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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads Title Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number...

2

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: HVAC Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Programs: HVAC Systems Title Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: HVAC Systems Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6432E Year of Publication 2013...

3

A detailed loads comparison of three building energy modeling programs:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

detailed loads comparison of three building energy modeling programs: detailed loads comparison of three building energy modeling programs: EnergyPlus, DeST and DOE-2.1E Title A detailed loads comparison of three building energy modeling programs: EnergyPlus, DeST and DOE-2.1E Publication Type Journal Year of Publication 2013 Authors Zhu, Dandan, Tianzhen Hong, Da Yan, and Chuang Wang Date Published 05/2013 Keywords building energy modeling program, building thermal loads, comparison, dest, DOE-2.1E, energyplus Abstract Building energy simulation is widely used to help design energy efficient building envelopes and HVAC systems, develop and demonstrate compliance of building energy codes, and implement building energy rating programs. However, large discrepancies exist between simulation results from different building energy modeling programs (BEMPs). This leads many users and stakeholders

4

Building energy modeling programs comparison Research on HVAC systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy modeling programs comparison Research on HVAC systems energy modeling programs comparison Research on HVAC systems simulation part Title Building energy modeling programs comparison Research on HVAC systems simulation part Publication Type Journal Year of Publication 2013 Authors Zhou, Xin, Da Yan, Tianzhen Hong, and Dandan Zhu Keywords Building energy modeling programs, comparison tests, HVAC system simulation, theory analysis Abstract Building energy simulation programs are effective tools for the evaluation of building energy saving and optimization of design. The fact that large discrepancies exist in simulated results when different BEMPs are used to model the same building has caused wide concern. Urgent research is needed to identify the main elements that contribute towards the simulation results. This technical report summarizes methodologies, processes, and the main assumptions of three building energy modeling programs (BEMPs) for HVAC calculations: EnergyPlus, DeST, and DOE-2.1E, and test cases are designed to analyze the calculation process in detail. This will help users to get a better understanding of BEMPs and the research methodology of building simulation. This will also help build a foundation for building energy code development and energy labeling programs.

5

Building energy modeling programs comparison Research on HVAC...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building energy simulation programs are effective tools for the evaluation of building energy saving and optimization of design. The fact that large discrepancies exist in...

6

A comparison of programming models for multiprocessors with explicitly managed memory hierarchies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On multiprocessors with explicitly managed memory hierarchies (EMM), software has the responsibility of moving data in and out of fast local memories. This task can be complex and error-prone even for expert programmers. Before we can allow compilers ... Keywords: cell be, explicitly managed memory hierarchies, programming models

Scott Schneider; Jae-Seung Yeom; Benjamin Rose; John C. Linford; Adrian Sandu; Dimitrios S. Nikolopoulos

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Comparison of Home Retrofit Programs in Wisconsin  

SciTech Connect

To explore ways to reduce customer barriers and increase home retrofit completions, several different existing home retrofit models have been implemented in the state of Wisconsin. This study compared these programs' performance in terms of savings per home and program cost per home to assess the relative cost-effectiveness of each program design. However, given the many variations in these different programs, it is difficult to establish a fair comparison based on only a small number of metrics. Therefore, the overall purpose of the study is to document these programs' performance in a case study approach to look at general patterns of these metrics and other variables within the context of each program. This information can be used by energy efficiency program administrators and implementers to inform home retrofit program design. Six different program designs offered in Wisconsin for single-family energy efficiency improvements were included in the study. For each program, the research team provided information about the programs' approach and goals, characteristics, achievements and performance. The program models were then compared with performance results -- program cost and energy savings -- to help understand the overall strengths and weaknesses or challenges of each model.

Cunningham, K.; Hannigan, E.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Comparison of Home Retrofit Programs in Wisconsin  

SciTech Connect

To explore ways to reduce customer barriers and increase home retrofit completions, several different existing home retrofit models have been implemented in the state of Wisconsin. This study compared these programs' performance in terms of savings per home and program cost per home to assess the relative cost-effectiveness of each program design. However, given the many variations in these different programs, it is difficult to establish a fair comparison based on only a small number of metrics. Therefore, the overall purpose of the study is to document these programs' performance in a case study approach to look at general patterns of these metrics and other variables within the context of each program. This information can be used by energy efficiency program administrators and implementers to inform home retrofit program design. Six different program designs offered in Wisconsin for single-family energy efficiency improvements were included in the study. For each program, the research team provided information about the programs' approach and goals, characteristics, achievements and performance. The program models were then compared with performance results -- program cost and energy savings -- to help understand the overall strengths and weaknesses or challenges of each model.

Cunningham, K.; Hannigan, E.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

OSHWPP model programs guide  

SciTech Connect

Descriptions of model occupational health and safety programs implemented at DOE facilities are presented.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Modeling EERE Deployment Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to compile information and conclusions gathered as part of three separate tasks undertaken as part of the overall project, “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs,” sponsored by the Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation office within the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address improvements to modeling in the near term, and note gaps in knowledge where future research is needed.

Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.

2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

11

Comparison of Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs: Rebates and White  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Comparison of Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs: Rebates and White Comparison of Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs: Rebates and White Certificates **Subscription Required** Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Comparison of Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs: Rebates and White Certificates **Subscription Required** Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, - Utility Topics: Environmental Website: www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0957178709000460 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/comparison-energy-efficiency-incentiv Language: English Policies: "Financial Incentives,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Mandates/Targets This analysis utilizes New Jersey data to compare two incentive based

12

Comparison of Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs: Rebates and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs: Rebates and White Certificates **Subscription Required** Jump to: navigation, search Name Comparison of Energy Efficiency Incentive...

13

Comparison of two different rating programs for sustainable homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis compares two different rating programs for sustainable homes; The Code for Sustainable Homes in the United Kingdom, and LEED for Homes in the United States. The comparison is both in general and with respect ...

Bjarnadottir, Margret Halla

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Topics: GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.iea.org/papers/2009/Mitigation_potentials.pdf References: National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models[1] Summary "This paper focuses on mitigation potential to provide a comparative assessment across key economies. GHG mitigation potential is defined here to be the level of GHG emission reductions that could be realised, relative

15

Programming Models Facilitators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to prioritize and support activities · Focus is near term, while keeping an eye toward to long term (avoid box-scale (accelerator-based) hybrid computer systems in the near term and in the future. · Identify the types costs, system modeling 5 #12;REVIEW OF GRADING CRITERIA 6 Urgency Duration Responsive Applicability

16

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Model Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Business Model Business Model Resources to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Model Resources on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Model Resources on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Model Resources on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Model Resources on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Model Resources on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Model Resources on AddThis.com... Getting Started Assess the Market Establish Goals & Objectives Develop Plans of Action Business Model Resources Driving Demand Financing Workforce Development Business Model Resources Business Models Workshop and Materials

17

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Comparison of Soft X Rays...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of Soft X-Rays and Ions Irradiation in a Model of V79 Mammalian Cell Authors: B. Ginovska, J.H. Miller, D. J. Lynch and W. E. Wilson Institutions: School of Electrical...

18

Comparison of National Programs for Industrial Energy Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report looks at the Better Buildings, Better Plants program from the Department of Energy; E3, an initiative of five U.S. federal agencies; ENERGY STAR for Industry from the Environmental Protection Agency; and Superior Energy Performance, a product of the U.S. Council for Energy-Efficient Manufacturing. (See table on next page for a summary comparison of these programs.) By comparing the goals of several energy-efficiency programs that have been established to support industry, this report hopes to...

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

19

Modeling global temperature changes with genetic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use genetic programming (GP), a variant of evolutionary computation, to build interpretable models of global mean temperature as a function of natural and anthropogenic forcings. In contrast to the conventional approach, which engages models that ... Keywords: Data-driven modeling, Evolutionary computation, Genetic programming, Global temperature modeling, Unconstrained optimization

Karolina Stanislawska; Krzysztof Krawiec; Zbigniew W. Kundzewicz

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Dealing with world-model-based programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce POINTY, an interactive system for constructing world-model-based programs for robots. POINTY combines an interactive programming environment with the teaching-by-guiding methodology that has been successful in industrial robotics. Owing ...

Giuseppina C. Gini; M. L. Gini

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Online modelling based on Genetic Programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Genetic Programming (GP), a heuristic optimisation technique based on the theory of Genetic Algorithms (GAs), is a method successfully used to identify non-linear model structures by analysing a system's measured signals. Mostly, ... Keywords: GP, automatic learning, data driven model identification, fault diagnosis, genetic programming, machine learning, online modelling, real time, self-adaption

Stephan Winkler; Hajrudin Efendic; Luigi Del Re; Michael Affenzeller; Stefan Wagner

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Federal Energy Management Program: Model Acquisition Language...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Language for Energy-Efficient Product Contracts to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Model Acquisition Language for Energy-Efficient Product...

23

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Model Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy Efficiency, October 24-26, 2011. Workshop participants learned about various energy efficiency market business models and discussed strategies for long-term program...

24

Comparison between VNIIEF computer programs used to study NPP safety and similar western codes  

SciTech Connect

This report gives schematic comparison between VNIIEF computer programs used to study NPP safety and similar western codes. This comparison is schematic and in no way pretends to be complete.

Pevnitsky, A.V.; Tarasov, V.A.; Solovyev, V.P. [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

Gold Standard Program Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gold Standard Program Model Gold Standard Program Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Gold Standard Program Model Agency/Company /Organization: World Wildlife Fund Sector: Climate, Energy User Interface: Other Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.cdmgoldstandard.org/project-certification/rules-and-toolkit Cost: Paid Related Tools Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program (BenMAP) MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model ProForm ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS A bottom-up method of certifying Kyoto Protocol Clean Development Mechanism projects and voluntary programs that result in verifiable co-benefits. Approach It is a bottom up method of certifying Kyoto Protocol Clean Development Mechanism projects as well as voluntary programs that result in verifiable

26

Stable model implementation of layer supported models by program transformation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For practical applications, the use of top-down query-driven proof-procedures is convenient for an efficient use and computation of answers using Logic Programs as knowledge bases. A 2-valued semantics for Normal Logic Programs (NLPs) allowing for top-down ... Keywords: layer supported models, layering, program transformation, relevance, stable models

Luís Moniz Pereira; Alexandre Miguel Pinto

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Early Site Permit Model Program Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"The Early Site Permit (ESP) Model Program Plan (MPP)" provides step-by-step guidelines on preparing an ESP application. The Plan identifies work tasks necessary to prepare the application and guides applicants on effectively planning and managing the ESP program, including identifying and managing subcontracted resources. A model program plan details how to prepare applications. The MPP also describes interfaces among tasks and provides a generic schedule for executing the steps in preparing an ESP appl...

2002-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

28

Programming models for sensor networks: A survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sensor networks have a significant potential in diverse applications some of which are already beginning to be deployed in areas such as environmental monitoring. As the application logic becomes more complex, programming difficulties are becoming a ... Keywords: Programming models and languages, survey, taxonomy

Ryo Sugihara; Rajesh K. Gupta

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Isotope Programming Model: a Kind of Program Model for Context-Aware Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major feature of context-aware applications is that the program can implement different actions according to the context environment of users.With regard to programming context-aware applications with the traditional object-oriented model, behaviors ...

Xi Min; Zhao Jizhong; Qi Yong; He Hui; Li Ming; Wei Wei

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Comparison of Photovoltaic Models in the System Advisor Model: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The System Advisor Model (SAM) is free software developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for predicting the performance of renewable energy systems and analyzing the financial feasibility of residential, commercial, and utility-scale grid-connected projects. SAM offers several options for predicting the performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems. The model requires that the analyst choose from three PV system models, and depending on that choice, possibly choose from three module and two inverter component models. To obtain meaningful results from SAM, the analyst must be aware of the differences between the model options and their applicability to different modeling scenarios. This paper presents an overview the different PV model options and presents a comparison of results for a 200-kW system using different model options.

Blair, N. J.; Dobos, A. P.; Gilman, P.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Hydrate Model Code Comparison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reservoir Simulator Code Comparison Study An International Effort to Compare Methane Hydrate Reservoir Simulators Code Comparison Logo The National Energy Technology Laboratory...

32

NETL: Predictive Modeling and Evaluation - TVA Model Comparison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ozone/PM2.5 Formation & Transport Model Comparison Ozone/PM2.5 Formation & Transport Model Comparison Future regulatory actions for mitigating PM2.5 concentrations will rely, to some extent, on results from large-scale atmospheric models. The most efficient approach to evaluating regulatory actions is to use an integrated approach that examines multiple air quality impacts simultaneously. This is because of the strong linkage between PM2.5 levels, visibility degradation, ozone and acidic deposition. Thus, regional modeling of the impacts on PM2.5 levels from proposed emission reductions should be evaluated in terms of computed impacts not only on PM2.5 levels, but on ozone and acidic deposition as well. TVA is an active participant in the only ongoing assessment of this type, which is being done for the Southern Appalachian Mountains Initiative (SAMI) as part of its integrated assessment in the southeastern United States. SAMI, with its focus on protecting PSD Class I areas, is using a model called URM that can examine all the aforementioned phenomena at once. In addition, URM has the capability, which SAMI intends to use, of efficiently examining the sensitivity of model outputs to changes in emissions across the entire modeling domain. Finally, SAMI will use URM to test various emission management options (EMOs) for mitigating impacts in the southern Appalachians. These EMOs will include controls on various source sectors, including energy.

33

Model Policies | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center Center Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center FAQs Publications Resource Guides eLearning Model Policies Glossary Related Links ACE Learning Series Utility Savings Estimators Model Policies States and local jurisdictions across the nation have demonstrated leadership in developing programs and policies that both encourage and require compliance with energy codes, stretch codes (e.g., above-minimum codes) and green building techniques, energy-efficiency practices, and environmentally-friendly procedures. The laws and regulations behind these programs and policies can help states and jurisdictions establish unique policies to address their particular needs. Model policies for residential and commercial building construction have

34

Combined Operating License Model Program Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Model Program Plan (MPP) provides functional guidance on how to prepare a Combined Operating License (COL) application for a new nuclear power facility when incorporating previous findings from both design certification (DC) and an early site permit (ESP) proceedings. The plan identifies the activities necessary to prepare an application and provides guidance on planning and managing a COL program, including working with DC and ESP holders and using subcontracted resources to develop necessary new in...

2003-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

35

A Comparison of Experimental Data and Model Predictions with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Comparison of Experimental Data and Model Predictions with Constitutive Laws ... Friction Stir Welding and Processing of Advanced Materials for Coal and  ...

36

PICASSO: A GENERAL INTERACTIVE GRAPHICS MODELING PROGRAM.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is intended to serve as a user's manual for PICASSO. The detailed description of the concepts involved and the methods used in implementing those concepts will be treated in a subsequent paper and are incorporated in the Ph.D. thesis of one of the authors. The program evolved from earlier work on a graphics program for printed circuit board design which had a fixed library of elements. The need for a dynamic graphics program (i.e., one which allows the creation of new elements as required) soon became obvious, and the generality of such a program for mathematical modeling was a major factor in the development of PICASSO. It was thought that the present stage of development of this modeling program had reached a point that a report such as this would be useful in creating a broader interest in the field. However, work continues to further generalize the program into such areas as computer animation, 3-D display and modeling, and a more general interface to available ''analysis'' routines, such as the available compilers and interpreters. It should be emphasized that the program is continually changing as new ideas and applications arise. For example, in order to create a modeling system which is complete in some sense, PICASSO was designed explicitly to interface with the CDC analysis program MIMIC. The next step, already under investigation, is to allow for user-defined output templates to specify,the form of the output of a model. This feature, along with the capability for multiple definitions of an element, will allow for several types of analysis to be done on a single model. Another innovation being studied is the provision for ''robot'' commands, with which the user may define a sequence of. commands to be carried out on demand, in much the same way as mechanical ''robots'' are programmed. For this reason there will usually be several versions of PICASSO available, one of which is relatively ''bug-free''. The authors wish to gratefully acknowledge support from the Math and. Computing Division and the Electrical Engineering Department of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science of the University of California, Berkeley. Specifically, we wish to thank Ivan Wood and Horace Warnock of EE Drafting for support and many suggestions; Michiyuki Nakamura, Richard LaPierre, John Mendes, Don Evans and Frank Neu of EE Research and Development for many suggestions and interesting applications; Professor Baskin, EECS Department, UCB, James Baker and Carl Quong, Math and Computing, LBL for support and encouragement; and Norma Hart for preparing the manuscript.

Austin, D.M.; Holmes, H.H.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

A price discrimination modeling using geometric programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a price discrimination model which determines the product's selling price and marketing expenditure in two markets. We assume production as a function of price and marketing cost in two states. The cost of production is also assumed ... Keywords: economics, mathematical programming, production and operations management

Seyed J. Sadjadi; M. Ziaee

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Model Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide Model Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Model Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.epa.gov/cleanenergy/documents/suca/evaluation_guide.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/model-energy-efficiency-program-impac Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This document provides guidance on model approaches for calculating energy, demand and emissions savings resulting from energy efficiency programs. It

39

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Comparison of DNA Damage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of DNA Damage Risk from Low-Dose Radiation and Folate Deficiency Arnold C. Huang,1,2 Chantal Courtemanche,1,2 Nicole Kerry,1,2 Susan T. Mashiyama,1,2 Michael Fenech,3...

40

Property:Data Comparison to Computational Models | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Comparison to Computational Models Comparison to Computational Models Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Data Comparison to Computational Models Property Type Text Pages using the property "Data Comparison to Computational Models" Showing 14 pages using this property. A Alden Large Flume + Designed as needed Alden Small Flume + Designed as needed Alden Tow Tank + Velocity, flow characteristics Alden Wave Basin + Wave height, period, length, velocity D Davidson Laboratory Tow Tank + Comparisons to validate and improve CFD models are made periodically. M MHL Free Surface Channel + Custom MHL Data Acquisition System includes graphical displays for the results of each sampling channel. MHL Tow Tank + Custom MHL Data Acquisition System includes graphical displays for the results of each sampling channel.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of...

42

PICASSO: A GENERAL INTERACTIVE GRAPHICS MODELING PROGRAM.  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to serve as a user's manual for PICASSO. The detailed description of the concepts involved and the methods used in implementing those concepts will be treated in a subsequent paper and are incorporated in the Ph.D. thesis of one of the authors. The program evolved from earlier work on a graphics program for printed circuit board design which had a fixed library of elements. The need for a dynamic graphics program (i.e., one which allows the creation of new elements as required) soon became obvious, and the generality of such a program for mathematical modeling was a major factor in the development of PICASSO. It was thought that the present stage of development of this modeling program had reached a point that a report such as this would be useful in creating a broader interest in the field. However, work continues to further generalize the program into such areas as computer animation, 3-D display and modeling, and a more general interface to available ''analysis'' routines, such as the available compilers and interpreters. It should be emphasized that the program is continually changing as new ideas and applications arise. For example, in order to create a modeling system which is complete in some sense, PICASSO was designed explicitly to interface with the CDC analysis program MIMIC. The next step, already under investigation, is to allow for user-defined output templates to specify,the form of the output of a model. This feature, along with the capability for multiple definitions of an element, will allow for several types of analysis to be done on a single model. Another innovation being studied is the provision for ''robot'' commands, with which the user may define a sequence of. commands to be carried out on demand, in much the same way as mechanical ''robots'' are programmed. For this reason there will usually be several versions of PICASSO available, one of which is relatively ''bug-free''. The authors wish to gratefully acknowledge support from the Math and. Computing Division and the Electrical Engineering Department of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science of the University of California, Berkeley. Specifically, we wish to thank Ivan Wood and Horace Warnock of EE Drafting for support and many suggestions; Michiyuki Nakamura, Richard LaPierre, John Mendes, Don Evans and Frank Neu of EE Research and Development for many suggestions and interesting applications; Professor Baskin, EECS Department, UCB, James Baker and Carl Quong, Math and Computing, LBL for support and encouragement; and Norma Hart for preparing the manuscript.

Austin, D.M.; Holmes, H.H.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Comparison of National Programs for Industrial Energy Efficiency: Industry Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report looks at the Better Buildings, Better Plants program from the Department of Energy; E3, an initiative of five U.S. federal agencies; ENERGY STAR for Industry from the Environmental Protection Agency; and Superior Energy Performance, a product of the U.S. Council for Energy-Efficient Manufacturing. By comparing the goals of several energy-efficiency programs that have been established to support industry, this report hopes to help industrial facilities find the right fit for their own ...

2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

44

Comparison of Wind-Field Models Using the CAMX Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of the Cross-Appalachian Tracer Experiment have been used to compare the performance of three different wind models—a primitive-equation model a quasi-geostrophic model and a linear-interpolation model. The comparison shows that the ...

David P. Chock; Ying-Hwa Kuo

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

A comparison group analysis of DOE`s Energy-Related Inventions Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past decade, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has conducted four evaluations of the economic impacts of the US DOE`s Energy-Related Inventions Program (ERIP). None of these evaluations has involved the use of a comparison group. Instead, statistics on the innovation process have been compiled from a review of the literature. Unfortunately, the types of technologies and inventors documents by previous studies do not match those supported by the Energy-Related Inventions Program. ERIP-supported technologies are diverse in both application and technical complexity. ERIP-supported inventors are a particular subset of inventors: the Program targets inventors who are either independently employed or are employees of a small business. The purpose of this task is to identify and characterize a matched comparison group of inventors whose progress can be compared with the progress of ERIP inventors. With this comparison group, we will be able to assess more accurately the impact of the ERIP support and thereby strengthen the program`s impact evaluations. This report is divided into six sections. As background to understanding the comparison group design and the results provided in this report, section 1.3 provides an overview of the Energy-Related Inventions Program. Section 2 describes the research design used to define and characterize a suitable comparison group. Section 3 presents comparative statistics describing both the comparison group and the ERIP technologies. Section 4 is more qualitative in nature; it describes four technologies in the comparison group that were commercially successful, focusing on how they succeeded in the absence of DOE/ERIP support. The report ends with a summary of its findings (section 5) and a list of references (section 6).

Brown, M.A.; Curlee, T.R.; Elliott, S.R.; Franchuk, C.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Posters A Comparison of Model-Simulated Relative Humidity with...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

71 Posters A Comparison of Model-Simulated Relative Humidity with Satellite-Derived Cloudiness R. J. Alliss and S. Raman Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences North...

47

LS Note 280 Benchmark and Comparisons of FEL Simulation Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

60439 June 30, 1999 I. Introduction A low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) is under construction are reported here. The programs TDA3D and GENESIS solve the paraxial FEL equations with the approximation that the amplitude of the radiation field is slowly varying; d dz k a a f s s w B s = - +sin( ) , (1) d dz k k p

Kemner, Ken

48

Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Agency/Company /Organization: Future Perfect Sector: Climate Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development, Greenhouse Gas Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Training materials Website: www.gpstrategiesltd.com/divisions/future-perfect/ Country: South Korea Eastern Asia Language: English References: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling[1] Logo: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Jointly sponsored by Greenhouse Gas Inventory & Research (GIR) Center of

49

Comparison of kinetic theory models of laser ablation of carbon  

SciTech Connect

The paper compares the predictions of three-dimensional kinetic theory models of laser ablation of carbon. All the models are based on the moment solution of the Boltzmann equation for arbitrary strong evaporation but use different approximations. Comparison of the model predictions demonstrated that the choice of the particular model has very little influence on the results. The influence of the heat conduction from the gas to the solid phase was also found to be negligible in this problem.

Shusser, Michael [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Human factors engineering program review model  

SciTech Connect

The staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is performing nuclear power plant design certification reviews based on a design process plan that describes the human factors engineering (HFE) program elements that are necessary and sufficient to develop an acceptable detailed design specification and an acceptable implemented design. There are two principal reasons for this approach. First, the initial design certification applications submitted for staff review did not include detailed design information. Second, since human performance literature and industry experiences have shown that many significant human factors issues arise early in the design process, review of the design process activities and results is important to the evaluation of an overall design. However, current regulations and guidance documents do not address the criteria for design process review. Therefore, the HFE Program Review Model (HFE PRM) was developed as a basis for performing design certification reviews that include design process evaluations as well as review of the final design. A central tenet of the HFE PRM is that the HFE aspects of the plant should be developed, designed, and evaluated on the basis of a structured top-down system analysis using accepted HFE principles. The HFE PRM consists of ten component elements. Each element in divided into four sections: Background, Objective, Applicant Submittals, and Review Criteria. This report describes the development of the HFE PRM and gives a detailed description of each HFE review element.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Climate Impact of Transportation A Model Comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transportation contributes to a significant and rising share of global energy use and GHG emissions. Therefore modeling future travel demand, its fuel use, and resulting CO2 emission is highly relevant for climate change mitigation. In this study we compare the baseline projections for global service demand (passenger-kilometers, ton-kilometers), fuel use, and CO2 emissions of five different global transport models using harmonized input assumptions on income and population. For four models we also evaluate the impact of a carbon tax. All models project a steep increase in service demand over the century. Technology is important for limiting energy consumption and CO2 emissions, but quite radical changes in the technology mix are required to stabilize or reverse the trend. While all models project liquid fossil fuels dominating up to 2050, they differ regarding the use of alternative fuels (natural gas, hydrogen, biofuels, and electricity), because of different fuel price projections. The carbon tax of US$200/tCO2 in 2050 stabilizes or reverses global emission growth in all models. Besides common findings many differences in the model assumptions and projections indicate room for improvement in modeling and empirical description of the transport system.

Girod, Bastien; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Grahn, Maria; Kitous, Alban; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Hybrid programming model for implicit PDE simulations on multicore architectures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complexity of programming modern multicore processor based clusters is rapidly rising, with GPUs adding further demand for fine-grained parallelism. This paper analyzes the performance of the hybrid (MPI+OpenMP) programming model in the context of ...

Dinesh Kaushik; David Keyes; Satish Balay; Barry Smith

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) Jump to: navigation, search Name LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) Agency/Company /Organization Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Sector Energy, Land Topics Pathways analysis References LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI)[1] Abstract Established in 1989, the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) is an International focal point for understanding climate change and analyzing and diagnosing the performance of the world's climate models; the PCMDI is a DOE program located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The PCMDI mission is to develop improved methods and tools for the diagnosis ...

54

Comparison of nuclear mass models at nuclearmasses.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear masses are crucial in many astrophysics studies, as well as other areas of basic and applied nuclear science. There are now many different global theoretical models of nuclear masses - but choosing the best model for a given application can be challenging. The suite of codes online at nuclearmasses.org greatly facilitates the comparison of nuclear models with evaluated masses as well as the intercomparison of theoretical models. We demonstrate the utility of this suite by comparing the RMS deviations of 13 different theoretical mass models from the AME2003 evaluated masses over mass ranges appropriate for astrophysics.

Smith, Michael S.; Nesaraja, Caroline D.; Lingerfelt, Eric J.; Koura, Hiroyuki; Kondev, Filip G. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6354 (United States); Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6354 (United States) and Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6354 (United States); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka-gun, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan); Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, 60439 (United States)

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

55

The dc modeling program (DCMP): Version 2. 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this project one of the main objectives was the refinement of tools for the study of HVDC systems. The original software was prepared in project RP1964-2 (EL-4365) as power flow and stability program models for HVDC systems. In this project new modeling capabilities were added to both the power flow and stability models. Additionally, the HVDC specific model capabilities were integrated into a new program, termed the Standalone program, for use in the development and testing of HVDC models. This manual provides technical background for programmers and those interested in understanding, augmenting or transporting the dc models.

Chapman, D.G. (Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, MB (Canada))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Attachment F: Summary Checklist of Model AIP Provisions and Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

F: Summary Checklist of Model AIP Provisions and Program F: Summary Checklist of Model AIP Provisions and Program Policies Attachment F: Summary Checklist of Model AIP Provisions and Program Policies Summary Checklist of Model AIP Provisions and Program Policies In response to concerns expressed by DOE and State AIP program representatives, the Office of Environmental Activities has developed a list of mandatory and non-mandatory model language provisions for new and renegotiated AIPs. The underlying concepts for the mandatory provisions are set forth in Attachment A. Other program policies are set forth in a question and answer format in Attachment B. The texts of the optional provisions and mandatory provisions that may be applicable are provided in Attachments C and D respectively. Suggested language related to emergency

57

An orthogonal access modifier model for feature-oriented programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In feature-oriented programming (FOP), a programmer decomposes a program in terms of features. Ideally, features are implemented modularly so that they can be developed in isolation. Access control is an important ingredient to attain feature ... Keywords: feature-oriented programming, orthogonal access modifier model

Sven Apel; Jörg Liebig; Christian Kästner; Martin Kuhlemann; Thomas Leich

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Building an advanced climate model: Program plan for the CHAMMP (Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics) Climate Modeling Program  

SciTech Connect

The issue of global warming and related climatic changes from increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has received prominent attention during the past few years. The Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics (CHAMMP) Climate Modeling Program is designed to contribute directly to this rapid improvement. The goal of the CHAMMP Climate Modeling Program is to develop, verify, and apply a new generation of climate models within a coordinated framework that incorporates the best available scientific and numerical approaches to represent physical, biogeochemical, and ecological processes, that fully utilizes the hardware and software capabilities of new computer architectures, that probes the limits of climate predictability, and finally that can be used to address the challenging problem of understanding the greenhouse climate issue through the ability of the models to simulate time-dependent climatic changes over extended times and with regional resolution.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

The dc modeling program (DCMP): Version 2. 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this project one of the main objectives was the refinement of tools for the study of HVDC systems. The original software was prepared in project RP1964-2 (EL-4365) as power flow and stability program models for HVDC systems. In this project new modeling capabilities were added to both the power flow and stability models. Additionally, the HVDC specific model capabilities were integrated into a new program, termed the Standalone program, for use in the development and testing of HVDC models.

Chapman, D.G. (Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, MB (Canada))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

The dc modeling program (DCMP): Version 2. 0  

SciTech Connect

In this project one of the main objectives was the refinement of tools for the study of HVDC systems. The original software was prepared in project RP1964-2 (EL-4365) as power flow and stability program models for HVDC systems. In this project new modeling capabilities were added to both the power flow and stability models. Additionally, the HVDC specific model capabilities were integrated into a new program, termed the Standalone program, for use in the development and testing of HVDC models. This volume provides information on the application of the software in the form of a User's Manual.

Chapman, D.G. (Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, MB (Canada))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A 0-1 goal programming model for nurse scheduling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a computerized nurse-scheduling model is developed. The model is approached through a 0-1 linear goal program. It is adapted to Riyadh Al-Kharj hospital Program (in Saudi Arabia) to improve the current manual-made schedules. The developed ...

M. N. Azaiez; S. S. Al Sharif

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Datalog programs and their stable models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is about the functionality of software systems used in answer set programming (ASP). ASP languages are viewed here, in the spirit of Datalog, as mechanisms for characterizing intensional (output) predicates in terms of extensional (input) ...

Vladimir Lifschitz

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models July 31, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) today announced the release of the report "Climate Models: An Assessment of Strengths and Limitations," the 10th in a series of 21 Synthesis and Assessment Products (SAPs) managed by U.S. federal agencies. Developed under the leadership of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), this report, SAP 3.1, describes computer models of the Earth's climate and their ability to simulate current climate change. "Complex climate models are tools that provide insights and knowledge into how future climate may evolve. To assure that future climate projections

64

Development and Implementation of a Program Management Maturity Model  

SciTech Connect

In 2006, Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) announced an updatedvision statement for the organization. The vision is “To be the most admired team within the NNSA [National Nuclear Security Administration] for our relentless drive to convert ideas into the highest quality products and services for National Security by applying the right technology, outstanding program management and best commercial practices.” The challenge to provide outstanding program management was taken up by the Program Management division and the Program Integration Office (PIO) of the company. This article describes how Honeywell developed and deployed a program management maturity model to drive toward excellence.

Hartwig, Laura; Smith, Matt

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project. Phase 1: The Critical Components to Simulate Cirrus Initiation Explicitly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project, a project of the GCSS [Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Cloud System Studies] Working Group on Cirrus Cloud Systems, involves the systematic comparison of current models of ice crystal ...

Ruei-Fong Lin; David O'C. Starr; Paul J. DeMott; Richard Cotton; Kenneth Sassen; Eric Jensen; Bernd Kärcher; Xiaohong Liu

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Radiative effects of a CO/sub 2/ increase: results of a model comparison  

SciTech Connect

A comparison of infrared radiative transfer models is announced. The initial phase is underway, with other phases scheduled through 1984. The results of the ir model comparison will be included in the state-of-the-art report on climate modeling. Although the time scale for completion of the comparison is a few years, significant preliminary results have already been obtained. (PSB)

Luther, F.M.

1982-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

67

Model Comparison in Plasma Energy Confinement Scaling revisited  

SciTech Connect

Already in 1998 we presented on a MaxEnt conference a Bayesian model comparison for the confinement scaling of fusion devices. The reason to visit this field again is an over the years enlarged data basis facilitating new physical insights. We compare up to ten physical models on the basis of the old (low-{beta}) data of the 1998 approach and newly acquired high-{beta} data. This work serves as an example where the prior odds cannot be set constant (as would be the normal procedure) but has to be furnished with physics information.

Preuss, R.; Dinklage, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

68

Strategies for Energy Efficient Resource Management of Hybrid Programming Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many scientific applications are programmed using hybrid programming models that use both message-passing and shared-memory, due to the increasing prevalence of large-scale systems with multicore, multisocket nodes. Previous work has shown that energy efficiency can be improved using software-controlled execution schemes that consider both the programming model and the power-aware execution capabilities of the system. However, such approaches have focused on identifying optimal resource utilization for one programming model, either shared-memory or message-passing, in isolation. The potential solution space, thus the challenge, increases substantially when optimizing hybrid models since the possible resource configurations increase exponentially. Nonetheless, with the accelerating adoption of hybrid programming models, we increasingly need improved energy efficiency in hybrid parallel applications on large-scale systems. In this work, we present new software-controlled execution schemes that consider the effects of dynamic concurrency throttling (DCT) and dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) in the context of hybrid programming models. Specifically, we present predictive models and novel algorithms based on statistical analysis that anticipate application power and time requirements under different concurrency and frequency configurations. We apply our models and methods to the NPB MZ benchmarks and selected applications from the ASC Sequoia codes. Overall, we achieve substantial energy savings (8.74% on average and up to 13.8%) with some performance gain (up to 7.5%) or negligible performance loss.

Li, Dong [ORNL; Supinski, Bronis de [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Schulz, Martin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios S [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Cameron, Kirk W. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Comparison of models for predicting landfill methane recovery. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill methane models are tools used to project methane generation over time from a mass of landfilled waste. These models are used for sizing landfill gas (LFG) collection systems, evaluations and projections of LFG energy uses, and regulatory purposes. The objective of this project was to select various landfill methane models and to provide a comparison of model outputs to actual long-term gas recovery data from a number of well managed and suitable landfills. Another objective was to use these data to develop better estimates of confidence limits that can be assigned to model projections. This project assessed trial model forms against field data from available landfills where methane extraction was maximized, waste filling history was well-documented, and other pertinent site information was of superior quality. Data were obtained from 18 US landfills. Four landfill methane models were compared: a zero-order, a simple first order, a modified first order, and a multi-phase first order model. Models were adjusted for best fit to field data to yield parameter combinations based on the minimized residual errors between predicted and experienced methane recovery. The models were optimized in this way using two data treatments: absolute value of the differences (arithmetic error minimization) and absolute value of the natural log of the ratios (logarithmic error minimization).

