerations have been placed on the closed form solutions simplification and on the user friendly operation. The main emphasis of this research is the development of a methodology which is implemented in a computer program capable of generating symbolic kinematic and static forces models of manipulators. The fact that the models are obtained trigonometrically reduced is among the most significant results of this work and the most difficult to implement. Mathematica, a commercial program that allows symbolic manipulation, is used to implement the program package. SML is written such that the user can change any of the subroutines or create new ones easily. To assist the user, an on-line help has been written to make of SML a user friendly package. Some sample applications are presented. The design and optimization of the 5-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) FARS manipulator using SML is discussed. Finally, the kinematic and static models of two different 7-DOF manipulators are calculated symbolically.

March-Leuba, S.; Jansen, J.F.; Kress, R.L.; Babcock, S.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dubey, R.V. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Comparison of mean retention time (MRT) of markers in the reticulorumen (RR) estimated by modelling their faecal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-EDTA) were injected via the rumen cannula through the reticulo-omasal orifice prior to duodenal sampling (9 by modelling and algebraic methods were close. Markers (digesta phases) had an effect on accuracy of MRTRR

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

396

3-PG Productivity Modeling of Regenerating Amazon Forests: Climate Sensitivity and Comparison with MODIS-Derived NPP  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Potential forest growth predicted by the Physiological Principles in Predicting Growth (3-PG) model was compared for forest and deforested areas in the Legal Amazon to assess potential differing regeneration associated with climate. Historical ...

Joseph D. White; Neal A. Scott; Adam I. Hirsch; Steven W. Running

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Comparison of Rainfall Profiles in the West African Monsoon as Depicted by TRMM PR and the LMDZ Climate Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vertical rainfall profiles obtained with TRMM-PR 2A25 standard products are compared with rain profiles deduced from the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique second generation global climate model (LMDZ, the Z stands for zoom capability) with ...

Samo Diatta; Frédéric Hourdin; Amadou Thierno Gaye; Nicolas Viltard

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Comparison of Snow Cover from Satellite and Numerical Weather Prediction Models in the Northern Hemisphere and Northern Europe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Snow cover has a strong effect on the surface and lower atmosphere in NWP models. Because the progress of in situ observations has stalled, satellite-based snow analyses are becoming increasingly important. Currently, there exist several products ...

Otto Hyvärinen; Kalle Eerola; Niilo Siljamo; Jarkko Koskinen

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Diabatic wind speed profiles in coastal regions: Comparison of an internal boundary layer (IBL) model with observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A model is presented to transform wind speed observations at a single height over sea ... of 100 m). Only moderate and strong winds from the sea are considered, which are particularly important for wind energy ap...

A. C. M. Beljaars; A. A. M. Holtslag; W. C. Turkenburg

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Volume Comparison  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Volume Comparison Volume Comparison Data for October 2013 | Release Date: January 7, 2014 | Complete XLS File Beginning with data for August 2010, natural gas consumption for the residential and commercial sectors was derived from the total system sendout reported by local distribution companies on Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries." The new methodology was designed to yield estimates that more closely reflect calendar month consumption patterns. Total system sendout is the sum of all volumes dispatched into the service territory during the report month, less any storage injections and deliveries to points outside the service territory. Previously, residential and commercial consumption estimates were based solely on reported sector

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Scientific programming in Fortran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Fortran programming language was designed by John Backus and his colleagues at IBM to reduce the cost of programming scientific applications. IBM delivered the first compiler for its model 704 in 1957. IBM's competitors soon offered incompatible ...

W. Van Snyder

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Shliomis model-based magnetic squeeze film in rotating rough curved circular plates: a comparison of two different porous structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study aims to analyse the effect of different porous structures on the performance of a Shliomis model-based magnetic squeeze film in rotating rough porous curved circular plates. For porous structures Kozeny-Carman's formulation and Irmay's model have been adopted. A Shliomis model-based magnetic fluid flow is considered. The stochastically averaging models of Christensen and Tonder have been used for characterising the effect of transverse roughness. The associated stochastically averaged Reynolds type equation is solved to obtain the pressure distribution leading to the calculation of the load carrying capacity. The results presented in graphical form show that the adverse effect of transverse roughness can be compensated by the positive effect of magnetisation in the case of negatively skewed roughness, suitably choosing the rotation ratio and the curvature parameters. Further, this compensation appears to be more in the case of Kozeny-Carman's formulation as compared to that of Irmay's model, which makes the Kozeny-Carman's model a superior choice.

Jimit R. Patel; Gunamani Deheri

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

A Comparison of Single- and Multi-parameter Wave Criteria for Accessing Wind Turbines in Strategic Maintenance and Logistics Models for Offshore Wind Farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Different vessel types for transferring technicians for maintenance and inspection of offshore wind farms are often evaluated and compared by their limiting significant wave height for accessing the wind turbines. The limiting significant wave height is also the parameter that is often used as the access criteria in strategic decision support tools for maintenance and logistics for offshore wind farms. In practice, however, other wave parameters, such as the peak wave period and wave heading, have major influence on the accessibility to a wind turbine for a given vessel. We compare the use of single-parameter and multi-parameter wave criteria for access to wind turbines in two strategic maintenance and logistics models for offshore wind farms: one simulation model and one optimization model. Multi-parameter wave criteria in the form of limiting significant wave heights as functions of peak wave period and wave heading are obtained by numerical analysis of the vessel docking operation. Results for availability, operation and maintenance costs and the optimal vessel fleet size and mix are found using both these multi-parameter wave criteria and using a corresponding single-parameter limiting significant wave height. The comparison indicates that the use of a single limiting significant wave height can give similar results as when using more complex multi-parameter wave criteria. An important precondition is that the single limiting significant wave height is carefully chosen to represent the vessel and the wave conditions.

Iver Bakken Sperstad; Elin E. Halvorsen-Weare; Matthias Hofmann; Lars Magne Nonås; Magnus Stålhane; MingKang Wu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Facilities, testing program and modeling needs for studying liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic flows in fusion blankets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Since many years, liquid metal flows for applications in fusion blankets have been investigated worldwide. A review is given about modeling requirements and existing experimental facilities for investigations of liquid metal related issues in blankets with the focus on magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Most of the performed theoretical and experimental works were dedicated to fundamental aspects of MHD flows under very strong magnetic fields as they may occur in generic elements of fusion blankets like pipes, ducts, bends, expansions and contractions. Those experiments are required to progressively validate numerical tools with the purpose of obtaining codes capable to predict MHD flows at fusion relevant parameters in complex blanket geometries, taking into account electrical and thermal coupling between fluid and structural materials. Scaled mock-up experiments support the theoretical activities and help deriving engineering correlations for cases which cannot be calculated with required accuracy up to now.