Vogt, W.G. [SCS Engineers, Reston, VA (United States); Augenstein, D. [Institute for Environmental Management, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

The comparison and selection of programming languages for high energy physics applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the issues surrounding the comparison and selection of a programming language to be used in high energy physics software applications. The evaluation method used was specifically devised to address the issues of particular importance to high energy physics (HEP) applications, not just the technical features of the languages considered. The method assumes a knowledge of the requirements of current HEP applications, the data-processing environments expected to support these applications and relevant non-technical issues. The languages evaluated were Ada, C, FORTRAN 77, FORTRAN 99 (formerly 8X), Pascal and PL/1. Particular emphasis is placed upon the past, present and anticipated future role of FORTRAN in HEP software applications. Upon examination of the technical and practical issues, conclusions are reached and some recommendations are made regarding the role of FORTRAN and other programming languages in the current and future development of HEP software. 54 refs.

White, B.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Designing a unified programming model for heterogeneous machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While high-efficiency machines are increasingly embracing heterogeneous architectures and massive multithreading, contemporary mainstream programming languages reflect a mental model in which processing elements are homogeneous, concurrency is limited, ...

Michael Garland; Manjunath Kudlur; Yili Zheng

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

NEAMS: The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEAMS: The Nuclear Energy Advanced NEAMS: The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Program The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program is developing a simulation tool kit using leading-edge computational methods that will accelerate the development and deployment of nuclear power technologies that employ enhanced safety and security features, produce power more cost-effectively, and utilize natural resources more efficiently. The NEAMS ToolKit

73

Photovoltaic subsystem marketing and distribution model: programming manual. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Complete documentation of the marketing and distribution (M and D) computer model is provided. The purpose is to estimate the costs of selling and transporting photovoltaic solar energy products from the manufacturer to the final customer. The model adjusts for the inflation and regional differences in marketing and distribution costs. The model consists of three major components: the marketing submodel, the distribution submodel, and the financial submodel. The computer program is explained including the input requirements, output reports, subprograms and operating environment. The program specifications discuss maintaining the validity of the data and potential improvements. An example for a photovoltaic concentrator collector demonstrates the application of the model.

Not Available

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

COMPARISON OF RF CAVITY TRANSPORT MODELS FOR BBU SIMULATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transverse focusing effect in RF cavities plays a considerable role in beam dynamics for low-energy beamline sections and can contribute to beam breakup (BBU) instability. The purpose of this analysis is to examine RF cavity models in simulation codes which will be used for BBU experiments at Jefferson Lab and improve BBU simulation results. We review two RF cavity models in the simulation codes elegant and TDBBU (a BBU simulation code developed at Jefferson Lab). elegant can include the Rosenzweig-Serafini (R-S) model for the RF focusing effect. Whereas TDBBU uses a model from the code TRANSPORT which considers the adiabatic damping effect, but not the RF focusing effect. Quantitative comparisons are discussed for the CEBAF beamline. We also compare the R-S model with the results from numerical simulations for a CEBAF-type 5-cell superconducting cavity to validate the use of the R-S model as an improved low-energy RF cavity transport model in TDBBU. We have implemented the R-S model in TDBBU. It will improve BBU simulation results to be more matched with analytic calculations and experimental results.

Ilkyoung Shin,Byung Yunn,Todd Satogata,Shahid Ahmed

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

DEUS Computer Evaluation Model, Volume 1: Program Descriptive Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents DEUS, a computer simulation model of duel energy use systems. The model is designed for the evaluation of cogeneration systems and is a useful tool for utilities as well as cogenerators. Volume 1 describes the program methodology and its data base; Volume 2 is a user's manual.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Comparison of Test Procedures and Energy Efficiency Criteria in Selected International Standards and Labeling Programs for Clothes Washers, Water Dispensers, Vending Machines and CFLs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CFL technology has matured, CFL efficiency levels have beenthe CFL standards and labeling programs, energy efficiencyto bare bulb CFL. Comparison of Energy Efficiency Values In

Fridley, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Comparison of low-level waste disposal programs of DOE and selected international countries  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to examine and compare the approaches and practices of selected countries for disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) with those of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The report addresses the programs for disposing of wastes into engineered LLW disposal facilities and is not intended to address in-situ options and practices associated with environmental restoration activities or the management of mill tailings and mixed LLW. The countries chosen for comparison are France, Sweden, Canada, and the United Kingdom. The countries were selected as typical examples of the LLW programs which have evolved under differing technical constraints, regulatory requirements, and political/social systems. France was the first country to demonstrate use of engineered structure-type disposal facilities. The UK has been actively disposing of LLW since 1959. Sweden has been disposing of LLW since 1983 in an intermediate-depth disposal facility rather than a near-surface disposal facility. To date, Canada has been storing its LLW but will soon begin operation of Canada`s first demonstration LLW disposal facility.

Meagher, B.G. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cole, L.T. [Cole and Associates (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Model Design for Transmission Congestion Management Based on Fuzzy Programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on data collected previously on the electricity market of the East China, we use stepwise regression method to find the approximate expression of the active power flow of each power sets on East China’s certain electrical network. Then classified ... Keywords: electrical network, transmission congestion management, fuzzy programming, multiobjective optimization, model design

Yu Zhao; Bo Zhao; Chunjie Qi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Developing Oregon's renewable energy portfolio using fuzzy goal programming model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Renewable energy continues to be a hot topic in the United States affecting security and sustainability. A model to create renewable energy portfolio is established using guidelines drawn by Oregon's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) legislation with ... Keywords: Fuzzy goal programming, Oregon, Renewable energy portfolio

Tugrul U. Daim; Gulgun Kayakutlu; Kelly Cowan

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Advanced Modeling Grid Research Program | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development » Advanced Modeling Grid Development » Advanced Modeling Grid Research Program Advanced Modeling Grid Research Program The electric power industry has undergone extensive changes over the past several decades and become substantially more complex, dynamic, and uncertain, as new market rules, regulatory policies, and technologies have been adopted. The availability of more detailed data about system conditions from devices, such as phasor measurement units (PMUs) for wide area visibility and advanced meter infrastructure (AMI) for dynamic pricing and demand response, can be a great benefit for electric system reliability and flexibility. However, this large volume (and variety) of data poses its own challenges. Shifting operational data analytics from a traditionally off-line environment to real-time situational awareness (e.g., visibility) to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Geothermal Chemical Modeling Project DOE Advanced Brine Chemistry Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The brine-calcite-anhydrite-silica scale model program is ready to be used by the industry at a research level. Versions are already in use in studies of scaling in geothermal and oil production systems. A set of short course notes has been prepared to help perspective users. IBM and Macintosh versions of the model are available. The gas phase models have been incorporated in the general package for distribution. Both mainframe (SUN) and PC versions (MacIntosh and IBM) of the code have been distributed.

Moeller, N.; Weare, J.H.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Equivalent Transformations in the Model of Programs with Commuting and Monotone Operators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fundamental problem in the theory of algebraic program models is considered. It consists in constructing a system of equivalent transformations of program schemes that is complete in the model. It is solved for a model different from those considered ...

R. I. Podlovchenko

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

final report for Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of the work on parallel programming patterns that was part of the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing

Johnson, Ralph E.

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

84

Model Rain and Clouds over Oceans: Comparison with SSM/I Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison of global model cloud and rain parameterization output with satellite observed radiances was carried out. Hydrometeor profiles from ECMWF operational short-range forecasts were combined with a microwave radiative transfer model to ...

Frédéric Chevallier; Peter Bauer

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The International Urban Energy Balance Models Comparison Project: First Results from Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large number of urban surface energy balance models now exist with different assumptions about the important features of the surface and exchange processes that need to be incorporated. To date, no comparison of these models has been conducted; ...

C. S. B. Grimmond; M. Blackett; M. J. Best; J. Barlow; J-J. Baik; S. E. Belcher; S. I. Bohnenstengel; I. Calmet; F. Chen; A. Dandou; K. Fortuniak; M. L. Gouvea; R. Hamdi; M. Hendry; T. Kawai; Y. Kawamoto; H. Kondo; E. S. Krayenhoff; S-H. Lee; T. Loridan; A. Martilli; V. Masson; S. Miao; K. Oleson; G. Pigeon; A. Porson; Y-H. Ryu; F. Salamanca; L. Shashua-Bar; G-J. Steeneveld; M. Tombrou; J. Voogt; D. Young; N. Zhang

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

On the Dynamics of Hawaiian Cloud Bands: Comparison of Model Results with Observations and Island Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a detailed comparison study of three-dimensional model results with an aircraft wind field mapping for the island of Hawaii. Model runs were initialized using an aircraft sounding from 1 August 1985, and detailed predictions ...

Roy M. Rasmussen; Piotr Smolarkiewicz; John Warner

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Clear-Sky Window Channel Radiances: A Comparison between Observations and the ECMWF Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison of clear-sky radiances of the Meteosat window channel with the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model results is presented, aiming to assess both the model's performance and the quality of the observations. ...

Isabel F. Trigo; Pedro Viterbo

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Comparison of Projections to Actual Performance in the DOE-EPRI Wind Turbine Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the US Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP), Global Energy Concepts (GEC) worked with participating utilities to develop a set of performance projections for their projects based on historical site atmospheric conditions, turbine performance data, operation and maintenance (O and M) strategies, and assumptions about various energy losses. After a preliminary operation period at each project, GEC compared the actual performance to projections and evaluated the accuracy of the data and assumptions that formed the performance projections. This paper presents a comparison of 1999 power output, turbine availability, and other performance characteristics to the projections for TVP projects in Texas, Vermont, Iowa, Nebraska, Wisconsin, and Alaska. Factors that were overestimated or underestimated are quantified. Actual wind speeds are compared to projections based on long-term historical measurements. Turbine power curve measurements are compared with data provided by the manufacturers, and loss assumptions are evaluated for accuracy. Overall, the projects performed well, particularly new commercial turbines in the first few years of operation. However, some sites experienced below average wind resources and greater than expected losses. The TVP project owners successfully developed and constructed wind power plants that are now in full commercial operation, serving a total of approximately 12,000 households.

Rhoads, H.; VandenBosche, J.; McCoy, T.; Compton, A. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC); Smith, B. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

89

Summary of multi-core hardware and programming model investigations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes our investigations into multi-core processors and programming models for parallel scientific applications. The motivation for this study was to better understand the landscape of multi-core hardware, future trends, and the implications on system software for capability supercomputers. The results of this study are being used as input into the design of a new open-source light-weight kernel operating system being targeted at future capability supercomputers made up of multi-core processors. A goal of this effort is to create an agile system that is able to adapt to and efficiently support whatever multi-core hardware and programming models gain acceptance by the community.

Kelly, Suzanne Marie; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Levenhagen, Michael J.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Comparison of the ATP version of the EMTP and the NETOMAC program for simulation of HVdc systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates the capabilities and limitations of the EMTP and NETOMAC program as applied to HVdc system simulation. The fundamental differences between the two programs and their effect on simulation results are described. Consistency of the results obtained from these programs is examined through simulation of a test HVdc network. As expected, a very high degree of agreement between the two sets of simulation results proved to be achievable, but only when particular care was taken to overcome internal program differences. Finally, the new advanced stability feature of NETOMAC is briefly discussed and then tested against the complex transient models established in the EMTP and in the NETOMAC transients program section.

Lehn, P.; Rittiger, J. [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany); Kulicke, B. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

A model for a national low level waste program  

SciTech Connect

A national program for the management of low level waste is essential to the success of environmental clean-up, decontamination and decommissioning, current operations and future missions. The value of a national program is recognized through procedural consistency and a shared set of resources. A national program requires a clear waste definition and an understanding of waste characteristics matched against available and proposed disposal options. A national program requires the development and implementation of standards and procedures for implementing the waste hierarchy, with a specitic emphasis on waste avoidance, minimization and recycling. It requires a common set of objectives for waste characterization based on the disposal facility's waste acceptance criteria, regulatory and license requirements and performance assessments. Finally, a national waste certification program is required to ensure compliance. To facilitate and enhance the national program, a centralized generator services organization, tasked with providing technical services to the generators on behalf of the national program, is necessary. These subject matter experts are the interface between the generating sites and the disposal facility(s). They provide an invaluable service to the generating organizations through their involvement in waste planning prior to waste generation and through championing implementation of the waste hierarchy. Through their interface, national treatment and transportation services are optimized and new business opportunities are identified. This national model is based on extensive experience in the development and on-going management of a national transuranic waste program and management of the national repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The Low Level Program at the Savannah River Site also successfully developed and implemented the waste hierarchy, waste certification and waste generator services concepts presented below. The Savannah River Site services over forty generators and has historically managed over 12,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The results of the waste minimization program at the site resulted in over 900 initiatives, avoiding over 220,000 cubic meters of waste for a life cycle cost savings of $275 million. At the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the low level waste program services over 20 major generators and several hundred smaller generators that produce over 4,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The Los Alamos National Laboratory low level waste program utilizes both on-site and off-site disposal capabilities. Off-site disposal requires the implementation of certification requirements to utilize both federal and commercial options. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is the US Department of Energy's first deep geological repository for the permanent disposal of Transuanic waste. Transuranic waste was generated and retrievably stored at 39 sites across the US. Transuranic waste is defined as waste with a radionuclide concentration equal to or greater than 100 nCi/g consisting of radionuclides with half-lives greater than 20 years and with an atomic mass greater than uranium. Combining the lessons learned from the national transuranic waste program, the successful low level waste program at Savannah River Site and the experience of off-site disposal options at Los Alamos National Laboratory provides the framework and basis for developing a viable national strategy for managing low level waste.

Blankenhorn, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Comparison between CPBPV, ESC/Java, CBMC, Blast, EUREKA and Why for Bounded Program Verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report describes experimental results for a set of benchmarks on program verification. It compares the capabilities of CPBVP "Constraint Programming framework for Bounded Program Verification" [4] with the following frameworks: ESC/Java, CBMC, Blast, EUREKA and Why.

Collavizza, Hélčne; Van Hentenryck, Pascal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Hydrogen program combustion research: Three dimensional computational modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have significantly increased our computational modeling capability by the addition of a vertical valve model in KIVA-3, code used internationally for engine design. In this report the implementation and application of the valve model is described. The model is shown to reproduce the experimentally verified intake flow problem examined by Hessel. Furthermore, the sensitivity and performance of the model is examined for the geometry and conditions of the hydrogen-fueled Onan engine in development at Sandia National Laboratory. Overall the valve model is shown to have comparable accuracy as the general flow simulation capability in KIVA-3, which has been well validated by past comparisons to experiments. In the exploratory simulations of the Onan engine, the standard use of the single kinetic reaction for hydrogen oxidation was found to be inadequate for modeling the hydrogen combustion because of its inability to describe both the observed laminar flame speed and the absence of autoignition in the Onan engine. We propose a temporary solution that inhibits the autoignition without sacrificing the ability to model spark ignition. In the absence of experimental data on the Onan engine, a computational investigation was undertaken to evaluate the importance of modeling the intake flow on the combustion and NO{sub x} emissions. A simulation that began with the compression of a quiescent hydrogen-air mixture was compared to a simulation of the full induction process with resolved opening and closing of the intake valve. Although minor differences were observed in the cylinder-averaged pressure, temperature, bulk-flow kinetic energy and turbulent kinetic energy, large differences where observed in the hydrogen combustion rate and NO{sub x} emissions. The flow state at combustion is highly heterogeneous and sensitive to the details of the bulk and turbulent flow and that an accurate simulation of the Onan engine must include the modeling of the air-fuel induction.

Johnson, N.L.; Amsden, A.A.; Butler, T.D.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The NEAMS program plan includes information on the program vision, objective, scope, schedule and cost, management, development team and collaborations.

95

The new computer program for three dimensional relativistic hydrodynamical model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An effective computer program for three dimensional relativistic hydrodynamical model has been developed. It implements a new approach to the early hot phase of relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The computer program simulates time-space evolution of nuclear matter in terms of ideal-fluid dynamics. Equations of motions of hydrodynamics are solved making use of finite difference methods. Commonly-used algorithms of numerical relativistic hydrodynamics RHLLE and MUSTA-FORCE have been applied in simulations. To speed-up calculations, parallel processing has been made available for solving hydrodynamical equations. The test results of simulations for 3D, 2D and Bjorken expansion are reported in this paper. As a next step we plan to implement the hadronization algorithm by implementing the continuous particle emission for freeze-out and comparing it with Cooper-Frye formula.

Daniel Kikola; Wiktor Peryt; Yuri M. Sinyukov; Marcin Slodkowski; Marek Szuba

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

A comparison study of multi-component Lattice Boltzmann models for flow in porous media applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison study of three different multi-component Lattice Boltzmann models is carried out to explore their capability of describing binary immiscible fluid systems. The Shan-Chen pseudo potential model, the Oxford free energy model and the colour ... Keywords: Binary fluids, Lattice Boltzmann, Multi-component models

Jianhui Yang; Edo S. Boek

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

A Comparison of Radiation Variables Calculated in the UCLA General Circulation Model to Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparisons are made between the spatial patterns of solar and thermal fluxes of radiation calculated by the UCLA general circulation model and observations. The latter include estimates at the Pacific Ocean surface of the climatological averages ...

Bryan C. Weare

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Comparisons between Model Forecast and Observed Boundary Layer Profiles and Related Comments on Cloud Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study comparisons are made between Met Office mesoscale model boundary layer profiles, and radiosonde data collected in the central United Kingdom during three intensive boundary layer cloud experiments. Significant differences between ...

J. D. Price; M. R. Bush

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Comparisons of Transport and Dispersion Model Predictions of the URBAN 2000 Field Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The tracer releases of the “URBAN 2000” urban tracer and meteorological field experiment conducted in Salt Lake City, Utah, in October 2000 provided a wealth of data for comparison with the predictions of transport and dispersion models. ...

Steve Warner; Nathan Platt; James F. Heagy

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Modeling National Impacts for the Building America Program  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we present a model to estimate the nationalenergy and economic impacts of the Department of Energy Building Americaprogram. The program goal is to improve energy performance in newresidential construction, by working with builders to design andconstruct energy-efficient homes at minimal cost. The model is anadaptation of the method used to calculate the national energy savingsfor appliance energy efficiency standards. The main difference is thatthe key decision here is not the consumer decision to buy anefficienthouse, but rather the builder decision to offer such a house inthe market. The builder decision is treated by developing a number ofscenarios in which the relative importance of first costs vs. energysavings is varied.

Coughlin, Katie M.; McNeil, Michael A.

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Modeling and optimization of stencil printing operations: A comparison study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparison study for the optimization of stencil printing operations using hybrid intelligence technique and response surface methodology (RSM). An average 60% of soldering defects are attributed to solder paste stencil printing ... Keywords: DPMO, Fuzzy quality loss function, Genetic algorithms, Neural network, Printed circuit board, Stencil printing, Surface mount technology

Tsung-Nan Tsai

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

A Comparison of the AC and DC Power Flow Models for LMP Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shifting transformers is often dependent upon the transformer's tap value. Last, the power flow modelsA Comparison of the AC and DC Power Flow Models for LMP Calculations Thomas J. Overbye, Xu Cheng power flow model for LMP-based market calculations. The paper first provides a general discussion

103

Modeling National Impacts for the Building America Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Renewable Energy (EERE) is supporting the development ofgoals. For the most part EERE program impacts are estimatedcase, which removes any EERE program activities that are

Coughlin, Katie M.; McNeil, Michael A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Comparisons of the Second-Moment Statistics of Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study the magnitude and the temporal and spatial correlation scales of background fluctuations generated by three climate models, two different coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models and one energy balance model, were ...

Kwano-Y. Kim; Gerald R. North; Gabriele C. Hegerl

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Urban Dispersion Modeling: Comparison with Single-Building Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two models have been developed to predict airflow and dispersion in urban environments. The first model, the Realistic Urban Spread and Transport of Intrusive Contaminants (RUSTIC) model, is a fast-running urban airflow code that rapidly ...

Steve R. Diehl; Donald A. Burrows; Eric A. Hendricks; Robert Keith

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Bayesian Models of Judgments of Causal Strength: A Comparison  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

causal learning using Bayesian generic priors on generativeBayesian Models of Judgments of Causal Strength: Afour alternative Bayesian models of causal strength

Lu, Hongjing; Yuille, Alan L.; Liljiholm, Mimi; Cheng, Patricia W.; Holyoak, Keith J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Bayesian Models of Judgments of Causal Strength: A Comparison  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

causal learning using Bayesian generic priors on generativeBayesian Models of Judgments of Causal Strength: Afour alternative Bayesian models of causal strength

Hongjing Lu; Alan L. Yuille; Mimi Liljeholm; Patricia W. Cheng; Keith J. Holyoak

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Simulation model for wind energy storage systems. Volume III. Program descriptions. [SIMWEST CODE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effort developed a comprehensive computer program for the modeling of wind energy/storage systems utilizing any combination of five types of storage (pumped hydro, battery, thermal, flywheel and pneumatic). An acronym for the program is SIMWEST (Simulation Model for Wind Energy Storage). The level of detail of SIMWEST is consistent with a role of evaluating the economic feasibility as well as the general performance of wind energy systems. The software package consists of two basic programs and a library of system, environmental, and load components. Volume III, the SIMWEST program description contains program descriptions, flow charts and program listings for the SIMWEST Model Generation Program, the Simulation program, the File Maintenance program and the Printer Plotter program. Volume III generally would not be required by SIMWEST user.

Warren, A.W.; Edsinger, R.W.; Burroughs, J.D.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

A comparison between python and Tcl solution on four programs assigned in CS0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper takes four programs that were assigned to students in a bread-first computer science course and compares the solutions when written in Tcl/Tk and Python. It then concludes with a discussion of which programming language is better in a CSO ...

Peter C. Isaacson; Terry A. Scott

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Comprehensive Electricity Competition Act: A Comparison of Model Results, The  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report describes EIA's use of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to evaluate the effects of the Administration's restructuring proposal using the parameter settings and assumptions from the Policy Office Electricity Modeling System (POEMS) analysis.

Andy S. Kydes

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Comparison of data models for plant lifecycle information management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several data models have been defined for enabling information interoperability during the process plant life cycle. The data models differ in details and their scopes are different, making it difficult to compare and evaluate them. While the importance ... Keywords: Aex, Ifc, Interoperability, Iso 15926, Plant Modeling, Step

Pekka Siltanen; Antti Pärnänen

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

A.: Modeling and forecasting electricity loads: A comparison  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study two statistical approaches to load forecasting. Both of them model electricity load as a sum of two components – a deterministic (representing seasonalities) and a stochastic (representing noise). They differ in the choice of the seasonality reduction method. Model A utilizes differencing, while Model B uses a recently developed seasonal volatility technique. In both models the stochastic component is described by an ARMA time series. Models are tested on a time series of system-wide loads from the California power market and compared with the official forecast of the California System Operator (CAISO). 1.

Rafa? Weron

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

On the Verification and Comparison of Extreme Rainfall Indices from Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interpretation of model precipitation output (e.g., as a gridpoint estimate versus as an areal mean) has a large impact on the evaluation and comparison of simulated daily extreme rainfall indices from climate models. It is first argued that ...

Cheng-Ta Chen; Thomas Knutson

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

A Comparison of the HIRLAM Gridpoint and Spectral Semi-Lagrangian Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison of two semi-Lagrangian limited area models, one spectral, and the other grid point, is described. Forecasts from both models are compared and contrasted, first on a 55-km horizontal mesh and subsequently on a 22-km horizontal mesh. ...

Nils Gustafsson; A. McDonald

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Gas-Phase Diffusion in Porous Media: Comparison of Models Stephen W. Webb  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Gas-Phase Diffusion in Porous Media: Comparison of Models Gas-Phase Diffusion in Porous Media: Comparison of Models Stephen W. Webb Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87 185 ABSTRACT Two models are commonly used to analyze gas- phase diffusion in porous media in the presence of advection, the Advective-Dispersive Model (ADM) and the Dusty-gas Model (DGM). The ADM, which is used in TOUGH2, is based on a simple linear addition of advection calculated by Darcy's law and ordinary diffusion using Fick's law with a porosity- tortuosity-gas saturation multiplier to account for the porous medium. Another approach for gas-phase transport in porous media is the Dusty-Gas Model. This model applies the kinetic theory of gases to the gaseous components and the porous media (or "dust") to combine transport due to diffusion and

116

From Measurements to Models: Cross-Comparison of Measured and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cloud conditions were clustered into 32 regimes or states resulting in time series animations of global atmospheric conditions. These analyses establish a set of modeled...

117

Validation of the RRTM Shortwave Radiation Model and Comparison...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

use at European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) in their weather forecast model (Morcrette et al. 2001). The absorption coefficients required for RRTM are...

118

Using graph-based program characterization for predictive modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using machine learning has proven effective at choosing the right set of optimizations for a particular program. For machine learning techniques to be most effective, compiler writers have to develop expressive means of characterizing the program being ... Keywords: compiler optimization, graph-based program characterization, iterative compilation, machine learning, support vector machine

Eunjung Park; John Cavazos; Marco A. Alvarez

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Radiation Fog: A Comparison of Model Simulation with Detailed Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional model designed to study the formation, growth, and dissipation of radiation fog is described. The model is compared with detailed observations made at the 200-m tower at Cabauw in the Netherlands. This study we use observations ...

Peter G. Duynkerke

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Comparison of Predictive Models for Photovoltaic Module Performance: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines three models used to estimate the performance of photovoltaic (PV) modules when the irradiances and PV cell temperatures are known. The results presented here were obtained by comparing modeled and measured maximum power (Pm) for PV modules that rely on different technologies.

Marion, B.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Comparison of DNA Damage Risk from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of DNA Damage Risk from Low-Dose Radiation and Folate Comparison of DNA Damage Risk from Low-Dose Radiation and Folate Deficiency. Authors: Chantal Courtemanche, Arnold C. Huang, Nicole Kerry, Bernice Ng, and Bruce N. Ames. Institutions: Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, California. Our overall goal is to understand and quantify the real effects of low-dose radiation by measuring direct and specific cellular changes. However, since the background dose of radiation to which most individuals are exposed is well below the levels where significant biological effects, such as mutation or tumor induction, are observed, our novel approach is to compare the consequences of radiation to those of specific nutritional deficiencies. By determining which of these two common stresses at physiologically relevant doses leads to a greater amount of DNA damage, we

122

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Comparisons of IR and ROS for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparisons of IR and ROS for Induction of Damage to Cells Comparisons of IR and ROS for Induction of Damage to Cells Kathryn D. Held1, Yvonne L. McCarey1, Laurence Tartier1, Elena V. Rusyn1, Giuseppe Schettino2, Melvyn Folkard2, Kevin M. Prise2, and Barry D. Michael2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114; 2Gray Laboratory Cancer Research Trust, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, HA6 2JR, UK Accurate evaluation of the risks associated with exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR) is a major challenge for environmental sciences. Studies on the mechanisms of the actions of low doses of IR are needed to help understand possible risks. IR exerts its effects on cells through production of reactive oxidizing species (ROS) such as ·OH, H2O2 and

123

Addition of Diffusion Model to MELCOR and Comparison with Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A chemical diffusion model was incorporated into the thermal-hydraulics package of the MELCOR Severe Accident code (Reference 1) for analyzing air ingress events for a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor.

Brad Merrill; Richard Moore; Chang Oh

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Psychophysiological Reactivity to Self and Model Images in an Upward Social Comparison Manipulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current study examined affective reactivity to oneself in an upward socialcomparison manipulation using autonomic physiological responses. Study I was conducted to select images of thin and average size models used to elicit a social comparison process for Study II. For Study II, thirty-two female undergraduate students had their startle reflex and skin conductance responses recorded while viewing images of themselves presented adjacent to thin or average size models. Participants also viewed positive, negative, and neutral affect images to test our experimental manipulation of Peter Lang’s startle paradigm. Following the visual presentation, participants used the SAM scale to rate each image along the dimensions of valence, arousal, dominance, body satisfaction, and attractiveness. Analyses revealed that participants reacted to thin and average size models and self with similar levels of body image satisfaction, valence, and arousal, even though thin models were perceived as highly more attractive. Positive affect images were rated higher on valence and arousal among all the picture types. With regards to the psychophysiological data, there were differences in startle reactivity among the three model-to-self comparison images, with images of Thin-to-Self Comparison eliciting more of an inhibited startle response and Thin-to-Average Comparison images eliciting more of a potentiated startle response. In terms of arousal, positive affect images were perceived as more arousing among all the picture types. Contrary to what was expected, there were no significant differences in skin conductance responsiveness between the three model-to self comparison images. The results are discussed from a social-comparison perspective with regard to affective reactivity to body image. Future research directions are proposed.

Tamez, Jeannine

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Comparison between LQCD and PNJL model at finite chemical potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lattice QCD has the sign problem at real quark chemical potential. There are some regions with no sign problem; one is the imaginary quark chemical potential region and the others are the real and imaginary isospin chemical potential regions. We show that the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model can reproduce LQCD data in the regions. We also determine the model parameters from the data and predict the QCD phase diagram in the real quark chemical potential region.

Sakai, Yuji; Kouno, Hiroaki; Yahiro, Masanobu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth System Modeling (ESM) Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

127

A Model-Theoretic Approach to Belief Change in Answer Set Programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We address the problem of belief change in (nonmonotonic) logic programming under answer set semantics. Our formal techniques are analogous to those of distance-based belief revision in propositional logic. In particular, we build upon the model theory ... Keywords: Answer set programming, belief merging, belief revision, program encodings, strong equivalence

James Delgrande; Torsten Schaub; Hans Tompits; Stefan Woltran

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Computational Modeling and the Experimental Plasma Research Program A White Paper Submitted to the FESAC Subcommittee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational Modeling and the Experimental Plasma Research Program A White Paper Submitted of the fusion energy program. The experimental plasma research (EPR) program is well positioned to make major in fusion development and promote scientific discovery. Experimental plasma research projects explore

129

Application of dynamic programming model in inventory management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

???This thesis aims to apply dynamic programming approach to formulate three main topics related to inventory management under three real world situations and then propose… (more)

Tao, Feng ( ??)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Comparison to the Revised ECMWF Shortwave Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Comparison to the Revised ECMWF Shortwave Model M. J. Iacono, J. S. Delamere, E. J. Mlawer, and S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Massachusetts J.-J. Morcrette European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Reading, United Kingdom Introduction An important step toward improving radiative transfer codes in general circulation models (GCMs) is their thorough evaluation by comparison to measurements directly, or to other data-validated radiation models. This work extends the clear-sky shortwave (SW) GCM evaluation presented by Iacono et al. (2001) to computations including clouds. The rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM) SW radiation model accurately reproduces clear-sky direct beam fluxes from the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer

131

Comparison of residence time models for cascading rotary dryers  

SciTech Connect

The predictions of the models of Matchett and Baker (1988), Saeman and Mitchell (1954) and Friedman and Marshall (1949) for the solids residence time in rotary dryers have been compared with both pilot-scale and industrial-scale data. A countercurrent pilot-scale dryer of 0.2m diameter and 2m long has been used with air velocities up to 1.5 m to measure the residence times of sorghum grain. The average discrepancy for the solids residence time between the predictions and the experiments that were carried out in the pilot-scale rotary dryer is {minus}10.4%. Compared with the models of Friedman and Marshall (1949) and Saeman and Mitchell (1954) for the pilot-scale data obtained here, the Matchett and Baker model is more satisfactory for predicting the solids residence time in this pilot-scale dryer. It has also been found that the model of Matchett and Baker describes the industrial data of Saeman and Mitchell (1954) than the correlation of Friedman and Marshall (1949).

Cao, W.F.; Langrish, T.A.G. [Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A damage model for rock fragmentation and comparison of calculations with blasting experiments in granite  

SciTech Connect

Early attempts at estimation of stress wave damage due to blasting by use of finite element calculations met with limited success due to numerical instabilities that prevented calculations from being carried to late times. An improved damage model allows finite element calculations which remain stable at late times. Reasonable agreement between crater profiles calculated with this model using the PRONTO finite element program and excavated crater profiles from blasting experiments in granite demonstrate a successful application of this model. Detailed instructions for use of this new damage model with the PRONTO finite element programs are included. 18 refs., 16 figs.

Thorne, B.J.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Comparison of Blade-Strike Modeling Results with Empirical Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study is the initial stage of further investigation into the dynamics of injury to fish during passage through a turbine runner. As part of the study, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) estimated the probability of blade strike, and associated injury, as a function of fish length and turbine operating geometry at two adjacent turbines in Powerhouse 1 of Bonneville Dam. Units 5 and 6 had identical intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, and draft tubes, but Unit 6 had a new runner and curved discharge ring to minimize gaps between the runner hub and blades and between the blade tips and discharge ring. We used a mathematical model to predict blade strike associated with two Kaplan turbines and compared results with empirical data from biological tests conducted in 1999 and 2000. Blade-strike models take into consideration the geometry of the turbine blades and discharges as well as fish length, orientation, and distribution along the runner.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

134

3He Neutron Detector Pressure Effect and Comparison to Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reported here are the results of measurements performed to determine the efficiency of 3He filled proportional counters as a function of gas pressure in the SAIC system. Motivation for these measurements was largely to validate the current model of the SAIC system. Those predictions indicated that the neutron detection efficiency plotted as a function of pressure has a simple, logarithmic shape. As for absolute performance, the model results indicated the 3He pressure in the current SAIC system could not be reduced appreciably while meeting the current required level of detection sensitivity. Thus, saving 3He by reducing its pressure was predicted not to be a viable option in the current SAIC system.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Stromswold, David C.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

135

Comparison of problem model change mechanisms issued from CSP and TRIZ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Comparison of problem model change mechanisms issued from CSP and TRIZ RRoollaanndd DDee GGuuiioo satisfaction problem (CSP), on the other hand. Keywords: over-constrained problems, dialectical methods issued from CSP and TRIZ 2 · a set of evaluation parameters, which represent the objective of the problem

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

136

A Comparison between Gravity Wave Momentum Fluxes in Observations and Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the first time, a formal comparison is made between gravity wave momentum fluxes in models and those derived from observations. Although gravity waves occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, the focus of this paper is on scales ...

Marvin A. Geller; M. Joan Alexander; Peter T. Love; Julio Bacmeister; Manfred Ern; Albert Hertzog; Elisa Manzini; Peter Preusse; Kaoru Sato; Adam A. Scaife; Tiehan Zhou

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Final Map Draft Comparison Report WIND ENERGY RESOURCE MODELING AND MEASUREMENT PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

II Final Map Draft Comparison Report #12;WIND ENERGY RESOURCE MODELING AND MEASUREMENT PROJECT Tel: 978-749-9591 Fax: 978-749-9713 mbrower@awstruewind.com August 10, 2004 #12;2 WIND ENERGY RESOURCE issues. 1 Background In Task 2 of the project, five promising areas of the state for wind energy

138

Statistical model comparison applied to common network motifs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

important limitations, which we also briefly discuss. Methods A model M describes the deterministic dynamic beha- viour of variables z(t) = (z1(t), ..., zK (t))T by a system of differential equations dzk/dt = fk(z(t), t, ?), using para- meters ?... . The parameters may include initial values. Measurements yki of each zk are taken at time points ti, i = 1, ..., N. For notational simplicity, we assume all vari- ables are measured at all the time points, but the follow- ing discussion is easily extended to more...