L. Bühler; C. Mistrangelo; J. Konys; R. Bhattacharyay; Q. Huang; D. Obukhov; S. Smolentsev; M. Utili

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Kinetic modeling of pressure-assisted solvent extraction of polyphenols from green tea in comparison with the conventional extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the study, the kinetics of pressure-assisted solvent extraction (PSE) of polyphenols from green tea at different pressures (300, 400, 500 MPa) was studied. The model derived from Patricelli, which describes the two step extraction consisting of rapid washing followed by slow diffusion, had been applied to estimate the extraction kinetics. The model parameters were calculated using the experimental results obtained from PSE and conventional solvent extraction (CSE). The results showed a good prediction of Patricelli’s model for extraction kinetics in all experiments (R2 ? 0.996), which gave the possibility for estimation of the extraction rate and extent of PSE. The results also showed that the extraction by washing was more efficient with PSE than CSE. In addition, the initial extraction rate of the PSE was always much larger than that of the CSE. Therefore, PSE was more effective for extracting the green tea polyphenols than the CSE.

Jun Xi; Lang He; Lianggong Yan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Comparison of 1D and 2D CSR Models with Application to the FERMI@ELETTRA Bunch Compressors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We compare our 2D mean field (Vlasov-Maxwell) treatment of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effects with 1D approximations of the CSR force which are commonly implemented in CSR codes. In our model we track particles in 4D phase space and calculate 2D forces [1]. The major cost in our calculation is the computation of the 2D force. To speed up the computation and improve 1D models we also investigate approximations to our exact 2D force. As an application, we present numerical results for the Fermi{at}Elettra first bunch compressor with the configuration described in [1].

Bassi, G.; Ellison, J.A.; Heinemann, K.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

407

Physical Modeling of the Motions of a Container Ship Moored to a Dock with Comparison to Numerical Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ship moored to a dock, a 1:50 scale model is moored to two types of dock, solid wall dock and pile supported dock. Irregular waves of TMA spectrum with various periods, heights, and directions are generated in the wave basin to induce the motions...

Zhi, Yuanzhe

2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

408

Modeling the barotropic response of the global ocean to atmospheric wind and pressure forcing -comparisons with observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-G. Model outputs are compared to in situ observations with tide gauge data (TG) and bottom pressure gauge data (BPR), and also with T/P altimetric cross over points (noted CO). Intercomparisons were performed/P and Jason altimeters deliver very accurate data sets (within 2 centimeter global error for T/P). How- ever

409

A process-oriented model for efficient execution of dataflow programs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dividing computation into subtasks that can be executed on separate processing elements is a very difficult task. Dataflow systems represent an extreme case where each machine instruction is an independent subcomputation. As a consequence, the execution overhead is very high. In this paper, we present an execution model for dataflow where the unit of computation is not a single instruction. Rather, the dataflow graph is divided into paths according to their data dependencies. Each path is then treated as a very simple process: it is loaded into memory; it switches between ready, running, and block states; and it communicates with other such processes through messages. The main advantage of the proposed approach over conventional approaches to parallelism is that there is a mechanical way of creating subcomputations that can be executed in parallel. At the same time, this approach does not suffer from the inefficiencies inherent to purely dataflow systems. Instead, it permits the granularity of processes to be adjusted to achieve a balance between the amount of parallelism that can usefully be exploited and the amount of sequential execution that can be handled effectively within one process.

Lubomir Bic

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Low abundances of heavy elements in the solar outer layers: comparisons of solar models with helioseismic inversions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent solar photospheric abundance analyses have led to a significant reduction of the metal abundances compared to the previous determinations. The solar models computed with standard opacities and diffusion processes using these new abundances give poor agreement with helioseismic inversions for the sound-speed profile, the surface helium abundance, and the convective zone depth. We attempt to obtain a good agreement between helioseismic inversions and solar models which present the "old" mixture in the interior and new chemical composition in the convective zone. To reach this result, we assume an undermetallic accretion at the beginning of the main sequence. We compute solar models with the Toulouse-Geneva Evolution Code, in which we simulate an undermetallic accretion in the early stages of the main sequence, in order to obtain new mixture in the outer convective zone. We compare the sound-speed profile, the convective zone depth, and the surface helium abundance with those deduced from helioseismology. The model with accretion but without any mixing process inside is in better agreement with helioseismology than the solar model with the new abundances throughout. There is, however, a spike under the convective zone which reaches 3.4%. Furthermore, the convective zone depth and the surface helium abundance are too low. Introducing undershooting below the convective zone allows us to recover the good convective zone radius and the addition of rotation-induced mixing and tachocline allows us to reconcile the surface helium abundance. But in any case the agreement of the sound-speed profile with helioseismic inference is worse than obtained with the old abundances.

M. Castro; S. Vauclair; O. Richard

2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

411

Well-to-wheel Energy Consumption and Pollutant Emissions Comparison between Electric and Non-electric Vehicles: a Modeling Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although electric vehicles (EVs) gain more and more popularity these years, the issue on whether they are really more environmentally and ecologically sound than non-electric vehicles, e.g. gasoline and diesel fuel burned internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles has become a heat-debated one. This paper outlines an assessment model which intends to compare well-to-wheel energy consumption and pollutant emissions between \\{EVs\\} and non-electric ones, using Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) technique based on the potential environmental and ecological impact. The modeling in this case predicted that from the perspective of total energy consumption and pollution, further improvements are still necessary for the feasibility and widespread use of EVs.