Domedel-Puig, Nuria; Pournara, Iosifina; Wernisch, Lorenz

2010-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

139

FLUVSIM: a program for object-based stochastic modeling of fluvial depositional systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a FORTRAN program for hierarchical object-based modeling of complex fluvial facies. Unique features of this program include (1) a simple approach to place channel, levee, and crevasse sands within a matrix of floodplain shales, (2) ... Keywords: facies modeling, geostatistics, reservoir characterization

C. V. Deutsch; T. T. Tran

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Modelling damping ratio and shear modulus of sand-mica mixtures using genetic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents two Genetic Programming (GP) models for damping ratio and shear modulus of sand-mica mixtures based on experimental results. The experimental database used for GP modelling is based on a laboratory study of dynamic properties of saturated ... Keywords: Genetic programming, Leighton buzzard sand, Mica, Resonant column testing

Abdulkadir Cevik; Ali Firat Cabalar

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Time Series Forecasting for Dynamic Environments: the DyFor Genetic Program Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time Series Forecasting for Dynamic Environments: the DyFor Genetic Program Model Neal Wagner programming (GP) to the task of forecasting with favorable results. However, these studies, like those "dynamic" GP model that is specifically tailored for forecasting in non-static environments. This Dynamic

Michalewicz, Zbigniew

142

Programming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programming for Exascale Computers William Gropp and Marc Snir April 15, 2013 Abstract Exascale systems will present programmers with many challenges. We review the...

143

Comparison of Arabinoxylan Structure in Bioenergy and Model Grasses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arabinoxylan Arabinoxylan Structure in Bioenergy and Model Grasses Ameya R. Kulkarni, 1 Sivakumar Pattathil, 1 Michael G. Hahn, 1,2 William S. York, 1,3 and Malcolm A. O'Neill 1 1 Complex Carbohydrate Research Center and US Department of Energy BioEnergy Science Center, 2 Department of Plant Biology, and 3 Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA Abstract Heteroxylans were solubilized from the alcohol-insoluble residue of switchgrass, rice, Brachypodium, Miscanthus, foxtail millet, and poplar with 1 M KOH. A combination of enzymatic, chemical, nu- clear magnetic resonance (NMR), mass spectroscopic, and immu- nological techniques indicated that grass arabinoxylans have comparable structures and contain no discernible amount of the reducing end sequence present in dicot glucuronoxylan. Our data suggest that rice, Brachypodium, and foxtail

144

Discussion of comparison study of hydraulic fracturing models -- Test case: GRI Staged Field Experiment No. 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides comments to a companion journal paper on predictive modeling of hydraulic fracturing patterns (N.R. Warpinski et. al., 1994). The former paper was designed to compare various modeling methods to demonstrate the most accurate methods under various geologic constraints. The comments of this paper are centered around potential deficiencies in the former authors paper which include: limited actual comparisons offered between models, the issues of matching predictive data with that from related field operations was lacking or undocumented, and the relevance/impact of accurate modeling on the overall hydraulic fracturing cost and production.

Cleary, M.P.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Identifying Inter-task Communication in Shared Memory Programming Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern computers often use multi-core architectures, covering clusters of homogeneous cores for high performance computing, to heterogeneous architectures typically found in embedded systems. To efficiently program such architectures, it is important ...

Per Larsen; Sven Karlsson; Jan Madsen

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Variational Objective Analysis for Atmospheric Field Programs: A Model Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to examine the effectiveness of the variational objective analysis (VOA) for producing realistic diagnoses of atmospheric field program data. Simulations from the Naval Research Laboratory's Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere ...

D. E. Waliser; J. A. Ridout; S. Xie; M. Zhang

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Comparison of the predictions of two models with dose measurements in a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of the predictions of two models with dose measurements in a Comparison of the predictions of two models with dose measurements in a case of children exposed to the emissions of a lead smelter Title Comparison of the predictions of two models with dose measurements in a case of children exposed to the emissions of a lead smelter Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-2397E Year of Publication 2009 Authors Bonnard, Roseline, and Thomas E. McKone Journal Journal of Human and Environmental Risk Assessment Volume 15 Issue 6 Pagination 1203-1226 ISSN 1080-7039 Keywords environmental chemistry, exposure & risk group, exposure and health effects, exposure assessment, ieubk, indoor environment department, lead, multimedia models, probabilistic risk assessment Abstract The predictions of two source-to-dose models are systematically evaluated with observed data collected in a village polluted by a currently operating secondary lead smelter. Both models were built up from several sub-models linked together and run using Monte-Carlo simulation, to calculate the distribution children's blood lead levels attributable to the emissions from the facility. The first model system is composed of the CalTOX model linked to a recoded version of the IEUBK model. This system provides the distribution of the media-specific lead concentrations (air, soil, fruit, vegetables and blood) in the whole area investigated. The second model consists of a statistical model to estimate the lead deposition on the ground, a modified version of the model HHRAP and the same recoded version of the IEUBK model. This system provides an estimate of the concentration of exposure of specific individuals living in the study area. The predictions of the first model system were improvedin terms of accuracy and precision by performing a sensitivity analysis and using field data to correct the default value provided for the leaf wet density. However, in this case study, the first model system tends to overestimate the exposure due to exposed vegetables. The second model was tested for nine children with contrasting exposure conditions. It managed to capture the blood levels for eight of them. In the last case, the exposure of the child by pathways not considered in the model may explain the failure of the model. The interest of this integrated model is to provide outputs with lower variance than the first model system, but at the moment further tests are necessary to conclude about its accuracy.

148

Quantifying Differences in Circulation Patterns Based on Probabilistic Models: IPCC AR4 Multimodel Comparison for the North Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The comparison of circulation patterns (CPs) obtained from reanalysis data to those from general circulation model (GCM) simulations is a frequent task for model validation, downscaling of GCM simulations, or other climate change–related studies. ...

Henning W. Rust; Mathieu Vrac; Matthieu Lengaigne; Benjamin Sultan

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

SECA Core Program - Recent Development of Modeling Activities at PNNL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation discusses recent modeling activities at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Khaleel, M.A.; Recknagle, K.P.; Koeppel, B.; Vetrano, J.; Sun, X.; Korolev, V.; Johnson, K.I.; Nguygen, N.; Rector, D.; Singh, P.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

150

Materials Reliability Program: Codes Comparison for Reactor Internals Neutronics, Thermal, and Mechanical Calculations (MRP-354)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the last few years, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has led an effort to conduct functionality analyses, which have been performed by AREVA and Westinghouse, to evaluate the potential degradation of reactor internals during life extension to 60 years. The methodologies employed in these functionality analyses make use of different thermal-hydraulic, neutronics, and structural models and computer codes and involve different geometries and loading histories. A comparative ...

2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

151

Layered Models Top-Down Querying of Normal Logic Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For practical applications, the use of top-down query-driven proof-procedures is essential for an efficient use and computation of answers using Logic Programs as knowledge bases. Additionally, abductive reasoning on demand is intrinsically a top-down ... Keywords: Relevance, Semantics, Smodels, XSB-XASP

Luís Moniz Pereira; Alexandre Miguel Pinto

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Tuning collective communication for Partitioned Global Address Space programming models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) languages offer programmers the convenience of a shared memory programming style combined with locality control necessary to run on large-scale distributed memory systems. Even within a PGAS language programmers ... Keywords: Collective communication, One-sided communication, Partitioned Global Address Space languages

Rajesh Nishtala; Yili Zheng; Paul H. Hargrove; Katherine A. Yelick

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Revisiting Naur's programming as theory building for enterprise architecture modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent burgeoning interest in Enterprise Architecture and its focus on artifact driven methods is taken as a motivation for the re-appraisal of Peter Naur's notion of "programming as theory building". Naur strongly disputes the value of the role ...

Balbir S. Barn; Tony Clark

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Kinetic model reduction using integer and semi-infinite programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work an optimization-based approach to kinetic model reduction was studied with a view to generating reduced-model libaries for reacting-flow simulations. A linear integer formulation of the reaction elimination ...

Bhattacharjee, Binita, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Rule-based programming for integrative biological modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systems biology aims at integrating processes at various time and spatial scales into a single and coherent formal description to allow computer modeling. In this context, we focus on rule-based modeling and its integration in the domain-specific language ... Keywords: Domain-specific languages, Rule-based modeling, Spatial systems biology

Olivier Michel; Antoine Spicher; Jean-Louis Giavitto

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Fractured rock modeling in the National Waste Terminal Storage Program: a review of requirements and status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Generalized computer codes capable of forming the basis for numerical models of fractured rock masses are being used within the NWTS program. Little additional development of these codes is considered justifiable, except in the area of representation of discrete fractures. On the other hand, model preparation requires definition of medium-specific constitutive descriptions and site characteristics and is therefore legitimately conducted by each of the media-oriented projects within the National Waste Terminal Storage program. However, it is essential that a uniform approach to the role of numerical modeling be adopted, including agreement upon the contribution of modeling to the design and licensing process and the need for, and means of, model qualification for particular purposes. This report discusses the role of numerical modeling, reviews the capabilities of several computer codes that are being used to support design or performance assessment, and proposes a framework for future numerical modeling activities within the NWTS program.

St. John, C.; Krug, A.; Key, S.; Monsees, J.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Monte Carlo Modeling of Diffuse Scattering from Single Crystals: The Program ZMC  

SciTech Connect

Diffuse scattering probes the local ordering in a crystal, whereas Bragg peaks are descriptive of the average long-range ordering. The population of local configurations can be explored by modeling the three-dimensional distribution of diffuse scattering. Local configurations are not constrained by the average crystallographic symmetry, so one way of modeling diffuse scattering is by modeling a disordered (short-range-ordered) structure and then calculating its diffuse scattering. The structure must contain enough unit cells to give a statistically valid model of the populations of local configurations, and so requirements for a program to model this ordering are very different from programs that model average crystal structures (used to fit the Bragg diffraction). ZMC is a program that has been developed to model diffuse scattering, particularly from molecular crystals. The strategies used to tackle the problem and the way in which they are implemented will be discussed.

Goossens, D.J.; Heerdegen, A.P.; Chan, E.J.; Welberry, T.R. (ANU)

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

158

Characterizing the performance of ecosystem models across time scales: A spectral analysis of the North American Carbon Program site-level synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ecosystem models are important tools for diagnosing the carbon cycle and projecting its behavior across space and time. Most assessments of model performance occur at individual temporal scales, but ecosystems respond to drivers at multiple time scales. Spectral methods, such as wavelet analyses, present an alternative approach that enables the identification of the dominant time scales contributing to model performance in the frequency domain. In this study we used wavelet analyses to synthesize the performance of twenty-one ecosystem models at nine eddy-covariance towers as part of the North American Carbon Program's site-level inter-comparison. This study expands upon previous single-site and single-model analyses to determine what patterns of model failure are consistent across a diverse range of models and sites.

Dietze, Michael; Vargas, Rodrigo; Richardson, Andrew D.; Stoy, Paul C.; Barr, Alan; Anderson, Ryan; Arain, M. A.; Baker, Ian; Black, T. Andrew; Chen, Jing Ming; Ciais, Philippe; Flanagan, Lawrence; Gough, Christopher; Grant, R. F.; Hollinger, D.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Kucharik, Chris; Lafleur, Peter; Liu, Shuguang; Lokupitiya, Erandathie; Luo, Yiqi; Munger, J. W.; Peng, Changhui; Poulter, Benjamin; Price, David T.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Riley, William; Sahoo, Alok Kumar; Schaefer, Kevin; Suyker, Andrew E.; Tian, Hanqin; Tonitto, Christine; Verbeeck, Hans; Verma, Shashi B.; Wang, Weifeng; Weng, Ensheng

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

159

Comparison of Decommissioning Dose Modeling Codes for Nuclear Power Plant Use: RESRAD and DandD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of power plants are currently in the decommissioning phase. As the plants seek to terminate their operating license, they need to successfully conduct definite dose assessments. To assist these utilities in selecting an analysis code and appropriate input data, EPRI conducted a code comparison. However, this report was done as the industry's input to the NRC on their evolving review and improvement of decommissioning modeling. In early 2000, EPRI will publish a report for the commercial nuclear ...

1999-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

160

Creating A Model HTTP Server Program Using java  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HTTP Server is a computer programs that serves webpage content to clients. A webpage is a document or resource of information that is suitable for the World Wide Web and can be accessed through a web browser and displayed on a computer screen. This information is usually in HTML format, and may provide navigation to other webpage's via hypertext links. WebPages may be retrieved from a local computer or from a remote HTTP Server. WebPages are requested and served from HTTP Servers using Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP). WebPages may consist of files of static or dynamic text stored within the HTTP Server's file system. Client-side scripting can make WebPages more responsive to user input once in the client browser. This paper encompasses the creation of HTTP server program using java language, which is basically supporting for HTML and JavaScript.

Veerasamy, Bala Dhandayuthapani

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A two-stage stochastic programming model for the parallel machine scheduling problem with machine capacity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a two-stage stochastic programming model for the parallel machine scheduling problem where the objective is to determine the machines' capacities that maximize the expected net profit of on-time jobs when the due dates are uncertain. ... Keywords: Average sample approximation, Parallel machine scheduling, Ranking and selection, Stochastic programming, Weighted number of on-time jobs

Talal Al-Khamis; Rym M'Hallah

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Genetic programming model of solid oxide fuel cell stack: first results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models that predict performance are important tools in understanding and designing solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Modelling of SOFC stack-based systems is a powerful approach that can provide useful insights into the nonlinear dynamics of ... Keywords: SOFC stack, genetic programming, modelling, nonlinear dynamics, simulation, solid oxide fuel cells

Uday K. Chakraborty

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

APPLICATION OF MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING MODELS TO COAL QUALITY CONTROL.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The problem of utilizing blending techniques to control coal quality at the production-consumption phase is considered. Three blending models were developed to provide coal of… (more)

BAAFI, ERNEST YAW.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Publicly Available Computer Models in the Hypercon program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Virtual Concrete Electrical Conductivity Test. ... completed his Ph.D. thesis at the University of Gent in ... 4SIGHT does not currently model degradation. ...

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

165

A comparison of a hierarchy of models for determining energy balance components over vegetation canopies  

SciTech Connect

Several methods for estimating surface energy balance components over a vegetated surface are compared. These include Penman-Monteith, Deardorff, and multilayer canopy (CANWHT) models for evaporation. Measurements taken during the 1991 DOE-sponsored Boardman Area Regional Flux Experiment over a well-irrigated, closed wheat canopy are used in the comparison. The relative performance of each model is then evaluated. It is found that the Penman-Monteith approach using a simple parameterization for stomatal conductance performs best for evaporation flux. The Deardorff model is found to have the best relative performance for sensible heat, while the CANWHT model gives the best results for net radiation and soil heat flux. The Priestley-Taylor model for evaporation and a resistance-analog equation for sensible heat flux are also tested. 35 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

Vogel, C.A.; Baldocchi, D.D.; Luhar, A.K.; Rao, K.S. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Solar irradiance models and measurements: a comparison in the 220 nm to 240 nm wavelength band  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar irradiance models that assume solar irradiance variations to be due to changes in the solar surface magnetic flux have been successfully used to reconstruct total solar irradiance on rotational as well as cyclical and secular time scales. Modelling spectral solar irradiance is not yet as advanced, and also suffers from a lack of comparison data, in particular on solar-cycle time scales. Here we compare solar irradiance in the 220 nm to 240 nm band as modelled with SATIRE-S and measured by different instruments on the UARS and SORCE satellites. We find good agreement between the model and measurements on rotational time scales. The long-term trends, however, show significant differences. Both SORCE instruments, in particular, show a much steeper gradient over the decaying part of cycle 23 than the modelled irradiance or that measured by UARS/SUSIM.

Unruh, Yvonne C; Krivova, Natalie A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Comparison of chiller models for use in model-based fault detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selecting the model is an important and essential step in model based fault detection and diagnosis (FDD). Factors that are considered in evaluating a model include accuracy, training data requirements, calibration effort, generality, and computational requirements. The objective of this study was to evaluate different modeling approaches for their applicability to model based FDD of vapor compression chillers. Three different models were studied: the Gordon and Ng Universal Chiller model (2nd generation) and a modified version of the ASHRAE Primary Toolkit model, which are both based on first principles, and the DOE-2 chiller model, as implemented in CoolTools{trademark}, which is empirical. The models were compared in terms of their ability to reproduce the observed performance of an older, centrifugal chiller operating in a commercial office building and a newer centrifugal chiller in a laboratory. All three models displayed similar levels of accuracy. Of the first principles models, the Gordon-Ng model has the advantage of being linear in the parameters, which allows more robust parameter estimation methods to be used and facilitates estimation of the uncertainty in the parameter values. The ASHRAE Toolkit Model may have advantages when refrigerant temperature measurements are also available. The DOE-2 model can be expected to have advantages when very limited data are available to calibrate the model, as long as one of the previously identified models in the CoolTools library matches the performance of the chiller in question.

Sreedharan, Priya; Haves, Philip

2001-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

168

Comparison of Chiller Models for Use in Model-Based Fault Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selecting the model is an important and essential step in model based fault detection and diagnosis (FDD). Factors that are considered in evaluating a model include accuracy, training data requirements, calibration effort, generality, and computational requirements. The objective of this study was to evaluate different modeling approaches for their applicability to model based FDD of vapor compression chillers. Three different models were studied: the Gordon and Ng Universal Chiller model (2nd generation) and a modified version of the ASHRAE Primary Toolkit model, which are both based on first principles, and the DOE-2 chiller model, as implemented in CoolToolsTM, which is empirical. The models were compared in terms of their ability to reproduce the observed performance of an older, centrifugal chiller operating in a commercial office building and a newer centrifugal chiller in a laboratory. All three models displayed similar levels of accuracy. Of the first principles models, the Gordon-Ng model has the advantage of being linear in the parameters, which allows more robust parameter estimation methods to be used and facilitates estimation of the uncertainty in the parameter values. The ASHRAE Toolkit Model may have advantages when refrigerant temperature measurements are also available. The DOE-2 model can be expected to have advantages when very limited data are available to calibrate the model, as long as one of the previously identified models in the CoolTools library matches the performance of the chiller in question.

Sreedhara, P.; Haves, P.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

A comparison study between fuzzy time series model and ARIMA model for forecasting Taiwan export  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study compares the application of two forecasting methods on the amount of Taiwan export, the ARIMA time series method and the fuzzy time series method. Models discussed for the fuzzy time series method include the Factor models, the Heuristic models, ... Keywords: ARIMA model, Fuzzy time series, Taiwan export

Chi-Chen Wang

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Use of Computational Modeling to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Computational Modeling to Evaluate Hypotheses about the Use of Computational Modeling to Evaluate Hypotheses about the Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Bystander Effects Authors: Yuchao “Maggie” Zhao and Rory Conolly Institutions: CIIT Centers for Health Research, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina A detailed understanding of the biological mechanisms of radiation-induced damage at the molecular and cellular levels is needed for accurate assessment of the shape of the dose-response curve for radiationinduced health effects in the intact organism. Computational models can contribute to the improved understanding of mechanisms through integration of data and quantitative evaluation of hypotheses. We propose to develop a novel computational model of bystander effects elicited by oxidative stress and a

171

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Mechanistic Modeling of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Texas A&M University College Station TX 77843 The primary objective of this project is to provide data for building a mathematical model of the role of repair in the...

172

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Macro System Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET; versions 1 and 2) H2A Production H2A Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM) Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis (HyDRA) HyPro...

173

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: A Model for Interphase Chromosome...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the 46 interphase chromosomes is modeled as a random polymer involving 30 nm zig-zag chromatin fiber confined within a sphere whose radius is dependent upon the chromosome length...

174

A Comparison of Forecast Error Generators for Modeling Wind and Load Uncertainty  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents four algorithms to generate random forecast error time series, including a truncated-normal distribution model, a state-space based Markov model, a seasonal autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model, and a stochastic-optimization based model. The error time series are used to create real-time (RT), hour-ahead (HA), and day-ahead (DA) wind and load forecast time series that statistically match historically observed forecasting data sets, used for variable generation integration studies. A comparison is made using historical DA load forecast and actual load values to generate new sets of DA forecasts with similar stoical forecast error characteristics. This paper discusses and compares the capabilities of each algorithm to preserve the characteristics of the historical forecast data sets.

Lu, Ning; Diao, Ruisheng; Hafen, Ryan P.; Samaan, Nader A.; Makarov, Yuri V.

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

175

Three-dimensional Fast Flux Test Facility plenum model turbulent flow prediction and data comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations of turbulent flow in a scaled Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) upper plenum model were performed using the TEMPEST hydrothermal code. A standard k-element of model was used to describe turbulence through an effective viscosity. Comparisons with previously reported mean velocity and turbulence field data measured in the plenum model and two-dimensional numerical simulations using the TEACH code were made. Predicted horizontal and vertical mean velocities and turbulent kinetic energy are shown to be in good agreement with available experimental data when inlet conditions of the dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy are appropriately prescribed. The three-dimensional quarter-symmetry simulation predicts the turbulent kinetic energy field significantly better than the two-dimensional centerplane simulations. These results lead to conclusions concerning deficiencies in the experimental data and the turbulence model.

Eyler, L.L.; Sawdye, R.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Conveying the Benefits of Employment: A Comparison of the Organizational Settings of California's AFDC and GAIN Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Settings of California’s AFDC and GAIN Programs Workingwith Dependent Children (AFDC), the cash assistance programand training program for AFDC recipients. A major conclusion

Jewell, Christopher; Glaser, Bonnie

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

A Comparison of Climates Simulated by a General Circulation Model when Run in the Annual Cycle and Perpetual Modes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison is made between the climate simulated by the Canadian Climate Centre (CCC) General Circulation Model when run its usual “annual cycle”mode, in which the solar declination angle varies annually, and the climate which is simulated when ...

F. W. Zwiers; G. J. Boer

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Tropical Oceanic Response to Extratropical Thermal Forcing in a Coupled Climate Model: A Comparison between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The tropical oceanic response to the extratropical thermal forcing is quantitatively estimated in a coupled climate model. This work focuses on comparison of the responses between the tropical Atlantic and Pacific. Under the same extratropical ...

Haijun Yang; Lu Wang

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Comparison between Nimbus-7 SMMR and ECMWF Model Analyses: The Problem of the Surface Latent Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nimbus-7 SMMR data of sea surface temperature, surface wind and precipitable water are compared to the ECMWF model daily analyzes for the first Special Observing Period of the FGGE Period (January-February 1979). The comparison of these fields ...

L. Eymard; C. Klapisz; R. Bernard

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A Comparison between Raw Ensemble Output, (Modified) Bayesian Model Averaging, and Extended Logistic Regression Using ECMWF Ensemble Precipitation Reforecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a 20-yr ECMWF ensemble reforecast dataset of total precipitation and a 20-yr dataset of a dense precipitation observation network in the Netherlands, a comparison is made between the raw ensemble output, Bayesian model averaging (BMA), and ...

Maurice J. Schmeits; Kees J. Kok

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Modeling of Plume Downwash and Enhanced Diffusion near Buildings: Comparison to Wind Tunnel Observations for in Arctic Industrial Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of a modified Industrial Source Complex model to simulate concentration distributions resulting from high wind speeds (neutral conditions) has been evaluated by comparison to data from a wind tunnel study of a Prudhoe Bay, AK oil-...

Alex Guenther; Brian Lamb; Ronald Petersen

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

A Comparison of the Noah and OSU Land Surface Models in the ECPC Seasonal Forecast Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Noah land surface model (LSM) has recently been implemented into the Experimental Climate Prediction Center’s (ECPC’s) global Seasonal Forecast Model (SFM). Its performance is compared to the older ECPC SFM with the Oregon State University (...

Laurel L. De Haan; Masao Kanamitsu; Cheng-Hsuan Lu; John O. Roads

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Statistical modelling of tropical cyclone tracks: a comparison of models for the variance of trajectories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe results from the second stage of a project to build a statistical model for hurricane tracks. In the first stage we modelled the unconditional mean track. We now attempt to model the unconditional variance of fluctuations around the mean. The variance models we describe use a semi-parametric nearest neighbours approach in which the optimal averaging length-scale is estimated using a jack-knife out-of-sample fitting procedure. We test three different models. These models consider the variance structure of the deviations from the unconditional mean track to be isotropic, anisotropic but uncorrelated, and anisotropic and correlated, respectively. The results show that, of these models, the anisotropic correlated model gives the best predictions of the distribution of future positions of hurricanes.

Hall, T; Hall, Tim; Jewson, Stephen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Commercial Prototype Building Models | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prototype Building Models Prototype Building Models The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of commercial building energy codes and standards by participating in review processes and providing analyses that are available for public review and use. To calculate the impact of ASHRAE Standard 90.1, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) created a suite of 16 prototype buildings covering 80% of the commercial building floor area in the United States for new construction, including both commercial buildings and mid- to high-rise buildings. These prototype buildings-derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models-cover all the reference building types except supermarkets, and also add a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings. As ASHRAE Standard 90.1

185

Performance Modeling of Shared Memory Programsof SharedMemory Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nus edu sg/~teoymURL: www.comp.nus.edu.sg/ teoym 7th Workshop on High Performance Computing UPM Analysis l i l d l­ Analytical Model · Summary 1 November 2011 47th Workshop on High Performance Computing November 2011 57th Workshop on High Performance Computing (invited talk) #12;R l t d W kRelated Work

Teo, Yong-Meng

186

Project Title Economic Modeling & Unconventional Gas Resource Appraisal Program Line Tough Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

support to assess the economic viability of new tough gas plays (tight gas, shale gas, CBM). Project are illustrated using the US shale gas plays as case templates. Discounted cash flow models are applied1 Project Title Economic Modeling & Unconventional Gas Resource Appraisal Program Line Tough Gas

Santos, Juan

187

Pre-processing Optimisation Applied to the Classical Integer Programming Model for Statistical Disclosure Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pre-processing optimisation is proposed that can be applied to the integer and mixed integer linear programming models that are used to solve the cell suppression problem in statistical disclosure control. In this paper we report our initial findings ... Keywords: Cell Suppression Problem, Classical Model, External Attacker, Pre-processing Optimisation, Statistical Disclosure Control

Martin Serpell; Alistair Clark; Jim Smith; Andrea Staggemeier

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Modeling Intercellular Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Intercellular Interactions During Radiation Carcinogenesis Modeling Intercellular Interactions During Radiation Carcinogenesis Authors: Rainer K Sachs,1 Michael Chan,2 Lynn Hlatky,3 Philip Hahnfeldt3 Institutions: 1Departments of Mathematics and Physics, University of California Berkeley California; 2School of Medicine, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla California; 3Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston Massachusetts Abstract By modulating the microenvironment of malignant or pre-malignant epithelial cells, inhibitory or stimulatory signals from nearby cells, including those in stromal and vascular tissues, can play a key role in carcinogenesis; cancer is ultimately a disease of a whole-cell community, not just of a single cell, clone, or cell lineage. However, current commonly used

189

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Computational Modeling of Biochemical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Modeling of Biochemical Pathways Linking Ionizing Computational Modeling of Biochemical Pathways Linking Ionizing Radiation to Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis, and Tumor Incidence Authors: Yuchao Maggie Zhao and Rory Conolly Institutions: Center for Computational Systems Biology CIIT Centers for Health Research Long-Range Goal: To develop an integrated, computational framework for the prediction of low-dose-response to ionizing radiation (IR) in people. Methodology: To provide a flexible framework to evaluate mechanisms of cellular adaptive responses after exposure to IR, three progressively more complicated descriptions of biochemical pathways linking DNA damage with cell-cycle checkpoint control and apoptosis were developed. These descriptions focus on p53-dependent checkpoint arrest and apoptosis, p73-dependent apoptosis, and Chk2-dependent checkpoint arrest,

190

Federal Energy Management Program: Model Acquisition Language for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Acquisition Language for Energy-Efficient Product Contracts Model Acquisition Language for Energy-Efficient Product Contracts Training Available Graphic of the eTraining logo Energy-Efficient Federal Purchasing: This intermediate FEMP eTraining course offers hands-on learning on finding, specifying, and selecting energy-efficient products. Energy-Efficient Product Procurement: This introductory FEMP First Thursday Seminar details executive order and Federal Acquisition Regulation requirements for purchasing FEMP-designated and ENERGY STAR products. Federal agencies must insert specific contract language for Energy Efficiency in Energy-Consuming Products as defined in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Section 52.223-15 in solicitations and contracts when ENERGY STAR®-qualified or FEMP-designated energy-consuming products are:

191

Comparison of Aermod and ISCST3 Models for Particulate Emissions from Ground Level Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emission factors (EFs) and results from dispersion models are key components in the air pollution regulatory process. The EPA preferred regulatory model changed from ISCST3 to AERMOD in November, 2007. Emission factors are used in conjunction with dispersion models to predict 24-hour concentrations that are compared to National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for determining the required control systems in permitting sources. This change in regulatory models has had an impact on the regulatory process and the industries regulated. In this study, EFs were developed for regulated particulate matter PM10 and PM2.5 from cotton harvesting. Measured concentrations of TSP and PM10 along with meteorological data were used in conjunction with the dispersion models ISCST3 and AERMOD, to determine the emission fluxes from cotton harvesting. The goal of this research was to document differences in emission factors as a consequence of the models used. The PM10 EFs developed for two-row and six-row pickers were 154 + 43 kg/km2 and 425 + 178 kg/km2, respectively. From the comparison between AERMOD and ISCST3, it was observed that AERMOD EFs were 1.8 times higher than ISCST3 EFs for Emission factors (EFs) and results from dispersion models are key components in the air pollution regulatory process. The EPA preferred regulatory model changed from ISCST3 to AERMOD in November, 2007. Emission factors are used in conjunction with dispersion models to predict 24-hour concentrations that are compared to National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for determining the required control systems in permitting sources. This change in regulatory models has had an impact on the regulatory process and the industries regulated. In this study, EFs were developed for regulated particulate matter PM10 and PM2.5 from cotton harvesting. Measured concentrations of TSP and PM10 along with meteorological data were used in conjunction with the dispersion models ISCST3 and AERMOD, to determine the emission fluxes from cotton harvesting. The goal of this research was to document differences in emission factors as a consequence of the models used. The PM10 EFs developed for two-row and six-row pickers were 154 + 43 kg/km2 and 425 + 178 kg/km2, respectively. From the comparison between AERMOD and ISCST3, it was observed that AERMOD EFs were 1.8 times higher than ISCST3 EFs for absence of solar radiation. Using AERMOD predictions of pollutant concentrations off property for regulatory purposes will likely affect a source?s ability to comply with limits set forth by State Air Pollution Regulatory Agencies (SAPRAs) and could lead to inappropriate regulation of the source.

Botlaguduru, Venkata Sai V.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Comparison of chiller models for use in model-based fault detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

detection and diagnosis (FDD). Factors that are consideredtheir applicability to model based FDD of vapor compressionextended equipment life. FDD involves two steps: detecting

Sreedharan, Priya; Haves, Philip

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Translation techniques for distributed-shared memory programming models  

SciTech Connect

The high performance computing community has experienced an explosive improvement in distributed-shared memory hardware. Driven by increasing real-world problem complexity, this explosion has ushered in vast numbers of new systems. Each new system presents new challenges to programmers and application developers. Part of the challenge is adapting to new architectures with new performance characteristics. Different vendors release systems with widely varying architectures that perform differently in different situations. Furthermore, since vendors need only provide a single performance number (total MFLOPS, typically for a single benchmark), they only have strong incentive initially to optimize the API of their choice. Consequently, only a fraction of the available APIs are well optimized on most systems. This causes issues porting and writing maintainable software, let alone issues for programmers burdened with mastering each new API as it is released. Also, programmers wishing to use a certain machine must choose their API based on the underlying hardware instead of the application. This thesis argues that a flexible, extensible translator for distributed-shared memory APIs can help address some of these issues. For example, a translator might take as input code in one API and output an equivalent program in another. Such a translator could provide instant porting for applications to new systems that do not support the application's library or language natively. While open-source APIs are abundant, they do not perform optimally everywhere. A translator would also allow performance testing using a single base code translated to a number of different APIs. Most significantly, this type of translator frees programmers to select the most appropriate API for a given application based on the application (and developer) itself instead of the underlying hardware.

Fuller, Douglas James

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Business Models for Code Compliance | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compliance Compliance Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Basics Compliance Evaluation Software & Web Tools Regulations Resource Center Business Models for Code Compliance The U.S. Department of Energy is coordinating strategies and activities with companies, individuals, and government entities to demonstrate, quantify, and monetize energy code compliance and coordinate deployment at the local, state, and regional levels. Consumer Assurance through Code Compliance Energy efficiency measures in the buildings sector, if properly realized and captured, provide a tremendous opportunity to reduce energy consumption and expenditures. Yet currently there is a lack of assurance that buildings as designed realize the levels of energy efficiency established in the

195

Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Extremophiles 2004 Extremophiles 2004 5th International Conference on Extremophiles SEPTEMBER 19 -23, 2004 CAMBRIDGE, MARYLAND Extremophiles 2004 5th International Conference on Extremophiles © 2004, American Society for Microbiology 1752 N Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20036-2904 Phone: 202-737-3600 World Wide Web: www.asm.org All Rights Reserved Printed in the United States of America ISBN: 1-55581 324-0 TABLE OF CONTENTS General Information Scientific Program Abstracts for Oral Sessions Abstracts for Poster Sessions Index 4 10 18 42 144 4 ASM Conferences EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Frank Robb, Chair University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute Michael W. Adams University of Georgia Koki Horikoshi Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology Robert M. Kelly North Carolina State University Jennifer Littlechild

196

A comparison of one and two dimensional models of transonic accretion discs around collapsed objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct models of the inner part of a transonic adiabatic accretion disc assuming constant specific angular momentum taking the vertical structure fully into account.\\\\ For comparison purposes, we construct the corresponding one dimensional viscous disc models derived under vertical averaging assumptions. The conditions under which a unique location for the critical/sonic point is obtained, given an appropriate set of exterior boundary conditions for these models, is also discussed. This is not unique if the standard '$\\alpha $' prescription with viscous stress proportional to the angular velocity gradient is used.\\\\ We use a simple model to discuss the possible limitations on the form of the viscous stress arising from the requirement that viscous information must travel at a finite speed. Contrary to results in the existing literature, the viscous stress tends to be {\\it increased} rather than reduced for the type of flows we consider in which the angular momentum and angular velocity gradients have opposite signs. However, finite propagation effects may result in a unique location for the sonic point.\\\\ We found good agreement between the radial flow and specific angular momentum profiles in the inner regions of the one dimensional models and those in the equatorial plane for corresponding two dimensional models which may be matched for a range of $\\alpha $ between 0.1 and 10$^{-4}$.

J. C. B. Papaloizou; E. Szuszkiewicz

1994-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

197

A Review of Ground Coupled Heat Pump Models Used in Whole-Building Computer Simulation Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasingly, building owners are turning to ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems to improve energy efficiency. Ground-coupled heat pump (GCHP) systems with a vertical closed ground loop heat exchanger are one of the more widely used systems. Over the last thirty years, a number of simulation models have been developed to calculate the performance of the ground heat exchanger (GHX). The several computer programs can evaluate the GCHP systems as a part of the whole-building energy simulation. This paper briefly presents a general introduction to GSHP systems and the GCHP system, and reviews the currently developed GCHP models and compares computer programs for a GCHP design. In addition, GHX models which play an important role on the GCHP performance are reviewed. Finally, several widely recognized computer simulation programs for building energy analysis are compared regarding their GCHP simulation capability.

Do, S. L.; Haberl, J. S.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Modeling of absorption heat pumps: solar applications employing chemical storage and steady-state modeling with a comparison to experiments  

SciTech Connect

This work develops simulation models for absorption heat pumps (AHPs) with the goal of enabling a more analytical approach to their study and design. A continuous, liquid absorbent AHP with chemical storage is modeled using mass and energy balances and assuming mass transfer equilibrium. This model is used with the TRNSYS program to simulate the performance of an AHP in a residential solar-driven heating and cooling system. The steady-state and cyclic testing of a prototype gas-fired ammonia-water AHP in an environmental chamber is described; measurements include temperatures, pressures, absorbent concentrations, flow rates and heat flows. The coefficient of performance and heating capacity depend most strongly on ambient temperature; varying the load water temperature and flow rate has lesser effects. The performance of the unit is sensitive to refrigerant charge, with the optimum charge varying with ambient temperature. This AHP shows a significant performance degradation in cyclic operation. A modular, steady-state simulation program for absorption heat pumps in developed and validated with experimental data. The model utilizes an analysis of the refrigerant and absorbent inventory to set the system pressures.