Z.J. Li; X.L. Chen; M. Ding

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Performance model and annual yield comparison of parabolic-trough solar thermal power plants with either nitrogen or synthetic oil as heat transfer fluid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The majority of commercial parabolic-trough plants in the world operate with synthetic oil as heat transfer fluid in the solar field. However, the synthetic oils that are available at affordable cost present some challenges such as their flammability, environmental toxicity and a temperature limitation of around 400 °C. As alternative, this work proposes the use of pressurized nitrogen as heat transfer fluid. In order to analyze the feasibility of this technology, a comparison between a plant with nitrogen and a conventional plant with synthetic oil has been carried out. In both cases, 50 MWe parabolic-trough plants with 6 h of thermal storage are used as reference. A performance model including the solar field, the thermal storage system and the power block has been developed for each plant in the TRNSYS simulation software. This paper also describes the specifications, design and sizing of the solar field and explains the basic operation strategy applied in each model. Both annual simulations have been performed considering the same location, Almería (Spain), and meteorological data. In summary, the results show that similar net annual electricity productions can be attained for parabolic-trough plants with the same collection area using either nitrogen or synthetic oil as heat transfer fluid.

Mario Biencinto; Lourdes González; Eduardo Zarza; Luis E. Díez; Javier Muñoz-Antón

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison against 6th Power Plan (Update cyclically Roadmap with a strong linkage to utility programs Scan for Technologies 1. How does it address the NW Data Clearinghouse BPA/RTF NEEA/Regional Programs Group Update Regional EE Technology Roadmap Lighting

414

The Effects of Parceling on Testing Group Differences in Second-Order CFA Models: A Comparison between Multi-Group CFA and MIMIC Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using multi-group confirmatory factor analysis (MCFA) and multiple-indicator-multiple-cause (MIMIC) to investigate group difference in the context of the second-order factor model with either the unparceled or parceled data had never been thoroughly...

Zou, Yuanyuan

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

415

TOWARDS A POWER EFFICIENT PROGRAMMING MODEL FOR AD HOC In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a distributed operating system for ad hoc net-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 TOWARDS A POWER EFFICIENT PROGRAMMING MODEL FOR AD HOC NETWORKS Abstract In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a distributed operating system for ad hoc net- works. The goal of our system is to extend total system lifetime for ad hoc networking applications through power

Sirer, Emin Gun

416

A physically-based heat pump model was connected to an optimization program to form a computer code for use in the design of high-efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;ABSTRACT A physically-based heat pump model was connected to an optimization program to form a computer code for use in the design of high-efficiency heat pumps. The method used allows efficiency of conventional heat pumps, ten variables were optimized while heating capacity was fixed

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

417

The development of a laser safety program for a large academic research institution using Texas A&M University as a model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a model for developing a laser safety program for a large academic research institution. It is based on the standards and requirements of the 1993 American National Standards Institute document Z136.1, The Safe Use of Lasers...

Johnson, Douglas Allen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

418

Automatic Thread Distribution For Nested Parallelism In OpenMP OpenMP is becoming the standard programming model for sharedmemory parallel architectures. One of its most inter-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automatic Thread Distribution For Nested Parallelism In OpenMP Abstract OpenMP is becoming in the language is the support for nested parallelism. Previous research and parallelization experiences have shown the benefits of using nested parallelism as an alternative to combining several programming models

Corbalan, Julita

419

Comparison of Measurement And Modeling Of Current Profile Changes Due To Neutral Bean Ion Redistribution During TAE Avalanches in NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brief "avalanches" of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs) are observed in NSTX plasmas with several different n numbers simultaneously present. These affect the neutral beam ion distribution as evidenced by a concurrent drop in the neutron rate and, sometimes, beam ion loss. Guiding center orbit modeling has shown that the modes can transiently render portions of the beam ion phase space stochastic. The resulting redistribution of beam ions can also create a broader beam-driven current profile and produce other changes in the beam ion distribution function

Darrow, Douglas

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

420

Using precision gravity data in geothermal reservoir engineering modeling studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Precision gravity measurements taken at various times over a geothermal field can be used to derive information about influx into the reservoir. Output from a reservoir simulation program can be used to compute surface gravity fields and time histories. Comparison of such computer results with field-measured gravity data can add confidence to simulation models, and provide insight into reservoir processes. Such a comparison is made for the Bulalo field in the Philippines.

Atkinson, Paul G.; Pederseen, Jens R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Report for the ASC CSSE L2 Milestone (4873) - Demonstration of Local Failure Local Recovery Resilient Programming Model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recovery from process loss during the execution of a distributed memory parallel application is presently achieved by restarting the program, typically from a checkpoint file. Future computer system trends indicate that the size of data to checkpoint, the lack of improvement in parallel file system performance and the increase in process failure rates will lead to situations where checkpoint restart becomes infeasible. In this report we describe and prototype the use of a new application level resilient computing model that manages persistent storage of local state for each process such that, if a process fails, recovery can be performed locally without requiring access to a global checkpoint file. LFLR provides application developers with an ability to recover locally and continue application execution when a process is lost. This report discusses what features are required from the hardware, OS and runtime layers, and what approaches application developers might use in the design of future codes, including a demonstration of LFLR-enabled MiniFE code from the Matenvo mini-application suite.

Heroux, Michael A.; Teranishi, Keita [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Comparison of unsaturated flow and solute transport through waste rock at two experimental scales using temporal moments and numerical modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study analyzed and compared unsaturated flow response and tracer breakthrough curves from a 10-m high constructed pile experiment (CPE) in the field (Antamina, Peru) and two 0.8 m high laboratory-based columns. Similar materials were used at both experimental scales, with the exception of a narrower grain size distribution range for the smaller column tests. Observed results indicate flow and solute transport regimes between experimental scales were comparable, dominated by flow and solute migration through granular matrix materials. These results are supported by: analogous breakthrough curves (normalized to cross-sectional area and flow path length) that suggest observation- or smaller- scale heterogeneities within the porous media have been homogenized or smoothed at the transport-scale, long breakthrough tails, and similar recovered tracer mass fractions (i.e., 0.72 – 0.80) at the end of the experiment. CPE breakthrough curves do indicate a portion of the fluid flow follows rapid flow paths (open void or film flow); however, this portion accounts for a minor (i.e., ~ 0.1%) component of the overall flow and transport regime. Flow-corrected temporal moment analysis was used to estimate flow and transport parameter values, however large temporal variations in flow indicate this method is better suited for conceptualizing transport regimes. In addition, a dual-porosity mobile-immobile (MIM), rate-limited mass-transfer approach was able to simulate tracer breakthrough and the dominant transport regimes from both scales. Dispersivity values used in model simulations reflect a scale-dependency, whereby column values were approximately 2x smaller than those values applied in CPE simulations. The mass-transfer coefficient, for solute transport between mobile and immobile regions, was considered as a model calibration factor. Column experiments are characterized by a larger ‘mobile to immobile’ porosity ratio and a shorter experimental duration and flow path, which supports larger mass-transfer coefficient values (relative to the CPE). These results demonstrate that laboratory-based experiments may be able to mimic flow regimes observed in the field; however, the requirement of scale-dependent dispersivities and in particular mass-transfer coefficients indicates these tests may be more limited in understanding larger-scale solute transport between regions of different mobility. Nevertheless, the results of this study suggest that the reasonably simplistic modeling approaches utilized in this study may be applied at other field sites to estimate parameters and conceptualize dominant transport processes through highly heterogeneous, unsaturated material.

Sharon Blackmore; Leslie Smith; K. Ulrich Mayer; Roger D. Beckie

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Comparison of detection threshold measurements and modeling for approaching electric cars and conventional cars presented in traffic and pink noise  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigates the difference in audibility of an approaching conventional car with internal combustion engine and an electric car at various velocities. The goal was to compare the risk that pedestrians do not hear the approaching car in time. Binaural recordings of each of these approaching cars were presented together with either a traffic noise masker or a pink noise masker. In the first detection experiment the threshold level was determined for which the cars could just be detected. In a second reaction time experiment the moment was determined at which the approaching car was first detectable. This measured reaction time should give an indication about how much time a person has to evade an impending collision. Results indicated that slowly approaching electric cars where less audible than cars with a conventional engine. The results also showed that the decrement of reaction times as a function of SNR was halved when pink noise was used instead of traffic noise. A psycho-acoustic masking model [Dau et al. J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 99 3615–3622 (1996)] was applied to predict detection thresholds and showed good correspondence with the subjective data.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Comparison of detection threshold measurements and modeling for approaching electric cars and conventional cars presented in traffic and pink noise  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigates the difference in audibility of an approaching conventional car with internal combustion engine and an electric car at various velocities. The goal was to compare the risk that pedestrians do not hear the approaching car in time. Binaural recordings of each of these approaching cars were presented together with either a traffic noise masker or a pink noise masker. In the first detection experiment the threshold level was determined for which the cars could just be detected. In a second reaction time experiment the moment was determined at which the approaching car was first detectable. This measured reaction time should give an indication about how much time a person has to evade an impending collision. Results indicated that slowly approaching electric cars where less audible than cars with a conventional engine. The results also showed that the decrement of reaction times as a function of SNR was halved when pink noise was used instead of traffic noise. A psycho-acoustic masking model [Dau et. al. (1996) J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 99 3615 - 3622] was applied to predict detection thresholds and showed good correspondence with the subjective data.

Julian Grosse; Reinhard Weber; Steven Van de Par

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Comparison of Experimental and Model Data for the Evaporation of a Synthetic Topopah Spring Tuff Pore Water, Yucca Mountain, NV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evaporation of a range of synthetic pore water solutions representative of the potential high-level-nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, NV is being investigated. The motivation of this work is to understand and predict the range of brine compositions that may contact the waste containers from evaporation of pore waters, because these brines could form corrosive thin films on the containers and impact their long-term integrity. A relatively complex synthetic Topopah Spring Tuff pore water was progressively concentrated by evaporation in a closed vessel, heated to 95 C in a series of sequential experiments. Periodic samples of the evaporating solution were taken to determine the evolving water chemistry. According to chemical divide theory at 25 C and 95 C our starting solution should evolve towards a high pH carbonate brine. Results at 95 C show that this solution evolves towards a complex brine that contains about 99 mol% Na{sup +} for the cations, and 71 mol% Cl{sup -}, 18 mol% {Sigma}CO{sub 2}(aq), 9 mol% SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} for the anions. Initial modeling of the evaporating solution indicates precipitation of aragonite, halite, silica, sulfate and fluoride phases. The experiments have been used to benchmark the use of the EQ3/6 geochemical code in predicting the evolution of carbonate-rich brines during evaporation.

Alai, M; Sutton, M; Carroll, S

2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

426

Combined cycle power plants: A comparison between two different dynamic models to evaluate transient behaviour and residual life  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The deregulated energy market and the increasing quota of electrical capacity covered by non-predictable renewable sources require strongly irregular and discontinuous operation of thermoelectric plants to satisfy users demand and compensate the variability of renewable sources. As a consequence, due to thermo-mechanical fatigue, creep and corrosion, a lifetime reduction of the most critical components occurs. The availability of a procedure able to predict the residual life of plant devices is necessary to assist the management decisions about power plants’ operation and maintenance scheduling. The first step of this procedure is the capability of simulating the plant behaviour versus time by evaluating the trends of the main thermodynamic parameters that describe the plant operation during different transient periods. In this context, the main contribution of the present paper is to propose a complete procedure able to simulate the plant dynamic behaviour and estimate the residual life reduction of some components. Indeed, two different models, developed by two different research groups, of the same single pressure heat recovery steam generator unit are presented and utilized to characterize the dynamic behaviour of the above mentioned power plant. The main thermodynamic variables during different transient operation conditions are predicted and good correspondence between the two methods is obtained. It can be also noted that, when the geometry and size of the devices are considered, the thermal inertia related to heat exchangers tubes, pipes and other physical masses causes a delay in the system response. Moreover, a residual life estimation of the most stressed component is presented.

Alberto Benato; Anna Stoppato; Stefano Bracco

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-169: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS --Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing (08/11/04)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-169) Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-169) Mickey Carter Fish and Wildlife Project Manager - KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing Project No: 1994-017-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities, 2.15 Acquisition of Sensitive Riparian Resources, 6.10 Access Fencing Location: Lemhi County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Custer Soil and Water Conservation District Description of the Proposed Action: The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the installation of a fenced stream crossing over the Pahsimeroi River to enhance a livestock riparian exclosure.

429

Community Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Programs Friends of Berkeley Lab Navigate Section Community Richmond Bay Campus Planning Tours Community Programs Friends of Berkeley Lab Community Education Programs...