McLinden, M.O.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

A comparison of cloud microphysical quantities with forecasts from cloud prediction models  

SciTech Connect

Numerical weather prediction models (ECMWF, NCEP) are evaluated using ARM observational data collected at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Cloud forecasts generated by the models are compared with cloud microphysical quantities, retrieved using a variety of parameterizations. Information gained from this comparison will be utilized during the FASTER project, as models are evaluated for their ability to reproduce fast physical processes detected in the observations. Here the model performance is quantified against the observations through a statistical analysis. Observations from remote sensing instruments (radar, lidar, radiometer and radiosonde) are used to derive the cloud microphysical quantities: ice water content, liquid water content, ice effective radius and liquid effective radius. Unfortunately, discrepancies in the derived quantities arise when different retrieval schemes are applied to the observations. The uncertainty inherent in retrieving the microphysical quantities using various retrievals is estimated from the range of output microphysical values. ARM microphysical retrieval schemes (Microbase, Mace) are examined along with the CloudNet retrieval processing of data from the ARM sites for this purpose. Through the interfacing of CloudNet and “ARM” processing schemes an ARMNET product is produced and employed as accepted observations in the assessment of cloud model predictions.

Dunn, M.; Jensen, M.; Hogan, R.; O’Connor, E.; Huang, D.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Energy efficiency and the cost of GHG abatement: A comparison of bottom-up and hybrid models for the US  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas McKinsey a b s t r a c t A highly influential report by the McKinsey consulting firm suggests energy­economy models. Using the CIMS hybrid model, we conducted simulations for comparison with the McKinsey reserved. 1. Introduction The McKinsey consulting company has produced a number of country-specific studies

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201

THE PROPAGATION OF UNCERTAINTIES IN STELLAR POPULATION SYNTHESIS MODELING. III. MODEL CALIBRATION, COMPARISON, AND EVALUATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stellar population synthesis (SPS) provides the link between the stellar and dust content of galaxies and their observed spectral energy distributions. In the present work, we perform a comprehensive calibration of our own flexible SPS (FSPS) model against a suite of data. These data include ultraviolet, optical, and near-IR photometry, surface brightness fluctuations, and integrated spectra of star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds (MCs), M87, M31, and the Milky Way (MW), and photometry and spectral indices of both quiescent and post-starburst galaxies at z {approx} 0. Several public SPS models are intercompared, including the models of Bruzual and Charlot (BC03), Maraston (M05), and FSPS. The relative strengths and weaknesses of these models are evaluated, with the following conclusions: (1) the FSPS and BC03 models compare favorably with MC data at all ages, whereas M05 colors are too red and the age dependence is incorrect; (2) all models yield similar optical and near-IR colors for old metal-poor systems, and yet they all provide poor fits to the integrated J - K and V - K colors of both MW and M31 star clusters; (3) FSPS is able to fit all of the ultraviolet data because both the post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) and horizontal branch evolutionary phases are handled flexibly, while the BC03 and M05 models fail in the far-UV, and both far- and near-UV, respectively; (4) all models predict ugr colors too red, D{sub n}4000 strengths too strong, and Hdelta{sub A} strengths too weak compared to massive red sequence galaxies, under the assumption that such galaxies are composed solely of old metal-rich stars; and (5) FSPS and, to a lesser extent, BC03 can reproduce the optical and near-IR colors of post-starburst galaxies, while M05 cannot. Reasons for these discrepancies are explored. The failure at predicting the ugr colors, D{sub n}4000, and Hdelta{sub A} strengths can be explained by some combination of a minority population of metal-poor stars, young stars, blue straggler and/or blue horizontal branch (HB) stars, but not by appealing to inadequacies in either theoretical stellar atmospheres or canonical evolutionary phases (e.g., the main-sequence turnoff). The different model predictions in the near-IR for intermediate age systems are due to different treatments of the thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch stellar evolutionary phase. We emphasize that due to a lack of calibrating star cluster data in regions of the metallicity-age plane relevant for galaxies, all of these models continue to suffer from serious uncertainties that are difficult to quantify.

Conroy, Charlie; Gunn, James E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Mathematical models and algorithms for the computer program 'WOLF'  

SciTech Connect

The computer program FLOW finds the nonrelativistic self- consistent set of two-dimensional ion trajectories and electric fields (including space charges from ions and electrons) for a given set of initial and boundary conditions for the particles and fields. The combination of FLOW with the optimization code PISA gives the program WOLF, which finds the shape of the emitter which is consistent with the plasma forming it, and in addition varies physical characteristics such as electrode position, shapes, and potentials so that some performance characteristics are optimized. The motivation for developing these programs was the desire to design optimum ion source extractor/accelerator systems in a systematic fashion. The purpose of this report is to explain and derive the mathematical models and algorithms which approximate the real physical processes. It serves primarily to document the computer programs. 10 figures. (RWR)

Halbach, K.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

EnergyPlusDeST DOE-2.1E Building energy modeling programs comparison  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ST #12; 1 IEA BESTest ASHRAE Standard 140[1] [2] 1 EnergyPlus, DeST, DOE-2, ESP, BLAST TRNSYS 1 ASHRAE RP865[1] 2ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140 [4] 3 IEA SHC BESTest / [5] EnergyPlus [6] [7 4 EnergyPlus DeST 4 #12; 4 4.1 CAVVAV ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 EnergyPlus De

204

Bayesian Neural Networks for Uncertainty Analysis of Hydrologic Modeling: A Comparison of Two Schemes  

SciTech Connect

Bayesian Neural Networks (BNNs) have been shown as useful tools to analyze modeling uncertainty of Neural Networks (NNs). This research focuses on the comparison of two BNNs. The first BNNs (BNN-I) use statistical methods to describe the characteristics of different uncertainty sources (input, parameter, and model structure) and integrate these uncertainties into a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) framework to estimate total uncertainty. The second BNNs (BNN-II) lump all uncertainties into a single error term (i.e. the residual between model prediction and measurement). In this study, we propose a simple BNN-II, which use Genetic Algorithms (GA) and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) to calibrate Neural Networks with different structures (number of hidden units) and combine the predictions from different NNs to derive predictions and uncertainty analysis. We tested these two BNNs in two watersheds for daily and monthly hydrologic simulation. The BMA based BNNs developed in this study outperforms BNN-I in the two watersheds in terms of both accurate prediction and uncertainty estimation. These results show that, given incomplete understanding of the characteristics associated with each uncertainty source, the simple lumped error approach may yield better prediction and uncertainty estimation.

Zhang, Xuesong; Zhao, Kaiguang

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Teaching UML using umple: Applying model-oriented programming in the classroom  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show how a technology called Umple can be used to improve teaching UML and modeling. Umple allows UML to be viewed both textually and graphically, with updates to one view reflected in the other. It allows UML concepts to be added to programming languages, ...

Timothy C. Lethbridge; Gunter Mussbacher; Andrew Forward; Omar Badreddin

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Efficiently speeding up sequential computation through the n-way programming model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With core counts on the rise, the sequential components of applications are becoming the major bottleneck in performance scaling as predicted by Amdahl's law. We are therefore faced with the simultaneous problems of occupying an increasing number of ... Keywords: algorithmic diversity, n-way, parallel programming model, sequential computations, speedup

Romain E. Cledat; Tushar Kumar; Santosh Pande

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The Effect of Process Topology and Load Balancing on Parallel Programming Models for SMP Clusters and Iterative Algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article focuses on the effect of both process topology and load balancing on various programming models for SMP clusters and iterative algorithms. More specifically, we consider nested loop algorithms with constant flow dependencies, that can be ... Keywords: MPI, OpenMP, SMP clusters, high performance computing, hybrid programming, iterative algorithms, parallel programming, tiling

Nikolaos Drosinos; Nectarios Koziris

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Comparison of homogenized and enhanced diffusion solutions of model PWR problems  

SciTech Connect

Model problem comparisons in slab geometry are made between two forms of homogenized diffusion theory and enhanced diffusion theory. The pin-cell discontinuity factors for homogenized diffusion calculations are derived from homogenized variational nodal P1 response matrices and from standard finite differencing. Enhanced diffusion theory consists of applying quasi-reflected interface conditions to reduce variational nodal Pn response matrices to one degree of freedom per interface, without homogenization within the cell. As expected both homogenized diffusion methods preserve reaction rates exactly if the discontinuity factors are derived from the P 11 reference solutions. If no reference lattice solution is available, discontinuity factors may be approximated from single cells with reflected boundary conditions; the computational effort is then comparable to calculating the enhanced diffusion response matrices. In this situation enhanced diffusion theory gives the most accurate results and finite difference discontinuity factors the least accurate. (authors)

Lewis, E. E. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern Univ., 2145 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Smith, M. A. [Nuclear Engineering Div., Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) influences the market for plumbing fixtures and fittings by encouraging consumers to purchase products that carry the WaterSense label, which certifies those products as performing at low flow rates compared to unlabeled fixtures and fittings. As consumers decide to purchase water-efficient products, water consumption will decline nationwide. Decreased water consumption should prolong the operating life of water and wastewater treatment facilities.This report describes the method used to calculate national water savings attributable to EPA?s WaterSense program. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet model, the National Water Savings (NWS) analysis model, accompanies this methodology report. Version 1.0 of the NWS model evaluates indoor residential water consumption. Two additional documents, a Users? Guide to the spreadsheet model and an Impacts Report, accompany the NWS model and this methodology document. Altogether, these four documents represent Phase One of this project. The Users? Guide leads policy makers through the spreadsheet options available for projecting the water savings that result from various policy scenarios. The Impacts Report shows national water savings that will result from differing degrees of market saturation of high-efficiency water-using products.This detailed methodology report describes the NWS analysis model, which examines the effects of WaterSense by tracking the shipments of products that WaterSense has designated as water-efficient. The model estimates market penetration of products that carry the WaterSense label. Market penetration is calculated for both existing and new construction. The NWS model estimates savings based on an accounting analysis of water-using products and of building stock. Estimates of future national water savings will help policy makers further direct the focus of WaterSense and calculate stakeholder impacts from the program.Calculating the total gallons of water the WaterSense program saves nationwide involves integrating two components, or modules, of the NWS model. Module 1 calculates the baseline national water consumption of typical fixtures, fittings, and appliances prior to the program (as described in Section 2.0 of this report). Module 2 develops trends in efficiency for water-using products both in the business-as-usual case and as a result of the program (Section 3.0). The NWS model combines the two modules to calculate total gallons saved by the WaterSense program (Section 4.0). Figure 1 illustrates the modules and the process involved in modeling for the NWS model analysis.The output of the NWS model provides the base case for each end use, as well as a prediction of total residential indoor water consumption during the next two decades. Based on the calculations described in Section 4.0, we can project a timeline of water savings attributable to the WaterSense program. The savings increase each year as the program results in the installation of greater numbers of efficient products, which come to compose more and more of the product stock in households throughout the United States.

Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; McNeil, Michael; Dunham_Whitehead, Camilla; Letschert, Virginie; della_Cava, Mirka

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

210

Expand the Modeling Capabilities of DOE's EnergyPlus Building Energy Simulation Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

EnergyPlus{trademark} is a new generation computer software analysis tool that has been developed, tested, and commercialized to support DOE's Building Technologies (BT) Program in terms of whole-building, component, and systems R&D (http://www.energyplus.gov). It is also being used to support evaluation and decision making of zero energy building (ZEB) energy efficiency and supply technologies during new building design and existing building retrofits. Version 1.0 of EnergyPlus was released in April 2001, followed by semiannual updated versions over the ensuing seven-year period. This report summarizes work performed by the University of Central Florida's Florida Solar Energy Center (UCF/FSEC) to expand the modeling capabilities of EnergyPlus. The project tasks involved implementing, testing, and documenting the following new features or enhancement of existing features: (1) A model for packaged terminal heat pumps; (2) A model for gas engine-driven heat pumps with waste heat recovery; (3) Proper modeling of window screens; (4) Integrating and streamlining EnergyPlus air flow modeling capabilities; (5) Comfort-based controls for cooling and heating systems; and (6) An improved model for microturbine power generation with heat recovery. UCF/FSEC located existing mathematical models or generated new model for these features and incorporated them into EnergyPlus. The existing or new models were (re)written using Fortran 90/95 programming language and were integrated within EnergyPlus in accordance with the EnergyPlus Programming Standard and Module Developer's Guide. Each model/feature was thoroughly tested and identified errors were repaired. Upon completion of each model implementation, the existing EnergyPlus documentation (e.g., Input Output Reference and Engineering Document) was updated with information describing the new or enhanced feature. Reference data sets were generated for several of the features to aid program users in selecting proper model inputs. An example input data file, suitable for distribution to EnergyPlus users, was created for each new or improved feature to illustrate the input requirements for the model.

Don Shirey

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

211

Expand the Modeling Capabilities of DOE's EnergyPlus Building Energy Simulation Program  

SciTech Connect

EnergyPlus{trademark} is a new generation computer software analysis tool that has been developed, tested, and commercialized to support DOE's Building Technologies (BT) Program in terms of whole-building, component, and systems R&D (http://www.energyplus.gov). It is also being used to support evaluation and decision making of zero energy building (ZEB) energy efficiency and supply technologies during new building design and existing building retrofits. Version 1.0 of EnergyPlus was released in April 2001, followed by semiannual updated versions over the ensuing seven-year period. This report summarizes work performed by the University of Central Florida's Florida Solar Energy Center (UCF/FSEC) to expand the modeling capabilities of EnergyPlus. The project tasks involved implementing, testing, and documenting the following new features or enhancement of existing features: (1) A model for packaged terminal heat pumps; (2) A model for gas engine-driven heat pumps with waste heat recovery; (3) Proper modeling of window screens; (4) Integrating and streamlining EnergyPlus air flow modeling capabilities; (5) Comfort-based controls for cooling and heating systems; and (6) An improved model for microturbine power generation with heat recovery. UCF/FSEC located existing mathematical models or generated new model for these features and incorporated them into EnergyPlus. The existing or new models were (re)written using Fortran 90/95 programming language and were integrated within EnergyPlus in accordance with the EnergyPlus Programming Standard and Module Developer's Guide. Each model/feature was thoroughly tested and identified errors were repaired. Upon completion of each model implementation, the existing EnergyPlus documentation (e.g., Input Output Reference and Engineering Document) was updated with information describing the new or enhanced feature. Reference data sets were generated for several of the features to aid program users in selecting proper model inputs. An example input data file, suitable for distribution to EnergyPlus users, was created for each new or improved feature to illustrate the input requirements for the model.

Don Shirey

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

212

Comparison of high pressure transient PVT measurements and model predictions. Part I.  

SciTech Connect

A series of experiments consisting of vessel-to-vessel transfers of pressurized gas using Transient PVT methodology have been conducted to provide a data set for optimizing heat transfer correlations in high pressure flow systems. In rapid expansions such as these, the heat transfer conditions are neither adiabatic nor isothermal. Compressible flow tools exist, such as NETFLOW that can accurately calculate the pressure and other dynamical mechanical properties of such a system as a function of time. However to properly evaluate the mass that has transferred as a function of time these computational tools rely on heat transfer correlations that must be confirmed experimentally. In this work new data sets using helium gas are used to evaluate the accuracy of these correlations for receiver vessel sizes ranging from 0.090 L to 13 L and initial supply pressures ranging from 2 MPa to 40 MPa. The comparisons show that the correlations developed in the 1980s from sparse data sets perform well for the supply vessels but are not accurate for the receivers, particularly at early time during the transfers. This report focuses on the experiments used to obtain high quality data sets that can be used to validate computational models. Part II of this report discusses how these data were used to gain insight into the physics of gas transfer and to improve vessel heat transfer correlations. Network flow modeling and CFD modeling is also discussed.

Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.; Winters, William Stanley, Jr.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Comparison of Geophysical Model Functions for SAR Wind Speed Retrieval in Japanese Coastal Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This work discusses the accuracies of geophysical model functions (GMFs) for retrieval of sea surface wind speed from satellite-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images in Japanese coastal waters characterized by short fetches and variable atmospheric stability conditions. In situ observations from two validation sites, Hiratsuka and Shirahama, are used for comparison of the retrieved sea surface wind speeds using CMOD (C-band model)4, CMOD_IFR2, CMOD5 and CMOD5.N. Of all the geophysical model functions (GMFs), the latest C-band GMF, CMOD5.N, has the smallest bias and root mean square error at both sites. All of the GMFs exhibit a negative bias in the retrieved wind speed. In order to understand the reason for this bias, all SAR-retrieved wind speeds are separated into two categories: onshore wind (blowing from sea to land) and offshore wind (blowing from land to sea). Only offshore winds were found to exhibit the large negative bias, and short fetches from the coastline may be a possible reason for this. Moreover, it is clarified that in both the unstable and stable conditions, CMOD5.N has atmospheric stability effectiveness, and can keep the same accuracy with CMOD5 in the neutral condition. In short, at the moment, CMOD5.N is thought to be the most promising GMF

Yuko Takeyama; Teruo Ohsawa; Katsutoshi Kozai; Charlotte Bay Hasager; Merete Badger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

A Comparison of Forecast Error Generators for Modeling Wind and Load Uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents four algorithms to generate random forecast error time series. The performance of four algorithms is compared. The error time series are used to create real-time (RT), hour-ahead (HA), and day-ahead (DA) wind and load forecast time series that statistically match historically observed forecasting data sets used in power grid operation to study the net load balancing need in variable generation integration studies. The four algorithms are truncated-normal distribution models, state-space based Markov models, seasonal autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models, and a stochastic-optimization based approach. The comparison is made using historical DA load forecast and actual load values to generate new sets of DA forecasts with similar stoical forecast error characteristics (i.e., mean, standard deviation, autocorrelation, and cross-correlation). The results show that all methods generate satisfactory results. One method may preserve one or two required statistical characteristics better the other methods, but may not preserve other statistical characteristics as well compared with the other methods. Because the wind and load forecast error generators are used in wind integration studies to produce wind and load forecasts time series for stochastic planning processes, it is sometimes critical to use multiple methods to generate the error time series to obtain a statistically robust result. Therefore, this paper discusses and compares the capabilities of each algorithm to preserve the characteristics of the historical forecast data sets.

Lu, Ning; Diao, Ruisheng; Hafen, Ryan P.; Samaan, Nader A.; Makarov, Yuri V.

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

215

IMPROVEMENTS IN HANFORD TRANSURANIC (TRU) PROGRAM UTILIZING SYSTEMS MODELING AND ANALYSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hanford's Transuranic (TRU) Program is responsible for certifying contact-handled (CH) TRU waste and shipping the certified waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Hanford's CH TRU waste includes material that is in retrievable storage as well as above ground storage, and newly generated waste. Certifying a typical container entails retrieving and then characterizing it (Real-Time Radiography, Non-Destructive Assay, and Head Space Gas Sampling), validating records (data review and reconciliation), and designating the container for a payload. The certified payload is then shipped to WIPP. Systems modeling and analysis techniques were applied to Hanford's TRU Program to help streamline the certification process and increase shipping rates.

UYTIOCO EM

2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

216

Comparison of model estimated and measured direct-normal solar irradiance  

SciTech Connect

Direct-normal solar irradiance (DNSI), the energy in the solar spectrum incident in unit time at the Earth{close_quote}s surface on a unit area perpendicular to the direction to the Sun, depends only on atmospheric extinction of solar energy without regard to the details of the extinction, whether absorption or scattering. Here we report a set of closure experiments performed in north central Oklahoma in April 1996 under cloud-free conditions, wherein measured atmospheric composition and aerosol optical thickness are input to a radiative transfer model, MODTRAN 3, to estimate DNSI, which is then compared with measured values obtained with normal incidence pyrheliometers and absolute cavity radiometers. Uncertainty in aerosol optical thickness (AOT) dominates the uncertainty in DNSI calculation. AOT measured by an independently calibrated Sun photometer and a rotating shadow-band radiometer agree to within the uncertainties of each measurement. For 36 independent comparisons the agreement between measured and model-estimated values of DNSI falls within the combined uncertainties in the measurement (0.3{endash}0.7{percent}) and model calculation (1.8{percent}), albeit with a slight average model underestimate ({minus}0.18{plus_minus}0.94){percent}; for a DNSI of 839Wm{sup {minus}2} this corresponds to {minus}1.5{plus_minus}7.9Wm{sup {minus}2}. The agreement is nearly independent of air mass and water-vapor path abundance. These results thus establish the accuracy of the current knowledge of the solar spectrum, its integrated power, and the atmospheric extinction as a function of wavelength as represented in MODTRAN 3. An important consequence is that atmospheric absorption of short-wave energy is accurately parametrized in the model to within the above uncertainties. {copyright} 1997 American Geophysical Union

Halthore, R.N.; Schwartz, S.E. [Department of Applied Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York (United States)] [Department of Applied Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York (United States); Michalsky, J.J. [Atmospheric Sciences Research Center, State University of New York at Albany (United States)] [Atmospheric Sciences Research Center, State University of New York at Albany (United States); Anderson, G.P. [Phillips Laboratory/Geophysics Directorate, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts (United States)] [Phillips Laboratory/Geophysics Directorate, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts (United States); Ferrare, R.A. [Hughes STX Corporation, Lanham, Maryland (United States)] [Hughes STX Corporation, Lanham, Maryland (United States); Holben, B.N. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (United States)] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (United States); Ten Brink, H.M. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, ECN, Petten (Netherlands)] [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, ECN, Petten (Netherlands)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Converter Program: PSADD Dictionary for Dynamics Model, Version 2.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual contains a listing of the PSADD dictionary for PSS/E dynamics models. The format of this dictionary is the same as that used for the "main" PSADD. Wherever possible, dictionary names and data types are the same as those used in the "main" PSADD. Please note that not all of the PSS/E dynamics models have been included in this dictionary and are convertible by the CONVERTER program. EPRI advisors and PTI engineers selected the models for inclusion based on the perceived "usefulness" of the mode...

2000-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

218

Glass Furnace Model (GFM) development and technology transfer program final report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Glass Furnace Model (GFM) was developed under a cost-shared R&D program by the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory in close collaboration with a consortium of five glass industry members: Techneglas, Inc., Owens-Corning, Libbey, Inc., Osram Sylvania, Inc., and Visteon, Inc. Purdue University and Mississippi State University's DIAL Laboratory were also collaborators in the consortium. The GFM glass furnace simulation model that was developed is a tool industry can use to help define and evaluate furnace design changes and operating strategies to: (1) reduce energy use per unit of production; (2) solve problems related to production and glass quality by defining optimal operating windows to reduce cullet generation due to rejects and maximize throughput; and (3) make changes in furnace design and/or operation to reduce critical emissions, such as NO{sub x} and particulates. A two-part program was pursued to develop and validate the furnace model. The focus of the Part I program was to develop a fully coupled furnace model which had the requisite basic capabilities for furnace simulation. The principal outcome from the Phase I program was a furnace simulation model, GFM 2.0, which was copyrighted. The basic capabilities of GFM 2.0 were: (1) built-in burner models that can be included in the combustion space simulation; (2) a participating media spectral radiation model that maintains local and global energy balances throughout the furnace volume; and (3) a multiphase (liquid, solid) melt model that calculates (does not impose) the batch-melting rate and the batch length. The key objectives of the Part II program, which overlapped the Part I program were: (1) to incorporate a full multiphase flow analytical capability with reduced glass chemistry models in the glass melt model and thus be able to compute and track key solid, gas, and liquid species through the melt and the combustion space above; and (2) to incorporate glass quality indices into the simulation to facilitate optimization studies with regard to productivity, energy use and emissions. Midway through the Part II program, however, at the urging of the industrial consortium members, the decision was made to refocus limited resources on transfer of the existing GFM 2.0 software to the industry to speed up commercialization of the technology. This decision, in turn, necessitated a de-emphasis of the development of the planned final version of the GFM software that had full multiphase capability, GFM 3.0. As a result, version 3.0 was not completed; considerable progress, however, was made before the effort was terminated. The objectives of the Technology Transfer program were to transfer the Glass Furnace Model (GFM) to the glass industry and to promote its widespread use by providing the requisite technical support to allow effective use of the software. GFM Version 2.0 was offered at no cost on a trial, six-month basis to expedite its introduction to and use by the industry. The trial licenses were issued to generate a much more thorough user beta test of the software than the relatively small amount completed by the consortium members prior to the release of version 2.0.

Lottes, S. A.; Petrick, M.; Energy Systems

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

219

Explicit/multi-parametric model predictive control (MPC) of linear discrete-time systems by dynamic and multi-parametric programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents a new algorithm for solving the explicit/multi-parametric model predictive control (or mp-MPC) problem for linear, time-invariant discrete-time systems, based on dynamic programming and multi-parametric programming techniques. The ... Keywords: Dynamic programming, Explicit Model Predictive Control, Model Predictive Control, Multi-parametric control, Multi-parametric programming

K. I. Kouramas; N. P. Faísca; C. Panos; E. N. Pistikopoulos

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Evaluating the SWAT Model for Hydrological Modeling in the Xixian Watershed and A Comparison with the XAJ Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Already declining water availability in Huaihe River, the 6th largest river in China, is further stressed by climate change and intense human activities. There is a pressing need for a watershed model to better understand the interaction between land use activities and hydrologic processes and to support sustainable water use planning. In this study, we evaluated the performance of SWAT for hydrologic modeling in the Xixian River Basin, located at the headwaters of the Huaihe River, and compared its performance with the Xinanjiang (XAJ) model that has been widely used in China

Shi, Peng; Chen, Chao; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Zhang, Xuesong; Cai, Tao; Fang, Xiuqin; Qu, Simin; Chen, Xi; Li, Qiongfang

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

On Intermediate Models for Barotropic Continental Shelf and Slope Flow Fields. Part II: Comparison of Numerical Model Solutions in Doubly Periodic Domains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a program to improve understanding of the dynamics of the complicated, vigorous eddy and jet flow fields recently observed over the continental shelf and slope, we investigate the potential of intermediate models for use in both ...

J. A. Barth; J. S. Allen; P. A. Newberger

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS TO CFD MODELS FOR BLENDING IN A TANK USING DUAL OPPOSING JETS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research has been completed in a pilot scale, eight foot diameter tank to investigate blending, using a pump with dual opposing jets. The jets re-circulate fluids in the tank to promote blending when fluids are added to the tank. Different jet diameters and different horizontal and vertical orientations of the jets were investigated. In all, eighty five tests were performed both in a tank without internal obstructions and a tank with vertical obstructions similar to a tube bank in a heat exchanger. These obstructions provided scale models of several miles of two inch diameter, serpentine, vertical cooling coils below the liquid surface for a full scale, 1.3 million gallon, liquid radioactive waste storage tank. Two types of tests were performed. One type of test used a tracer fluid, which was homogeneously blended into solution. Data were statistically evaluated to determine blending times for solutions of different density and viscosity, and the blending times were successfully compared to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. The other type of test blended solutions of different viscosity. For example, in one test a half tank of water was added to a half tank of a more viscous, concentrated salt solution. In this case, the fluid mechanics of the blending process was noted to significantly change due to stratification of fluids. CFD models for stratification were not investigated. This paper is the fourth in a series of papers resulting from this research (Leishear, et.al. [1- 4]), and this paper documents final test results, statistical analysis of the data, a comparison of experimental results to CFD models, and scale-up of the results to a full scale tank.

Leishear, R.

2011-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

223

Comparison of Model Forecast Skill of Sea-Level Pressure Along the East and West Coasts of the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Comparison of Model Forecast Skill of Sea-Level Pressure Along the East and West Coasts, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington Submitted to: Weather and Forecasting May 2008 Revised recent advances in numerical weather prediction, major errors in short-range forecasts still occur

Mass, Clifford F.

224

HEAP: heat energy analysis program. A computer model simulating solar receivers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal design of solar receivers is commonly accomplished via approximate models, where the receiver is treated as an isothermal box with lumped quantities of heat losses to the surroundings by radiation, conduction and convection. These approximate models, though adequate for preliminary design purposes, are not detailed enough to distinguish between different receiver designs, or to predict transient performance under variable solar flux, ambient temperatures, etc. A computer code has been written for this purpose and is given the name HEAP, an acronym for Heat Energy Analysis Program. HEAP has a basic structure that fits a general heat transfer problem, but with specific features that are custom-made for solar receivers. The code is written in MBASIC computer language. This document explains the detailed methodology followed in solving the heat transfer problem, and includes a program flow chart, an explanation of input and output tables, and an example of the simulation of a cavity-type solar receiver.

Lansing, F.L.

1979-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Early Site Permit Demonstration Program, plant parameters envelopes: Comparison with ranges of values for four hypothetical sites. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this volume is to report the results of the comparison of the ALWR plan parameters envelope with values of site characteristics developed for our hypothetical sites that generally represent conditions encountered within the United States. This effort is not intended to identify or address the suitability of any existing site, site area, or region in the United States. Also included in this volume is Appendix F, SERCH Summaries Regarding Siting.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A hybrid programming model for compressible gas dynamics using openCL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current trend towards multicore/manycore and accelerated architectures presents challenges, both in portability, and also in the choices that developers must make on how to use the resources that these architectures provide. This paper explores some of the possibilities that are enabled by the Open Computing Language (OpenCL), and proposes a programming model that allows developers and scientists to more fully subscribe hybrid compute nodes, while, at the same time, reducing the impact of system failure.

Bergen, Benjamin Karl [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daniels, Marcus G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Weber, Paul M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Use of Models to Reduce Uncertainty and Improve Ecological Effectiveness of Water Quality Trading Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through a United States Department of Agriculture-Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA-NRCS) Conservation Innovation Grant, collaborators working on the development of the interstate Ohio River Basin Water Quality Trading Program (www.epri.com/ohiorivertrading) have conducted a robust analysis to evaluate possible approaches for using water quality models for crediting nutrient load reductions from agricultural best management practices (BMPs). A credit estimation method that ensures reliable and...

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

228

Duality, thermodynamics, and the linear programming problem in constraint-based models of metabolism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that the dual to the linear programming problem that arises in constraint-based models of metabolism can be given a thermodynamic interpretation in which the shadow prices are chemical potential analogues, and the objective is to minimise free energy consumption given a free energy drain corresponding to growth. The interpretation is distinct from conventional non-equilibrium thermodynamics, although it does satisfy a minimum entropy production principle. It can be used to motivate extensions of constraint-based modelling, for example to microbial ecosystems.

Patrick B. Warren; Janette L. Jones

2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

229

90.1 Prototype Building Models Large Hotel | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hotel Hotel The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

230

90.1 Prototype Building Models Large Office | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office Office The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

231

90.1 Prototype Building Models Small Office | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office Office The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

232

90.1 Prototype Building Models Strip Mall | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strip Mall Strip Mall The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

233

90.1 Prototype Building Models Small Hotel | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hotel Hotel The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

234

90.1 Prototype Building Models Hospital | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hospital Hospital The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

235

Final Report - From Measurements to Models: Cross-Comparison of Measured and Simulated Behavioral States of the Atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

The ARM sites and the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) were constructed to make measurements of the atmosphere and radiation system in order to quantify deficiencies in the simulation of clouds within models and to make improvements in those models. While the measurement infrastructure of ARM is well-developed and a model parameterization testbed capability has been established, additional effort is needed to develop statistical techniques which permit the comparison of simulation output from atmospheric models with actual measurements. Our project establishes a new methodology for objectively comparing ARM measurements to the outputs of leading global climate models and reanalysis data. The quantitative basis for this comparison is provided by a statistical procedure which establishes an exhaustive set of mutually-exclusive, recurring states of the atmosphere from sets of multivariate atmospheric and cloud conditions, and then classifies multivariate measurements or simulation outputs into those states. Whether measurements and models classify the atmosphere into the same states at specific locations through time provides an unequivocal comparison result. Times and locations in both geographic and state space of model-measurement agreement and disagreement will suggest directions for the collection of additional measurements at existing sites, provide insight into the global representativeness of the current ARM sites (suggesting locations and times for use of the AMF), and provide a basis for improvement of models. Two different analyses were conducted: One, using the Parallel Climate Model, focused on an IPCC climate change scenario and clusters that characterize long-term changes in the hydrologic cycle. The other, using the GISS Model E GCM and the ARM Active Remotely Sensed Cloud Layers product, explored current climate cloud regimes in the Tropical West Pacific.

Del Genio, Anthony D; Hoffman, Forrest M; Hargrove, Jr, William W

2007-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

236

The Lifecycle of Bayesian Network Models Developed for Multi-Source Signature Assessment of Nuclear Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Multi-Source Signatures for Nuclear Programs project, part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) Signature Discovery Initiative, seeks to computationally capture expert assessment of multi-type information such as text, sensor output, imagery, or audio/video files, to assess nuclear activities through a series of Bayesian network (BN) models. These models incorporate knowledge from a diverse range of information sources in order to help assess a country’s nuclear activities. The models span engineering topic areas, state-level indicators, and facility-specific characteristics. To illustrate the development, calibration, and use of BN models for multi-source assessment, we present a model that predicts a country’s likelihood to participate in the international nuclear nonproliferation regime. We validate this model by examining the extent to which the model assists non-experts arrive at conclusions similar to those provided by nuclear proliferation experts. We also describe the PNNL-developed software used throughout the lifecycle of the Bayesian network model development.

Gastelum, Zoe N.; White, Amanda M.; Whitney, Paul D.; Gosink, Luke J.; Sego, Landon H.

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

237

An Architecture for Agent-Oriented Programming with a Programmable Model of Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed computing, where the underlying network is complex, heterogeneous and unreliable, is hard to realize with traditional approaches. Energy Distribution Automation (DA), where the power line is used for communication, and the processing is highly distributed, is our application domain for assessments of new technologies for this kind of system. In this paper we propose a Multi-Agent approach with a large expected number of heavily distributed, medium grain agents. The concept of Agent-Oriented Programming (AOP) is adopted, and an architecture, the DA-SoC, is developed. The language DAAL is used for programming the agents, and the most important feature is a novel programmable Model of Interaction (MoI), which allows the user to tailor agent interaction and the social behaviour of agents in the society. The semantic addressing is a powerful abstraction mechanism, that facilitates run-time network management. The emphasis of the paper is on describing and analysing the architect...

Staffan Hagg; Fredrig Ygge

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

An Architecture for Agent-Oriented Programming with a Programmable Model of Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed computing, where the underlying network is complex, heterogeneous and unreliable, is hard to realize with traditional approaches. Energy Distribution Automation (DA), where the power line is used for communication, and the processing is highly distributed, is our application domain for assessments of new technologies for this kind of system. In this paper we propose a Multi-Agent approach with a large expected number of heavily distributed, medium grain agents. The concept of Agent-Oriented Programming (AOP) is adopted, and an architecture, the DA-SoC, is developed. The language DAAL is used for programming the agents, and the most important feature is a novel programmable Model of Interaction (MoI), which allows the user to tailor agent interaction and the social behaviour of agents in the society. The semantic addressing is a powerful abstraction mechanism, that facilitates run-time network management. The emphasis of the paper is on describing and analysing th...

Ac Ti On; Staffan Hägg; Fredrik Ygge

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

On the Use of a Mixed Integer Nonlinear Programming Model for Refrigerant Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, a novel mixed integer nonlinear programming model for single component refrigerant design is presented. At the heart of the approach is a new formulation for structural feasibility that allows multiple bonds, connectivity and isomers. The strategy defines a set of structural groups (consisting of atoms), subsets of which are combined to form refrigerant molecules. Molecules formed this way must obey structural and stability constraints. The design objective is to build a refrigerant molecule that has desired physical properties and performance characteristics. These attributes are formulated as mathematical programming constraints and performance objectives which involve both continuous and integer variables. With the current renewed interest in the environment, the suggested approach is applied to refrigerant design with an environmental constraint. The results indicate the viability and the flexibility of the approach. 1 Introduction The search for new compounds wit...

In International; Nachiket Churi; Luke E. K. Achenie; Copyright Luke; E. K. Achenie

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

TSD capacity model interface with waste reduction planning in the Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a picture of how the integration of waste generation forecasting with treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) capacity modeling interfaces with waste reduction planning in the Environmental Restoration Program. Background information is given for the major activities at the seven Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., sites: (1) Oak Ridge National Laboratory; (2) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant; (3) Oak Ridge K-25 Site; (4) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant; (5) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant; (6) Oak Ridge Associated Universities; and (7) the off-site contaminated areas near DOE facilities. A perspective is provided for strategies to achieve waste reduction, how waste generation forecasts rates were developed, and how those forecasted waste generation rates will be used in TSD capacity modeling. The generation forecasting in combination with TSD modeling allows development of quantifiable goals and subsequent waste reduction. 2 figs.

Phifer, B.E. Jr.; Grumski, J.T.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Stack and cell modelling with SOFC3D: a computer program for the 3D simulations of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stack and cell modelling with SOFC3D: a computer program for the 3D simulations of solid oxide fuel, France 1 Introduction SOFC3D is a computer program, which simulates the behaviour of a solid oxide fuel or the channels, the electrical potential \\Phi at any point of the solid part of the SOFC, and the molar fractions

Herbin, Raphaèle

242

Program on Technology Innovation: A Preliminary Hybrid Model of Nickel Alloy Stress Corrosion Crack Propagation in PWR Primary Water Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of nickel-based alloys in pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environments is a well-known issue in the nuclear power industry. Empirical models have been developed for this alloy/environment system, including the Scott model; the similar Materials Reliability Program, MRP-55 model for Alloy 600; and the MRP-115 model for weld metal. A model of the effects of dissolved hydrogen concentration, temperature, and the resulting electrochemical potent...

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

243

Comparison of Experimental and Theoretical Forces on a Model Dredge Cutterhead  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dredging is a critical part of maintaining the nation’s ports and harbors that play a major role in international trade. The design of dredge equipment requires knowledge of the forces expected on an average dredge. For a cutter suction dredge one of the largest forces is applied on the cutter head. To determine the design criteria for a given cutter suction dredge the forces on the cutter head must be known. Forces on a 33 cm (13 inch) model cutter head have been measured using a model cutter suction dredge 10.2 cm ( (4 inch)) suction and 3 inch (7.6 cm) discharge) in the Haynes Coastal Engineering Laboratory. The experimental results are compared to the results of a previously developed theory for estimating cutterhead forces. A MATLAB program is written and used to solve the theoretical equations. The sediment used in the study had a d50 of 0.27 mm and an angle of internal friction of 21.6°. The sediment is contained in the deep sediment pit 7.6 m (25 ft long), 3.7 m wide(12 ft ) and 1.5 m deep(5 ft) in the dredge/tow tank that is 45.7 m long(150 ft), 3.7 m wide(12 ft), and 3.0 m deep(10 ft). The objectives of the study are to calculate the forces using existing theory and MATLAB program and compare the theoretical results to those measured in the laboratory. The effects of the depth of cut, direction of swing, and cutter rpm on the forces acting on the cutter head are evaluated. The forces on the cutterhead are determined through the use of a set of six load cells rated at 13.3 kN (3000 lb). The load cell measurements allow direct calculation of the forces on the cutter head through the use of static equilibrium equations with the assumption of a constant swing speed. Once the forces are determined the results can be scaled to fit an actual dredge and then be applied in the determination of dredge design characteristics. The study shows the ability of the theory to determine the forces within an order or magnitude. The theoretical forces allow design of a cutter using a factor of safety. The variability of the forces in the laboratory study shows the assumption that the cutting forces are generally steady is not always valid.

Permenter, Rusty

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Comparison and validation of HEU and LEU modeling results to HEU experimental benchmark data for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology MITR reactor.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like the MITR-II reactor. Towards this goal, comparisons of MCNP5 Monte Carlo neutronic modeling results for HEU and LEU cores have been performed. Validation of the model has been based upon comparison to HEU experimental benchmark data for the MITR-II. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a model which could represent the experimental HEU data, and therefore could provide a basis to demonstrate LEU core performance. This report presents an overview of MITR-II model geometry and material definitions which have been verified, and updated as required during the course of validation to represent the specifications of the MITR-II reactor. Results of calculations are presented for comparisons to historical HEU start-up data from 1975-1976, and to other experimental benchmark data available for the MITR-II Reactor through 2009. This report also presents results of steady state neutronic analysis of an all-fresh LEU fueled core. Where possible, HEU and LEU calculations were performed for conditions equivalent to HEU experiments, which serves as a starting point for safety analyses for conversion of MITR-II from the use of HEU fuel to the use of UMo LEU fuel.

Newton, T. H.; Wilson, E. H; Bergeron, A.; Horelik, N.; Stevens, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (MIT Nuclear Reactor Lab.)

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

245

The impact of parallel programming models on the performance of iterative linear solvers for finite element applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parallel iterative linear solvers for unstructured grids in FEM applications, originally developed for the Earth Simulator (ES), are ported to various types of parallel computer. The performance of flat MPI and hybrid parallel programming models is compared ...

Kengo Nakajima

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Three-Dimensional Numerical Model Simulations of Airflow Over Mountainous Terrain: A Comparison with Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of airflow over two different choices of mountainous terrain and the comparisons of results with aircraft observations are presented. Two wintertime casts for flow over Elk Mountain, Wyoming where surface heating is assumed ...

Terry L. Clark; Robert Gall

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Annex XXIII: Phase II Results Regarding Monopile Foundation Modeling  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview and describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, which operates under Subtask 2 of the International Energy Agency Wind Annex XXIII.

Jonkman, J.; Butterfield, S.; Passon, P.; Larsen, T.; Camp, T.; Nichols, J.; Azcona, J.; Martinez, A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

MODELLING OF BURNING AND EXTINCTION CHARACTERISTICS OF A POLYMER DIFFUSION FLAME AND COMPARISON WITH EXPERIMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Seshadri, K. : Combustion and Flame, 26, 363, 1976. ActaD.P. and Prahl, J.M. : and Flame 33, 55, 1978. Burke, S.P.OF A POLYMER DIFFUSION FLAME AND COMPARISON WITH EXPERIMENT

Pitz, W.J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

MT3D: a 3 dimensional magnetotelluric modeling program (user's guide and documentation for Rev. 1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

MT3D.REV1 is a non-interactive computer program written in FORTRAN to do 3-dimensional magnetotelluric modeling. A 3-D volume integral equation has been adapted to simulate the MT response of a 3D body in the earth. An integro-difference scheme has been incorporated to increase the accuracy. This is a user's guide for MT3D.REV1 on the University of Utah Research Institute's (UURI) PRIME 400 computer operating under PRIMOS IV, Rev. 17.

Nutter, C.; Wannamaker, P.E.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Automatic Calibration of a Building Energy Simulation Model Using a Global Optimization Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simulation model used to analyze the energy performance of an existing building should be calibrated to measured consumption data from the building so the simulation output closely follows the measured time series energy consumption data and shows the same temperature dependence. This paper has used optimization software to show that a simple simulation program which is a coding of the ASHRAE 'Simplified Energy Analysis Procedure' can be automatically calibrated to “measured” data. The “measured data” used in this case study was simulation data to which a small amount of white noise had been added.

Lee, S. U.; Claridge, D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (NUREG-0711)Revision 3: Update Methodology and Key Revisions  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the human factors engineering (HFE) programs of applicants for nuclear power plant construction permits, operating licenses, standard design certifications, and combined operating licenses. The purpose of these safety reviews is to help ensure that personnel performance and reliability are appropriately supported. Detailed design review procedures and guidance for the evaluations is provided in three key documents: the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800), the HFE Program Review Model (NUREG-0711), and the Human-System Interface Design Review Guidelines (NUREG-0700). These documents were last revised in 2007, 2004 and 2002, respectively. The NRC is committed to the periodic update and improvement of the guidance to ensure that it remains a state-of-the-art design evaluation tool. To this end, the NRC is updating its guidance to stay current with recent research on human performance, advances in HFE methods and tools, and new technology being employed in plant and control room design. NUREG-0711 is the first document to be addressed. We present the methodology used to update NUREG-0711 and summarize the main changes made. Finally, we discuss the current status of the update program and the future plans.

OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.; Fleger, S.

2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

252

A Comparative Verification of Localized Aviation Model Output Statistics Program (LAMP) and Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) Model Forecasts of Ceiling Height and Visibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an effort to support aviation forecasting, the National Weather Service’s Meteorological Development Laboratory (MDL) has recently redeveloped the Localized Aviation Model Output Statistics (MOS) Program (LAMP) system. LAMP is designed to run ...

David E. Rudack; Judy E. Ghirardelli

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

The North Atlantic Subpolar Gyre in Four High-Resolution Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present the first quantitative comparison between new velocity datasets and high-resolution models in the North Atlantic subpolar gyre [1/10° Parallel Ocean Program model (POPNA10), Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model (MICOM), ° ...

A. M. Treguier; S. Theetten; E. P. Chassignet; T. Penduff; R. Smith; L. Talley; J. O. Beismann; C. Böning

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Modelling of environmental impacts of solid waste landfilling within the life-cycle analysis program EASEWASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new computer-based life-cycle assessment model (EASEWASTE) has been developed to evaluate resource and environmental consequences of solid waste management systems. This paper describes the landfilling sub-model used in the life-cycle assessment program EASEWASTE, and examines some of the implications of this sub-model. All quantities and concentrations of leachate and landfill gas can be modified by the user in order to bring them in agreement with the actual landfill that is assessed by the model. All emissions, except the generation of landfill gas, are process specific. The landfill gas generation is calculated on the basis of organic matter in the landfilled waste. A landfill assessment example is provided. For this example, the normalised environmental effects of landfill gas on global warming and photochemical smog are much greater than the environmental effects for landfill leachate or for landfill construction. A sensitivity analysis for this example indicates that the overall environmental impact is sensitive to the gas collection efficiency and the use of the gas, but not to the amount of leachate generated, or the amount of soil or liner material used in construction. The landfill model can be used for evaluating different technologies with different liners, gas and leachate collection efficiencies, and to compare the environmental consequences of landfilling with alternative waste treatment options such as incineration or anaerobic digestion.

Kirkeby, Janus T.; Birgisdottir, Harpa [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Bhander, Gurbakash Singh; Hauschild, Michael [Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management, Technical University of Denmark, Building 424, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)], E-mail: thc@er.dtu.dk

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

User's guide for GSMP, a General System Modeling Program. [In PL/I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GSMP is designed for use by systems analysis teams. Given compiled subroutines that model the behavior of components plus instructions as to how they are to be interconnected, this program links them together to model a complete system. GSMP offers a fast response to management requests for reconfigurations of old systems and even initial configurations of new systems. Standard system-analytic services are provided: parameter sweeps, graphics, free-form input and formatted output, file storage and recovery, user-tested error diagnostics, component model and integration checkout and debugging facilities, sensitivity analysis, and a multimethod optimizer with nonlinear constraint handling capability. Steady-state or cyclic time-dependence is simulated directly, initial-value problems only indirectly. The code is written in PL/I, but interfaces well with FORTRAN component models. Over the last five years GSMP has been used to model theta-pinch, tokamak, and heavy-ion fusion power plants, open- and closed-cycle magneto-hydrodynamic power plants, and total community energy systems.

Cook, J.M.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

COMPARISON OF PROPORTIONAL AND ON/OFF COLLECTOR LOOP CONTROL STRATEGIES USING A DYNAMIC COLLECTOR MODEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Energy. "Solar heating and Cooling ProjectProgram." ings of the Solar Heating and Operational Resultsin the Control of Solar Heating and Cooling Systems."

Schiller, Steven R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Si deposition rates in a two-dimensional CVD (chemical vapor deposition) reactor and comparisons with model calculations  

SciTech Connect

Deposition rates are presented for silicon from silane in a helium carrier gas using a tubular CVD reactor with a two-dimensional flow geometry. Measured surface-temperature profiles, inlet gas velocities, total pressures, and silane/helium concentrations are reported, providing exact boundary conditions that can be used in a two-dimensional numerical CVD model. Comparisons are made between this data and two variations of a model by Coltrin, Kee, and Miller in which different empirical expressions for the silane and disilane reactive sticking coefficient are used.

Breiland, W.G.; Coltrin, M.E.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Operational semantics of an imperative concurrent programming language on relaxed memory model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of programs. One important challenge for programming on such hardware is to make sure that a correctly written is available to them about the program (for example code hoisting). Many of these reorderings do not remain

Prasad, Sanjiva

259

Comparing OpenMP, HPF, AND MPI Programming: A Study Case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparison of three programming models--OpenMP, HPF, and MPI--applied to a diphasic compressible fluid mechanics code. The parallelization analysis is conducted, and the authors also present the experimental results obtained on ...

Jean-Yves Berthou; Eric Fayolle

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

A Fast Algorithm in Exponential Change-Points Model with Comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamic programming (DP) algorithm can be used to find an exact solution of the maximum likelihood estimation of change points in a sequence of data from exponential family. Since the algorithm has a quadratic complexity in data size n, it is computationally ... Keywords: Change points, Exponential family, Dynamic programming, Segmental K-means

Kuo-Ching Chang; Chui-liang Chiang; Chung-Bow lee

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Comparison of Monthly Temperature Extremes Simulated by CMIP3 and CMIP5 Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extreme monthly-mean temperatures simulated by 28 models in the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) are evaluated and compared with those from 24 models in the third phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison ...

Yao Yao; Yong Luo; Jianbin Huang; Zongci Zhao

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

A Comparison of Methods for Computing the Sigma-Coordinate Pressure Gradient Force for Flow over Sloped Terrain in a Hybrid Theta-Sigma Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five methods for computing the pressure gradient force within a sigma domain of a hybrid model are compared for flow over a steeply sloped terrain. The comparison includes pressure gradient calculations determined from a direct transformation to ...

Donald R. Johnson; Louis W. Uccellini

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

An Experiment with an Advanced Surface Parameterization in a Mesobeta-Scale Model. Part III: Comparison with the HAPEX-MOBILHY Dataset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this last part, a detailed comparison of the model predictions with all the HAPEX-MOBILHY dataset available within a mesoscale subdomain is carried out. The simulation subdomain encompasses a fraction of a pine forest and of a nearby ...

J. Noilhan; P. Lacarrčre; P. Bougeault

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

World Climate Research Programme's (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3) Multi-Model Dataset Archive at PCMDI (Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

In response to a proposed activity of the WCRP's Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM),PCMDI volunteered to collect model output contributed by leading modeling centers around the world. Climate model output from simulations of the past, present and future climate was collected by PCMDI mostly during the years 2005 and 2006, and this archived data constitutes phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3). In part, the WGCM organized this activity to enable those outside the major modeling centers to perform research of relevance to climate scientists preparing the Fourth Asssessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The IPCC was established by the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environmental Program to assess scientific information on climate change. The IPCC publishes reports that summarize the state of the science. This unprecedented collection of recent model output is officially known as the WCRP CMIP3 multi-model dataset. It is meant to serve IPCC's Working Group 1, which focuses on the physical climate system - atmosphere, land surface, ocean and sea ice - and the choice of variables archived at the PCMDI reflects this focus. A more comprehensive set of output for a given model may be available from the modeling center that produced it. As of November 2007, over 35 terabytes of data were in the archive and over 303 terabytes of data had been downloaded among the more than 1200 registered users. Over 250 journal articles, based at least in part on the dataset, have been published or have been accepted for peer-reviewed publication. Countries from which models have been gathered include Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany and Korea, Italy, Japan, Norway, Russia, Great Britain and the United States. Models, variables, and documentation are collected and stored. Check http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/data_status_tables.htm to see at a glance the output that is available. (Description taken from http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/about_ipcc.php)

265

Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Task 23: Phase IV Results Regarding Floating Wind Turbine Modeling; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, which operates under Subtask 2 of the International Energy Agency Wind Task 23. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating spar buoy in 320 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants' codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

Jonkman, J.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Nygaard, T.; Maus, K.; Karimirad, M.; Gao, Z.; Moan, T.; Fylling, I.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Task 23: Phase IV Results Regarding Floating Wind Turbine Modeling; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, which operates under Subtask 2 of the International Energy Agency Wind Task 23. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating spar buoy in 320 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants' codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

Jonkman, J.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Nygaard, T.; Maus, K.; Karimirad, M.; Gao, Z.; Moan, T.; Fylling, I.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

MAG2D: Interactive 2-1/2-dimensional magnetic modeling program (User's Guide and Documentation for Rev. 1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

MAG2D is an interactive computer program used for modeling 2-1/2-dimensional magnetic data. A forward algorithm is used to give the theoretical attraction of magnetic intensity at a station due to a perturbing body given by the initial model. The resultant model can then be adjusted for a better fit by a combination of manual adjustment, one-dimensional automatic search, and Marquardt inversion. MAG2D has an interactive data management system for data manipulation and display built around subroutines to do a forward problem, a one-dimensional direct search and an inversion. These subroutines were originally separate batch-mode programs.

Nutter, C.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Analysis and comparison of active solar desiccant and absorption cooling systems. Part 1; Model description  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparative analysis has been performed to compare the cooling and dehumidification performance of future ventilation-mode desiccant systems, proposed advanced absorption systems, and conventional vapor compression systems. A common framework has been developed for direct comparison of these different cooling technologies; this method is described in this paper.

Warren, M.L. (ASI Controls, San Ramon, CA (US)); Wahlig, M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA). Applied Science Div.)

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Climatology of Warm Boundary Layer Clouds at the ARM SGP Site and Their Comparison to Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 4-yr climatology (1997–2000) of warm boundary layer cloud properties is developed for the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Parameters in the climatology include cloud ...

Manajit Sengupta; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Thomas P. Ackerman

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Modeling of Downward Surface Longwave Flux Density for Global Change Applications and Comparison with Pyrgeometer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The success of satellite monitoring of global climate change depends on the ability to validate satellite inference methods against accurate “ground truth.” Under a recent World Meteorological Organization—World Climate Research Program activity ...

F. Miskolczi

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Status of the INL high-temperature electrolysis research program –experimental and modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper provides a status update on the high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) research and development program at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), with an overview of recent large-scale system modeling results and the status of the experimental program. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an advanced nuclear reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of reactor coolant outlet temperatures. In terms of experimental research, the INL has recently completed an Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) HTE test at the 15 kW level. The initial hydrogen production rate for the ILS test was in excess of 5000 liters per hour. Details of the ILS design and operation will be presented. Current small-scale experimental research is focused on improving the degradation characteristics of the electrolysis cells and stacks. Small-scale testing ranges from single cells to multiple-cell stacks. The INL is currently in the process of testing several state-of-the-art anode-supported cells and is working to broaden its relationship with industry in order to improve the long-term performance of the cells.

J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; K. G. Condie; G. K. Housley; J. S. Herring; J. J. Hartvigsen

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Photoelectrochemical Materials: Theory and Modeling - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Muhammad N. Huda (Primary Contact), Yanfa Yan*, Todd Deutsch*, Mowafak M. Al-Jassim* and A. John A. Turner* Department of Physics University of Texas at Arlington Arlington, TX 76019 Phone: (817) 272-1097 Email: huda@uta.edu *National Renewable Energy Laboratory DOE Manager HQ: Eric L. Miller Phone: (202) 287-5892 Email: Eric.Miller@ee.doe.gov Subcontractor: University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX Project Start Date: September 2009 Project End Date: August 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives For FY 2012, the main goal of this project was to improve materials efficiency by understanding and hence tuning the following by theoretical/computational modeling

273

Comparisons of HRD and SLOSH Surface Wind Fields in Hurricanes: Implications for Storm Surge Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface wind observations analyzed by the Hurricane Research Division (HRD) were compared to those computed by the parametric wind model used in the National Weather Service Sea, Lake, and Overland Surges from Hurricanes (SLOSH) model’s storm ...

Samuel H. Houston; Wilson A. Shaffer; Mark D. Powell; Jye Chen

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Southern Hemisphere Medium-Range Forecast Skill and Predictability: A Comparison of Two Operational Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The skill of two global numerical weather prediction models, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) medium-range forecast model and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) operational model, has been ...

James A. Renwick; Craig S. Thompson

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Laboratory–Numerical Model Comparisons of Flow over a Coastal Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Different modeling approaches are applied to the same geophysical flow in order to assess the ability of laboratory models to provide useful benchmarks in the development of oceanic numerical models. The test case considered here—that of the flow ...

Nicolas Pérenne; Dale B. Haidvogel; Don L. Boyer

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A Comparison of Data Assimilation Methods Using a Planetary Geostrophic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assimilating hydrographic observations into a planetary geostrophic model is posed as a problem in control theory. The cost functional is the sum of weighted model and data residuals. Model errors are assumed to be spatially correlated, and ...

Edward D. Zaron

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

A Comparison of Three Different Modeling Strategies for Evaluating Cloud and Radiation Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parallel simulations of clouds and radiation fields by a single-column model (SCM), a regional circulation model, and a global circulation model (GCM), each using the same treatment of all physical processes and approximately the same spatial ...

Steven J. Ghan; L. Ruby Leung; James McCaa

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Modular Accident Analysis Program, Version 5, Molten Corium–Concrete Interaction and Debris Coolability Model Enhancement Description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes proposed enhancements to the Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP) molten corium–concrete interaction (MCCI) model. MAAP is a computer program that simulates the operation of light-water and heavy-water moderated nuclear power plants for both current and advanced light-water reactor designs.Engineers at Fukushima observed that water pumped into the reactor vessel rose to a certain height, but it did not rise further as more water was pumped into the reactor ...

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

279

Comparison of Test Procedures and Energy Efficiency Criteria in Selected International Standards & Labeling Programs for Copy Machines, External Power Supplies, LED Displays, Residential Gas Cooktops and Televisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inactivity. Besides energy, the U.S. ENERGY STAR programAgency. 2010. “U.S. ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for1103.pdf Appendix 1.2 U.S. ENERGY STAR Program Requirements

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

INTERLINE 5. 0 -- An expanded railroad routing model: Program description, methodology, and revised user's manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rail routine model, INTERLINE, has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate potential routes for transporting radioactive materials. In Version 5.0, the INTERLINE routing algorithms have been enhanced to include the ability to predict alternative routes, barge routes, and population statistics for any route. The INTERLINE railroad network is essentially a computerized rail atlas describing the US railroad system. All rail lines, with the exception of industrial spurs, are included in the network. Inland waterways and deep water routes along with their interchange points with the US railroadsystem are also included. The network contains over 15,000 rail and barge segments (links) and over 13,000 stations, interchange points, ports, and other locations (nodes). The INTERLINE model has been converted to operate on an IBM-compatible personal computer. At least a 286 computer with a hard disk containing approximately 6 MB of free space is recommended. Enhanced program performance will be obtained by using arandom-access memory drive on a 386 or 486 computer.

Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Clarke, D.B.; Jacobi, J.M. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Transportation Center)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A comparison of the usability of performing ad hoc querying on dimensionally modeled data versus operationally modeled data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To study the usability of dimensionally modeled data (DMD), we conducted an experiment involving 113 participants to analyze their performance in ad hoc querying tasks. The results show that DMD's usability is high according to both objective and subjective ... Keywords: Business intelligence, Data models, Dimensionally modeled data, Learnability, Usability

DušAn VujošEvi?; Ivana Kova?Evi?; Milija Suknovi?; Nenad Lali?

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Present-Day Atmospheric Simulations Using GISS ModelE: Comparison to In Situ, Satellite, and Reanalysis Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A full description of the ModelE version of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) and results are presented for present-day climate simulations (ca. 1979). This version is a complete rewrite of ...

Gavin A. Schmidt; Reto Ruedy; James E. Hansen; Igor Aleinov; Nadine Bell; Mike Bauer; Susanne Bauer; Brian Cairns; Vittorio Canuto; Ye Cheng; Anthony Del Genio; Greg Faluvegi; Andrew D. Friend; Tim M. Hall; Yongyun Hu; Max Kelley; Nancy Y. Kiang; Dorothy Koch; Andy A. Lacis; Jean Lerner; Ken K. Lo; Ron L. Miller; Larissa Nazarenko; Valdar Oinas; Jan Perlwitz; Judith Perlwitz; David Rind; Anastasia Romanou; Gary L. Russell; Makiko Sato; Drew T. Shindell; Peter H. Stone; Shan Sun; Nick Tausnev; Duane Thresher; Mao-Sung Yao

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

The photovoltaic market analysis program : background, model development, applications and extensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to describe and motivate the market analysis program for photovoltaics that has developed over the last several years. The main objective of the program is to develop tools and procedures to ...

Lilien, Gary L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Temperature and Water Vapor Variance Scaling in Global Models: Comparisons to Satellite and Aircraft Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of the scale dependence of height-resolved temperature T and water vapor q variability are valuable for improved subgrid-scale climate model parameterizations and model evaluation. Variance spectral benchmarks for T and q obtained ...

B. H. Kahn; J. Teixeira; E. J. Fetzer; A. Gettelman; S. M. Hristova-Veleva; X. Huang; A. K. Kochanski; M. Köhler; S. K. Krueger; R. Wood; M. Zhao

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

A Comparison of the Performance of Two Operational Dynamic Tropical Cyclone Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares the performance of two multi-level high-resolution baroclinic tropical cyclone models which are currently in operational use. In the Atlantic, the National Hurricane Center utilizes the Movable Fine-mesh Model (MFM) for ...

Michael Fiorino; Edward J. Harrison Jr.; Donald G. Marks

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Comparison of Cumulus Parameterizations and Entrainment Using Domain-Mean Wind Divergence in a Regional Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several different cumulus parameterizations are compared in a 10-day regional model simulation over the tropical Americas in northern summer. A simple bulk diagnostic test is devised, comparing the model's preferred domain-mean wind divergence ...

Brian E. Mapes; Thomas T. Warner; Mei Xu; David J. Gochis

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Comparison between Wavenumber Truncation and Horizontal Diffusion Methods in Spectral Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commonly used horizontal diffusion and wavenumber truncation dealiasing methods in spectral models are verified using the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model version 3. For the same horizontal grid resolution, time ...

Peter C. Chu; Xiong-Shan Chen; Chenwu Fan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Comparison of precipitation derived from the ECMWF operational forecast model and satellite precipitation data sets.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation is an important component of the climate system and the accurate representation of the diurnal rainfall cycle is a key test of model performance. Although the modelling of precipitation in the cooler mid-latitudes has improved, in ...

Chris Kidd; Erin Dawkins; George Huffman

289

Tropical Cyclone-like Vortices in a Limited Area Model: Comparison with Observed Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A climate simulation of a limited area model implemented over the Australian region is analyzed for the presence of low pressure systems that have some of the physical characteristics of tropical cyclones. The model is run at a horizontal ...

Kevin Walsh; Ian G. Watterson

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

How fast and fat is your probabilistic model checker? an experimental performance comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the efficiency of several probabilistic model checkers by comparing verification times and peak memory usage for a set of standard case studies. The study considers the model checkers ETMCC, MRMC, PRISM (sparse and hybrid mode), YMER ...

David N. Jansen; Joost-Pieter Katoen; Marcel Oldenkamp; Mariëlle Stoelinga; Ivan Zapreev

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Numerical Simulation of Organized Convection. Part I: Model Description and Preliminary Comparisons with Squall Line Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical model designed for the simulations of mesoscale flows perturbed by deep convective clouds is discussed. It is based on the time dependent coupling between a three-dimensional nonhydrostatic mesoscale model and a quasi-one-dimensional ...

Yves Pointin

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Thermal Tides in the Atmosphere of Venus: Comparison of Model Results with Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linearized primitive equation (LPE) model is developed to study thermal tides in the atmosphere of Venus. The LPE model describes diurnal and semidiurnal oscillations of a cyclostrophically balanced atmosphere in which zonal velocity varies ...

Judith Burt Pechmann; Andrew P. Ingersoll

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A Comparison of Soil Moisture Models Using Soil Climate Analysis Network Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of the lack of field measurements, models are often used to monitor soil moisture conditions. Therefore, it is important to find a model that can accurately simulate soil moisture under a variety of land surface conditions. In this paper, ...

Lei Meng; Steven M. Quiring

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Comparison of Structure Parameter Scaling Expressions with Turbulence Closure Model Predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The convective boundary-layer scaling expressions presented by Wyngaard and LeMone (1980) are compared with predictions from a turbulence closure model. We first examine a model experiment involving a clear-air, convectively driven boundary layer ...

Stephen D. Burk

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Comparison of Arctic Climate Simulations by Uncoupled and Coupled Global Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations of present-day Arctic climate are assessed from suites of 1) 13 global atmosphere-only models from the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP-II) and 2) 8 coupled atmosphere–ocean–ice models from the Data Distribution Center ...

John E. Walsh; Vladimir M. Kattsov; William L. Chapman; Veronika Govorkova; Tatyana Pavlova

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Comparison of Two Groundwater Flow Models--UNSAT1D and HELP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities seeking to predict leakage from capped solid-waste disposal sites must select models that closely represent the landfill design and meteorology of the site. Predictions made by two models for three sites under varied conditions gave similar results for humid conditions. However, the predictions of HELP, the simpler model, were less useful for semihumid and arid environments.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Comparison of Regional Clear-Sky Albedos Inferred from Satellite Observations and Model Computations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have taken an important first step in validating climate models by comparing model and satellite inferred clear sky TOA (top-of-atmosphere) albedos. Model albodos were computed on a 1° × 1° latitude-longitude grid, allowing for variations in ...

B. P. Briegleb; P. Minnis; V. Ramanathan; E. Harrison

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

A Boundary-Layer Model for Mars: Comparison with Viking Lander and Entry Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional boundary-layer model for Mars is described, and its results are compared with Viking data. The model equations are similar to Earth boundary-layer models in that they include contributions from Coriolis, pressure gradient, and ...

Robert M. Haberle; Howard C. Houben; Rolf Hertenstein; Tomas Herdtle

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Empirical models for Dark Matter Halos. I. Nonparametric Construction of Density Profiles and Comparison with Parametric Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use techniques from nonparametric function estimation theory to extract the density profiles, and their derivatives, from a set of N-body dark matter halos. We consider halos generated from LCDM simulations of gravitational clustering, as well as isolated, spherical collapses. The logarithmic density slopes gamma = d(log rho)/d(log r) of the LCDM halos are found to vary as power-laws in radius, reaching values of gamma ~ -1 at the innermost resolved radii (~0.01 r_virial). This behavior is significantly different from that of broken power-law models like the NFW profile, but similar to that of models like de Vaucouleurs'. Accordingly, we compare the N-body density profiles with various parametric models to find which provide the best fit. We consider an NFW-like model with arbitrary inner slope; Dehnen & McLaughlin's anisotropic model; Einasto's model (identical in functional form to Sersic's model but fit to the space density); and the density model of Prugniel & Simien that was designed to match the deprojected form of Sersic's R^{1/n} law. Overall, the best-fitting model to the LCDM halos is Einasto's, although the Prugniel-Simien and Dehnen-McLaughlin models also perform well. With regard to the spherical collapse halos, both the Prugniel-Simien and Einasto models describe the density profiles well, with an rms scatter some four times smaller than that obtained with either the NFW-like model or the 3-parameter Dehnen-McLaughlin model. Finally, we confirm recent claims of a systematic variation in profile shape with halo mass.

David Merritt; Alister W. Graham; Ben Moore; Juerg Diemand; Balsa Terzic

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Gaseous dry deposition of atmospheric mercury: A comparison of two surface resistance models for deposition to semiarid vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the United States, atmospheric mercury (Hg) deposition, from regional and international sources, is the largest contributor to increased Hg concentrations in bodies of water leading to bioaccumulation of methyl mercury in fish. In this work, modeled dry deposition velocities (vd) for gaseous Hg are calculated using two surface resistance parameterizations found in the literature. The flux is then estimated as the product of the species concentration and modeled vd. The calculations utilize speciated atmospheric mercury concentrations measured during an annual monitoring campaign in southern Idaho. Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) were monitored with Tekran models 2537A and 1130, respectively. Two anemometers collected meteorological data, including one fast-response three-dimensional sonic anemometer to measure turbulence parameters. For the flux calculation, three resistances are required to model the mechanisms that transport gaseous Hg from the atmosphere to the surface, with the surface resistance being the largest source of error. Results from two surface resistance models are presented. In particular, the downward flux is sensitive to the choice of model and input parameters such as seasonal category and mesophyll resistance. A comparison of annual GEM and RGM fluxes calculated using the two models shows good agreement for RGM (3.2% difference for annual deposition); however, for the low-solubility species of GEM, the models show a 64% difference in annual fluxes, with a range of 32% to 200% in seasonal fluxes. Results indicate the importance of understanding the diurnal variation of the physical processes modeled in the surface resistance parameterization for vd.

Heather A. Holmes; Eric R. Pardyjak; Kevin D. Perry; Michael L. Abbott

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Results and Comparison from the SAM Linear Fresnel Technology Performance Model: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the new Linear Fresnel technology performance model in NREL's System Advisor Model. The model predicts the financial and technical performance of direct-steam-generation Linear Fresnel power plants, and can be used to analyze a range of system configurations. This paper presents a brief discussion of the model formulation and motivation, and provides extensive discussion of the model performance and financial results. The Linear Fresnel technology is also compared to other concentrating solar power technologies in both qualitative and quantitative measures. The Linear Fresnel model - developed in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute - provides users with the ability to model a variety of solar field layouts, fossil backup configurations, thermal receiver designs, and steam generation conditions. This flexibility aims to encompass current market solutions for the DSG Linear Fresnel technology, which is seeing increasing exposure in fossil plant augmentation and stand-alone power generation applications.

Wagner, M. J.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A Comparison of Simulated Cloud Radar Output from the Multiscale Modeling Framework Global Climate Model with CloudSat Cloud Radar Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last few years a new type of global climate model (GCM) has emerged in which a cloud-resolving model is embedded into each grid cell of a GCM. This new approach is frequently called a multiscale modeling framework (MMF) or superparameterization. In this article we present a comparison of MMF output with radar observations from the NASA CloudSat mission, which uses a near-nadir-pointing millimeter-wavelength radar to probe the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. We account for radar detection limits by simulating the 94 GHz radar reflectivity that CloudSat would observe from the high-resolution cloud-resolving model output produced by the MMF. Overall, the MMF does a good job of reproducing the broad pattern of tropical convergence zones, subtropical belts, and midlatitude storm tracks, as well as their changes in position with the annual solar cycle. Nonetheless, the comparison also reveals a number of model shortfalls including (1) excessive hydrometeor coverage at all altitudes over many convectively active regions, (2) a lack of low-level hydrometeors over all subtropical oceanic basins, (3) excessive low-level hydrometeor coverage (principally precipitating hydrometeors) in the midlatitude storm tracks of both hemispheres during the summer season (in each hemisphere), and (4) a thin band of low-level hydrometeors in the Southern Hemisphere of the central (and at times eastern and western) Pacific in the MMF, which is not observed by CloudSat. This band resembles a second much weaker ITCZ but is restricted to low levels.