430

An optimization model for regional micro-grid system management based on hybrid inexact stochastic-fuzzy chance-constrained programming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Micro-grid system management considering air pollutant control and carbon dioxide (CO2) mitigation is a challenging task, since many system parameters such as electric demand, resource availability, system cost as well as their interrelationships may appear uncertain. To reflect these uncertainties, effective inexact system-analysis methods are desired. In this study, a hybrid inexact stochastic-fuzzy chance-constrained programming (ITSFCCP) was developed for micro-grid system planning, and interval-parameter programming (IPP), two-stage stochastic programming (TSP) and fuzzy credibility constrained programming (FCCP) methods were integrated into a general framework to manage pollutants and CO2 emissions under uncertainties presented as interval values, fuzzy possibilistic and stochastic probabilities. Moreover, FCCP allowed satisfaction of system constraints at specified confidence level, leading to model solutions with the lowest system cost under acceptable risk magnitudes. The developed model was applied to a case of micro-grid system over a 24-h optimization horizon with a real time and dynamic air pollutant control, and total amount control for CO2 emission. Optimal generation dispatch strategies were derived under different assumptions for risk preferences and emission reduction goals. The obtained results indicated that stable intervals for the objective function and decision variables could be generated, which were useful for helping decision makers identify the desired electric power generation patterns, and CO2 emission reduction under complex uncertainties, and gain in-depth insights into the trade-offs between system economy and reliability.

L. Ji; D.X. Niu; M. Xu; G.H. Huang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

A model-data intercomparison of CO2 exchange across North America: Results from the North American Carbon Program Site Synthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our current understanding of terrestrial carbon processes is represented in various models used to integrate and scale measurements of CO{sub 2} exchange from remote sensing and other spatiotemporal data. Yet assessments are rarely conducted to determine how well models simulate carbon processes across vegetation types and environmental conditions. Using standardized data from the North American Carbon Program we compare observed and simulated monthly CO{sub 2} exchange from 44 eddy covariance flux towers in North America and 22 terrestrial biosphere models. The analysis period spans {approx}220 site-years, 10 biomes, and includes two large-scale drought events, providing a natural experiment to evaluate model skill as a function of drought and seasonality. We evaluate models' ability to simulate the seasonal cycle of CO{sub 2} exchange using multiple model skill metrics and analyze links between model characteristics, site history, and model skill. Overall model performance was poor; the difference between observations and simulations was {approx}10 times observational uncertainty, with forested ecosystems better predicted than nonforested. Model-data agreement was highest in summer and in temperate evergreen forests. In contrast, model performance declined in spring and fall, especially in ecosystems with large deciduous components, and in dry periods during the growing season. Models used across multiple biomes and sites, the mean model ensemble, and a model using assimilated parameter values showed high consistency with observations. Models with the highest skill across all biomes all used prescribed canopy phenology, calculated NEE as the difference between GPP and ecosystem respiration, and did not use a daily time step.

Schwalm, C.R.; Williams, C.A.; Schaefer, K.; Anderson, R.; Arain, M.A.; Baker, I.; Black, T.A.; Chen, G.; Ciais, P.; Davis, K. J.; Desai, A. R.; Dietze, M.; Dragoni, D.; Fischer, M.L.; Flanagan, L.B.; Grant, R.F.; Gu, L.; Hollinger, D.; Izaurralde, R.C.; Kucharik, C.; Lafleur, P.M.; Law, B.E.; Li, L.; Li, Z.; Liu, S.; Lokupitiya, E.; Luo, Y.; Ma, S.; Margolis, H.; Matamala, R.; McCaughey, H.; Monson, R. K.; Oechel, W. C.; Peng, C.; Poulter, B.; Price, D.T.; Riciutto, D.M.; Riley, W.J.; Sahoo, A.K.; Sprintsin, M.; Sun, J.; Tian, H.; Tonitto, C.; Verbeeck, H.; Verma, S.B.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Student Internship Programs Program Description  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Student Internship Programs Program Description The objective of the Laboratory's student internship programs is to provide students with opportunities for meaningful hands- on...

433

Numerical Simulation of the Irish Wind Climate and Comparison with Wind  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Numerical Simulation of the Irish Wind Climate and Comparison with Wind Numerical Simulation of the Irish Wind Climate and Comparison with Wind Atlas Data Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): The wind climate of Ireland has been calculated using the Karlsruhe Atmospheric Mesoscale Model KAMM using the statistical-dynamical method. The large-scale climatology is represented by 65 classes of geostropic wind. From the frequency of the classes and the simulations the climatology of the surface wind is determined. The simulated winds are processed similar to observed data to obtain LIB-files for the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program WAsP. Comparisons are made with mast observations which have been analyzed by WAsP. Sites with high wind power potential are well predicted. Stations with low power are over predicted. (Purpose): Article describing an example of a KAMM

434

Stochastic Dynamic Programming and Stochastic Fluid-Flow Models in the Design and Analysis of Web-Server Farms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Web-server farm is a specialized facility designed specifically for housing Web servers catering to one or more Internet facing Web sites. In this dissertation, stochastic dynamic programming technique is used to obtain the optimal admission...

Goel, Piyush

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

435

Model program for the control and eradication of pullorum-typhoid infection from breeding/multiplier flocks in selected areas in Brazil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODEL PROGRAM FOR THE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF PULLORUM-TYPHOID INFECTION FROM BREEDING/MULTIPLIER FLOCKS IN SELECTED AREAS IN BRAZIL A Thesis by VICTOR EMMANOEL VIEIRA SARAIVA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University... IN BRAZIL A Thesis by VICTOR EMMANOEL VIEIRA SARAIVA Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of the Committee) /4 P Dr. Leon H. Russell (Member) Le nd C. Grumbles (Member) Dr. James E. Grimes (Member) Dr. Norman D. Heidelbau (Head...

Saraiva, Victor Emmanoel Vieira

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

436

Comparisons of gyrofluid and gyrokinetic simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gyrokinetic and gyrofluid models show the most promise for large scale simulations of tokamak microturbulence. This paper discusses detailed comparisons of these two complementary approaches. Past comparisons with linear theory have been fairly good, therefore the emphasis here is on nonlinear comparisons. Simulations include simple two dimensional slab test cases, turbulent three dimensional slab cases, and toroidal cases, each modeling the nonlinear evolution of the ion temperature gradient instability. There is good agreement in both turbulent and coherent nonlinear slab comparisons in terms of the ion heat flux, both in magnitude and scaling with magnetic shear. However, the nonlinear saturation level for {vert_bar}{Phi}{vert_bar} in the slab comparisons show differences of approximately 40%. Preliminary toroidal comparisons show agreement within 50%, in terms of ion heat flux and saturation level.

Parker, S.E.; Dorland, W.; Santoro, R.A.; Beer, M.A.; Liu, Q.P.; Lee, W.W.; Hammett, G.W.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

EERE Program Management Guide - Appendix G | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

G EERE Program Management Guide - Appendix G Appendix G is a model position description for EERE program managers. pmguideappendixg.pdf More Documents & Publications EERE Program...

438

Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.eformativeoptions.com/distributed-wind-policy-comparison-tool-news Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/distributed-wind-policy-comparison-to Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Financial Incentives,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation Regulations: Feed-in Tariffs This Web-based tool allows users to identify policies that have had the most (and least) impact on improving the bottom line economics of wind

439

Integration of a sludge deposition model into the ATHOS3 computer program and application to a sample U-tube steam generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study pursues a approach to sludge deposition prediction, similar to that published by Keefer, et al.. Starting with the same basic model as Beal and Chen, Keefer, et al. made several simplifying assumptions so that a closed form solution to the equations describing deposition and reentrainment could be obtained. Using a similar approach, this study shows how the physics of the sludge model can be integrated directly into a steady-state thermal-hydraulic analysis computer program such as ATHOS3 to provide an estimate of the relative amounts of sludge expected to accumulate in various regions of a steam generator. This allows sludge deposition and reentrainment rates (i.e. rate coefficients) to be calculated at every node used to model the steam generator (which can be many thousands), so that sludge deposition patterns can readily be examined along with thermal-hydraulic parameters.

Keeton, L.W.; Keefer, R.H.; Clark, P.R.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Comparison between Gaussian-type orbitals and plane wave ab initio density functional theory modeling of layer silicates: Talc [Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 4}O{sub 10}(OH){sub 2}] as model system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quantum chemical characterization of solid state systems is conducted with many different approaches, among which the adoption of periodic boundary conditions to deal with three-dimensional infinite condensed systems. This method, coupled to the Density Functional Theory (DFT), has been proved successful in simulating a huge variety of solids. Only in relatively recent years this ab initio quantum-mechanic approach has been used for the investigation of layer silicate structures and minerals. In the present work, a systematic comparison of different DFT functionals (GGA-PBEsol and hybrid B3LYP) and basis sets (plane waves and all-electron Gaussian-type orbitals) on the geometry, energy, and phonon properties of a model layer silicate, talc [Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 4}O{sub 10}(OH){sub 2}], is presented. Long range dispersion is taken into account by DFT+D method. Results are in agreement with experimental data reported in literature, with minimal deviation given by the GTO/B3LYP-D* method regarding both axial lattice parameters and interaction energy and by PW/PBE-D for the unit-cell volume and angular values. All the considered methods adequately describe the experimental talc infrared spectrum.

Ulian, Gianfranco; Valdrè, Giovanni, E-mail: giovanni.valdre@unibo.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Biologiche e Geologico-Ambientali, Centro di Ricerca Interdisciplinare di Biomineralogia, Cristallografia e Biomateriali, Università di Bologna “Alma Mater Studiorum” Piazza di Porta San Donato 1, 40126 Bologna (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Scienze Biologiche e Geologico-Ambientali, Centro di Ricerca Interdisciplinare di Biomineralogia, Cristallografia e Biomateriali, Università di Bologna “Alma Mater Studiorum” Piazza di Porta San Donato 1, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Tosoni, Sergio [Departament de Química Física and Institut de Química Teòrica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)] [Departament de Química Física and Institut de Química Teòrica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Fluid Volumes: The Program “FLUIDS”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter describes the program FLUIDS. The mathematical model underlying this program contains over 200 variables and describes control mechanisms of body fluid volumes and electrolytes as well as respirat...

Fredericus B. M. Min

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Final Report, Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing: Co-Array Fortran, Grant Number DE-FC02-01ER25505  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major accomplishment of this project is the production of CafLib, an 'object-oriented' parallel numerical library written in Co-Array Fortran. CafLib contains distributed objects such as block vectors and block matrices along with procedures, attached to each object, that perform basic linear algebra operations such as matrix multiplication, matrix transpose and LU decomposition. It also contains constructors and destructors for each object that hide the details of data decomposition from the programmer, and it contains collective operations that allow the programmer to calculate global reductions, such as global sums, global minima and global maxima, as well as vector and matrix norms of several kinds. CafLib is designed to be extensible in such a way that programmers can define distributed grid and field objects, based on vector and matrix objects from the library, for finite difference algorithms to solve partial differential equations. A very important extra benefit that resulted from the project is the inclusion of the co-array programming model in the next Fortran standard called Fortran 2008. It is the first parallel programming model ever included as a standard part of the language. Co-arrays will be a supported feature in all Fortran compilers, and the portability provided by standardization will encourage a large number of programmers to adopt it for new parallel application development. The combination of object-oriented programming in Fortran 2003 with co-arrays in Fortran 2008 provides a very powerful programming model for high-performance scientific computing. Additional benefits from the project, beyond the original goal, include a programto provide access to the co-array model through access to the Cray compiler as a resource for teaching and research. Several academics, for the first time, included the co-array model as a topic in their courses on parallel computing. A separate collaborative project with LANL and PNNL showed how to extend the co-array model to other languages in a small experimental version of Co-array Python. Another collaborative project defined a Fortran 95 interface to ARMCI to encourage Fortran programmers to use the one-sided communication model in anticipation of their conversion to the co-array model later. A collaborative project with the Earth Sciences community at NASA Goddard and GFDL experimented with the co-array model within computational kernels related to their climate models, first using CafLib and then extending the co-array model to use design patterns. Future work will build on the design-pattern idea with a redesign of CafLib as a true object-oriented library using Fortran 2003 and as a parallel numerical library using Fortran 2008.

Robert W. Numrich

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

443

Use of Federated Object Modeling to Develop a Macro-System Model for the U.S. Department of Energy's Hydrogen Program; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE is working on changing transportation fuel to hydrogen. To assist in that effort, we are developing a macro-system model that will link existing or developmental component models together.

Ruth, M. F.; Vanderveen, K. B.; Sa, T. J.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Comparison of Production Costs and Resource Use for Organic and Conventional Production Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Comparison of Production Costs and Resource Use for Organic and Conventional Production Systems Karen Klonsky1 The USDA established the National Organic Program (NOP) to develop national standards for organically produced agricultural products and establish an organic certification program

Ferrara, Katherine W.

445

Program Manager  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will participate in a wide spectrum of program and project management activities involving systems engineering and integration support for Defense Programs...