Marchand, Roger T.; Haynes, J. M.; Mace, Gerald G.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Stephens, Graeme L.

2009-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

303

A Comparison of the Hybrid and EnSRF Analysis Schemes in the Presence of Model Errors due to Unresolved Scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hybrid analysis scheme is compared with an ensemble square root filter (EnSRF) analysis scheme in the presence of model errors as a follow-up to a previous perfect-model comparison. In the hybrid scheme, the ensemble perturbations are updated ...

Xuguang Wang; Thomas M. Hamill; Jeffrey S. Whitaker; Craig H. Bishop

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume II, Book 3. Dynamic simulation model and computer program descriptions. CDRL item 2. [SPP dynamics simulation program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The mathematical models and computer program comprising the SPP Dynamic Simulation are described. The SPP Dynamic Simulation is a computerized model representing the time-varying performance characteristics of the SPP. The model incorporates all the principal components of the pilot plant. Time-dependent direct normal solar insulation, as corrupted by simulated cloud passages, is transformed into absorbed radiant power by actions of the heliostat field and enclosed receiver cavity. The absorbed power then drives the steam generator model to produce superheated steam for the turbine and/or thermal storage subsystems. The thermal storage subsystem can, in turn, also produce steam for the turbine. The turbine using the steam flow energy produces the mechanical shaft power necessary for the generator to convert it to electrical power. This electrical power is subsequently transmitted to a transmission grid system. Exhaust steam from the turbine is condensed, reheated, deaerated, and pressurized by pumps for return as feedwater to the thermal storage and/or steam generator. A master control/instrumentation system is utilized to coordinate the various plant operations. The master controller reacts to plant operator demands and control settings to effect the desired output response. The SPP Dynamic Simulation Computer program is written in FORTRAN language. Various input options (e.g., insolation values, load demands, initial pressures/temperatures/flows) are permitted. Plant performance may be monitored via computer printout or computer generated plots. The remainder of this document describes the detailed pilot plant dynamic model, the basis for this simulation, and the utilization of this simulation to obtain analytical plant performance results.

None

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Comparison of the prediction accuracy of daily and monthly regression models for energy consumption in commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The measured energy savings from retrofits in commercial buildings are generally determined as the difference between the energy consumption predicted using a baseline model and the measured energy consumption during the post retrofit period. Most baseline models are developed by regressing the daily energy consumption versus the daily average temperature (daily models) or by regressing the monthly energy consumption versus the monthly average temperature (monthly models). Since the post-retrofit weather is generally different from the weather used for model development, the prediction error of the baseline model may be different from the fitting error. Daily and monthly baseline models were developed for a midsize commercial building with (i) dual-duct CAV and VAV systems, (ii) office and university occupancy schedules, and (iii) different operating practices using the weather of a mild weather year. The prediction errors were identified as the difference between the energy use predicted by the regression models and the values simulated by a calibrated simulation program when both models use weather from a year very different from the weather year used to develop the regression model. The major results are summarized below: 1. When the AHUs operate 24 hours per day, annual energy prediction errors of daily regression models were found to be less than 1.4%. The errors of monthly regression models were found to be in the same range as the error of the daily models. 2. When the AHUs were shut down during unoccupied periods, annual prediction errors for both daily and monthly regression models were as high as 15%. However, the prediction error of daily regression models can be decreased to a range of 2% to 3% if the daily average energy consumption is regressed versus the average temperature during the operation period. Based on these findings, we suggest use of daily or monthly regression models when the AHUs are operated 24 hours per day. When shut-down is performed during unoccupied hours, daily energy consumption should be regressed versus the average ambient temperature during operating hours to develop the baseline model.

Wang, Jinrong

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Abstract--A stochastic dynamic programming hydrothermal dispatch model to simulate a bid-based market is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on dynamic programming that optimizes and validates the bid prices strategies for each power plant in a hydro-thermal, and simulating them as if they were a single power plant. In a hydro-thermal system as the one simulated several plants. Emphasis is given to hydro reservoir modeling and to the assessment of their market power

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad CatĂłlica de Chile)

307

Parallel multigrid solvers using OpenMP/MPI hybrid programming models on multi-core/multi-socket clusters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OpenMP/MPI hybrid parallel programming models were implemented to 3D finite-volume based simulation code for groundwater flow problems through heterogeneous porous media using parallel iterative solvers with multigrid preconditioning. Performance and ... Keywords: multigrid, openMP/MPI hybrid, preconditioning

Kengo Nakajima

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Comparison of Accelerated Testing with Modeling to Predict Lifetime of CPV Solder Layers (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) cell assemblies can fail due to thermomechanical fatigue in the die-attach layer. In this presentation, we show the latest results from our computational model of thermomechanical fatigue. The model is used to estimate the relative lifetime of cell assemblies exposed to various temperature histories consistent with service and with accelerated testing. We also present early results from thermal cycling experiments designed to help validate the computational model.

Silverman, T. J.; Bosco, N.; Kurtz, S.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

A Comparison of Isoconversional and Model-Fitting Approaches to Kinetic Parameter Estimation and Application Predictions  

SciTech Connect

Chemical kinetic modeling has been used for many years in process optimization, estimating real-time material performance, and lifetime prediction. Chemists have tended towards developing detailed mechanistic models, while engineers have tended towards global or lumped models. Many, if not most, applications use global models by necessity, since it is impractical or impossible to develop a rigorous mechanistic model. Model fitting acquired a bad name in the thermal analysis community after that community realized a decade after other disciplines that deriving kinetic parameters for an assumed model from a single heating rate produced unreliable and sometimes nonsensical results. In its place, advanced isoconversional methods (1), which have their roots in the Friedman (2) and Ozawa-Flynn-Wall (3) methods of the 1960s, have become increasingly popular. In fact, as pointed out by the ICTAC kinetics project in 2000 (4), valid kinetic parameters can be derived by both isoconversional and model fitting methods as long as a diverse set of thermal histories are used to derive the kinetic parameters. The current paper extends the understanding from that project to give a better appreciation of the strengths and weaknesses of isoconversional and model-fitting approaches. Examples are given from a variety of sources, including the former and current ICTAC round-robin exercises, data sets for materials of interest, and simulated data sets.

Burnham, A K

2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

310

Determining Wind Turbine Gearbox Model Complexity Using Measurement Validation and Cost Comparison: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) has conducted extensive field and dynamometer test campaigns on two heavily instrumented wind turbine gearboxes. In this paper, data from the planetary stage is used to evaluate the accuracy and computation time of numerical models of the gearbox. First, planet-bearing load and motion data is analyzed to characterize planetary stage behavior in different environments and to derive requirements for gearbox models and life calculations. Second, a set of models are constructed that represent different levels of fidelity. Simulations of the test conditions are compared to the test data and the computational cost of the models are compared. The test data suggests that the planet-bearing life calculations should be made separately for each bearing on a row due to unequal load distribution. It also shows that tilting of the gear axes is related to planet load share. The modeling study concluded that fully flexible models were needed to predict planet-bearing loading in some cases, although less complex models were able to achieve good correlation in the field-loading case. Significant differences in planet load share were found in simulation and were dependent on the scope of the model and the bearing stiffness model used.

LaCava, W.; Xing, Y.; Guo, Y.; Moan, T.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Simulation of boreal black spruce chronosequences: Comparison to field measurements and model evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005), Reimplementation of the BIOME-BGC model to simulatemodel for other biomes, BIOME-BGC, and an application forsensitivity analysis of the BIOME- BGC terrestrial ecosystem

Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Gower, Stith T.; Goulden, Michael L.; McMillan, Andrew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Comparison of two-equation turbulence models for boundary layers with pressure gradient  

SciTech Connect

This paper compares the performance of eight low Reynolds number k-epsilon and k-omega models for high Reynolds number, incompressible turbulent boundary layers with favorable, zero, and adverse pressure gradients. Results obtained underscore the k-epsilon model's unsuitability for such flows. Even more seriously, the k-epsilon model is demonstrated to be inconsistent with the well-established physical structure of the turbulent boundary layer, and low Reynolds number corrections cannot remove the inconsistency. By contrast, the k-omega model, with and without low Reynolds number modifications, proves to be very accurate for all of the tests conducted. 16 refs.

Wilcox, D.C. (DCW Industries, Inc., La Canada, CA (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

A cost/benefit model for insertion of technological innovation into a total quality management program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study provides economic justification for insertion of technological innovation into a total quality management (TQM) program in a remanufacturing environment. One of the core principles of TQM is continuous improvement. A preferred metric for measuring quality improvement is the cost of quality. Traditionally, comprehensive quality cost reports have regularly been issued in a fixed format to identify opportunities for improvement and provide guidelines for improvement over time. However, current research has shown that continuous improvement is enhanced by a quality cost approach that is much more flexible [1]. This approach is based upon exposure of the cost savings directly related to quality improvement. in many cases a process-level engineer, who may not be trained in quality costing techniques, will be responsible for the economic analysis to justify a quality improvement initiative. Research has shown that most engineers, simply do not have the training or experience to adequately cost justify quality improvement. The results of this study provide process-level engineers with a cost/benefit model template, which can be used to cost justify technological improvement based upon total quality costs.

Ratliff, William L

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Modeling of Asymmetry between Gasoline and Crude Oil Prices: A Monte Carlo Comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Engle---Granger two-step procedure is commonly used to estimate cointegrating vectors and consequently asymmetric error-correction models. This study uses Monte Carlo methods and demonstrates that the Engle---Granger two-step method leads to biased ... Keywords: Asymmetry, Gasoline, Modeling, Oil prices

Afshin Honarvar

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Comparison of Bulk and Bin Warm-Rain Microphysics Models Using a Kinematic Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the development and testing of a bulk warm-rain microphysics model that is capable of addressing the impact of atmospheric aerosols on ice-free clouds. Similarly to previous two-moment bulk schemes, this model predicts the ...

Hugh Morrison; Wojciech W. Grabowski

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Statistical Tests for the Comparison of Surface Gravity Wave Spectra with Application to Model Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new second generation deep-water ocean wave model VAG is presented and several modifications are tested on a one month hindcast. On the same period and with the same windfields a version of the third generation model WAM is also tested. All the ...

A. Guillaume

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

A Comparison of Energy Detectability Models for Cognitive Radios in Fading Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we first analyze the accuracy of different energy detector models in approximating the exact solution in AWGN. These models motivate us to develop approximation analysis to address energy detection for fading channels. Our analysis develops ... Keywords: Cognitive radios, Energy detector, Rayleigh fading, Receiver diversity, Spectrum sensing

Selami Ciftci; Murat Torlak

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A Comparison of Two Shallow-Water Models with Nonconforming Adaptive Grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an effort to study the applicability of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) techniques to atmospheric models, an interpolation-based spectral element shallow-water model on a cubed-sphere grid is compared to a block-structured finite-volume method ...

Amik St-Cyr; Christiane Jablonowski; John M. Dennis; Henry M. Tufo; Stephen J. Thomas

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

A Comparison of Simulated Precipitation by Hybrid Isentropic-Sigma and Sigma Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objectives of this study are threefold: 1) to compare simulators of dry and moist baroclinic development from 10-and 22-layer hybrid isentropic-sigma coordinate models with those from 11-, 27-, and 35-layer sigma coordinate models; 2) ...

Donald R. Johnson; Tom H. Zapotocny; Fred M. Reames; Bart J. Wolf; R. Bradley Pierce

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Nonlinear Modeling of the Dynamic Effects of Infused Insulin on Glucose: Comparison of Compartmental With Volterra Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a computational study that compares simulated compartmental (differential equation) and Volterra models of the dynamic effects of insulin on blood glucose concentration in humans. In the ...

Markakis, Michail

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Use of a Lidar Forward Model for Global Comparisons of Cloud Fraction between the ICESat Lidar and the ECMWF Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model in simulating clouds is evaluated using observations by the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System lidar on the Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat). ...

Jonathan M. Wilkinson; Robin J. Hogan; Anthony J. Illingworth; Angela Benedetti

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Tideflow| A dataflow-inspired execution model for high performance computing programs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Traditional programming, execution and optimization techniques have been shown to be inadequate to exploit the features of computer processors with many cores. In particular,… (more)

Orozco, Daniel A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

A comparison of modeled and measured energy use in hybrid electric vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CarSim 2.5.4, written by AeroVironment, Inc. of Monrovia, California and SIMPLEV 3.0, written by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory were used to simulate two series-configured hybrid electric vehicles that competed in the 1994 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Challenge. Vehicle speed and battery energy use were measured over a 0.2-km maximum effort acceleration and a 58-km range event. The simulations` predictions are compared to each other and to measured data. A rough uncertainty analysis of the validation is presented. The programs agree with each other to within 5% and with the measured energy data within the uncertainty of the experiment.

Cuddy, M.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

DOE/DHS INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEM CYBER SECURITY PROGRAMS: A MODEL FOR USE IN NUCLEAR FACILITY SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY  

SciTech Connect

Many critical infrastructure sectors have been investigating cyber security issues for several years especially with the help of two primary government programs. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National SCADA Test Bed and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program have both implemented activities aimed at securing the industrial control systems that operate the North American electric grid along with several other critical infrastructure sectors (ICS). These programs have spent the last seven years working with industry including asset owners, educational institutions, standards and regulating bodies, and control system vendors. The programs common mission is to provide outreach, identification of cyber vulnerabilities to ICS and mitigation strategies to enhance security postures. The success of these programs indicates that a similar approach can be successfully translated into other sectors including nuclear operations, safeguards, and security. The industry regulating bodies have included cyber security requirements and in some cases, have incorporated sets of standards with penalties for non-compliance such as the North American Electric Reliability Corporation Critical Infrastructure Protection standards. These DOE and DHS programs that address security improvements by both suppliers and end users provide an excellent model for nuclear facility personnel concerned with safeguards and security cyber vulnerabilities and countermeasures. It is not a stretch to imagine complete surreptitious collapse of protection against the removal of nuclear material or even initiation of a criticality event as witnessed at Three Mile Island or Chernobyl in a nuclear ICS inadequately protected against the cyber threat.

Robert S. Anderson; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Paul Moskowitz

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Validation and Comparison of Carbon Sequestration Project Cost Models with Project Cost Data Obtained from the Southwest Partnership  

SciTech Connect

Obtaining formal quotes and engineering conceptual designs for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration sites and facilities is costly and time-consuming. Frequently, when looking at potential locations, managers, engineers and scientists are confronted with multiple options, but do not have the expertise or the information required to quickly obtain a general estimate of what the costs will be without employing an engineering firm. Several models for carbon compression, transport and/or injection have been published that are designed to aid in determining the cost of sequestration projects. A number of these models are used in this study, including models by J. Ogden, MIT's Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies Program Model, the Environmental Protection Agency and others. This report uses the information and data available from several projects either completed, in progress, or conceptualized by the Southwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) to determine the best approach to estimate a project's cost. The data presented highlights calculated versus actual costs. This data is compared to the results obtained by applying several models for each of the individual projects with actual cost. It also offers methods to systematically apply the models to future projects of a similar scale. Last, the cost risks associated with a project of this scope are discussed, along with ways that have been and could be used to mitigate these risks.

Robert Lee; Reid Grigg; Brian McPherson

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Anisotropic gaseous models of tidally limited star clusters -- comparison with other methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new models of the evolution and dissolution of star clusters evolving under the combined influence of internal relaxation and external tidal fields, using the anisotropic gaseous model based on the Fokker-Planck approximation, and a new escaper loss cone model. This model borrows ideas from loss cones of stellar distributions near massive black holes, and describes physical processes related to escaping stars by a simple model based on two timescales and a diffusion process. We compare our results with those of direct $N$-body models and of direct numerical solutions of the orbit-averaged Fokker-Planck equation. For this comparative study we limit ourselves to idealized single point mass star clusters, in order to present a detailed study of the physical processes determining the rate of mass loss, core collapse and other features of the system's evolution. With the positive results of our study the path is now open in the future to use the computationally efficient gaseous models for future studies with more realism (mass spectrum, stellar evolution).

R. Spurzem; M. Giersz; K. Takahashi; A. Ernst

2004-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

327

Comparison of kinetic and equilibrium reaction models insimulating the behavior of porous media  

SciTech Connect

In this study we compare the use of kinetic and equilibriumreaction models in the simulation of gas (methane) hydrate behavior inporous media. Our objective is to evaluate through numerical simulationthe importance of employing kinetic versus equilibrium reaction modelsfor predicting the response of hydrate-bearing systems to externalstimuli, such as changes in pressure and temperature. Specifically, we(1) analyze and compare the responses simulated using both reactionmodels for natural gas production from hydrates in various settings andfor the case of depressurization in a hydrate-bearing core duringextraction; and (2) examine the sensitivity to factors such as initialhydrate saturation, hydrate reaction surface area, and numericaldiscretization. We find that for large-scale systems undergoing thermalstimulation and depressurization, the calculated responses for bothreaction models are remarkably similar, though some differences areobserved at early times. However, for modeling short-term processes, suchas the rapid recovery of a hydrate-bearing core, kinetic limitations canbe important, and neglecting them may lead to significantunder-prediction of recoverable hydrate. Assuming validity of the mostaccurate kinetic reaction model that is currently available, the use ofthe equilibrium reaction model often appears to be justified andpreferred for simulating the behavior of gas hydrates, given that thecomputational demands for the kinetic reaction model far exceed those forthe equilibrium reaction model.

Kowalsky, Michael B.; Moridis, George J.

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

328

Microsoft Word - Transport-program.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TRANSPORT PROGRAM TRANSPORT PROGRAM C-MOD 5 YEAR REVIEW MAY, 2003 PRESENTED BY MARTIN GREENWALD MIT - PLASMA SCIENCE & FUSION CENTER Alcator C-Mod C-MOD - OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES * Prediction and control are the ultimate goals of transport studies - Experiments and theory have progressed to the point where meaningful, quantitative tests are being made. - Theory/experiment comparisons drive the experimental program * C-Mod operates in unique regime in several important respects - crucial for validation of physics models * Facility Upgrades - important tools for transport research: shaping, heating, current drive (LHCD), particle control (cryopump). * Diagnostics - the tokamak is a scientific instrument - Investment in high resolution diagnostics enabled edge studies.

329

The RERTR Program: Past, present and future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The past, present and future of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program are discussed with an emphasis on some of the reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics codes and modelling required to accommodate research and test reactor analysis, and some of the development work still in progress is described. Some comparisons with physical measurements and Monte Carlo are provided. The efforts in fuels development and the experimental support are summarized. The accomplishments in joint study programs and the transfer of technology are high lighted. The joint study with the Russian reduced enrichment program presents many new challenges.

Woodruff, W.L.; Travelli, A.; Matos, J.E.; Snelgrove, J.L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

A Comparison of a Hierarchy of Models for Determining Energy Balance Components over Vegetation Canopies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several methods for estimating surface energy balance components over a vegetated surface are compared. These include Penman-Monteith, Deardorff, and multilayer canopy (CANWHT) models for evaporation. Measurements taken during the 1991 DOE-...

Christoph A. Vogel; Dennis D. Baldocchi; Ashok K. Luhar; K. Shankar Rao

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

A Comparison of Statistical and Model-Based Downscaling Techniques for Estimating Local Climate Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The respective merits of statistical and regional modeling techniques for downscaling GCM predictions have been evaluated over New Zealand, a small mountainous country surrounded by ocean. The boundary conditions were supplied from twice-daily ...

John W. Kidson; Craig S. Thompson

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Impulsively Started Flow in a Submarine Canyon: Comparison of Results from Laboratory and Numerical Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intercomparisons have been made of results from laboratory experiments and a numerical model for the flow in the vicinity of an idealized submarine canyon located along an otherwise continuous shelf. Motion in the rotating and continuously ...

Nicolas Pérenne; J. William Lavelle; David C. Smith IV; Don L. Boyer

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Triple frequency radar reflectivity signatures of snow: Observations and comparisons to theoretical ice particle scattering models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An observation-based study is presented that utilizes aircraft data from the 2003 Wakasa Bay AMSR Precipitation Validation Campaign to assess recent advances in the modeling of microwave scattering properties of non-spherical ice particles in the ...

Mark S. Kulie; Michael J. Hiley; Ralf Bennartz; Stefan Kneifel; Simone Tanelli

334

Space-Time Spectral Structure of a GLAS General Circulation Model and a Comparison with Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wavenumber-frequency spectra of geopotential height have been computed from a winter simulation of a GLAS general circulation model, and are compared to the spectra obtained from 15 winters of observed analyses. The variances in several ...

David M. Straus; J. Shukla

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

A Comparison of General Circulation Model Predictions to Sand Drift and Dune Orientations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growing concern over climate change and desertification stresses the importance of aeolian process prediction. In this paper the use of a general circulation model to predict current aeolian features is examined. A GCM developed at NASA/...

Dan G. Blumberg; Ronald Greeley

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Estimates of Cn2 from Numerical Weather Prediction Model Output and Comparison with Thermosonde Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Area-averaged estimates of Cn2 from high-resolution numerical weather prediction (NWP) model output are produced from local estimates of the spatial structure functions of refractive index with corrections for the inherent smoothing and filtering ...

Rod Frehlich; Robert Sharman; Francois Vandenberghe; Wei Yu; Yubao Liu; Jason Knievel; George Jumper

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

A Comparison of Seeded and Nonseeded Orographic Cloud Simulations with an Explicit Cloud Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice initiation by specific cloud seeding aerosols, quantified in laboratory studies, has been formulated for use in mesoscale numerical cloud models. This detailed approach, which explicitly represents artificial ice nuclei activation, is unique ...

Michael P. Meyers; Paul J. Demott; William R. Cotton

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

A Comparison of Soil-Moisture Sensitivity in Two Global Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Area-averaged surface hydrological processes from two global spectral general circulation climate models coupled to simple slab-ocean mixed layers are compared for the climates simulated with present-day (control) and increased atmospheric carbon ...

Gerald A. Meehl; Warren M. Washington

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Paleoclimate data–model comparison and the role of climate forcings over the past 1500 years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The past 1500 years provides a valuable opportunity to study the response of the climate system to external forcings. However, the integration of paleoclimate proxies with climate modeling is critical to improving our understanding of climate ...

Steven J. Phipps; Helen V. McGregor; Joëlle Gergis; Ailie J. E. Gallant; Raphael Neukom; Samantha Stevenson; Duncan Ackerley; Josephine R. Brown; Matt J. Fischer; Tas D. van Ommen

340

Comparison of a Two-Dimensional Wave Prediction Model with Synoptic Measurements in Lake Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We compare results from a simple parametric, dynamical, deep-water wave prediction model with two sets of measured wave height maps of Lake Michigan. The measurements were made with an airborne laser altimeter under two distinctly different wind ...

Paul C. Liu; David J. Schwab; John R. Bennett

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Performance comparison of meta-heuristic algorithms for training artificial neural networks in modelling laser cutting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of artificial neural networks ANNs for modelling laser cutting is broad and ever increasing. The practical application of ANNs is mostly dependent on the success of the training process which is a complex task. Considering the disadvantages ...

Miloš Madi?; Danijel Markovi?; Miroslav Radovanovi?

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Data Assimilation in a Baroclinic Coastal Ocean Model: Ensemble Statistics and Comparison of Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of data assimilation methods in an idealized three-dimensional time-dependent coastal baroclinic model is assessed by computing ensemble error statistics. The analytical representer solution allows for computation of posterior ...

A. L. Kurapov; G. D. Egbert; R. N. Miller; J. S. Allen

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Comparison of Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter, 3DVAR, and 4DVAR in a Quasigeostrophic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) data assimilation, three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3DVAR), and four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4DVAR) schemes are implemented in a quasigeostrophic channel model. ...

Shu-Chih Yang; Matteo Corazza; Alberto Carrassi; Eugenia Kalnay; Takemasa Miyoshi

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Measurement of Surface Energy Fluxes from Two Rangeland Sites and Comparison with a Multilayer Canopy Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rangelands are often characterized by a patchy mosaic of vegetation types, making measurement and modeling of surface energy fluxes particularly challenging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate surface energy fluxes measured using three eddy ...

Gerald N. Flerchinger; Michele L. Reba; Danny Marks

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Oblique, Stratified Winds about a Shelter Fence. Part II: Comparison of Measurements with Numerical Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) models of disturbed micrometeorological winds, steady-state computations using a second-order closure are compared with observations (see Part I) in which the surface layer wind was disturbed by ...

John D. Wilson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Comparison of Results from a Meandering-Plume Model with Measured Atmospheric Tracer Concentration Fluctuations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measured wind-azimuth data are used in a simple meandering-plume model to predict observed SF6 concentration fluctuations measured downwind of a point source during a range of stability conditions. The meander component of plume diffusion is ...

Holly Peterson; Brian Lamb

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Trajectory Models for Heavy Particles in Atmospheric Turbulence: Comparison with Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The simplest “random flight” models for the paths of heavy particles in turbulence have been tested against previous observations of the deposition of glass beads from an elevated source in the atmospheric surface layer. For the bead sizes ...

John D. Wilson

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Comparison of Model Calculations with Spectral UV Measurements during the SUSPEN Campaign: The Effect of Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectral measurements of global solar irradiance, obtained under cloud-free conditions during the SUSPEN campaign (July 1997) in Thessaloniki, Greece, are compared with radiative transfer model calculations, showing an agreement to within ±5% for ...

A. Kazantzidis; D. S. Balis; A. F. Bais; S. Kazadzis; E. Galani; E. Kosmidis; M. Blumthaler

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Comparison of Tropical Ocean–Atmosphere Fluxes with the NCAR Community Climate Model CCM3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of the marine boundary layer produced by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model version 3 (CCM3) are compared with observations from two experiments in the central and western equatorial ...

William D. Collins; Junyi Wang; Jeffrey T. Kiehl; Guang J. Zhang; Daniel I. Cooper; William E. Eichinger

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A Comparison of Explicit and Semi-Implicit Model Calculations of Geostrophic Adjustment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The adjustment properties of numerical models are important both from the Point of view of the handling of noise and the ability to produce proper quasi-geostrophic states from physically derived imbalances between mass and motion fields. This ...

William G. Collins

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

A Comparison between General Circulation Model Simulations Using Two Sea Surface Temperature Datasets for January 1979  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations with the UCLA atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) using two different global sea surface temperature (SST) datasets for January 1979 are compared. One of these datasets is based on COADS (SSTs) at locations where there are ...

Tomoaki Ose; Carlos R. Mechoso; David Halpern

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Simulations of the February 1979 Stratospheric Sudden Warming: Model Comparisons and Three-Dimensional Evolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of the stratospheric flow during the major stratospheric sudden warming of February 1979 is studied using two primitive equation models of the stratosphere and mesosphere. The United Kingdom Meteorological Office Stratosphere-...

G. L. Manney; J. D. Farrara; C. R. Mechoso

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Tropospheric Aerosol Optical Thickness from the GOCART Model and Comparisons with Satellite and Sun Photometer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Georgia Institute of Technology–Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model is used to simulate the aerosol optical thickness ? for major types of tropospheric aerosols including sulfate, dust, organic carbon ...

Mian Chin; Paul Ginoux; Stefan Kinne; Omar Torres; Brent N. Holben; Bryan N. Duncan; Randall V. Martin; Jennifer A. Logan; Akiko Higurashi; Teruyuki Nakajima

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Laboratory–Numerical Model Comparisons of Canyon Flows: A Parameter Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated set of laboratory and numerical-model experiments has been conducted to understand the development of residual circulation surrounding a coastal canyon and to explore further the degree to which laboratory experiments can provide ...

Don L. Boyer; Dale B. Haidvogel; Nicolas Pérenne

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Paleoclimate Data–Model Comparison and the Role of Climate Forcings over the Past 1500 Years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The past 1500 years provide a valuable opportunity to study the response of the climate system to external forcings. However, the integration of paleoclimate proxies with climate modeling is critical to improving the understanding of climate ...

Steven J. Phipps; Helen V. McGregor; Joëlle Gergis; Ailie J. E. Gallant; Raphael Neukom; Samantha Stevenson; Duncan Ackerley; Josephine R. Brown; Matt J. Fischer; Tas D. van Ommen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Development of a Modelling and Simulation Method Comparison and Selection Framework for Health Services Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were car- ried out with local and national level health care man- agers to investigate their responses in depth. At the end of the project (after iterative revision of the tool), the national level health care manager at the NHS Institute of Innovation... and modelling in aerospace and the military Distributed Simulation, Discrete Event Simulation, System Dynamics, Real Time Simulation, Monte Carlo Simulation, Agent Based Simulation, War Gaming, Hybrid Simulation, Inverse Simulation, Petri-net, Markovian Model...

Jun, Gyuchan T; Morris, Zoe; Eldabi, Tillal; Harper, Paul; Naseer, Aisha; Patel, Brijesh; Clarkson, John P

2011-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

357

A comparison of two heat transfer models for estimating thermal drawdown in Hot Dry Rock reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Estimates of thermal drawdown in Hot Dry Rock geothermal systems have been made with two different models of heat transfer from hydraulically fractured reservoir rock blocks to water circulated through the fracture permeability. One model is based on deconvolution of experimental tracer response curves into a network of flowpaths connected in parallel with heat transfer calculated individually in each flowpath. The second model is based on one-dimensional flow through the rock with a block size distribution described as a group of equivalent-radius spheres for which the heat transfer equations can be solved analytically. The two-models were applied to the planned Phase II long-term thermal drawdown experiment at Fenton Hill, NM. The results show good agreement between the two models, with estimates of temperature cooldown from 240/sup 0/C to 150/sup 0/C in a few years depending on selected operation parameters, but with somewhat differing cooldown curve characteristic shapes. Data from the long-term experiment will be helpful in improving the two models.

Robinson, B.A.; Kruger, P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Determining students' intent to stay in it programs: an empirical model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current declining enrollment and attrition trends in IT programs have inspired an emerging body of literature: IT student retention. To shed some insight on whom leaves and stays in IT programs, the authors developed a new construct, computing resilience, ... Keywords: IT resilience, IT students, emotional intelligence, ethnic identity, persistence, retention, student attrition

Tracy L. Lewis; Wanda J. Smith; France Bélanger; K. Vernard Harrington

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Behavior scoring model for coalition loyalty programs by using summary variables of transaction data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OKCashbag (OCB), the largest coalition loyalty program in Korea, offers a number of benefits such as sharing customer data with participating firms and cross-selling. There is great value in utilizing information pertaining to coalition loyal patrons. ... Keywords: Big data, Coalition loyalty program, Dimension reduction, OKCashbag

Moo Yeob Lee; Ann Sung Lee; So Young Sohn

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

GRAV2D: an interactive 2-1/2 dimensional gravity modeling program (user's guide and documentation for Rev. 1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GRAV2D is an interactive computer program used for modeling 2-1/2 dimensional gravity data. A forward algorithm is used to give the theoretical attraction of gravity intensity at a station due to a perturbing body given by the initial model. The resultant model can then be adjusted for a better fit by a combination of manual adjustment, one-dimensional automatic search, and Marquardt inversion. GRAV2D has an interactive data management system for data manipulation and display built around subroutines to do a forward problem, a one-dimensional direct search and an inversion. This is a user's guide and documentation for GRAV2D.

Nutter, C.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4E 4E Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building J.H. Dudley, D. Black, M. Apte, M.A. Piette Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory P. Berkeley University of California, Berkeley May 2010 Presented at the 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Pacific Grove, CA, August 15-20, 2010, and published in the Proceedings DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

362

Evaluation of the Multiscale Modeling Framework Using Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a recently developed approach to climate modeling, called the multiscale modeling framework (MMF), a two-dimensional cloud-resolving model (CRM) is embedded into each grid column of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), replacing traditional ...

Mikhail Ovtchinnikov; Thomas Ackerman; Roger Marchand; Marat Khairoutdinov

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The Angular Distribution of UV-B Sky Radiance under Cloudy Conditions: A Comparison of Measurements and Radiative Transfer Calculations Using a Fractal Cloud Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, global warming concerns have focused attention on cloud radiative forcing and its accurate encapsulation in radiative transfer measurement and modeling programs. At present, this process is constrained by the dynamic movement and ...

Christopher Kuchinke; Kurt Fienberg; Manuel Nunez

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Tracer test analysis of the Klamath Falls geothermal resource: a comparison of models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two tracer tests on doublet systems in a fractured geothermal system were carried out in Klamath Falls, Oregon. The purpose of the tests were to obtain data which would lead to information about the reservoir and to test the applicability of current tracer flow models. The results show rapid breakthrough times and indicate fracture flow with vigorous mixing of injector fluid before production of same. This leads to the idea that thermal breakthrough is not directly related to tracer breakthrough in the Klamath Union doublet system. There has been no long-term enthalpy loss from exploiting the resource for 40 years. In order to reduce the data, models were developed to analyze the results. Along with a porous media flow model two mathematical models developed to analyze fractured geothermal systems are used to help decipher the various tracer return curves. The flow of tracers in doublet systems was investigated. A mathematical description is used for tracer flow through fractures as a function of time and various nonlinear parameters which can be found using a curve fitting technique. This allows the reservoir to be qualitatively defined. These models fit the data well, but point to the fact that future improvement needs to be considered for a clearer and more quantitative understanding of fractured geothermal systems. 22 refs., 32 figs., 11 tabs.

Johnson, S.E.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Comparison of kinetic and equilibrium reaction models insimulating gas hydrate behavior in porous media  

SciTech Connect

In this study we compare the use of kinetic and equilibriumreaction models in the simulation of gas (methane) hydrate behavior inporous media. Our objective is to evaluate through numerical simulationthe importance of employing kinetic versus equilibrium reaction modelsfor predicting the response of hydrate-bearing systems to externalstimuli, such as changes in pressure and temperature. Specifically, we(1) analyze and compare the responses simulated using both reactionmodels for natural gas production from hydrates in various settings andfor the case of depressurization in a hydrate-bearing core duringextraction; and (2) examine the sensitivity to factors such as initialhydrate saturation, hydrate reaction surface area, and numericaldiscretization. We find that for large-scale systems undergoing thermalstimulation and depressurization, the calculated responses for bothreaction models are remarkably similar, though some differences areobserved at early times. However, for modeling short-term processes, suchas the rapid recovery of a hydrate-bearing core, kinetic limitations canbe important, and neglecting them may lead to significantunder-prediction of recoverable hydrate. The use of the equilibriumreaction model often appears to be justified and preferred for simulatingthe behavior of gas hydrates, given that the computational demands forthe kinetic reaction model far exceed those for the equilibrium reactionmodel.

Kowalsky, Michael B.; Moridis, George J.

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

366

COMPARISONS FOR RAMS MODELS (V3A, V4.3 AND V6.0)  

SciTech Connect

The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) is an atmospheric numerical model developed by scientists at Colorado State University and the ASTER Division of Mission Research Corporation for simulating and forecasting meteorological phenomena. RAMS v3a and v4.3 are being used by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) as an operational tool for weather forecast and emergency response for the Savannah River Site (SRS). ATmospheric, Meteorological, and Environmental Technologies (ATMET) is now the proprietor of RAMS. The latest upgrade (v6.0) was officially released on January 11, 2006. ATG plans to eventually replace the RAMS v3a and v4.3 with the RAMS v6.0 for operational site forecasting if the newest version provides a significant improvement in the numerical forecast. A study to compare the three model (v3a, v4.3 and v6.0) results with respect to surface stations observations was conducted and is the subject of this report. Two cases were selected for simulation by these three RAMS models. One simulation started at 0 Z on April 3, 2007 and represents a warm weather case (high temperature of 26 C and low temperature of 16 C) at SRS, while the other simulation started at 0 Z on April 7, 2007 and represents a cold weather case (high temperature of 9 C and low temperature of -1 C) at SRS. The wind speeds, wind directions, temperatures and the dew point temperatures predicted by the three RAMS models were interpolated to 46 surface observation locations. The interpolated results were compared with the observation data. Statistically, the differences between the three model results were very small. For the present configurations, the predictions from RAMS v6.0 are no better than the older models with the exception of wind direction. The proposed path forward would be to fine tune the RAMS v6.0 model input parameters to improve the predictions. This should also provide insights into current weaknesses in all RAMS versions.