446

Program Managers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Managers Program Managers Enabling remarkable discoveries and tools that transform our understanding of energy and matter and advance national, economic, and energy...

447

Retiree Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Library Services Retiree Program Retiree Program The Research Library offers a 1 year library card to retired LANL employees that allows usage of Library materials. This service...

448

Educational Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Educational Programs Educational Programs A collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) Jacobs School of Engineering...

449

Program Impact Analysis | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Impact Analysis Program Impact Analysis BECP periodically assesses the impacts of its activities by estimating historical and projected energy savings, consumer savings, and avoided emissions. Since the inception of the Program 20 years ago, cumulative full-fuel-cycle (FFC) energy savings from 1992- 2012 are estimated to be approximately 4.8 quads and cost savings to consumers have been more than $44 billion. These savings have resulted primarily from the Program's activities which upgrade the model energy codes, accelerate their adoption by states and localities, and improve code compliance by means of various software tools and other types of training and technical support. The federal budgetary cost of the Program over this same period (1992-2012) was estimated to be around $110 million, resulting in a ratio of more than $400

450

BETO Conversion Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 2A—Conversion Technologies II: Bio-Oils, Sugar Intermediates, Precursors, Distributed Models, and Refinery Co-Processing BETO Conversion Program Bryna Berendzen, Technology Manager, Bioenergy Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy

451

Environmental Programs Environmental Programs Committee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Architecture) The Environmental Programs Committee coordinates courses and curricula on environmental topics. Wiesner (Civil and Environmental Engineering) Gordon G. Wittenberg (Architecture) #12;162 Environmental Programs Environmental Programs Committee Walter Whitfield Isle, Chair (English

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

452

SRS - Programs - Nonproliferation Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3/2012 3/2012 SEARCH GO spacer SRS Home Nonproliferation Programs In the crucial field of nuclear nonproliferation, SRS employee contributions helped to advance all three of the planned plutonium disposition facilities at the Savannah River Site: the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF); Waste Solidification Building (WSB); and the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility. A $345 million project, the WSB will process liquid waste from the MOX facility. After material is processed at the WSB, transuranic waste will be packaged and sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico, and low-level waste will be packaged and sent to onsite or commercial off-site low-level waste disposal facilities. The mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility will be a major component in the United States' program to dispose of excess weapons grade plutonium.

453

Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL, LBNL and SNL for the Used Fuel Disposition Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The report summarizes laboratory and field observations and numerical modeling related to coupledprocesses involving brine and vapor migration in geologic salt, focusing on recent developments and...

454

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. This report, Volume 2, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program SMECC (Substation Maximum Earth Current Computation Program). This program analyzes the electric current distribution among grounded structures inside and outside a substation for different fault conditions. The fault conditions are automatically selected by the program, or they may be specified by the user, or both. The fault condition resulting in maximum substation earth current is identified and reported. Data requirements for this program are: ground impedance, transformer data, transmission line data, transmission line grounding impedances, etc. The program provides four types of standard outputs: (1) a report of voltages and current flow in the unfaulted system, (2) a brief report of the maximum ground potential rise (worst fault condition), (3) a summary report of all fault conditions which have been analyzed by the program, and (4) a detailed report of voltages and current flow for a selected set of fault conditions.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. This report, Volume 3, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program SGSYS (Substation Grounding SYStem Analysis Program). This program analyzes the substation ground field given the total electric current injected into the ground field and the design of the grounding system. Standard outputs of the program are (1) total ground resistance, (2) step voltage, (3) touch voltage, (4) voltages on a grid of points, (5) voltage profile along straight lines, (6) transfer voltages, (7) ground potential rise, (8) body currents, (9) step voltage profile along straight lines, and (10) touch voltage profile along straight lines. This program can be utilized in an interactive or batch mode. In the interactive mode, the user defines the grounding system geometry, soil parameters, and output requests interactively, with the use of a user friendly conversational program. The users manual describes data requirements and data preparation procedures. An appendix provides forms which facilitate data collection procedures. The installation and validation manual describes the computer files which make up the program SGSYS and provides a test case for validation purposes.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Accelerating Energy Savings Performance Contracting Through Model...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Accelerating Energy Savings Performance Contracting Through Model Statewide Programs Accelerating Energy Savings Performance Contracting Through Model Statewide Programs Provides...

457

A two-stage stochastic mixed-integer program modelling and hybrid solution approach to portfolio selection problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was developed by Harry Markowitz firstly in the 1950's. In his work, the PSP was formulated as the mean, in the classic MV model and other models of PSP (Chang, Meade et al. 2000, Kellerer, Mansini et al. 2000, Crama

Qu, Rong

458

Abstract: Comparisons between the BBM equation and a ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparisons between the BBM equation and a Boussinesq system. This project aims to cast light on a Boussinesq system of equations modelling two-way ...

459

IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program Results for CY2009, Appendix 2: ITP Emerging Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

127 DOE Industrial Technologies Program 127 DOE Industrial Technologies Program Appendix 2: ITP Emerging Technologies Aluminum ............................................................................................................................................................................ 130 u Direct Chill Casting Model ................................................................................................................................................................130 Chemicals............................................................................................................................................................................ 130

460

Transmission Line Structure Spotting and Optimization within a Defined Transmission Line Routing Centerline Using Non-Linear Programming Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and optimize structure heights for overhead transmission lines. The modeling tool will address common problems in determining overhead transmission line structure heights and locations. Some of the common problems consist of structure locations often having...

Cockrum, Joshua W.