Chen, K

2007-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

367

A Comparison of Some Tropical Ocean Models: Hindcast Skill and El Nińo Evolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropical Pacific SST hindcasts are examined in the Zebiak and Cane (Lamont), Latif (MPIZ), Oberhuber (OPYC), and GFDL ocean models, each forced by the same wind-stress fields over the 1970–85 time interval. Skill scores reveal that, although all ...

Arthur J. Miller; Tim P. Barnett; Nicholas E. Graham

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Aspects of the comparison of stratospheric trace species measurements with photochemical models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observation and measurement of reservoir species, including H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, ClONO/sub 2/, HNO/sub 4/, HOCl, N/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and others, can potentially test some portions of photochemical models of the stratosphere, leading to improvements and increased confidence in model predictions. But abundance measurements of a single reservoir species without accompanying values for other species do not serve, in most cases, to constrain the related model mechanism and parameters within the recognized uncertainties. This follows from the sensitivity of abundance of a species to fluctuations in its long-lived precursors from transport processes. A better test of theory would be provided by correlation studies in which precursor concentrations and photolytic fluxes are measured simultaneously and in the same air volume as the reservoir species. Three recent reported differing observations or upper limits for H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ give an example of the difficulties. All three reported values could be nearly consistent with the current LLNL one-dimensional stratospheric photochemical model, depending on the values of O/sub 3/, NO/sub x/ and H/sub 2/O appropriate to each measurement. The important precursors in each case can be identified by consideration of the appropriate kinetics and observed precursor variability. 10 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

Connell, P.S.; Wuebbles, D.J.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Three-Dimensional Model Study of the Antarctic Ozone Hole in 2002 and Comparison with 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An offline 3D chemical transport model (CTM) has been used to study the evolution of the Antarctic ozone hole during the sudden warming event of 2002 and to compare it with similar simulations for 2000. The CTM has a detailed stratospheric ...

W. Feng; M. P. Chipperfield; H. K. Roscoe; J. J. Remedios; A. M. Waterfall; G. P. Stiller; N. Glatthor; M. Höpfner; D.-Y. Wang

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Wind-Driven Thermocline Variability in the Pacific: A Model–Data Comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatial and temporal patterns of interannual temperature variability within the main thermocline (200–400-m depth) of the Pacific (30°S–60°N) during 1968–97 are documented in two observational datasets and an ocean general circulation model ...

Jo Ann Lysne; Clara Deser

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Comparison of Wake Model Simulations with Offshore Wind Turbine Wake Profiles Measured by Sodar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper gives an evaluation of most of the commonly used models for predicting wind speed decrease (wake) downstream of a wind turbine. The evaluation is based on six experiments where free-stream and wake wind speed profiles were measured ...

R. J. Barthelmie; G. C. Larsen; S. T. Frandsen; L. Folkerts; K. Rados; S. C. Pryor; B. Lange; G. Schepers

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Model Clouds as Seen from Space: Comparison with Geostationary Imagery in the 11-?m Window Channel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A monitoring of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model with the Meteosat infrared window channel during December 2000 is presented. The Meteosat images are simulated every 3 h during the 31 days of the month from the ...

F. Chevallier; G. Kelly

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

MULTI-ISOPTOPE PROCESS MONITOR: A COMPARISON OF MODEL AND EXPERIMENTAL VALIDATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MIP Monitoring concept was demonstrated through a series of simulations as well as experiments. While qualitatively these studies generated similar results, there were significant differences between the simulated and experimentally determined spectra. This chapter investigates these differences between modeled and experimentally determined CZT gamma spectra and subsequent PCA analysis generated from each.

Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Christensen, Richard; Schwantes, Jon M.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Comparison of two generation-recombination terms in the Poisson-Nernst-Planck model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two phenomenological forms proposed to take into account the generation-recombination phenomenon of ions are investigated. The first form models the phenomenon as a chemical reaction, containing two coefficients describing the dissociation of neutral particles in ions, and the recombination of ions to give neutral particles. The second form is based on the assumption that in thermodynamical equilibrium, a well-defined density of ions is stable. Any deviation from the equilibrium density gives rise to a source term proportional to the deviation, whose phenomenological coefficient plays the role of a life time. The analysis is performed by evaluating the electrical response of an electrolytic cell to an external stimulus for both forms. For simplicity we assume that the electrodes are blocking, that there is only a group of negative and positive ions, and that the negative ions are immobile. For the second form, two cases are considered: (i) the generation-recombination phenomenon is due to an intrinsic mechanism, and (ii) the production of ions is triggered by an external source of energy, as in a solar cell. We show that the predictions of the two models are different at the impedance as well as at the admittance level. In particular, the first model predicts the existence of two plateaux for the real part of the impedance, whereas the second one predicts just one. It follows that impedance spectroscopy measurements could give information on the model valid for the generation-recombination of ions.

Lelidis, I. [Solid State Section, Department of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, Athens 157 84 (Greece); Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, Laboratoire de Physique des Systemes Complexes, 33 rue Saint-Leu 80039, Amiens (France); Barbero, G. [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Sfarna, A. [Solid State Section, Department of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, Athens 157 84 (Greece)

2012-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

375

User manual for geothermal energy assisted dairy complex computer programs: PREBLD, MODEL0, MODEL1, MODEL2, FRMAT2, PREPI2, NET2, DAIRY and DAIRY1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The operation of the programs on a computer is described. The programs are divided into two parts: the simulation of the buildings and the simulation of the pipe network. (MHR)

Not Available

376

CellSs: a programming model for the cell BE architecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work we present Cell superscalar (CellSs) which addresses the automatic exploitation of the functional parallelism of a sequential program through the different processing elements of the Cell BE architecture. The focus in on the simplicity and ...

Pieter Bellens; Josep M. Perez; Rosa M. Badia; Jesus Labarta

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

A sniffer technique for an efficient deduction of model dynamical equations using genetic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel heuristic technique that enhances the search facility of the standard genetic programming (GP) algorithm is presented. The method provides a dynamic sniffing facility to optimize the local search in the vicinity of the current best chromosomes ...

Dilip P. Ahalpara; Abhijit Sen

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Early evaluation of directive-based GPU programming models for productive exascale computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Graphics Processing Unit (GPU)-based parallel computer architectures have shown increased popularity as a building block for high performance computing, and possibly for future Exascale computing. However, their programming complexity remains as a major ...

Seyong Lee; Jeffrey S. Vetter

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Modeling Occurrences of Non-VFR Weather: A Case Study for Design of Flight Instruction Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective methods in which climatology is considered are needed in the design of flight instruction programs. Weather conditions less than the minimum (LM) thresholds designated for Minimum Instructional Visual Flight Rules (MIVFR) were defined ...

Thomas Q. Carney; Robert F. Dale

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Modules based on the geochemical model PHREEQC for use in scripting and programming languages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The geochemical model PHREEQC is capable of simulating a wide range of equilibrium reactions between water and minerals, ion exchangers, surface complexes, solid solutions, and gases. It also has a general kinetic formulation that allows modeling of ... Keywords: C, C++, COM, Component object model, Fortran, Geochemical modeling, PHREEQC, Reactive-transport modeling

Scott R. Charlton; David L. Parkhurst

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Chemical kinetic modeling of high pressure propane oxidation and comparison to experimental results  

SciTech Connect

A pressure dependent kinetic mechanism for propane oxidation is developed and compared to experimental data from a high pressure flow reactor. The experiment conditions range from 10--15 atm, 650--800 K, and were performed at a residence time of 200 {micro}s for propane-air mixtures at an equivalence ratio of 0.4. The experimental results include data on negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior, where the chemistry describing this phenomena is considered critical in understanding automotive engine knock and cool flame oscillations. Results of the numerical model are compared to a spectrum of stable species profiles sampled from the flow reactor. Rate constants and product channels for the reaction of propyl radicals, hydroperoxy-propyl radicals and important isomers with O{sub 2} were estimated using thermodynamic properties, with multifrequency quantum Kassel Theory for k(E) coupled with modified strong collision analysis for fall-off. Results of the chemical kinetic model show an NTC region over nearly the same temperature regime as observed in the experiments. The model simulates properly the production of many of the major and minor species observed in the experiments. Numerical simulations show many of the key reactions involving propylperoxy radicals are in partial equilibrium at 10--15 atm. This indicates that their relative concentrations are controlled by a combination of thermochemistry and rate of minor reaction channels (bleed reactions) rather than primary reaction rates. This suggests that thermodynamic parameters of the oxygenated species, which govern equilibrium concentrations, are important. The modeling results show propyl radical and hydroperoxy-propyl radicals reaction with O{sub 2} proceeds, primarily, through thermalized adducts, not chemically activated channels.

Koert, D.N. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Bozzelli, J.W. [New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Newark, NJ (United States). Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Dept.; Cernansky, N.P. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics

1995-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

382

Kurucz model energy distributions: a comparison with real stars. II. Metal-deficient stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy distributions of synthetic spectra for Kurucz model atmospheres are compared with observed energy distributions of metal-deficient stars of the blue horizontal-branch (BHB), F-G-K subdwarf (SD) and G-K giant (MDG) types. The best coincidence of the synthetic and observed energy curves is found for BHB stars. The largest differences are found in the ultraviolet wavelengths for subdwarfs and cool MDGs. The influence of errors of effective temperatures, gravities and metallicities is estimated.

V. Straizys; R. Lazauskaite; G. Valiauga

2002-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

383

Results from baseline tests of the SPRE I and comparison with code model predictions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Space Power Research Engine (SPRE), a free-piston Stirling engine with linear alternator, is being tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center as part of the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) as a candidate for high capacity space power. This paper presents results of base-line engine tests at design and off-design operating conditions. The test results are compared with code model predictions.

Cairelli, J.E.; Geng, S.M. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center; Skupinski, R.C. [Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States). NASA Lewis Research Center Group

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Comparison of Fourier and model-based estimators in single mode multiaxial interferometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are several solutions to code the signal arising from optical long baseline multi-aperture interferometers. In this paper,we focus on the {\\bf non homothetic spatial coding scheme} (multiaxial) with the fringe pattern coded along one dimension on one detector(all-in-one). After describing the physical principles governing single mode interferometers using that sort of recombination scheme, we analyze two different existing methods that measure the source visibility. The first technique, so-called Fourier estimator, consists in integrating the high frequency peak of the power spectral density of the interferogram. The second method, so-called model-based estimator, has been specifically developed for the AMBER instrument of the VLTI and deals with directly modelling the interferogram recorded on the detector. Performances of both estimators are computed in terms of Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of the visibility, assuming that the interferograms are perturbed by photon and detector noises. Theoretical expressions of the visibility SNR are provided, validated through numerical computations and then compared. We show that the model-based estimator offers up to 5 times better performances than the Fourier one.

E. Tatulli; J. -B. LeBouquin

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Comparison of Two Gas Selection Methodologies: An Application of Bayesian Model Averaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One goal of hyperspectral imagery analysis is the detection and characterization of plumes. Characterization includes identifying the gases in the plumes, which is a model selection problem. Two gas selection methods compared in this report are Bayesian model averaging (BMA) and minimum Akaike information criterion (AIC) stepwise regression (SR). Simulated spectral data from a three-layer radiance transfer model were used to compare the two methods. Test gases were chosen to span the types of spectra observed, which exhibit peaks ranging from broad to sharp. The size and complexity of the search libraries were varied. Background materials were chosen to either replicate a remote area of eastern Washington or feature many common background materials. For many cases, BMA and SR performed the detection task comparably in terms of the receiver operating characteristic curves. For some gases, BMA performed better than SR when the size and complexity of the search library increased. This is encouraging because we expect improved BMA performance upon incorporation of prior information on background materials and gases.

Renholds, Andrea S.; Thompson, Sandra E.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Chilton, Lawrence K.

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Computational modeling study of the radial line slot antenna microwave plasma source with comparisons to experiments  

SciTech Connect

The radial line slot antenna plasma source is a high-density microwave plasma source comprising a high electron temperature source region within the plasma skin depth from a coupling window and low electron temperature diffusion region far from the window. The plasma is typically comprised of inert gases like argon and mixtures of halogen or fluorocarbon gases for etching. Following the experimental study of Tian et al.[J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 24, 1421 (2006)], a two-dimensional computational model is used to describe the essential features of the source. A high density argon plasma is described using the quasi-neutral approximation and coupled to a frequency-domain electromagnetic wave solver to describe the plasma-microwave interactions in the source. The plasma is described using a multispecies plasma chemistry mechanism developed specifically for microwave excitation conditions. The plasma is nonlocal by nature with locations of peak power deposition and peak plasma density being very different. The spatial distribution of microwave power coupling depends on whether the plasma is under- or over-dense and is described well by the model. The model predicts the experimentally observed low-order diffusion mode radial plasma profiles. The trends of spatial profiles of electron density and electron temperature over a wide range of power and pressure conditions compare well with experimental results.

Raja, Laxminarayan L. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Mahadevan, Shankar [Esgee Technologies Inc., 1301 S. Capital of Texas Hwy. Suite B-122, Austin, Texas 78746 (United States); Ventzek, Peter L. G.; Yoshikawa, Jun [Tokyo Electron Ltd., Akasaka Biz Tower, 3-1 Akasaka 5-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107-6325 (Japan)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Chemical kinetic modeling of high pressure propane oxidation and comparison to experimental results. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

A pressure dependent kinetic mechanism for propane oxidation is developed and compared to experimental data from a high pressure flow reactor. Experimental conditions range from 10--15 atm, 650--800 K, and a residence time of 198 ms for propane-air mixtures at an equivalence ratio of 0.4. The experimental results clearly indicate a negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior. The chemistry describing this phenomena is critical in understanding automotive engine knock and cool flame oscillations. Results of the numerical model are compared to a spectrum of stable species profiles sampled from the flow reactor. Rate constants and product channels for the reaction of propyl radicals, hydroperoxy-propyl radicals and important isomers (radicals) with O{sub 2} were estimated using thermodynamic properties, with multifrequency quantum Kassel Theory for k(E) coupled with modified strong collision analysis for fall-off. Results of the chemical kinetic model show an NTC region over nearly the same temperature regime as observed in the experiments. Sensitivity analysis identified the key reaction steps that control the rate of oxidation in the NTC region. The model reasonably simulates the profiles for many of the major and minor species observed in the experiments.

Koert, D.N. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Bozzelli, J.W. [New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Newark, NJ (United States). Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Dept.; Cernansky, N.P. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Comparison of Raman Scattering Measurements and Modeling in NIF Ignition Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent NIF indirect-drive experiments have shown significant Raman scattering from the inner beams. NIF data has motivated improvements to rad-hydro modeling, leading to the 'high flux model' [M. D. Rosen et al., HEDP 7, 180 (2011)]. Cross-beam energy transfer [P. A. Michel et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010] in the laser entrance hole is an important tool for achieving round implosions, and is uniformly distributed across the laser spot in rad-hydro simulations (but not necessarily in experiments). We find the Raman linear gain spectra computed with these plasma conditions agree well in time-dependent peak wavelength with the measured data, especially when overlapping laser-beam intensities are used. More detailed, spatially non-uniform modeling of the cross-beam transfer has been performed. The resulting gains better follow the time history of the measured backscatter. We shall present the impact of spatially non-uniform energy transfer on SRS gain. This metric is valid when amplification is in a linear regime, and so we shall also present an assessment of whether electron trapping in Langmuir waves can play a role in these shots.

Strozzi, D J; Hinkel, D E; Williams, E A; Town, R J; Michel, P A; Divol, L; Berger, R L; Moody, J D

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

389

Gasoline surrogate modeling of gasoline ignition in a rapid compression machine and comparison to experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of gasoline in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines (HCCI) and in duel fuel diesel - gasoline engines, has increased the need to understand its compression ignition processes under engine-like conditions. These processes need to be studied under well-controlled conditions in order to quantify low temperature heat release and to provide fundamental validation data for chemical kinetic models. With this in mind, an experimental campaign has been undertaken in a rapid compression machine (RCM) to measure the ignition of gasoline mixtures over a wide range of compression temperatures and for different compression pressures. By measuring the pressure history during ignition, information on the first stage ignition (when observed) and second stage ignition are captured along with information on the phasing of the heat release. Heat release processes during ignition are important because gasoline is known to exhibit low temperature heat release, intermediate temperature heat release and high temperature heat release. In an HCCI engine, the occurrence of low-temperature and intermediate-temperature heat release can be exploited to obtain higher load operation and has become a topic of much interest for engine researchers. Consequently, it is important to understand these processes under well-controlled conditions. A four-component gasoline surrogate model (including n-heptane, iso-octane, toluene, and 2-pentene) has been developed to simulate real gasolines. An appropriate surrogate mixture of the four components has been developed to simulate the specific gasoline used in the RCM experiments. This chemical kinetic surrogate model was then used to simulate the RCM experimental results for real gasoline. The experimental and modeling results covered ultra-lean to stoichiometric mixtures, compressed temperatures of 640-950 K, and compression pressures of 20 and 40 bar. The agreement between the experiments and model is encouraging in terms of first-stage (when observed) and second-stage ignition delay times and of heat release rate. The experimental and computational results are used to gain insight into low and intermediate temperature processes during gasoline ignition.

Mehl, M; Kukkadapu, G; Kumar, K; Sarathy, S M; Pitz, W J; Sung, S J

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

A Review of Procedures for Updating Air Quality Modeling Techniques for Regulatory Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air quality models are a key component in determining pollution control requirements. To ensure that the best techniques are used, modeling guidance must be flexible and include better techniques as they become available. Revisions to modeling ...

Jawad S. Touma; John S. Irwin; Joseph A. Tikvart; C. Thomas Coulter

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Short note: A FORTRAN program to introduce field-measured sedimentary logs into reservoir modelling packages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building reservoir-scale facies models of outcrops is a practice that improves the three-dimensional geological modelling of subsurface analogues. Facies modelling of outcrops can be achieved either with geostatistical or object-based methods, which ...

O. Falivene; P. Arbués; J. Howell; O. Fernández; P. Cabello; J. A. Muńoz; L. Cabrera

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Simulating thermal explosion of RDX-based explosives: Model comparison with experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We compare two-dimensional model results with measurements for the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior in a thermal explosion experiment. Confined high explosives are heated at a rate of 1 C per hour until an explosion is observed. The heating, ignition, and deflagration phases are modeled using an Arbitrarily Lagrangian-Eulerian code (ALE3D) that can handle a wide range of time scales that vary from a structural to a dynamic hydro time scale. During the pre-ignition phase, quasi-static mechanics and diffusive thermal transfer from a heat source to the HE are coupled with the finite chemical reactions that include both endothermic and exothermic processes. Once the HE ignites, a hydro dynamic calculation is performed as a burn front propagates through the HE. Two RDX-based explosives, C-4 and PBXN-109, are considered, whose chemical-thermal-mechanical models are constructed based on measurements of thermal and mechanical properties along with small scale thermal explosion measurements. The simulated dynamic response of HE confinement during the explosive phase is compared to measurements in large scale thermal explosion tests. The explosion temperatures for both HE's are predicted to within 5 C. Calculated and measured wall strains provide an indication of vessel pressurization during the heating phase and violence during the explosive phase. During the heating phase, simulated wall strains provide only an approximate representation of measured values indicating a better numerical treatment is needed to provide accurate results. The results also show that more numerical accuracy is needed for vessels with lesser confinement strength. For PBXN-109, the measured wall strains during the explosion are well represented by the ALE3D calculations.

Yoh, J J; McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Wardell, J F; Tarver, C M

2004-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

393

Comparison of multimarker logistic regression models, with application to a genomewide scan of schizophrenia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with asymptotics do not explain the pattern of ?^ seen above, since the multimarker model with fewest parameters has the higher inflation in the med- ian. Other quality control factors could be responsible, but the pre-study QC step should have gone some way... , for example the window on chromosome 16 starting at rs17618203 using the haplotype test, actually become more significant after correction; others are cor- rected by an order of magnitude or more. QC of top ranked windows We examined quality control statistics...

Wason, James M S; Dudbridge, Frank

2010-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

394

Comparison of model and observations of the wake of a MOD-OA wind turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of wind velocity measurements upwind and downwind of the MOD-OA wind turbine at Clayton, New Mexico, was used to determine some of the characteristics of wakes within approximately two blade diameters of the machine. The magnitudes and shapes of the velocity profiles downwind of the turbine were compared with results obtained from a model. Generally good agreement was obtained at speeds well below the rated speed of the MOD-OA, but the results were not as satisfactory for higher values.

Doran, J.C.; Packard, K.R.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Relativistic heat conduction: the kinetic theory approach and comparison with Marle's model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to close the set of relativistic hydrodynamic equations, constitutive relations for the dissipative fluxes are required. In this work we outline the calculation of the corresponding closure for the heat flux in terms of the gradients of the independent scalar state variables: number density and temperature. The results are compared with the ones obtained using Marle's approximation in which a relativistic correction factor is included for the relaxation time parameter. It is shown how including such correction this BGK-like model yields good results in the relativistic case and not only in the non-relativistic limit as was previously found by other authors.

A. R. Mendez; A. L. Garcia-Perciante

2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

396

Geomagnetic Backtracing: A comparison of Tsyganenko 1996 and 2005 External Field models with AMS-02 data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We used a backtracing code to reconstruct particle trajectory inside the Earth Magnetosphere during the last solar active period (2011 and 2012) when very high Solar Wind pressure values were measured. We compared our results on AMS-02 proton and electron data with 2 different External Field models, namely Tsyganenko 1996 (T96) and 2005 (T05), both for quiet (defined as the periods when the solar wind pressure is below the average value, set at 2nPa) and active periods. Although T05 has been specifically designed for storm events, at high energy the particle trajectory is similar for the two models. For instance at rigidities larger than 50 GV, the RMS of angular difference between reconstructed asymptotic direction outside the Magnetosphere is of the order of the millirad, while it increases at intermediate energies. We also confirmed, as a function of the pointing direction, the well known East-West effect on the trajectory of primary particles and on the access solid angle on the AMS detector.

Boschini, M J; Della Torre, S; Gervasi, M; Grandi, D; Haino, S; La Vacca, G; Pensotti, S; Rancoita, P G; Rozza, D; Tacconi, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Model simulations of the first aerosol indirect effect and comparison of cloud susceptibility fo satellite measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Present-day global anthropogenic emissions contribute more than half of the mass in submicron particles primarily due to sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol components derived from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning. These anthropogenic aerosols modify the microphysics of clouds by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and enhance the reflectivity of low-level water clouds, leading to a cooling effect on climate (the Twomey effect or first indirect effect). The magnitude of the first aerosol indirect effect is associated with cloud frequency as well as a quantity representing the sensitivity of cloud albedo to changes in cloud drop number concentration. This quantity is referred to as cloud susceptibility [Twomey, 1991]. Analysis of satellite measurements demonstrates that marine stratus clouds are likely to be of higher susceptibility than continental clouds because of their lower number concentrations of cloud drops [Platnick and Twomey, 1994]. Here, we use an improved version of the fully coupled climate/chemistry model [Chuang et al., 1997] to calculate the global concentrations Of sulfate, dust, sea salt, and carbonaceous aerosols (biomass smoke and fossil fuel organic matter and black carbon). We investigated the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on cloud susceptibility and calculated the associated changes of shortwave radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere. We also examined the correspondence between the model simulation of cloud susceptibility and that inferred from satellite measurements to test whether our simulated aerosol concentrations and aerosol/cloud interactions give a faithful representation of these features.

Chuang, C; Penner, J E; Kawamoto, K

2002-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

398

Comparison of Test Procedures and Energy Efficiency Criteria in Selected International Standards & Labeling Programs for Copy Machines, External Power Supplies, LED Displays, Residential Gas Cooktops and Televisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency Regulations: Standby Power Consumption. ” http://Management Corporation. 2011. “e-Standby Program. ” http://formulas – in addition to standby and off-mode. The other

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Refiners Switch to Reformulated Refiners Switch to Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model Contents * Summary * Introduction o Table 1. Comparison of Simple Model and Complex Model RFG Per Gallon Requirements * Statutory, Individual Refinery, and Compliance Baselines o Table 2. Statutory Baseline Fuel Compositions * Simple Model * Complex Model o Table 3. Complex Model Variables * Endnotes Related EIA Short-Term Forecast Analysis Products * RFG Simple and Complex Model Spreadsheets * Areas Particpating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program * Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations * Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model * Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules * Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline, 1995 , (Adobe

400

Tritium transport in the NuMI decay pipe region - modeling and comparison with experimental data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NuMI (Neutrinos at Main Injector) beam facility at Fermilab is designed to produce an intense beam of muon neutrinos to be sent to the MINOS underground experiment in Soudan, Minnesota. Neutrinos are created by the decay of heavier particles. In the case of NuMI, the decaying particles are created by interaction of high-energy protons in a target, creating mostly positive pions. These particles can also interact with their environment, resulting in production of a variety of short-lived radionuclides and tritium. In the NuMI beam, neutrinos are produced by 120 GeV protons from the Fermilab Main Injector accelerator which are injected into the NuMI beam line using single turn extraction. The beam line has been designed for 400 kW beam power, roughly a factor of 2 above the initial (2005-06) running conditions. Extracted protons are bent downwards at a 57mr angle towards the Soudan Laboratory. The meson production target is a 94 cm segmented graphite rod, cooled by water in stainless tubes on the top and bottom of the target. The target is followed by two magnetic horns which are pulsed to 200 kA in synchronization with the passage of the beam, producing focusing of the secondary hadron beam and its daughter neutrinos. Downstream of the second horn the meson beam is transported for 675 m in an evacuated 2 m diameter beam (''decay'') pipe. Subsequently, the residual mesons and protons are absorbed in a water cooled aluminum/steel absorber immediately downstream of the decay pipe. Some 200 m of rock further downstream ranges out all of the residual muons. During beam operations, after installation of the chiller condensate system in December 2005, the concentration of tritiated water in the MINOS sump flow of 177 gpm was around 12 pCi/ml, for a total of 0.010 pCi/day. A simple model of tritium transport and deposition via humidity has been constructed to aid in understanding how tritium reaches the sump water. The model deals with tritium transported as HTO, water in which one hydrogen atom has been replaced with tritium. Based on concepts supported by the modeling, a dehumidification system was installed during May 2006 that reduced the tritium level in the sump by a factor of two. This note is primarily concerned with tritium that was produced in the NuMI target pile, carried by air flow into the target hall and down the decay pipe passageway (where most of it was deposited). The air is exhausted through the existing air vent shaft EAV2 (Figure 1).

Hylen, J.; Plunkett, R.; /Fermilab

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Comparison of Model Estimated and Measured Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct-normal solar irradiance (DNSI), the total energy in the solar spectrum incident in unit time on a unit area at the earth's surface perpendicular to the direction to the Sun, depends only on atmospheric extinction of solar energy without regard to the details of the extinction - whether absorption or scattering. Here we report a set of closure experiments performed in north-central Oklahoma in April 1996, under cloud-free conditions, wherein measured atmospheric composition and aerosol optical thickness are input to a radiative transfer model, MODTRAN-3, to estimate DNSI, which is then compared with measured values obtained with normal incidence pyrheliometers and absolute cavity radiometers. Uncertainty in aerosol optical thickness (AOT) dominates the uncertainty in DNSI calculation. AOT measured by an independently calibrated sunphotometer and a rotating Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance - A Closure Experiment, Halthore et al. 2 shadow-band radiometer agree to within the uncerta...

Rangasayi Halthore; Schwartz; S. E.; Michalsky; J. J.; Anderson; G. P.; Gail P. Anderson; Ferrare R. A.; ten Brink H. M; Holben B. N.; Harry M. Ten Brink

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Comparison of Nonlinear Model Results Using Modified Recorded and Synthetic Ground Motions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study has been performed that compares results of nonlinear model runs using two sets of earthquake ground motion time histories that have been modified to fit the same design response spectra. The time histories include applicable modified recorded earthquake ground motion time histories and synthetic ground motion time histories. The modified recorded earthquake ground motion time histories are modified from time history records that are selected based on consistent magnitude and distance. The synthetic ground motion time histories are generated using appropriate Fourier amplitude spectrums, Arias intensity, and drift correction. All of the time history modification is performed using the same algorithm to fit the design response spectra. The study provides data to demonstrate that properly managed synthetic ground motion time histories are reasonable for use in nonlinear seismic analysis.

Robert E. Spears; J. Kevin Wilkins

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Methods and Models of the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, PNNL-MA-860  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (HIDP) provides internal dosimetry support services for operations at the Hanford Site. The HIDP is staffed and managed by the Radiation and Health Technology group, within the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Operations supported by the HIDP include research and development, the decontamination and decommissioning of facilities formerly used to produce and purify plutonium, and waste management activities. Radioelements of particular interest are plutonium, uranium, americium, tritium, and the fission and activation product radionuclides 137Cs, 90Sr, and 60Co. This manual describes the technical basis for the design of the routine bioassay monitoring program and for assessment of internal dose. The purposes of the manual are as follows: • Provide assurance that the HIDP derives from a sound technical base. • Promote the consistency and continuity of routine program activities. • Provide a historical record. • Serve as a technical reference for radiation protection personnel. • Aid in identifying and planning for future needs.

Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Bihl, Donald E.; Maclellan, Jay A.; Antonio, Cheryl L.; Hill, Robin L.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

Comparison between Model Simulations and Measurements of Hyperspectral Far- infrared Radiation from FIRST during the RHUBC-II Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface downward far-infrared (far-IR) spectra were collected from NASA’s Far-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Troposphere (FIRST) instrument from August to October 2009 at an altitude of 5.4 km near the summit of Cerro Toco, Chile. This region is known for its dry, cold, and dominantly clear atmosphere, which is optimal for studying the effects, that water vapor and cirrus clouds have on the far-IR. Comparisons with Line-By-Line Discrete Ordinants Radiative Transfer model, LBLDIS, show that FIRST observes the very fine spectral structure in the far-IR with differences as small as +/- 0.7% for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky simulations. Clear sky model analysis demonstrated the greatest sensitivity to atmospheric conditions is between 300 and 500 cm-1. The cloudy-sky simulations demonstrated that the far-IR radiation has minimal sensitivity to cloud particle effective radius, yet is very sensitive to cloud optical thickness at wavenumbers between 400 - 600 cm-1. In fact, cirrus optical thickness found to be inferred from the brightness temperature differences at 250 and 559.5 cm-1. Aerosols proved to reduce downwelling radiance by half that a clear-sky would emit, but had little effect on the total far-IR radiative forcing. Furthermore, these far-IR measurements open a new window to understanding the radiative impacts of various atmospheric constituents such as water vapor and clouds, and to understanding and modeling the Earth’s climate and energy budget.

Baugher, Elizabeth

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

COMPARISON OF CONVECTIVE OVERSHOOTING MODELS AND THEIR IMPACT ON ABUNDANCES FROM INTEGRATED LIGHT SPECTROSCOPY OF YOUNG (<3 Gyr) STAR CLUSTERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing program to measure detailed chemical abundances in nearby galaxies, we use a sample of young- to intermediate-age clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud with ages of 10 Myr-2 Gyr to evaluate the effect of isochrone parameters, specifically core convective overshooting, on Fe abundance results from high-resolution, integrated light spectroscopy. In this work we also obtain fiducial Fe abundances from high-resolution spectroscopy of the cluster individual member stars. We compare the Fe abundance results for the individual stars to the results from isochrones and integrated light spectroscopy to determine whether isochrones with convective overshooting should be used in our integrated light analysis of young- to intermediate-age (10 Myr-3 Gyr) star clusters. We find that when using the isochrones from the Teramo group, we obtain more accurate results for young- and intermediate-age clusters over the entire age range when using isochrones without convective overshooting. While convective overshooting is not the only uncertain aspect of stellar evolution, it is one of the most readily parameterized ingredients in stellar evolution models, and thus important to evaluate for the specific models used in our integrated light analysis. This work demonstrates that our method for integrated light spectroscopy of star clusters can provide unique tests for future constraints on stellar evolution models of young- and intermediate-age clusters.

Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A., E-mail: jcolucci@ucolick.org, E-mail: rab@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 1156 High Street, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

406

International Disaster Medical Sciences Fellowship: Model Curriculum and Key Considerations for Establishment of an Innovative International Educational Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to engage in similar training programs, this paper providesprogram. DETAILS OF THE TRAINING PROGRAM Educational Goalsthe remainder by the Training Program Liaison (TPL) of the

Koenig, Kristi L; Bey, Tareg; Schultz, Carl H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTS TO CFD MODELS FOR MIXING USING DUAL OPPOSING JETS IN TANKS WITH AND WITHOUT INTERNAL OBSTRUCTIONS  

SciTech Connect

This paper documents testing methods, statistical data analysis, and a comparison of experimental results to CFD models for blending of fluids, which were blended using a single pump designed with dual opposing nozzles in an eight foot diameter tank. Overall, this research presents new findings in the field of mixing research. Specifically, blending processes were clearly shown to have random, chaotic effects, where possible causal factors such as turbulence, pump fluctuations, and eddies required future evaluation. CFD models were shown to provide reasonable estimates for the average blending times, but large variations -- or scatter -- occurred for blending times during similar tests. Using this experimental blending time data, the chaotic nature of blending was demonstrated and the variability of blending times with respect to average blending times were shown to increase with system complexity. Prior to this research, the variation in blending times caused discrepancies between CFD models and experiments. This research addressed this discrepancy, and determined statistical correction factors that can be applied to CFD models, and thereby quantified techniques to permit the application of CFD models to complex systems, such as blending. These blending time correction factors for CFD models are comparable to safety factors used in structural design, and compensate variability that cannot be theoretically calculated. To determine these correction factors, research was performed to investigate blending, using a pump with dual opposing jets which re-circulate fluids in the tank to promote blending when fluids are added to the tank. In all, eighty-five tests were performed both in a tank without internal obstructions and a tank with vertical obstructions similar to a tube bank in a heat exchanger. These obstructions provided scale models of vertical cooling coils below the liquid surface for a full scale, liquid radioactive waste storage tank. Also, different jet diameters and different horizontal orientations of the jets were investigated with respect to blending. Two types of blending tests were performed. The first set of eighty-one tests blended small quantities of tracer fluids into solution. Data from these tests were statistically evaluated to determine blending times for the addition of tracer solution to tanks, and blending times were successfully compared to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models. The second set of four tests blended bulk quantities of solutions of different density and viscosity. For example, in one test a quarter tank of water was added to a three quarters of a tank of a more viscous salt solution. In this case, the blending process was noted to significantly change due to stratification of fluids, and blending times increased substantially. However, CFD models for stratification and the variability of blending times for different density fluids was not pursued, and further research is recommended in the area of blending bulk quantities of fluids. All in all, testing showed that CFD models can be effectively applied if statistically validated through experimental testing, but in the absence of experimental validation CFD model scan be extremely misleading as a basis for design and operation decisions.

Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Fowley, M.

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

408

A Fractal Interfacial Entrainment Model for Dry Convective Boundary Layers. Part II: Discussion of Model Behavior and Comparison with Other Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Details of the fractal interfacial entrainment (FIE) model recently presented by Kamada are compared to those of previous models, water tank results, and atmospheric data from the Wangara experiment. Effects of capping inversion resolution and ...

Ray F. Kamada

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Müller: Modeling the Impact of a Learning Phase on the Business Value of a Pair Programming Project. APSEC 11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Pair programmers need a ”warmup phase” before the pair can work at full speed. The length of the learning interval varies, depending on how experienced the developers are with pair programming and how familiar they are with each other. We study how large the impact of the lower pair productivity during warmup is on the business value of the pair programming project. To this end, we extend our net present value model for pair programming to explicitly include a learning interval for pairs. We then carry out a simulation study where we vary the shape of the learning curve, the length of the learning interval, the final productivity level of the pairs, the market pressure, and the size of the workforce. Our simulations show that the cost of the warmup phase is reasonably small compared to the project value, but nonetheless must be taken into account when estimating the project. Our results also suggest that the learning overhead is not an obstacle to introducing and using pair programming in a real environment.

Frank Padberg

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Comparison of Frames: Jordan vs Einstein Frame for a Non-minimal Dark Energy Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct a dark energy model where a scalar field non-minimally coupled to gravity plays the role of the dark component. We compare cosmological consequences of this non-minimal coupling of the scalar field and gravity in the spirit of the dark energy paradigm in Jordan and Einstein frames. Some important issues such as phantom divide line crossing, existence of the bouncing solutions and the stability of the solutions are compared in these two frames. We show that while a non-minimally coupled scalar field in the Jordan frame is a suitable dark energy component with capability to realize phantom divide line crossing, its conformal transformation in the Einstein frame has not this capability. The conformal transformation from Jordan frame to Einstein frame transforms the equation of state parameter of the dark energy component to its minimal form with a redefined scalar field and in this case it is impossible to realize a phantom phase with possible crossing of the phantom divide line.

Kourosh Nozari; S. Davood Sadatian

2009-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

411

TACK: a program coupling chemical kinetics with a two-dimensional transport model in geochemical systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Transport And Chemical Kinetics (TACK) program has been designed to make predictions of the chemistry in the vicinity of a planned repository for nuclear waste, i.e. SFL 3-5, where SFL is the Swedish abbreviation for "Swedish repository for long-lived ... Keywords: coupled, diffusion, dispersion, reaction, transport, two-dimensional

Göran Källvenius; Christian Ekberg

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Fuzzy parametric programming model for multi-objective integrated solid waste management under uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid waste management is increasingly becoming a challenging task for the municipal authorities due to increasing waste quantities, changing waste composition, decreasing land availability for waste disposal sites and increasing awareness about the ... Keywords: Fuzzy parametric programming, Integrated solid waste management system, Long term planning, Multi-objective and multi-period planning, Solid waste management

Amitabh Kumar Srivastava; Arvind K. Nema

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

A Comparison of TWP-ICE Observational Data with Cloud-Resolving Model Results  

SciTech Connect

Observations made during the TWP-ICE campaign are used to drive and evaluate thirteen cloud-resolving model simulations with periodic lateral boundary conditions. The simulations employ 2D and 3D dynamics, one- and two-moment microphysics, several variations on large-scale forcing, and the use of observationally derived aerosol properties to prognose droplet numbers. When domain means are averaged over a 6-day active monsoon period, all simulations reproduce observed surface precipitation rate but not its structural distribution. Simulated fractional areas covered by convective and stratiform rain are uncorrelated with one another, and are both variably overpredicted by up to a factor of {approx}2. Stratiform area fractions are strongly anticorrelated with outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) but are negligibly correlated with ice water path (IWP), indicating that ice spatial distribution controls OLR more than mean IWP. Overpredictions of OLR tend to be accompanied by underpredictions of reflected shortwave radiation (RSR). When there are two simulations differing only in microphysics scheme or large-scale forcing, the one with smaller stratiform area tends to exhibit greater OLR and lesser RSR by similar amounts. After {approx}10 days, simulations reach a suppressed monsoon period with a wide range of mean precipitable water vapor, attributable in part to varying overprediction of cloud-modulated radiative flux divergence compared with observationally derived values. Differences across the simulation ensemble arise from multiple sources, including dynamics, microphysics, and radiation treatments. Close agreement of spatial and temporal averages with observations may not be expected, but the wide spreads of predicted stratiform fraction and anticorrelated OLR indicate a need for more rigorous observation-based evaluation of the underlying micro- and macrophysical properties of convective and stratiform structures.

Fridlind, A. M.; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Grabowski, Wojciech W.; Hill, A.; Jones, T. R.; Khaiyer, M. M.; Liu, G.; Minnis, Patrick; Morrison, H.; Nguyen, L.; Park, S.; Petch, Jon C.; Pinty, Jean-Pierre; Schumacher, Courtney; Shipway, Ben; Varble, A. C.; Wu, Xiaoqing; Xie, Shaocheng; Zhang, Minghua

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

414

Evaluation of methane emissions from Palermo municipal landfill: Comparison between field measurements and models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane (CH{sub 4}) diffuse emissions from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills represent one of the most important anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gas. CH{sub 4} is produced by anaerobic biodegradation of organic matter in landfilled MSW and constitutes a major component of landfill gas (LFG). Gas recovery is a suitable method to effectively control CH{sub 4} emissions from landfill sites and the quantification of CH{sub 4} emissions represents a good tool to evaluate the effectiveness of a gas recovery system in reducing LFG emissions. In particular, LFG emissions can indirectly be evaluated from mass balance equations between LFG production, recovery and oxidation in the landfill, as well as by a direct approach based on LFG emission measurements from the landfill surface. However, up to now few direct measurements of landfill CH{sub 4} diffuse emissions have been reported in the technical literature. In the present study, both modeling and direct emission measuring methodologies have been applied to the case study of Bellolampo landfill located in Palermo, Italy. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate CH{sub 4} diffuse emissions, based on direct measurements carried out with the flux accumulation chamber (static, non-stationary) method, as well as to obtain the CH{sub 4} contoured flux map of the landfill. Such emissions were compared with the estimate achieved by means of CH{sub 4} mass balance equations. The results showed that the emissions obtained by applying the flux chamber method are in good agreement with the ones derived by the application of the mass balance equation, and that the evaluated contoured flux maps represent a reliable tool to locate areas with abnormal emissions in order to optimize the gas recovery system efficiency.

Di Bella, Gaetano, E-mail: dibella@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Di Trapani, Daniele, E-mail: ditrapani@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Viviani, Gaspare, E-mail: gviv@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) RAPID Engineering Program, Project 7: Development of Field Exposure Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to develop a conceptual model for estimating magnetic field (EMF) personal exposure (PE) of individuals or groups and construct a working model using existing data.

Bracken, T.D.; Rankin, R.F.; Wiley, J.A.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Program on Technology Innovation: An Aspen Plus Model of Biomass Torrefaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2009, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed an Aspen Plus model of biomass torrefaction to use as a tool for evaluating different torrefaction process conditions. This report describes the model in detail, as well as the results from the model simulation of five biomass fuels.

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

417

Modeling, Simulation and Analysis of Complex Networked Systems: A Program Plan for DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many complex systems of importance to the U.S. Department of Energy consist of networks of discrete components. Examples are cyber networks, such as the internet and local area networks over which nearly all DOE scientific, technical and administrative data must travel, the electric power grid, social networks whose behavior can drive energy demand, and biological networks such as genetic regulatory networks and metabolic networks. In spite of the importance of these complex networked systems to all aspects of DOE's operations, the scientific basis for understanding these systems lags seriously behind the strong foundations that exist for the 'physically-based' systems usually associated with DOE research programs that focus on such areas as climate modeling, fusion energy, high-energy and nuclear physics, nano-science, combustion, and astrophysics. DOE has a clear opportunity to develop a similarly strong scientific basis for understanding the structure and dynamics of networked systems by supporting a strong basic research program in this area. Such knowledge will provide a broad basis for, e.g., understanding and quantifying the efficacy of new security approaches for computer networks, improving the design of computer or communication networks to be more robust against failures or attacks, detecting potential catastrophic failure on the power grid and preventing or mitigating its effects, understanding how populations will respond to the availability of new energy sources or changes in energy policy, and detecting subtle vulnerabilities in large software systems to intentional attack. This white paper outlines plans for an aggressive new research program designed to accelerate the advancement of the scientific basis for complex networked systems of importance to the DOE. It will focus principally on four research areas: (1) understanding network structure, (2) understanding network dynamics, (3) predictive modeling and simulation for complex networked systems, and (4) design, situational awareness and control of complex networks. The program elements consist of a group of Complex Networked Systems Research Institutes (CNSRI), tightly coupled to an associated individual-investigator-based Complex Networked Systems Basic Research (CNSBR) program. The CNSRI's will be principally located at the DOE National Laboratories and are responsible for identifying research priorities, developing and maintaining a networked systems modeling and simulation software infrastructure, operating summer schools, workshops and conferences and coordinating with the CNSBR individual investigators. The CNSBR individual investigator projects will focus on specific challenges for networked systems. Relevancy of CNSBR research to DOE needs will be assured through the strong coupling provided between the CNSBR grants and the CNSRI's.

Brown, D L

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Evaluation of the Surface Climatology over the Conterminous United States in the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program Hindcast Experiment Using a Regional Climate Model Evaluation System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface air temperature, precipitation, and insolation over the conterminous United States region from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) regional climate model (RCM) hindcast study are evaluated using the Jet ...

Jinwon Kim; Duane E. Waliser; Chris A. Mattmann; Linda O. Mearns; Cameron E. Goodale; Andrew F. Hart; Dan J. Crichton; Seth McGinnis; Huikyo Lee; Paul C. Loikith; Maziyar Boustani

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Examination of Convection-Allowing Configurations of the WRF Model for the Prediction of Severe Convective Weather: The SPC/NSSL Spring Program 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Convection-allowing configurations of the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model were evaluated during the 2004 Storm Prediction Center–National Severe Storms Laboratory Spring Program in a simulated severe weather forecasting environment. The ...

John S. Kain; S. J. Weiss; J. J. Levit; M. E. Baldwin; D. R. Bright

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing:A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues,recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, anddescriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.  

SciTech Connect

The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing:A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues,recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, anddescriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

ARM - Program News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

their research, ranging from short-term field campaigns to long-term data analyses, weather and climate model comparisons, and measurement validation efforts. At the 93rd...

423

Repository Integration Program: RIP performance assessment and strategy evaluation model theory manual and user`s guide  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the theory and capabilities of RIP (Repository Integration Program). RIP is a powerful and flexible computational tool for carrying out probabilistic integrated total system performance assessments for geologic repositories. The primary purpose of RIP is to provide a management tool for guiding system design and site characterization. In addition, the performance assessment model (and the process of eliciting model input) can act as a mechanism for integrating the large amount of available information into a meaningful whole (in a sense, allowing one to keep the ``big picture`` and the ultimate aims of the project clearly in focus). Such an integration is useful both for project managers and project scientists. RIP is based on a `` top down`` approach to performance assessment that concentrates on the integration of the entire system, and utilizes relatively high-level descriptive models and parameters. The key point in the application of such a ``top down`` approach is that the simplified models and associated high-level parameters must incorporate an accurate representation of their uncertainty. RIP is designed in a very flexible manner such that details can be readily added to various components of the model without modifying the computer code. Uncertainty is also handled in a very flexible manner, and both parameter and model (process) uncertainty can be explicitly considered. Uncertainty is propagated through the integrated PA model using an enhanced Monte Carlo method. RIP must rely heavily on subjective assessment (expert opinion) for much of its input. The process of eliciting the high-level input parameters required for RIP is critical to its successful application. As a result, in order for any project to successfully apply a tool such as RIP, an enormous amount of communication and cooperation must exist between the data collectors, the process modelers, and the performance. assessment modelers.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Integrating object-oriented data modelling with a rule-based programming paradigm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LOGRES is a new project for the development of extended database systems which is based on the integration of the object-oriented data modelling paradigm and of the rule-based approach for the specification of queries and updates. The data model supports ...

F. Cacace; S. Ceri; S. Crespi-Reghizzi; L. Tanca; R. Zicari

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Groundwater modeling: Application of a multiphase fluid flow model as a decision-making tool for assessing and remediating installation restoration program sites. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research examined a two-dimensional numerical model, VALOR, which can simulate multiphase fluid flow in soils and groundwater, and evaluated the applicability of the model as a decision-making tool for assessing and remediating IRP sites. Model sensitivity analyses were conducted to study the influence of grid sizes, soil types, and organic release rates on the simulated migration of both light and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). The VALOR model was applied to a case study of a JP-4 release at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. The finer grid sizes provide the most accurate definition of NAPL distribution. The soil type and release rate sensitivity analyses demonstrate that NAPL migrates quicker through coarse sands than fine sand and clay. The light NAPL ponds at the water table and spreads laterally. The dense NAPL migrates through the subsurface and ponds at the aquifer bottom. The fast organic release simulations predict wider vertical pathways of migration. The slow organic release simulations predict higher light NAPL saturation at the water table. The case study indicates that within limits, VALOR may be useful for assessing NAPL distribution, estimating contaminated soil volumes, and evaluating remediation alternatives.... Groundwater modeling, Non-aqueous Phase Liquids: NAPL, Multiphase fluid flow model, Installation Restoration Program, IRP.

Scott, D.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

The community environmental monitoring program: a model for stakeholder involvement in environmental monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1981, the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has involved stakeholders directly in its daily operation and data collection, as well as in dissemination of information on radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the primary location where the United States (US) conducted nuclear testing until 1992. The CEMP is funded by the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, and is administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. The CEMP provides training workshops for stakeholders involved in the program, and educational outreach to address public concerns about health risk and environmental impacts from past and ongoing NTS activities. The network includes 29 monitoring stations located across an approximately 160,000 km{sup 2} area of Nevada, Utah and California in the southwestern US. The principal radiological instruments are pressurized ion chambers for measuring gamma radiation, and particulate air samplers, primarily for alpha/beta detection. Stations also employ a full suite of meteorological instruments, allowing for improved interpretation of the effects of meteorological events on background radiation levels. Station sensors are wired to state-of-the-art data-loggers that are capable of several weeks of on-site data storage, and that work in tandem with a communications system that integrates DSL and wireless internet, land line and cellular phone, and satellite technologies for data transfer. Data are managed through a platform maintained by the Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC) that DRI operates for the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The WRCC platform allows for near real-time upload and display of current monitoring information in tabular and graphical formats on a public web site. Archival data for each station are also available on-line, providing the ability to perform trending analyses or calculate site-specific exposure rates. This configuration also allows for remote programming and troubleshooting of sensors. Involvement of stakeholders in the monitoring process provides a number of benefits, including increased public confidence in monitoring results, as well as decreasing costs by more than 50 percent from when the program was managed entirely by U.S. federal employees. Additionally, the CEMP provides an ideal platform for testing new environmental sensors. (authors)

Hartwell, William T. [Division of Earth and Ecosystem Sciences, Desert Research Institute, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States); Shafer, David S. [Division of Hydrological Sciences, Desert Research Institute, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Baldrige Program Transition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Baldrige Performance Excellence Program is transitioning to a Sustainable, Enterprise Model. ... A Vision to Be Among the Best. ...

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

428

Geothermal solution modeling program. Progress report, October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in the development of a chemical equilibrium model for hydrothermal brines to 300/sup 0/C is discussed. The model enables accurate solubility predictions to be made for scaling minerals in complex geothermal brine systems (Na-K-Mg-Ca-H-Cl-SO/sub 4/-OH-CO/sub 3/-HCO/sub 3/-CO/sub 2/-H/sub 2/O). The model incorporates a highly successful algorithm for solving for the equilibrium configurations of complicated chemical systems by free energy minimization. (ACR)

Weare, J.H.; Moeller, N.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Comparison of the Land-Surface Interaction in the ECMWF Reanalysis Model with the 1987 FIFE Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment for the summer season of 1987 are used to assess the land-surface interaction of the ECMWF reanalysis. In comparison with an earlier study, ...

Alan K. Betts; Pedro Viterbo; Anton C. M. Beljaars

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Annex XXIII: Phase III Results Regarding Tripod Support Structure Modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes. This paper describes the findings of code-to-code verification activities of the IEA Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration.

Nichols, J.; Camp, T.; Jonkman, J.; Butterfield, S.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Azcona, J.; Martinez, A.; Munduate, X.; Vorpahl, F.; Kleinhansl, S.; Kohlmeier, M.; Kossel, T.; Boker, C.; Kaufer, D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Program on Technology Innovation: Development of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Performance and Cost Modeling Tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the development of an integrated performance and cost model for advanced coal power plant undertaken to enable users to screen technologies prior to engaging in more extensive studies of their preferred choice. Such screening activities generally require utilities to contract with outside engineering firms with access to sophisticated engineering modeling software and experienced staff to perform the studies, thus costing significant time and investment.

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

432

Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing - Towards Enhancing OpenMP for Manycore and Heterogeneous Nodes  

SciTech Connect

OpenMP was not well recognized at the beginning of the project, around year 2003, because of its limited use in DoE production applications and the inmature hardware support for an efficient implementation. Yet in the recent years, it has been graduately adopted both in HPC applications, mostly in the form of MPI+OpenMP hybrid code, and in mid-scale desktop applications for scientific and experimental studies. We have observed this trend and worked deligiently to improve our OpenMP compiler and runtimes, as well as to work with the OpenMP standard organization to make sure OpenMP are evolved in the direction close to DoE missions. In the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing project, the HPCTools team at the University of Houston (UH), directed by Dr. Barbara Chapman, has been working with project partners, external collaborators and hardware vendors to increase the scalability and applicability of OpenMP for multi-core (and future manycore) platforms and for distributed memory systems by exploring different programming models, language extensions, compiler optimizations, as well as runtime library support.

Barbara Chapman

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

UCSD Geothermal Chemical Modeling Project: DOE Advanced Brine Chemistry Program. [University of California at San Diego (UCSD)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE funding to the UCSD Chemical Modeling Group supports research to provide computer models which will reliably characterize the equilibrium chemistry of geothermal brines (solution, solid and gas phases) under variable thermodynamic conditions. With this technology, it will be possible to rapidly and inexpensively predict the chemical behavior of geothermal brines during various resource recovery stages; exploration, production, plant energy extraction and rejection as well as in ancillary programs such as mineral recovery. Our modeling technology is based on recent progress in the physical chemistry of concentrated aqueous solutions. The behavior of these fluids has not been predicted from first principle theories. However, because of the importance of concentrated brines to many industrial and natural processes, there have been numerous efforts to develop accurate phenomenological expressions for predicting the chemical behavior of these brines. One of the most successful of these efforts is that of Pitzer and coworkers. Incorporating the semiempirical equations of Pitzer, we have shown at UCSD that we can create highly accurate models of brine-solid-gas chemistry.

Moeller, N.; Weare, J.H.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Designing Energy Efficient Communication Runtime Systems for Data Centric Programming Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The insatiable demand of high performance computing is being driven by the most computationally intensive applications such as computational chemistry, climate modeling, nuclear physics, etc. The last couple of decades have observed a tremendous rise ... Keywords: PGAS, Communication Runtime Systems, Energy Efficiency

Abhinav Vishnu; Shuaiwen Song; Andres Marquez; Kevin Barker; Darren Kerbyson; Kirk Cameron; Pavan Balaji

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Designing On-Road Vehicle Test Programs for the Development of Effective Vehicle Emission Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HC Reduction in S.E. (%) NOx Reduction in S.E. (%) Table 2:c) HC, d) NOx Younglove/Scora/Barth VSP Bin CO2 Reduction inNOx Table 1: Vehicle Specific Power bins used in preliminary MOVES model (4). Table 2: Percent reduction

Younglove, T; Scora, G; Barth, M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Comparison of Average Transport and Dispersion Among a Gaussian Model, a Two-Dimensional Model and a Three-Dimensional Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission uses MACCS2 (MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2) for regulatory purposes such as planning for emergencies and cost-benefit analyses. MACCS2 uses a straight-line Gaussian model for atmospheric transport and dispersion. This model has been criticized as being overly simplistic, although only expected values of metrics of interest are used in the regulatory arena. To test the assumption that averaging numerous weather results adequately compensates for the loss of structure in the meteorology that occurs away from the point of release, average MACCS2 results have been compared with average results from a state-of-the-art, 3-dimensional LODI (Lagrangian Operational Dispersion Integrator)/ADAPT (Atmospheric Data Assimilation and Parameterization Technique) and a Lagrangian trajectory, Gaussian puff transport and dispersion model from RASCAL (Radiological Assessment System for consequence Analysis). The weather sample included 610 weather trials representing conditions for a hypothetical release at the Central Facility of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site. The values compared were average ground concentrations and average surface-level air concentrations at several distances out to 100 miles (160.9 km) from the assumed release site.

Mitchell, J A; Molenkamp, C R; Bixler, N E; Morrow, C W; Ramsdell, Jr., J V

2004-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

437

MAG2D: Interactive 2-1/2-dimensional magnetic modeling program (User's Guide and Documentation for Rev. 1)  

SciTech Connect

MAG2D is an interactive computer program used for modeling 2-1/2-dimensional magnetic data. A forward algorithm is used to give the theoretical attraction of magnetic intensity at a station due to a perturbing body given by the initial model. The resultant model can then be adjusted for a better fit by a combination of manual adjustment, one-dimensional automatic search, and Marquardt inversion. MAG2D has an interactive data management system for data manipulation and display built around subroutines to do a forward problem, a one-dimensional direct search and an inversion. These subroutines were originally separate batch-mode programs.

Nutter, C.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster Formation in a Cellular Environment Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster Formation in a Cellular Environment Larry Toburen East Carolina University Why This Project Modern tools of radiobiology are leading to many new discoveries regarding how cells and tissues respond to radiation exposure. We can now irradiate single cells and observe responses in adjacent cells. We can also measure clusters of radiation damage produced in DNA. The primary tools available to describe the initial spatial pattern of damage formed by the absorption of ionizing radiation are based on (MC) Monte Carlo simulations of the structure of charged particle tracks. Although many MC codes exist and considerable progress is being made in the incorporation of detailed macromolecular target structures into these codes, much of the interaction

439

Assessment of the feasibility of developing a Hanford Site weld modeling program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welding on the Hanford Site is an everyday occurrence, and most of the weldments made on site are relatively straightforward. Groove geometries, fillers, and wleding techniques and parameters are normally decided by experience or handbook advice. However, there are other weldments that might employ new materials, as well as one-of-a-kind welding situations. Implementation of a verified analytical weld assessment method would allow optimization of weld metal and heat-affected zone microstructure, and of variables that affect structural deformation and residual stresses. Realistic prediction of weldment thermal and strain history will require the use of a finite element model. Microstructure and resultant properties can be predicted using complex computer-based microstructure evolution models, literature-based empirical equations, or experimentally established behaviors. This report examines the feasibility of developing analytical methods for establishing weld parameter envelopes in new, complex welded configurations.

Atteridge, D.G.; Anderson, W.E.; Klein, R.F.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Program on Technology Innovation: Cumulative Risk Assessment of Urban Air Toxics: Pilot Modeling Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cumulative risk modeling for estimating the burden of exposure to urban air toxics requires consideration of a range of factors influencing population health. These factors include multiple toxic compounds, a variety of pollutant sources, background levels of air pollutants, and non-chemical stressors not historically considered in regulatory risk assessments. To date, quantitative methods to account for all these factors remain sporadic and relatively untested. However, the United States ...

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Program on Technology Innovation: Modeling of SMES and Its Integration to the Power Grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has long followed the development of superconducting magnet energy storage (SMES) and its application in electric power systems. Previous studies have primarily investigated both the benefits of using SMES and the power-system-level control issues that arise when SMES is integrated with the power system. More specific details of modeling for system integration, particularly with larger SMES units, have not been addressed in detail in the past. Because the Center for Advanced Power Systems (CAPS) at ...

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Materials Reliability Program: Finite-Element Model Validation for Dissimilar Metal Butt-Welds (MRP-316)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual stresses imparted by the welding process are a principal factor in the process of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 82/182 nickel-alloy dissimilar metal (DM) piping butt welds in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Analytical models are frequently used to simulate the welding process in order to predict the residual stress distribution in the weld and base material as an input to crack growth calculations. The crack growth calculations, in turn, have demonstrated a high sen...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

443

Introduction to multidimensional combustion modeling with the CONCHAS-SPRAY computer program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CONCHAS-SPRAY is a finite-difference computer code for the calculation of two-dimensional chemically reacting fluid flows. In this paper we discuss four problem areas that are encountered in multidimensional numerical combustion modeling, and the numerical techniques used by CONCHAS-SPRAY to overcome these problems. Then the equations are given that are solved by the computer code, and some results from an example problem are discussed. 7 figures, 1 table.

O'Rourke, P.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Comparison of the U-233 dog data of Stevens et al. with uranium retention functions in ICRP Publication 30 and a 3-compartment mammillary model for uranium  

SciTech Connect

Stevens measured the distribution, retention, and excretion of U-233 in seven beagles each given a single injection of U-233 citrate (2.8 ..mu..Ci/kg U-233 (VI) (approx.3 mg/dog)). These data, when plotted together with results obtained with the ICRP (Pub. 30) retention functions for purposes of comparison, are seen to differ only slightly from the ICRP-30 model. The number of transformations in the body, over a fifty-year period agree within a factor of 2. A three-compartment mammillary model has been parameterized from the data of Stevens by the method of Bernard. Retention in tissues of the body is represented by a linear combination of three compartments. The data plots for the dogs and ICRP-30 model will be presented and discussed together with the three compartment mammillary model for U-233 retention, distribution, and excretion. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Bernard S.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

International Disaster Medical Sciences Fellowship: Model Curriculum and Key Considerations for Establishment of an Innovative International Educational Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Management Institute Independent Study Program Professional Development Series University on-line basic disaster training and

Koenig, Kristi L; Bey, Tareg; Schultz, Carl H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Comparison of the Vertical Velocity Used to Calculate the Cloud Droplet Number Concentration in a Cloud Resolving and a Global Climate Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of the Vertical Velocity Comparison of the Vertical Velocity used to Calculate the Cloud Droplet Number Concentration in a Cloud-Resolving and a Global Climate Model H. Guo, J. E. Penner, M. Herzog, and X. Liu Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan Introduction Anthropogenic aerosols are effective cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The availability of CCN affects the initial cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and droplet size; therefore, cloud optical properties (the so-called first aerosol indirect effect). However, the estimate of CDNC from a mechanistic treatment shows significant differences from the empirical schemes mainly due to the large bias of the large-scale vertical velocity (w) (Ghan et al. 1993, 1995; Boucher and Lohmann 1995;

447

Using CORE Model-Based Systems Engineering Software to Support Program Management in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Project: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes how a model-based systems engineering software, CORE, is helping the U. S. Department of Energy's Office of Biomass Program assist with bringing biomass-derived biofuels to the market. This software tool provides information to guide informed decision-making as biomass-to-biofuels systems are advanced from concept to commercial adoption. It facilitates management and communication of program status by automatically generating custom reports, Gantt charts, and tables using the widely available programs of Microsoft Word, Project and Excel.

Riley, C.; Sandor, D.; Simpkins, P.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Using CORE Model-Based Systems Engineering Software to Support Program Management in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Project: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes how a model-based systems engineering software, CORE, is helping the U. S. Department of Energy's Office of Biomass Program assist with bringing biomass-derived biofuels to the market. This software tool provides information to guide informed decision-making as biomass-to-biofuels systems are advanced from concept to commercial adoption. It facilitates management and communication of program status by automatically generating custom reports, Gantt charts, and tables using the widely available programs of Microsoft Word, Project and Excel.

Riley, C.; Sandor, D.; Simpkins, P.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

SCIENCE Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SCIENCE Program SCIENCE Program early science program Early at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility CONTACT  Argonne Leadership Computing Facility | www.alcf.anl.gov | (877) 737-8615 Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model PI: Venkatramani Balaji Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Award: 150 Million Hours Materials Design and Discovery: Catalysis and Energy Storage PI: Larry Curtiss Argonne National Laboratory Award: 50 Million Hours Direct Numerical Simulation of Autoignition in a Jet in a Cross-Flow PI: Christos Frouzakis Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Award: 150 Million Hours High-Accuracy Predictions of the Bulk Properties of Water PI: Mark Gordon Iowa State University Award: 150 Million Hours Cosmic Structure Probes

450

Model Development and Loads Analysis of an Offshore Wind Turbine on a Tension Leg Platform with a Comparison to Other Floating Turbine Concepts: April 2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results of the analysis of a 5-MW wind turbine located on a floating offshore tension leg platform (TLP) that was conducted using the fully coupled time-domain aero-hydro-servo-elastic design code FAST with AeroDyn and HydroDyn. The report also provides a description of the development process of the TLP model. The model has been verified via comparisons to frequency-domain calculations. Important differences have been identified between the frequency-domain and time-domain simulations, and have generated implications for the conceptual design process. An extensive loads and stability analysis for ultimate and fatigue loads according to the procedure of the IEC 61400-3 offshore wind turbine design standard was performed with the verified TLP model. This report compares the loads for the wind turbine on the TLP to those of an equivalent land-based turbine. Major instabilities for the TLP are identified and described.

Matha, D.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Electromagnetic Transients Program (EMTP): EdF Reports on Turbogenerator Saturation Models, DC Converter Station Energizing Transients, Airgap Models, Substation Models, Low-Frequency Corona Models, and High-Frequency Corona Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EMTP is a complex computer program used to analyze power system transients. This report presents the results of six studies Electricite de France conducted using EMTP to analyze a variety of power system transients.

1994-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

452

A Comparison Between Modeled and Measured Clear-Sky Radiative Shortwave Fluxes in Arctic Environments, with Special Emphasis on Diffuse Radiation  

SciTech Connect

The ability of the SBDART radiative transfer model to predict clear-sky diffuse and direct normal broadband shortwave irradiances is investigated. Model calculations of these quantities are compared with data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. The model tends to consistently underestimate the direct normal irradiances at both sites by about 1%. In regards to clear-sky diffuse irradiance, the model overestimates this quantity at the SGP site in a manner similar to what has been observed in other studies (Halthore and Schwartz, 2000). The difference between the diffuse SBDART calculations and Halthore and Schwartz’s MODTRAN calculations is very small, thus demonstrating that SBDART performs similarly to MODTRAN. SBDART is then applied to the NSA site, and here it is found that the discrepancy between the model calculations and corrected diffuse measurements (corrected for daytime offsets, Dutton et al., 2001) is 0.4 W/m2 when averaged over the 12 cases considered here. Two cases of diffuse measurements from a shaded “black and white” pyranometer are also compared with the calculations and the discrepancy is again minimal. Thus, it appears as if the “diffuse discrepancy” that exists at the SGP site does not exist at the NSA sites. We cannot yet explain why the model predicts diffuse radiation well at one site but not at the other.

Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Donna M.

2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

453

INTERLINE 5.0 -- An expanded railroad routing model: Program description, methodology, and revised user`s manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rail routine model, INTERLINE, has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate potential routes for transporting radioactive materials. In Version 5.0, the INTERLINE routing algorithms have been enhanced to include the ability to predict alternative routes, barge routes, and population statistics for any route. The INTERLINE railroad network is essentially a computerized rail atlas describing the US railroad system. All rail lines, with the exception of industrial spurs, are included in the network. Inland waterways and deep water routes along with their interchange points with the US railroadsystem are also included. The network contains over 15,000 rail and barge segments (links) and over 13,000 stations, interchange points, ports, and other locations (nodes). The INTERLINE model has been converted to operate on an IBM-compatible personal computer. At least a 286 computer with a hard disk containing approximately 6 MB of free space is recommended. Enhanced program performance will be obtained by using arandom-access memory drive on a 386 or 486 computer.

Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Clarke, D.B.; Jacobi, J.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Transportation Center

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Original article: Comparison of numerical models in radiative heat transfer with application to circuit-breaker simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two different modeling approaches for the numerical computation of the radiation energy exchange in the context of the simulation of high-voltage circuit breakers are investigated. These are the basic Radiative Transfer Equation method and the P1 model ... Keywords: CFD modeling, Circuit breakers, Finite volume discretization, P1 model, Radiative heat transfer

Matthieu Melot; Jean-Yves TréPanier; Ricardo Camarero; Eddy Petro

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Comparison of calculated results from two analytical models with measured data from a heat-exchanger flow test  

SciTech Connect

Predicted results from both a network flow model and a turbulent flow model were compared with measured results from an air flow test on a half-scale model of the auxiliary heat exchanger for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Measurements of both velocity and pressure were made within the heat exchanger shell side flow field. These measurements were compared with calculated results from both a network flow model and a turbulent flow model. Both analytical models predicted early identical results which, except for some minor anomalies, compared favorably with the measured data.

Carosella, D.P.; Pavlics, P.N.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Quantum Circuit Model Topological Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum Circuit Model Topological Model Comparison of Models Topological Quantum Computation Eric Rowell Texas A&M University October 2010 Eric Rowell Topological Quantum Computation #12;Quantum Circuit Model Topological Model Comparison of Models Outline 1 Quantum Circuit Model Gates, Circuits

Rowell, Eric C.

457

Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M-PACE through ModelObservation Comparisons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M the microphysical properties of Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus. Intensive measurements taken during the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M

Solomon, Amy

458

Joint Program Report 164 Appendix B page 1 Appendix B: Comparison of U.S. Marginal Abatement Cost Curves from a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Curves from a McKinsey & Co. Study with Results from the MIT EPPA Model* Jennifer Morris, Sergey Paltsev derived for USA for 2030 in the McKinsey and Company report (Creyts et al., 2007) with a curve obtained and the CO2 (or GHG) price, is described in a recent report by Morris et al. (2008). Figure B1 shows the McKinsey

459

Extreme Precipitation and Temperature over the U.S. Pacific Northwest: A Comparison between Observations, Reanalysis Data, and Regional Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme precipitation and temperature indices in reanalysis data and regional climate models are compared to station observations. The regional models represent most indices of extreme temperature well. For extreme precipitation, finer grid ...

Valérie Duličre; Yongxin Zhang; Eric P. Salathé Jr.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

A Model Comparison: Numerical Simulations of the North and Equatorial Atlantic Oceanic Circulation in Depth and Isopycnic Coordinates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of medium-resolution (1°) numerical simulations for the equatorial and North Atlantic basin have been performed with two primitive equation models, one employing depth and the other density as the vertical coordinate. The models have ...

Eric P. Chassignet; Linda T. Smith; Rainer Bleck; Frank O. Bryan

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling programs comparison" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

A Comparison between the Hoskins-Bretherton Model of Frontogenesis and the Analysis of an Intense Surface Frontal Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hoskins-Bretherton model of frontogenesis employed here represents the counterpart of the two-dimensional Eady problem expressed in geostrophic coordinate space. The fundamental characteristics of the model solution are shown to be derivable ...

William Blumen

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Comparison of Model-Produced and Observed Microwave Radiances and Estimation of Background Error Covariances for Hydrometeor Variables within Hurricanes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radiative transfer model was updated to better simulate Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I)–observed brightness temperatures in areas of high ice concentration. The difference between the lowest observed and model-produced brightness ...

Clark Amerault; Xiaolei Zou

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Comparison of Convective Boundary Layer Velocity Spectra Retrieved from Large Eddy Simulation and Weather Research and Forecasting Model Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As computing capabilities expand, operational and research environments are moving toward the use of fine-scale atmospheric numerical models. These models are attractive for users who seek accurate description of small-scale turbulent motions. One ...

Jeremy A. Gibbs; Evgeni Fedorovich

464