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. It can be used to compute transient ground potential rise due to lightning or switching, and the ground impedance (i.e. resistance and reactance) at specified frequencies. This report, Volume 4, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program TGRND (Transient GRouNDing System Analysis Program). This program computes transient ground potential rise resulting from lightning, switching, or other transient electric currents injected to a grounding system. The program also computes the impedance (i.e. resistance and reactance) of a grounding system as a function of frequency. This program can be utilized in an interactive or batch mode. The users manual describes data requirements and data preparation procedures. The installation and validation manual describes the computer files which make up the program TGRND and provides a test case for validation purposes.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Wheat Improvement Programs WHEAT PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Royalty revenues, which assist funding of programs and attracting/retaining top scientists, have increased

463

Chemical Hydride Rate Modeling, Validation, and System Demonstration - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Troy A. Semelsberger (Primary Contact), Biswajit Paik, Tessui Nakagawa, Ben Davis, and Jose I. Tafoya Los Alamos National Laboratory MS J579, P.O. Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM 87545 Phone: (505) 665-4766 Email: troy@lanl.gov DOE Managers HQ: Ned Stetson Phone: (202) 586-9995 Email: Ned.Stetson@ee.doe.gov GO: Jesse Adams Phone: (720) 356-1421 Email: Jesse.Adams@go.doe.gov Project Start Date: February 2009 Project End Date: February 2014 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Investigate reaction characteristics of various fluid-phase * ammonia-borane (AB)-ionic liquid (IL) compositions Identify and quantify hydrogen impurities and develop *

464

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459 heat sweep model for estimating energy recovery from fractured geothermal reservoirs based on earlySTANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary

Stanford University

465

State-level evaluations of the Weatherization Assistance Program in 1990-1996: a metaevaluation that estimates national savings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Weatherization Assistance Program is one of the largest energy conservation programs in the nation. To obtain an updated estimate of national Program savings, an approach of metaevaluation was selected, which involved locating, assembling, and summarizing the results of all state-level evaluations of the Program that have become available since 1990. All of the savings estimates that are presented in this report are for dwellings that heat primarily with natural gas.This review of the state-level evaluations conducted since 1990 concluded that Program performance has improved significantly in the last seven years. The finding that savings are increasing are supported by a literature review, within-state comparisons of savings over time, and regression modeling results.

Berry, L.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Educational Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Programs Programs Argonne National Laboratory Educational Programs Search Argonne ... Search Argonne Home > Educational Programs > Welcome Type of Appointments Postdoctoral Newsletters Postdoctoral Office Activities Postdoctoral Programs Alumni Postdoctoral Society of Argonne Newcomers Assistance Office Postdoctoral Resources Postdoctoral Mentoring Program Contact Us Schedule of Career Development Seminars Organized by the Postdoctoral Office for 2011 Here is a schedule of all of our Career Development Seminars and Workshops! Normally, the events happen at lunchtime and food is provided. The topics of these events include: Journal Clubs Career Development Networking We welcome all of our Postdocs and colleagues to and join us! Wednesday January 19 Postdoc Journal Club and pizza lunch. Magnetic Domain-Wall Racetrack Memory

467

Comparison between Observed and Model Simulated Atmospheric Circulation Patterns Associated with Extreme Temperature Days over North America using CMIP5 Historical Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Circulation patterns associated with extreme temperature days over North America as simulated by a suite of climate models are compared with those obtained from observations. Seventeen coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models ...

Paul C. Loikith; Anthony J. Broccoli

468

Comparison of the ANP model with the data for neutrino induced single pion production from the MiniBooNE and MINER$?$A experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present theoretical predictions in the framework of the ANP model for single pion production ($\\pi^+, \\pi^0$) in $\

J. -Y. Yu; E. A. Paschos; I. Schienbein

2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

469

Comparison of the ANP model with the data for neutrino induced single pion production from the MiniBooNE and MINER$\  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present theoretical predictions in the framework of the ANP model for single pion production ($\\pi^+, \\pi^0$) in $\

Yu, J -Y; Schienbein, I

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

programs in climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) project develops and maintains advanced numerical models of the ocean, sea ice, and ice sheets for use in global climate change

471

international programs  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

9%2A en International Programs http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsemergencyoperationscounterterrorisminternationalprograms

472

The Oil Security Metrics Model: A Tool for Evaluating the Prospective Oil Security Benefits of DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy R&D Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

505 505 The Oil Security Metrics Model: A Tool for Evaluating the Prospective Oil Security Benefits of DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy R&D Programs May 2006 David L. Greene Corporate Fellow Paul N. Leiby Senior Research Staff DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone: 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD: 703-487-4639 Fax: 703-605-6900 E-mail: info@ntis.fedworld.gov

473

Computational Energy Sciences Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computational EnErgy SCiEnCES program Computational EnErgy SCiEnCES program Description Led by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Advanced Research (AR) Computational Energy Sciences (CES) Program provides high-performance computational modeling and simulation resources to the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and other programs of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These resources are dedicated to speeding development and reducing costs associated with advanced power system design and performance modeling. CES research is focused on developing a set of complex but flexible computational tools that allow more rapid and efficient scale-up of new subsystems, devices, and components, thereby reducing the need for large and expensive demonstration-scale testing of integrated energy systems,

474

A Generate-Test-Aggregate parallel programming library for systematic parallel programming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Generate-Test-Aggregate (GTA for short) algorithm is modeled following a simple and straightforward programming pattern, for combinatorial problems. First, generate all candidates; second, test and filter out invalid ones; finally, aggregate valid ... Keywords: Functional programming, Generate-Test-Aggregate algorithm, High-level parallel programming, MapReduce, Program calculation, Program transformation

Yu Liu; Kento Emoto; Zhenjiang Hu

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

The St. Catherine`s sea turtle conservation program: Modeling effective science education through conservation and research partnerships  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Georgia school teachers served eight to ten day internships as research colleagues on St. Catherine`s island, Georgia. Interns monitored daily nesting activity, evaluated possible nests, validated egg chambers, screened the nests, and monitored each nest daily and assessed hatching success by excavation upon emergence of hatchlings. The real-world, hands-on holistic field experience immersed school teachers in the problems of executing a natural history conservation project integrating scientific content and methodology, mathematical analysis, and computer documentation. Outcomes included increased scientific inquiry, reduced science anxiety, heightened self-confidence, and enhanced credibility with students and colleagues. This educational model is applicable to many areas and problems.

March, N.B.; Bishop, G. [Georgia Southern Univ., Statesboro, GA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

476

Midwest Building Energy Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Midwest Building Energy Program Midwest Building Energy Program Stacey Paradis Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance sparadis@mwalliance.org 312-784-7267 April 2, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Purpose * Reduce Energy Use in New Construction (Energy Codes) * Reduce Energy Use in Existing Construction (Benchmarking) Objectives * Technical Assistance to States In Midwest Adopt Latest Model Energy Codes * Foster Maximum Compliance with Current Energy Codes

477

Midwest Building Energy Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Midwest Building Energy Program Midwest Building Energy Program Stacey Paradis Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance sparadis@mwalliance.org 312-784-7267 April 2, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Purpose * Reduce Energy Use in New Construction (Energy Codes) * Reduce Energy Use in Existing Construction (Benchmarking) Ob